Science.gov

Sample records for macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

  1. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Solveig L; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-03-01

    This review provides a clinically-oriented summary of the most commonly encountered overgrowth syndromes associated with vascular malformations. This manuscript will outline morphologic features, clinical evaluation and management of this complex group of patients. Recent genetic advances have aided in classification and help to explain overlapping clinical features in many cases. PMID:27607325

  2. Mayer-Rokitansky syndrome and anorectal malformation.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Shreeprasad P; Kalrao, Vijay; Patankar, Shilpa S

    2004-12-01

    Mayer Rokitansky Kuster Houser syndrome (MRKH syndrome) is characterized by Mullerian duct structures agenesis, vaginal atresia being the commonest variant. It can be associated with renal, skeletal, spine and other malformations. Patient with Mayer Rokitansky syndrome has a varied presentation from newborn period to adolescence. Thorough investigations are required for classification of the syndrome and diagnosis of associated anomalies. The MRKH syndrome patient may require complex vaginal reconstructive surgery and a detailed counseling about the potentials of menstruation and fertility. Here we are presenting a patient having association of anorectal malformation, Mullerian duct agenesis and renal anomaly. PMID:15630325

  3. The Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Willing, Marcia C.; Lind, Anne C.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three children from two families with a new pattern recognition malformation syndrome consisting of severe congenital microcephaly (MIC), intractable epilepsy including infantile spasms, and generalized capillary malformations that was first reported recently in this journal [Carter et al. (2011); Am J Med Genet A 155: 301–306]. Two of our reported patients are an affected brother and sister, suggesting this is an autosomal recessive severe congenital MIC syndrome. PMID:21815250

  4. Anorectal malformations and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, J; Abu-Dalu, K; Lernau, O; Sagi, M; Voss, R; Cohen, T

    1989-11-01

    During 1980 to 1986, 89 children with Down syndrome and 42 with imperforate anus were diagnosed among 64,870 liveborn infants in the Jewish population of Jerusalem. Two of the children had both Down syndrome and imperforate anus. This indicates a high incidence of imperforate anus among children with Down syndrome (2.2%). PMID:2531980

  5. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity. PMID:26697951

  6. Dandy-Walker malformation in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zangwill, K M; Boal, D K; Ladda, R L

    1988-09-01

    We report on 2 Old Order Amish patients with Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome and the Dandy-Walker malformation; a similar case is noted in the literature. Pedigree analysis of our patients documents extensive inbreeding in successive generations. Considering the rarity of EvC syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation as isolated malformations, the appearance of both in our 2 patients plus the patient in the literature suggests that Dandy-Walker malformation may be a manifestation in the EvC syndrome. However, in this isolate the coincidental occurrence of 2 rare recessive traits cannot be excluded. PMID:3223493

  7. Malformations Among the X-Linked Intellectual Disability Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2013-01-01

    Malformations are significant contributions to childhood mortality and disability. Their co-occurrence with intellectual disability may compound the health burden, requiring additional evaluation and management measures. Overall, malformations of greater or lesser severity occur in at least some cases of almost half of the 153 XLID syndromes. Genitourinary abnormalities are most common, but tend to contribute little or no health burden and occur in only a minority of cases of a given XLID syndrome. Some malformations (e.g., lissencephaly, hydranencephaly, long bone deficiency, renal agenesis/dysplasia) are not amenable to medical or surgical intervention; others (e.g., hydrocephaly, facial clefting, cardiac malformations, hypospadias) may be substantially corrected. PMID:24166814

  8. Contracted foal syndrome associated with multiple malformations in two foals.

    PubMed

    Binanti, D; Zani, D D; De Zani, D; Turci, T; Zavaglia, G; Riccaboni, P

    2014-02-01

    Congenital anomalies in horses are very rare, and contracted foal syndrome is one of the most commonly reported. This malformation is characterized by contraction of the joints of the forelimbs and/or hindlimbs. In addition, the syndrome can be characterized by vertebral column malformations, such as scoliosis or torticollis, and cranial deformity. The present report describes the radiological and necroscopical findings of multiple rare malformations in two foals. Both foals showed skeletal abnormalities and fenestration of the abdominal cavity. Other pathological findings include a interventricular septal defect in one and a unilateral hydronephrosis and partial hydroureter in the other foal. Although in this report a specific aetiology could not be provided, insecticides treatment provided during the second month of pregnancy might play a role in the pathogenesis of these malformations. PMID:23406278

  9. High Incidence of Progressive Postnatal Cerebellar Enlargement in Costello Syndrome: Brain Overgrowth Associated with HRAS Mutations as the Likely Cause of Structural Brain and Spinal Cord Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Hopkins, Elisabeth; Doyle, Daniel; Dobyns, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Costello syndrome is a rasopathy caused by germline mutations in the proto-oncogene HRAS. Its presentation includes failure-to-thrive with macrocephaly, characteristic facial features, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, papillomata, malignant tumors, and cognitive impairment. In a systematic review we found absolute or relative macrocephaly (100%), ventriculomegaly (50%), and other abnormalities on brain and spinal cord imaging studies in 27/28 individuals. Posterior fossa crowding with cerebellar tonsillar herniation (CBTH) was noted in 27/28 (96%), and in 10/17 (59%) with serial studies posterior fossa crowding progressed. Sequelae of posterior fossa crowding and CBTH included hydrocephalus requiring shunt or ventriculostomy (25%), Chiari 1 malformation (32%) and syrinx formation (25%). Our data reveal macrocephaly with progressive frontal bossing and CBTH, documenting an ongoing process rather than a static congenital anomaly. Comparison of images obtained in young infants to subsequent studies demonstrated postnatal development of posterior fossa crowding. This process of evolving megalencephaly and cerebellar enlargement is in keeping with mouse model data, delineating abnormal genesis of neurons and glia, resulting in an increased number of astrocytes and enlarged brain volume. In Costello syndrome and macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome disproportionate brain growth is the main factor resulting in postnatal CBTH and Chiari 1 malformation. PMID:20425820

  10. [Larsen's syndrome with associates malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Galván, C; Domenech, E; Méndez, A

    1979-01-01

    A rare polymalformative syndrome is described, consisting in multiple joints dislocations, peculiar face, deformations of the hands and feet, abnormal pattern of the palms creases and congenital heart defect. New findings not reported before were: choanal atresia, agenesia of the right kidney and gall bladder and hypoplasic male genitals. PMID:496092

  11. Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with Extensive Arterial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Renee Frances; Barbeau, L. Daphna Yasova; Co-Vu, Jennifer; Beegle, Richard D.; Williams, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome is characterized by craniofacial, ocular and vertebral defects secondary to abnormal development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and vertebrae. Other findings include cardiac and vascular abnormalities. Though these associations are known, the specific anomalies are not well defined. We present a 7-month-old infant with intermittent respiratory distress that did not improve with respiratory interventions. Echocardiogram suggested a double aortic arch. Cardiac CT angiogram confirmed a right arch and aberrant, stenotic left subclavian artery, dilation of the main pulmonary artery, and agenesis of the left thyroid lobe. Repeat echocardiograms were concerning for severely dilated coronary arteries. Given dilation, a rheumatologic workup ensued, only identifying few weakly positive autoantibodies. Further imaging demonstrated narrowing of the aorta below the renal arteries and extending into the common iliac arteries and proximal femoral arteries. Given a physical exam devoid of rheumatologic findings, only weakly positive autoantibodies, normal inflammatory markers, and presence of the coronary artery dilation, the peripheral artery narrowings were not thought to be vasculitic. This case illustrates the need to identify definitive anomalies related to Goldenhar Syndrome. Although this infant's presentation is rare, recognition of specific vascular findings will help differentiate Goldenhar Syndrome from other disease processes. PMID:26688769

  12. RASA1 somatic mutation and variable expressivity in capillary malformation/arteriovenous malformation (CM/AVM) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macmurdo, Colleen F; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Le, Jenny; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Milla, Carlos; Teng, Joyce M C; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Stevenson, David A

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations in RASA1 are associated with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. CM-AVM syndrome is characterized by multi-focal capillary malformations and arteriovenous malformations. Lymphatic anomalies have been proposed as part of the phenotype. Intrafamilial variability has been reported, suggesting modifiers and somatic events. The objective of the study was to identify somatic RASA1 "second hits" from vascular malformations associated with CM-AVM syndrome, and describe phenotypic variability. Participants were examined and phenotyped. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood on all participants. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband. Using Sanger sequencing, RASA1 exon 8 was PCR-amplified to track the c.1248T>G, p.Tyr416X germline variant through the family. A skin biopsy of a capillary malformation from the proband's mother was also obtained, and next-generation sequencing was performed on DNA from the affected tissue. A familial germline heterozygous novel pathogenic RASA1 variant, c.1248T>G (p.Tyr416X), was identified in the proband and her mother. The proband had capillary malformations, chylothorax, lymphedema, and overgrowth, while her affected mother had only isolated capillary malformations. Sequence analysis of DNA extracted from a skin biopsy of a capillary malformation of the affected mother showed a second RASA1 somatic mutation (c.2245C>T, p.Arg749X). These results and the extreme variable expressivity support the hypothesis that somatic "second hits" are required for the development of vascular anomalies associated with CM-AVM syndrome. In addition, the phenotypes of the affected individuals further clarify that lymphatic manifestations are also part of the phenotypic spectrum of RASA1-related disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26969842

  13. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a…

  14. A novel syndrome with psychiatric features and review of malformation syndromes with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    du Souich, Christèle; Austin, Jehannine C; Friedlander, Robin; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2009-02-15

    Psychiatric disease occurs with increased frequency in a number of malformation syndromes. We hypothesize that the study of these disorders is helpful for understanding the pathophysiology of psychiatric disease. With this objective, we have been screening for individuals with malformations and prominent psychiatric disease. We report on a man with visual and auditory hallucinations and behavioral problems who was the product of an incestuous relationship and had anomalies primarily of his face, hands and feet. His distinctive features define an undescribed acro-auricular malformation syndrome with a psychiatric component. The study of Mendelian syndromes such as the one presented will likely be helpful for isolating novel genes involved in psychiatric illness. PMID:19253384

  15. Klippel-Trénaunay Syndrome with Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformation: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Mahniya F.; Tiwana, Muhammad H.; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare vascular congenital anomaly affecting less than 200,000 people in the United States. Vascular malformations associated with KTS tend to affect slow flow systems: venous, capillary, and lymphatic systems. The nature of the syndrome leads to a higher risk for the development of arteriovenous malformations. Our case presentation describes a patient with KTS and an associated rare presentation of intraventricular arteriovenous malformation (AVM). PMID:24653849

  16. Kabuki Syndrome and Anorectal Malformations: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siminas, Sotirios; Baillie, Colin Tennant; Turnock, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by a distinctive facies, intellectual disability, growth delay, and a variety of skeletal, visceral, and other anomalies, including anorectal malformations (ARMs). We present two cases of female patients with KS, diagnosed and successfully managed at our institution, one with a perineal fistula and one with a rectovestibular fistula. Our report, along with a literature review, shows that the syndrome is usually associated with “low” anomalies, with a potential for a good prognosis. Management of the anorectal anomaly in patients with KS is not essentially different from that in other nonsyndromic patients, taking into account the frequent association of the syndrome with serious congenital heart disease, which might affect the decision-making and timing of the stages of anorectal reconstruction. The frequent occurrence of learning and feeding difficulties makes establishment of toilet training and bowel management rather more challenging, requiring the expertise of a multidisciplinary team. The finding of ARMs in female patients with other characteristics of KS, although inconstant, could support the clinical suspicion for the syndrome until genetic confirmation is available, and should alert the physician for the potential of severe cardiac defects. PMID:26171318

  17. Malformation syndromes caused by disorders of cholesterol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Forbes D.; Herman, Gail E.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is critical for normal growth and development. In addition to being a major membrane lipid, cholesterol has multiple biological functions. These roles include being a precursor molecule for the synthesis of steroid hormones, neuroactive steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids. Cholesterol is also essential for the proper maturation and signaling of hedgehog proteins, and thus cholesterol is critical for embryonic development. After birth, most tissues can obtain cholesterol from either endogenous synthesis or exogenous dietary sources, but prior to birth, the human fetal tissues are dependent on endogenous synthesis. Due to the blood-brain barrier, brain tissue cannot utilize dietary or peripherally produced cholesterol. Generally, inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis lead to both a deficiency of cholesterol and increased levels of potentially bioactive or toxic precursor sterols. Over the past couple of decades, a number of human malformation syndromes have been shown to be due to inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis. Herein, we will review clinical and basic science aspects of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, desmosterolosis, lathosterolosis, HEM dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform erythroderma and Limb Defects Syndrome, sterol-C-4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, and Antley-Bixler syndrome. PMID:20929975

  18. [Complete endocardial cushion defect and bone malformations of the hands. Holt-Oram syndrome].

    PubMed

    Del Corso, L; Vannini, A; De Marco, S; Gnesi, A; Pentimone, F

    1991-10-01

    A 44 year old woman with upper limb skeletal malformations and endocardial cushion defect is described. This congenital heart disease was rarely reported in association with Holt-Oram syndrome. PMID:1745380

  19. [Management of gastrointestinal malformations in children with asplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Maki; Urushihara, Naoto; Fujimoto, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Kisaburo

    2011-07-01

    Asplenia syndrome (AS) is a complex disorder that includes a variety of cardiovascular and gastrointestinal malformations (GMs), and its prognosis remains poor. We treated 40 AS patients between 2000 and 2010, 10 of whom underwent surgery to correct GMs. These comprised 7 hiatus hernias (HH), 1 intestinal malrotation (IM), 1 stomach volvulus, and 1 ompalocele. In this review, we consider the optimal surgical timing and methods of management, especially for HH and IM. Surgery was performed in 6 of 7 HH patients. Four of those underwent laparotomy, 1 thoracotomy, and 1 laparoscopy. The Toupet method or fixation of the His angle or hiatus closure was selected in each case. Because the stomach intruding into the mediastinum may cause pulmonary venous obstruction and respiratory impairment, surgical repair is preferably performed prior to Glenn surgery. Among the 9 IMs, 8 were nonrotational and required no treatment, and only 1 required surgical treatment. GMs in AS are difficult to manage because of the unique anatomy, meaning there are no fixed surgical techniques. Each patient must be carefully examined preoperatively, and the optimum surgical method selected. Close collaboration with cardiovascular surgeons is vital when determining the timing and method of surgery. PMID:21819015

  20. Turner syndrome with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min Kyung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common chromosomal disorder and is associated with a range of comorbidities involving the cardiovascular system. Vascular abnormalities, in particular, are a common finding in cases of TS. However, dissection involving the vertebral arteries is rare. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with TS who had been treated with growth hormone replacement therapy for the past 3 years. She presented with weakness of both lower legs, and was ultimately diagnosed with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation. We treated her with intravenous high dose dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg) and she could walk without assistance after 6 days of treatment. In conclusion, when a patient with TS shows sudden weakness of the lower limbs, we should consider the possibility of spinal vessel rupture and try to take spine magnetic resonance imaging as soon as possible. We suggest a direction how to make a proper diagnosis and management of sudden vertebral artery hemorrhage in patients with TS. PMID:26817012

  1. Cardiovascular malformations in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A.E.; Ardinger, H.H.; Ardinger, R.H. Jr.

    1997-01-31

    We reviewed 215 patients (59 new, 156 from the literature) with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), and found that 95 (44%) had a cardiovascular malformation (CVM). Classifying CVMs by disordered embryonic mechanisms, there were 5 (5.3%) class I (ectomesenchymal tissue migration abnormalities), 56 (58.9%) class II (abnormal intracardiac blood flow), 25 (26.3%) class IV (abnormal extracellular matrix), and 5 (5.3%) class V (abnormal targeted growth). Comparing the frequencies of individual CVMs in this series with a control group (the Baltimore-Washington Infant Study), there were 6 individual CVMs which showed a significant difference from expected values. When frequencies of CVMs in SLOS were analyzed by mechanistic class, classes IV and V were significantly more frequent, and class I significantly less frequent, than the control group. Although CVMs in SLOS display mechanistic heterogeneity, with an overall predominance of class II CVMs, the developmental error appears to favor alteration of the cardiovascular developmental mechanisms underlying atrioventricular canal and anomalous pulmonary venous return. This information should assist the clinical geneticist evaluating a patient with possible SLOS, and should suggest research direction for the mechanisms responsible for the SLOS phenotype. 102 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  2. Severe holocord syrinx in a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Segal, Devorah; Heary, Robert F; Sabharwal, Sanjeev; Barry, Maureen T; Ming, Xue

    2016-07-01

    The authors present the case of a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome who developed a rapidly progressive holocord syringomyelia that was treated surgically. A 3-year-old boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria (MCAP) syndrome presented with several months of right leg weakness, worsening scoliosis, and increased seizures. An MRI study of the brain demonstrated a Chiari I malformation and massively dilated syringomyelia extending from C-2 to the conus medullaris. The patient underwent an urgent suboccipital craniectomy with C1-3 laminectomies to relieve the CSF outflow obstruction with significant clinical improvement. Surgery was complicated by bleeding from intracranial vascular malformations. This report describes a very rapidly developing, massive holocord syringomyelia related to CSF obstruction due to an unusual congenital brain malformation and associated vascular overgrowth at the site. Serial, premorbid MRI studies demonstrated the very rapid progression from no Chiari malformation, to progressively greater cerebellar tonsillar herniation, to holocord syrinx. This complication has never been reported in MCAP syndrome and should be considered in any affected MCAP patient with a progressive neurological decline, even if previous spine imaging findings were normal. Surgical complications due to hemorrhage also need to be considered in this vascular brain malformation. PMID:27035547

  3. Familial Incidence of Cardiovascular Malformations in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Angela M; Qureshi, Muhammad Y; Olson, Timothy M; Eidem, Benjamin W; O'Leary, Patrick W

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive left-sided congenital heart lesions exhibit familial clustering, and familial echocardiographic screening for bicuspid aortic valve has become standard practice. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe left-sided obstructive lesion; however, familial screening is not universally recommended. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence of cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands. First-degree relatives were screened for CVM by transthoracic echocardiography. Screening was completed in 152 family members (97 parents and 55 siblings) of 52 probands. Of these, 17 of 152 (11%) had CVM. Anomalies detected included: bicuspid aortic valve in 5 (3%), isolated dilated ascending aorta in 4 (3%), coarctation of the aorta in 1, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in 1, anomalous, intramural coronary artery in 1, bicuspid pulmonary valve in 1, and other anomalies in 4. Most were previously undiagnosed (11 of 17, 65%). Fourteen of 52 families (27%) had ≥1 relative with CVM. Overall, 7 of 55 siblings (13%), 5 of 46 fathers (11%) and 5 of 51 mothers (10%) had CVM. Although the incidence of CVM in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands was lower in this cohort than previously reported, it remained substantial, with at least one additional member having CVM in 27% of families. The frequent occurrence of undiagnosed CVM highlights the importance of routine familial screening in HLHS. In fact, even if screening was done in childhood, it may be appropriate to screen again in the third or fourth decade to exclude isolated enlargement of the ascending aorta. PMID:26433269

  4. Clinical syndromes of arteriovenous malformations of the transverse-sigmoid sinus.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, S; Soto, M; Silvela, J

    1975-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations or fistulae shunting arterial blood from branches of the external and internal carotid and vertebral arteries into the transverse-sigmoid sinus may produce different clinical syndromes. The literature is reviewed with 96 patients including six personal cases. Usually these malformations have a congenital origin and only in 4% of the series was there a previous history of a severe head injury. Clinical groups are defined and the role of angiography assessed. Direct surgical approach with occlusion or removal of the vascular malformation is the treatment of choice. Possible methods of treatment by selective embolization are discussed. Images PMID:1097602

  5. Split-hand/feet malformation: A rare syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gane, Bahubali D.; Natarajan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM) is mainly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and characterized by malformation of the limb involving the central rays of the autopod. It presents with a deep median cleft of the hand and/or foot, aplasia/hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Pathogenic mechanism is a failure to maintain signaling from the median apical ectodermal ridge. Without this signaling, cells of the underlying progress zone stop proliferation and differentiation which in turn results in defects of the central rays. We describe a case of SHFM in 10-year-old boy. PMID:27453866

  6. Split-hand/feet malformation: A rare syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gane, Bahubali D; Natarajan, P

    2016-01-01

    Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM) is mainly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and characterized by malformation of the limb involving the central rays of the autopod. It presents with a deep median cleft of the hand and/or foot, aplasia/hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Pathogenic mechanism is a failure to maintain signaling from the median apical ectodermal ridge. Without this signaling, cells of the underlying progress zone stop proliferation and differentiation which in turn results in defects of the central rays. We describe a case of SHFM in 10-year-old boy. PMID:27453866

  7. An autosomal dominant syndrome of renal and anogenital malformations with syndactyly.

    PubMed

    Green, A J; Sandford, R N; Davison, B C

    1996-07-01

    We describe a family with autosomal dominant inheritance of anal anomalies, renal tract abnormalities, genital malformations, and syndactyly. These clinical manifestations do not clearly fall into any previously described syndrome. A mother and daughter had almost identical congenital malformations, short stature, and unusual facies. The proband was born with anal stenosis, a rectovaginal fistula, clitoral hypertrophy, a pelvic right kidney, and syndactyly of both feet. Her daughter had the same anal, clitoral, and foot anomalies, a solitary pelvic kidney, and no fistula. This family is likely to represent autosomal dominant inheritance of a new combination of malformations, which may overlap with the Townes-Brocks syndrome, but does not fall into a current diagnostic category. PMID:8818947

  8. Identical twin sisters with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome associated with Chiari malformations and syrinx.

    PubMed

    Parsley, Lea; Bellus, Gary; Handler, Michael; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui

    2011-11-01

    Chiari malformations are multifactorial and heterogeneous entities, characterized by abnormalities in the posterior fossa. They have been identified in association with various genetic syndromes in recent years. Two previous studies have noted an association of Chiari malformations with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). In this clinical report, we highlight identical twins with RTS caused by a mutation in CREBBP that presented with slightly different Chiari malformations in association with an extensive multiloculated syrinx and scoliosis. RTS has been found to be associated with craniocervical abnormalities in literature review, and this clinical report demonstrates the prudent consideration of the physician who cares for patients impacted by RTS to effectively screen via symptomatology and physical examination for Chiari pathology or other craniocervical abnormalities. PMID:21932317

  9. Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams-Beuren: à propos de trois nouvelles observations

    PubMed Central

    Sator, Hicham; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Dafiri, Rachida; Chat, Latifa

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de Williams-Beuren est une maladie génétique rare, il associe classiquement une dysmorphie faciale assez spécifique, des malformations cardiovasculaires et un profil neuropsychologique particulier. Nous rapportons les observations de trois enfants atteints du syndrome de Williams-Beuren en insistant surtout sur les anomalies vasculaires observées sur l'angio-scanner et angio-IRM. PMID:27200143

  10. Craniocervical junction malformation in a child with Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis-Möbius syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Grill, Franz; Safi, Hatem; Ghachem, Maher Ben; Chehida, Farid Ben; Klaushofer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    We report a male child with Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis (OMLH), the main features being bilateral sixth and seventh nerve palsies, limb anomalies and hypoplasia of the tongue. Additional features were shortness of the neck associated with torticollis. Radiographs of the cervical spine were non-contributory, but 3D computed tomography (CT) scanning of this area identified: a) congenital hypoplasia of the atlas; b) the simultaneous development of occiput-atlas malformation/developmental defect. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report assessing the cervico-cranium malformation in a child with OMLH-Möbius syndrome. PMID:17210070

  11. Clinical spectrum of eye malformations in four patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bourchany, A; Giurgea, I; Thevenon, J; Goldenberg, A; Morin, G; Bremond-Gignac, D; Paillot, C; Lafontaine, P O; Thouvenin, D; Massy, J; Duncombe, A; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Masurel-Paulet, A; Chehadeh, S El; Huet, F; Bron, A; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Lyonnet, S; Faivre, L

    2015-07-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by a specific facial gestalt, intellectual deficiency, Hirschsprung disease and multiple congenital anomalies. Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox2 gene (ZEB2) cause MWS. ZEB2 encodes for Smad-interacting protein 1, a transcriptional co-repressor involved in TGF-beta and BMP pathways and is strongly expressed in early stages of development in mice. Eye abnormalities have rarely been described in patients with this syndrome. Herein, we describe four patients (two males and two females; mean age 7 years) with MWS and eye malformations. Ocular anomalies included, iris/retinal colobomas, atrophy or absence of the optic nerve, hyphema, and deep refraction troubles, sometimes with severe visual consequences. All eye malformations were asymmetric and often unilateral and all eye segments were affected, similarly to the nine MWS cases with ophthalmological malformations previously reported (iris/chorioretinal/optic disc coloboma, optic nerve atrophy, retinal epithelium atrophy, cataract, and korectopia). In human embryo, ZEB2 is expressed in lens and neural retina. Using the present report and data from the literature, we set out to determine whether or not the presence of eye manifestations could be due to specific type or location of mutations. We concluded that the presence of eye malformations, although a rare feature in MWS, should be considered as a part of the clinical spectrum of the condition. PMID:25899569

  12. Cardiovascular malformations in DiGeorge syndrome (congenital absence of hypoplasia of the thymus).

    PubMed Central

    Moerman, P; Goddeeris, P; Lauwerijns, J; Van der Hauwaert, L G

    1980-01-01

    Partial or complete absence of the thymus (DiGeorge syndrome, III-IV pharyngeal pouch syndrome) is often associated with agenesis or hypoplasia of the parathyroid glands and, almost invariably, with cardiovascular malformations. The clinical and pathologcial findings in 10 cases proven at necropsy are presented. All patients presented with cardiac symptoms and signs in the first weeks of life and, with one exception, all died of a cardiac cause. Major cardiovascular malformations were found in all 10 cases. Four had, in association with a ventricular septal defect of the infundibular type, an interrupted aortic arch, which was left-sided in two and right-sided in two other cases. Four patients had truncus arteriosus type I, in two of them associated with a right-sided aortic arch. Two patients with tetralogy of Fallot had a right-sided aortic arch. Only two of the 10 had a normally developed left aortic arch. Aberrant subclavian arteries were found in five cases. From our observations and a survey of the previously published patients it appears that 90 per cent of the necropsy-proven cases of DiGeorge syndrome have cardiovascular malformations and that 95 per cent of these malformations can be classified as aortic arch anomalies, truncus ateriosus, or tetralogy of Fallot. Images PMID:7426208

  13. Cardiac malformations and hypertension, but not metabolic risk factors, are common in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Landin-Wilhelmsen, K; Bryman, I; Wilhelmsen, L

    2001-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is caused by an X chromosome aberration and is characterized by endogenous estrogen deficiency secondary to ovarian dysgenesis and short stature. Our aim was to study the prevalence of cardiovascular malformations and cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, blood lipids and glucose, coagulation factors, social factors, smoking habits) in adults with Turner syndrome in comparison with a female random population sample. One hundred women with Turner syndrome (aged 16-71 yr) underwent physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and blood sampling. Seventy-one of them were matched for age [mean age, 33.7 +/- 11 yr (range, 25-64)] with a random population sample (n = 213) of women [mean age, 34.8 +/- 9 yr (range, 25-64)] from the World Health Organization's Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases Project, Göteborg. Six percent of Turner syndrome women were smokers compared with 25% in the population (P < 0.001). Turner syndrome women were relatively heavier and had a lower degree of leisure time physical activity than controls (P < 0.001). Diabetes and treatment for hypertension were present in 3 and 22% among Turner syndrome women vs. 2% (not significant) and 3% (P < 0.001) in controls, respectively. Cardiovascular malformations were found among 17% in Turner syndrome women (45,X dominated) vs. 0.5% in controls (P < 0.001). Systolic but not diastolic blood pressure was higher in Turner syndrome women. No differences were seen in serum total cholesterol, high- or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a), or plasma fibrinogen concentrations between patients and controls. Diabetes or hypertension was not related to karyotype. In conclusion, congenital cardiovascular malformations were frequent. Most cardiovascular risk factors (glucose and lipid levels, fibrinogen, smoking habits) were not increased, but hypertension was more common in Turner syndrome women. PMID:11549644

  14. Embolosclerotherapy by the Transvenous Approach for Lower Extremity Arteriovenous Malformation in Cowden Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kishino, Mitsuhiro; Nakadate, Masashi; Kudo, Toshifumi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with Cowden syndrome presented with pain at rest in the right leg. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the right lower extremity were detected by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Angiography indicated arteriolovenous fistulae, which were initially treated using a transarterial approach with minimal therapeutic effect. In contrast, excellent outcomes were achieved with a transvenous approach using coil embolization and liquid sclerotherapy for the venous component of the nidus. At 15 months after embolosclerotherapy, no angiographic evidence of AVM recurrence was noted. Embolosclerotherapy by the transvenous approach for AVM in Cowden syndrome was a useful therapeutic strategy for arteriolovenous fistulae. PMID:27087878

  15. NFIA Haploinsufficiency Is Associated with a CNS Malformation Syndrome and Urinary Tract Defects

    PubMed Central

    Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Donovan, Diana J; Xi, Qiongchao; Turbe-Doan, Annick; Li, Qing-Gang; Campbell, Craig G; Shanske, Alan L; Sherr, Elliott H; Ahmad, Ayesha; Peters, Roxana; Rilliet, Benedict; Parvex, Paloma; Bassuk, Alexander G; Harris, David J; Ferguson, Heather; Kelly, Chantal; Walsh, Christopher A; Gronostajski, Richard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Higgins, Anne; Ligon, Azra H; Quade, Bradley J; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Maas, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Complex central nervous system (CNS) malformations frequently coexist with other developmental abnormalities, but whether the associated defects share a common genetic basis is often unclear. We describe five individuals who share phenotypically related CNS malformations and in some cases urinary tract defects, and also haploinsufficiency for the NFIA transcription factor gene due to chromosomal translocation or deletion. Two individuals have balanced translocations that disrupt NFIA. A third individual and two half-siblings in an unrelated family have interstitial microdeletions that include NFIA. All five individuals exhibit similar CNS malformations consisting of a thin, hypoplastic, or absent corpus callosum, and hydrocephalus or ventriculomegaly. The majority of these individuals also exhibit Chiari type I malformation, tethered spinal cord, and urinary tract defects that include vesicoureteral reflux. Other genes are also broken or deleted in all five individuals, and may contribute to the phenotype. However, the only common genetic defect is NFIA haploinsufficiency. In addition, previous analyses of Nfia−/− knockout mice indicate that Nfia deficiency also results in hydrocephalus and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Further investigation of the mouse Nfia+/− and Nfia−/− phenotypes now reveals that, at reduced penetrance, Nfia is also required in a dosage-sensitive manner for ureteral and renal development. Nfia is expressed in the developing ureter and metanephric mesenchyme, and Nfia+/− and Nfia−/− mice exhibit abnormalities of the ureteropelvic and ureterovesical junctions, as well as bifid and megaureter. Collectively, the mouse Nfia mutant phenotype and the common features among these five human cases indicate that NFIA haploinsufficiency contributes to a novel human CNS malformation syndrome that can also include ureteral and renal defects. PMID:17530927

  16. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E.

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Segmental overgrowth, lipomatosis, arteriovenous malformation and epidermal nevus (SOLAMEN) syndrome is related to mosaic PTEN nullizygosity.

    PubMed

    Caux, Frédéric; Plauchu, Henri; Chibon, Frédéric; Faivre, Laurence; Fain, Olivier; Vabres, Pierre; Bonnet, Françoise; Selma, Zied Ben; Laroche, Liliane; Gérard, Marion; Longy, Michel

    2007-07-01

    We describe two patients from distinct Cowden disease families with specific germline PTEN mutations whose disease differs from the usual appearance of Cowden disease. Their phenotype associates classical manifestations of Cowden disease and congenital dysmorphisms including segmental overgrowth, arteriovenous and lymphatic vascular malformations, lipomatosis and linear epidermal nevus reminiscent of the diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. We provide evidence in one of the two patients of a secondary molecular event: a loss of the PTEN wild-type allele, restricted to the atypical lesions that may explain an overgrowth of the affected tissues and the atypical phenotype. These data provide a new demonstration of the Happle hypothesis to explain some segmental exacerbation of autosomal-dominant disorders. They also show that a bi-allelic inactivation of PTEN can lead to developmental anomalies instead of malignant transformation, thus raising the question of the limitations of the tumor suppressive function in this gene. Finally, we suggest using the term 'SOLAMEN syndrome' (Segmental Overgrowth, Lipomatosis, Arteriovenous Malformation and Epidermal Nevus) in these peculiar situations to help the difficult distinction between the phenotype of our patients and Proteus syndrome. PMID:17392703

  18. Autosomal recessive ectodermal dysplasia: I. An undescribed dysplasia/malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bustos, T; Simosa, V; Pinto-Cisternas, J; Abramovits, W; Jolay, L; Rodriguez, L; Fernandez, L; Ramela, M

    1991-12-15

    We describe 27 individuals of 7 families related to each other with high probability who showed manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia and other anomalies affecting females as severely as males with variable expressivity. All parents were normal. These families were detected in a relatively isolated and inbred population with very small neighbouring communities from a Caribbean Sea island, Margarita Island, in Northeastern Venezuela (Nueva Esparta State). The clinical picture common to all patients could not be classified within the heterogeneous group of known ectodermal dysplasias and the published cases do not resemble our patients. We believe that this condition constitutes a newly recognized autosomal recessive dysplasia/malformation syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia. PMID:1776626

  19. Ear malformation and hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Galloway, C; Armstrong, D; Posnick, J

    1993-01-01

    Although the hearing loss of patients with Treacher Collins syndrome is well documented, few studies have reported jointly on their hearing loss and ear pathology. This paper reports on the hearing loss and computerized tomography (CT) assessments of ear malformations in a large pediatric series of patients with Treacher Collins. Of the 29 subjects assessed by the Craniofacial Program between 1986 and 1990, paired audiologic and complete CT assessments were available for 23 subjects. The external ear canal abnormalities were largely symmetric, either bilaterally stenotic or atretic. In most cases, the middle ear cavity was bilaterally hypoplastic and dysmorphic, and ossicles were symmetrically dysmorphic or missing. Inner ear structures were normal in all patients. The majority of patients had a unilateral or bilateral moderate or greater degree of hearing loss and almost half had an asymmetric hearing loss. The hearing loss of all subjects was conductive, except for three whose loss was bilateral mixed. Two types of bilaterally symmetric hearing loss configurations, flat and reverse sloping, were noted. Conductive hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins is mainly attributable to their middle ear malformations, which are similar for those of patients with malformed or missing ossicles. PMID:8418881

  20. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome after resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord.

    PubMed

    Balmaseda, M T; Gordon, C; Cunningham, M L; Clairmont, A C

    1987-09-01

    Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. This unusual type of intestinal obstruction known as superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity. It is diagnosed radiologically by an abrupt, vertical cutoff of barium flow in the third portion of the duodenum. The management is primarily medical but occasionally surgical correction is required. Herein, the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome was made in an incomplete quadriplegic woman who had recently undergone surgical resection of an arteriovenous malformation in the cervical cord. This case was managed successfully with gastrointestinal decompression, proper positioning in the side-lying position, and adequate nutrition. PMID:3631039

  1. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    do Vale, Jorge Marques; Silva, Eloísa; Pereira, Isabel Gil; Marques, Catarina; Sanchez-Serrano, Amparo; Torres, António Simões

    2014-01-01

    The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery. PMID:25410846

  2. Mitochondria DNA depletion syndrome in a infant with multiple congenital malformations, severe myopathy, and prolonged postoperative paralysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Canham, Natalie; Ruggieri, Martino; Phadke, Rahul; Kinali, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are an important cause of mitochondrial cytopathies in both children and adults. We describe a newborn with multiple congenital malformations including a right aberrant subclavian artery and a trachea-oesophageal fistula in whom mitochondrial depletion syndrome was unmasked by perioperative muscle relaxation. After vecuronium infusion, the infant developed an irreversible postoperative paralysis, leading to death 32 days after surgery. The present case highlights (a) the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial depletion syndrome; (b) the importance of rigorous antemortem and postmortem investigations when the cause of a severe myopathy is uncertain; (c) the possible coexistence of mitochondrial depletion syndrome and congenital malformations as a result of a likely abnormal antenatal embryofetal development and (d) the importance of a careful anaesthetic management of children with mitochondrial depletion syndrome, which could be prone to complications related to the possible depressive effects on mitochondrial electron transport chain mediated by some anaesthetic agents. PMID:24789116

  3. [Diabetic mother's newborn with Goldenhar syndrome and cerebral malformations. Case report].

    PubMed

    Kerckoff Villanueva, Hugo; Retamoza, Beatriz; Bautista, Armando

    2008-11-01

    Goldenhar syndrome, also known as oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome, is a rare illness with unknown etiology. It happens in 1 of 50,000 newborns and is characterized by first and second brachial arch changes, with variable grades of hemifacial hypoplasia. We report a clinical case of a 39-years-old woman with a BMI of 33, family history of diabetes mellitus decease, and two fetal losses with unknown etiology. We first met patient at 24 gestational weeks. Second level ultrasound findings were: fetus with tri-ventricular obstructive hydrocephalia, symmetrical macrocranium, and occipital encephalocele. As her capilar glycaemia level was 197 to 338 mg/dL, diagnosis was gestational diabetes. Patient was scheduled to cesarian section and we obtain a newborn with: 2,050 g of weight, 45 cm of height, 38 cm of cephalic diameter, 6/7 Apgar score, and 33 gestational weeks (Capurro). Obesity and 2-type diabetes are well-known fetal malformation etiologies, due to insulin resistance. Maternal hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in embryo cells, it changes Pax3 gene path, and causes several chromosomopaties and malformations; main perinatal mortality etiology, among them, are neural tube alterations. All together enable to establish this Goldenhar diagnosis: palpebral coloboma, facial asymmetry, external ear, upper hemivertebra, and microphthalmy. PMID:19065822

  4. Etiology of craniofacial malformations in mouse models of blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heude, Églantine; Bellessort, Brice; Fontaine, Anastasia; Hamazaki, Manatsu; Treier, Anna-Corina; Treier, Mathias; Levi, Giovanni; Narboux-Nême, Nicolas

    2015-03-15

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus-inversus syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by narrow palpebral fissures and eyelid levator muscle defects. BPES is often associated to premature ovarian insufficiency (BPES type I). FOXL2, a member of the forkhead transcription factor family, is the only gene known to be mutated in BPES. Foxl2 is essential for maintenance of ovarian identity, but the developmental origin of the facial malformations of BPES remains, so far, unexplained. In this study, we provide the first detailed account of the developmental processes leading to the craniofacial malformations associated to Foxl2. We show that, during development, Foxl2 is expressed both by Cranial Neural Crest Cells (CNCCs) and by Cranial Mesodermal Cells (CMCs), which give rise to skeletal (CNCCs and CMCs) and muscular (CMCs) components of the head. Using mice in which Foxl2 is selectively inactivated in either CNCCs or CMCs, we reveal that expression of Foxl2 in CNCCs is essential for the development of extraocular muscles. Indeed, inactivation of Foxl2 in CMCs has only minor effects on muscle development, whereas its inactivation in CNCCs provokes a severe hypoplasia of the levator palpabrae superioris and of the superior and inferior oblique muscles. We further show that Foxl2 deletion in either CNCCs or CMCs prevents eyelid closure and induces subtle skeletal developmental defects. Our results provide new insights in the complex developmental origin of human BPES and could help to understand the origin of other ocular anomalies associated to this syndrome. PMID:25416281

  5. Lymphatic Malformation, Retinoblastoma, or Facial Cleft: Atypical Presentations of PHACE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ibieta, María; López-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by large cervicofacial infantile hemangiomas and associated anomalies: posterior fossa brain malformation, hemangioma, arterial cerebrovascular anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, and eye/endocrine abnormalities of the brain. When ventral developmental defects (sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe) are present the condition is termed PHACE. In this report, we describe three PHACE cases that presented unique features (affecting one of the organ systems described for this syndrome) that have not been described previously. In the first case, a definitive PHACE association, the patient presented with an ipsilateral mesenteric lymphatic malformation, at the age of 14 years. In the second case, an anomaly of the posterior segment of the eye, not mentioned before in PHACE literature, a retinoblastoma, has been described. Specific chemotherapy avoided enucleation. And, in the third case, the child presented with an unusual midline frontal bone cleft, corresponding to Tessier 14 cleft. Two patients' hemangiomas responded well to propranolol therapy. The first one was followed and treated in the pre-propranolol era and had a moderate response to corticoids and interferon. PMID:26221546

  6. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis: the skin as a clue to complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea D; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Ruggieri, Martino; Zollino, Marcella; Corsello, Giovanni; Neri, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is defined as an excessive growth in body hair beyond the normal variation compared with individuals of the same age, race and sex and affecting areas not predominantly androgen-dependent. The term hirsutism is usually referred to patients, mainly women, who show excessive hair growth with male pattern distribution.Hypertrichosis is classified according to age of onset (congenital or acquired), extent of distribution (generalized or circumscribed), site involved, and to whether the disorder is isolated or associated with other anomalies. Congenital hypertrichosis is rare and may be an isolated condition of the skin or a component feature of other disorders. Acquired hypertrichosis is more frequent and is secondary to a variety of causes including drug side effects, metabolic and endocrine disorders, cutaneous auto-inflammatory or infectious diseases, malnutrition and anorexia nervosa, and ovarian and adrenal neoplasms. In most cases, hypertrichosis is not an isolated symptom but is associated with other clinical signs including intellective delay, epilepsy or complex body malformations.A review of congenital generalized hypertrichosis is reported with particular attention given to the disorders where excessive diffuse body hair is a sign indicating the presence of complex malformation syndromes. The clinical course of a patient, previously described, with a 20-year follow-up is reported. PMID:26242548

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with a Chiari I malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hansberry, David R.; Agarwal, Nitin; Tomei, Krystal L.; Goldstein, Ira M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors describe a unique case of a patient who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) following postoperative treatment of a Chiari I malformation. Case Decsription: A 25-year-old female presented with complaints of left upper and lower extremity paresthesias and gait disturbances. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and cervical spine showed a Chiari I malformation with tonsillar descent beyond the level of the C1 lamina. She underwent a suboccipital craniectomy and C1 laminectomy with cerebellar tonsillar cauterization and duraplasty. Postoperatively, an MRI showed bilateral acute infarcts of the cerebellar vermis. She was initially treated for cerebellar ischemia with hypertensive therapy with a subsequent decline in her neurologic status and generalized tonic–clonic seizure. Further workup showed evidence of PRES. After weaning pressors, the patient had a significant progressive improvement in her mental status. Conclusion: Although the mechanism of PRES remains controversial given its diverse clinical presentation, several theories implicate hypertension and steroid use as causative agents. PMID:24232171

  8. Assessment of PTEN-associated vascular malformations in a patient with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anusic, Sandra; Clemens, Robert Karl Josef; Meier, Thomas Oleg; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis of phosphatase and tensin homologue hamartoma syndromes is common. Correct diagnosis has a relevant impact on patients, as the risk of malignancies is high and treatment options are limited. We report the case of a 24-year-old man who presented with symptomatic vascular intramuscular lesions of the left forearm and right calf, macrocephaly, post Hashimoto thyroiditis, a multicystic intracranial paratrigonal lesion, lentiginous hyperpigmented maculae on the foreskin and multiple skin lesions. MRI showed extended fibrofatty changes and malformed vessels in the forearm and calf lesions, also, arteriovenous shunting was present in these lesions. The patient had been treated by embolisation and surgically in the past, with limited results. A multidisciplinary assessment and genetic counselling were undertaken and a surveillance programme was initiated. Treatment options of the symptomatic vascular lesions include excision or possibly cryoablation. Physiotherapy to prevent progression of the contractures should be initiated meanwhile. PMID:27358095

  9. Comparison of existing classifications for coding congenital malformation and genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lowry, R B; Rocheleau, J; Keillor, L

    1977-01-01

    One thousand consecutive new registrations at the B.C. Health Surveillance Registry were coded by means of ICD (8th Edition), Cardiff Classification, and SNOMED systems. The Cardiff system uses the basic ICD number with important fifth and sixth digit modifiers, which improve discrimination. In certain conditions, however, the basic three-digit number differs from that in ICD and hence comparability is not always possible. The SNOMED system has six subcategories, followed by a five-digit code. These subcategories deal with Function, Disease, Topography, Etiology, Morphology, and Procedure. For our particular needs, the SNOMED system was not entirely satisfactory as it has not expanded sufficiently for many of the malformation syndromes. For hospital use, though, the SNOMED system may have numerous advantages over other existing systems. PMID:884243

  10. [Familial syndrome combining short small intestine, intestinal malrotation, pyloric hypertrophy and brain malformation. 3 anatomoclinical case reports].

