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Sample records for macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

  1. Tetralogy of Fallot associated with macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome is characterized by cutaneous vascular lesions, including cutis marmorata telangiectatica and hemangiomas, associated with congenital anomalies, including macrocephaly, macrosomia, asymmetry and mental retardation. In addition to these cardinal signs, several other clinical conditions have been reported in people with this condition. However, to the best of our knowledge, the presence of tetralogy of Fallot has not previously been reported in association with this syndrome. Case presentation We present a case of a Mexican newborn girl with tetralogy of Fallot associated with macrocephaly-capillary malformation. We discuss the clinical treatment of the patient and its consequences. Conclusion Since physiologic cutis marmorata is a common condition in newborns, the information provided in this report could be helpful in future cases in preventing severe clinical consequences or sudden death in patients with similar symptoms. PMID:20210980

  2. [Abdominal vascular malformations and Down syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nso Roca, A P; García Sánchez, P; Quero Jiménez, J

    2007-04-01

    Malformations of the abdominal venous system are rare vascular disorders. These entities are associated with other malformations and with chromosomal anomalies such as trisomy 21. Abdominal venous malformations are probably the most frequent congenital vascular malformations in Down syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis allows the early follow-up and treatment of complications. We present a case of Down syndrome associated with an abdominal venous malformation diagnosed at the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:17430719

  3. The Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Willing, Marcia C.; Lind, Anne C.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three children from two families with a new pattern recognition malformation syndrome consisting of severe congenital microcephaly (MIC), intractable epilepsy including infantile spasms, and generalized capillary malformations that was first reported recently in this journal [Carter et al. (2011); Am J Med Genet A 155: 301–306]. Two of our reported patients are an affected brother and sister, suggesting this is an autosomal recessive severe congenital MIC syndrome. PMID:21815250

  4. Anorectal malformations and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, J; Abu-Dalu, K; Lernau, O; Sagi, M; Voss, R; Cohen, T

    1989-11-01

    During 1980 to 1986, 89 children with Down syndrome and 42 with imperforate anus were diagnosed among 64,870 liveborn infants in the Jewish population of Jerusalem. Two of the children had both Down syndrome and imperforate anus. This indicates a high incidence of imperforate anus among children with Down syndrome (2.2%). PMID:2531980

  5. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26697951

  6. Genetics Home Reference: capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MALFORMATION Sources for This Page Boon LM, Mulliken JB, Vikkula M. RASA1: variable phenotype with capillary and ... 265-9. Review. Eerola I, Boon LM, Mulliken JB, Burrows PE, Dompmartin A, Watanabe S, Vanwijck R, Vikkula ...

  7. Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with congenital portal venous malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Savarirayan, R; Tomlinson, P; Thompson, E

    1998-01-01

    We report a 4 year old boy in whom the clinical features of craniosynostosis and bilateral absent radii led to a diagnosis of Baller-Gerold syndrome. Additional congenital abnormalities included midface hypoplasia, atrial and ventricular septal defects, right hydronephrosis, partial sacral agenesis, and anterior ectopic anus. Evidence of portal venous hypertension was present from 8 months and a congenital portal venous malformation was discovered at 2 years. This is the first reported case of Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with a congenital portal venous malformation. We discuss the diagnostic confusion between this syndrome and other overlapping malformation syndromes and propose optimal evaluation strategies aimed at clarifying the nosology of these syndromes. Images PMID:9733037

  8. Contracted foal syndrome associated with multiple malformations in two foals.

    PubMed

    Binanti, D; Zani, D D; De Zani, D; Turci, T; Zavaglia, G; Riccaboni, P

    2014-02-01

    Congenital anomalies in horses are very rare, and contracted foal syndrome is one of the most commonly reported. This malformation is characterized by contraction of the joints of the forelimbs and/or hindlimbs. In addition, the syndrome can be characterized by vertebral column malformations, such as scoliosis or torticollis, and cranial deformity. The present report describes the radiological and necroscopical findings of multiple rare malformations in two foals. Both foals showed skeletal abnormalities and fenestration of the abdominal cavity. Other pathological findings include a interventricular septal defect in one and a unilateral hydronephrosis and partial hydroureter in the other foal. Although in this report a specific aetiology could not be provided, insecticides treatment provided during the second month of pregnancy might play a role in the pathogenesis of these malformations. PMID:23406278

  9. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  10. [Larsen's syndrome with associates malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Galván, C; Domenech, E; Méndez, A