    PubMed

    Nezelof, C; Jaubert, F; Lyon, G

    1976-01-01

    Anatomoclinical study of 3 cases of an exceptional malformative condition characterized by: --extreme shortness of the small intestine, --mesenterium commune, --hypertrophic pylorus, --malformation of the central nervous system (heterotopia, absence of operculum temporale). Clinically this malformative condition is characterized by failure and inertia of the intestinal peristalsis producing at intervals of 10-15 days episodes of subocclusion, the repetition of which causes death. The syndrome is familial and seems to be of autosomal recessive inheritance. The absence of mechanical obstruction, the repeated failure of colostomy and ileostomy, the normal aspect of the myenteric plexuses verified by cytoenzymatic and silver stains allow to individualize this anatomoclinical syndrome and to rule out the hypothesis of Hirschsprung's disease, Chagas' disease, idiopathic megacolon or hypoplasia of the myenteric plexuses. The association of cerebral malformations leads to consider the responsibility of a lack of synthesis of a same specific intermediate factor which is up to now poorly determined, implicated in the neuronal migration and neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1023783

  11. Atypical Cerebellar Slump Syndrome and External Hydrocephalus following Craniocervical Decompression for Chiari I Malformation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    THAKAR, Sumit; DADLANI, Ravi; TAWARI, Manish; HEGDE, Alangar S

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic cerebellar slump (CS) and external hydrocephalus (EH) are amongst the rarer complications of foramen magnum decompression (FMD) for Chiari I malformation (CM). CS typically presents with delayed onset headache related to dural traction or with neurological deficit offsetting the benefit of FMD. EH, consisting of ventriculomegaly along with subdural fluid collection(s) (SFCs), has been related to cerebrospinal fluid egress from a tiny breach in an otherwise intact arachnoid. We describe the case of a 21-year-old man with CM and syringomyelia who presented with impaired gag, spastic quadriparesis, and raised intracranial pressure 1 week following an uneventful FMD during which the arachnoid had been widely fenestrated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infratentorial SFC, dilated aqueduct and triventriculomegaly, features of CS, and a residual but resolving syrinx. His symptoms resolved following a high pressure ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. At a 6-month follow-up visit, he was asymptomatic and demonstrated partial resolution of the syrinx, with no recurrence of the SFC. The unusual features in the clinical course of this patient were an atypical CS syndrome presenting with concomitantly resolving syringomyelia, and the development of EH after a wide arachnoidal fenestration. This is the first case in indexed literature describing such a combination of unusual postoperative complications of a FMD. A hypothesis is presented to explain the clinico-radiological findings of the case. PMID:24257499

  12. Spinal cord detethering in children with tethered cord syndrome and Chiari type 1 malformations.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad; Cheema, Ahmed A; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Gross, Naina L; Martin, Michael D; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the association between tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Chiari type 1 malformation (CM1), and report on the surgical outcomes of children with CM1 and TCS who underwent sectioning of the filum terminale (SFT). The relationship between TCS and CM1 is unclear. A retrospective review of 170 consecutive spinal cord detetherings between 2008 and 2012 was performed. We identified 17 children with CM1 who underwent SFT. Information regarding clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes was analyzed. A mean tonsillar herniation of 10.0mm (range: 5-21) was noted. Children with a fatty or thickened filum terminale demonstrated a greater amount of tonsillar displacement (p<0.005). A low conus medullaris was found in 12 children and a syrinx was present in three. The preoperative symptoms improved in all children. The postoperative MRI (mean 21.8 months) revealed an unchanged tonsillar position in all but one child. No worsening of neurologic function was noted. Pediatric patients who have both CM1 and TCS, but do not demonstrate classic Chiari-related symptoms, may experience symptomatic improvement after filum terminale sectioning. PMID:26165471

  13. Syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur pied malformé (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Benbella, Imane; Khalki, Hanane; Lahmadi, Khalid; Kouara, Sara; Abbadi, Abderrahim; Er-rami, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de larva migrans cutanée est une dermite sous cutanée causée par des larves d'ankylostomes d'animaux en impasse parasitaire chez l'homme. L'infestation transcutanée est favorisée par le contact avec le sol contaminé par les larves du parasite. Nous rapportons le cas d'un nourrisson de 15 mois, originaire de Guinée-Bissau, atteint d'un syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur un pied malformé. Cette malformation sous forme d'une syndactylie associée à une tuméfaction du pied, était à l'origine d'un retard d'acquisition de la station debout. De même, on a rapporté une notion de pieds nus, vue la difficulté de chausser le pied malformé du patient. Tous ces facteurs auraient contribués à favoriser l'infestation du malade par les larves du nématode. PMID:27217876

  14. Joubert's syndrome with retinal dysplasia: neonatal tachypnoea as the clue to a genetic brain-eye malformation.

    PubMed Central

    King, M D; Dudgeon, J; Stephenson, J B

    1984-01-01

    Five children with features of Joubert's syndrome and Leber's amaurosis are described. The presenting symptoms were panting tachypnoea in the newborn, prolonged apnoeic attacks in the neonatal period (in both of identical twins), global developmental delay, and failure to develop vision. Three children had multiple hemifacial spasms, such as have been seen in Joubert's syndrome, and the same three had cystic dysplasia of the kidneys. Necropsy confirmed the retinal and renal pathology, together with agenesis of the vermis and brainstem dysgenesis in the identical twins. It is concluded that a gene for Leber's amaurosis may commonly manifest itself as the specific hind brain malformation underlying Joubert's syndrome. In infants with respiratory irregularities (especially rapid panting), hemifacial spasms, or developmental delay, absence of the cerebellar vermis should be specifically sought by ultrasound and computed tomography, and the electroretinogram measured, whether or not impaired vision is clinically evident. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6476867

  15. The nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome: a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome with congenital nasopalpebral lipomas, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, V B; Velasquez, D; Arrivillaga, R

    1982-04-01

    We describe a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome from eight affected individuals in three generations of a Venezuelan family. It is characterized by congenital symmetrical upper lid and nasopalpebral lipomas, bilateral symmetrical upper and lower palpebral colobomas located at the junction of the inner and middle thirds of the lids, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia. Affected individuals have a broad forehead, window's peak, abnormal pattern of eyebrows and eyelashes, and maldevelopment of the lacrimal punctae. Interorbital distance is normal, but interpupillary distance is increased due to divergent strabismus originating from visual interference from inner canthal masses. Persistent epiphora, conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal (and less frequently lens) opacities are a secondary consequence of the defect of the lacrimal punctae and the inability to close the lids completely. The syndrome has complete penetrance and a rather narrow range of expressivity. The primary defect could involve a dysplasia of adipose tissue leading to nasopalpebral and upper lid lipomas during embryogenesis, with the rest of the malformations being secondary to interference of morphogenesis of the mid-upperface developmental field from the lipomatous hamartomas. Alternatively, a central rather than a peripheral mechanism of malformation might be considered, such as defective migration of neural crest cells. PMID:7091184

  16. Diffuse Venous Malformation of the Uterus in a Pregnant Woman with Klippel-Trénaunay Syndrome Diagnosed by DCE-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yara, Nana; Masamoto, Hitoshi; Iraha, Yuko; Wakayama, Akihiko; Chinen, Yukiko; Nitta, Hayase; Kinjo, Tadatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Background. We experienced a rare case of a pregnant woman with Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome complicated with diffuse venous malformation of the uterus. This is the first report on the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI for the diagnosis of diffuse venous malformation of the uterus. Case Presentation. A 23-year-old woman presented with convulsions and talipes equinus position of both lower limbs at 11 weeks of gestation. At 27 weeks, ultrasonography demonstrated tubular echolucent spaces throughout the myometrium. Dynamic MRI at 37 weeks revealed that the myometrial lesion was enhanced slowly and showed homogeneous enhancement even on a 10 min delayed image. Taken together with unilateral foot hypertrophy, varices, and port-wine stain, the patient was diagnosed as having Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome complicated with diffuse venous malformation of the pregnant uterus. The patient underwent elective cesarean section because of severe dystonia. The lower uterine segment was thickened and heavy venous blood flow was observed at the incision. Histological diagnosis of the myometrial biopsy specimen was venous malformation. Conclusions. Both diffuse venous malformation and Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome during pregnancy can involve considerable complications, in particular, massive bleeding during labor. Women who suffer from this syndrome should be advised about the risk of complications of pregnancy. PMID:27006845

  17. [Syndactylia associated with multiple malformation syndromes. Observation of a new symptomatologic complex in 3 brothers].

    PubMed

    Garau, A; Nurchi, A M; Melis, P; Frau, G; Costa, G

    1988-01-01

    Hand and feet malformations are often part of complex malformation associations. The present paper reports on a family whose three sibs (two males and one female) are affected with symmetric soft tissue syndactyly involving both fingers and toes, fifth finger clinodactyly, a pattern of dysmorphism including down slanting palpebral fissures, long flat nasal saddle, out turned nostril openings ("Greek warrior helmet"-like profile), dysplastic teeth, and, in addition, severe growth retardation, microcephaly, severe mental deficiency with immaturity of cerebral activity of EEG, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and some skeletal anomalies. All cases show large secondary constriction in one of the chromosome 1 pair (1qh+). PMID:2845373

  18. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome associated with Chiari type I malformation caused by a large 16p13.3 microdeletion: a contiguous gene syndrome?

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Cezary; Volz, Kim; Ranola, Maria; Kitch, Karla; Karim, Tariza; O'Neil, Joseph; Smith, Jodi; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo

    2010-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RSTS, OMIM 180849) is a rare condition, which in 65% of cases is caused by haploinsufficiency of CREBBP (cAMP response element binding protein binding protein) localized to 16p13.3. A small subset of RSTS cases caused by 16p13.3 microdeletions involving neighboring genes have been recently suggested to be a true contiguous gene syndrome called severe RSTS or 16p13.3 deletion syndrome (OMIM 610543). In the present report, we describe a case of a 2-year-old female with RSTS who, besides most of the typical features of RSTS has corpus callosum dysgenesis and a Chiari type I malformation which required neurosurgical decompression. CGH microarray showed a approximately 520.7 kb microdeletion on 16p13.3 involving CREBBP, ADCY9, and SRL genes. We hypothesize that the manifestations in this patient might be influenced by the haploinsufficiency for ADCY9 and SRL. PMID:20101707

  19. A FETAL RAT TESTIS ENDOCRINE AND GENOMIC "SIGNATURE"ACCURATELY PREDICTS THE PHTHALATE SYNDROME OF MALFORMATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Phthalate esters (PE) vary greatly in their potency to induce malformations during sexual differentiation in the male rat. Since in vitro assay batteries are currently unable to generate useful information on the potential of chemicals within this class to disrupt ...

  20. VACTERL/caudal regression/Currarino syndrome-like malformations in mice with mutation in the proprotein convertase Pcsk5

    PubMed Central

    Szumska, Dorota; Pieles, Guido; Essalmani, Rachid; Bilski, Michal; Mesnard, Daniel; Kaur, Kulvinder; Franklyn, Angela; El Omari, Kamel; Jefferis, Joanna; Bentham, Jamie; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Johnson, Paul; Tymowska-Lalanne, Zuzanna; Stammers, Dave; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Morris, Andrew; Brown, Steve D.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cama, Armando; Capra, Valeria; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Constam, Daniel; Seidah, Nabil G.; Prat, Annik; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-induced recessive mouse mutation (Vcc) with a pleiotropic phenotype that includes cardiac, tracheoesophageal, anorectal, anteroposterior patterning defects, exomphalos, hindlimb hypoplasia, a presacral mass, renal and palatal agenesis, and pulmonary hypoplasia. It results from a C470R mutation in the proprotein convertase PCSK5 (PC5/6). Compound mutants (Pcsk5Vcc/null) completely recapitulate the Pcsk5Vcc/Vcc phenotype, as does an epiblast-specific conditional deletion of Pcsk5. The C470R mutation ablates a disulfide bond in the P domain, and blocks export from the endoplasmic reticulum and proprotein convertase activity. We show that GDF11 is cleaved and activated by PCSK5A, but not by PCSK5A-C470R, and that Gdf11-deficient embryos, in addition to having anteroposterior patterning defects and renal and palatal agenesis, also have a presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and exomphalos. Pcsk5 mutation results in abnormal expression of several paralogous Hox genes (Hoxa, Hoxc, and Hoxd), and of Mnx1 (Hlxb9). These include known Gdf11 targets, and are necessary for caudal embryo development. We identified nonsynonymous mutations in PCSK5 in patients with VACTERL (vertebral, anorectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, limb malformation OMIM 192350) and caudal regression syndrome, the phenotypic features of which resemble the mouse mutation. We propose that Pcsk5, at least in part via GDF11, coordinately regulates caudal Hox paralogs, to control anteroposterior patterning, nephrogenesis, skeletal, and anorectal development. PMID:18519639

  1. Dlx5 Homeodomain:DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-03-27

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including split hand and foot malformation 1 in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain:(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A Q186H mutation linked to split hand and foot malformation 1 likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and they likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes. PMID:26829219

  2. A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; HAGIO, Mitsuyoshi; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; MIZUTANI, Shinya; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS. PMID:26616155

  3. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome).

  4. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome). PMID:27625455

  5. Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Pandey, Vaibhav

    2015-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) are among the more frequent congenital anomalies encountered in paediatric surgery, with an estimated incidence ranging between 1 in 2000 and 1 in 5000 live births. Antenatal diagnosis of an isolated ARM is rare. Most cases are diagnosed in the early neonatal period. There is a wide spectrum of presentation ranging from low anomalies with perineal fistula having simple management to high anomalies with complex management. Advances in the imaging techniques with improvement in knowledge of the embryology, anatomy and physiology of ARM cases have refined diagnosis and initial management. There has been marked improvement in survival of such patient over the last century. The management of ARM has moved forward from classical procedures to PSARP to minimal invasive procedures. But still the fecal and urinary incontinence can occur even with an excellent anatomic repair, mainly due to associated problems. There has been a paradigm shift in approach to these patients which involves holistic approach to the syndrome of Anorectal malformations with a long term goal of achievement of complete fecal and urinary continence with excellent quality of life. PMID:25552824

  6. p63 Gene Mutations in EEC Syndrome, Limb-Mammary Syndrome, and Isolated Split Hand–Split Foot Malformation Suggest a Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    van Bokhoven, Hans; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Bamshad, Mike; Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Duijf, Pascal H. G.; Vanmolkot, Kaate R. J.; van Beusekom, Ellen; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Celli, Jacopo; Merkx, Gerard F. M.; Tenconi, Romano; Fryns, Jean Pierre; Verloes, Alain; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth A.; Raas-Rotschild, Annick; Majewski, Frank; Beemer, Frits A.; Janecke, Andreas; Chitayat, David; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Kayserili, Hülya; Yates, John R. W.; Neri, Giovanni; Brunner, Han G.

    2001-01-01

    p63 mutations have been associated with EEC syndrome (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate), as well as with nonsyndromic split hand–split foot malformation (SHFM). We performed p63 mutation analysis in a sample of 43 individuals and families affected with EEC syndrome, in 35 individuals affected with SHFM, and in three families with the EEC-like condition limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), which is characterized by ectrodactyly, cleft palate, and mammary-gland abnormalities. The results differed for these three conditions. p63 gene mutations were detected in almost all (40/43) individuals affected with EEC syndrome. Apart from a frameshift mutation in exon 13, all other EEC mutations were missense, predominantly involving codons 204, 227, 279, 280, and 304. In contrast, p63 mutations were detected in only a small proportion (4/35) of patients with isolated SHFM. p63 mutations in SHFM included three novel mutations: a missense mutation (K193E), a nonsense mutation (Q634X), and a mutation in the 3′ splice site for exon 5. The fourth SHFM mutation (R280H) in this series was also found in a patient with classical EEC syndrome, suggesting partial overlap between the EEC and SHFM mutational spectra. The original family with LMS (van Bokhoven et al. 1999) had no detectable p63 mutation, although it clearly localizes to the p63 locus in 3q27. In two other small kindreds affected with LMS, frameshift mutations were detected in exons 13 and 14, respectively. The combined data show that p63 is the major gene for EEC syndrome, and that it makes a modest contribution to SHFM. There appears to be a genotype-phenotype correlation, in that there is a specific pattern of missense mutations in EEC syndrome that are not generally found in SHFM or LMS. PMID:11462173

  7. Cardiorenal Syndrome is Present in Human Fetuses with Severe, Isolated Urinary Tract Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Waltraut M.; Kübler, Kirsten; Fimmers, Rolf; Willruth, Arne; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Gembruch, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Objective We analyzed the association between renal and cardiovascular parameters in fetuses with isolated severe urinary tract malformations. Methods 39 fetuses at a mean gestational age of 23.6 weeks with nephropathies or urinary tract malformations and markedly impaired or absent renal function were prospectively examined. Fetal echocardiography was performed, and thicknesses of the interventricular septum, and left and right ventricular wall were measured. Blood flow velocity waveforms of the umbilical artery, middle cerebral artery, and ductus venosus were obtained by color Doppler ultrasound. Concentrations of circulating n-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (nt-proBNP), cystatin C, ß2-microglobulin, and hemoglobin were determined from fetal blood samples. Results Malformations included 21 cases of obstructive uropathy, 10 fetuses with bilateral nephropathy, and 8 cases of bilateral renal agenesis. Marked biventricular myocardial hypertrophy was present in all cases. The ratio between measured and gestational age-adjusted normal values was 2.01 (interventricular septum), 1.85, and 1.78 (right and left ventricular wall, respectively). Compared to controls, levels of circulating nt-proBNP were significantly increased (median (IQR) 5035 ng/L (5936 ng/L) vs. 1874 ng/L (1092 ng/L); p<0.001). Cystatin C and ß2-microglobulin concentrations were elevated as follows (mean ± SD) 1.85±0.391 mg/L and 8.44±2.423 mg/L, respectively (normal range 1.66±0.202 mg/L and 4.25±0.734 mg/L, respectively). No correlation was detected between cardiovascular parameters and urinary tract morphology and function. Despite increased levels of nt-proBNP cardiovascular function was preserved, with normal fetal Doppler indices in 90.2% of cases. Conclusion Urinary tract malformations resulting in severe renal impairment are associated with biventricular myocardial hypertrophy and elevated concentrations of circulating nt-proBNP during fetal life. Cardiovascular findings do not

  8. Syringomyelia and Bone Malformations in the Setting of Hypertrichosis Cubiti (Hairy Elbow Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Vito; Testa, Gianluca; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Sessa, Giuse

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The hypertrichosis cubiti also named “hairy elbow syndrome” is a benign anomaly which occurs as an isolated sign but sometime it may be associated with others abnormalities including short stature, facial dysmorphism, developmental delay and bone anomalies. Case Report: The Authors report on a girl 8 years old, who showed a classical hypertrichosis cubiti, tufts of peluria in the thoraco lumbar region, moderate scoliosis and bilateral large big toes. In correspondence with the tufts of spinal peluria the MRI displayed areas of syringomyelia. Conclusion: A review of the cases of hypertrichosis cubiti associated to spine and bone anomalies is reported. This is the first report of the association of hypertrichosis cubiti with syringomyelia and large big toes. The presence of peluria in the elbow and/or in the thoraco lumbar region may be a clue of malformations of spine and bone. In conclusion the HC may be a simply aesthetic, benign anomaly, but may be also a clue of malformations affecting many organs including the spine and skeletal tissue. PMID:27299038

  9. Broad Spectrum of Skeletal Malformation Complex in Patients with Cleidocranial Dysplasia Syndrome: Radiographic and Tomographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ben Chehida, Farid; Kenis, Vladimir; Ganger, Rudolf; Radler, Christof; Hofstaetter, Jochen G.; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cleidocranial dysplasia is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by defective ossification of the intramembraneous ossification (primarily the clavicles, cranium, and pelvis), and it is caused by mutations in the RUNX2 gene that is responsible for osteoblast differentiation. Spine deformities were of progressive nature and considered to be the major orthopedic abnormalities encountered in our practice in patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. We aimed to further delineate the underlying spine pathology and its etiological understanding. Extraspinal deformities were dealt with respectively. Material and methods In this paper, we describe 7 patients who were consistent with the phenotypic and the genotypic characterization of cleidocranial dysplasia. Reformatted computed tomography (CT) scans have been applied in several instances to further understand the underlying pathology of progressive spine tilting. Radiographs were sufficient to illustrate other skeletal malformations. Results Anatomical survey demonstrates that a broad spectrum of frequently unrecognized orthopedic aberrations were encountered. We believe that torticollis has evolved in connection with the persistence of synchondrosis of the skull base and the upper cervical spine and these are strongly correlated to the well-known pathology of posterior occipital synchondrosis. Similarly, scoliosis and kyphoscoliosis resulted from the pathologic aberration of the cartilaginous stage of disrupted embryological development. All our results are discussed for the first time. Coxa vara, patellar dysplasia, and genu valgum were observed as extraspinal deformities. Conclusion This paper includes for the first time the anatomical analysis of the malformation complex of the craniocervical and the entire spine in patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Reformatted CT scan was the modality of choice. We were able to illustrate that the persistence of skull base and the cervical spine synchondrosis were

  10. Congenital stapes malformation: Rare conductive hearing loss in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Eliason, Michael; Conley, George S

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a known autosomal dominant cause of congenital hearing loss. It is characterized by a distinctive phenotypic appearance and often involves sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone abnormalities and inner ear dysmorphisms have been described in association with the disease. However, middle ear abnormalities as causes of conductive hearing loss are not typically seen in Waardenburg syndrome. We discuss a case of an 8-year-old female who meets diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome type 3 and who presented with a bilateral conductive hearing loss associated with congenital stapes fixation. We discuss management strategy in this previously unreported phenotype. PMID:26152551

  11. Multiple congenital malformations in two sibs reminiscent of hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Dincsoy, M.Y.; Salih, M.A.M.; Al-Jurayyan, N.

    1995-04-10

    We report on two sibs, born to consanguineous parents, with defects of the midline including cleft lip and palate, flat nose, hypotelorism, and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, in addition to short limbs, radiolucent tibial notch, digital anomalies, ambiguous genitalia, and hypopituitarism. In spite of the similarities between this condition and the hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes, our patients had neither preaxial nor postaxial polydactyly, but had previously undescribed bilateral radiolucent tibial notch, which is not known to be part of those two syndromes. The cases presented here may very well represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Amphibian malformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    National Wildlife Health Center

    1998-01-01

    Frog malformations have been reported from 42 states. The broad geographic distribution of these malformations warrants national attention. Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin are studying this problem in an effort to document its scope and to determine the causes of the observed malformations.

  13. Syndrome of absent abdominal muscles: two cases with microcephaly, polymicrogyria, and cerebellar malformations

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Reid R.

    1970-01-01

    Two unique cases of the syndrome of absent abdominal muscles with central nervous system involvement are presented. Microcephaly, polymicrogyria, and cerebellar heterotopiae were present in both. In case 1 there was also absence of the corpus callosum and agenesis of the cerebellar vermis. In case 2 a count of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord showed a reduction of approximately 50% in the lower thoracic region. The pertinent literature is briefly discussed. The findings in the nervous system suggest that the syndrome is the result of defective embryogenesis during the first trimester. Images PMID:4250700

  14. Venous malformations of the anterior abdominal wall in blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome: implications for antenatal and intrapartum management

    PubMed Central

    Cauldwell, Matthew; Kyle, Pippa; Treharne, Ian; Wong, Terry; Holden, Simon T; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a rare vascular disorder characterized by rubbery blue–purple cutaneous nodules that are histologically thin-walled dilated vascular spaces. The exact inheritance of the disease in unknown but in cases of familial recurrence, there appears to be a pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance. The vascular lesions may manifest in any organ system but tend to predominate in the gastrointestinal tract (GI). There are only a handful of cases reported in the literature, but reported complications arising from the naevi include sponatenous GI bleeding requiring laparotomy and blood transfusion and the development of large naevi in the cervix thus preventing vaginal delivery. In this case we describe a patient with known BRBNS who developed symptomatic anaemia during her pregnancy which required antenatal admission and blood transfusion. She was managed expectantly in a multidisciplinary setting by obstetricians, gastroenterologists and an obstetric physician with the aim of a vaginal delivery. Nevertheless, she had an elective caesarean section at term for breech presentation. Surgery was complicated by the unexpected finding of venous malformations within the abdominal wall musculature and subcutaneous fat that resulted in a primary haemorrhage and required urgent blood transfusion. The patient made a good postoperative recovery and had a healthy male infant who at birth displayed no external features of BRBNS. This report demonstrates for the first time the appearance of naevi in the abdominal wall and the important considerations that need to be made regarding mode of delivery and future pregnancies.

  15. Dlx5 Homeodomain: DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J.; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-29

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1;more » this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes.« less

  16. Potential Pitfalls on the 99mTc-Mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy in a Patient with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maestri Brittain, Jane; Borgwardt, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is an obliterative cholangiopathy affecting 1:10.000–14.000 of newborns. Infants with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation syndrome (BASM) are a subgroup of BA patients with additional congenital anomalies. Untreated the disease will result in fatal liver failure within the first years of life. Kasai portoenterostomy restores bile flow and delay the progressive liver damage thereby postponing liver transplantation. An early diagnosis is of most importance to ensure the effectiveness of the operation. The 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of the diagnostic strategy when an infant presents jaundice due to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (>20 µmol/L total bilirubin of which 20% is conjugated) with its high sensitivity of 97%–100% in refuting BA. Rapid extraction of tracer by the liver and no visible tracer in the small bowl after 24 h is indicative of BA. Laparotomy with antegrade cholangiography is then performed giving the final diagnosis when the remains of the obliterated biliary tree are revealed in the case of BA. We present a case demonstrating some of the challenges of interpreting the 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy in an infant with BASM and stress the importance that the 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of a spectrum of imaging modalities in diagnosing BA. PMID:26838802

  17. Femoral-facial syndrome with malformations in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leal, Evelia; Macías-Gómez, Nelly; Rodríguez, Lisa; Mercado, F Miguel; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2003-01-01

    The femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FFS) is a very rare association of femoral and facial abnormalities. Maternal diabetes mellitus has been mainly involved as the causal agent. We report the second case of FFS with anomalies in the central nervous system (CNS) including corticosubcortical atrophy, colpocephaly, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri and absent septum pellucidum. The psychomotor development has been normal. We propose that the CNS defects observed in these patients are part of the spectrum of abnormalities in the FFS. PMID:12504316

  18. Etiologies of uterine malformations.

    PubMed

    Jacquinet, Adeline; Millar, Debra; Lehman, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Ranging from aplastic uterus (including Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome) to incomplete septate uterus, uterine malformations as a group are relatively frequent in the general population. Specific causes remain largely unknown. Although most occurrences ostensibly seem sporadic, familial recurrences have been observed, which strongly implicate genetic factors. Through the study of animal models, human syndromes, and structural chromosomal variation, several candidate genes have been proposed and subsequently tested with targeted methods in series of individuals with isolated, non-isolated, or syndromic uterine malformations. To date, a few genes have garnered strong evidence of causality, mainly in syndromic presentations (HNF1B, WNT4, WNT7A, HOXA13). Sequencing of candidate genes in series of individuals with isolated uterine abnormalities has been able to suggest an association for several genes, but confirmation of a strong causative effect is still lacking for the majority of them. We review the current state of knowledge about the developmental origins of uterine malformations, with a focus on the genetic variants that have been implicated or associated with these conditions in humans, and we discuss potential reasons for the high rate of negative results. The evidence for various environmental and epigenetic factors is also reviewed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273803

  19. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    Chiari malformations (CMs) are structural defects in the cerebellum. The cerebellum is the part of the brain that controls balance. With CM, brain tissue extends into the spinal canal. It can happen when part of the skull is too ...

  20. Arteriovenous Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the formation of brain AVMs. NIH Patient Recruitment for Arteriovenous Malformation Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Brain Aneurysm Foundation 269 Hanover Street, ...

  1. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  2. Endothelial Neuropilin Disruption in Mice Causes DiGeorge Syndrome-Like Malformations via Mechanisms Distinct to Those Caused by Loss of Tbx1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingjing; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sucov, Henry M.

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of human congenital malformations known as DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is replicated in mice by mutation of Tbx1. Vegfa has been proposed as a modifier of DGS, based in part on the occurrence of comparable phenotypes in Tbx1 and Vegfa mutant mice. Many additional genes have been shown to cause DGS-like phenotypes in mice when mutated; these generally intersect in some manner with Tbx1, and therefore impact the same developmental processes in which Tbx1 itself is involved. In this study, using Tie2Cre, we show that endothelial-specific mutation of the gene encoding the VEGFA coreceptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) also replicates the most prominent terminal phenotypes that typify DGS. However, the developmental etiologies of these defects are fundamentally different from those caused by absence of TBX1. In Tie2Cre/Nrp1 mutants, initial pharyngeal organization is normal but subsequent pharyngeal organ growth is impaired, second heart field differentiation is normal but cardiac outflow tract cushion organization is distorted, neural crest cell migration is normal, and palatal mesenchyme proliferation is impaired with no change in apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that impairment of VEGF-dependent endothelial pathways leads to a spectrum of DiGeorge syndrome-type malformations, through processes that are distinguishable from those controlled by Tbx1. PMID:22396765

  3. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  4. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... spine that can lead to nerve damage or paralysis. Chiari malformations also can happen after brain or spinal surgery. Doctors haven't identified a ...

  5. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Catherine Y; Yonkers, Marc A; Liu, Tiffany S; Minckler, Don S; Tao, Jeremiah P

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  6. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Yonkers, Marc A.; Liu, Tiffany S.; Minckler, Don S.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  7. Loss of Wnt5a disrupts second heart field cell deployment and may contribute to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Tanvi; Li, Ding; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Hutson, Mary R.; Kelly, Robert G.; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Outflow tract (OFT) malformation accounts for ∼30% of human congenital heart defects and manifests frequently in TBX1 haplo-insufficiency associated DiGeorge (22q11.2 deletion) syndrome. OFT myocardium originates from second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the pharyngeal and splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), but how these progenitors are deployed to the OFT is unclear. We find that SHF progenitors in the SpM gradually gain epithelial character and are deployed to the OFT as a cohesive sheet. Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, is expressed specifically in the caudal SpM and may regulate oriented cell intercalation to incorporate SHF progenitors into an epithelial-like sheet, thereby generating the pushing force to deploy SHF cells rostrally into the OFT. Using enhancer trap and Cre transgenes, our lineage tracing experiments show that in Wnt5a null mice, SHF progenitors are trapped in the SpM and fail to be deployed to the OFT efficiently, resulting in a reduction in the inferior OFT myocardial wall and its derivative, subpulmonary myocardium. Concomitantly, the superior OFT and subaortic myocardium are expanded. Finally, in chick embryos, blocking the Wnt5a function in the caudal SpM perturbs polarized elongation of SHF progenitors, and compromises their deployment to the OFT. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for Wnt5a in deploying SHF progenitors from the SpM to the OFT. Given that Wnt5a is a putative transcriptional target of Tbx1, and the similar reduction of subpulmonary myocardium in Tbx1 mutant mice, our results suggest that perturbing Wnt5a-mediated SHF deployment may be an important pathogenic mechanism contributing to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. PMID:25410658

  8. A Rare Case of Acroangiodermatitis Associated with a Congenital Arteriovenous Malformation (Stewart-Bluefarb Syndrome) in a Young Veteran: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Archie, Mark; Khademi, Saieh; Aungst, David; Nouvong, Aksone; Freeman, Shanna; Gelabert, Hugh; Rigberg, David; deVirgilio, Christian; Lewis, Michael; O'Connell, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AD) is a rare angioproliferative disease manifesting with cutaneous lesions clinically similar to Kaposi's sarcoma. AD is a benign hyperplasia of preexisting vasculature and may be associated with acquired or congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVM), or severe chronic venous insufficiency (because of hypostasis, elevated venous pressure, arteriovenous shunting). Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome is the rare syndrome in which AD is associated with a congenital AVM. We present the case of a young veteran with a painful, chronic nonhealing ulcer and ipsilateral popliteal artery occlusion likely because of trauma, who elected transmetatarsal amputation for symptomatic relief. A 24-year-old male veteran presented with a 5-year history of a nonhealing dorsal left foot ulcer, resulting from a training exercise injury. He ultimately developed osteomyelitis requiring antibiotics, frequent debridements, multiple trials of unsuccessful skin substitute grafting, and severe unremitting pain. He noted a remote history of left digital deformities treated surgically as a child, and an AVM, previously endovascularly treated at an outside facility. Arterial duplex revealed somewhat dampened left popliteal, posterior tibial (PT), and dorsalis pedis (DP) artery signals with arterial brachial index of 1.0. CT angiography showed occlusion of the proximal to mid popliteal artery with significant calcifications felt initially to be a result of prior trauma. Pedal pulses were palpable and transcutaneous oxygen measurements revealed adequate oxygenation. Because of unremitting pain, the patient opted for amputation. Pathology revealed vascular proliferation consistent with AD. This case illustrates an unusual diagnosis of acroangiodermatitis, and a rare syndrome when associated with his underlying AVM (Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome). This resulted in a painful, chronic ulcer and was further complicated by trauma-related arterial occlusive disease. AD disease can hinder wound

  9. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used. PMID:26631589

  10. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  11. Mutations in zebrafish pitx2 model congenital malformations in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome but do not disrupt left-right placement of visceral organs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongchang; Buel, Sharleen M; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Pitx2 is a conserved homeodomain transcription factor that has multiple functions during embryonic development. Mutations in human PITX2 cause autosomal dominant Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), characterized by congenital eye and tooth malformations. Pitx2(-/-) knockout mouse models recapitulate aspects of ARS, but are embryonic lethal. To date, ARS treatments remain limited to managing individual symptoms due to an incomplete understanding of PITX2 function. In addition to regulating eye and tooth development, Pitx2 is a target of a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) signaling pathway that mediates left-right (LR) asymmetry of visceral organs. Based on its highly conserved asymmetric expression domain, the Nodal-Pitx2 axis has long been considered a common denominator of LR development in vertebrate embryos. However, functions of Pitx2 during asymmetric organ morphogenesis are not well understood. To gain new insight into Pitx2 function we used genome editing to create mutations in the zebrafish pitx2 gene. Mutations in the pitx2 homeodomain caused phenotypes reminiscent of ARS, including aberrant development of the cornea and anterior chamber of the eye and reduced or absent teeth. Intriguingly, LR asymmetric looping of the heart and gut was normal in pitx2 mutants. These results suggest conserved roles for Pitx2 in eye and tooth development and indicate Pitx2 is not required for asymmetric looping of zebrafish visceral organs. This work establishes zebrafish pitx2 mutants as a new animal model for investigating mechanisms underlying congenital malformations in ARS and high-throughput drug screening for ARS therapeutics. Additionally, pitx2 mutants present a unique opportunity to identify new genes involved in vertebrate LR patterning. We show Nodal signaling-independent of Pitx2-controls asymmetric expression of the fatty acid elongase elovl6 in zebrafish, pointing to a potential novel pathway during LR organogenesis. PMID:27297886

  12. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations of Midbrain-Hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of malformations of midbrain and hindbrain. These can be classified as predominantly cerebellar malformations, combined cerebellar and brain stem malformations, and predominantly brain stem malformations. The diagnostic criteria for the majority of these morphological malformations are based on neuroimaging findings. The predominantly cerebellar malformations include predominantly vermian hypoplasia seen in Dandy-Walker malformation and rhombencephalosynapsis, global cerebellar hypoplasia reported in lissencephaly and microlissencephaly, and unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia seen in PHACES, vanishing cerebellum, and cerebellar cleft. Cerebellar dysplasias are seen in Chudley-McCullough syndrome, associated with LAMA1 mutations and GPR56 mutations; Lhermitte-Duclos disease; and focal cerebellar dysplasias. Cerebellar hyperplasias are seen in megalencephaly-related syndromes and hemimegalencephaly with ipsilateral cerebellomegaly. Cerebellar and brain stem malformations include tubulinopathies, Joubert syndrome, cobblestone malformations, pontocerebellar hypoplasias, and congenital disorders of glycosylation type Ia. Predominantly brain stem malformations include congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome, pontine tegmental cap dysplasia, diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia, disconnection syndrome, and pontine clefts. PMID:26599961

  14. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively. PMID:21437824

  15. Dlx5 homedomain/DNA complex; Structure, binding and effect of mutations related to split-hand and foot malformation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1; this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes. PMID:26829219

  16. Stratified Whole Genome Linkage Analysis of Chiari Type I Malformation Implicates Known Klippel-Feil Syndrome Genes as Putative Disease Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Markunas, Christina A.; Soldano, Karen; Dunlap, Kaitlyn; Cope, Heidi; Asiimwe, Edgar; Stajich, Jeffrey; Enterline, David; Grant, Gerald; Fuchs, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Chiari Type I Malformation (CMI) is characterized by displacement of the cerebellar tonsils below the base of the skull, resulting in significant neurologic morbidity. Although multiple lines of evidence support a genetic contribution to disease, no genes have been identified. We therefore conducted the largest whole genome linkage screen to date using 367 individuals from 66 families with at least two individuals presenting with nonsyndromic CMI with or without syringomyelia. Initial findings across all 66 families showed minimal evidence for linkage due to suspected genetic heterogeneity. In order to improve power to localize susceptibility genes, stratified linkage analyses were performed using clinical criteria to differentiate families based on etiologic factors. Families were stratified on the presence or absence of clinical features associated with connective tissue disorders (CTDs) since CMI and CTDs frequently co-occur and it has been proposed that CMI patients with CTDs represent a distinct class of patients with a different underlying disease mechanism. Stratified linkage analyses resulted in a marked increase in evidence of linkage to multiple genomic regions consistent with reduced genetic heterogeneity. Of particular interest were two regions (Chr8, Max LOD = 3.04; Chr12, Max LOD = 2.09) identified within the subset of “CTD-negative” families, both of which harbor growth differentiation factors (GDF6, GDF3) implicated in the development of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). Interestingly, roughly 3–5% of CMI patients are diagnosed with KFS. In order to investigate the possibility that CMI and KFS are allelic, GDF3 and GDF6 were sequenced leading to the identification of a previously known KFS missense mutation and potential regulatory variants in GDF6. This study has demonstrated the value of reducing genetic heterogeneity by clinical stratification implicating several convincing biological candidates and further supporting the hypothesis that

  17. De Novo Loss-of-Function Mutations in USP9X Cause a Female-Specific Recognizable Syndrome with Developmental Delay and Congenital Malformations.

    PubMed

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Latour, Brooke; Jolly, Lachlan; Mancini, Grazia M; Pfundt, Rolph; Wu, Ka Man; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Anderlid, Britt-Marie M; Wood, Stephen A; Cheung, Sau Wai; Barnicoat, Angela; Probst, Frank; Magoulas, Pilar; Brooks, Alice S; Malmgren, Helena; Harila-Saari, Arja; Marcelis, Carlo M; Vreeburg, Maaike; Hobson, Emma; Sutton, V Reid; Stark, Zornitza; Vogt, Julie; Cooper, Nicola; Lim, Jiin Ying; Price, Sue; Lai, Angeline Hwei Meeng; Domingo, Deepti; Reversade, Bruno; Gecz, Jozef; Gilissen, Christian; Brunner, Han G; Kini, Usha; Roepman, Ronald; Nordgren, Ann; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in more than a hundred genes have been reported to cause X-linked recessive intellectual disability (ID) mainly in males. In contrast, the number of identified X-linked genes in which de novo mutations specifically cause ID in females is limited. Here, we report 17 females with de novo loss-of-function mutations in USP9X, encoding a highly conserved deubiquitinating enzyme. The females in our study have a specific phenotype that includes ID/developmental delay (DD), characteristic facial features, short stature, and distinct congenital malformations comprising choanal atresia, anal abnormalities, post-axial polydactyly, heart defects, hypomastia, cleft palate/bifid uvula, progressive scoliosis, and structural brain abnormalities. Four females from our cohort were identified by targeted genetic testing because their phenotype was suggestive for USP9X mutations. In several females, pigment changes along Blaschko lines and body asymmetry were observed, which is probably related to differential (escape from) X-inactivation between tissues. Expression studies on both mRNA and protein level in affected-female-derived fibroblasts showed significant reduction of USP9X level, confirming the loss-of-function effect of the identified mutations. Given that some features of affected females are also reported in known ciliopathy syndromes, we examined the role of USP9X in the primary cilium and found that endogenous USP9X localizes along the length of the ciliary axoneme, indicating that its loss of function could indeed disrupt cilium-regulated processes. Absence of dysregulated ciliary parameters in affected female-derived fibroblasts, however, points toward spatiotemporal specificity of ciliary USP9X (dys-)function. PMID:26833328

  18. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations.

    PubMed

    Escot, Sophie; Blavet, Cédrine; Faure, Emilie; Zaffran, Stéphane; Duband, Jean-Loup; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-02-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology. PMID:26755698

  19. Novel KIF7 missense substitutions in two patients presenting with multiple malformations and features of acrocallosal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tunovic, Sanjin; Barañano, Kristin W; Barkovich, James A; Strober, Jonathan B; Jamal, Leila; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    We present two children who both had two missense mutations in the Kinesin Family Member 7 (KIF7) gene. A seven year old female with severe developmental delays, failure to thrive and growth retardation, infantile spasms, a cardiac vascular ring and right-sided aortic arch, imperforate anus, hydronephrosis with a right renal cyst, syndactyly and abnormal white matter was a compound heterozygote for c.3365C > G, predicting p.(Ser1122Trp) that was maternally inherited and c.2482G > A, predicting p.(Val828Met) that was paternally inherited. An eight year old female with severe developmental delays, epilepsy, left postaxial polydactyly of the hand and abnormalities of brain development including hydrocephalus, pachygyria and absence of the body and splenium of the corpus callous was a compound heterozygote for c.461G > A, predicting p.(Arg154Gln) and c.2959 G > A, predicting p.(Glu987Lys) that was maternally inherited and her father was unavailable for testing. The presentations in these children include features of acrocallosal syndrome, such as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, enlarged ventricles, facial dysmorphism with a prominent forehead and broad halluces in the first child, but included atypical findings for individuals previously reported to have truncating mutations in KIF7, including imperforate anus, infantile spasms and severe growth retardation. We conclude that these phenotypes may result from the KIF7 sequence variants and abnormal hedgehog signaling, but that the full spectrum of KIF7-associated features remains to be determined. PMID:26174511

  20. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Psychological Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Rohanachandra, Yasodha Maheshi; Dahanayake, Dulangi Maneksha Amerasinghe; Wijetunge, Swarna

    2016-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation, which is a congenital malformation of the cerebellum, is documented in literature to be associated with psychotic symptoms, obsessive compulsive symptoms, mood symptoms, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. The pathogenesis of psychiatric symptoms in Dandy-Walker malformation is thought to be due to disruption of the corticocerebellar tracts, resulting in what is known as cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. We present a case of Dandy-Walker malformation presenting with psychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the necessity to be aware of psychiatric manifestations of cerebellar disease as it has an impact on the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27493822

  1. Opercular malformations: clinical and MRI features in 11 children.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Y; Adamsbaum, C; Sellier, N; Robain, O; Ponsot, G; Kalifa, G

    1995-11-01

    Opercular malformations are rare and complex brain malformations for which only very fragmented neuropathological descriptions have been reported. They are related to an abnormal development of both sylvian fissure and frontoparietal operculum. We report a retrospective clinical and MRI study of 11 patients presenting with opercular malformations. A congenital pseudobulbar syndrome was observed in six cases, various motor disorders in seven cases, mental retardation in six cases and epilepsy in four cases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the main features of opercular malformations in children and to try to characterise this entity on the basis of its clinical features and MRI pattern. PMID:8577527

  2. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Psychological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Dahanayake, Dulangi Maneksha Amerasinghe

    2016-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation, which is a congenital malformation of the cerebellum, is documented in literature to be associated with psychotic symptoms, obsessive compulsive symptoms, mood symptoms, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. The pathogenesis of psychiatric symptoms in Dandy-Walker malformation is thought to be due to disruption of the corticocerebellar tracts, resulting in what is known as cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. We present a case of Dandy-Walker malformation presenting with psychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the necessity to be aware of psychiatric manifestations of cerebellar disease as it has an impact on the diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27493822

  3. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  4. Malformations of cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Trudy; Atefy, Ramin; Sheen, Volney

    2012-01-01

    Background Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are increasingly recognized as an important cause of epilepsy and developmental delay. MCD encompass a wide spectrum of disorders with various underlying genetic etiologies and clinical manifestations. High resolution imaging has dramatically improved our recognition of MCD. Review Summary This review will provide a brief overview of the stages of normal cortical development, including neuronal proliferation, neuroblast migration, and neuronal organization. Disruptions at various stages lead to characteristic MCD. Disorders of neurogenesis give rise to microcephaly (small brain) or macrocephaly (large brain). Disorders of early neuroblast migration give rise to periventricular heterotopia (neurons located along the ventricles), whereas abnormalities later in migration lead to lissencephaly (smooth brain) or subcortical band heterotopia (smooth brain with a band of heterotopic neurons under the cortex). Abnormal neuronal migration arrest give rise to over-migration of neurons in cobblestone lissencephaly. Lastly, disorders of neuronal organization cause polymicrogyria (abnormally small gyri and sulci). This review will also discuss the known genetic mutations and potential mechanisms that contribute to these syndromes. Conclusion Identification of various gene mutations has not only given us greater insight into some of the pathophysiologic basis of MCD, but also an understanding of the processes involved in normal cortical development. PMID:18469675

  5. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected. PMID:18493797

  6. Intraoral venous malformation with phleboliths

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash S.; Dhillon, Manu; Gill, Navneet

    2011-01-01

    The most common type of vascular malformation is the venous malformation and these are occasionally associated with phleboliths. We report a case of a 45 year old woman with intraoral venous malformation with phleboliths. PMID:24151422

  7. Combined Lymphedema and Capillary Malformation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, Reid A.; Chaudry, Gulraiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphedema and capillary malformation are independent vascular malformations that can cause overgrowth of the lower extremity. We report a series of patients who had both types of malformations affecting the same leg. The condition is unique but may be confused with other types of vascular malformation overgrowth conditions (eg, Klippel–Trenaunay and Parkes Weber). Methods: Our Vascular Anomalies Center and Lymphedema Program databases were searched for patients with both capillary malformation and lymphedema. Diagnosis of lymphedema–capillary malformation was made by history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Because lymphedema–capillary malformation has phenotypical overlap with other conditions, only patients who had imaging confirming their diagnosis were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological features, morbidity, and treatment were recorded. Results: Eight patients (4 females and 4 males) had confirmed lymphedema–capillary malformation. Referring diagnosis was Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (n = 4), diffuse capillary malformation with overgrowth (n = 3), or lymphatic malformation (n = 1). The condition was unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2). Morbidity included infection (n = 6), difficulty fitting clothes (n = 6), bleeding or leaking vesicles (n = 5), leg length discrepancy (n = 4), and difficulty ambulating (n = 3). All patients were managed with compression regimens. Operative management was liposuction (n = 3), treatment of phlebectatic veins (n = 3), staged skin/subcutaneous excision (n = 1), and/or epiphysiodesis (n = 1). Conclusions: Lymphedema and capillary malformation can occur together in the same extremity. Both conditions independently cause limb overgrowth primarily because of subcutaneous adipose deposition. Compression garments and suction-assisted lipectomy can improve the condition. Lymphedema–capillary malformation should not be confused with other vascular malformation overgrowth

  8. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J.; Pasztor, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  9. Cerebellar and Brainstem Malformations.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations has been shown. Familiarity with the spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. This article discusses cerebellar and brainstem malformations, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and recurrence. PMID:27423798

  10. Pediatric neuroanesthesia. Arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Newfield, P; Hamid, R K

    2001-06-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations can occur singly, multiply, and in conjunction with aneurysms and denovo, family, or in conjunction with connective-tissue disorders. Intracranial hemorrhage is the most common presentation, occurring in 20% to 50% of cases. In children, seizures are the second most common presentation occurring in 15% to 20% of cases. The modalities available treatment of arteriovenous malformations are microsurgery, embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery with heavy particles, alpha knife, or linear accelerator. Induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia are designed to prevent rupture of arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm and to improve intracranial compliance in the presence of an intracranial hematoma, during both diagnostic (CT, MR scanning) and therapeutic procedures. PMID:11469062

  11. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  12. Diffuse malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Guerrini, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities and severe epilepsy. Advances in imaging and genetics have improved the diagnosis and classification of these conditions. Up to now, eight genes have been involved in different types of MCD. Lissencephaly-pachygyria and subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) represent a malformative spectrum resulting from mutations of either LIS1 or DCX genes. LIS1 mutations cause a more severe malformation in the posterior brain regions. DCX mutations usually cause anteriorly predominant lissencephaly in males and SBH in female patients. Additional forms are X-linked lissencephaly with corpus callosum agenesis and ambiguous genitalia associated with mutations of the ARX gene. Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) encompass heterogeneous disorders named LCH types a to d. LCHa is related to mutation in LIS1 or DCX, LCHb with mutation of the RELN gene, and LCHd could be related to the TUBA1A gene. Polymicrogyria encompasses a wide range of clinical, etiological, and histological findings. Among several syndromes, recessive bilateral fronto-parietal polymicrogyria has been associated with mutations of the GPR56 gene. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been associated with mutations in the SRPX2 gene in a few individuals and with linkage to chromosome Xq28 in a some other families. X-linked bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) consists of PNH with focal epilepsy in females and prenatal lethality in males. Filamin A (FLNA) mutations have been reported in some families and in sporadic patients. It is possible to infer the most likely causative gene by brain imaging studies and other clinical findings. PMID:23622213

  13. Inherited CHST11/MIR3922 deletion is associated with a novel recessive syndrome presenting with skeletal malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sameer S; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Duzkale, Hatice; McLaughlin, Heather; Giovanni, Monica; Zhang, Chengsheng; Stitziel, Nathan; Fingeroth, Joyce; Joyce, Robin M; Lebo, Matthew; Rehm, Heidi; Vuzman, Dana; Maas, Richard; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Murray, Michael; Cassa, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin are ubiquitous disaccharide carbohydrate chains that contribute to the formation and function of proteoglycans at the cell membrane and in the extracellular matrix. Although GAG-modifying enzymes are required for diverse cellular functions, the role of these proteins in human development and disease is less well understood. Here, we describe two sisters out of seven siblings affected by congenital limb malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease. Using Whole-Genome Sequencing (WGS), we identified in the proband deletion of a 55 kb region within chromosome 12q23 that encompasses part of CHST11 (encoding chondroitin-4-sulfotransferase 1) and an embedded microRNA (MIR3922). The deletion was homozygous in the proband but not in each of three unaffected siblings. Genotyping data from the 1000 Genomes Project suggest that deletions inclusive of both CHST11 and MIR3922 are rare events. Given that CHST11 deficiency causes severe chondrodysplasia in mice that is similar to human limb malformation, these results underscore the importance of chondroitin modification in normal skeletal development. Our findings also potentially reveal an unexpected role for CHST11 and/or MIR3922 as tumor suppressors whose disruption may contribute to malignant lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26436107

  14. Associated malformations in patients with limb reduction deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Alembik, Yves; Dott, Beatrice; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2010-01-01

    Infants with limb reduction deficiencies (LRD) often have other associated congenital malformations. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated malformations in a defined population. This study included special strengths: each affected child was examined by a geneticist, all elective terminations were ascertained, and the surveillance for malformations was continued until 1 year of age. The associated malformations in infants with LRD were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 25 years in 347,810 consecutive births in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital malformations. Of the 271 LRD infants born during this period, representing a prevalence of 7.8 per 10,000, 57.9% had associated malformations. There were 17(6.3%) patients with chromosomal abnormalities including 10 trisomies 18, and 62 (22.9%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VA(C)TER(L) association. However numerous recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Poland, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting, oral-facial-digital, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, oculo-auriculo-vertebral defect spectrum, CHARGE, Townes-Brocks, Moebius, Du Pan, Smith-Lemli-Opitz, hypoglossia-hypodactyly, amniotic band, De Lange, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fanconi, radius aplasia- thrombocytopenia, Roberts, Holt-Oram, and fetal diethylstilbestrol. Seventy eight (28.8%) of the patients were multiply, non-syndromic, non chromosomal malformed infants (MCA). Malformations in the cardiac system, in the genital system, and in the central nervous system were the most common other malformations, 11.4%, 9.4%, and 7.7% of the associated malformations, respectively, followed by malformations in the renal system (4.8%), and in the digestive system (4.6%). Prenatal diagnosis was performed in 48.4% of dysmorphic syndromes with LRD. The overall prevalence

  15. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity associated with intestinal neuronal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Berger, S; Ziebell, P; OFFsler, M; Hofmann-von Kap-herr, S

    1998-09-01

    A close relation between different forms of dysganglionosis such as intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND) type B and aganglionosis has been established. No systematic analysis of other malformations and diseases accompanying IND has been made as yet. Congenital malformations and perinatal morbidity were analyzed in 109 patients with IND seen at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Mainz from 1977 to 1996. IND was associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 47 cases; 22 children with IND had other abdominal malformations, including anal atresia, rectal stenosis, sigmoidal stenosis, ileal atresia, pyloric stenosis, and esophageal atresia. A cystic bowel duplication, a choledochal cyst, and a persisting urachus were also found. Extra-abdominal malformations such as Down's syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, aortic stenosis, and malformations of vertebral bodies were seen. Twin siblings of children with IND were either healthy (n=3) or died in utero (n=1). Seventeen children with IND developed severe intra-abdominal complications during the perinatal period such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), meconium ileus, or bowel perforations. NEC was frequently associated with preterm birth. Bowel perforations were seen in mature and preterm newborns with IND. Taken together, IND is found in a variety of obstructive bowel diseases. This may support the hypothesis that IND is a secondary phenomenon or that congenital atresias and stenoses of the digestive tract have a pathogenesis similar to that of intestinal innervation disturbances. IND may also be a part of complex malformation patterns since it occurs with a number of extraintestinal and non-obstructive intestinal malformations. PMID:9716673

  16. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  17. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  18. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  19. Congenital vascular malformations in scintigraphic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pilecki, Stanisław; Gierach, Marcin; Gierach, Joanna; Świętaszczyk, Cyprian; Junik, Roman; Lasek, Władysław

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Congenital vascular malformations are tumour-like, non-neoplastic lesions caused by disorders of vascular tissue morphogenesis. They are characterised by a normal cell replacement cycle throughout all growth phases and do not undergo spontaneous involution. Here we present a scintigraphic image of familial congenital vascular malformations in two sisters. Material/Methods A 17-years-old young woman with a history of multiple hospitalisations for foci of vascular anomalies appearing progressively in the upper and lower right limbs, chest wall and spleen. A Parkes Weber syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical picture. Due to the occurrence of new foci of malformations, a whole-body scintigraphic examination was performed. A 12-years-old girl reported a lump in the right lower limb present for approximately 2 years, which was clinically identified as a vascular lesion in the area of calcaneus and talus. Phleboscintigraphy visualized normal radiomarker outflow from the feet via the deep venous system, also observed in the superficial venous system once the tourniquets were released. In static and whole-body examinations vascular malformations were visualised in the area of the medial cuneiform, navicular and talus bones of the left foot, as well as in the projection of right calcaneus and above the right talocrural joint. Conclusions People with undiagnosed disorders related to the presence of vascular malformations should undergo periodic follow-up to identify lesions that may be the cause of potentially serious complications and to assess the results of treatment. Presented scintigraphic methods may be used for both diagnosing and monitoring of disease progression. PMID:24567769

  20. Genetics Home Reference: capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  1. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parinda H; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called “visceral heterotaxy”, in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.  PMID:26180693

  2. Overgrowth Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Kalish, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall-Smith, Weaver, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith-Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  3. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  4. Arteriovenous malformation of the filum terminale: an exceptional case.

    PubMed

    Troude, Lucas; Melot, Anthony; Brunel, Hervé; Roche, Pierre-Hugues

    2016-06-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the spine display a variety of different locations, angioarchitectures, and clinical presentations. The authors describe an exceptional case of a filum terminale AVM that is not described in any classification and discuss the origin and management of this malformation. A 59-year-old woman was admitted in June 2012 for cauda equina syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging and spinal angiography revealed an AVM of the filum terminale, located below the conus medullaris, fed by the anterior spinal artery. After an unsuccessful attempt to reach the nidus with a microcatheter, the AVM was resected. At 20 months after surgery, the patient was fully independent and radiological images confirmed the exclusion of the malformation. AVMs that originate from the filum terminale are exceptional. According to updated classifications, AVMs of the filum terminale should be categorized as a separate entity. PMID:26495953

  5. Electroencephalography in congenital malformations of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Campos, P; Cruz, G; Lizarraga, R; Bancalari, E; Guillen, D; Castañeda, C

    1994-12-01

    We studied clinical and EEG features of 36 cases with congenital malformations of the CNS. Patients were followed at the outpatient clinic of Hospital Cayetano Heredia and of Hogar Clinica San Juan de Dios in Lima-Peru, from January 1984 to June 1992. Eighty percent of the patients had convulsive syndromes and mental retardation. The most frequent malformation was agenesis of corpus callosum, and it was not possible to find a "typical" EEG pattern. The second were porencephalic cysts, with a good clinical-EEG correlation. There were two typical cases of schizencephaly, one of hemimegalencephaly with good prognosis, and one of holoprosencephaly. The results are compared to those obtained for a series we previously reported. Data discussed take into account reports on the subject registered in the literature. It is concluded that EEG is an useful method to evaluate possible CNS malformations in developing countries. PMID:7611945

  6. Major Congenital Malformations in Barbados: The Prevalence, the Pattern, and the Resulting Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Keerti; Krishnamurthy, Kandamaran; Greaves, Camille; Kandamaran, Latha; Nielsen, Anders L.; Kumar, Alok

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To study the prevalence and the pattern of major congenital malformations and its contribution to the overall perinatal morbidity and mortality. Methods. It is a retrospective population based study. It includes all major congenital malformations in newborns during 1993-2012. The data was collected from the birth register, the neonatal admission register and the individual patient records at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital where over 90% of deliveries take place and it is the only facility for the care of sick newborns in this country. Results. The overall prevalence of major congenital malformations among the live births was 59/10,000 live births and that among the stillbirths was 399/10,000 stillbirths. Circulatory system was the most commonly affected and accounted for 20% of all the major congenital malformations. Individually, Down syndrome (4.1/10, 000 live births) was the commonest major congenital malformation. There was a significant increase in the overall prevalence during the study period. Major congenital malformations were responsible for 14% of all neonatal death. Conclusions. Less than 1% of all live newborns have major congenital malformations with a preponderance of the malformations of the circulatory system. Major congenital malformations contribute significantly to the overall neonatal morbidity and mortality in this country. PMID:25006483

  7. Brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Adi R

    2011-01-01

    An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a particular abnormality of blood vessels. Brain AVMs are congenital, but symptoms usually do not appear until the second decade of life - if at all. The most common presenting symptom is a brain hemorrhage, but other possible symptoms include neurological deficits, seizures and headaches. Until recently, the gold standard for diagnosing AVM was conventional angiography. However, computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography are now the first-line diagnostic tools for AVMs. This article reviews the presenting symptoms, diagnostic procedures and treatment options for brain AVMs, including embolization, micro-surgery and radiosurgery. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your CE preference. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. PMID:21771938

  8. Systemic to pulmonary vascular malformation.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, H M; Janevski, B K; Penn, O C; Sie, H T; ten Velde, G P

    1992-11-01

    A case is reported of life-threatening haemoptysis as a result of an anomalous communication between a bronchial artery and pulmonary vein, demonstrated by angiography. The patient recovered following bilobectomy of the right lower and middle lobes. When a systemic artery is involved in an arteriovenous malformation of the lung, haemodynamics are different compared with those present in malformations fed by the pulmonary artery. This implicates other clinical features, options for surgical intervention and prognosis. In reviewing the literature, a relationship with Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is absent in these specific malformations. PMID:1486979

  9. Arteriovenous malformations of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, I; DeAsis, A; Torno, R; Godec, C J

    1989-01-01

    We report a rare case of a localized arteriovenous malformation of the bladder mimicking a bladder tumor and presenting with gross hematuria. The mass was successfully resected transurethrally. PMID:2908934

  10. Embolization of uterine arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Guoyun; Xie, Fubo; Wang, Bo; Tao, Guowei; Kong, Beihua

    2013-01-01

    Background: Uterine arteriovenous malformation is a rare but potential life-threatening source of bleeding. A high index of suspicion and accurate diagnosis of the condition in a timely manor are essential because instrumentation that is often used for other sources of uterine bleeding can be lead to massive hemorrhage. Case: We describe here a case of uterine arteriovenous malformation. A 32-year-old woman presented abnormal vaginal bleeding following the induced abortion. A diagnosis of uterine arteriovenous malformation made on the basis of Doppler ultrasonraphy was confirmed through pelvic angiography. The embolization of bilateral uterine arteries was performed successfully. Conclusion: Uterine arteriovenous malformation should be suspected in patient with abnormal vaginal bleeding, especially who had the past medical history incluing cesarean section, induced abortion, or Dillation and Curethage and so on. Although angiography remains the gold standard, Doppler ultrasonography is also a good noninvasive technique. The transcatheter uterine artery embolization offers a safe and effective treatment PMID:24639742

  11. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments. PMID:23312968

  12. Vascular Malformation and Common Keratinocytic Nevus of the Soft Type: Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, André; Carvalho, Rodrigo; Amaro, Cristina; Freitas, Isabel; Cardoso, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis is a rare syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a pigmented nevus and a cutaneous vascular malformation. We report a 5-year-old boy with all the typical findings of phacomatosis pigmentovascularis type Ia. Although its existence according to the traditional classification has been questioned, this case represents a very rare association of a capillary vascular malformation and a common keratinocytic nevus of the soft type. PMID:25506441

  13. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain. We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated. PMID:27149441

  14. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  15. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ~1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  16. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  17. AUTISM WITH OPHTHALMOLOGIC MALFORMATIONS: THE PLOT THICKENS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana; Johansson, Maria; Bandim, Jose M; Gillberg, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To review the association of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in individuals manifesting thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence and compare them with three new studies in which ASD was also associated with ocular and systemic malformations: (1) a Swedish study of individuals with CHARGE association (Coloboma, Heart, choanal Atresia, developmental or growth Retardation, Genital anomaly, and Ear involvement); (2) a Swedish study of Goldenhar syndrome; and (3) Brazilian Möbius syndrome (sequence) study. Methods In the Swedish CHARGE study, 31 patients met the inclusion criteria (3+ or 4 of the common characteristics of the CHARGE syndrome). The same team of investigators also evaluated 20 Swedish patients with Goldenhar syndrome. In the Brazilian Möbius study, 28 children with a diagnosis of Möbius sequence were studied; some children had a history of exposure during their mother’s pregnancy to the abortifacient drug misoprostol in an unsuccessful abortion attempt Results In the CHARGE study, five patients had the more severe autism disorder and five had autistic-like condition. In the Goldenhar study, two had autism disorder and one had autistic-like condition. In the Brazilian Möbius study, the systemic findings of the misoprostol-exposed and misoprostol-unexposed patients were almost undistinguishable, and ASD was present in both groups (autism disorder in five and autistic-like condition in three). Conclusion Autism spectrum disorder has been reported in two conditions with known early pregnancy exposure to the teratogenic agents thalidomide and misoprostol. In the Brazilian Möbius study, autism also occurred in both the misoprostol-exposed and misoprostol-unexposed groups. Autism also was present in patients with both CHARGE association and Goldenhar syndrome. PMID:15747750

  18. Why study human limb malformations?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2003-01-01

    Congenital limb malformations occur in 1 in 500 to 1 in 1000 human live births and include both gross reduction defects and more subtle alterations in the number, length and anatomy of the digits. The major causes of limb malformations are abnormal genetic programming and intra-uterine disruption to development. The identification of causative gene mutations is important for genetic counselling and also provides insights into the mechanisms controlling limb development. This article illustrates some of the lessons learnt from the study of human limb malformation, organized into seven categories. These are: (1) identification of novel genes, (2) allelic mutation series, (3) pleiotropy, (4) qualitative or (5) quantitative differences between mouse and human development, (6) physical and teratogenic disruption, and (7) unusual biological phenomena. PMID:12587917

  19. Evolutionary origin of cardiac malformations.

    PubMed

    Taussig, H B

    1988-10-01

    The author has proposed in previous publications that isolated cardiac malformations have an evolutionary origin. This is partly supported by the fact that isolated cardiac malformations found in humans occur also in other placental mammals as well as in birds. External gross examination of the heart in just over 5,000 birds was carried out during a 3 year period. Anomalies included one instance of duplicate hearts, two specimens in which no heart could be identified and in a fourth, a yellow-rumped warbler, the heart lay in the neck outside of the thoracic cavity. Published reports of similar occurrences of an ectopically placed heart concern birds, cattle and humans. The fact that various species of both placental mammals and birds show evidence of heritability for heart defects, and that these species cannot interbreed, combined with the fact that birds and mammals have many similar malformations, points to either a common external causative factor or a common origin. Genes that code the malformed heart must be transmitted with that part of the genetic makeup common to all birds and mammals. Malformations caused by teratogens produce widespread organ injury to a potentially normal embryo whereas the evolutionary malformation is an organ-specific anomaly in an otherwise normal mammal or bird and occurs in widely separated species. The implications of this theory are important for parents of children with an isolated congenital heart defect who may have ingested one or another drug or chemical or have been exposed to toxins or infectious agents before or after conception of the affected offspring. PMID:3047192

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Close All Description Dandy-Walker malformation affects brain development, primarily development of the cerebellum , which is the ... Walker malformation , signs and symptoms caused by abnormal brain development are present at birth or develop within the ...

  1. Arteriovenous malformation of nose-revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, C V; Kailash, N; Kailas, Gayattre; Divya Jyothi, N

    2012-12-01

    Areteriovenous malformations are rare in the head and neck region and generally arise from intracranial vessels. We present one rare case with spontaneous arteriovenous malformations related to the nose. PMID:24294582

  2. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Apert syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Crouzon syndromes: clinical findings, genes and extracellular matrix. J Craniofac Surg. 2005 May;16(3):361- ... receptors, and human limb malformations: clinical and molecular correlations. Am J Med Genet. 2002 Oct 15;112( ...

  4. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  5. PHACE(S) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Geoffrey L

    2015-01-01

    PHACE(S) syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. The acronym refers to the commonest features of PHACE: posterior fossa malformations, large facial hemangiomas, cerebral arterial anomalies, cardiovascular anomalies, and eye anomalies. When ventral developmental defects such as sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe occur, the PHACES acronym may be used. The hallmark feature of PHACE is the presence of one or more large facial infantile hemangiomas that occupy at least one facial segment. Infantile hemangiomas differ from the capillary malformation (port wine stain) of Sturge-Weber syndrome, and the arteriovenous malformation of Wyburn-Mason syndrome, distinguishing PHACE syndrome from other neurocutaneous disorders with red birthmarks. The true incidence of PHACE has not yet been established. Girls are more commonly affected than boys. Cerebral vascular anomalies are probably the most common extracutaneous feature. Given that several organ systems are involved, a multidisciplinary approach to disease surveillance and treatment is advised. PMID:26564079

  6. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  7. Syndrome in Question.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  8. Apert Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashanth; Veena, KM

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malformation and symmetrical syndactyly. We present a 10-month-old infant having all the features of classical Apert syndrome. How to cite this article: Khan S, Chatra L, Shenai P, Veena KM. Apert Syndrome: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):203-206. PMID:25206168

  9. Galenic arteriovenous malformation with precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ventureyra, E C; Badejo, A

    1984-01-01

    Pineal lesions may appear with precocious puberty. In this report, a patient with precocious puberty and macrogenitosomia caused by an arteriovenous malformation in the pineal region is presented. This vascular malformation was not visualized during investigations 3 years before the present series. It appears that the vascular malformation increased considerably in size within a 3-year period. This case suggests that some arteriovenous malformations may take a malignant course, increasing rapidly in size and behaving like tumors by causing destruction and compression of surrounding structures. This case seems to be unique because, to the best of our knowledge, an arteriovenous malformation associated with precocious puberty has never been described previously. PMID:6689808

  10. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Amy L.; Ball, Karen L.; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M.; Faughnan, Marie E.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in “research silos” with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  11. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Akers, Amy L; Ball, Karen L; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M; Faughnan, Marie E; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A; McCulloch, Charles E; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L

    2013-04-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in "research silos" with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  12. Congenital malformations in diabetic offspring.

    PubMed

    Temesio, P; Belitzky, R; Gallego, L; Martell, M; Pose, S V

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective study of 215 deliveries in diabetic mothers at Hospital de Clínicas (Montevideo, Uruguay) has been performed. Presence of congenital malformations (CM) was considered in relation to age of the mothers, class of maternal diabetes, maternal angiopathy, treatment and metabolic control. The prevalence of CM in the series was 9.8%. None of the factors analyzed seems to be statistically linked to the prevalence of CM. PMID:613685

  13. [Maternal imagination and congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2011-01-01

    Since antiquity philosophers and scientists tried to explain the cause of congenital malformations. In early modern medicine maternal imagination was largely accepted as their true cause, This concept was rejected by Blondel, a London physician. Around 1750 Wolff introduced the Hemmungsbildung as the cause of congenital malformations, a concept adopted in 1781 by Blumenbach. Later on Soemmerring (1784), Crichton (1785) and Meckel the younger adopted Blumenbach's concept. In 1824 Suringar further developed it. More and more the excessive development of fetal blood vessels or nerves was rejected as a possible cause, although from time to time these ideas were adopted again. In the early 1800s Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1811) and Vrolik (1817) developed a classification of monstra. These attempts urged Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (Etienne's son) and Vrolik the younger (Gerard's son) to develop it further. Nevertheless, around 1840 Vrolik had to admit that although we are well acqainted with the various malformations, we are still ignorant of the primary cause of these phenomena. Meanwhile the dispute between the adherents of the theory of preformation and those who had adopted the concept of epigenesis exercised many minds. In the second half of the eighteenth century the latter theory became more and more adopted and this fact cleared the way for the ideas introduced by Wolff and Blumenbach, because it was consistent with the idea of a gradual development of fetal structures. PMID:22073754

  14. Split-hand/feet malformation in three tamilian families and review of the reports from India.

    PubMed

    Amalnath, S Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Dutta, Tarun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a rare condition which can be either syndromic or nonsyndromic. We report three unrelated pedigrees, one with autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and the other two with autosomal recessive (AR) pattern. We also briefly review the published reports from India. PMID:24959024

  15. The Arnold-Chiari Malformation and Its Implications for Individuals with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittler, Joel E.

    1986-01-01

    The Arnold-Chiari malformation is present in most infants born with myelomeningocele (a form of spina bifida) and hydrocephalus. The syndrome is responsible for structural abnormalities in the brain, and peripheral nervous system. Etiology, symptoms, impact on central nervous system structures, surgical treatment, and implications for education…

  16. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be...

  17. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-05-01

    SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain.We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated. PMID:27149441

  18. Congenital malformations of the hand and forearm in children: what radiologists should know.

    PubMed

    Aucourt, Julie; Budzik, Jean-François; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Mézel, Aurélie; Cotten, Anne; Boutry, Nathalie

    2012-04-01

    Congenital upper limb malformations represent complex pathologies because of their varied clinical presentations, imaging features, and etiologies. They can be divided into (1) failure of formation with transverse, intercalary, and longitudinal (preaxial, postaxial, and mesoaxial) deficiencies, (2) failure of differentiation with synostoses, carpal coalitions, syndactylies, and symphalangism, (3) duplication with ulnar dimelia and polydactylies, and (4) brachydactylies. Congenital Madelung's deformity, clinodactyly, camptodactyly, and Kirner's deformity are usually included in these malformations. Despite advances in molecular diagnosis, a good knowledge of clinical and imaging features as well as special consideration of other skeletal or nonskeletal abnormalities are essential to eventually diagnose an embryo fetopathy (maternal valproate treatment, constriction band syndrome), a genetic disorder (trisomy 21 or Down syndrome, Turner's syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome), or a nongenetic syndrome (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb association, Poland's syndrome). Genetic counseling for a child presenting with a congenital upper limb malformation is of great value, both for the treating team and the parents, and imaging is often required. The latter is still largely supported by conventional radiography, both for diagnosis and functional prognosis, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging will be great tools in the near future to better evaluate these conditions. PMID:22648430

  19. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  20. Acute Porphyria in a Patient with Arnold Chiari Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianbin; O’Keefe, Kevin; Webb, Lisa B.; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 33 Final Diagnosis: Acute porphyria Symptoms: Abdominal pain • alternating bowel habits Medication: Metronidazole • bactrim • oxybutynin Clinical Procedure: EMG • porhyria workup Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation are both uncommon genetic disorders without known association. The insidious onset, non-specific clinical manifestations, and precipitating factors often cause diagnosis of acute porphyria to be missed, particularly in patients with comorbidities. Case Report: A women with Arnold Chiari malformation type II who was treated with oxybutynin and antibiotics, including Bactrim for neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infection, presented with non-specific abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea. After receiving Flagyl for C. difficile colitis, the patient developed psychosis, ascending paralysis, and metabolic derangements. She underwent extensive neurological workup due to her congenital neurological abnormalities, most of which were unremarkable. As a differential diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome, acute porphyria was then considered and ultimately proved to be the diagnosis. After hematin administration and intense rehabilitation, the patient slowly recovered from the full-blown acute porphyria attack. Conclusions: This case report, for the first time, documents acute porphyria attack as a result of a sequential combination of 3 common medications. This is the first case report of the concomitant presence of both acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation, 2 genetic disorders with unclear association. PMID:25697467

  1. Sonographic markers for early diagnosis of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Renna, Maria Daniela; Pisani, Paola; Conversano, Francesco; Perrone, Emanuele; Casciaro, Ernesto; Renzo, Gian Carlo Di; Paola, Marco Di; Perrone, Antonio; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Fetal malformations are very frequent in industrialized countries. Although advanced maternal age may affect pregnancy outcome adversely, 80%-90% of fetal malformations occur in the absence of a specific risk factor for parents. The only effective approach for prenatal screening is currently represented by an ultrasound scan. However, ultrasound methods present two important limitations: the substantial absence of quantitative parameters and the dependence on the sonographer experience. In recent years, together with the improvement in transducer technology, quantitative and objective sonographic markers highly predictive of fetal malformations have been developed. These markers can be detected at early gestation (11-14 wk) and generally are not pathological in themselves but have an increased incidence in abnormal fetuses. Thus, prenatal ultrasonography during the second trimester of gestation provides a “genetic sonogram”, including, for instance, nuchal translucency, short humeral length, echogenic bowel, echogenic intracardiac focus and choroid plexus cyst, that is used to identify morphological features of fetal Down’s syndrome with a potential sensitivity of more than 90%. Other specific and sensitive markers can be seen in the case of cardiac defects and skeletal anomalies. In the future, sonographic markers could limit even more the use of invasive and dangerous techniques of prenatal diagnosis (amniocentesis, etc.). PMID:24179631

  2. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear bone malformations with posterior labyrinth involvement: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Palomeque Vera, Juan Miguel; Platero Sánchez-Escribano, María; Gómez Hervás, Javier; Fernández Prada, María; González Ramírez, Amanda Rocío; Sainz Quevedo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Inner ear bone malformations are one cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss. This investigation focused on those affecting the posterior labyrinth, especially enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, which is associated with fluctuating and progressive hearing loss. The objectives of this study were to analyze the behavior of the electrical stimulation, auditory functionality and linguistic development in patients with inner ear malformations involving the posterior labyrinth. The study included ten patients undergoing cochlear implantation (cases: five with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, two with vestibular aqueduct stenosis/aplasia, and three with semicircular canal disorders). Post-implantation, data were gathered on the electrical stimulation threshold and maximum comfort levels and on the number of functioning electrodes. Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech (EARS) subtests were used to assess auditory functionality and language acquisition at 6, 12, and 24 months post-implantation. Results were compared with findings in a control group of 28 cochlear implantation patients without these malformations. No significant differences were found between case and control groups in electrical stimulation parameters; auditory functionality subtest scores were lower in cases than controls, although the difference was only statistically significant for some subtests. In conclusion, cochlear implantation patients with posterior labyrinth bone malformations and profound hearing loss, including those with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, showed no significant difference in electrical stimulation threshold with controls. Although some auditory functionality test results were lower in cases than in controls, cochlear implantation appears to be beneficial for all patients with these malformations. PMID:25971996

  3. Chiari Malformations and Syringohydromyelia in Children.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-04-01

    Chiari malformations are a heterogeneous group of disorders with distinct clinical anatomical features all of which involve the hindbrain. Our understanding of Chiari malformations increased tremendously over the past decades, and progress in neuroimaging was instrumental for that. Conventional and advanced neuroimaging of the brain and spine play a key role in the workup of children with suspected Chiari malformations. In addition, neuroimaging studies in Chiari malformations may guide the management, serve as a predictor of outcome, and shed light on the pathogenesis. PMID:27063663

  4. Nitrosatable drug exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy and selected congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jean D.; Werler, Martha M; Shinde, Mayura U; Vuong, Ann M; Kelley, Katherine E.; Huber, John C.; Sharkey, Joseph R.; Griesenbeck, John S.; Romitti, Paul A.; Malik, Sadia; Suarez, Lucina; Langlois, Peter H.; Canfield, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nitrosatable drugs can react with nitrite in the stomach to form N-nitroso compounds, and results from animal studies suggest that N-nitroso compounds are teratogens. With data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, the relation between prenatal exposure to nitrosatable drugs and limb deficiencies, oral cleft, and heart malformations in offspring was examined. METHODS Maternal reports of drugs taken during the first trimester of pregnancy were classified with respect to nitrosatability for mothers of 741 babies with limb deficiencies, 2,774 with oral cleft malformations, 8,091 with congenital heart malformations, and 6,807 without major congenital malformations. Nitrite intake was estimated from maternal responses to a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS Isolated transverse limb deficiencies and atrioventricular septal defects were associated with secondary amine drug exposures (adjusted odds ratios [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence limit [CI] 1.11, 2.06 and aOR 1.97, 95% CI 1.19, 3.26, respectively). Tertiary amines were associated with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (aOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.10, 2.04) and single ventricle (aOR 1.61, 95% CI 1.06, 2.45). These two malformations were also significantly associated with amide drugs. For several malformations, the strongest associations with nitrosatable drug use occurred among mothers with the highest estimated dietary nitrite intake, especially for secondary amines and atrioventricular septal defects (highest tertile of nitrite, aOR 3.30, 95% CI 1.44, 7.58). CONCLUSION Prenatal exposure to nitrosatable drugs may be associated with several congenital malformations, especially with higher nitrite intake. The possible interaction between nitrosatable drugs and dietary nitrite on risk of congenital malformations warrants further attention. PMID:22903972

  5. Complete Maxillo-Mandibular Syngnathia in a Newborn with Multiple Congenital Malformations.

    PubMed

    Broome, M; Vial, Y; Jacquemont, S; Sergi, C; Kamnasaran, D; Giannoni, E

    2016-02-01

    Syngnathia is an extremely rare condition involving congenital fusion of the maxilla with the mandible. Clinical presentations vary from simple mucosal bands (synechiae) to complete bony fusion (synostosis). Most cases are unilateral incomplete fusions. We report the case of a severely growth-retarded newborn infant with complete synostosis of the mandible with the maxilla and the zygoma associated with cleft palate, choanal atresia, deafness, delayed cerebral white matter development, and genital and limb malformations. Extensive genetic analysis did not reveal any mutations. This association of multiple congenital malformations may represent an entity distinct from previously described syndromes associated with syngnathia. PMID:23778189

  6. Developmental venous anomaly, capillary telangiectasia, cavernous malformation, and arteriovenous malformation: spectrum of a common pathological entity?

    PubMed

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Zabramski, Joseph M; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations of the central nervous system are thought to originate from abnormal developmental processes during embryogenesis. Reports have cited the dynamic nature of these lesions and their "maturation" into other types of malformations. Herein we report on three patients with vascular malformations who exhibited dynamic alterations with stepwise progression of their lesions. These cases lend support to the hypothesis that these malformations may constitute the spectrum of a single disease caused by alterations in a common developmental program and that accumulating injury (e.g., by radiation) may allow one malformation type to mature into another. This concept warrants further investigation. PMID:26743915

  7. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  8. Clinical, Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, P.F.; Raggio, C.L.; Blank, R.D.; McCarty, C.; Broeckel, U.; Pickart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) pose a significant health problem because they can be associated with spinal deformities, such as congenital scoliosis and kyphosis, in addition to various syndromes and other congenital malformations. Additional information remains to be learned regarding the natural history of congenital scoliosis and related health problems. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the process of somite formation, which gives rise to vertebral bodies, there is a wide gap in our understanding of how genetic factors contribute to CVM development. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy most commonly contributes to the occurrence of CVM, followed by other factors such as hypoxia and anticonvulsant medications. This review highlights several emerging clinical issues related to CVM, including pulmonary and orthopedic outcome in congenital scoliosis. Recent breakthroughs in genetics related to gene and environment interactions associated with CVM development are discussed. The Klippel-Feil syndrome which is associated with cervical segmentation abnormalities is illustrated as an example in which animal models, such as the zebrafish, can be utilized to provide functional evidence of pathogenicity of identified mutations. PMID:23653580

  9. Visual Fixation in Chiari Type II Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Michael S.; Sharpe, James A.; Lillakas, Linda; Dennis, Maureen; Steinbach, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Chiari type II malformation is a congenital deformity of the hindbrain. Square wave jerks are horizontal involuntary saccades that interrupt fixation. Cerebellar disorders may be associated with frequent square wave jerks or saccadic oscillations such as ocular flutter. The effects of Chiari type II malformation on visual fixation are unknown. We recorded eye movements using an eye tracker in 21 participants with Chiari type II malformation, aged 8 to 19 years while they fixated a target for 1 minute. Thirty-eight age-matched healthy participants served as controls. Square wave jerks’ parameters were similar in the 2 groups. Saccadic oscillations were not seen. Chiari type II malformation is not associated with pathological square wave jerks or abnormal saccadic oscillations. The congenital nature of this deformity may permit compensation that preserves stable visual fixation. Alternatively, the deformity of Chiari type II malformation may spare parts of the cerebellum that usually cause fixation instability when damaged. PMID:19182152

  10. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  11. Fourth case of cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal syndrome (CODAS), description of new features and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlin, S; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Le Merrer, M; Portnoi, M F; Chantot, S; Jonard, L; Mantel-Guiochon, A; Siffroi, J P; Garabedian, E N; Denoyelle, F

    2010-06-01

    Cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal syndrome (CODAS, OMIM 600373) is a very rare congenital malformation syndrome. This clinical entity is highly distinctive and associates mental retardation, cataract, enamel abnormalities, malformations of the helix, epiphyseal and vertebral malformations, and characteristic dysmorphic features. Since 1991, only three affected children have been reported. The etiology and pattern of inheritance of CODAS syndrome still remain unknown. We describe a new sporadic case presenting with all the characteristic features of CODAS syndrome associated with previously unreported malformations of the heart, larynx, and liver. All investigations such as karyotype, metabolic screening and array CGH were normal. PMID:20503327

  12. Advanced Imaging of Chiari 1 Malformations.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Akbar; Shah, Manish N; Goyal, Manu S

    2015-10-01

    Type I Chiari malformations are congenital deformities involving cerebellar tonsillar herniation downward through the foramen magnum. Structurally, greater than 5 mm of tonsillar descent in adults and more than 6 mm in children is consistent with type I Chiari malformations. However, the radiographic severity of the tonsillar descent does not always correlate well with the clinical symptomatology. Advanced imaging can help clinically correlate imaging to symptoms. Specifically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow abnormalities are seen in patients with type I Chiari malformation. Advanced MRI involving cardiac-gated and phase-contrast MRI affords a view of such CSF flow abnormalities. PMID:26408061

  13. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  14. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Tanmay H.; Badve, Manasi S.; Olajide, Kowe O.; Skorupan, Havyn M.; Waters, Jonathan H.; Vallejo, Manuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-year-old female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae) who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiber-optic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III) precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus. PMID:24765318

  15. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  16. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    PubMed

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  17. Update on the management of anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-three years ago, on 10 August 1980, in Mexico City, the first patient with an anorectal malformation was operated on using the posterior sagittal approach. At that time it was not obvious that we were actually opening a "Pandora's box" that continues to give many positive surprises, a few disappointments, and the constant hope that each day we can learn more about how to improve the quality of life of children born with all different types of anorectal malformations. In November 2012, patient number 3000 in our database was operated in the city of Cochabamba, Bolivia; during one of our International Courses of Anorectal Malformations and Colorectal Problems in Children. The goal of this article is to give a brief update on the current management of patients with anorectal malformation, based on the multiple lessons learned during this period. PMID:23913263

  18. Revision surgery for Chiari malformation decompression.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Catherine A; Fried, Arno H

    2003-09-15

    Chiari malformations comprise four different hindbrain anomalies originally described by Hans Chiari, a professor of pathology at the German University in Prague. There are four basic Chiari malformations. The reasons for revision of Chiari malformation decompression may be for conservative or inadequate initial decompression or the development of postoperative complications. Another reason involves cases of both hindbrain herniation and syringomyelia in patients who have undergone adequate posterior fossa decompression without resolution of symptoms, signs, or radiological appearance of their syrinx cavity. Additionally, symptom recurrence has been reported in association with various types of dural grafts. Reoperation or revision surgery for patients with Chiari malformations is common and may not be due to technical error or inadequate decompression. The types of revision surgeries, their indications, and initial presentations will be reviewed. PMID:15347221

  19. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  20. Spontaneous arteriovenous malformations in the cervical area

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, J.