    1979-01-01

    A rare polymalformative syndrome is described, consisting in multiple joints dislocations, peculiar face, deformations of the hands and feet, abnormal pattern of the palms creases and congenital heart defect. New findings not reported before were: choanal atresia, agenesia of the right kidney and gall bladder and hypoplasic male genitals. PMID:496092

  11. Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with Extensive Arterial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Renee Frances; Barbeau, L. Daphna Yasova; Co-Vu, Jennifer; Beegle, Richard D.; Williams, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome is characterized by craniofacial, ocular and vertebral defects secondary to abnormal development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and vertebrae. Other findings include cardiac and vascular abnormalities. Though these associations are known, the specific anomalies are not well defined. We present a 7-month-old infant with intermittent respiratory distress that did not improve with respiratory interventions. Echocardiogram suggested a double aortic arch. Cardiac CT angiogram confirmed a right arch and aberrant, stenotic left subclavian artery, dilation of the main pulmonary artery, and agenesis of the left thyroid lobe. Repeat echocardiograms were concerning for severely dilated coronary arteries. Given dilation, a rheumatologic workup ensued, only identifying few weakly positive autoantibodies. Further imaging demonstrated narrowing of the aorta below the renal arteries and extending into the common iliac arteries and proximal femoral arteries. Given a physical exam devoid of rheumatologic findings, only weakly positive autoantibodies, normal inflammatory markers, and presence of the coronary artery dilation, the peripheral artery narrowings were not thought to be vasculitic. This case illustrates the need to identify definitive anomalies related to Goldenhar Syndrome. Although this infant's presentation is rare, recognition of specific vascular findings will help differentiate Goldenhar Syndrome from other disease processes. PMID:26688769

  12. RASA1 somatic mutation and variable expressivity in capillary malformation/arteriovenous malformation (CM/AVM) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macmurdo, Colleen F; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Le, Jenny; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Milla, Carlos; Teng, Joyce M C; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Stevenson, David A

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations in RASA1 are associated with capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. CM-AVM syndrome is characterized by multi-focal capillary malformations and arteriovenous malformations. Lymphatic anomalies have been proposed as part of the phenotype. Intrafamilial variability has been reported, suggesting modifiers and somatic events. The objective of the study was to identify somatic RASA1 "second hits" from vascular malformations associated with CM-AVM syndrome, and describe phenotypic variability. Participants were examined and phenotyped. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood on all participants. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on the proband. Using Sanger sequencing, RASA1 exon 8 was PCR-amplified to track the c.1248T>G, p.Tyr416X germline variant through the family. A skin biopsy of a capillary malformation from the proband's mother was also obtained, and next-generation sequencing was performed on DNA from the affected tissue. A familial germline heterozygous novel pathogenic RASA1 variant, c.1248T>G (p.Tyr416X), was identified in the proband and her mother. The proband had capillary malformations, chylothorax, lymphedema, and overgrowth, while her affected mother had only isolated capillary malformations. Sequence analysis of DNA extracted from a skin biopsy of a capillary malformation of the affected mother showed a second RASA1 somatic mutation (c.2245C>T, p.Arg749X). These results and the extreme variable expressivity support the hypothesis that somatic "second hits" are required for the development of vascular anomalies associated with CM-AVM syndrome. In addition, the phenotypes of the affected individuals further clarify that lymphatic manifestations are also part of the phenotypic spectrum of RASA1-related disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26969842

  13. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a

  14. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a…

  15. Cardiovascular malformations in Malaysian neonates with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoe, T S; Chan, K C; Boo, N Y

    1990-10-01

    A prospective study was done to determine the incidence of cardiovascular malformations in neonates with Down's syndrome. 17/34 (50%) of the babies with Down's syndrome born at the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia had congenital heart defects. These included 7 cases of ventricular septal defect (VSD), 3 cases of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), 2 cases of atrio-ventricular canal defect, 2 cases of ventricular septal defect with patent ductus arteriosus, 1 case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 1 case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and 1 case of complex cyanotic heart. Only 8/17 (47%) of these babies had any clinical signs suggesting underlying cardiac defects. In view of the common occurrence of cardiac anomalies, it is recommended that echocardiographic screening should be carried out on all neonates with Down's syndrome. PMID:2148028