    1970-01-01

    Four patients with spontaneous arteriovenous malformations of cervical vessels have been presented. The embryology of these vessels has been discussed in order to suggest an explanation for the apparent difference in the incidence of arteriovenous malformations involving the internal carotid artery and those involving either the vertebral or the external carotid arteries. A fifth case (S.T.) is presented as a probable iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula and is to be added to the steadily growing reports of this phenomenon. Images PMID:5431722

  1. Lymphangiosarcoma complicating extensive congenital mixed vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Al Dhaybi, Rola; Agoumi, Mehdi; Powell, Julie; Dubois, Josée; Kokta, Victor

    2010-09-01

    Pediatric hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignant vascular tumor. A few cases have shown pediatric hepatic angiosarcoma occurring on a background of preexisting vascular lesions. We report the case of a newborn girl who presented extensive limbs and upper trunk cutaneous mixed vascular malformations at birth. These malformations were associated with thrombocytopenia. Cutaneous biopsies revealed complex vascular malformations with a significant lymphatic component. Compressive body suit therapy led to regression of the limbs' cutaneous vascular malformations. At the age of 9 months, the patient presented multiple heterogeneous hepatosplenic nodules. Aggressive treatment with prednisone, vincristine, and hepatosplenic embolizations resulted in initial improvement of the hepatosplenic lesions for few months, followed by an increase of the lesions with failure of response to treatment despite adding alpha-interferon-2b to treatment. The patient died at the age of 19 months. The autopsy's pathological examination revealed a hepatic-based angiosarcoma with plurimetastatic dissemination to the spleen, lungs, peritoneum, pleura, mesenteric linings as well as the serosa of the stomach and small intestine. Multiple cutaneous and visceral complex capillaro-lymphatico-venous malformations were also identified. We hypothesize that these multiple extensive mixed vascular malformations were associated with chronic lymphedema which probably predisposed to the development of the angiosarcoma in our patient. PMID:20863270

  2. Dandy–Walker Malformation, Genitourinary Abnormalities, and Intellectual Disability in Two Families

    PubMed Central

    Gregor, Anne; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    We report on two families, each with documented consanguinity and two affected with overlapping features of Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, intellectual disability, and hearing deficit. This phenotype shares similar findings with many well-known syndromes. However, the clinical findings of this syndrome categorize this as a new syndrome as compared with the phenotype of already established syndromes. Due to parental consanguinity, occurrence in siblings of both genders and the absence of manifestations in obligate carrier parents, an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is more likely. The authors believe that these families suggest a novel autosomal recessive cerebello–genital syndrome. Array CGH analyses of an affected did not show pathological deletions or duplications. PMID:26109232

  3. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  4. Alagille syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac malformations (most frequently peripheral pulmonary stenosis), ophthalmological abnormalities (typically of the anterior chamber with posterior embryotoxon being the most common), skeletal anomalies (most commonly butterfly vertebrae), and characteristic facial appearance. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but expressivity is highly variable. Sibs and parents of probands are often found to have mild expression of the presumptive disease gene, with abnormalities of only one or two systems. The frequency of new mutations appears relatively high, estimated at between 15 and 50%. The disease gene has been mapped to chromosome 20 band p12 based on multiple patients described with cytogenetic or molecular rearrangements of this region. However, the frequency of detectable deletions of 20p12 is low (less than 7%). Progress has been made in the molecular definition of an Alagille syndrome critical region within the short arm of chromosome 20. We will review the clinical, genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in this syndrome. Images PMID:9039994

  5. Surgical management of arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Anniek; FitzJohn, Trevor; Tan, Swee T

    2011-03-01

    This article presents our experience in managing a series of consecutive patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) referred to our Vascular Anomalies Centre over a 14-year period. These patients were culled from our prospective Vascular Anomalies Database 1996-2010. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to supplement the data collected. Out of 1131 patients with vascular anomalies, 53 patients (22 males, 31 females) with AVM were identified. Their mean age was 29 (range: 3-88) years with 14 stage-III, 34 stage-II and five stage-I AVMs, affecting the head and neck area (n=32), lower limb (n=13), upper limb (n=7) and trunk (n=1). Eight patients with eight stage-III and 14 patients with 15 stage-II AVMs underwent definitive surgery following preoperative embolisation in 10 patients. Seventeen patients required reconstruction with free flaps (n=8) or local or regional flaps (n=9), tissue expansion (n=4), tendon recession (n=1), tendon transfer (n=1), osseo-integration (n=1) and skin grafting (n=5). Fourteen patients required a combination of reconstructive techniques. During an average follow-up of 54 (range: 10-135) months, two (8.7%) lesions recurred but were improved following surgery. One patient with life-threatening stage-III AVM underwent 'palliative' surgery following preoperative embolisation and the lesion had improved and remained stable during the 4-year follow-up period. AVM is a challenging clinical problem that requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Complete surgical excision remains the gold-standard treatment and immediate reconstruction is an integral part of definitive surgery for AVM. The heterogeneous nature of AVM requires treatment to be tailored for individual patients and the complex excision defects necessitate expertise in a variety of reconstructive techniques. Our experience shows a recurrence rate of 8.7% following definitive surgery for AVM. PMID:20663728

  6. Cardiovascular malformations and other cardiovascular abnormalities in neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, A E; Birch, P H; Korf, B R; Tenconi, R; Niimura, M; Poyhonen, M; Armfield Uhas, K; Sigorini, M; Virdis, R; Romano, C; Bonioli, E; Wolkenstein, P; Pivnick, E K; Lawrence, M; Friedman, J M

    2000-11-13

    Although it is well recognized that a peripheral vasculopathy may occur in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), it is unclear whether cardiovascular abnormalities are more common. We reviewed the frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, in particular, cardiovascular malformations (CVMs), among 2322 patients with definite NF1 in the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation International Database from 1991-98. Cardiovascular malformations were reported in 54/2322 (2.3%) of the NF1 patients, only 4 of whom had Watson syndrome or NF1-Noonan syndrome. There was a predominance of Class II "flow" defects [Clark, 1995: Moss and Adams' Heart Disease in Infants, Children, and Adolescents Including the Fetus and Young Adult. p 60-70] (43/54, 80%) among the NF1 patients with CVMs. Pulmonic stenosis, that was present in 25 NF1 patients, and aortic coarctation, that occurred in 5, constitute much larger proportions of all CVMs than expected. Of interest was the paucity of Class I conotruncal defects (2 patients with tetralogy of Fallot), and the absence of atrioventricular canal, anomalous pulmonary venous return, complex single ventricle and laterality defects. Besides the 54 patients with CVMs, there were 27 patients with other cardiac abnormalities (16 with murmur, 5 with mitral valve prolapse, 1 with intracardiac tumor, and 5 with electrocardiogram abnormalities). No patient in this study had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There were 16 patients who had a peripheral vascular abnormality without an intracardiac CVM, plus an additional 4 patients among those with a CVM who also had a peripheral vascular abnormality. PMID:11078559

  7. Spectrum of urorectal septum malformation sequence.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Nayak, Shalini S; Shukla, Anju; Girisha, Katta M

    2016-05-01

    Urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS) is a rare spectrum of malformations involving various organ systems. Here, we present eight cases of URSMS, noted in autopsy, with different degrees of complexity, seven being the complete type and one being the partial type. All cases had gastrointestinal tract malformation in the form of the imperforate anus and indeterminate genitalia. Other gastrointestinal tract anomalies were anal agenesis in two cases, anorectal agenesis in two cases, and malformed lower intestinal tract in four cases. The associated renal abnormality was noted in five cases, which were unilateral renal agenesis, dysplastic kidney, hydronephrosis, horseshoe kidney, and unilateral hypoplastic ectopic kidney. External genital malformation, present in both male and female fetuses, included a knob-like structure at perineum in female fetuses, genital fold hypoplasia and penile aplasia or hypoplasia in male fetuses. Skeletal abnormalities included two cases of sacral agenesis and one case of lumbosacral dysraphism. Other anomalies included a case with alobar holoprosencephaly, truncus arteriosus with hypoplastic lungs in one case, and three cases with abdominal wall defects. It is our attempt to delineate a spectrum of abnormalities associated with URSMS. PMID:26663027

  8. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  9. Sex hormone exposure during pregnancy and malformations.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H; Briggs, M

    1979-01-01

    This general review of the effects of exposure to sex hormones during pregnancy and subsequent fetal malformation presents summaries of animal studies, develops the data indicating virilization and feminization in humans, documents chromosome abnormalities, and presents data on the connection of steroid exposure in utero and somatic malformations. Fetal exposure can occur 3 different ways, through hormonal pregnancy test, via obstetrical use of hormones, or because of continued maternal use of oral contraceptives after conception. In the latter case, an ongoing prospective study indicates that accidental ingestion of oral contraceptives after conception is not harmful to the fetus if taken during early pregnancy. Tables present summaries of numerous large surveys and retrospective studies linking particular sex hormones (exogenous) to particular fetal malformations including neural tube defects and other constellations of developmental problems. The question of exogenous hormone effects on the personality of infants who were exposed in utero is addressed. PMID:400321

  10. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  11. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N.; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  12. Middle and inner ear malformations in two siblings exposed to valproic acid during pregnancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Houtte, Evelyne; Casselman, Jan; Janssens, Sandra; De Kegel, Alexandra; Maes, Leen; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2014-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a known teratogenic drug. Exposure to VPA during the pregnancy can lead to a distinct facial appearance, a cluster of major and minor anomalies and developmental delay. In this case report, two siblings with fetal valproate syndrome and a mild conductive hearing loss were investigated. Radiologic evaluation showed middle and inner ear malformations in both children. Audiologic, vestibular and motor examination was performed. This is the first case report to describe middle and inner ear malformations in children exposed to VPA. PMID:25216807

  13. Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dragieva, G; Stahel, H U; Meyer, M; Kempf, W; Häffner, A; Burg, G; Hafner, J

    2003-08-01

    A 34-year-old male patient was referred with a recalcitrant leg ulcer overlying an extensive vascular malformation, which had led several times to septic soft tissue infections. During his infancy he had been diagnosed to have Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Clinical examination revealed asymmetric hypertrophy of the lower extremities, an extensive portwine stain on the more severely affected left limb as well as prominent venous varicosities of both legs. Hands and feet showed striking cerebriform palmoplantar hypertrophy, and macrodactily with syndactily of several fingers. All toes had been amputated in early childhood due to extreme overgrowth and currently the patient walked on his forefeet in a prominent pes equinus deformity. Further symptoms consisted in several lipomas at both arms, another portwine stain at the left hemithorax and a single café-au-lait spot at the left scapula. Angio-magnetic resonance imaging scans of both legs showed an extensive venous-lymphatic vascular malformation involving the whole subcutis and infiltrating the muscle. The chronic wound was interpreted as venous stasis ulceration. Local percutaneous sclerotherapy of the dilated veins underneath the ulcer was discussed, but considered to carry a relevant risk of skin necrosis with consecutive progression of the wound. A conventional split-skin graft led to complete wound healing. Since, the patient consequently wears custom-made compression stockings and remained free from recurrences. The syndromatic constellation of palmoplantar overgrowth, multiple lipomas, giant fingers and toes, limb overgrowth, venous-lymphatic malformation and a café-au-lait spot led to the diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. The possible aetiology, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis and management of this rare disorder are discussed. PMID:14524037

  14. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  15. Presentation and management of hydromyelia in children with Chiari type-II malformation.

    PubMed

    La Marca, F; Herman, M; Grant, J A; McLone, D G

    1997-02-01

    Hydromyelia in patients with myelomeningocele and Chiari-II malformation is a relatively frequent finding on MRI studies. However, not all children develop symptoms from the hydromyelia that requires treatment. Furthermore, treatment of hydromyelia in spina bifida patients is rather complex due to the associated malformations. The authors retrospectively analyzed 231 MRI studies carried out on spina bifida patients who presented neurological deterioration. Hydromyelia was found in 48.5% of the patients. Forty-five children with severe hydromyelia required treatment. These patients were first divided into 2 groups: those with holocord hydromyelia, and those with a segmental lesion. Fifteen patients presented symptoms characteristic of symptomatic Chiari-II malformation: neck rigidity; swallowing difficulty; pain in the upper extremeties; weakness or spasticity in the upper extremeties. Eighteen patients presented symptoms typical of the tethered cord syndrome: scoliosis; worsening bladder and/or bowel function; pain in the lower extremeties; weakness or spasticity in the lower extremeties. Twelve patients presented a mixed-type symptomatology. These patients subsequently underwent posterior cervical decompression, tethered cord release or insertion of a hydromyelia-pleural shunt according to the type of presenting symptoms and to the extent of the hydromyelic lesion. A pattern of successful treatment was identified for each type of presenting clinical and radiological picture. This has allowed the authors to determine an algorithm for optimal treatment of hydromyelia associated with Chiari-II malformation and myelomeningocele, which is proposed here. PMID:9419035

  16. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  17. Retroperitoneal vascular malformation mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Indu Bhushan; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old man presented to the Department of Surgery with a painful groin swelling on right side. Exploration revealed a reddish-blue hemangiomatous mass in the scrotum extending through inguinal canal into the retroperitoneum. On further dissection swelling was found to be originating from right external iliac vein. The swelling was excised after ligating all vascular connections. The histopathological examination of excised mass confirmed the diagnosis of venous variety of vascular malformation. This is the first reported case of vascular malformation arising from retroperitoneum and extending into inguinoscrotal region, presenting as incarcerated inguinal hernia. PMID:21633582

  18. Congenital Malformations Leading to Paradoxical Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-05-01

    The absolute separation of the right and left circulations and the filtration of blood by the pulmonary circulation are essential to prevent the passage of thrombotic material from the venous system into the systemic arterial circulation. Any breach of the intracardiac septae or circumvention of the pulmonary capillary network may cause a paradoxical embolus. The most common causes are atrial septal defects and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. This article discusses unusual connections and pathways related to congenital malformations. Although anticoagulation is necessary to prevent paradoxical emboli, the hematologic disturbances and the most appropriate therapy in these patients warrant further investigation. PMID:27150173

  19. Cardiac and non-cardiac malformations produced by Mercury in hamsters. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    The susceptibility of the developing mammalian embryo to the adverse effects of mercury is well documented. A variety of organic mercury compounds have been demonstrated to produce embryotoxic effects in experimental animals. HARADA recently summarized the reports of human intrauterine methylmercury poisoning, i.e., congenital Minamata disease, resulting from the ingestion of contaminated food. Ongoing studies in this laboratory have involved several different aspects of the embryotoxicity produced by inorganic mercury in hamsters including a dose response study, the interaction of mercuric acetate with cadmium and zinc, the effect of different routes of administration, the placental permeability of /sup 203/Hg and the embryotoxic response in several different hamster strains. Little is known regarding a human syndrome of congenital malformations characterized by ectopia cordis, internal cardiac defects and abnormalities of the diaphragm and ventral body wall. Most papers regarding this human syndrome are clinical reports describing the characteristics and management of specific cases; only speculative information is provided regarding etiology and possible embryopathic mechanisms. The observation that a similar syndrome, which will be designated CNC for cardiac and non-cardiac malformations, can be produced by mercury in hamsters prompted the present study. The specific goals of this study were 1) to study the effect of treating pregnant hamsters at different times during embryonic organogenesis to determine the time which produces the highest incidence of the CNC syndrome and whether different treatment times modify the morphological characteristics of the inclusive malformations and 2) to study the structural features of all mercury-induced external and internal abnormalities of the CNC syndrome in late gestation fetuses.

  20. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with Extensive Lymphangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Sirin; Tabaja, Ali; Rajab, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare disorder characterized by the triad of vascular malformations, venous varicosities, and bone and soft-tissue hypertrophy. We present a case of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with limb hypertrophy, port-wine stains, lymphangiomas, and venous varicosities in the limbs. PMID:26587303

  1. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  2. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  3. Acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformation secondary to hydatid cyst operation.

    PubMed

    Gezer, S; Turut, H; Oz, G; Demirag, F; Tastepe, I

    2007-10-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are abnormal communications between pulmonary arteries and pulmonary veins. The majority of the cases are congenital in origin, and acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are very rare. We present a case here, which - to the best of our knowledge - is the first acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformation secondary to a hydatid cyst operation in the literature, and we discuss the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities and treatment of acquired pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. PMID:17902072

  4. A Single-Center Experience of CNS Anomalies or Neural Tube Defects in Patients With Jarcho-Levin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Peker, Erdal; Gülşen, İsmail; Ağengin, Kemal; Kaba, Sultan; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2016-03-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS) is a genetic disorder characterized by distinct malformations of the ribs and vertebrae, and/or other associated abnormalities such as neural tube defect, Arnold-Chiari malformation, renal and urinary abnormalities, hydrocephalus, congenital cardiac abnormalities, and extremity malformations. The study included 12 cases at 37-42 weeks of gestation and diagnosed to have had Jarcho-Levin syndrome, Arnold-Chiari malformation, and meningmyelocele. All cases of Jarcho-Levin syndrome had Arnold-Chiari type 2 malformation; there was corpus callosum dysgenesis in 6, lumbosacral meningmyelocele in 6, lumbal meningmyelocele in 3, thoracal meningmyelocele in 3, and holoprosencephaly in 1 of the cases. With this article, the authors underline the neurologic abnormalities accompanying Jarcho-Levin syndrome and that each of these abnormalities is a component of Jarcho-Levin syndrome. PMID:26239489

  5. Two unique TUBB3 mutations cause both CFEOM3 and malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Mary C; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Tischfield, Max A; Stasheff, Steven F; Brancati, Francesco; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma; Nuovo, Sara; Garaci, Francesco; MacKinnon, Sarah E; Hunter, David G; Grant, P Ellen; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2016-02-01

    One set of missense mutations in the neuron specific beta tubulin isotype 3 (TUBB3) has been reported to cause malformations of cortical development (MCD), while a second set has been reported to cause isolated or syndromic Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles type 3 (CFEOM3). Because TUBB3 mutations reported to cause CFEOM had not been associated with cortical malformations, while mutations reported to cause MCD had not been associated with CFEOM or other forms of paralytic strabismus, it was hypothesized that each set of mutations might alter microtubule function differently. Here, however, we report two novel de novo heterozygous TUBB3 amino acid substitutions, G71R and G98S, in four patients with both MCD and syndromic CFEOM3. These patients present with moderately severe CFEOM3, nystagmus, torticollis, and developmental delay, and have intellectual and social disabilities. Neuroimaging reveals defective cortical gyration, as well as hypoplasia or agenesis of the corpus callosum and anterior commissure, malformations of hippocampi, thalami, basal ganglia and cerebella, and brainstem and cranial nerve hypoplasia. These new TUBB3 substitutions meld the two previously distinct TUBB3-associated phenotypes, and implicate similar microtubule dysfunction underlying both. PMID:26639658

  6. Coexistent arteriovenous malformation and hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; O'Toole, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous angiomas or cavernomas have been occasionally described in patients presenting with medically intractable epilepsy. Reports of cavernomas associated with a second pathology potentially causative of seizures have rarely been documented; most commonly, the second pathology is focal cortical dysplasia or less frequently, hippocampal sclerosis. To our knowledge, cases of arteriovenous malformation arising in this clinical setting and associated with hippocampal sclerosis have not been previously described. We report a 56-year-old woman who initially presented at age 24years with staring spells. Imaging studies revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe. At age 51years, she represented with signs and symptoms related to a hemorrhage from the malformation. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) of the lesion. She subsequently developed seizures, refractory to medical management. MRI studies showed atrophy in the right hippocampus. She underwent resection of the right parietal lobe and hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the right parietal lesion revealed an arteriovenous malformation marked by focally prominent vascular sclerosis, calcification and adjacent hemosiderin deposition. The hippocampus was marked by prominent neuronal loss and gliosis in the CA1 region, consistent with CA1 sclerosis or hippocampal sclerosis International League Against Epilepsy type 2. PMID:26899356

  7. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  9. [Topics of brain malformation and epilepsy--age-dependent epileptic encephalopathies and interneuronopathies].

    PubMed

    Kato, Mitsubiro

    2010-09-01

    The ARX gene is involved in the development of GABAergic interneurons in the forebrain. Loss-of-function mutations, such as nonsense or frameshifts mutation, of ARX cause a group of brain malformations, such as hydranencephaly, lissencephaly, and agenesis of the corpus callosum, while expansion mutations of the polyalanine tracts of ARX, supposed to be gain-of-function mutations, result in a non-malformation group, such as non-syndromic mental retardation, mental retardation with dystonia, West syndrome, and Ohtahara syndrome. A variety of phenotypes caused by pleiotropic mutations of the ARX gene are considered to share a common pathological mechanism connected with the structural and functional disturbance of interneurons, designated as 'interneuronopathies'. We identified the second gene responsible for Ohtahara syndrome, STXBP1, which is essential for synaptic vesicle release. Molecular studies of the diseases will reveal the relationships between the structure and function of the brain. It is indispensable to clarify the etiology of hereditary diseases and identify new approaches to treatment. PMID:20845763

  10. Delleman (Oculocerebrocutaneous) Syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Basso, Tomás; Vigo, Rodolfo; Iacouzzi, Sebastián; Prémoli, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Delleman syndrome is an unusual entity, characterized by ocular cysts or microphthalmia, focal dermal anomalies and cerebral malformations. In the following article, we carry out a review of the disease and we present the case of a patient with microphthalmos and palpebral coloboma. As we could not put orbital expanders at an early stage, we performed reconstructive surgery. PMID:25005212

  11. Partial urorectal septum malformation sequence in a kitten with disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brice S; Pain, Amélie; Meynaud-Collard, Patricia; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    A 2-month-old kitten exhibited simultaneously an imperforate anus, hypospadias, rectourethral fistula and genital dysgenesis (penis restricted to the glans, absence of prepuce and bifid scrotum). Surgical correction consisted of separation of the urinary and digestive tracts, perineal urethrostomy and connection of the rectum to the newly made anal opening. Pathological examination of the testes, conventionally removed at 9 months of age, showed no mature spermatozoa and underdevelopment of germ and Leydig cells. In humans, the absence of an anal opening in association with abnormal sexual development defines the urorectal septum malformation sequence. Here, we describe the first case of this syndrome in a kitten with a normal male karyotype (38,XY) and a normal coding sequence for the SRY gene. Both the rectourethral fistula and observed genital abnormalities might have been induced by a disturbance in the hedgehog signalling pathway. However, although four polymorphic sites were identified by DHH gene sequencing, none cosegregated with the malformation. PMID:24718294

  12. Dandy-Walker malformation and neurocutaneous melanosis in a three-month-old infant

    PubMed Central

    Swar, Mohamed Osman; Mahgoub, Shaza Mohamed; Yassin, Rehab Omer; Osman, Atika Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Dandy-Walker Malformation (DWM) is a rare congenital malformation of the brain. It is characterized by cystic enlargement of the fourth ventricle which is communicating with an enlarged posterior fossa, cerebellar dysgenesis, high tentorial insertion and hydrocephalus. Neurocutaneous Melanosis (NCM) is a congenital neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by large or multiple melanocytic nevi and benign or malignant melanocytic tumors of the leptomeninges. We report three months old boy who presented with projectile vomiting associated with a noticeable increase in head size. Several congenital nevi were seen all over his body with evident signs of hydrocephalus. The association of DWM and NCM is a rare complex, and to our knowledge, this is the eleventh case to be reported in the literature. In this article, we discuss the proposed pathogenesis, classification and management of the condition.

  13. A locus for cerebral cavernous malformations maps to chromosome 7q in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, D.A.; Gallione, C.J.; Morrison, L.A.; Davis, L.E.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1995-07-20

    Cavernous malformations (angiomas) affecting the central nervous system and retina can be inherited in autosomal dominant pattern (OMIM 116860). These vascular lesions may remain clinically silent or lead to a number of neurological symptoms including seizure, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit, and migraine. We have mapped a gene for this disorder in two families, one of Italian-American origin and one of Mexican-American origin, to markers on proximal 7q, with a combined maximum lod score of 3.92 ({theta} of zero) with marker D7S479. Haplotype analysis of these families places the locus between markers D7S502 proximally and D7S515 distally, an interval of approximately 41 cM. The location distinguishes this disorder from an autosomal dominant vascular malformation syndrome where lesions are primarily cutaneous and that maps to 9p21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Aborting a malformed fetus: a debatable issue in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Alaiyan, Saleh; Alfaleh, Khalid M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies contribute a significant proportion of infant morbidity and mortality, as well as fetal mortality. They are generally grouped into three major categories: structural/metabolic, congenital infections, and other conditions. The most prevalent conditions include congenital heart defects, orofacial clefts, Down syndrome, and neural tube defects. Several prenatal diagnostic procedures have been introduced, both cytogenetic (such as chorion biopsy, amniocentesis and funiculocentesis) and biophysical (ultrasound 2-D, 3-D and 4-D, ultrasonography with Doppler, etc.). Insufficient data are currently available from Saudi Arabia on the epidemiology of the lethal congenital abnormalities which should be a priority due to high rate of consanguineous marriages among first cousins and their association with congenital anomalies. In terms of consanguinity and birth defects, a significant positive association has been consistently demonstrated between consanguinity and morbidity, and congenital defects with a complex etiology appear to be both more prevalent in consanguineous families and have a greater likelihood of recurrence. A debate regarding aborting a malformed fetus still exists among the senior Islamic scholars in many of the Islamic countries. The progressive interpretations of Islam have resulted in laws allowing for early abortion on request in two countries; six others permit abortion on health grounds and three more also allow abortion in cases of rape or fetal impairment. In Saudi Arabia, efforts to legalize abortion in certain circumstances have been recently discussed among Senior Religious Scholars and specialized physicians to permit abortions in certain circumstances. In this mini-review we discuss the current debate regarding aborting a malformed fetus in Saudi Arabia with a focus on the Islamic perspective. PMID:24027674

  15. Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N

    2016-02-15

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  16. Variable expressivity of hypertelorism in three siblings with Greig syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gencik, A; Genciková, A

    1986-01-01

    Two sisters and one brother are reported with a complex of congenital malformations, hypertelorism, mental retardation, flattened nasal root, divergent strabism++, mongoloid palpebral fissures, malformations of the ears, pathologic alterations of the eye-fundus in terms of optic nerve atrophy, all suggesting Greig syndrome. The major symptom of this syndrome, the hypertelorism, varied considerably in its expressivity in the three siblings. This fact is normally taken into consideration in the diagnosis of Greig syndrome, but we suggest that an alteration in skull formation should be the criterion for the syndrome rather than extreme hypertelorism. PMID:3756012

  17. RASA1 analysis guides management in a family with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Flore, Leigh Anne; Leon, Eyby; Maher, Tom A.; Milunsky, Jeff M.

    2012-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM; MIM 60354) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multifocal cutaneous capillary malformations, often in association with fast-flow vascular lesions, which may be cutaneous, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intraosseus, or cerebral arteriovenous malformations or arteriovenous fistulas. CM-AVM results from heterozygous mutations in the RASA1 gene. Capillary malformations of the skin are common, and clinical examination alone may not be able to definitively diagnose-or exclude- CM-AVM. We report a family in which the proband was initially referred for a genetic evaluation in the neonatal period because of the presence of a cardiac murmur and minor dysmorphic features. Both he and his mother were noted to have multiple capillary malformations on the face, head, and extremities. Echocardiography revealed dilated head and neck vessels and magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the brain revealed a large infratentorial arteriovenous fistula, for which he has had two embolization procedures. RASA1 sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation, confirming his diagnosis of CM-AVM. We established targeted mutation analysis for the proband's mother and sister, the latter of whom is a healthy 3-year-old whose only cutaneous finding is a facial capillary malformation. This revealed that the proband's mother is also heterozygous for the RASA1 mutation, but his sister is negative. Consequently, his mother will undergo magnetic resonance imaging and angiography screening for intracranial and spinal fast-flow lesions, while his sister will require no imaging or serial evaluations. Targeted mutation analysis has been offered to additional maternal family members. This case illustrates the benefit of molecular testing in diagnosis and making screening recommendations for families with CM-AVM.

  18. Median Facial Cleft in Amniotic Band Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debabrata; Das, Gobinda; Gayen, Sibnath; Konar, Arpita

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome manifests at birth with a variety of malformations ranging from constriction ring to defects incompatible to life, in various parts of the body. Although some theories have been proposed for the development of this syndrome, the exact cause remains unknown. The median facial cleft is an extremely rare manifestation of amniotic band syndrome with a relative paucity of reports available in the literature. Here, we report one such case. PMID:21731335

  19. Genetics Home Reference: megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... some people with MCAP, excessive growth affects not only the brain but other individual parts of the body, which ... closely related disorders of brain overgrowth and abnormal brain and body morphogenesis. Am J Med Genet A. 2012 Feb;158A(2):269-91. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.34402. Epub 2012 Jan 6. ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... process helps to maintain the proper balance of protein production and breakdown (protein homeostasis) that cells need to function and survive. ... in the STAMBP gene reduce or eliminate the production of STAM binding protein. This shortage allows damaged or unneeded proteins to ...

  1. Growth retardation, dysmorphic facies and minor malformations following massive exposure to phenobarbitone in utero.

    PubMed

    Seip, M

    1976-09-01

    A syndrome of facial dysmorphism, pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, developmental delay and minor malformations is described in two siblings. The facial anomalies consist of short nose with low nasal bridge, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, ptosis of eyelid (patient 2), lowset ears, wide mouth with protruding lips and relative prognathism. Patient 2 in addition had a cleft soft palate and a hypoplastic phalanx of his fifth fingers. Both siblings were exposed to extraordinary high levels of phenobarbitone (5.0-8.6 mg/100 ml) in utero. The same clinical picture has been reported by others following use of phenytoin in pregnancy, and the term "fetal hydantoin syndrome" has been proposed. Since the syndrome seems to occur both following exposure to phenytoin and to phenobarbital this term should probably be avoided. This interesting coincidence indicates that the drugs may have a similar mechanism of action on the development of the fetus. PMID:822687

  2. GI-Associated Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Hemangiomas and vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract, rare clinical entities, present as overt or occult bleeding. They can be distributed throughout the intestinal digestive system, or present as a singular cavernous hemangioma or malformation, which is often located in the rectosigmoid region. Misdiagnosis is common despite characteristic radiographic features such as radiolucent phleboliths on plain film imaging and a purplish nodule on endoscopy. Adjunctive imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are suggested as there is potential for local invasion. Endorectal ultrasound with Doppler has also been found to be useful in some instances. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment, with an emphasis on sphincter preservation. Nonsurgical endoscopic treatment with banding and sclerotherapy has been reported with success, especially in instances where an extensive resection is not feasible. PMID:22942801

  3. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  4. Statins and congenital malformations: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Fischer, Michael A; Seely, Ellen W; Ecker, Jeffrey L; Franklin, Jessica M; Desai, Rishi J; Allen-Coleman, Cora; Mogun, Helen; Avorn, Jerry; Huybrechts, Krista F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the teratogenic potential of statins. Design Cohort study. Setting United States. Participants A cohort of 886 996 completed pregnancies linked to liveborn infants of women enrolled in Medicaid from 2000 to 2007. Methods We examined the risk of major congenital malformations and organ specific malformations in offspring associated with maternal use of a statin in the first trimester. Propensity score based methods were used to control for potential confounders, including maternal demographic characteristics, obstetric and medical conditions, and use of other drugs. Results 1152 (0.13%) women used a statin during the first trimester. In unadjusted analyses, the prevalence of malformations in the offspring of these women was 6.34% compared with 3.55% in those of women who did not use a statin in the first trimester (relative risk 1.79, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 2.23). Controlling for confounders, particularly pre-existing diabetes, accounted for this increase in risk (1.07, 0.85 to 1.37). There were also no statistically significant increases in any of the organ specific malformations assessed after accounting for confounders. Results were similar across a range of sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Our analysis did not find a significant teratogenic effect from maternal use of statins in the first trimester. However, these findings need to be replicated in other large studies, and the long term effects of in utero exposure to statins needs to be assessed, before use of statins in pregnancy can be considered safe. PMID:25784688

  5. Neuroembryology and brain malformations: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Modern neuroembryology integrates descriptive morphogenesis with more recent insight into molecular genetic programing and data enabled by cell-specific tissue markers that further define histogenesis. Maturation of individual neurons involves the development of energy pumps to maintain membrane excitability, ion channels, and membrane receptors. Most malformations of the nervous system are best understood in the context of aberrations of normal developmental processes that result in abnormal structure and function. Early malformations usually are disorders of genetic expression along gradients of the three axes of the neural tube, defective segmentation, or mixed lineages of individual cells. Later disorders mainly involve cellular migrations, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and myelination. Advances in neuroimaging now enable the diagnosis of many malformations in utero, at birth, or in early infancy in the living patient by abnormal macroscopic form of the brain. These images are complimented by modern neuropathological methods that disclose microscopic, immunocytochemical, and subcellular details beyond the resolution of MRI. Correlations may be made of both normal and abnormal ontogenesis with clinical neurological and EEG maturation in the preterm or term neonate for a better understanding of perinatal neurological disease. Precision in terminology is a key to scientific communication. PMID:23622157

  6. Malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Leventer, Richard J; Guerrini, Renzo; Dobyns, William B

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are macroscopic or microscopic abnormalities of the cerebral cortex that arise as a consequence of an interruption to the normal steps of formation of the cortical plate. The human cortex develops its basic structure during the first two trimesters of pregnancy as a series of overlapping steps, beginning with proliferation and differentiation of neurons, which then migrate before finally organizing themselves in the developing cortex. Abnormalities at any of these stages, be they environmental or genetic in origin, may cause disruption of neuronal circuitry and predispose to a variety of clinical consequences, the most common of which is epileptic seizures. A large number of MCDs have now been described, each with characteristic pathological, clinical, and imaging features. The causes of many of these MCDs have been determined through the study of affected individuals, with many MCDs now established as being secondary to mutations in cortical development genes. This review will highlight the best-known of the human cortical malformations associated with epilepsy. The pathological, clinical, imaging, and etiologic features of each MCD will be summarized, with representative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images shown for each MCD. The malformations tuberous sclerosis, focal cortical dysplasia, hemimegalencephaly, classical lissencephaly, subcortical band heterotopia, periventricular nodular heterotopia, polymicrogyria, and schizencephaly will be presented. PMID:18472484

  7. Chiari I malformations: clinical and radiologic reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Elster, A D; Chen, M Y

    1992-05-01

    Clinical findings and magnetic resonance (MR) images in 68 patients with Chiari I malformations were retrospectively analyzed to identify those radiologic features that correlated best with clinical symptoms. A statistically significant (P = .03) female predominance of the malformation was observed, with a female: male ratio of approximately 3:2. Associated skeletal anomalies were seen in 24% of patients. Syringomyelia was detected in 40% of patients, most commonly between the C-4 and C-6 levels. Of the 25 patients who presented with spinal symptoms, 23 (92%) proved to have a syrinx at MR imaging. When the syrinx extended into the medulla (n = 3), however, brain stem symptoms predominated. Patients with objective brain stem or cerebellar signs had the largest mean tonsillar herniations. Patients with tonsillar herniations greater than 12 mm were invariably symptomatic, but approximately 30% of patients with tonsils herniating 5-10 mm below the foramen magnum were asymptomatic at MR imaging. "Incidental" Chiari I malformations are thus much more common than previously recognized, and careful clinical assessment remains the cornerstone for proper diagnosis and management. PMID:1561334

  8. A case of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis syndrome with epilepsy (Haberland syndrome).

    PubMed

    Zahariev, Zahari Iv; Peycheva, Marieta V; Dobrev, Hristo P

    2009-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by scalp, facial, and ocular lesions and multiple intracranial malformations. Approximately 50 cases have been described in the literature. We report a 34-year-old woman with a 6-year history of epilepsy, without mental retardation, with predominantly ipsilateral skin lesions evident at birth, with limbal lipodermoid of the left eye and multiple non-progressive, ipsilateral intracranial structures of soft, cystic components. The described malformations are congenital, mostly unilaterally located and with similar lipomatous structure. PMID:20232658

  9. Hepatic fibrosis in Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Marcellini, Matilde; Devito, Rita; Capolino, Rossella; Viola, Laura; Digilio, M Cristina

    2004-01-15

    Kabuki (Niikawa-Kuroki) syndrome (KS) is characterized by a distinctive face, mental retardation, growth deficiency, skeletal anomalies, dermatoglyphic abnormalities, palatal anomalies, congenital heart defects, and urogenital malformations. Congenital hepatic abnormalities have been sporadically described in patients with KS from the literature, consisting of extrahepatic biliary atresia, neonatal sclerosing cholangitis, and severe neonatal jaundice. We report here on an additional patient with a congenital abnormality of the liver consisting of hepatic fibrosis. To our knowledge, idiopathic congenital hepatic fibrosis has not been reported in KS. Thus, our observation expands the spectrum of liver malformations found in KS with the inclusion of hepatic fibrosis and supports the evidence that hepatic abnormalities may not be uncommon in KS. Clinician should be advised to search for the specific facial anomalies of KS in patients with syndromic congenital hepatic diseases, and KS should be added to the list of previously recognized multiple congenital anomaly syndromes with hepatic involvement. Due to the frequent association with congenital heart malformations, KS should be considered in the evaluation of patients with neonatal liver disease and cardiac malformation. Due to the expression patterns of Notch genes, involvement of the Notch signaling pathway in the development of heart and liver anomalies in KS should be considered. PMID:14699623

  10. [Cloverleaf skull and other malformations of the skull. Pathology and clinical aspect].

    PubMed

    Gathmann, H A

    1977-01-01

    Malformations of different parts of the cartilage results in achondrogenesis II, thanatophoric dwarfism and in metatropic dwarfism. Whether the base of the skull or the cranial-distal skeleton are affected, both together or separately, depends upon the localization of the defect within the cartilage. The different types of the cloverleaf syndrome are characterised by a defect of vessels and cartilage that affect the chondrocranium and the cranial-distal skeleton in different grades. The mal-development of the vessel-system is particularly marked in the upper back of the calotte. PMID:610339

  11. Lethal pallister-killian syndrome: Phenotypic similarity with fryns syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ignacio Rodriquez, J.; Garcia, I.; Alvarez, J.; Delicado, A.; Palacios, J.

    1994-11-01

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, profound mental retardation, and epilepsy. Chromosomes of peripheral lymphocytes are usually normal, but tissue cultures show varying degrees of mosaicism for isochromosome 12p. In babies who die neonatally of severe malformations, including diaphragmatic hernia, and who also have a {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, and other internal anomalies, Fryns syndrome is more likely to be suspected than Pallister-Killian syndrome, especially if karyotyping is unavailable or if peripheral lumphocytes have a normal chromosome constitution. An initial diagnosis of Fryns syndrome had to be modified in 3 successive newborn infants since chromosome analysis or in situ hybridization with a chromosome 12 probe on kidney tissue demonstrated the mosaic aneuploidy characteristic of Pallister-Killian syndrome. These 3 patients confirm that a similar pattern of malformations can be present in both conditions at birth. It consists of {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and other defects. Newborn infants who present this phenotype, but lack a conclusively normal chromosome test, may not have Fryns syndrome. A diagnosis of Fryns syndrome should be made carefully to avoid the risk of inappropriate genetic counseling. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neurophatic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarly based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients. PMID:20018097

  13. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (Chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment).

    PubMed

    Fernández, Alfredo Avellaneda; Guerrero, Alberto Isla; Martínez, Maravillas Izquierdo; Vázquez, María Eugenia Amado; Fernández, Javier Barrón; Chesa i Octavio, Ester; Labrado, Javier De la Cruz; Silva, Mercedes Escribano; de Araoz, Marta Fernández de Gamboa Fernández; García-Ramos, Rocío; Ribes, Miguel García; Gómez, Carmen; Valdivia, Joaquín Insausti; Valbuena, Ramón Navarro; Ramón, José R

    2009-01-01

    Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neuropathic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarily based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients. PMID:20018097

  14. The diagnostic value of MRI fistulogram and MRI distal colostogram in patients with anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Kavalcova, Lucie; Skaba, Richard; Kyncl, Martin; Rouskova, Blanka; Prochazka, Ales

    2013-08-01

    Contrast fistulogram (FG) and distal pressure colostogram (DPCG) are standard diagnostic methods for the assessment of anorectal malformations. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) earned a place among essential diagnostic methods in preoperative investigations after the Currarino syndrome and a high incidence of associated spinal dysraphism were described. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of substituting FG and DPCG by a modified pelvic MRI, e.g. MRI fistulogram (MRI-FG) and MRI colostogram (MRI-DPCG). The prospective study involved 29 patients with anorectal malformations who underwent a modified pelvic MRI. The length and course of fistulas and rectum, and the presence of sacral anomalies were studied on MRI images and compared with images obtained by radiologic examinations. Modified MRI brought identical results as contrast studies in 25 patients when related to the fistula and rectum length and course. MRI was more accurate for the detection of sacral anomalies. MRI-FG was the only imaging method used in the four most recent patients. The results support the assumption that conventional contrast examinations for the assessment of anorectal malformations can be replaced by MRI, thus reducing the radiation dose. PMID:23932626

  15. Neuro-ophthalmology of type 1 Chiari malformation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Chiari malformation is a congenital deformity leading to herniation of cerebellar tonsils. Headache is a typical symptom of this condition, but patients with Chiari malformation often present with double vision and vertigo. Examination of eye movements in such patients often reveals nystagmus and strabismus. Eye movement deficits in the context of typical symptomatic presentation are critical clinical markers for the diagnosis of Chiari malformation. We will review eye movement deficits that seen in patients with type 1 Chiari malformation. We will then discuss the underlying pathophysiology and therapeutic options for such deficits. PMID:26843890

  16. Somatic Activation of AKT3 Causes Hemispheric Developmental Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Elhosary, Princess Christina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Hills, L. Benjamin; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hill, Anthony; Hill, R. Sean; Barry, Brenda J.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.D.; Riviello, James J.; Barkovich, A. James; Black, Peter M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged, malformed cerebral hemisphere, typically causing epilepsy that requires surgical resection. We studied resected HMG tissue to test whether the condition might reflect somatic mutations affecting genes critical to brain development. We found that 2/8 HMG samples showed trisomy of chromosome 1q, encompassing many genes, including AKT3, which is known to regulate brain size. A third case showed a known activating mutation in AKT3 (c.49G→A, creating p.E17K) that was not present in the patient’s blood cells. Remarkably, the E17K mutation in AKT3 is exactly paralogous to E17K mutations in AKT1 and AKT2 recently discovered in somatic overgrowth syndromes. We show that AKT3 is the most abundant AKT paralogue in brain during neurogenesis and that phosphorylated AKT is abundant in cortical progenitor cells. Our data suggest that somatic mutations limited to brain could represent an important cause of complex neurogenetic disease. PMID:22500628

  17. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z.

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  18. Anorectal Malformations: Finding the Pathway out of the Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Leonor; Meyrat, Blaise J; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Meuli, Reto A; Gudinchet, François

    2013-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) are a complex group of congenital anomalies involving the distal anus and rectum, as well as the urinary and genital tracts in a significant number of cases. Most ARMs result from abnormal development of the urorectal septum in early fetal life. In most cases, the anus is not perforated and the distal enteric component ends blindly (atresia) or as a fistula into the urinary tract, genital tract, or perineum. ARMs are also present in a great number of syndromes and associations of congenital anomalies. The classification of ARMs is mainly based on the position of the rectal pouch relative to the puborectal sling, the presence or absence of fistulas, and the types and locations of the fistulas. All of this information is crucial in determining the most appropriate surgical approach for each case. Imaging studies play a key role in evaluation and classification of ARMs. In neonates, clinical and radiologic examinations in the first 3 days of life help determine the type of ARM and the need for early colostomy. In older children, preoperative pelvic magnetic resonance imaging is the most efficient diagnostic method for evaluating the size, morphology, and grade of development of the sphincteric musculature. PMID:23479709

  19. Congenital malformations and genetic diseases in comic books.

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, A; Adib, S M

    2003-01-01

    Medical syndromes have often been represented in fine arts, but rarely have clinical diagnoses been discussed in comic book characters. Since their first appearance in Europe in the middle of the 19th century and in America in 1895, comic books have been considered as "the 9th art". In many comic books, the appearance and/or the behavior of central or support characters are suggestive of already well-defined medical disorders. The representation of five particular groups or clinical features: mental retardation, abnormal stature, abnormal hair, obesity, and cranial malformations is discussed from mostly European comic series. Whether comic authors intended to describe specific clinical entities while drawing their characters or whether such situations appeared by mere luck, is open to debate. In many series from the first half of the 20th century characters with remarkable clinical features were also painted as psycho-social deviants. Such stereotypes are found much less frequently nowadays. Writers of comic books, realizing the major impact of their work especially in adolescent age groups, have increasingly been using their series to actually promote issues of equity and well being for physically or mentally impaired people. PMID:12725585

  20. A Case of Concurrent Miller-Dieker Syndrome (17p13.3 Deletion) and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Macmurdo, C

    2015-12-01

    Features of Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS, 17p13.3 deletion syndrome, LIS1-associated lissencephaly) include classic lissencephaly, microcephaly, cardiac malformations, growth restriction, and characteristic facial changes. Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome) are known to have congenital cardiac malformations (in particular conotruncal defects), palatal abnormalities (especially velopharyngeal insufficiency), hypocalcemia, immune deficiency, learning disabilities, and characteristic facial features. This case report describes phenotypic characteristics of a patient with extremely rare instance of having both MDS and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that is unique in the medical literature. Prognosis in this concurrent phenotype is poor with our patient suffering from several malformations seen in both conditions and expiring in the neonatal period. PMID:27617133

  1. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    PubMed

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  2. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  3. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  4. Prevalence at birth of congenital malformations in communities near the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Hessol, N.A.; Gilbert, E.S.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of congenital malformations among births in Benton and Franklin counties, in southeastern Washington State, from 1968 through 1980. The Hanford Site is in this area and serves as a major employer. In addition, various agriculturally and chemically related activities are in the area. Hospital and vital records were used to identify 454 malformation cases among 23,319 births; this yielded a malformation rate of 19.6 per 1000 births, a rate similar to those reported in other studies. The rates of specific malformations ascertained during the first year of life were compared with combined rates from the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho from the Birth Defects Monitoring Program. Among defects that would be expected to be comparably ascertained, a statistically significant elevated rate of neural tube defects was observed (1.72 per 1000 births vs. 0.99 per 1000). Rates of cleft lip were significantly lower in Benton and Franklin counties than in the Birth Defects Monitoring Program (0.59 per 1,000 vs. 1.17 per 1000). For congenital heart defects, pyloric stenosis, and Down syndrome, which are often not diagnosed in the newborn period, Birth Defects Monitoring Program data did not offer appropriate comparisons. The rates of these defects did not appear to be elevated in relation to rates found in other relevant populations. When rates of neural tube defects were compared with those in populations other than the Birth Defects Monitoring Program, the Benton and Franklin county rates were still considered to be elevated. The increased bicounty rate cannot be explained by employment of the parents at Hanford or by the impact of plant emissions on the local population.

  5. Congenital malformation and maternal occupational exposure to glycol ethers. Occupational Exposure and Congenital Malformations Working Group.

    PubMed

    Cordier, S; Bergeret, A; Goujard, J; Ha, M C; Aymé, S; Bianchi, F; Calzolari, E; De Walle, H E; Knill-Jones, R; Candela, S; Dale, I; Dananché, B; de Vigan, C; Fevotte, J; Kiel, G; Mandereau, L

    1997-07-01

    Glycol ethers are found in a wide range of domestic and industrial products, many of which are used in women's work environments. Motivated by concern about their potential reproductive toxicity, we have evaluated the risk of congenital malformations related to glycol ether exposure during pregnancy as part of a multicenter case-control study, conducted in six regions in Europe. The study comprised 984 cases of major congenital malformations and 1,134 controls matched for place and date of birth. Interviews of the mothers provided information about occupation during pregnancy, sociodemographic variables, and other potential risk factors (medical history, tobacco, alcohol, drugs). A chemist specializing in glycol ethers evaluated exposure during pregnancy, using the job description given by the mother, without knowledge of case or control status. We classified malformations into 22 subgroups. The overall odds ratio (OR) of congenital malformation associated with glycol ether exposure was 1.44 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.90], after adjustment for several potential confounders. The association with exposure to glycol ethers appeared particularly strong in three subgroups: neural tube defects (OR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.16-3.24), multiple anomalies (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.24-3.23), and cleft lip (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.11-3.73). In this last subgroup, risk, especially of an isolated defect, tended to increase with level of exposure. PMID:9209847

  6. [Early stage of a cloverleaf skull malformation].

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Hori, A; Ulbrich, R; Rath, W

    1982-12-01

    Cloverleaf skull anomaly was diagnosed sonographically and in the fetogram, together with concomitant chondrodystrophy. This resulted in an indication for intentional abortion in the 29th week. Consequently, this rare form of skull monstrosity could be examined pathologico-anatomically for the first time in a very early stage of foetal development. Contrary to the widely held opinion that the reason for such hideous malformation is a hydrocephalus internus due to a deformation of the skull base, we found a practically negligible hydrocephalus, although the cloverleaf skull had already developed in a very marked manner. Hence, this case contradicts the generally adopted formal pathogenetic interpretation of cloverleaf skull monstrosity. PMID:7178767

  7. Oral vascular malformations: laser treatment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Rocchetti, F.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Lo Giudice, G.

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations are a very heterogeneous group of circulatory system's diseases that can involve different kind of vessels: arterial, venous or lymphatic ones. Many treatments, such as conventional surgery, embolization, steroid therapy and laser therapy, are available for vascular lesions. The laser approach relies more therapeutic techniques: the transmucosal thermophotocoagulation, intralesional photocoagulation, the excisional biopsy. Today laser is demonstrated to be the gold standard technique to treat vascular lesions that allows a safe and efficient treatment and a lower post-operative healing time. The only disadvantage is the risk of carbonization that could be avoided by using the multiple-spot single pulsed wave technique.

  8. Pretreatment imaging of peripheral vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joshua B; Cogswell, Petrice M; McKusick, Michael A; Binkovitz, Larry A; Riederer, Stephen J; Young, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations (VMs) are complex and diverse vascular lesions which require individualized pretreatment planning. Pretreatment imaging using various modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging and time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography, is a valuable tool for classifying peripheral VMs to allow proper diagnosis, demonstrate complete extent, identify the nidus, and distinguish between low-flow and high-flow dynamics that determines the treatment approach. We discuss pretreatment imaging findings in four patients with peripheral VMs and how diagnostic imaging helped guide management. PMID:25625123

  9. Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation Masquerating Zoster Sine Herpete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  10. Role of Embolization for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Lavine, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex high-flow lesions that can result in devastating neurological injury when they hemorrhage. Embolization is a critical component in the management of many patients with cerebral AVMs. Embolization may be used as an independent curative therapy or more commonly in an adjuvant fashion prior to either micro- or radiosurgery. Although the treatment-related morbidity and mortality for AVMs—including that due to microsurgery, embolization, and radiosurgery—can be substantial, its natural history offers little solace. Fortunately, care by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the comprehensive management of AVMs can offer excellent results in most cases. PMID:25624978

  11. Toward postnatal reversal of ocular congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Aniridia is a panocular disorder that severely affects vision in early life. Most cases are caused by dominantly inherited mutations or deletions of the PAX6 gene, which encodes a transcription factor that is essential for the development of the eye and the central nervous system. In this issue of the JCI, Gregory-Evans and colleagues demonstrate that early postnatal topical administration of an ataluren-based formulation reverses congenital malformations in the postnatal mouse eye, providing evidence that manipulation of PAX6 after birth may lead to corrective tissue remodeling. These findings offer hope that ataluren administration could be a therapeutic paradigm applicable to some major congenital eye defects. PMID:24355915

  12. Microlissencephaly: a heterogeneous malformation of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Barkovich, A J; Ferriero, D M; Barr, R M; Gressens, P; Dobyns, W B; Truwit, C L; Evrard, P

    1998-06-01

    We report the neonatal courses, early postnatal development, and neuroimaging findings of 17 patients with marked microcephaly and simplified cerebral gyral patterns, a condition that we call microlissencephaly. Retrospective analyses of the clinicoradiologic features of these patients allowed segregation of the patients into 5 distinct groups with varying outcomes. The apparent discreteness of these groups suggests multiple etiologies of this malformation, although there appears to be a strong genetic component with probable autosomal recessive inheritance. Utilizing the neonatal course and neuroradiologic features of these infants allows classification of specific subsets, which may be useful to predict outcome. PMID:9706619

  13. Chiari I malformation: classification and management.

    PubMed

    Bindal, A K; Dunsker, S B; Tew, J M

    1995-12-01

    Considerable debate exists about which surgical options are best for the management of the Chiari I malformation. We present a classification system for the Chiari I malformation that improves the prediction of outcome and guides the selection of surgical treatment. Twenty-seven adult patients with Chiari I malformations were grouped on the basis of the presence of signs and symptoms of brain stem compression, syringomyelia, or both. To objectively assess changes in clinical status postoperatively, a scale was developed to quantify the signs and symptoms, which were statistically analyzed by the paired t test. Five patients were asymptomatic and underwent no treatment. Ten patients had symptoms of brain stem compression without associated syringomyelia and underwent brain stem decompression, including anterior decompression in one patient with basilar invagination; all 10 patients had significant improvement at 4-year mean follow-up visits (P < 0.0001). In 12 patients with syringomyelia, 5 were symptomatic from syringomyelia only, 6 were symptomatic from both brain stem compression and syringomyelia, and 1 was symptomatic from brain stem compression only. The median length of symptoms before presentation was longer for patients with syringomyelia than for patients without (2 yr versus 9 mo; P < 0.025); the mean follow-up was 4 years. Surgical procedures included posterior brain stem decompression in 12 patients, plugging of the obex in 7, and placement of syringosubarachnoid shunts in 7, a syringopleural shunt in 1, and fourth ventricular stents in 2. In the 12 patients with syringomyelia, symptoms from brain stem compression dramatically improved with surgical decompression (P < 0.025), whereas symptoms from syringomyelia less dramatically improved or stabilized. The slight improvement or stabilization of syrinx symptoms represents a successful result, given the documented progressive nature of syringomyelia in this group. We conclude that surgical treatment for

  14. Rieger syndrome: a clinical, molecular, and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Amendt, B A; Semina, E V; Alward, W L

    2000-10-01

    Rieger syndrome (RIEG 1; MIM 180500) is an autosomal dominant disorder of morphogenesis. It is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by malformations of the eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. RIEG belongs to the Axenfeld-Rieger group of anomalies, which includes Axenfeld anomaly and Rieger anomaly (or Rieger eye malformation), which display ocular features only. Recently, mutations in the homeodomain transcription factor, PITX2, have been shown to be associated with Rieger syndrome. This review discusses the clinical manifestations of Rieger syndrome and how they correlate with the current molecular and biochemical studies on this human disorder. PMID:11092457

  15. Joubert syndrome associated with multicystic kidney disease and hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, D M; Zacharowicz, L; Edelman, M; Lee, S C; Greifer, I; Rapin, I

    1997-12-01

    There are several diseases characterized by renal cysts and neurological abnormalities. Joubert syndrome is distinguished by hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, hypotonia, retinal dystrophy characterized by abnormal eye movements, and impaired psychomotor development, together with abnormal respiratory pattern. We describe a boy with Joubert syndrome associated with multicystic renal dysplasia and hepatic fibrosis. We speculate that the association of malformations of the renal and nervous systems in this syndrome and others are not random. Concomitant malformations of these systems are likely based upon their common developmental and genetic features. PMID:9438658

  16. Jarcho-Levin syndrome presenting with diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Onay, O S; Kinik, S T; Otgün, Y; Arda, I S; Varan, B

    2008-08-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylothoracic or spondylocostal dysostosis) is an eponym that is used to define individuals with a short neck, short trunk, and short stature and multiple vertebral anomalies. The prognosis is directly related to respiratory complications. Reported findings associated with Jarcho-Levin syndrome include congenital heart defects, abdominal wall malformations, genitourinary malformations, upper limb anomalies, and neural tube defects. We report on a 6-day-old girl who presented with an incomplete form of Jarcho-Levin syndrome with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital heart disease. PMID:18629769

  17. Association of a Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and a fistula from the coronary to the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, W; Van Nooten, G; Jordaens, L

    1993-01-01

    We report the case history of a 52-year-old man with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and a fistula from the left anterior descending artery to the pulmonary artery. He had a left lateral bypass tract. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this association. Arterial malformations, along with vascular malformations of the coronary sinus, can be present in patients with a WPW syndrome. Coronary angiography with attention to the possible presence of arterial and venous malformations is indicated when atypical symptoms or signs are present in the WPW syndrome. PMID:8447186

  18. Fat embolism after liposuction in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Michael; Durand, Paul; Kundu, Neilendu; Doumit, Gaby

    2013-07-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a rare but potentially fatal postoperative complication from liposuction. We present the case of a 24-year-old woman with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome who developed FES as a complication of lower extremity liposuction. There may be an increased risk of FES in patients with vascular malformations undergoing liposuction. PMID:23851798

  19. Lymphatic and other vascular malformative/overgrowth disorders are caused by somatic mutations in PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    Luks, Valerie L.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Vivero, Matthew P.; Uller, Wibke; Rab, Rashed; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Guevara, Carlos J.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Greene, Arin K.; Fishman, Steven J.; Kozakewich, Harry P.W.; Maclellan, Reid A.; Mulliken, John B.; Rahbar, Reza; Spencer, Samantha A.; Trenor, Cameron C.; Upton, Joseph; Zurakowski, David; Perkins, Jonathan A.; Kirsh, Andrew; Bennett, James T; Dobyns, William B; Kurek, Kyle C.; Warman, Matthew L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Murillo, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that somatic PIK3CA mutations would be found in patients with more common disorders including isolated lymphatic malformation (LM) and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS). Study design We used next generation sequencing, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and single molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) to search for somatic PIK3CA mutations in affected tissue from patients seen at Boston Children’s Hospital who had an isolated LM (n=17), KTS (n=21), fibro-adipose vascular anomaly (FAVA; n=8), or congenital lipomatous overgrowth with vascular, epidermal, and skeletal anomalies syndrome (CLOVES; n = 33), the disorder for which we first identified somatic PIK3CA mutations. We also screened 5 of the more common PIK3CA mutations in a second cohort of patients with LM (n=31) from Seattle Children’s Hospital. Results Most individuals from Boston Children’s Hospital who had isolated LM (16/17) or LM as part of a syndrome, such as KTS (19/21), FAVA (4/8), and CLOVES (30/32) were somatic mosaic for PIK3CA mutations, with 5 specific PIK3CA mutations accounting for ~ 80% of cases. Seventy-four percent of patients with LM from Seattle Children’s Hospital also were somatic mosaic for 1 of 5 specific PIK3CA mutations. Many affected tissue specimens from both cohorts contained fewer than 10% mutant cells. Conclusions Somatic PIK3CA mutations are the most common cause of isolated lymphatic malformations and disorders in which lymphatic malformation is a component feature. Five PIK3CA mutations account for most cases. The search for causal mutations requires sampling of affected tissues and techniques that are capable of detecting low-level somatic mosaicism, because the abundance of mutant cells in a malformed tissue can be low. PMID:25681199

  20. Unilateral, Linear Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome (Bean's syndrome): An Unfamiliar Presentation: First Case from India

    PubMed Central

    Sancheti, Karan; Podder, Indrashis; Das, Anupam; Choudhury, Sourav; Chandra, Somodyuti; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) also called Bean's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple cutaneous venous malformations in association with visceral lesions, most commonly affecting the gastrointestinal tract. We report here, a 21-year-old woman patient, who presented with unilateral, blaschkoid distribution of cutaneous venous malformations along with blue rubber bleb nevus and recurrent episodes of hematochezia due to vascular lesions in the sigmoid colon; likely to be a case of BRBNS. The unusual unilateral, blaschkoid distribution of BRBNS prompted this present report. PMID:26677281

  1. Embryonic development and malformation of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Wilting, Jörg; Buttler, Kerstin; Rössler, Jochen; Norgall, Susanne; Schweigerer, Lothar; Weich, Herbert A; Papoutsi, Maria

    2007-01-01

    In the human, malformations of lymphatic vessels can be observed as lymphangiectasia, lymphangioma and lymphangiomatosis, with a prevalence of 1.2-2.8 per thousand. Their aetiology is unknown and a causal therapy does not exist. We investigated the origin of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in avian and murine embryos, and compared the molecular profile of LECs from normal and malformed lymphatics of children. In avian embryos, Prox1+ lymphangioblasts are located in the confluence of the cranial and caudal cardinal veins, where the jugular lymph sac (JLS) forms. Cell lineage studies show that the JLS is of venous origin. In contrast, the lymphatics of the dermis are derived from mesenchymal lymphangioblasts located in the dermatomes, suggesting a dual origin of LECs in avian embryos. The same may hold true for murine embryos, where Lyve1+ LEC precursors are found in the cardinal veins, and in the mesenchyme. The mesenchymal cells express the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, indicating a cell type with lymphendothelial and leukocyte characteristics. In the human, such cells might give rise to Kaposi's sarcoma. Microarray analyses of LECs from lymphangiomas of children show a large number of regulated genes, such as VEGFR3. Our studies show that lymphvasculogenesis and lymphangiogenesis occur simultaneously in the embryo, and suggest a function for VEGFR3 in lymphangiomas. PMID:18300425

  2. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity. PMID:26757792

  3. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Lim, Dong-Jun; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  4. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  5. Combined neuroradiological and neurosurgical treatment of intracerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Adelt, D; Brückmann, H; Krenkel, W; Hacke, W; Zeumer, H

    1988-07-01

    Four patients with intracerebral vascular malformations underwent preoperative butylcyanoacrylate embolization via a calibrated leak catheter, in order to reduce the risks of surgery alone. In three cases the malformation was removed without causing neurological deficits. One patient died later from recurrent bleeding. PMID:3171616

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate Associated with Other Malformations in a Neotropical Primate (Saimiri ustus)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Beatriz; Lopes, Claudia AA; Moura, Marina; Nogueira, Denise M; Gonçalves, Miguel AB; Fasano, Daniele M; Andrade, Marcia CR; Nascimento, Laine WF; Marinho, Antonio M

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) has been documented in several species of nonhuman primates, which in general are susceptible at similar doses and stages of gestation to the same teratogens as humans. Cleft lip can be unilateral or bilateral, isolated, syndromic, familial, or genetic. Here we report the first case of syndromic cleft lip and palate in a male bare-eared squirrel monkey (Saimiri ustus). Associated with the orofacial clefts, the monkey manifested absence of bones, malformation of vertebrae L3, only 4 fingers in each hand, and shortening of tendons leading to inflection of the hands and fingers. Previous reports describing cleft lip and palate in other squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in other breeding units have suggested consanguineous mating as a possible cause. Although the etiology in the case we present is unknown, we discuss factors associated with orofacial clefts in humans and various nonhuman primates. PMID:20587169

  7. Phenotypic subregions within the split-hand/foot malformation 1 locus.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Malene B; Kreiborg, Sven; Jensen, Per; Bak, Mads; Mang, Yuan; Lodahl, Marianne; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Tommerup, Niels; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2016-03-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation 1 (SHFM1) is caused by chromosomal aberrations involving the region 7q21.3, DLX5 mutation, and dysregulation of DLX5/DLX6 expression by long-range position effects. SHFM1 can be isolated or syndromic with incomplete penetrance and a highly variable clinical expression, possibly influenced by sex and imprinting. We report on a new family with five affected individuals with syndromic SHFM1 that includes split-hand/foot malformations, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, and an inv(7)(q21.3q35) present both in the proband and her affected son. The proximal inversion breakpoint, identified by next generation mate-pair sequencing, truncates the SHFM1 locus within the regulatory region of DLX5/6 expression. Through genotype-phenotype correlations of 100 patients with molecularly characterized chromosomal aberrations from 32 SHFM1 families, our findings suggest three phenotypic subregions within the SHFM1 locus associated with (1) isolated SHFM, (2) SHFM and hearing loss, and (3) SHFM, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, respectively (ranked for increasing proximity to DLX5/6), and encompassing previously reported tissue-specific enhancers for DLX5/6. This uniquely well-characterized cohort of SHFM1 patients allowed us to systematically analyze the recently suggested hypothesis of skewed transmission and to confirm a higher penetrance in males vs. females in a subgroup of patients with isolated SHFM. PMID:26839112

  8. Chiari Type I malformation and syringomyelia in unrelated patients with blepharophimosis. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Paquis, P; Lonjon, M; Brunet, M; Lambert, J C; Grellier, P

    1998-11-01

    Syringomyelia is a rare, mainly sporadic disease of the spinal cord, which is associated with 80% of cases in which a Chiari Type I malformation is also present. A mendelian transmission of syringomyelia (autosomal dominant or recessive) has been proposed in approximately 2% of reported cases. The association of syringomyelia with hereditary diseases (Noonan's syndrome, phacomatoses) has been mentioned frequently in the literature. The authors report the presence of a Chiari Type I malformation accompanied by syringomyelia in two unrelated patients affected by a familial Type II blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES). The first patient was a 35-year-old woman who presented with a right C-8 root paresia. The second case involved a 20-year-old man who complained of cervical radicular pain. Both belong to families in which BPES was segregated in an autosomal dominant modality, but other family members had no known neurological symptoms. To the authors' knowledge, such a combination has never been described. Perhaps the possible involvement of a genetic component in some cases of Chiari Type I-associated syringomyelia will someday be debated. PMID:9817424

  9. Congenital malformations in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) at Takasakiyama.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru; Kurita, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Kimoto, Satoshi; Egawa, Junko

    2014-04-01

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, many congenitally malformed infants were born into provisioned Japanese macaque troops. Although the exact cause of this problem was not determined, the occurrence of malformations decreased thereafter. We examined possible factors such as total population size, number of adult females, birth rate, and volume of provisioned food. Agrichemicals attached to provisioned food are suspected as the main cause, as other factors were found to have no influence. Many more malformations were seen in males compared with females, in feet compared with hands, and in the fourth compared with other digits. We confirmed that the frequency of congenital malformation was high during the 1960s through to the mid-1970s when increased levels of provisioned food were given and that the incidence of congenital malformations was also elevated among wild macaques during this time. PMID:24474604

  10. Anaesthetic Management for Cataract Surgery in VACTERL Syndrome Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khatavkar, Sonal S; Jagtap, S R

    2009-01-01

    Summary Eight year old girl, weighing 14 kg with VACTERL syndrome V: Vertebral anomalies, A: Anal malformation, C: Cardiovascular defect, TE: Tracheal and esophageal malformation, R: Renal agenesis, L: Limb anomalies. underwent cataract surgery under general anaesthesia. She had multiple congenital anomalies like esophageal atresia, imperforate anus (corrected), single kidney & radial aplasia. Anticipating problems of gastro-esophageal reflux & chronic renal failure, successful management was done. PMID:20640087

  11. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, Y; Aoki, K; Hasegawa, T

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. PMID:9880644

  12. Management of Femoral Shaft Fracture in Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogendra; Jha, Ranjib Kumar; Karn, Navin Kumar; Sah, Sanjaya Kumar; Mishra, Bibhuti Nath; Bhattarai, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare complex malformation characterized by the clinical triad of capillary malformations, soft tissue and bone hypertrophy, and venous/lymphatic malformation. Fractures of long bones in such cases are challenging to treat. A 12-year-old female with this syndrome presented with femoral shaft fracture of right thigh. She was initially kept on skeletal traction for two weeks and then she underwent closed reduction and immobilization with external fixator with uneventful intraoperative and postoperative period. Fracture united at four and half months. PMID:26885423

  13. Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss, part 2: syndromic and acquired causes.

    PubMed

    Huang, B Y; Zdanski, C; Castillo, M

    2012-03-01

    This article is the second in a 2-part series reviewing neuroimaging in childhood SNHL. Previously, we discussed the clinical work-up of children with hearing impairment, the classification of inner ear malformations, and congenital nonsyndromic causes of hearing loss. Here, we review and illustrate the most common syndromic hereditary and acquired causes of childhood SNHL, with an emphasis on entities that demonstrate inner ear abnormalities on cross-sectional imaging. Syndromes discussed include BOR syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Pendred syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, and X-linked hearing loss with stapes gusher. We conclude the article with a review of acquired causes of childhood SNHL, including infections, trauma, and neoplasms. PMID:21596810

  14. MOEBIUS SYNDROME: CHALLENGES OF AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Budić, Ivana; Šurdilović, Dušan; Slavković, Anđelka; Marjanović, Vesna; Stević, Marija; Simić, Dušica

    2016-03-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes. PMID:27276780

  15. Generalized overgrowth syndromes with prenatal onset.

    PubMed

    Yachelevich, Naomi

    2015-04-01

    Children with generalized overgrowth syndromes are large at birth, or have excessive postnatal growth. Many of these syndromes are associated with an increase in neoplasia. Consideration of the possibility of overgrowth syndrome in a pediatric patient who presents with increased growth parameters, variable malformations and neurodevelopmental phenotype, and distinctive features, is important for medical management, reproductive counseling, and tumor surveillance for some of the disorders. This review describes the clinical features and surveillance recommendations for the common generalized overgrowth syndromes the pediatrician may encounter. It also provides a glimpse into advances of recent years in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disrupted growth regulation in these disorders. PMID:25861999

  16. Sturge-Weber syndrome - A case report.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Shahid M; Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), also called as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis is an uncommon congenital neurological disorder & frequent among the neurocutaneous syndromes specifically with vascular predominance. This disorder is characterized by facial capillary malformation & other neurological condition. The oral manifestations are gingival hemangiomatosis restricting to either side in upper and lower jaw, sometimes bilateral. We report a case of SWS with oral, ocular and neurological features. PMID:25853049

  17. Craniofacial malformation among endemic cretins in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Israel, H; Johnson, G F; Fierro-Benitez, R

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 6% of the inhabitants of two villages in Ecuador are deaf-mute and mentally retarded cretins. These communities are situated in the Andean highlands where environmental and dietary stores of iodine are extremely scarce. Endemic goiter and cretinism are widespread, and 10% of the cretins are additionally burdened with dwarfism and facial dysmorphia. Those with obvious involvement of the skeletal system were selected in order to study the extent of craniofacial malformation. Their appearance is characterized by midface hypoplasia, a broad nose with a depressed bridge, and a conspicuous circumoral prominence. Radiographic evaluation demonstrates a vertical displacement of the cranial base with an associated upward tilt of the midface. The flattened frontal bone, reduced frontal sinus pneumatization, and diminutive nasal bones collectively create a backward sloping face. The defect in the craniofacial skeleton of these Ecuadorian cretins is characteristic, and it readily sets them apart from the dysmorphism of those cretins with myxedema. PMID:6874895

  18. CT of thrombosed arteriovenous malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Pinto, R.S.; Lin, J.P.; Rose, H.; Lieberman, A.

    1984-02-01

    Thrombosed arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children are rare lesions that may present with headaches or a seizure disorder. Thirteen patients (4 months to 21 years of age) with this lesion were examined with computed tomography (CT). In 11 patients surgical confirmation was obtained, and the other two patients were examined with follow-up CT scans. Angiography either showed an avascular mass (7/13) or was negative (6/13). CT showed a lobulated lesion (8/13), peripheral location (11/13), and minimal surrounding edema (8/13). All of the lesions were hyperdense prior to the administration of contrast material and all enhanced either slightly or not at all following contrast material administration. It is concluded that these characteristic CT features aid in making the diagnosis of thrombosed AVM. The major differential diagnosis is small intracerebral neoplasm.

  19. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  20. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding. PMID:24481819

  1. Benign Vascular Malformation at the Ischial Tuberosity.

    PubMed

    Said, Rami; Bevelaqua, Anna-Christina

    2016-07-01

    A 31-year-old female student was referred to physical therapy with a chief complaint of proximal, posterior left thigh pain that began insidiously 12 months prior, and progressively worsened while training for a half-marathon. A mobile, soft mass was identified just inferior to the ischial tuberosity that was tender and painful to palpation, recreating the patient's chief complaint. Radiographic findings were negative for a suspected avulsion fracture at the ischial tuberosity. Therefore, the physician performed musculoskeletal ultrasonography, which revealed a superficial hypoechoic mass with vascular flow. Magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent biopsy led to the diagnosis of a benign vascular malformation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):607. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0410. PMID:27363574

  2. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  3. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  4. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    PubMed

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  5. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Barwad, Parag; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Gupta, Saurabh K; Juneja, Rajnish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Jagia, Priya; Sharma, Sanjiv

    2013-01-01

    Background: Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs) are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs). Aims: To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods: All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. Results: A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33%) were AVP type I and 23 (59%) were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (n = 7), aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7), closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5), systemic AVM (n = 5), coronary AVM (n = 4), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (n = 3), pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3), and venovenous collaterals (n = 2). Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 – 7F Judkin's right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. Conclusions: AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow. PMID:24688229

  6. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended. PMID:24407715

  7. Maternal Hypothyroidism in Early Pregnancy and Infant Structural Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Norstedt Wikner, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Background. The question is debated on whether maternal hypothyroidism or use of thyroxin in early pregnancy affects the risk for infant congenital malformations. Objectives. To expand the previously published study on maternal thyroxin use in early pregnancy and the risk for congenital malformations. Methods. Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register were used for the years 1996–2011 and infant malformations were identified from national health registers. Women with preexisting diabetes or reporting the use of thyreostatics, anticonvulsants, or antihypertensives were excluded from analysis. Risk estimates were made as odds ratios (ORs) or risk ratios (RRs) after adjustment for year of delivery, maternal age, parity, smoking, and body mass index. Results. Among 23 259 infants whose mothers in early pregnancy used thyroxin, 730 had a major malformation; among all 1 567 736 infants, 48012 had such malformations. The adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI 0.98–1.14). For anal atresia the RR was 1.85 (95% CI 1.00–1.85) and for choanal atresia 3.14 (95% CI 1.26–6.47). The risk of some other malformations was also increased but statistical significance was not reached. Conclusions. Treated maternal hypothyroidism may be a weak risk factor for infant congenital malformations but an association with a few rare conditions is possible. PMID:24744955

  8. Neurosurgical management of congenital malformations of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Maher, Cormac O

    2011-08-01

    Congenital malformations encompass a diverse group of disorders that often present at birth, either as the result of genetic abnormalities, infection, errors of morphogenesis, or abnormalities in the intrauterine environment. Congenital disorders affecting the brain are now often diagnosed before delivery with the use of prenatal ultrasonography. Over the past several decades, there have been major advances in the understanding and management of these conditions. This review focuses on the most common cranial congenital malformations, limiting the discussion to the neurosurgically relevant aspects of arachnoid cysts, pineal cysts, Chiari malformations, and encephaloceles. PMID:21807319

  9. PHACE syndrome and congenitally absent thyroid gland at MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Mark D; Yu, John-Paul J; Asch, Sarah; Mathes, Erin F

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and abnormalities of the eye. Thyroid disorders associated with PHACE syndrome have been described, although there are limited reports of this rare occurrence. We report a case of PHACE syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism in an infant, for which absent thyroid gland was diagnosed at magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26995578

  10. US and MRI features in venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, F.; Maira, A.; Tarantino, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are classified as vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Venous vascular malformations are the most common type of vascular malformation. They may be isolated or multiple and they rarely affect the trunk. The authors report a rare case of isolated venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall with an emphasis on the related MRI and ultrasound (US) features. PMID:23450707

  11. Caudal duplication syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Shoaib; Ali, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Complete duplication of genitourinary system, colon and vertebral column is a very rare and complex congenital condition termed as "caudal duplication syndrome" with variable presentations. This term is often quoted as a type of incomplete separation of mono-ovular twins or conjoined twinning. It is associated with other congenital malformations of the genitourinary, gastrointestinal and other organ systems. The hereby reported case, a 3-month-old male infant had presented with the classical form of the disease i.e., duplication of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary system and vertebral column with anterior abdominal wall hernia and a large lipomeningocele. PMID:24411548

  12. MALLEABLE INSPECTION STATION WHERE WORKERS ELIMINATE MALFORMED CASTINGS AND SEPARATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE INSPECTION STATION WHERE WORKERS ELIMINATE MALFORMED CASTINGS AND SEPARATED GOOD CASTINGS PRIOR TO ANNEALING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  14. Genetics Home Reference: multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations

    MedlinePlus

    ... These abnormal blood vessels show a deficiency of smooth muscle cells while endothelial cells are maintained. Venous malformations cause lesions below the surface of the skin or mucous membranes, which are ...

  15. Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis presenting with sturge-weber syndrome and klippel-trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sumit; Bala, Sanchaita; Halder, Chinmay; Ahar, Rahul; Gangopadhyay, Anusree

    2015-01-01

    Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis (PPV) is a rare cutaneous disorder characterized by combination of capillary malformation and other pigmented naevi. Four types and two subtypes have been described where subtype 'a' present only with cutaneous form and subtype 'b' also with systemic association like in Sturge-Weber syndrome or Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Hereby, we report a case where our patient presented with port-wine stain, Nevus of Ota, Sturge-Weber syndrome, and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome; which has made it a rare combination. PMID:25657402

  16. Early Recognition of Proteus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodenbeck, Dorothy L; Greyling, Laura A; Anderson, John H; Davis, Loretta S

    2016-09-01

    Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare mosaic condition characterized by progressive overgrowth of tissues due to a somatic activating mutation of the AKT1 gene. Distinct cutaneous features, including cerebriform connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, vascular malformations, and adipose abnormalities, can alert the dermatologist to the underlying condition before the onset of asymmetric skeletal overgrowth. We present a series of photographs documenting the skin and musculoskeletal changes in a patient with Proteus syndrome over the first 2 years of life to emphasize the key signs that a dermatologist can recognize to facilitate an earlier diagnosis in these patients. PMID:27378680

  17. Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Verma, S B; Vasani, R

    2016-07-01

    Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome (SBS) is a subtype of pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma (PKS), which is associated with congenital arteriovenous malformation. It is a rare syndrome, characterized by cutaneous lesions with onset in the second decade of life. We report a case of SBS in a 33-year-old man presenting with a 15-year history of unilateral, reddish-brown, raised lesions on his right lower leg and the dorsum of his foot. Diagnosis of PKS was confirmed by histopathology and radiology. We report the clinical features, aetiopathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment of this rare condition. PMID:27273760

  18. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  19. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Parakh, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a morbid condition associated with complications such as hemoptysis, right heart failure, paradoxical embolism, and even death. There is no known association of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Possible hypothesis for this association is an increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to the compensatory formation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We present one such case presenting with hemoptysis that was managed with endovascular treatment. PMID:27413264

  20. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  1. Oral encapsulated vascular malformation: An undescribed presentation in the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Márcio-Américo; Dias, Pedro-de Souza; Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2016-01-01

    Vascular lesions have been classified in two broad categories, hemangiomas and malformations. Encapsulated vascular lesions have not been reported in the oral cavity, but they were described in other sites, mainly in the orbit. Herein, we present a case of an oral encapsulated vascular lesion located in the right buccal mucosa of a 69-year-old male, including histological and immunohistochemical description and a literature review. Key words:Buccal mucosa, hemangioma, vascular malformation, oral cavity. PMID:26855712

  2. Sincipital Encephaloceles: A Study of Associated Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Shashidhar Vedavyas; Dutta, Hemonta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the associated intracranial malformations in patients with sincipital encephaloceles. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted over 8 years from June 2007 to May 2015 on 28 patients. The patients were evaluated by either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging whichever was feasible. Encephaloceles were described with respect to their types, contents, and extensions. A note was made on the associated malformations with sincipital encephaloceles. Results: Fifty percent of the patients presented before the age of 3 years and both the sexes were affected equally. Nasofrontal encephalocele was the most common type seen in 13 patients (46.4%), and corpus callosal agenesis (12 patients) was the most common associated malformation. Other malformations noted were arachnoid cyst (10 patients), hydrocephalus (7 patients), and agyria-pachygyria complex (2 patients). Conclusion: Capital Brain malformations are frequently encountered in children with sincipital encephaloceles. Detail radiological evaluation is necessary to plan treatment and also to prognosticate such rare malformations. PMID:27313974

  3. Eye malformations in Cameroonian children: a clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Eballé, André Omgbwa; Ellong, Augustin; Koki, Godefroy; Nanfack, Ngoune Chantal; Dohvoma, Viola Andin; Mvogo, Côme Ebana

    2012-01-01

    Summary The aim of this work was to describe the clinical aspects of eye malformations observed at the ophthalmology unit of the Yaoundé Gynaecology, Obstetrics and Pediatrics Hospital. Patients and methods We carried out a retrospective study of all malformations of the eye and its adnexae observed among children aged 0–5 years who were seen at the ophthalmology unit from January 2003 to December 2009. Results Out of the 2254 children who were examined, 150 (6.65%) presented eye malformations. The mean age was 14.40 ± 4 months. Eye malformations were diagnosed in 71.66% of cases during the first year of life. The most frequent malformations were congenital lacrimal duct obstruction (66.66%), congenital cataract (10.9%), congenital glaucoma (10.9%), microphthalmos (5.03%), and congenital ptosis (3.77%). Conclusion Eye malformations among children can lead to visual impairment and are a cause for discomfort to children and parents. Therefore, systematic postnatal screening is recommended to enable early management. PMID:23055685

  4. Giant cystic cerebral cavernous malformation with multiple calcification - case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Chun; Kwon, Ki-Young; Rhee, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong-Won; Hur, Jin-Woo; Lee, Hyun-Koo

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation with giant cysts is rare and literature descriptions of its clinical features are few. In this case study, the authors describe the clinical symptoms, radiological findings, and pathological diagnosis of cerebral cavernous malformations with giant cysts, reviewing the relevant literature to clearly differentiate this from other disease entities. The authors present a case of a 19-year-old male with a giant cystic cavernous malformation, who was referred to the division of neurosurgery due to right sided motor weakness (grade II/II). Imaging revealed a large homogenous cystic mass, 7.2×4.6×6 cm in size, in the left fronto-parietal lobe and basal ganglia. The mass had an intra-cystic lesion, abutting the basal portion of the mass. The initial diagnosis considered this mass a glioma or infection. A left frontal craniotomy was performed, followed by a transcortical approach to resect the mass. Total removal was accomplished without post-operative complications. An open biopsy and a histopathological exam diagnosed the mass as a giant cystic cavernous malformation. Imaging appearances of giant cavernous malformations may vary. The clinical features, radiological features, and management of giant cavernous malformations are described based on pertinent literature review. PMID:24167810

  5. 576 kb deletion in 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI is associated with limb malformation, congenital heart disease and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-Fu; Yang, Yi-Feng; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-10

    1p36 deletion (monosomy 1p36) is one of the most common terminal deletions observed in humans, characterized by special facial features, mental retardation, heart defects, development delay and epilepsy. Previously, we reported molecular findings in patients with limb, congenital heart disease (CHD) and other malformations with SNP-array. In a syndromic patient of the same cohort, we detected a small deletion of 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI (Sloan-Kettering Institute protooncoprotein). Recently, dominant mutations in SKI were identified to be correlated with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. Retrospective examination revealed this patient with limb malformations, CHD, epilepsy and mild development delay. Together with previous reports, our study suggests that the 1p36.33-1p36.32 deletion encompassing SKI may represents a previous undescribed microdeletion disorder. PMID:23892090

  6. Partial tetrasomy 14 associated with multiple malformations.

    PubMed

    Winberg, Johanna; Lagerstedt Robinson, Kristina; Naess, Karin; Lesko, Nicole; Wibom, Rolf; Liedén, Agne; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Graff, Caroline; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Nordgren, Ann; Gustavsson, Peter

    2013-06-01

    We report on an 8-year-old female patient with multiple malformations including bilateral cleft lip and palate, coloboma, and craniosynostosis. She presented with severe intellectual disability, seizures, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. Mitochondrial investigations in a muscle biopsy revealed reduced activity in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Chromosome analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies showed an isodicentric marker chromosome 14 that was identified in all cells analyzed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts. Parental chromosome studies were normal. To further characterize the marker chromosome and determine its origin, we performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and polymorphic marker analysis with quantitative fluorescent PCR (QF-PCR). The combined results from cytogenetic and array-CGH analyses showed tetrasomy 14p13q13.1 and results from the QF-PCR point to formation of the marker chromosome in the maternal meiosis. Isodicentric chromosomes involving partial 14q have previously been reported in four cases; however, this is the first patient with tetrasomy 14p13q13.1 in non-mosaic form surviving beyond infancy. PMID:23613323

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-07-28

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  8. [Urinary tract abnormalities associated with anorectal malformations].