  16. Kabuki Syndrome and Anorectal Malformations: Implications for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siminas, Sotirios; Baillie, Colin Tennant; Turnock, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic condition characterized by a distinctive facies, intellectual disability, growth delay, and a variety of skeletal, visceral, and other anomalies, including anorectal malformations (ARMs). We present two cases of female patients with KS, diagnosed and successfully managed at our institution, one with a perineal fistula and one with a rectovestibular fistula. Our report, along with a literature review, shows that the syndrome is usually associated with “low” anomalies, with a potential for a good prognosis. Management of the anorectal anomaly in patients with KS is not essentially different from that in other nonsyndromic patients, taking into account the frequent association of the syndrome with serious congenital heart disease, which might affect the decision-making and timing of the stages of anorectal reconstruction. The frequent occurrence of learning and feeding difficulties makes establishment of toilet training and bowel management rather more challenging, requiring the expertise of a multidisciplinary team. The finding of ARMs in female patients with other characteristics of KS, although inconstant, could support the clinical suspicion for the syndrome until genetic confirmation is available, and should alert the physician for the potential of severe cardiac defects. PMID:26171318

  17. Malformation syndromes caused by disorders of cholesterol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Forbes D.; Herman, Gail E.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is critical for normal growth and development. In addition to being a major membrane lipid, cholesterol has multiple biological functions. These roles include being a precursor molecule for the synthesis of steroid hormones, neuroactive steroids, oxysterols, and bile acids. Cholesterol is also essential for the proper maturation and signaling of hedgehog proteins, and thus cholesterol is critical for embryonic development. After birth, most tissues can obtain cholesterol from either endogenous synthesis or exogenous dietary sources, but prior to birth, the human fetal tissues are dependent on endogenous synthesis. Due to the blood-brain barrier, brain tissue cannot utilize dietary or peripherally produced cholesterol. Generally, inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis lead to both a deficiency of cholesterol and increased levels of potentially bioactive or toxic precursor sterols. Over the past couple of decades, a number of human malformation syndromes have been shown to be due to inborn errors of cholesterol synthesis. Herein, we will review clinical and basic science aspects of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, desmosterolosis, lathosterolosis, HEM dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform erythroderma and Limb Defects Syndrome, sterol-C-4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, and Antley-Bixler syndrome. PMID:20929975

  18. Previously apparently undescribed syndrome: Shallow orbits, ptosis, coloboma, trigonocephaly, gyral malformations, and mental and growth retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Ramer, J.C.; Ladda, R.L.; Lin, A.E.

    1995-07-03

    We describe 2 children with severe ptosis, trigonocephaly, broad nasal bridge, and major brain malformation. A total of 8 children have been reported who share most of these findings. Two of the individuals have had identical pericentric inversions involving chromosome 2p12-q14. These cases appear to represent a unique malformation syndrome. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. [Cognitive and affective characteristics of children with malformation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tosi, B; Maestro, S; Marcheschi, M

    1995-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the psychological and relational aspects in children suffering from specific malformative syndrome and precisely Down s., Sotos s., X-Fragile s. and Williams s. Indeed literature provides much data related to the phenotype, to the organic-biological characteristics, but little or nothing is known about the affective structure, the episodes and to the particular dynamics that emerge in he relation between the parents and the malformed child. A protocol was applied to our sample group (16 subjects). This protocol includes laboratory and instrumental tests (chromosome test, neurometabolic screening, EEG, CT or cranial MRI, cardiac and abdominal ultrasonography, ear and eye test) aspects. This evaluation is carried out through the proposal of standardized situations (psychometric tests) and a use of a freer observational setting. This permits us to understand how the child perceives himself the awareness and the image he has of himself and how able he is to integrate his illness experiences and his way of relating with the environment. The data of our observations are thus used to compile a grill for the structural diagnosis of the personality. Besides, this evaluation is flanked by the observation of the family in order to explore the psychological image that parents have of their child, his character, his good points, his bad points, his similarities, how he relates to them, any educational problems and the emotional reaction that the communication of the diagnosis has raised in them. The videotaped observations are subsequently evaluated through the application of a grill for the study of the mother-child relationship. The results obtained from the psychological research underline a reasonable heterogeneity both of the intellectual level and of the metapsychological profile. Twelve subjects were mentally retarded (5 with mild mental retardation, 7 with moderate mental retardation); the remaining 4 had a normal cognitive development (3 with Sotos s., 1 with Williams s.). Psychological disturbances are present and thus divided: light disturbances (affective immaturity, neurotic-depressive organisation) in 11 subjects. Average disturbances (dysharmonious structure, and borderline personality) in 4 subjects; severe disturbances (psychosis) in 1 subject. Besides, above all in the group of subjects with X-Fragile s. and Down s., the tendency to assume behaviour of a regressive type, also postural, emerges. Among the 4 groups it is frequent to resort to defence mechanisms of hypomaniac type, accompanied by the denial of the patient's "sick parts". Another common characteristic concerns the quality of imaginary life which is shown to be repetitive and stereotype in content. Indeed these children's play activity characterized by a limited capacity of symbolization. Instead, when the symbolic process is more developed, contents concerning a deteriorated and destructive image of the Self emerges. Through the evaluation of family dynamics what is more noticeable is that the parent-malformed child interaction appears to be quite nonstimulating and noninvolving or incoherent, lacking in harmony and empathy towards the child's inner world. Indeed we can notice a lack of both verbal and extraverbal exchange of communication and brief interactive sequences which do not usually take into account the child's proposals and an affective tonality of depressive and nonaffective type. Therefore it may be concluded a certain smoothness in the clinical expression of the syndromes considered, both as far as the cognitive deficit entity and the psychic problems are concerned. Referring to the interactive dynamics between parents and children with dismorphic syndrom it seems that the child's pathology becomes the organizational summit of the above-mentioned relational dynamics among most of the patients examined... PMID:8569638