    PubMed

    Tohda, A; Hosokawa, S; Shimada, K

    1995-08-01

    Anorectal malformation (ARM) is often associated with urological problems such as congenital urogenital anomalies, recto-urinary fistula, neurogenic bladder due to vertebral anomalies and operative complications. We analyzed 57 cases of ARM and discussed about the management of associated urogenital anomalies during neonatal and infantile period. The incidence of urogenital anomalies was 85.7% in high type, 65.5% in intermediate type and 38.1% in low type. Among these urinary tract anomalies, VUR was most common and was documented in 38.6% of ARM patients. Renal dysplasia, PUJ stenosis, megaureter and urethral stenosis was also common in these patients. Renal dysfunction was documented in 5 cases (2 in high type, 2 in intermediate and 1 in low type), mainly due to VUR and renal aplasia. These results show the need for evaluation of urinary tract during the neonatal and early infantile period even in low type ARM. The management of urinary tract anomalies associated with ARM is firmly related with the management of ARM itself, and we must be closely in co-operation with pediatric surgeons. PMID:7474624

  9. Management and outcome of low anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Mikko P; Rintala, Risto J

    2010-11-01

    Low anorectal malformation comprises about half of all anorectal anomalies. Most of the literature concerning management of anorectal anomalies is centred around the treatment and outcome of high anomalies. The management of low anomalies has been considered significantly less challenging than high anomalies. Also, the outcome of low anomalies has traditionally been considered good. However, recent more critical long-term follow-up reports show a different picture. Many patients with low anomalies suffer from long-term anorectal functional problems, especially constipation but also soiling that occurs in a significant percentage of patients. In this review, we compile the recent views on the diagnosis, surgical treatment and outcome of low anorectal anomalies. We also present an algorithm for the management of these anomalies. The emphasis on the surgical management of low anorectal anomalies is to use as minimally invasive operative methods as possible and preserve the native mechanisms of continence that usually are much better preserved than in more severe high anomalies. PMID:20845044

  10. Implications of an Incidental Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Van K.; Shah, Nirav G.; Verceles, Avelino C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have been associated with life-threatening complications, such as stroke and massive hemoptysis, thus posing significant morbidity if left untreated. We report a case of an incidental finding of a PAVM in a trauma patient newly recognized to have suspected hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case Description. A 34-year-old man with a history of recurrent epistaxis presented with a sudden fall associated with seizure-like activity. Trauma imaging showed a large subdural hematoma and, incidentally, a serpiginous focus within the right upper lobe with a prominent feeding artery consistent with a PAVM. The patient was diagnosed with a simple PAVM related to possible or suspected HHT, an autosomal dominant trait with age-related penetrance. He underwent a pulmonary arteriography of the right upper and lower lobe with the use of a microcatheter system; however, the PAVM could not be visualized. Thus, he was managed medically. The patient was educated on the need for prophylactic antibiotics prior to dental procedures and surveillance imaging. Discussion. Our case highlights the importance of obtaining a complete past medical and family history in young patients with a history of recurrent epistaxis to elicit features of HHT. The diagnosis can be made clinically and directly affects family members, who would otherwise not receive appropriate screening. PMID:27027094

  11. [Stereotactically targeted radiotherapy of cerebral arteriovenous malformations].

    PubMed

    Kimmig, B; Engenhart, R; Wowra, B; Höver, K H; Marin-Grez, M; Sturm, V

    1989-09-01

    A report is given about radiotherapy in 41 patients suffering from cerebral vessel anomalies. A modified linear accelerator was used in a moving field technique with multiple pendulum planes to apply single doses between 8 and 28 Gy by means of stereotaxis into the angiographically determined target volume. The medium follow-up is 23 months. The latency of radiogenic effects is between one and two years. Radiological controls with an interval of more than 18 months after therapy are available in 17 out of 41 patients. Angiographic investigation showed complete obliterations of pathological vessels in six out of these patients and partial obliterations in six patients; five patients remained unchanged. There were no acute complications. Seven patients presented neurological deficiencies with a latency of 6 to 12 months, however, in all cases but one they regressed completely. Even taking into consideration the small number of patients and the short time of observation, a comparison with the results of other radiotherapeutical proceedings allows to draw the conclusion that the presented technique of stereotaxic convergent-beam irradiation represents a relatively simple, reliable and, in case of precise indication, efficient method for the therapy of cerebral arteriovenous malformations. PMID:2678547

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Maziyar A; Choudhri, Omar; Gibbs, Iris C; Soltys, Scott G; Adler, John R; Thompson, Patricia A; Tayag, Armine T; Samos, Cindy H; Chang, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare lesions associated with recurrent hemorrhage and progressive ischemia. Occasionally a favorable location, size or vascular anatomy may allow management with endovascular embolization and/or microsurgical resection. For most, however, there is no good treatment option. Between 1997 and 2014, we treated 37 patients (19 females, 18 males, median age 30years) at our institution diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord AVM (19 cervical, 12 thoracic, and six conus medullaris) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) stereotactic radiosurgery. A history of hemorrhage was present in 50% of patients. The mean AVM volume of 2.3cc was treated with a mean marginal dose of 20.5Gy in a median of two sessions. Clinical and MRI follow-up were carried out annually, and spinal angiography was repeated at 3years. We report an overall obliteration rate of 19% without any post-treatment hemorrhagic events. In those AVM that did not undergo obliteration, significant volume reduction was noted at 3years. Although the treatment paradigm for spinal cord AVM continues to evolve, radiosurgical treatment is capable of safely obliterating or significantly shrinking most intramedullary spinal cord AVM. PMID:26869363

  13. Psychosocial adjustment and craniofacial malformations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pertschuk, M J; Whitaker, L A

    1985-02-01

    Forty-three children between the ages of 6 and 13 years with congenital facial anomalies underwent psychosocial evaluation prior to surgery. Also evaluated were healthy children matched to the craniofacial subjects by sex, age, intelligence, and economic background. Relative to this comparison group, the craniofacial children were found to have poorer self-concept, greater anxiety at the time of evaluation, and more introversion. Parents of the craniofacial children noted more frequent negative social encounters for their children and more hyperactive behavior at home. Teachers reported more problematic classroom behavior. Examination of these results revealed craniofacial malformations to be associated with psychosocial limitations rather than marked deficits. These children tended to function less well than the comparison children, but with few exceptions, they were not functioning in a psychosocially deviant range. Explanations for the observed circumscribed impact of facial deformity include the use of denial as a coping mechanism, possible diminished significance of appearance for younger children, and the restricted environment experienced by most of the subjects. It can be predicted that time would render these protective influences ineffective, so that adolescent and young adult patients could be at far greater psychosocial risk. PMID:3969404

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  15. Arteriovenous malformation of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adam; Tsuji, Masao; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Hanabusa, Kenichiro; Ukita, Tohru; Miyake, Hiroji; Ohmura, Takehisa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embedded in the vestibulocochlear nerve presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated by microsurgical elimination of the main feeding artery and partial nidus volume reduction with no permanent deficits. This 70-year-old woman was incidentally diagnosed 4 years previously with two small unruptured tandem aneurysms (ANs) on the right anterior inferior cerebral artery feeding a small right cerebellopontine angle AVM. The patient was followed conservatively until she developed sudden headache, nausea and vomiting and presented to our outpatient clinic after several days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated findings suggestive of early subacute SAH in the quadrigeminal cistern. A microsurgical flow reduction technique via clipping between the two ANs and partial electrocoagulation of the nidus buried within the eighth cranial nerve provided radiographical devascularization of the ANs with residual AVM shunt flow and no major deficits during the 2.5 year follow-up. This is only the second report of an auditory nerve AVM. In the event of recurrence, reoperation or application of alternative therapies may be considered. PMID:26244159

  16. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe. PMID:26636249

  17. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-01

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory. PMID:10321255

  18. [Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency and cerebral malformations].

    PubMed

    Eirís, J; Alvarez-Moreno, A; Briones, P; Alonso-Alonso, C; Castro-Gago, M

    1996-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a major cause of primary lactic acidosis and severe global developmental delay. A deficiency of PDH E1 alpha, a subunit of the PDH complex is a prominent cause of congenital lactic acidosis. The E1 alpha cDNA and corresponding genomic DNA have been located in the short arm of the X-chromosome (Xp22-1). A isolated 'cerebral' lactic acidosis with cerebral dysgenesis is a recognized pattern of presentation of PDH deficiency. Here, we report clinical features, magnetic resonance, and biochemical studies of two females aged 6 months (case 1) and 26 months (case 2). Both had severe development delay, minor dysmorphic features, microcephaly, severe hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebral atrophy, ventricular dilatation and increase in serum lactate levels without systemic acidosis. Urinary organic acid profile was compatible with PDH deficiency. Increased CSF lactate and pyruvate levels and reduced total PDH and PDH E1 activities in muscle and fibroblasts were observed in case 1. Otherwise, decreased total PDH activity in muscle but not in fibroblasts was seen in case 2. The PDH E1á gene was sequenced in the case 1 and a deletion in exon 7 was demonstrated. Dysmorphism with severe cerebral malformations in female patients merits a metabolic evaluation, including determination of lactate and pyruvate levels in CSF. PMID:8983728

  19. Association of Wolfram syndrome with Fallot tetralogy in a girl.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin A; Demir, Korcan; Hazan, Filiz; Yıldız, Melek; Elmas, Özlem N; Özkan, Behzat

    2016-06-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD: diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations of the WFS1 (wolframin) on chromosome 4 are responsible for the clinical manifestations in majority of patients with Wolfram syndrome. Wolfram syndrome is also accompanied by neurologic and psychiatric disorders, urodynamic abnormalities, restricted joint motility, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy, hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism in males and diabetic microvascular disorders. There are very limited data in the literature regarding cardiac malformations associated in children with Wolfram syndrome. A 5-year-old girl with Wolfram syndrome and tetralogy of Fallot is presented herein. PMID:27164349

  20. FAM222B Is Not a Likely Novel Candidate Gene for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Kirchmaier, Bettina; Rath, Matthias; Korenke, G Christoph; Tetzlaff, Fabian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Neveling, Kornelia; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Kuss, Andreas W; Gilissen, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3. A yeast 2-hybrid screen revealed interactions of FAM222B with the tubulin cytoskeleton and STAMBP which is known to be associated with microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome. However, a phenotype similar to existing models was not found, neither in fam222bb/fam222ba double mutant zebrafish generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases nor in an in vitro sprouting assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with siRNA against FAM222B. These observations led to the assumption that aberrant FAM222B is not involved in the formation of CCMs. PMID:27587990

  1. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Cerebellopontine Angle Arteriovenous Malformation Treated With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yilmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakin, Akin; Kiliç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a facial pain syndrome characterized as sudden onset and lightening-like sensation over somatosensorial branch(es) of fifth cranial nerve. Rarely, some underlying diseases or disorders could be diagnosed, such as multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and vascular malformations. The authors present a 47-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia over left V2 and V3 dermatomes. He had a previous transarterial embolization and long use of carbamazepine with partial response to treatment. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was planned. A marginal dose of 15 Gy was given to 50% isodose line. His pain was relieved by GKR in 1.5 years. Treatment of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations causing trigeminal neuralgia, with GKR has a very limited use in the literature. It, however, is obvious that success rate as pain relief, in a very challenging field of functional neurosurgery, is satisfactory. Large series, however, are in need to make a more comprehensive statement about efficacy and safety of the procedure in these pathologies. PMID:26674920

  2. Kousseff syndrome: A fifth case?

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, R.A.; Hamilton, W.; Pinette, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kousseff originally described three siblings with an open sacral myelomeningocele, conotruncal cardiac malformations, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, retrognathia, a short neck with a low posterior hairline, and renal agenesis as a new autosomal recessive condition. Open neural tube lesions and complex conotruncal cardiac defects are relatively common malformations, both as isolated defects and individually as components of syndromes, but they have been found together only rarely, as part of chromosomal syndromes or following maternal exposures. Toriello et al. reported a fourth case and suggested the eponym Kousseff syndrome for myelomeningcocele, conotruncal defects and minor facial abnormalies. We report a fifth probable case. This male infant was born by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 38 weeks gestation to a 23-year-old G{sub 2}P{sub 1001} mother. Pregnancy was complicated by an elevated alpha-fetoprotein at 16 weeks gestation, followed by an ultrasound diagnosis of an open disease. After birth, physical examination also revealed dysmorphic facies, with a bulbous nose and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly and hypotonia. Echocardiogram demonstrated complex conotruncal malformations. The patient underwent closure of the myelomeningocele but died at one month of age. Chromosomal analysis was normal (46,XY). Because conotruncal heart defects have been associated with deletions on chromosome 22, FISH analysis using a probe for the DiGeorge syndrome on the long arm of chromosome 22 was performed. It indicated no detectable deletion within this critical region on 22q11. Nonetheless there remains the possibility of a gene (or genes) located on 22q that could produce findings of this rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome when disrupted. Therefore, further investigation on this chromosome is warranted.

  3. Major and minor arterial malformations in patients with cutaneous vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Viaño, Juan; López-Gutierrez, Juan C; Palencia, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    The association of persistent embryonic arteries and the absence of 1 carotid or vertebral arteries with facial or neck hemangioma or vascular malformation have been frequently described. The abnormalities can involve major or minor vessels. Of 22 patients of our series with this neurocutaneous syndrome, 20 had the origin of both anterior cerebral arteries from the same internal carotid artery. Thirteen patients showed absence or hypoplasia of 1 carotid artery and 10 of 1 vertebral artery; 10 showed persistence of the trigeminal artery; 3 had persistent proatlantal artery; 6 showed the absence of the posterior communicating artery; and 4 had hypoplastic posterior cerebral artery. Other less frequent abnormalities were found in 7 patients. Intellectual level of most patients was either borderline or below normal. Abnormalities in the vascularization and perfusion of the frontal lobes may contribute to the borderline or lower mental level of these patients. PMID:19808986

  4. Clinical, genetic, and molecular aspects of split-hand/foot malformation: an update.

    PubMed

    Gurrieri, Fiorella; Everman, David B

    2013-11-01

    We here provide an update on the clinical, genetic, and molecular aspects of split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM). This rare condition, affecting 1 in 8,500-25,000 newborns, is extremely complex because of its variability in clinical presentation, irregularities in its inheritance pattern, and the heterogeneity of molecular genetic alterations that can be found in affected individuals. Both syndromal and nonsyndromal forms are reviewed and the major molecular genetic alterations thus far reported in association with SHFM are discussed. This updated overview should be helpful for clinicians in their efforts to make an appropriate clinical and genetic diagnosis, provide an accurate recurrence risk assessment, and formulate a management plan. PMID:24115638

  5. Lissencephaly and mongolian spots in Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panteliadis, Christos P; Karatza, Eliza D; Tzitiridou, Maria K; Koliouskas, Dimitrios E; Spiroglou, Kleomenis S

    2003-07-01

    Hurler disease or syndrome is a disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism, inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. We describe a case of a 15-month-old female exhibiting with clinical and laboratory characteristics of the syndrome, central nervous system lesions (lissencephaly, excessive ventricular enlargement and Dandy Walker malformation with vermis atrophy, cerebellar cyst) and mongolian spots in the trunk and extremities. The combination of mongolian spots and severe central nervous system lesions in Hurler syndrome is considered a rare clinical occurrence, while the association with lissencephaly has never been reported. PMID:13679124

  6. Fryns syndrome phenotype and trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Ladonne, J.M.; Gaillard, D.; Carre-Pigeon, F.; Gabriel, R.

    1996-01-02

    Trisomy 22 was detected in a 32-week-old fetus born to an overweight mother with hypertension. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was associated with phenotypic manifestations of Fryns Syndrome: Diaphragmatic hernia, facial defects, and nail hypoplasia with short distal fifth phalanges. This is the second report of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in trisomy 22. This case demonstrates the importance of karyotyping malformed fetuses or newborns, even if a nonchromosome syndrome seems identifiable on clinical grounds. To date, at least 10 cases of Fryns syndrome have been reported without chromosome analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Proteus syndrome: evaluation of the immunological profile.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Cutrupi, Maricia; Baronio, Manuela; Moratto, Daniele; Pizzino, M R; Mankad, Kshitij; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Plebani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare and complex disease characterized by malformations and overgrowth of different tissues. Prognosis of affected patients may be complicated by premature death, mostly due to pulmonary embolism and respiratory failure. To date, immunological data in Proteus syndrome are scarse.We report on the novel immunologic findings of a 15 years old girl affected with PS. Detailed T and B cell evaluation revealed maturational alterations for both subsets and functional hyperactivation for the latter. Such findings have not been reported previously in PS and may be the spy of more complex immune abnormalities in this syndrome. PMID:26758562

  8. Apert Syndrome: Late presentation and treatment challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Hamed, Ahlam A; Maki, Wala M; Hasan, Lina H M

    2014-01-01

    Apert syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, craniofacial anomalies, and severe symmetrical syndactyly of the hands and feet. Anomalies of the viscera, skeleton and cardiovascular system have also been reported… Untreated craniosynostosis leads to inhibition of brain growth and an increase in intracranial and intraorbital pressure. Most cases are sporadic, resulting from new mutations with a paternal age effect. The prognosis of Apert Syndrome depends on the severity of brain malformation and early surgical interventions. We describe a Sudanese infant with Apert syndrome who presented for the first time at the age of three months and had limited options for intervention.

  9. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  10. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Livia; Mainardi, Paola Cerruti

    2007-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin), moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1). To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require precocious clinical

  11. Solitary median maxillary central incisor in association with Goldenhar's syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garcia de Paula e Silva, Francisco Wanderley; de Carvalho, Fabricio Kitazono; Diaz-Serrano, Kranya Victória; de Freitas, Aldevina Campos; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2007-01-01

    Goldenhar's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by several anomalies that include dermal epibulbar cysts, auricular appendices and malformations and vertebral anomalies. In this article, the authors report a case of Goldenhar's syndrome in a 10-year-old child who presented with the classical signs of this condition and a solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI). PMID:17658185

  12. Two cases of Townes-Brocks syndrome with previously undescribed anomalies.

    PubMed

    Marlin, S; Toublanc, J E; Petit, C

    1998-10-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome is characterized by the association of anorectal, radial ray and outer ear malformations and deafness. We describe two patients affected with several typical clinical signs of Townes-Brocks syndrome in addition to growth and puberty delays and vertebral anomalies not previously reported. PMID:9823498

  13. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. PMID:26564078

  14. Anorectal malformations caused by defects in sonic hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Mo, R; Kim, J H; Zhang, J; Chiang, C; Hui, C C; Kim, P C

    2001-08-01

    Anorectal malformations are a common clinical problem affecting the development of the distal hindgut in infants. The spectrum of anorectal malformations ranges from the mildly stenotic anus to imperforate anus with a fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts to the most severe form, persistent cloaca. The etiology, embryology, and pathogenesis of anorectal malformations are poorly understood and controversial. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an endoderm-derived signaling molecule that induces mesodermal gene expression in the chick hindgut. However, the role of Shh signaling in mammalian hindgut development is unknown. Here, we show that mutant mice with various defects in the Shh signaling pathway exhibit a spectrum of distal hindgut defects mimicking human anorectal malformations. Shh null-mutant mice display persistent cloaca. Mutant mice lacking Gli2 or Gli3, two zinc finger transcription factors involved in Shh signaling, respectively, exhibit imperforate anus with recto-urethral fistula and anal stenosis. Furthermore, persistent cloaca is also observed in Gli2(-/-);Gli3(+/-), Gli2(+/-);Gli3(-/-), and Gli2(-/-);Gli3(-/-) mice demonstrating a gene dose-dependent effect. Therefore, Shh signaling is essential for normal development of the distal hindgut in mice and mutations affecting Shh signaling produce a spectrum of anorectal malformations that may reveal new insights into their human disease equivalents. PMID:11485934

  15. Anorectal Malformations Caused by Defects in Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Rong; Kim, Jae Hong; Zhang, Jianrong; Chiang, Chin; Hui, Chi-chung; Kim, Peter C. W.

    2001-01-01

    Anorectal malformations are a common clinical problem affecting the development of the distal hindgut in infants. The spectrum of anorectal malformations ranges from the mildly stenotic anus to imperforate anus with a fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts to the most severe form, persistent cloaca. The etiology, embryology, and pathogenesis of anorectal malformations are poorly understood and controversial. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is an endoderm-derived signaling molecule that induces mesodermal gene expression in the chick hindgut. However, the role of Shh signaling in mammalian hindgut development is unknown. Here, we show that mutant mice with various defects in the Shh signaling pathway exhibit a spectrum of distal hindgut defects mimicking human anorectal malformations. Shh null-mutant mice display persistent cloaca. Mutant mice lacking Gli2 or Gli3, two zinc finger transcription factors involved in Shh signaling, respectively, exhibit imperforate anus with recto-urethral fistula and anal stenosis. Furthermore, persistent cloaca is also observed in Gli2−/−;Gli3+/−, Gli2+/−;Gli3−/−, and Gli2−/−;Gli3−/− mice demonstrating a gene dose-dependent effect. Therefore, Shh signaling is essential for normal development of the distal hindgut in mice and mutations affecting Shh signaling produce a spectrum of anorectal malformations that may reveal new insights into their human disease equivalents. PMID:11485934

  16. Defining anural malformations in the context of a developmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Cole, R.A.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Wolcott, M.; Helgen, J.C.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes terminology and general concepts involved in animal development for the purpose of providing background for the study and understanding of frog malformations. The results of our radiographic investigation of rear limb malformations in Rana pipiens provide evidence that frog malformations are the product of early developmental errors. Although bacteria, parasites and viruses were identified in these metamorphosed frogs, the relevant window to look for the teratogenic effect of these agents is in the early tadpole stage during limb development. As a result, our microbiological findings must be regarded as inconclusive relative to determining their contribution to malformations because we conducted our examinations on metamorphosed frogs not tadpoles. Future studies need to look at teratogenic agents (chemical, microbial, physical or mechanical) that are present in the embryo, tadpole, and their environments at the stages of development that are relevant for the malformation type. The impact of these teratogenic agents then needs to be assessed in appropriate animal models using studies that are designed to mimic field conditions. The results of these laboratory tests should then be analyzed in such a way that will allow comparison with the findings in the wild-caught tadpoles and frogs.

  17. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  18. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Imaging of Peripheral Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mostardi, Petrice M.; Young, Phillip M.; McKusick, Michael A.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the performance of a recently developed 3D time-resolved CE-MRA technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection-Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), for accurate characterization and treatment planning of vascular malformations of the periphery. Materials and Methods Twelve patient studies were performed (eight female, four male; average age, 33 years). The protocol consisted of three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved CE-MRA followed by a single late phase T1-weighted acquisition. Vascular malformations were imaged in the forearm, hand, thigh, and foot. Imaging evaluation was performed for accurate characterization of lesion type, identification of feeding and draining vessels, involvement with surrounding tissue, overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning, and correlation with conventional angiography. Results Time-resolved CE-MRA allowed for characterization of malformation flow and type. Feeding and draining vessels were identified in all cases. Overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning was 3.58/4.0, and correlation with conventional angiography was scored as 3.89/4.0. Conclusion The CAPR time series has been shown to portray the temporal dynamics and structure of vascular malformations as well as the normal vasculature with high quality. CAPR time-resolved imaging is able to accurately characterize high and low flow lesions, allowing for pretreatment lesion assessment and treatment planning. Delayed imaging is important to capture complete filling of very slow flow vascular malformations. PMID:22674646

  19. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  20. Lethal outcomes in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karunamurthy, Arivarasan; Pantanowitz, Liron; Lepe, Jorge Guzman; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is an uncommon congenital angiodysplasia that manifests in infancy and is characterized by venous and lymphatic malformations of the skin, soft tissue, and bone causing limb hypertrophy. We report 2 patients with long-term KTS who developed lethal complications from uncommon and unusual manifestations. The 1st patient was a female with KTS who at 2 years of age underwent a below-the-knee amputation for a massively hypertrophied and malformed left foot. Two years later she required additional surgical removal of vascular malformations involving her left calf with extension to the groin, pubis, and ipsilateral abdomen. Fifteen years later she underwent splenectomy (400 g) revealing multifocal, cystically dilated vascular channels distorting the splenic architecture and died suddenly of massive intra-abdominal hemorrhage on the 2nd postoperative day. The 2nd patient was a 72-year-old male with long-standing KTS who presented with debilitating chronic penile and scrotal edema. Surgical excision of his lymphedematous scrotal and penile skin revealed a low-grade angiosarcoma arising in the setting of chronic lymphedema. The patient died shortly after surgery from massive hemorrhage due to traumatic rupture of malformed leg vessels. KTS may lead to significant morbidity and mortality, and pathologic consequences from long-term KTS have been rarely reported. These cases illustrate the risk of lethal hemorrhage, organomegaly from protracted vascular malformation, and development of vascular neoplasia associated with chronic lymphedema in KTS. PMID:23915076

  1. Spinal arteriovenous malformations: Is surgery indicated?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bikramjit; Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Mehrotra, Anant; Mohan, B. Madan; Phadke, Rajendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinico-radiological distinguishing features in various types of spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an aim to define the role of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Hero's modified Di Chiro classification differentiated four types of spinal AVMs on digital subtraction angiogram (DSA) in 74 patients: I. Dural arteriovenous fistulae (n = 35, 47.3%); II. Glomus/intramedullary (n = 13, 17.6%); III. Juvenile/metameric (n = 4, 5.4%); and, IV. Ventral perimedullary fistula (n = 21, 28.4%). A patient with extradural AVM remained unclassified. Demographic profiles, DSA features and reason for surgical referral were recorded. Statistical comparison of discrete variables like gender, spinal cord level, presentation and outcome was made using Chi-square test; and, continuous variables like age, feeder number, duration of symptoms and number of staged embolizations by one way analysis of variance with Boneferoni post hoc comparison. Embolization alone (n = 39, 52.7%), surgery alone (n = 16, 21.6%), and combined approach (n = 4, 5.4%) were the treatments offered (15 were treated elsewhere). Results: Type I-AVM occurred in significantly older population than other types (P = 0.01). Mean duration of symptoms was 13.18 ± 12.8 months. Thoracic cord involvement predominated in type-I and III AVMs (P = 0.01). Number of feeding arteries were 1 in 59.7%; 2 in 29.0%; and, multiple in 11.3% patients, respectively. Staged embolization procedures in type-III AVM were significant (P < 0.01). Surgical referral was required due to: Vessel tortuosity/insufficient parent vessel caliber (n = 7); residual AVM (n = 4); low flow AVM (n = 3); and, multiple feeders (n = 2). Check DSA (n = 34) revealed complete AVM obliteration in 26 and minor residual lesion in eight patients. Neurological status improved in 26 and stabilized in 25 patients. Conclusions: Differentiating between Type I-IV AVMs has a significant bearing on their management. Surgical

  2. An Unusual Cause of Dysphagia: A Large Expectorated Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Aaron S.; Gunasena, Rivindi; Schaefer, Nathan R.; Kennedy, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular malformations are generally detected in childhood or adolescence with first presentations in adulthood being rare. Case Report We report the case of a 52-year-old female with threatened compromise of her airway after expectorating a massive arteriovenous malformation anchored at the supraglottis. The only preceding symptom was dysphagia. The lesion was resected, the patient had a quick recovery, and she has shown no evidence of recurrence. Conclusion Although uncommon, vascular malformations of the supraglottis or hypopharynx should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with dysphagia because of the potential to cause disastrous airway compromise. Although a lesion presenting acutely mandates a definitive airway plan, when clinically possible, computed tomography scan and indirect laryngoscopy can provide useful information for the airway and operative teams. PMID:26130989

  3. Pediatric intraoral high-flow arteriovenous malformation: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Petel, Roy; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rarely reported in the dental pediatric literature. They may develop adjacent to primary molars and can be life-threatening due to their potential for massive bleeding. The most common symptom associated with documented cases of AVMs is spontaneous gingival bleeding. Other clinical signs include pain, erythematous gingiva, resorption and mobility of teeth, soft tissue discoloration, facial swelling, and asymmetry. Radiographically, AVMs are osteolytic lesions. The purpose of this report was to describe the challenge of diagnosis of a high-flow arteriovenous malformation located in the primary maxillary molar region, which was misdiagnosed as a dentoalveolar abscess adjacent to previously treated primary molars. A decision to extract a tooth with gingival swelling and associated spontaneous bleeding should be made after the differential diagnosis of a vascular malformation has been ruled out. PMID:25303512

  4. Revision Stapedectomy in a Female Patient with Inner Ear Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tirth R.; Moberly, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an unusual case of surgical management of congenital mixed hearing loss in a female patient with inner ear malformation. This report outlines the role of temporal bone imaging and previous surgical history in evaluating a patient's risk of perilymph gusher during stapes surgery. Methods. A 68-year-old female patient with a history of profound bilateral mixed hearing loss due to ossicular and cochlear malformation presented to our otology clinic. She had undergone multiple unsuccessful previous ear surgeries. Computed tomography revealed bilateral inner ear malformations. She elected to proceed with revision stapedectomy. Results. The patient received modest benefit to hearing, and no operative complications occurred. Conclusions. Although stapedectomy has been shown to improve hearing in patients with stapes fixation, there is risk of perilymph gusher in patients with inner ear abnormalities. Evaluation and counseling of the risk of gusher during stapes surgery should be done on a case-by-case basis. PMID:27144044

  5. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  6. Genomic Variants and Variations in Malformations of Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are a common cause of neurodevelopmental delay and epilepsy and are caused by disruptions in the normal development of the cerebral cortex. Advances in genetic tools have expanded our understanding of the genetics of these malformations over the past few years, with a number of new causative genes identified in patients with MCD. In addition, there has been a vast expansion in the phenotypic characterization of the known genes, with a wide range as well as severity of malformations being reported. There is increasing evidence of role of de novo mutations, including those occurring post fertilization, in MCD. These “somatic” mutations may not be detectable by traditional methods of genetic testing performed on blood DNA. Identification of the genetic etiology can help in guiding families in future pregnancies. Recent work has highlighted how elucidation of key molecular pathway can also allow for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:26022163

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Malformations. Consensus Document of the International Union of Phlebology (IUP): updated 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B; Baumgartner, I; Berlien, P; Bianchini, G; Burrows, P; Gloviczki, P; Huang, Y; Laredo, J; Loose, D A; Markovic, J; Mattassi, R; Parsi, K; Rabe, E; Rosenblatt, M; Shortell, C; Stillo, F; Vaghi, M; Villavicencio, L; Zamboni, P

    2015-04-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are the most common vascular developmental anomalies (birth defects) . These defects are caused by developmental arrest of the venous system during various stages of embryogenesis. VMs remain a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to the wide range of clinical presentations, unpredictable clinical course, erratic response to the treatment with high recurrence/ persistence rates, high morbidity following non-specific conventional treatment, and confusing terminology. The Consensus Panel reviewed the recent scientific literature up to the year 2013 to update a previous IUP Consensus (2009) on the same subject. ISSVA Classification with special merits for the differentiation between the congenital vascular malformation (CVM) and vascular tumors was reinforced with an additional review on syndrome-based classification. A "modified" Hamburg classification was adopted to emphasize the importance of extratruncular vs. truncular sub-types of VMs. This incorporated the embryological ongm, morphological differences, unique characteristics, prognosis and recurrence rates of VMs based on this embryological classification. The definition and classification of VMs were strengthened with the addition of angiographic data that determines the hemodynamic characteristics, the anatomical pattern of draining veins and hence the risk of complication following sclerotherapy. The hemolymphatic malformations, a combined condition incorporating LMs and other CVMs, were illustrated as a separate topic to differentiate from isolated VMs and to rectify the existing confusion with name-based eponyms such as Klippei-Trenaunay syndrome. Contemporary concepts on VMs were updated with new data including genetic findings linked to the etiology of CVMs and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. Besides, newly established information on coagulopathy including the role of D-Dimer was thoroughly reviewed to provide guidelines on investigations and

  8. Models of cortical malformation--Chemical and physical.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-02-15

    Pharmaco-resistant epilepsies, and also some neuropsychiatric disorders, are often associated with malformations in hippocampal and neocortical structures. The mechanisms leading to these cortical malformations causing an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory system are largely unknown. Animal models using chemical or physical manipulations reproduce different human pathologies by interfering with cell generation and neuronal migration. The model of in utero injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate mimics periventricular nodular heterotopia. The freeze lesion model reproduces (poly)microgyria, focal heterotopia and schizencephaly. The in utero irradiation model causes microgyria and heterotopia. Intraperitoneal injections of carmustine 1-3-bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea (BCNU) to pregnant rats produces laminar disorganization, heterotopias and cytomegalic neurons. The ibotenic acid model induces focal cortical malformations, which resemble human microgyria and ulegyria. Cortical dysplasia can be also observed following prenatal exposure to ethanol, cocaine or antiepileptic drugs. All these models of cortical malformations are characterized by a pronounced hyperexcitability, few of them also produce spontaneous epileptic seizures. This dysfunction results from an impairment in GABAergic inhibition and/or an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The cortical region initiating or contributing to this hyperexcitability may not necessarily correspond to the site of the focal malformation. In some models wide-spread molecular and functional changes can be observed in remote regions of the brain, where they cause pathophysiological activities. This paper gives an overview on different animal models of cortical malformations, which are mostly used in rodents and which mimic the pathology and to some extent the pathophysiology of neuronal migration disorders associated with epilepsy in humans. PMID:25850077

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital renal and urinary tract malformations.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, A; De Catte, L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidneys and the urinary tract are the most common sonographically identified -malformations in the prenatal period. Obstructive uropathies account for the majority of cases. The aim of prenatal diagnosis and management is to detect those anomalies having impact on the prognosis of the affected child and -requiring early postnatal evaluation or treatment to minimize adverse outcomes. In this paper, we summarize the embryology of kidneys and urinary tract, the normal sonographic appearance through-out pregnancy and the prenatal diagnosis of their congenital malformations. PMID:24753862

  10. [Urinary tract abnormalities with anorrectal malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Ceres, M L; Olagüe, R; Andrés, V; Lanuza, A

    1978-01-01

    Thirty five patients with anorrectal malformations are reviewed. These are divided in high and low anomalies according to some simple clinical data, better than the drawing of reference lines to determinate the height of puborrectalis muscle. Malformations were associated in 13 cases with urinary tract estructural anomalies and in four cases with isolated vesico-ureteral reflux. Diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made in 14 patients, 12 of them with recto-urinary fistula. A point is made about the complete and early exploration of all these patients to prevent irreparable renal damage that could be developed. PMID:655503

  11. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation presenting as visual deterioration in a child.

    PubMed

    Kaye, L C; Kaye, S B; Lagnado, R; Boothroyd, A; Morton, C; May, P

    2000-10-01

    A rare case of visual loss as the presenting feature of a central arteriovenous malformation involving the vein of Galen is reported. A 5-year-old girl with a history of deteriorating vision for the past 6 months was examined. Ocular examination showed a left hemianopia, left optic atrophy, and dilated vessels of the right optic disc. MRI revealed a massive deep-seated central arteriovenous malformation involving the vein of Galen. The mechanism of visual loss is likely to be a combination of ischaemic optic atrophy associated with a steal phenomenon and direct compression of the right optic radiation. PMID:11085301

  12. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  13. Chiari malformations: An important cause of pediatric aspiration.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jennifer C; Sinha, Sumi; Caruso, Paul A; Hersh, Cheryl J; Butler, William E; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpathy S; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic aspiration poses a major health risk to the pediatric population. We describe four cases in which work up for chronic aspiration with a brain MRI revealed a Chiari I malformation, a poorly described etiology of pediatric aspiration. All patients had at least one non-specific neurologic symptom but had swallow studies more characteristic of an anatomic than a neurologic etiology. Patients were referred to neurosurgery and underwent posterior fossa decompression with symptom improvement. A high index of suspicion for Chiari malformation should be maintained when the standard work up for aspiration is non-diagnostic, particularly when non-specific neurologic symptoms are present. PMID:27497399

  14. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Louisiana: an association between race and sex and the prevalence of specific cardiac malformations.

    PubMed

    Storch, T G; Mannick, E E

    1992-09-01

    We hypothesized that susceptibility to the genetic and environmental factors that disrupt cardiac development is associated with race and sex. To evaluate this hypothesis, we asked whether the prevalence of specific cardiac malformations differs by race and sex. We attempted to include all infants born alive in the State of Louisiana from January 1, 1988, through December 31, 1989, and diagnosed by echocardiography, catheterization and/or autopsy within a year of birth as having one of ten specific cardiac malformations. The prevalence of atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) per 1,000 live births was significantly higher for black females (.744) compared to black males (.198) and for white females (.414) compared to white males (.116). Complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA) was significantly higher for white males (.559) compared to white females (.122); in contrast, TGA was not significantly different for black males (.198) and black females (.169). Obstructive left heart syndrome (OLHS)--aortic stenosis and/or coarctation of the aorta--was significantly higher for white males (.652) compared to white females (.317); in contrast, OLHS was not significantly different for black males (.264) and black females (.169). Single ventricle (SV) was significantly higher for whites (.202) compared to blacks (.067). We did not find that race and sex were associated with differences in the prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The numbers of infants with anomalous pulmonary venous return, tricuspid atresia, double outlet right ventricle, or truncus arteriosus were too small to measure an association with race and sex. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of a subset of cardiac malformations differs by race and sex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1523585

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS POTENTIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR MALFORMATIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN ANURAN AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of species of anuran amphibians from different regions across North America have recently exhibited an increased occurrence of, predominantly, hind limb malformations. Research concerning factors potentially responsible for these malformations has focused extensively on ...

  16. Van der Woude Syndrome with Short Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Pallavi K.; Deshmukh, Kiran; Mangalgi, Anand; Patil, Subhash; Hugar, Deepa; Kodangal, Saraswathi Fakirappa

    2014-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition with high penetrance and variable expression. Clinical manifestation of this autosomal dominant clefting syndrome includes bilateral midline lower lip pits, cleft lip, and cleft palate along with hypodontia. These congenital lip pits appear as a malformation in the vermilion border of the lip, with or without excretion. Discomfort caused by spontaneous or induced drainage of saliva/mucus when pressure is applied or during a meal as well as poor aesthetic match is one of the main complaints of patients with congenital lip fistula. The pits are treated by surgical resection. Dentists should be aware of the congenital lip pits as in Van der Woude syndrome because they have been reported to be associated with a variety of malformations or other congenital disorders. Here, the authors report a rare case of Van der Woude syndrome with short review of the literature. PMID:25050184

  17. Deletion of 4q28.3-31.23 in the background of multiple malformations with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Duga, Balazs; Czako, Marta; Komlosi, Katalin; Hadzsiev, Kinga; Torok, Katalin; Sumegi, Katalin; Kisfali, Peter; Kosztolanyi, Gyorgy; Melegh, Bela

    2014-01-01

    The 4q deletion syndrome shows a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations consisting of key features comprising growth failure, developmental delay, craniofacial dysmorphism, digital anomalies, and cardiac and skeletal defects. We have identified a de novo interstitial distal deletion in a 9 month-old girl with growth failure, developmental delay, ventricular septum defect in the subaortic region, patent foramen ovale and patent ductus arteriosus, vascular malformation of the lung, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and craniofacial dysmorphism using array-comparative genomic hybridization. This de novo deletion is located at 4q28.3-31.23 (136,127,048 - 150,690,325), its size is 14.56 Mb, and contains 8 relevant genes (PCDH18, SETD7, ELMOD2, IL15, GAB1, HHIP, SMAD1, NR3C2) with possible contributions to the phenotype. Among other functions, a role in lung morphogenesis and tubulogenesis can be attributed to the deleted genes in our patient, which may explain the unique feature of vascular malformation of the lung leading to pulmonary hypertension. With the detailed molecular characterization of our case with 4q- syndrome we hope to contribute to the elucidation of the genetic spectrum of this disorder. PMID:24959202

  18. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  19. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  20. Cholelithiasis in cervico-oculo-acoustic (Wildervanck's) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kõse, G; Ozkan, H; Ozdamar, F; Kavukçu, S; Ozaksoy, D

    1993-10-01

    An unusual case of cholelithiasis in an 18-month-old boy with cervico-oculo-acoustic (Wildervanck's) syndrome is presented. Our patient had Duane's retraction syndrome, Klippel-Feil anomaly and congenital deafness. To our knowledge this is the first case in which a probable association between cholelithiasis and Wildervanck's syndrome has been recorded. On the other hand, the presence of mutual malformations and anomalies such as scoliosis, ventricular septal defect, ectopic kidney, hydrocephalus, hypoplastic thumb and growth retardation seems to suggest that Wildervanck's syndrome is a clinical variant of Klippel-Feil sequence. PMID:8241656

  1. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder. PMID:25606393

  2. Goldenhar syndrome with contralateral pulmonary aplasia: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Jugpal, Tejeshwar Singh; Kumar, Jyoti; Gupta, Swati; Garg, Anju

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 13-year-old boy with clinical features of Goldenhar syndrome (hemifacial microsomia with malformed ears) and associated contralateral pulmonary aplasia. The patient did not have any associated respiratory symptoms. Pulmonary aplasia is an uncommon association of Goldenhar Syndrome. A case of contralateral pulmonary aplasia has been rarely reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27200154

  3. Anesthetic considerations in a parturient with Freeman-Sheldon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K; Qasem, F; Armstrong, P; McConachie, I

    2016-08-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by malformations of the face, oral cavity and musculoskeletal system. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a parturient with Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, kyphoscoliosis and a cardiac pacemaker for a cesarean delivery and tubal ligation. With a predicted difficult airway, our team decided to provide a combined spinal-epidural anesthetic. Problems encountered included difficult intravenous access, failure to identify the subarachnoid space and patient discomfort during surgery. PMID:27016877

  4. Mimosa tenuiflora as a Cause of Malformations in Ruminants in the Northeastern Brazilian Semiarid Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Craniofacial anomalies, eye malformations, and permanent flexures of the forelimbs are common malformations seen in ruminants grazing semiarid rangelands of Northeastern Brazil. To investigate the cause of these malformations, we fed 2 suspected plants, Mimosa tenuiflora or Prosopis juliflora, to gr...

  5. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,…

  6. The syndrome of optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Borchert, Mark; Garcia-Filion, Pamela

    2008-09-01

    The congenital malformation known as optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) has been recognized in the past 30 years as an epidemic cause of congenital blindness. It was believed to occur either as an isolated anomaly or as a component of the syndrome of septo-optic dysplasia, which has evolved to include midline brain malformations and hypopituitarism. Evidence now suggests that ONH infrequently occurs in isolation. Most afflicted children will have hypothalamic dysfunction and/or neurodevelopmental impairment, regardless of MRI findings or severity of ONH. Adverse outcomes can often be ameliorated with early intervention. Thus, the syndrome of ONH should be suspected in all infants with signs of hypothalamic dysfunction or vision impairment. PMID:18713575

  7. Neu-Laxova syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Begum, J; Sharifunnaher, B; Saha, A K; Afroza, S; Islam, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Neu-Laxova syndrome (NLS) is a rare lethal syndrome found in both consanguinous and non-consanguinous couple. This is characterized by terrible face with unusual craniofacial appearance with exophthalmos, spectrum of central nervous system malformation, like microcaphaly, hypoplastic cerebellum, cleft lip/palate, ichthyosis and oedema. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical parameter. We report a 4 hour old male term newborn with IUGR of Neu-Laxova syndrome presented with anencephaly, rudimentary cerebellum, exophthalmos of right eye, bilateral cleft lip and palate and cryptorchidism. Anencephaly and cryptorchidism are two recently reported findings of NLS. We are presenting this case in addition from Bangladesh to lend further support to those two new findings as component of Neu-Laxova syndrome. Outcome of this syndrome is not good. Most of the patients are died of infection within hours to days. PMID:24584393

  8. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  9. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  10. Corpus callosum arteriovenous malformation with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Chandan B; Devi, B Indira; Somanna, Sampath; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Dawn, Rose

    2011-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with an intracerebral haematoma secondary to a large corpus callosal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) with an associated persistent trigeminal artery, and was treated with Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery for the AVM. This report discusses the embryological basis, radiological features and various classifications of this rare vascular anomaly. PMID:21501055

  11. [A case of malformation in Pachycheles serratus (Decapoda: Porcellanidae)].

    PubMed

    Lira, C; Hernández, G; Bolaños, J A

    2003-06-01

    An adult male of Pachycheles serratus with a malformation on the right cheliped was found during a collection of anomuran crabs in coastal waters of the peninsula de Macanao, Margarita island, Venezuela. The specimen was found at La Carmela beach (11 degrees 04'N-64 degrees 20'W), and featured a bifurcated fixed finger on the right cheliped. PMID:15264565

  12. Embryonic Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 Causes Malformations in Axial Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Minsub; Foley, Julie; Anna, Colleen; Mishina, Yuji; Eling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) have important functions in various physiological and pathological processes. COX-2 expression is highly induced by a variety of stimuli and is observed during certain periods of embryonic development. In this report, the direct effect of COX-2 expression on embryonic development is examined in a novel COX-2 transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses human COX-2 from the early stages of embryonic development. COX-2 transgenic fetuses exhibit severe skeletal malformations and die shortly after birth. Skeletal malformations are localized along the entire vertebral column and rib cage and are linked to defective formation of cartilage anlagen. The cartilage anlagen of axial skeleton fail to properly develop in transgenic embryos because of impaired precartilaginous sclerotomal condensation, which results from the reduction of cell number in the sclerotome. Despite the ubiquitous expression of COX-2, the number of apoptotic cells is highly increased in the sclerotome of transgenic embryos but not in other tissues, suggesting that it is a tissue-specific response. Therefore, the loss of sclerotomal cells due to an increased apoptosis is probably responsible for axial skeletal malformations in transgenic fetuses. In addition, the sclerotomal accumulation of p53 protein is observed in transgenic embryos, suggesting that COX-2 may induce apoptosis via the up-regulation of p53. Our results demonstrate that the aberrant COX-2 signaling during embryonic development is teratogenic and suggest a possible association of COX-2 with fetal malformations of unknown etiology. PMID:20236942

  13. Failed transarterial embolization of subserosal uterine arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jin; Sohn, In Sook; Kwon, Han Sung; Park, Sang Woo

    2013-01-01

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is rare but potentially life-threatening from excessive vaginal bleeding. All uterine AVMs reported to date have been found in the endometrial or myometrial layers. Here we present a patient with a subserosal type AVM on the fundus of uterus, which spontaneously ruptured. PMID:24328024

  14. Proximity to pollution sources and risk of amphibian limb malformation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brynn; Skelly, David; Demarchis, Livia K; Slade, Martin D; Galusha, Deron; Rabinowitz, Peter M

    2005-11-01

    The cause of limb deformities in wild amphibian populations remains unclear, even though the apparent increase in prevalence of this condition may have implications for human health. Few studies have simultaneously assessed the effect of multiple exposures on the risk of limb deformities. In a cross-sectional survey of 5,264 hylid and ranid metamorphs in 42 Vermont wetlands, we assessed independent risk factors for nontraumatic limb malformation. The rate of nontraumatic limb malformation varied by location from 0 to 10.2%. Analysis of a subsample did not demonstrate any evidence of infection with the parasite Ribeiroia. We used geographic information system (GIS) land-use/land-cover data to validate field observations of land use in the proximity of study wetlands. In a multiple logistic regression model that included land use as well as developmental stage, genus, and water-quality measures, proximity to agricultural land use was associated with an increased risk of limb malformation (odds ratio = 2.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-3.58; p < 0.001). The overall discriminant power of the statistical model was high (C = 0.79). These findings from one of the largest systematic surveys to date provide support for the role of chemical toxicants in the development of amphibian limb malformation and demonstrate the value of an epidemiologic approach to this problem. PMID:16263502

  15. [Congenital malformations of the external and middle ear].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyan; Yang, Jun; Wu, Hao

    2013-07-01

    Congenital malformations of the external and middle ear is the common reason of pediatric hearing impairment and cosmic problem. The treatment composes of auricular plastic surgery and auditory reconstruction surgery. The use of BAHA, vibrant sound-bridge and tissue engineering materials can significantly improve the treatment outcomes. PMID:24073571

  16. Hypospadias and anorectal malformations mediated by Eph/ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Selcuk; Dravis, Christopher; Garcia, Nilda; Henkemeyer, Mark; Baker, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Despite extensive research, the molecular basis of hypospadias and anorectal malformations is poorly understood, likely due to a multifactorial basis. The incidence of hypospadias is increasing, thus making research in this area warranted and timely. This review presents recent molecular work broadening our understanding of these disorders. Materials and Methods A brief review of our recent work and the literature on the role of Eph/ephrin signaling in hypospadias and anorectal malformations is presented. Results Genetically engineered mice mutant for ephrin-B2 or EphB2;EphB3 manifest a variety of genitourinary and anorectal malformations. Approximately 40% of adult male heterozygous mice demonstrate perineal hypospadias. Although homozygous mice die soon after birth, 100% of homozygous males demonstrate high imperforate anus with urethral anomalies and 100% of homozygous females demonstrate persistent cloaca. Male mice compound homozygous for EphB2ki/ki;EphB3Δ/Δ/ also demonstrate hypospadias. Conclusions These mouse models provide compelling evidence of the role of B-class Eph/ephrin signaling in genitourinary/anorectal development and add to our mechanistic and molecular understanding of normal and abnormal embryonic development. As research on the B-class Ephs and ephrins continues, they will likely be shown to be molecular contributors to the multifactorial basis of hypospadias and anorectal malformations in humans as well. PMID:18431460

  17. Gallbladder malformation with gastric wall-like architecture.

    PubMed

    Santonja, C; Rollán, V

    1996-09-01

    A 3-year-old girl was found to have a distended gallbladder, which pathologically consisted almost entirely of a gastric-type wall, featuring muscularis mucosae and a well-developed bilayered muscularis propria. This appears to be a unique, not previously recognized, malformation of the gallbladder. PMID:8887106

  18. Ventral Decompression in Chiari Malformation, Basilar Invagination, and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ridder, Thomas; Anderson, Richard C E; Hankinson, Todd C

    2015-10-01

    Ventral brainstem compression is an uncommon clinical diagnosis seen by pediatric neurosurgeons and associated with Chiari malformation, type I. Presenting clinical symptoms often include headaches, lower cranial neuropathies, myelopathy, central sleep apnea, ataxia, and nystagmus. When ventral decompression is required, both open and endoscopic transoral/transnasal approaches are highly effective. PMID:26408067

  19. Stereotactic microresection of small cerebral vascular malformations (SCVM).

    PubMed

    Lerch, K D; Schaefer, D; Palleske, H

    1994-01-01

    Between 1988-1993 we performed CT-stereotactic guided microsurgical resection as a one-session-procedure in 46 patients bearing small (< 30 mm) cerebral vascular malformations (SCVM). The location of the SCVM was deep subcortical in 38 patients, temporal medio- basal in 3 and brainstem in 5. The surgical technique intended to minimise invasiveness by reducing the operative approach to a size less than the diameter of the lesion concerned. The mean diameter of our SCVM's was 20 mm ranging from 10 to 30 mm. Histologically we found 23 arteriovenous malformations, 22 cavernous malformations and 1 capillary telangiectasia (capillary malformation). Clinical symptomatology consisted mainly of seizures, (progressive) neurological deficit and (minute) acute intracerebral bleeding. The SCVMs could be demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT as well as by MRI. 15 of the AVM's revealed as angiographically occult. Complete microsurgical resection of the SCVM was accomplished in all cases with a surgical morbidity of 6.5% and no operative mortality. In 14 patients, most of them with initial acute intracerebral haemorrhage, the pronounced focal neurological deficit improved. During the follow-up period (1/2-5 years) no rebleeding occurred. As far as epileptic seizures were concerned 13 patients became seizure-free without anticonvulsants and 11 patients seizure-free with anticonvulsant, in the remaining 4 patients seizures were reduced in frequency. PMID:7725939

  20. Surgical and Technical Modalities for Hearing Restoration in Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Thomas, Jan Peter; Volkenstein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Malformations of the external and middle ear often go along with an aesthetic and functional handicap. Independent of additional aesthetic procedures, a successful functional hearing restoration leads to a tremendous gain in quality of life for affected patients. The introduction of implantable hearing systems (bone conduction and middle ear devices) offers new therapeutic options in this field. We focus on functional rehabilitation of patients with malformations, either by surgical reconstruction or the use of different implantable hearing devices, depending on the disease itself and the severity of malformation as well as hearing impairment. Patients with an open ear canal and minor malformations are good candidates for surgical hearing restoration of middle ear structures with passive titanium or autologous implants. In cases with complete fibrous or bony atresia of the ear canal, the most promising functional outcome and gain in quality of life can be expected with an active middle ear implant or a bone conduction device combined with a surgical aesthetic rehabilitation in a single or multi-step procedure. Although the surgical procedure for bone conduction devices is straightforward and safe, more sophisticated operations for active middle ear implants (e.g., Vibrant Soundbridge, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) provide an improved speech discrimination in noise and the ability of sound localization compared with bone conduction devices where the stimulation reaches both cochleae. PMID:26667632

  1. Diagnosis and Nonsurgical Management of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, R. D.; Moloney, J. C.; Anderson, H. J.

    2007-11-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon problem and traditional treatment by hysterectomy excludes the possibility of future pregnancy. Developments in interventional techniques make transcatheter embolization of the feeding vessel(s) a therapeutic alternative, potentially preserving the patient's fertility. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of uterine AVM.

  2. Correlation between ultrasound diagnosis and autopsy findings of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vimercati, Antonella; Grasso, Silvana; Abruzzese, Marinella; Chincoli, Annarosa; de Gennaro, Alessandra; Miccolis, Angela; Serio, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Luigi; Fascilla, Fabiana Divina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective to compare ultrasound (US) and autopsy findings of fetal malformations in second trimester terminations of pregnancy to evaluate the degree of agreement between US and fetal autopsy. Methods in this study, all second trimester termination of pregnancy between 2003–2010 were considered. US and autopsy findings were compared and all cases were classified into five categories according to the degree of agreement between US and pathology (A1: full agreement between US and autopsy; A2: autopsy confirmed all US findings but revealed additional anomalies ‘rarely detectable’ prenatally; B: autopsy demonstrated all US findings but revealed additional anomalies ‘detectable’ prenatally; C: US findings were only partially demonstrated at fetal autopsy; D: total disagreement between US and autopsy). Results 144 cases were selected. In 49% of cases there was total agreement between US and autopsy diagnosis (A1). In 22% of cases additional information were about anomalies ‘not detectable’ by US (A2). In 12% of cases autopsy provided additional information about anomalies not observed but ‘detectable’ by US (B). In 13% of cases some anomalies revealed at US, such as valve insufficiencies, pericardial and pleural effusions, were not verified at autopsy (C). Total lack of agreement was noted only in 4% of cases (D). Main areas of disagreement concerned cardiovascular, CNS and complex malformations. The degree of agreement was higher if malformations were diagnosed in a tertiary center. Conclusions this study shows an overall high degree of agreement between definitive US and autopsy findings in second trimester termination of pregnancy for fetal malformations. Autopsy reveals to be the best tool to diagnose malformations and often showed other abnormalities of clinical importance not detected by US, but sometimes also US could provide additional information about functional anomalies because US is a dynamic examination. PMID:22905306

  3. A second locus for Rieger syndrome maps to chromosome 13q14.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.; del Bono, E. A.; Haines, J. L.; Pralea, A. M.; Cohen, J. S.; Greff, L. J.; Wiggs, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Rieger syndrome is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder typically characterized by malformations of the eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and exhibits significant variable expressivity. One locus associated with this disorder has been mapped to 4q25. Using a large four-generation pedigree, we have identified a second locus for Rieger syndrome located on chromosome 13q14. PMID:8751862

  4. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  5. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  6. Updates and Future Horizons on the Understanding, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sturge-Weber Syndrome Brain Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Warren; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Ball, Karen L.; Juhasz, Csaba; Jordan, Lori C.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Comi, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To review recent developments in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Method: Members of the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium Sturge-Weber Syndrome National Workgroup contributed their expertise to review the literature and present promising directions for research. Results: The increasing number…

  7. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  8. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  9. Tumors in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.; Rubinstein, J.H.

    1995-03-13

    The 14 tumors reported in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome since 1989, when added to the 22 previously reported, are beginning to show a pattern of neural and developmental tumors, especially of the head, which is malformed in the syndrome. Among the neoplasms were 12 of the nervous system: 2 each of oligodendroglioma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, and 3 other benign tumors; 2 of nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma; and 1 each of leiomyosarcoma, seminoma, and embryonal carcinoma. Among the other benign tumors were an ondontoma, a choristoma, a dermoid cyst, and 2 pilomatrixomas. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Intestinal malrotation in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Cathy A

    2015-10-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome which may include malformations of the central nervous system, heart, genitourinary tract, and other organs. However, intestinal malrotation has not been previously known to be associated with RSTS. This report documents six persons with RSTS who also had malrotation of the intestine requiring surgical repair. This suggests a possible increased frequency of malrotation in RSTS. Diagnostic studies for malrotation should be considered if recurrent vomiting, abdominal pain, and other symptoms of possible malrotation are present. PMID:26097216

  11. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome and cerebral haemangiopericytoma: a potential association.

    PubMed

    Mathews, M S; Kim, R C; Chang, G Y; Linskey, M E

    2008-04-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) a rare mesodermal phakomatosis consisting of capillary malformations, varicose veins, and limb hypertrophy, often associated with vascular malformations and benign tumours. A 33-year-old male presented with headaches secondary to a previously diagnosed intracranial tumour. He had a large blanching port-wine stain and hypertrophy of the left side of his body and limbs partial syndactyly of the 2(nd) and 3(rd) digits in all four extremities. The lesion was surgically resected and histology showed a Haemangiopericytoma. Thus KTS may be associated with intracranial Haemangiopericytomas, a malignant vascular tumour. PMID:18297229

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of Chudley-McCullough syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Teresa; Perez, Francisco A; Ishak, Gisele E; Doherty, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Chudley-McCullough syndrome (CMS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a complex brain malformation and profound congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Postnatal brain imaging findings include ventriculomegaly, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, inferior cerebellar dysplasia, arachnoid cysts, and malformations of cortical development including frontal subcortical heterotopia and polymicrogyria. Prenatal diagnosis of CMS is important due to the markedly less severe neurodevelopmental prognosis compared to disorders with similar brain imaging findings. We report prenatal imaging features that help distinguish CMS from other disorders, including slit-like frontal horns, agenesis of the corpus callosum, frontal subcortical heterotopia, arachnoid cysts, and cerebellar dysplasia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27312216

  13. Aarskog syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  14. The trisomy 18 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600) due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects ). The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care). Upper airway obstruction is likely more common

  15. Klippel–Trénaunay Syndrome – A Very Rare and Interesting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Lamba, Sachin; Pandita, Aakash; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome (KTS or KT) is an infrequently seen dermatological syndrome, which is often viewed as a triad of vascular malformation (capillary malformations or port-wine brands), venous varicosity, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy. We report a case of a 12-year-old male who presented to us with the symptoms of varicose plaques over both lower limbs and was diagnosed as a case of KTS. Management is normally conservative and includes stockings for compression of the branches to reduce edema because of chronic venous insufficiency; modern devices that cause on and off pneumatic compression; and rarely, surgical correction of varicose veins with lifelong follow-up. The orthopedic abnormalities are treated with epiphysiodesis in order to prevent (stop) overgrowing of limb and correction of bone deformity. PMID:25861232

  16. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  17. Goldenhar syndrome: a rare diagnosis with possible prenatal findings.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Bárbara; Igreja, Joana; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Cadilhe, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is a rare congenital disease associated with hemifacial hypoplasia as well as ear and ocular defects. Sometimes it is also associated with vertebral and other bone defects, cardiac malformations and central nervous system anomalies. Its aetiology is not yet clarified in the literature. We present a case of multiple malformations detected in the morphology ultrasound (at 22 weeks of gestation), namely absent nasal bones, micrognathia and absent left radius, among other defects. Genetic counselling, fetal brain MRI and cardiac sonography, which showed ventricular septal defect, were performed. 11 syndromes with poor fetal or neonatal prognosis were identified as possible diagnosis, using a genetic database and the couple asked for a medical termination of pregnancy. Postmortem examination has shown features consistent with Goldenhar syndrome. PMID:27329096

  18. Behavioral effects of congenital ventromedial prefrontal cortex malformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A detailed behavioral profile associated with focal congenital malformation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has not been reported previously. Here we describe a 14 year-old boy, B.W., with neurological and psychiatric sequelae stemming from focal cortical malformation of the left vmPFC. Case Presentation B.W.'s behavior has been characterized through extensive review Patience of clinical and personal records along with behavioral and neuropsychological testing. A central feature of the behavioral profile is severe antisocial behavior. He is aggressive, manipulative, and callous; features consistent with psychopathy. Other problems include: egocentricity, impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of empathy, lack of respect for authority, impaired moral judgment, an inability to plan ahead, and poor frustration tolerance. Conclusions The vmPFC has a profound contribution to the development of human prosocial behavior. B.W. demonstrates how a congenital lesion to this cortical region severely disrupts this process. PMID:22136635

  19. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bolde, Saroj; Pudale, Smita; Pandit, Gopal; Ruikar, Kirti; Ingle, Sachin B

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a congenital disorder of the lung similar to bronchopulmonary sequestration. In CPAM, usually an entire lobe of lung is replaced by a non-working cystic piece of abnormal lung tissue. This abnormal tissue will never function as normal lung tissue. The underlying cause for CPAM is not known. It occurs in approximately 1 in every 30000 pregnancies. The association between CPAM and malignancy has been well documented. There is a small risk (0.7%) of malignant transformation within the cyst. So early diagnosis and surgical resection is important to prevent the grave complications. Herein, we are reporting two interesting cases of CPAM and one belonged to Type II and other belonged to Type III of Stocker’s classification. PMID:25984523

  20. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Chandan B; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  1. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Chandan B.; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  2. Diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maha S; Saleem, Sahar N; Dobyns, William B; Barkovich, A James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-08-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic 'butterfly'-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term 'diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia' to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  3. Pediatric lymphatic malformations: evolving understanding and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Defnet, Ann M; Bagrodia, Naina; Hernandez, Sonia L; Gwilliam, Natalie; Kandel, Jessica J

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal treatment of lymphatic malformations continues to expand as new information about the biology and genetics of these lesions is discovered, along with knowledge gained from clinical practice. A patient-centered approach, ideally provided by a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team, should guide timing and modality of treatment. Current treatment options include observation, surgery, sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and laser therapy. New medical and surgical therapies are emerging, and include sildenafil, propranolol, sirolimus, and vascularized lymph node transfer. The primary focus of management is to support and optimize these patients' quality of life. Researchers continue to study lymphatic malformations with the goal of increasing therapeutic options and developing effective clinical pathways for these complicated lesions. PMID:26815877

  4. [Congenital vascular malformations: epidemiology, classification and therapeutic basis].

    PubMed

    Pereira Albino, J

    2010-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations are part of the rare diseases of angiology and vascular surgery and can present in a variety of forms. They rise a lot of doubts and many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Treatment options are widely variable and often debated; surgeons usually have doubts about the best procedure to adopt. It is also an area of great anatomic and functional variability where the confusion regarding the nomenclature and classifications has been frequent, rendering difficult to adopt standardized measures. There have been significant advances in the recent years towards reaching a consensus. Based on his practical clinical experience and past work on these issues, the author reviews the epidemiology, the classifications and the therapeutic basis of this pathology. The author emphasizes the fact that the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) classification provides a useful framework for classifying vascular anomalies, as well as the therapeutic percutaneous embolization using polidocanol foam to control venous malformations. PMID:20972487

  5. Ischaemic stroke with intact atrial septum--exclude arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Doering, Friederike; Eicken, Andreas; Hess, John

    2014-02-01

    A 44-year-old woman was referred to our centre for interventional cardiac catheterisation. The diagnostic work-up after a preceding ischaemic stroke led to the assumption of a patent foramen ovale due to a positive bubble study. Before the planned percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale, we performed a second bubble study, which showed an intact atrial septum. However, after two to three heart cycles bubbles could be detected in the left atrium, assuming a right-to-left shunt of an extracardiac origin most likely in the lung. We therefore performed cardiac catheterisation, yielding a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in the lower lobe of the right lung. This was successfully closed interventionally by placing a Cook coil, as well as several plugs into the malformation and feeding vessels. PMID:23347820

  6. Urorectal septum malformation sequence in a newborn with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Purkait, Radheshyam

    2012-02-01

    Urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS) is an extremely rare anomaly, consists of multiple system anomalies including ambiguous genitalia, absence of a perineal opening, an imperforate anus, and urological, colonic and lumbosacral defects. We describe a newborn with characteristic URSMS who also had features of congenital varus deformity of leg, polydactyly, tracheo-oesophageal fistula, cardiac defect, anal atresia and hydronephrosis in antenatal ultrasound characteristic of VACTERL association. PMID:22313652

  7. [Combined treatment of arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Dabizha, A Iu; Gindich, O A; Ogorodnik, Ia P; Al'tman, I V; Gomoliako, I V; Guch, A A

    2015-01-01

    An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a vascular developmental abnormality conditioned by impaired embryonic morphogenesis and characterized by the development of an abnormal connection between arteries and veins. More than 50% of the total number of patients suffering from this pathology are those having the pathological foci localizing in the area of the head and neck. At present, a combined method is both a generally accepted and the most radical one used for treatment for AVM. However, in the majority of cases, excision of the malformation leaves an extensive and complicated defect of tissues, whose direct closure leads to coarse cicatricious deformities. Over the period from 2004 to 2012, we followed up a total of 37 patients presenting with arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck. At admission the patients underwent preoperative examination including clinical tests, ultrasound duplex scanning, arteriography, MRT, and computed tomography. 24-72 hours prior to the operative intervention the patients were subjected to embolisation of the main vessels supplying the vascular malformation. Excision of the AVM was in 8 cases followed by primary closure of the postoperative wound, in 17 patients the defect was closed by transposition of the axial flaps, and 12 subjects underwent free transplantation of composite complexes of tissues. Relapse of the disease was revealed in 17 patients. In the majority of cases, relapses developed during the first year after the operative intervention (10 cases). The control of the disease's course was obtained in 20 patients. In 8 of the 12 patients with free transplantation of flaps we managed to obtain long-term control over the disease's course (more than 5 years). Hence, free microsurgical transplantation of compound complexes of tissues may be considered as a method of choice for closing the defect after excising an AVM in the area of the head and neck. Replacement of the defect with a well-vascularized tissue complex

  8. Radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, M; Runge, M; Kocher, M; Zähringer, M; Treuer, H; Sturm, V

    2004-07-27

    The authors evaluated the efficacy of radiosurgery (RS) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT AVMs). Two patients with seven HHT AVMs were treated by linear accelerator-RS. Complete obliteration was achieved 18 to 24 months post-treatment without side effects. Because HHT AVMs are small and multiple, RS is superior to microsurgery because it is noninvasive and all AVMs can be treated in one session regardless of their location. PMID:15277641

  9. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  10. Congenital malformations: an inquiry into classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed Central

    Kalter, H

    1998-01-01

    In the beginning, as a familiar book recalls, the earth was a formless void. And by separating light from dark, water from sky, life from dust, order came forth. Thus appeared organisation and categorisation. This is to say, classification, since to classify is to make for order and clarity. These are the qualities needed today for the study of congenital malformations and eventual control of their occurrence. What follows is an inquiry into the present state of this desideratum. PMID:9719373

  11. Parental perceptions of congenital cardiovascular malformations in their children.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Sameera; Saeedi, Osamah; Saleh, Doa'a A; Hamzeh, Hala; Hamid, Mohamed A; Crowell, Nancy; Boostrom, Camille; Loffredo, Christopher A; Jillson, Irene A

    2016-08-01

    We assessed parental attitudes towards congenital cardiovascular malformations in their children in a cross-sectional study in Egypt. Parents face many problems related to concerns about their child's prognosis, but these associations with parental stress have never been evaluated in Egypt or examined in relation to religiosity in a predominantly Muslim society. Accordingly, we conducted interviews in Cairo with mothers of 99 sequential infants born with conotruncal heart malformations (cases) and 65 mothers of age-matched controls. The survey assessed healthcare access and usage, knowledge of congenital cardiovascular malformations, religiosity, the Locus of Control Scale, and the Parenting Stress Index. Results showed that 45% of the mothers of cases had correct knowledge about their child's diagnosis; 85% were satisfied with the clinical care; and 79% reported that the cost of care was burdensome. Compared with parents of cases, parents of controls were more likely to report stress overall and all its subscales. Regarding belief about locus of control over health, God as a determining factor was given the highest endorsement. Mothers in the congenital cardiovascular malformations group reported a higher level of parental locus of control than did those in the control group. The correlations between stress and locus of control were stronger in the control than in the case group. Religiosity was related neither to stress nor to locus of control. Future studies can explore the roles that personal, familial, and societal factors play in exacerbating or reducing stress levels among parents of sick children, particularly in developing countries where economic pressures are acute. PMID:26561359

  12. Thoracoscopic anatomical resection of congenital lung malformations in adults

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Lidia; Ojanguren, Amaia; Dahdah, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations (CLM) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that may require surgical resection to prevent complications. Thoracoscopic resection of CLM has been reported in infants. Our goal was to state whether it can also be a viable option in adults. Between 2007 and 2014, 11 patients had a thoracoscopic resection of a CLM (six lobectomies and five anatomic segmentectomies) with satisfactory results. Although being more challenging in adults due to infectious sequellae, this approach is safe. PMID:25922729

  13. Headache and Chiari I Malformation in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Victorio, M Cristina; Khoury, Chaouki K

    2016-02-01

    Headache is a common problem in children and adolescents. Its recurrent and disabling nature may lead to use of neuroimaging to exclude secondary causes of headache such as Chiari I malformation (CM I). CM I has a variety of presentation with headache being the most common symptom. CM I can be asymptomatic and is also often found incidentally in neuroimaging done for conditions other than headache. This article reviews the spectrum of headache in patients with CM I. PMID:27017020

  14. [Anorectal malformations: their diagnosis and the initial decisions].

    PubMed

    de Espinosa, H

    1994-05-01

    The author presents the salient aspects of anorectal malformation which allow us to simplify their anatomical diagnosis. In many cases only clinical means are used while in others adequate use of technical studies are necessary. This enables us to reach therapeutic decisions in the simplest and most orderly fashion so that patients with these anomalies may be given the opportunity of attaining normal or near normal function. PMID:7991806

  15. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  16. Clinical and etiological heterogeneity in patients with tracheo-esophageal malformations and associated anomalies.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Erwin; Ploeg, Mirjam; van Bever, Yolande; Koopmans, Anna E; IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Rottier, Robbert J; Wijnen, Rene; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

    2014-08-01

    Esophageal Atresia (EA) is a severe developmental defect of the foregut that presents with or without a Tracheo-Esophageal Fistula (TEF). The prevalence of EA/TEF over time and around the world has been relatively stable. EA/TEF is manifested in a broad spectrum of anomalies: in some patients it manifests as an isolated atresia or fistula, but in over half it affects several organ systems. While the associated malformations are often those of the VACTERL spectrum (Vertebral, Anorectal, Cardiac, Tracheo-Esophageal, Renal and Limb), many patients are affected by other malformations, such as microcephaly, micrognathia, pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia, a single umbilical artery, and anomalies of the genitourinary, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Though EA/TEF is a genetically heterogeneous condition, recurrent genes and loci are sometimes affected. Tracheo-Esophageal (TE) defects are in fact a variable feature in several known single gene disorders and in patients with specific recurrent Copy Number Variations and structural chromosomal aberrations. At present, a causal genetic aberration can be identified in 11-12% of patients. In most, EA/TEF is a sporadic finding; the familial recurrence rate is low (1%). As this suggests that epigenetic and environmental factors also contribute to the disease, non-syndromic EA/TEF is generally believed to be a multifactorial condition. Several population-based studies and case reports describe a wide range of associated risks, including age, diabetes, drug use, herbicides, smoking and fetal alcohol exposure. The phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity seen in EA/TEF patients indicates not one underlying cause, but several. Unraveling the complex multifactorial and heterogeneous etiology of EA/TEF and associated features will require large cohorts of patients. Combined statistical analysis of component findings, genome sequencing, and genome wide association studies will elucidate new causal genetic defects and

  17. Congenital malformations of the central nervous system in spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed Central

    Creasy, M R; Alberman, E D

    1976-01-01

    A study of 2620 pregnancies ending in spontaneous abortion revealed a CNS defect in 3.6% of embryos and fetuses, and 3% of all complete conceptuses. The type of malformation observed varied with the gestational age at expulsion, encephaloceles being predominant in earlier specimens, while more typical anencephalus and spina bifida were more common among later abortions. Chromosome abnormalities were found in 40% of abortuses with CNS defects, but were almost entirely confined to those which were still at the embryonic stage of development. 53% of the latter were chromosomally abnormal, which is the same as the proportion found among embryos without a CNS malformation. Using published life-tables of recognized pregnancies it was estimated that the prevalence of anencephalus, spina bifida, or related malformation (other than hydrocephalus), without a chromosome anomaly, is 5.3 per thousand conceptuses at the beginning of the eighth week of gestation. By comparing this with the prevalence in total births, it was further estimated that only 24% of these are born alive, with 54% aborting spontaneously and 22% being stillborn. PMID:775092

  18. Environmental monitoring using malformed embryos of the amphipod Monoporeia affinis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundelin, B.; Eriksson, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis, such as embryonic malformation were confirmed as the most sensitive variable, when soft bottom microcosms were exposed to metals such as cadmium and lead, arsenic, organic compounds such as 4,5,6 trichloroguaiacol, contaminated sediment from areas impacted by heavy metals and pulp mill effluents. The effects were demonstrated also in low concentrations that did not significantly affect the meiofauna community. The microcosm test-system with high ecological realism could offer a possibility to translate laboratory results to the natural environments. Field surveys outside different types of pulp mills and metal works on the coast of the Gulf of Bothnia have confirmed the laboratory results. Significantly higher levels of malformed embryos of Monoporeia affinis were demonstrated in the impacted areas in comparison with reference areas. The reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis have been used in the national environmental monitoring program during two years and results indicated possibilities to distinguish between effects of xenobiotica and secondary eutrophication effects, such as unsaturated oxygen condition and occurrence of sulfides, which resulted in increased frequencies of dead eggs but not affected the frequencies of malformed eggs and embryos.

  19. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  20. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  1. Surgical and Endovascular Treatment for Spinal Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, Toshiki; ENDO, Hidenori; SATO, Kenichi; MATSUMOTO, Yasushi; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a broad term that constitutes diverse vascular pathologies. To date, various classification schemes for spinal AVM have been proposed in literature, which helped neurosurgeons understand the pathophysiology of the disease and determine an optimal treatment strategy. To discuss indications and results of surgical and endovascular interventions for spinal AVM, this article refers to the following classification proposed by Anson and Spetzler in 1992: type I, dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF); type II, glomus intramedullary AVM; type III, juvenile malformations; and type IV, perimedullary AVF. In general, complete obliteration of the fistula is a key for better outcome in type I dural and type IV perimedullary AVFs. On the other hand, in type II glomus and type III juvenile malformations, functional preservation, instead of pursuing angiographical cure, is the main goal of the treatment. In such cases, reduction of the shunt flow can alleviate clinical symptoms. Proper management of spinal AVM should start with neurological examination and understanding of angioarchitectures, which provide critical information that guides the indication and modality of intervention. Finally, close collaboration of the microsurgical and endovascular teams are mandatory for successful treatment. PMID:26948701

  2. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from genes to proteins to disease.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Kalani, M Yashar S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eales, Justin; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past half century molecular biology has led to great advances in our understanding of angio- and vasculogenesis and in the treatment of malformations resulting from these processes gone awry. Given their sporadic and familial distribution, their developmental and pathological link to capillary telangiectasias, and their observed chromosomal abnormalities, cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are regarded as akin to cancerous growths. Although the exact pathological mechanisms involved in the formation of CCMs are still not well understood, the identification of 3 genetic loci has begun to shed light on key developmental pathways involved in CCM pathogenesis. Cavernous malformations can occur sporadically or in an autosomal dominant fashion. Familial forms of CCMs have been attributed to mutations at 3 different loci implicated in regulating important processes such as proliferation and differentiation of angiogenic precursors and members of the apoptotic machinery. These processes are important for the generation, maintenance, and pruning of every vessel in the body. In this review the authors highlight the latest discoveries pertaining to the molecular genetics of CCMs, highlighting potential new therapeutic targets for the treatment of these lesions. PMID:21962164

  3. Advances in ultrasound imaging for congenital malformations during early gestation

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, William F.; Jolley, Jennifer A.; Simpson, Lynn L.

    2015-01-01

    With refinement in ultrasound technology, detection of fetal structural abnormalities has improved and there have been detailed reports of the natural history and expected outcomes for many anomalies. The ability to either reassure a high-risk woman with normal intrauterine images or offer comprehensive counseling and offer options in cases of strongly suspected lethal or major malformations has shifted prenatal diagnoses to the earliest possible gestational age. When indicated, scans in early gestation are valuable in accurate gestational dating. Stricter sonographic criteria for early nonviability guard against unnecessary intervention. Most birth defects are without known risk factors, and detection of certain malformations is possible in the late first trimester. The best time for a standard complete fetal and placental scan is 18–20 weeks. In addition, certain soft anatomic markers provide clues to chromosomal aneuploidy risk. Maternal obesity and multifetal pregnancies are now more common and further limit early gestation visibility. Other advanced imaging techniques during early gestation in select cases of suspected malformations include fetal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25820190

  4. Mitochondrial Factors and VACTERL Association-Related Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, S.; Solomon, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    VACTERL/VATER association is a group of congenital malformations characterized by at least 3 of the following findings: vertebral defects, anal atresia, cardiac defects, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal anomalies, and limb abnormalities. To date, no unifying etiology for VACTERL/VATER association has been established, and there is strong evidence for causal heterogeneity. VACTERL/VATER association has many overlapping characteristics with other congenital disorders that involve multiple malformations. In addition to these other conditions, some of which have known molecular causes, certain aspects of VACTERL/VATER association have similarities with the manifestations of disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction can result from a number of distinct causes and can clinically manifest in diverse presentations; accurate diagnosis can be challenging. Case reports of individuals with VACTERL association and confirmed mitochondrial dysfunction allude to the possibility of mitochondrial involvement in the pathogenesis of VACTERL/VATER association. Further, there is biological plausibility involving mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible etiology related to a diverse group of congenital malformations, including those seen in at least a subset of individuals with VACTERL association. PMID:23653577

  5. Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

  6. Chiari malformation type I: a new MRI classification.

    PubMed

    Amer, T A; el-Shmam, O M

    1997-01-01

    Thirty patients with Chiari I malformation were examined by MRI over 2-year period. All patients underwent MRI scan before and after surgical decompression of the posterior fossa. Images of the craniocervical junction confirmed tonsillar herniation in all cases and allowed the definition of two anatomically distinct types of Chiari malformation. Twenty-one of the 30 patients (70%) had concomitant syringomyelia and were classified as type A, while the remaining 9 patients (30%) had evidence of frank herniation of the cerebellar tonsils below the foramen magnum without evidence of syringomyelia and were labeled type B. Type A patients had a predominant central cord symptomatology; type B patients exhibited signs and symptoms of brain stem or cerebellar compression. The concomitant cord cavitary lesions (syringomyelia) were noncommunicating (isolated syrinxes), which were separated from the fourth ventricle by a syrinx-free segment of normal spinal cord. Holocord hydromyelic cavities were seen in 8 out of 21 patients with syringomyelia, isolated cervical cavities were seen in 4 patients, while combined cervical and thoracic cavities were seen in 9 patients. Kinking of the medullocervical junction and brain stem was seen in 20 out of 30 patients (67%). MRI has proved to be an excellent, noninvasive means of studying of the craniocervical anatomy; it has allowed a classification of Chiari malformation based on objective anatomic criteria with prognostic and clinical relevance. PMID:9223040

  7. A gene prenature ovarian failure associated with eyelid malformation maps to chromosomes 3q22-q23

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure and XX gonadal dysgenesis leading to female infertility have been reported in association with an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation of the eyelids: blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES; MIM 110100). This association distinguishes BPES type I from BPES type II, in which affected females are fertile and the transmission occurs through both sexes. Recently, a gene responsible for BPES type II has been mapped to chromosome 3q22-q23, and the critical region for the gene location has been reduced to the interval between loci D3S1615 and D3S1316. Hitherto, however, no information regarding the localization of the gene for BPES type I, in which female ovarian failure is associated with eyelid malformation, has been available. We have studied two independent families affected with BPES type I, including a total of 12 affected individuals (6 infertile women) and 6 healthy relatives. The diagnostic criteria for the ophthalmological anomaly included (1) reduced horizontal diameter of palpebral fissures, (2) drooping of the upper eyelids, and (3) an abnormal skinfold running from the lower lids. Telecanthus and a flat nasal bridge were present in most cases. In both families the disease was transmitted only by the male, and no affected woman of childbearing age was fertile. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A Mutation of β-Actin That Alters Depolymerization Dynamics Is Associated with Autosomal Dominant Developmental Malformations, Deafness, and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Procaccio, Vincent; Salazar, Gloria; Ono, Shoichiro; Styers, Melanie L.; Gearing, Marla; Davila, Antonio; Jimenez, Richard; Juncos, Jorge; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Meroni, Germana; Fontanella, Bianca; Sontag, Estelle; Sontag, Jean Marie; Faundez, Victor; Wainer, Bruce H.

    2006-01-01

    Actin, one of the major filamentous cytoskeletal molecules, is involved in a variety of cellular functions. Whereas an association between muscle actin mutations and skeletal and cardiac myopathies has been well documented, reports of human disease arising from mutations of nonmuscle actin genes have been rare. We have identified a missense point mutation in the gene coding for β-actin that results in an arginine-to-tryptophan substitution at position 183. The disease phenotype includes developmental midline malformations, sensory hearing loss, and a delayed-onset generalized dystonia syndrome in monozygotic twins. Cellular studies of a lymphoblastoid cell line obtained from an affected patient demonstrated morphological abnormalities of the actin cytoskeleton and altered actin depolymerization dynamics in response to latrunculin A, an actin monomer–sequestering drug. Resistance to latrunculin A was also observed in NIH 3T3 cells expressing the mutant actin. These findings suggest that mutations in nonmuscle actins may be associated with a broad spectrum of developmental malformations and/or neurological abnormalities such as dystonia. PMID:16685646

  9. A rare subtelomeric deletion syndrome: Wolf Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zorlu, P; Eksioglu, A S; Ozkan, M; Tos, T; Senel, S

    2014-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by a deletion of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4, and is characterized by psychomotor retardation, seizures, congenital malformations, and typical facial appearance including 'Greek warrior helmet' appearance of the nose. The form and the severity of clinical manifestations vary according to the size and location of the deletion. Major complications are severe growth retardation, developmental delay, seizures, feeding difficulties due to hypotonia, and predisposition to respiratory infections. Patients will benefit from supportive therapy and special education. It is important in terms of prognosis to provide counseling to families in this respect. We present here a case with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome in order to remind its rarity and the ability of the patients' progress in the areas of motor skills, speech, social interaction. PMID:25365852

  10. Prenatal diagnsis of intracardiac hamartoma and Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gedikbasi, Ali; Oztarhan, Kazim; Yararbas, Kanay; Arslan, Oguz; Yildirim, Dogukan; Oztek, Ibrahim; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with a higher frequency of heart defects detected prenatally when compared to postnatal reports. The most common heart defects detected prenatally are hypoplastic left heart syndrome and coarctation of the aorta. We report a case involving a fetus at 16 gestational weeks with a septated cystic hygroma located on the neck and head, an interventricular septal mass, a hypoplastic left ventricle due to aortic stenosis, mitral stenosis, and a hypoplastic aortic arch with a karyotype of mos 45, X, [47 cells]/47, XXX [3 cells]. The autopsy findings confirmed our prenatal diagnosis with a final diagnosis of Turner syndrome and congenital cardiac vascular malformation. PMID:20704479

  11. Clinical features in adult patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, E; Rodríguez-González, F

    2014-06-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) encompasses deletions at the distal part of the short arm of one chromosome 4 (4p16 region). Clinical signs frequently include a typical facial appearance, mental retardation, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia with decreased muscle bulk and seizures besides congenital heart malformations, midline defects, urinary tract malformations and brain, hearing and ophthalmologic malformations. Pathogenesis of WHS is multigenic and many factors are involved in prediction of prognosis such as extent of deletion, the occurrence of severe chromosome anomalies, the severe of seizures, the existence of serious internal, mainly cardiac, abnormalities and the degree of mental retardation. The phenotype of adult with WHS is in general similar to that of childhood being facial dysmorphism, growth retardation and mental retardation the rule in both adults and children. Avoid long-term complications and provide rehabilitation programs and genetic counseling may be essential in these patients. PMID:24656633

  12. Bill malformations in double-crested cormorants with low exposure to organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, T.; Fox, G.A.; Danesik, K.L.

    1999-12-01

    Eight of 20 newly hatched double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), captured at Dore Lake (Saskatchewan, Canada) and raised in captivity, developed malformed bills when they were 2 to 3 weeks old. Malformation was characterized by abnormal flexure and rotation of the maxilla and mandible, resulting in a crossed bill. By radiography, the premaxillary and dental bones were misshapen. Morphologically similar malformed bills in free-living comorants have been attributed to exposure to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. However, the concentrations of total PCBs in the livers of these captive cormorants with malformed bills and in their diet were lower than have been previously associated with such malformations and were considered too low to have been the cause. The bill malformations may have been caused by deficiency of vitamin D{sub 3}, because the cormorants were kept indoors without exposure to ultraviolet light and were fed frozen fish that may have been deficient in this vitamin.