  20. Cardiovascular malformations in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A.E.; Ardinger, H.H.; Ardinger, R.H. Jr.

    1997-01-31

    We reviewed 215 patients (59 new, 156 from the literature) with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), and found that 95 (44%) had a cardiovascular malformation (CVM). Classifying CVMs by disordered embryonic mechanisms, there were 5 (5.3%) class I (ectomesenchymal tissue migration abnormalities), 56 (58.9%) class II (abnormal intracardiac blood flow), 25 (26.3%) class IV (abnormal extracellular matrix), and 5 (5.3%) class V (abnormal targeted growth). Comparing the frequencies of individual CVMs in this series with a control group (the Baltimore-Washington Infant Study), there were 6 individual CVMs which showed a significant difference from expected values. When frequencies of CVMs in SLOS were analyzed by mechanistic class, classes IV and V were significantly more frequent, and class I significantly less frequent, than the control group. Although CVMs in SLOS display mechanistic heterogeneity, with an overall predominance of class II CVMs, the developmental error appears to favor alteration of the cardiovascular developmental mechanisms underlying atrioventricular canal and anomalous pulmonary venous return. This information should assist the clinical geneticist evaluating a patient with possible SLOS, and should suggest research direction for the mechanisms responsible for the SLOS phenotype. 102 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  1. [Management of gastrointestinal malformations in children with asplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Maki; Urushihara, Naoto; Fujimoto, Yoshifumi; Sakamoto, Kisaburo

    2011-07-01

    Asplenia syndrome (AS) is a complex disorder that includes a variety of cardiovascular and gastrointestinal malformations (GMs), and its prognosis remains poor. We treated 40 AS patients between 2000 and 2010, 10 of whom underwent surgery to correct GMs. These comprised 7 hiatus hernias (HH), 1 intestinal malrotation (IM), 1 stomach volvulus, and 1 ompalocele. In this review, we consider the optimal surgical timing and methods of management, especially for HH and IM. Surgery was performed in 6 of 7 HH patients. Four of those underwent laparotomy, 1 thoracotomy, and 1 laparoscopy. The Toupet method or fixation of the His angle or hiatus closure was selected in each case. Because the stomach intruding into the mediastinum may cause pulmonary venous obstruction and respiratory impairment, surgical repair is preferably performed prior to Glenn surgery. Among the 9 IMs, 8 were nonrotational and required no treatment, and only 1 required surgical treatment. GMs in AS are difficult to manage because of the unique anatomy, meaning there are no fixed surgical techniques. Each patient must be carefully examined preoperatively, and the optimum surgical method selected. Close collaboration with cardiovascular surgeons is vital when determining the timing and method of surgery. PMID:21819015

  2. Turner syndrome with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min Kyung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common chromosomal disorder and is associated with a range of comorbidities involving the cardiovascular system. Vascular abnormalities, in particular, are a common finding in cases of TS. However, dissection involving the vertebral arteries is rare. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with TS who had been treated with growth hormone replacement therapy for the past 3 years. She presented with weakness of both lower legs, and was ultimately diagnosed with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation. We treated her with intravenous high dose dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg) and she could walk without assistance after 6 days of treatment. In conclusion, when a patient with TS shows sudden weakness of the lower limbs, we should consider the possibility of spinal vessel rupture and try to take spine magnetic resonance imaging as soon as possible. We suggest a direction how to make a proper diagnosis and management of sudden vertebral artery hemorrhage in patients with TS. PMID:26817012