  13. Recurrent giant cell fibroblastoma: Malignancy predisposition in Kabuki syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Stergidou, Dorothea; Fryssira, Helena; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by distinctive facial phenotype, mental retardation, and internal organ malformations. Mutations of the epigenetic genes KMT2D and KDM6A cause dysregulation of certain developmental genes and account for the multiple congenital anomalies of the syndrome. Eight cases of malignancies have been reported in young patients with Kabuki syndrome although a causative association to the syndrome has not been established. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with Kabuki syndrome who developed a tumor on the right side of her neck. A relapsing tumor 19 months after initial excision, proved to be giant cell fibroblastoma. Τhis is the first report of giant cell fibroblastoma -a rare tumor of childhood- in a patient with Kabuki syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26898171

  14. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Chiari 1 Malformation Co-occurring in a Child.

    PubMed

    Osuagwu, Ferdnand C; Amalraj, Benedict; Noveloso, Bernard D; Aikoye, Salisu A; Bradley, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Very few studies have shown associations between autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and Chiari 1 malformation. Here, we report an 10-year-old male that presented after having seizures with a history of Chiari 1 malformation, autism spectrum disorder and ADHD with moderate mental retardation and speech delay. This case highlights the fact that autism spectrum disorder as biologically based neurodevelopmental disorder with altered brain growth may be associated with Chiari 1 malformation and ADHD. PMID:27050897

  15. Umbilical cyst due to patent urachus in a fetus with complete urorectal septum malformation sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kodandapani, Sreelakshmi; Shetty, Jyothi; Kumar, Pratap; Girisha, Katta M.

    2012-01-01

    Urorectal septum malformation sequence is a sporadic malformation due to failure of septation of primitive cloaca with no anal opening. Umbilical cyst can be associated with chromosomal aneuploidy such as trisomy 18 or trisomy 13. We report on a fetus with complete urorectal septum malformation sequence with an umbilical cyst resulting from a patent urachus and with meconium as its content. This report adds to the variety of the causes of umbilical cyst and the spectrum of consequences of urorectal septal defect.

  16. Thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation as a rare cause of isolated intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Entwistle, John J; Arnold, Michael A; Pierson, Christopher R; Governale, Lance S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare vascular lesions that most frequently present with back pain, radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy. Neurological decline is typically secondary to progressive radiculopathy, myelopathy, venous thrombosis, and stroke. Few case reports have described thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformations that present with both subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. This is the first reported case of a thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation presenting with isolated intraventricular hemorrhage on initial imaging followed by acute and fatal rehemorrhage. PMID:24784978

  17. Fistula of stapes footplate caused by pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid in inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, F; Hagen, R; Hofmann, E

    1997-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inner ear are well described, though the combination with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks remains controversial. In this paper a case of a bilateral Mondini malformation with a CSF otorrhea on one side is reported. The malformed stapes contains a perforation in the middle of the footplate and associated thinning analogous to a pothole in a mountain stream. The histological findings support the hypothesis of pulsatile flow of CSF as origin of the perforation of the footplate. PMID:9166882

  18. A case report of aphallia with urorectal septum malformation sequence in a newborn: a very rarely seen condition

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Ravinder; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Aphallia (absence of penis) is an extremely rare abnormality which has rarely been described in medical literature and can be part of the urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS). URSMS has hardly been reported in medical literature and includes the absence of perineal and anal openings in association with ambiguous genitalia and urogenital, colonic, and lumbosacral anomalies. This case report tells the importance of detailed examination of infants that are diagnosed with aphallia. We report a case of a newborn who was diagnosed as aphallia with the URSMS syndrome after birth. The neonate had an endocardial cushion defect (atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect) and bilateral agenesis of the kidney. The neonate succumbed to death secondary to hypoplastic lung leading to respiratory failure. PMID:26673776

  19. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Amit; Fischer, Stephanie M; Kimberling, William J; Smith, Richard J H

    2007-07-15

    Branchio-oto-renal syndrome, a phenotype consisting of hearing loss, auricular malformations, branchial arch remnants, and renal anomalies is now recognized as one of the more common forms of autosomal dominant syndromic hearing impairment. Three loci known to be associated with the BOR phenotype have been identified and two genes that act in a regulatory network have been cloned, EYA1 and SIX1. EYA1 and SIX1 are homologous to genes involved in Drosophila eye development, eyes absent gene (eya), and sine oculis (so), respectively. EYA1, a transcriptional co-activator has a conserved, 271-amino acid, C-terminal known as the Eya Domain (ED). SIX1 has two highly conserved domains; a homeodomain (HD) and a specific Six-domain (SD) whose products function as transcription factors with specific DNA-binding activity that are crucial for protein-protein interaction. To determine the molecular basis for the organ defects that occur in BOR syndrome, many studies have focused on the effects of mutations to EYA and effects of mutations of the EYA-SIX regulatory system. However, over 60% of BOR syndrome patients do not have known mutations in EYA1 and relatively little is known about mutations to SIX1. Further evaluation of SIX1 and its related target genes may provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of BOR syndrome and offer greater clues to the disease mechanisms. PMID:17238186

  20. Cerebral cavernous malformations associated to meningioma: High penetrance in a novel family mutated in the PDCD10 gene

    PubMed Central

    Garaci, Francesco; Marsili, Luisa; Riant, Florence; Marziali, Simone; Cécillon, Michaelle; Pasquarelli, Roberto; Sangiuolo, Federica; Floris, Roberto; Novelli, Giuseppe; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Multiple familial meningiomas occur in rare genetic syndromes, particularly neurofibromatosis type 2. The association of meningiomas and cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been reported in few patients in the medical literature. The purpose of our study is to corroborate a preferential association of CCMs and multiple meningiomas in subjects harbouring mutations in the PDCD10 gene (also known as CCM3). Three members of an Italian family affected by seizures underwent conventional brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast agent including gradient echo (GRE) imaging. The three CCM-causative genes were sequenced by Sanger method. Literature data reporting patients with coexistence of CCMs and meningiomas were reviewed. MRI demonstrated dural-based meningioma-like lesions associated to multiple parenchymal CCMs in all affected individuals. A disease-causative mutation in the PDCD10 gene (p.Gln112PhefsX13) was identified. Based on neuroradiological and molecular data as well as on literature review, we outline a consistent association between PDCD10 mutations and a syndrome of CCMs with multiple meningiomas. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple/familial meningioma syndromes. In case of multiple/familial meningioma the use of appropriate MRI technique may include GRE and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to rule out CCM. By contrast, proper post-gadolinium scans may aid defining dural lesions in CCM patients and are indicated in PDCD10-mutated individuals. PMID:26246098

  1. Trematode infection causes malformations and population effects in a declining New Zealand fish.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David W; Thomas, Harriet; Thieltges, David W; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    1. Animal malformations engender wide public and scientific concern because of associated environmental health risks. This is highlighted by increased incidence of limb malformations in amphibians associated with trematode infections and disturbance. Malformations may signal new emerging disease threats, but whether the phenomenon is broadly applicable across taxa, or has population-scale impacts, is unknown. 2. Malformations are widely reported in fish and, until now, have been attributed mainly to contaminants. We tested whether the trematode Telogaster opisthorchis caused severe malformations, leading to population effects, in Galaxias anomalus, a threatened New Zealand freshwater fish. 3. Experimental infection of larval fish caused increasing spinal malformation and mortality with infection intensity that closely matched field patterns. Field malformation frequency peaked in January (65%), before declining sharply in February (25%) and remaining low thereafter. 4. The peak occurred during a 'critical window' of larval development, with the decline coincident with a population crash, indicating that malformation was causing mortality in the field. 5. The occurrence of such critical developmental windows may explain why this mechanism of population impact has been overlooked. With global environmental stressors predicted to enhance trematode infections, our results show that parasite-induced malformation, and its population-scale impacts, could be more widespread than previously considered. PMID:19886894

  2. Ruptured spinal arteriovenous malformation: Presenting as stunned myocardium and neurogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mehesry, Tasneem H.; Shaikh, Nissar; Malmstrom, Mohammad F.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome usually defined as an acute pulmonary edema occurring shortly after a central neurologic insult. NPE was identified 100 years ago, but it is still underappreciated in the clinical setup. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury. It has a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated appropriately. Similarly, neurogenic shock is a known complication of spinal cord injury reported incidence is more than 20% in isolated upper cervical spinal injury. But NPE is rare to occur, and stunned myocardium (SM) is not reported in spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) rupture. SM is a reversible cardiomyopathy resulting in transient left ventricular dysfunction which has been described to occur in the setting of catecholamine release during situations of physiologic stress. We report a case of high spinal AVM rupture presenting as SM, NPE, and neurogenic shock. Case Description: A 32-year-old male who presented with sudden onset of pain and weakness in upper limbs. Imaging studies showed AVM rupture by imaging techniques. Initially, the patient had severe hypertension, respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilation, then he developed hypotension, bradycardia, and asystole, which required immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation and atropine. He remained with quadriplegia and suffered from frequent episodes of bradycardia and asystole. Conclusions: Spinal AVM rupture can present as neurogenic shock, stunned myocardium, and pulmonary edema. Early recognition of AVM rupture and prompt surgical intervention, as well as aggressive treatment of shock, may enhance recovery and decrease the long-term morbidity. PMID:26539315

  3. Split Hand/Foot Malformation Associated with 7q21.3 Microdeletion: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sivasankaran, Aswini; Srikanth, Ambika; Kulshreshtha, Pooja S; Anuradha, Deenadayalu; Kadandale, Jayarama S; Samuel, Chandra R

    2016-02-01

    Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) or ectrodactyly is a rare genetic condition affecting limb development. SHFM shows clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It can present as an isolated form or in combination with additional anomalies affecting the long bones (nonsyndromic form) or other organ systems including the craniofacial, genitourinary and ectodermal structures (syndromic ectrodactyly). This study reports a girl with SHFM who also exhibited developmental delay, mild dysmorphic facial features and sensorineural hearing loss. High-resolution banding analysis indicated an interstitial deletion within the 7q21 band. FISH using locus-specific BAC probes confirmed the microdeletion of 7q21.3. Chromosomal microarray analysis also revealed a microdeletion of 1.856 Mb in 7q21.3. However, a larger 8.44-Mb deletion involving bands 7q21.11q21.2 was observed, and the breakpoints were refined. The phenotype and the candidate genes underlying the pathogenesis of this disorder are discussed. PMID:27022330

  4. Split Hand/Foot Malformation Associated with 7q21.3 Microdeletion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankaran, Aswini; Srikanth, Ambika; Kulshreshtha, Pooja S.; Anuradha, Deenadayalu; Kadandale, Jayarama S.; Samuel, Chandra R.

    2016-01-01

    Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) or ectrodactyly is a rare genetic condition affecting limb development. SHFM shows clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It can present as an isolated form or in combination with additional anomalies affecting the long bones (nonsyndromic form) or other organ systems including the craniofacial, genitourinary and ectodermal structures (syndromic ectrodactyly). This study reports a girl with SHFM who also exhibited developmental delay, mild dysmorphic facial features and sensorineural hearing loss. High-resolution banding analysis indicated an interstitial deletion within the 7q21 band. FISH using locus-specific BAC probes confirmed the microdeletion of 7q21.3. Chromosomal microarray analysis also revealed a microdeletion of 1.856 Mb in 7q21.3. However, a larger 8.44-Mb deletion involving bands 7q21.11q21.2 was observed, and the breakpoints were refined. The phenotype and the candidate genes underlying the pathogenesis of this disorder are discussed. PMID:27022330

  5. Neurologic variant laryngomalacia associated with Chiari malformation and cervicomedullary compression: case reports.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Rajanya S; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Thompson, Dana M

    2011-02-01

    Two infants presented with intermittent stridor and evidence of laryngomalacia on flexible laryngoscopy. The first was a 10-month-old girl who had undergone 3 supraglottoplasty surgeries at an outside institution, without long-term resolution of symptoms. She was found during our evaluation to have a Chiari malformation. Laryngomalacia symptoms resolved after suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy, and the patient remained symptom-free at 6-month follow-up. The second infant was a 24-day-old boy with velocardiofacial syndrome who was found to have posterior cervicomedullary junction compression at the level of C1. He underwent C1 laminectomy for decompression of the brain stem, which resulted in immediate resolution of symptoms, and he remained symptom-free at 12-month follow-up. Neurologic abnormalities have been reported in up to 50% of infants with laryngomalacia. As such, brain stem dysfunction should be considered among the causes of laryngomalacia during evaluation, especially in patients with failure of supraglottoplasty. Both of these infants had resolution of symptoms after their neurosurgical procedures. PMID:21391421

  6. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Landis, Benjamin J; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with NGS gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high-throughput functional testing of variants contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offsprings, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long-term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialog between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients' health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients. PMID:27504451

  7. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5–8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs. PMID:22929023

  8. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Benjamin J.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with NGS gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high-throughput functional testing of variants contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offsprings, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long-term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialog between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients’ health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients. PMID:27504451

  9. Review of accessory tragus with highlights of its associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Bahar; Khachemoune, Amor

    2014-12-01

    Accessory tragus is a developmental defect involving malformation of part of the external ear. It is a moderately rare congenital condition reported in 1858 by Birkett for the first time. Histological features of accessory tragus include a thin layer of stratum corneum with a rugated epidermis, presence of eccrine glands, and irregular spatial positioning of vellus hair follicles accompanied by sebaceous glands. Accessory tragus is commonly a limited deformity; however, it can be a sign of associated congenital syndromes. It has been shown to be associated with Goldenhar syndrome, Townes-Brocks syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, VACTERL syndrome, and Wolf-Hirschhron syndrome. Surgical excision, the most common form of management of accessory tragus lesions, typically leads to a positive outcome. An extensive search was performed using pubmed.gov, Embase, MedLine, and Googlescholar.com using key words: accessory tragus, congenital malformations of ear, first branchial arch, and embryology. In this paper, we review the clinical and histological presentation, associated syndromes, management, and outcome of accessory tragus. PMID:25266223

  10. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable. PMID:26049589

  11. Current Therapeutic Options in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a vascular malformation syndrome consisting of a facial port-wine birthmark associated with malformed leptomeningeal blood vessels and a choroid "angioma" of the eye. It is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that occurs sporadically, is not inherited, and is caused by a somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ. In patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome, brain involvement typically presents in infancy with seizures, strokes, and stroke-like episodes, and a range of neurologic impairments. Standard treatment includes laser therapy for the birthmark, control of glaucoma through eyedrops or surgery, and the use of anticonvulsants. Increasingly low-dose aspirin is offered. Treatment with propranolol has been tried generally without the dramatic results seen in hemangiomas. Treatment with an anticonvulsant or low-dose aspirin or both before the onset of seizures is an option. Surgical resection may be offered to those whose seizures are medically refractory. Endocrine, medical rehabilitation and cognitive comorbidities are important to manage. In the future, new therapeutic options are likely to be offered stemming from preclinical studies and small pilot clinical trials currently ongoing. Discovery of the causative somatic mosaic mutation suggests new insights into the pathophysiology of this vascular malformation disorder, and potential novel treatment strategies for future study. The mutation results in constitutive overactivation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and the HIPPO-YAP pathways and inhibitors of these pathways may in the future prove useful in the treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:26706016

  12. Current Therapeutic Options in Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Comi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a vascular malformation syndrome consisting of a facial port-wine birthmark associated with malformed leptomeningeal blood vessels and a choroid “angioma” of the eye. It is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that occurs sporadically, is not inherited, and is caused by a somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ. In patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome, brain involvement typically presents in infancy with seizures, strokes, and stroke-like episodes, and a range of neurologic impairments. Standard treatment includes laser therapy for the birthmark, control of glaucoma through eyedrops or surgery, and the use of anticonvulsants. Increasingly low-dose aspirin is offered. Treatment with propranolol has been tried generally without the dramatic results seen in hemangiomas. Treatment with an anticonvulsant or low-dose aspirin or both before the onset of seizures is an option. Surgical resection may be offered to those whose seizures are medically refractory. Endocrine, medical rehabilitation and cognitive comorbidities are important to manage. In the future, new therapeutic options are likely to be offered stemming from preclinical studies and small pilot clinical trials currently ongoing. Discovery of the causative somatic mosaic mutation suggests new insights into the pathophysiology of this vascular malformation disorder, and potential novel treatment strategies for future study. The mutation results in constitutive overactivation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and the HIPPO-YAP pathways and inhibitors of these pathways may in the future prove useful in the treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:26706016

  13. Williams-Beuren syndrome--a rare cause of recurrent hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Botnaru, Victor; Rusu, Doina; Munteanu, Oxana

    2016-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare genetic disease with a distinctive constellation of clinical findings. The disease can be diagnosed clinically by a recognizable pattern of malformations, including cardiovascular malformations, a characteristic facial dysmorphism, as well as neurological and cognitive features. We present the case of a 23-years-old woman repeatedly admitted to Pulmonology Clinic for massive hemoptysis. Diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome was revealed by clinical findings and confirmed by CT-angiography data of cardiovascular malformations and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) genetic test. WBS is a multisystem disorder and usually is recognized by clinician. If clinical impression is not clearly consistent with WBS, FISH remains the most widely used test. PMID:27209840

  14. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  15. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  16. The anterior interhemispheric approach to a third ventricular cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    The anterior interhemispheric approach is a workhorse for treatment of lesions in the third ventricle. In this case, we demonstrate the utility of this approach for resecting a complex third ventricular cavernous malformation. We discuss patient positioning, optimal location of the craniotomy, and surgical resection techniques for safe removal of these lesions. We also demonstrate the importance of gravity retraction using the falx to prevent injury to the dominant frontal lobe. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/38woc28er7M . PMID:26722693

  17. NREM Sleep Parasomnia Associated with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Ameet S.; Walker, James M.; Farney, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Parasomnias are common sleep disorders in children, and most cases resolve naturally by adolescence.1 They represent arousal disorders beginning in NREM sleep and are generally non-concerning in children. The diagnosis can usually be made by clinical assessment, and testing with polysomnography is not routinely indicated.2 However, in certain cases with atypical features, polysomnography and more extensive neurologic evaluation are medically indicated. Citation: Daftary AS; Walker JM; Farney RJ. NREM Sleep Parasomnia associated with Chiari I malformation. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(5):526-529. PMID:22003350

  18. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  19. [The mother figure of children with malformations. A phenomenological study].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, M C

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this research refers to children suffering congenital malformation through an analysis of their mothers' reactions in dealing with such a situation. It deals with a descriptive study along the qualitative line through the phenomenological approach. In order to attain that purpose, interviews were made and data collected. The analysis was built under the view of meaning, the orientation of those mothers, i.e. the outlook of the world from their perspective, which was tracked from the meanings (units of meaning) to actual sense based on the philosophical insight of Dr. Martin Heidegger, aiming at characterizing the mother-being in her daily life. PMID:9775933

  20. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  1. Osteopetrosis and Chiari type I malformation: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; Cıkla, Ulaş; Bauer, Andrew; Başkaya, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis (OP) is hereditary X-linked, autosomal recessive (ARO), or autosomal dominant (ADO) skeletal disease. ARO has two subtypes, which are infantile malignant and intermediate type. ARO and X-linked OP have poor clinical outcome. ADO is called adult benign type because of the normal life expectancy, which has type I and type II. Here, the authors present an ADO patient with Chiari type I. Concomitant ADO with Chiari type I malformation is an extremely rare condition. Literature research yielded only one case report to date. PMID:26503583

  2. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  3. Arteriovenous malformation of the penis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Go, S; Tokiwa, K; Imazu, M; Higuchi, K; Iwai, N

    2000-07-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are common benign lesions in infancy, although they are rare in the genitourinary region. The authors report on a 2-year-old boy with a penile AVM. At presentation, there was venous dilatation and tortuosity of the prepuce without ulceration, which had been recognized at 1 year of age. Left internal iliac arteriography showed early venous filling leading to the diagnosis of AVM. Surgical excision was performed at age 2. The postoperative course was uneventful. At the 6-month follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence. This is the first report of a penile AVM that was successfully treated by surgical excision. PMID:10917314

  4. Delivery by cesarean section after embolization for vaginal arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toru; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Ota, Satoshi; Kamei, Tetsuya; Tateno, Masaya

    2008-01-01

    Vaginal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) can lead to life-threatening complications on delivery. No deliveries have been reported after selective embolization for a vaginal AVM. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was found to have an arterial pulsatile mass on the left vaginal wall. The findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were consistent with an AVM. Selective transcatheter embolization for the AVM was done and, afterwards, the patient was found to be pregnant. The prenatal course was uneventful and the patient underwent elective cesarean delivery at term. Vaginal AVM can be successfully treated with selective embolization, with a good obstetric outcome. PMID:17671389

  5. Type I Chiari malformation presenting with laryngomalacia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Christopher; Ulualp, Seckin O

    2015-08-01

    We describe clinical features of an infant with laryngomalacia and dysphagia caused by type I Chiari malformation (CM-I). A 12-month-old child presented with a 6 month history of progressive stridor, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux. Examination of the airway and swallowing function indicated mild laryngomalacia and aspiration with all consistencies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated CM-I. Symptoms were resolved after posterior fossa decompression. CM-I, typically diagnosed later in life, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of laryngomalacia and dysphagia. High clinical suspicion and thorough search for abnormalities ensure early diagnosis and proper management of children with neurologic variant laryngomalacia. PMID:26031456

  6. [Otoneurologic symptoms associated with Arnold-Chiari syndrome type I].

    PubMed

    Urban, Irena; Namysłowski, Grzegorz; Morawski, Krzysztof; Wojtacha, Maciej

    2004-01-01

    This study presents two cases of Arnold-Chiari malformation type I. In a 26-year old man, right side deafness and left side sensorineural hearing loss at high frequencies occurred. Another patient, a 48-year old man also complained of sensorineural hearing loss and dizziness, that appeared a year and half ago. In addition, this patient had episodes of vertigo with nausea and vomit that occurred about one year before main symptoms. In both patients ENT examinations were performed as well as an audiological diagnostic battery including tonal- and impedance-audiometry, auditory brainstem responses, distortion product otoacoustic emissions and electroencephalography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed pathological changes in the cerebello-pontine angle region that allowed diagnosing Arnold-Chiari malformation in both cases. Additionally, angio-MRI performed in patient with right side deafness revealed cochleovestibular nerve compression syndrome on the same side. Presumably, both anomalies occurring simultaneously in this patient might be responsible for deafness in the right ear, instead of mild or moderate hearing loss and tinnitus usually expected according to the literature. The paper presented two cases of Arnold-Chiari malformation with co-existing cochleovestibular nerve compression syndrome in one case. The importance of both audiological diagnostic battery and MRI in diagnostic procedures of this malformation has been demonstrated. PMID:15307473

  7. [The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome or a broad thumb-hallux syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hosek, J; Borková, A

    2008-01-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (broad thumb-hallux syndrome) is a rare congenital disease with prevalence 1:125,000 of life-born children. It is characterised by multiplex malformations, which includes growth and psychomotor retardation. Up to this date, over 1000 cases have been described in literature. This review is mainly focused on a description of symptoms, which occur in the syndrome mentioned above and serve as main diagnostic markers. Mutations in the CBP and the p300 genes have been associated with this disease as well. Therefore, substantial part is devoted to aetiology, where emphasis is put on a genetic origin of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Possibilities of this diagnose are mentioned at the end of the article. PMID:18401977

  8. DOORS syndrome: phenotype, genotype and comparison with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Philippe M; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-09-01

    DOORS syndrome (Deafness, Onychodystrophy, Osteodystrophy, mental Retardation, Seizures) is characterized mainly by sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small nails of hands and feet, intellectual deficiency, and seizures. Half of the patients with all clinical features have mutations in TBC1D24. We review here the manifestations of patients clinically diagnosed with DOORS syndrome. In this cohort of 32 families (36 patients) we detected 13 individuals from 10 families with TBC1D24 mutations. Subsequent whole exome sequencing in the cohort showed the same de novoSMARCB1 mutation (c.1130G>A), known to cause Coffin-Siris syndrome, in two patients. Distinguishing features include retinal anomalies, Dandy-Walker malformation, scoliosis, rocker bottom feet, respiratory difficulties and absence of seizures, and 2-oxoglutaric aciduria in the patients with the SMARCB1 mutation. We briefly discuss the heterogeneity of the DOORS syndrome phenotype and the differential diagnosis of this condition. PMID:25169651

  9. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, Ö; Özgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  10. Operative Management of OSAS in a Complex Case of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Elena; Cavaliere, Michele; Castagna, Giovanni; Marino, Anna; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Iengo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in childhood with high prevalence in syndromic subjects with craniofacial malformations. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartoneoplastic disorder associated with disproportionate and asymmetric overgrowth of body parts and hypertrophy or malformation of lymphatic tissues, such as palatine tonsils. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with Proteus Syndrome (PS) and suffering from OSAS due to asymmetric palatine tonsillar hypertrophy, treated with partial resection of left tonsil. To avoid the risk of a general anesthesia and remove only the obstructive portion of the palatine tonsil bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFITT) under local anesthesia was performed. Recovery of the obstructive respiratory disease was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of partial tonsillar resection performed in a patient with PS suffering from OSAS under local anesthesia. PMID:26199778

  11. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  12. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  13. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  14. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  15. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  16. Speech and Language in Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: A Case-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; De Grande, Sigrid; Van Buggenhout, Griet; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), a condition resulting from a distal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4, is usually associated with a severe phenotypic expression including multiple malformations, delayed psychomotor development, and profound learning disabilities. As far as communicative development is concerned, speech is usually absent…

  17. Familial congenital anterior cervical hypertrichosis associated with peripheral sensory and motor neuropathy--a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Trattner, A; Hodak, E; Sagie-Lerman, T; David, M; Nitzan, M; Garty, B Z

    1991-11-01

    We present three patients with familial congenital hypertrichosis localized to the anterior cervical region, associated with peripheral sensory and motor neuropathy. This association may represent a new neurocutaneous syndrome. The association of anterior midline cutaneous lesions with an underlying malformation is discussed. PMID:1666396

  18. "One More for My Baby": Foetal Alcohol Syndrome and Its Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Wendy; Wells, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Foetal alcohol syndrome has been described as the commonest preventable cause of mental retardation in the Western world. It refers to a pattern of malformations, growth retardation and central nervous system impairments found in children of mothers who drink large amounts of alcohol while they are pregnant. This paper describes the nature of…

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Clinically Suspected Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Michael; Ahmed, Osmanuddin; Chandra, Ankur; Gage, Kenneth L; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Ginsburg, Michael; Gornik, Heather L; Johnson, Pamela T; Oliva, Isabel B; Ptak, Thomas; Steigner, Michael L; Strax, Richard; Rybicki, Frank J; Dill, Karin E

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are often included in the differential diagnosis of common clinical presentations, including hypoxemia, hemoptysis, brain abscesses, and paradoxical stroke, as well as affecting 30% to 50% of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Various imaging studies are used in the diagnostic and screening settings, which have been reviewed by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Vascular Imaging Panel. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation screening in patients with HHT is commonly performed with transthoracic echocardiographic bubble study, followed by CT for positive cases. Although transthoracic echocardiographic bubble studies and radionuclide perfusion detect right-to-left shunts, they do not provide all of the information needed for treatment planning and may remain positive after embolization. Pulmonary angiography is appropriate for preintervention planning but not as an initial test. MR angiography has a potential role in younger patients with HHT who may require lifelong surveillance, despite lower spatial resolution compared with CT. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:27209598

  20. CHARGE association in Sweden: malformations and functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Strömland, Kerstin; Sjögreen, Lotta; Johansson, Maria; Ekman Joelsson, Britt-Marie; Miller, Marilyn; Danielsson, Susanna; Billstedt, Eva; Gillberg, Christopher; Jacobsson, Catharina; Norinder, Jan Andersson; Granström, Gösta

    2005-03-15

    CHARGE association (CA) consists of a non-random association of ocular coloboma (C), heart anomaly (H), atresia of choanae (A), retarded growth and/or development (R), genital hypoplasia (G), and ear anomalies and/or hearing impairment (E). A prospective multidisciplinary study of 31 Swedish patients with CA was undertaken in order to describe the associated malformations and functional deficits, find possible etiological factors and identify critical time periods for the maldevelopment. The clinical files were analyzed, the mothers answered a questionnaire on history of prenatal events, and a clinical evaluation of systemic findings, vision, hearing, balance, speech, oral and swallowing function, and neuro-psychiatric function, especially autism, was performed. The most frequent physical abnormalities affected ears (90%), eyes (90%), brain (61%), heart (52%), retarded growth (48%), genitals (38%), choanae (35%), and facial nerve (32%). Sixty-one percent of the patients were visually impaired or blind, and 74% had hearing loss or deafness. Problems in balance, speech, and eating were common. Forty percent of the patients had autism/atypical autism, and 82% had developmental delay. Three children were born following assisted fertilization and two mothers had diabetes. The mothers reported infections, bleedings, and drug use during pregnancy. Analysis of possible critical time periods suggested that most malformations were produced early in pregnancy, mainly during post conceptual weeks 4, 5, and 6. A multidisciplinary approach is essential in the assessment and management of CA. PMID:15633180

  1. Post-mortem cytogenomic investigations in patients with congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Dias, Alexandre Torchio; Zanardo, Évelin Aline; Dutra, Roberta Lelis; Piazzon, Flavia Balbo; Novo-Filho, Gil Monteiro; Montenegro, Marilia Moreira; Nascimento, Amom Mendes; Rocha, Mariana; Madia, Fabricia Andreia Rosa; Costa, Thais Virgínia Moura Machado; Milani, Cintia; Schultz, Regina; Gonçalves, Fernanda Toledo; Fridman, Cintia; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie Domenici

    2016-08-01

    Congenital anomalies are the second highest cause of infant deaths, and, in most cases, diagnosis is a challenge. In this study, we characterize patterns of DNA copy number aberrations in different samples of post-mortem tissues from patients with congenital malformations. Twenty-eight patients undergoing autopsy were cytogenomically evaluated using several methods, specifically, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), microsatellite marker analysis with a MiniFiler kit, FISH, a cytogenomic array technique and bidirectional Sanger sequencing, which were performed on samples of different tissues (brain, heart, liver, skin and diaphragm) preserved in RNAlater, in formaldehyde or by paraffin-embedding. The results identified 13 patients with pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs). Of these, eight presented aneuploidies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y (two presented inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism). In addition, other abnormalities were found, including duplication of the TYMS gene (18p11.32); deletion of the CHL1 gene (3p26.3); deletion of the HIC1 gene (17p13.3); and deletion of the TOM1L2 gene (17p11.2). One patient had a pathogenic missense mutation of g.8535C>G (c.746C>G) in exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene consistent with Thanatophoric Dysplasia type I. Cytogenomic techniques were reliable for the analysis of autopsy material and allowed the identification of inter- and intra-tissue mosaicism and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of congenital malformations. PMID:27450648

  2. Cardiovascular malformations and organic solvent exposure during pregnancy in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Tikkanen, J.; Heinonen, O.P.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the possible association between cardiovascular malformations and maternal exposure to organic solvents during the first trimester of pregnancy, 569 cases and 1,052 controls were retrospectively studied. The cases represented all infants with diagnosed cardiovascular malformations born in Finland in 1982-1984, and the controls were randomly selected from all normal births in the country during the same period. All mothers were interviewed approximately 3 months after delivery by a midwife using a structured questionnaire. Exposures to organic solvents at work during the first trimester of pregnancy were slightly more prevalent among the mothers of affected infants (10.4%) than among those of controls (7.8%). Logistic regression analysis of exposure to organic solvents showed an adjusted relative odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval, 0.8-2.2). In the analysis of ventricular septal defect, exposure to organic solvents showed an adjusted relative odds ratio of 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.7).

  3. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Arrigoni, F.; Romaniello, R.; Triulzi, F. M.; Peruzzo, D.; Bertoldo, A.

    2016-08-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity.

  4. Diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction with a characteristic ‘butterfly’-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term ‘diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia’ to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  5. Automatic localization of cerebral cortical malformations using fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Arrigoni, F; Romaniello, R; Triulzi, F M; Peruzzo, D; Bertoldo, A

    2016-08-21

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) encompass a variety of brain disorders affecting the normal development and organization of the brain cortex. The relatively low incidence and the extreme heterogeneity of these disorders hamper the application of classical group level approaches for the detection of lesions. Here, we present a geometrical descriptor for a voxel level analysis based on fractal geometry, then define two similarity measures to detect the lesions at single subject level. The pipeline was applied to 15 normal children and nine pediatric patients affected by MCDs following two criteria, maximum accuracy (WACC) and minimization of false positives (FPR), and proved that our lesion detection algorithm is able to detect and locate abnormalities of the brain cortex with high specificity (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  96%), sensitivity (WACC  =  83%, FPR  =  63%) and accuracy (WACC  =  85%, FPR  =  90%). The combination of global and local features proves to be effective, making the algorithm suitable for the detection of both focal and diffused malformations. Compared to other existing algorithms, this method shows higher accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:27444964

  6. Cervicofacial Lymphatic Malformations: A Retrospective Review of 40 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung Chae; Kim, Jae Bong; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Yong-Sun; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic malformation (LM) is a form of congenital vascular malformation with a low incidence. Although LM has been studied, no consensus has emerged regarding its cause or treatment. Methods In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 40 patients who visited our vascular anomalies center for the treatment of cervicofacial LM, which is a common manifestation of LM. The medical records of patients over a period of 12 years were reviewed and analyzed for commonalities regarding the diagnosis and the results of treatment. Results Suspected cervicofacial LM was confirmed through imaging studies. No difference in incidence was observed according to sex, and 73% of patients first presented with symptoms before the age of two years. The left side and the V2–V3 area were most commonly affected. No significant differences in incidence were observed among the macrocystic, microcystic, and combined types of LM. A total of 28 out of 36 patients received sclerotherapy as the first choice of treatment, regardless of the type of lesion. Complete resolution was achieved in only 25% of patients. Conclusions LM is important to confirm the diagnosis early and to choose an appropriate treatment strategy according to the stage of the disease and each individual patient's symptoms. When treatment is delayed or an incorrect treatment is administered, patient discomfort increases as the lesion gradually spreads. Therefore, more so than is the case for most other diseases, a team approach on a case-by-case basis is important for the accurate and appropriate treatment of LM. PMID:26848440

  7. Congenital pulmonary airway malformations: from prenatal diagnosis to postnatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Pelizzo, Gloria; Costanzo, Federico; Andreatta, Erika; Calcaterra, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAMs) include cystic and non-cystic lung lesions. These represent about 30-40% of developmental lung bud anomaly lesions mainly diagnosed during pregnancy or in newborn infants; or sometimes they remain undetected until adult life. The malformation usually presents as a sporadic, non-hereditary lung abnormality, with no predilection for the right or left lung, sex or race. CPAMs vary in their histological features, epidemiological and clinical presentation, severity and prognosis, supporting the embryologic hypothesis of arrested lung growth during branching morphogenesis. The existence of "hybrid" forms underline the possible common pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of different lesion types; a genetic role has also been proposed in abnormal lung development. Influence of the natural history on pre and postnatal management is relevant. Surgical resection is the standard of therapy for symptomatic CPAMs, while the management of asymptomatic cases remains controversial. The potential risk of infection and malignancy in CPAMs justifies complete surgical resection in the first year of life; while long term follow-up is required in children who do not undergo surgery. A multidisciplinary team including gynecologists, neonatologists, radiologists, pediatricians and pediatric surgeons is recommended in pre, postnatal management and in the postsurgical follow-up of all children with CPAMs. PMID:26365821

  8. Morphological and functional aspects of progenitors perturbed in cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Bizzotto, Sara; Francis, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular mechanisms important for the function of neuronal progenitors during development, revealed by their perturbation in different cortical malformations. We focus on a class of neuronal progenitors, radial glial cells (RGCs), which are renowned for their unique morphological and behavioral characteristics, constituting a key element during the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. We describe how the particular morphology of these cells is related to their roles in the orchestration of cortical development and their influence on other progenitor types and post-mitotic neurons. Important for disease mechanisms, we overview what is currently known about RGC cellular components, cytoskeletal mechanisms, signaling pathways and cell cycle characteristics, focusing on how defects lead to abnormal development and cortical malformation phenotypes. The multiple recent entry points from human genetics and animal models are contributing to our understanding of this important cell type. Combining data from phenotypes in the mouse reveals molecules which potentially act in common pathways. Going beyond this, we discuss future directions that may provide new data in this expanding area. PMID:25729350

  9. PDCD10 Gene Mutations in Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P.; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype. PMID:25354366

  10. Leaping lopsided: a review of the current hypotheses regarding etiologies of limb malformations in frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loeffler, I.K.; Stocum, D.L.; Fallon, J.F.; Meteyer, C.U.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in the investigation of limb malformations in free-living frogs has underlined the wide range in the types of limb malformations and the apparent spatiotemporal clustering of their occurrence. Here, we review the current understanding of normal and abnormal vertebrate limb development and regeneration and discuss some of the molecular events that may bring about limb malformation. Consideration of the differences between limb development and regeneration in amphibians has led us to the hypothesis that some of the observed limb malformations come about through misdirected regeneration. We report the results of a pilot study that supports this hypothesis. In this study, the distal aspect of the right hindlimb buds of X. laevis tadpoles was amputated at the pre-foot paddle stage. The tadpoles were raised in water from a pond in Minnesota at which 7% of surveyed newly metamorphosed feral frogs had malformations. Six percent (6 of 100) of the right limbs of the tadpoles raised in pond water developed abnormally. One truncated right limb was the only malformation in the control group, which was raised in dechlorinated municipal water. All unamputated limbs developed normally in both groups. Three major factors under consideration for effecting the limb malformations are discussed. These factors include environmental chemicals (primarily agrichemicals), encysted larvae (metacercariae) of trematode parasites, and increased levels of ultraviolet light. Emphasis is placed on the necessary intersection of environmental stressors and developmental events to bring about the specific malformations that are observed in free-living frog populations.

  11. Sirenomelia with upper limb malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Su, D; Yao, Q

    2015-01-01

    Sirenomelia sequence is a rare lethal pattern of congenital anomalies characterized by fusion of the legs and a variable combination of visceral abnormalities. Some cases accompanied with rare malformations have been reported. In this article, the authors report a case of sirenomelia with upper limb malformations and a review of the literature. PMID:26411229

  12. Fetal MRI as Complementary Study of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation During Pregnancy: A Single Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Paanakker, Alberto; Gomez-Leal, Paloma; Navarro-Sanchez, Patricia; Bueno-Crespo, Andres; Martinez-Cendan, Juan Pedro; Remezal-Solano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fetal lung masses are rare findings in prenatal ultrasound scanning in general population, of which congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is the most commonly diagnosed type. This paper reports a single case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation detected at our hospital and the subsequent clinical follow-up using ultrasound scanning and fetal magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27186452

  13. Congenital Cystic Lesions of the Lung: Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation and Bronchopulmonary Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Sfakianaki, Anna K; Copel, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cystic lesions of the lung in fetuses are rare. The most common malformations of the lower respiratory tract are congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and bronchopulmonary sequestration. With the increased use of obstetric ultrasound, cystic lung lesions are detected more often antenatally, which allows for proper planning of peripartum and neonatal management. This article discusses a range of diagnostic and management options. PMID:22866187

  14. Arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck: current concepts in management.

    PubMed

    Fowell, Christopher; Jones, Robert; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Monaghan, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The field of vascular anomalies and their clinical management is expanding and developments in the last few years have improved the understanding of haemangiomas and vascular malformations. In this paper, the first in the series of 3 educational reviews, we review the current trends and evidence-based management of arteriovenous malformations. PMID:27020371

  15. Congenital Malformations in Perinatal Autopsies – A Study of 100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Andola, Uma S; AM, Anita; Ahuja, Mukta; Andola, Sainath K

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital malformations remain a common cause of perinatal deaths and even though ultrasonogram can give fairly accurate diagnosis, perinatal autopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis and look for associated malformations. Objectives To emphasize the importance of perinatal autopsy in diagnosing congenital malformations and to compare the same with the prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods The present study comprises 100 consecutive perinatal autopsies conducted after obtaining the approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. In cases where prenatal ultrasound findings were available they were compared with the autopsy findings. Results Out of 100 perinatal autopsies, 44 cases were congenital anomalies with M:F = 1:1.5. Majority of the fetuses with congenital malformations (36.36%) were therapeutically terminated, Cental nervous system malformations being the commonest indication. The most common timing of therapeutic termination being 20 -24weeks. Congenital malformations were common between 35-39 weeks gestational age and birth weight range 350- 1000g. The malformations involving the central nervous system were commonest, seen in 15 cases (34.09%) followed by renal anomalies in 9 cases (20.45%) and multiple malformations in 7cases ( 15.91%). Autopsy confirmed the prenatal ultrasound findings in 50% of the cases, added to diagnosis in 29.54%, while it completely changed the primary diagnosis in 9.09% of the cases. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of perinatal autopsy in confirming the diagnosis of congenital anomalies by prenatal ultrasound findings. PMID:23373038

  16. Thrombosed vascular malformation within the flexor tendon sheath of the index finger in the palm

    PubMed Central

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Nele, Gisella; La Rusca, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are relatively infrequent among benign lesions of the hand. We report the case of an arteriovenous malformation in a 48-year-old white woman presenting a mass in her left hand without any symptoms. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology and the lesion completely removed by surgery. PMID:27252973

  17. Isolated sleep apnea due to Chiari type I malformation and syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Shiihara, T; Shimizu, Y; Mitsui, T; Saitoh, E; Sato, S

    1995-10-01

    We report an 11-year-old girl with Chiari type I malformation and syringomyelia, who experienced isolated sleep apnea without other neurologic problems. Monitoring with oximetry and movement of thoracic and abdominal walls indicated mixed-type sleep apnea. Chiari type I malformation should be differentiated from other disorders causing sleep apnea. PMID:8554669

  18. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: A rare and lethal anomaly with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Parelkar, Sandesh V.; Kapadnis, Satish P.; Sanghvi, Beejal V.; Joshi, Prashant B.; Mundada, Dinesh; Oak, Sanjay N.

    2013-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive lethal malformation characterized by typical manifestations of occipital encephalocele, bilateral polycystic kidneys and post axial polydactyly. The worldwide incidence varies from 1 in 13,250 to 1 in 140,000 live births. Highest incidence was reported in Gujarati Indians. We report a rare case of Meckel-Gruber syndrome and review of literature. PMID:24082939

  19. Tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit S; Geddes, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a well-characterized condition causing distinctive physical characteristics, intellectual disability, and multiple congenital malformations. Cardiac abnormalities are found in a third of individuals with this condition and usually consist of isolated septal defects or patent ductus arteriosus, although more complex congenital lesions have been described. We present the first reported case of tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia with hypoplasia of the right ventricle in the setting of Rubenstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:26085772

  20. Tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Geddes, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a well-characterized condition causing distinctive physical characteristics, intellectual disability, and multiple congenital malformations. Cardiac abnormalities are found in a third of individuals with this condition and usually consist of isolated septal defects or patent ductus arteriosus, although more complex congenital lesions have been described. We present the first reported case of tricuspid atresia and pulmonary atresia with hypoplasia of the right ventricle in the setting of Rubenstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:26085772