  3. An association of 19p13.2 microdeletions with Malan syndrome and Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Keiko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Sangu, Noriko; Shimada, Shino; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    Patients with microdeletions in the 19p13.2 chromosomal region show developmental delays, overgrowth, and distinctive features with big head appearances. These manifestations are now recognized as Sotos syndrome-like features (Sotos syndrome 2) or Malan syndrome. We identified three female patients with 19p13.2 deletions involving NFIX, a gene responsible for Malan syndrome. We compared the genotypic and phenotypic data of these patients with those of the patients previously reported. The most of the clinical features were found to overlap; however, Chiari malformation type I was observed in two of the three patients evaluated in this study. Because Chiari malformation type I has never been reported in the patients with NSD1-related Sotos syndrome, this finding indicates the possible role of 19p13.2 deletion in patients with mimicking features of Sotos syndrome but have negative NSD1 testing results. PMID:25736188

  4. Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams-Beuren: à propos de trois nouvelles observations

    PubMed Central

    Sator, Hicham; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Dafiri, Rachida; Chat, Latifa

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de Williams-Beuren est une maladie génétique rare, il associe classiquement une dysmorphie faciale assez spécifique, des malformations cardiovasculaires et un profil neuropsychologique particulier. Nous rapportons les observations de trois enfants atteints du syndrome de Williams-Beuren en insistant surtout sur les anomalies vasculaires observées sur l'angio-scanner et angio-IRM. PMID:27200143

  5. Clinical spectrum of eye malformations in four patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bourchany, A; Giurgea, I; Thevenon, J; Goldenberg, A; Morin, G; Bremond-Gignac, D; Paillot, C; Lafontaine, P O; Thouvenin, D; Massy, J; Duncombe, A; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Masurel-Paulet, A; Chehadeh, S El; Huet, F; Bron, A; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Lyonnet, S; Faivre, L

    2015-07-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by a specific facial gestalt, intellectual deficiency, Hirschsprung disease and multiple congenital anomalies. Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox2 gene (ZEB2) cause MWS. ZEB2 encodes for Smad-interacting protein 1, a transcriptional co-repressor involved in TGF-beta and BMP pathways and is strongly expressed in early stages of development in mice. Eye abnormalities have rarely been described in patients with this syndrome. Herein, we describe four patients (two males and two females; mean age 7 years) with MWS and eye malformations. Ocular anomalies included, iris/retinal colobomas, atrophy or absence of the optic nerve, hyphema, and deep refraction troubles, sometimes with severe visual consequences. All eye malformations were asymmetric and often unilateral and all eye segments were affected, similarly to the nine MWS cases with ophthalmological malformations previously reported (iris/chorioretinal/optic disc coloboma, optic nerve atrophy, retinal epithelium atrophy, cataract, and korectopia). In human embryo, ZEB2 is expressed in lens and neural retina. Using the present report and data from the literature, we set out to determine whether or not the presence of eye manifestations could be due to specific type or location of mutations. We concluded that the presence of eye malformations, although a rare feature in MWS, should be considered as a part of the clinical spectrum of the condition. PMID:25899569

  6. Type 2 congenital pulmonary airway malformation and congenital nephrotic syndrome: report of a new association.

    PubMed

    Millington, Karmaine A; Mani, Haresh

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) has been reported in association with many other congenital anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, however, an association of type 2 CPAM with congenital nephrotic syndrome has not been heretofore reported. We present the 1st report of such an association in a boy who had a prenatal diagnosis of cystic lung malformation and was found to have congenital nephrotic syndrome (diffuse mesangial sclerosis) at 1 month of age. A prenatal ultrasonogram had also shown oligohydramnios, and additionally the child had cleft lip and palate. There was no family history of childhood renal or pulmonary disease, and genetic testing for genes mutated in congenital nephrotic syndrome was negative. PMID:23350653

  7. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 6 Final Diagnosis: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Congenital defects Background: Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or Patau syndrome (trisomy 13). Sometimes phenotype may delusively correspond to the characteristic features of a given syndrome, but genotype tests do not confirm its presence. Case Report: We present the case of a 6-year-old girl admitted to the Clinic of Phoniatrics and Audiology for the assessment of communication in the course of congenital malformations with phenotype characteristic for trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). Immediately upon birth, dysmorphic changes suggesting trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) were observed, but trisomy 18 was excluded after karyotype test results were normal (46, XX). Conclusions: Disturbed articulation was diagnosed: deformed linguo-dental and palatal sounds, interdental realization with flat tongue of the /s/, /z/, /c/, /dz/, /ś/, /ź/, /ć/, /dz/ sounds (sigmatismus interdentalis). Hearing loss was confirmed. PMID:24478819

  8. Child with Deletion 9p Syndrome Presenting with Craniofacial Dysmorphism, Developmental Delay, and Multiple Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sirisena, Nirmala D.; Wijetunge, U. Kalpani S.; de Silva, Ramya; Dissanayake, Vajira H. W.

    2013-01-01

    A 4-month-old Sri Lankan male child case with a de novo terminal deletion in the p22?pter region of chromosome 9 is described. The child presented with craniofacial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and congenital malformations in agreement with the consensus phenotype. A distinctive feature observed in this child was complete collapse of the left lung due to malformation of lung tissue. Cytogenetic studies confirmed terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 distal to band p22 [46,XY,del(9)(p22?pter)]. This is the first reported case of a de novo deletion 9p syndrome associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. This finding contributes to the widening of the spectrum of phenotypic features associated with deletion 9p syndrome. PMID:23984121

  9. Genetics Home Reference: megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 6. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33514. Mirzaa GM, Conway RL, Gripp KW, Lerman-Sagie T, Siegel ... ajmg.a.34402. Epub 2012 Jan 6. Mirzaa GM, Rivière JB, Dobyns WB. Megalencephaly syndromes and activating ...

  10. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    PubMed

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated. PMID:26518262

  11. NFIA Haploinsufficiency Is Associated with a CNS Malformation Syndrome and Urinary Tract Defects

    PubMed Central

    Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Donovan, Diana J; Xi, Qiongchao; Turbe-Doan, Annick; Li, Qing-Gang; Campbell, Craig G; Shanske, Alan L; Sherr, Elliott H; Ahmad, Ayesha; Peters, Roxana; Rilliet, Benedict; Parvex, Paloma; Bassuk, Alexander G; Harris, David J; Ferguson, Heather; Kelly, Chantal; Walsh, Christopher A; Gronostajski, Richard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Higgins, Anne; Ligon, Azra H; Quade, Bradley J; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Maas, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Complex central nervous system (CNS) malformations frequently coexist with other developmental abnormalities, but whether the associated defects share a common genetic basis is often unclear. We describe five individuals who share phenotypically related CNS malformations and in some cases urinary tract defects, and also haploinsufficiency for the NFIA transcription factor gene due to chromosomal translocation or deletion. Two individuals have balanced translocations that disrupt NFIA. A third individual and two half-siblings in an unrelated family have interstitial microdeletions that include NFIA. All five individuals exhibit similar CNS malformations consisting of a thin, hypoplastic, or absent corpus callosum, and hydrocephalus or ventriculomegaly. The majority of these individuals also exhibit Chiari type I malformation, tethered spinal cord, and urinary tract defects that include vesicoureteral reflux. Other genes are also broken or deleted in all five individuals, and may contribute to the phenotype. However, the only common genetic defect is NFIA haploinsufficiency. In addition, previous analyses of Nfia−/− knockout mice indicate that Nfia deficiency also results in hydrocephalus and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Further investigation of the mouse Nfia+/− and Nfia−/− phenotypes now reveals that, at reduced penetrance, Nfia is also required in a dosage-sensitive manner for ureteral and renal development. Nfia is expressed in the developing ureter and metanephric mesenchyme, and Nfia+/− and Nfia−/− mice exhibit abnormalities of the ureteropelvic and ureterovesical junctions, as well as bifid and megaureter. Collectively, the mouse Nfia mutant phenotype and the common features among these five human cases indicate that NFIA haploinsufficiency contributes to a novel human CNS malformation syndrome that can also include ureteral and renal defects. PMID:17530927

  12. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E.

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Ear malformation and hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Galloway, C; Armstrong, D; Posnick, J

    1993-01-01

    Although the hearing loss of patients with Treacher Collins syndrome is well documented, few studies have reported jointly on their hearing loss and ear pathology. This paper reports on the hearing loss and computerized tomography (CT) assessments of ear malformations in a large pediatric series of patients with Treacher Collins. Of the 29 subjects assessed by the Craniofacial Program between 1986 and 1990, paired audiologic and complete CT assessments were available for 23 subjects. The external ear canal abnormalities were largely symmetric, either bilaterally stenotic or atretic. In most cases, the middle ear cavity was bilaterally hypoplastic and dysmorphic, and ossicles were symmetrically dysmorphic or missing. Inner ear structures were normal in all patients. The majority of patients had a unilateral or bilateral moderate or greater degree of hearing loss and almost half had an asymmetric hearing loss. The hearing loss of all subjects was conductive, except for three whose loss was bilateral mixed. Two types of bilaterally symmetric hearing loss configurations, flat and reverse sloping, were noted. Conductive hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins is mainly attributable to their middle ear malformations, which are similar for those of patients with malformed or missing ossicles. PMID:8418881

  14. Mitochondria DNA depletion syndrome in a infant with multiple congenital malformations, severe myopathy, and prolonged postoperative paralysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Canham, Natalie; Ruggieri, Martino; Phadke, Rahul; Kinali, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are an important cause of mitochondrial cytopathies in both children and adults. We describe a newborn with multiple congenital malformations including a right aberrant subclavian artery and a trachea-oesophageal fistula in whom mitochondrial depletion syndrome was unmasked by perioperative muscle relaxation. After vecuronium infusion, the infant developed an irreversible postoperative paralysis, leading to death 32 days after surgery. The present case highlights (a) the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial depletion syndrome; (b) the importance of rigorous antemortem and postmortem investigations when the cause of a severe myopathy is uncertain; (c) the possible coexistence of mitochondrial depletion syndrome and congenital malformations as a result of a likely abnormal antenatal embryofetal development and (d) the importance of a careful anaesthetic management of children with mitochondrial depletion syndrome, which could be prone to complications related to the possible depressive effects on mitochondrial electron transport chain mediated by some anaesthetic agents. PMID:24789116

  15. Lymphatic Malformation, Retinoblastoma, or Facial Cleft: Atypical Presentations of PHACE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ibieta, María; López-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by large cervicofacial infantile hemangiomas and associated anomalies: posterior fossa brain malformation, hemangioma, arterial cerebrovascular anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, and eye/endocrine abnormalities of the brain. When ventral developmental defects (sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe) are present the condition is termed PHACE. In this report, we describe three PHACE cases that presented unique features (affecting one of the organ systems described for this syndrome) that have not been described previously. In the first case, a definitive PHACE association, the patient presented with an ipsilateral mesenteric lymphatic malformation, at the age of 14 years. In the second case, an anomaly of the posterior segment of the eye, not mentioned before in PHACE literature, a retinoblastoma, has been described. Specific chemotherapy avoided enucleation. And, in the third case, the child presented with an unusual midline frontal bone cleft, corresponding to Tessier 14 cleft. Two patients' hemangiomas responded well to propranolol therapy. The first one was followed and treated in the pre-propranolol era and had a moderate response to corticoids and interferon. PMID:26221546

  16. Germline Mutations in RASA1 Are Not Found in Patients with Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome or Capillary Malformation with Limb Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Revencu, N.; Boon, L.M.; Dompmartin, A.; Rieu, P.; Busch, W.L.; Dubois, J.; Forzano, F.; van Hagen, J.M.; Halbach, S.; Kuechler, A.; Lachmeijer, A.M.A.; Lähde, J.; Russell, L.; Simola, K.O.J.; Mulliken, J.B.; Vikkula, M.

    2013-01-01

    The RASA1 gene encodes p120RASGAP, a multidomain cytoplasmic protein that acts as a negative regulator of the RAS signalling pathway. Heterozygous loss-of-function RASA1 mutations were identified in patients with Parkes Weber syndrome and multifocal capillary malformations. This syndrome is characterised by a capillary blush on an extremity, arteriovenous microfistulas, and bony and soft tissue hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to test RASA1 in 2 disorders characterised by asymmetric limb enlargement and vascular malformations, namely Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome and regional capillary malformation with overgrowth. We did not identify any clear pathogenic change in these patients. Thus, besides clinical and radiological criteria, RASA1 testing constitutes an additional tool to differentiate Parkes Weber syndrome of capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) from overlapping disorders. PMID:23801933

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with a Chiari I malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hansberry, David R.; Agarwal, Nitin; Tomei, Krystal L.; Goldstein, Ira M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors describe a unique case of a patient who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) following postoperative treatment of a Chiari I malformation. Case Decsription: A 25-year-old female presented with complaints of left upper and lower extremity paresthesias and gait disturbances. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and cervical spine showed a Chiari I malformation with tonsillar descent beyond the level of the C1 lamina. She underwent a suboccipital craniectomy and C1 laminectomy with cerebellar tonsillar cauterization and duraplasty. Postoperatively, an MRI showed bilateral acute infarcts of the cerebellar vermis. She was initially treated for cerebellar ischemia with hypertensive therapy with a subsequent decline in her neurologic status and generalized tonicclonic seizure. Further workup showed evidence of PRES. After weaning pressors, the patient had a significant progressive improvement in her mental status. Conclusion: Although the mechanism of PRES remains controversial given its diverse clinical presentation, several theories implicate hypertension and steroid use as causative agents. PMID:24232171

  18. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis: the skin as a clue to complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea D; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Ruggieri, Martino; Zollino, Marcella; Corsello, Giovanni; Neri, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is defined as an excessive growth in body hair beyond the normal variation compared with individuals of the same age, race and sex and affecting areas not predominantly androgen-dependent. The term hirsutism is usually referred to patients, mainly women, who show excessive hair growth with male pattern distribution.Hypertrichosis is classified according to age of onset (congenital or acquired), extent of distribution (generalized or circumscribed), site involved, and to whether the disorder is isolated or associated with other anomalies. Congenital hypertrichosis is rare and may be an isolated condition of the skin or a component feature of other disorders. Acquired hypertrichosis is more frequent and is secondary to a variety of causes including drug side effects, metabolic and endocrine disorders, cutaneous auto-inflammatory or infectious diseases, malnutrition and anorexia nervosa, and ovarian and adrenal neoplasms. In most cases, hypertrichosis is not an isolated symptom but is associated with other clinical signs including intellective delay, epilepsy or complex body malformations.A review of congenital generalized hypertrichosis is reported with particular attention given to the disorders where excessive diffuse body hair is a sign indicating the presence of complex malformation syndromes. The clinical course of a patient, previously described, with a 20-year follow-up is reported. PMID:26242548

  19. Spinal cord detethering in children with tethered cord syndrome and Chiari type 1 malformations.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad; Cheema, Ahmed A; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Gross, Naina L; Martin, Michael D; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the association between tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Chiari type 1 malformation (CM1), and report on the surgical outcomes of children with CM1 and TCS who underwent sectioning of the filum terminale (SFT). The relationship between TCS and CM1 is unclear. A retrospective review of 170 consecutive spinal cord detetherings between 2008 and 2012 was performed. We identified 17 children with CM1 who underwent SFT. Information regarding clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes was analyzed. A mean tonsillar herniation of 10.0mm (range: 5-21) was noted. Children with a fatty or thickened filum terminale demonstrated a greater amount of tonsillar displacement (p<0.005). A low conus medullaris was found in 12 children and a syrinx was present in three. The preoperative symptoms improved in all children. The postoperative MRI (mean 21.8 months) revealed an unchanged tonsillar position in all but one child. No worsening of neurologic function was noted. Pediatric patients who have both CM1 and TCS, but do not demonstrate classic Chiari-related symptoms, may experience symptomatic improvement after filum terminale sectioning. PMID:26165471

  20. Syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur pied malformé (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Benbella, Imane; Khalki, Hanane; Lahmadi, Khalid; Kouara, Sara; Abbadi, Abderrahim; Er-rami, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de larva migrans cutanée est une dermite sous cutanée causée par des larves d'ankylostomes d'animaux en impasse parasitaire chez l'homme. L'infestation transcutanée est favorisée par le contact avec le sol contaminé par les larves du parasite. Nous rapportons le cas d'un nourrisson de 15 mois, originaire de Guinée-Bissau, atteint d'un syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur un pied malformé. Cette malformation sous forme d'une syndactylie associée à une tuméfaction du pied, était à l'origine d'un retard d'acquisition de la station debout. De même, on a rapporté une notion de pieds nus, vue la difficulté de chausser le pied malformé du patient. Tous ces facteurs auraient contribués à favoriser l'infestation du malade par les larves du nématode.

  1. Novel FREM1 Mutations Expand the Phenotypic Spectrum Associated with Manitoba-Oculo-Tricho-Anal (MOTA) Syndrome and Bifid Nose Renal Agenesis Anorectal Malformations (BNAR) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nathanson, Jared; Swarr, Daniel T.; Singer, Amihood; Liu, Mochi; Chinn, Amy; Jones, Wendy; Hurst, Jane; Khalek, Nahla; Zackai, Elaine; Slavotinek, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in FREM1 have been demonstrated in Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome and Bifid Nose Renal Agenesis and Anorectal malformations (BNAR) syndrome, but the wider phenotypic spectrum that is associated with FREM1 mutations remains to be defined. We screened three probands with phenotypic features of MOTA syndrome. In one severely affected infant who was diagnosed with MOTA syndrome because of bilateral eyelid colobomas, a bifid nasal tip, hydrometrocolpos and vaginal atresia, we found two nonsense mutations that likely result in complete loss of FREM1 function. This infant also had renal dysplasia, a finding more consistent with BNAR syndrome. Another male who was homozygous for a novel stop mutation had a extensive eyelid colobomas, corneopalpebral synechiae and unilateral renal agenesis. A third male child diagnosed with MOTA syndrome because of corneopalpebral synechiae and eyelid colobomas had a homozygous splice site mutation in FREM1. These cases illustrate that disruption of the FREM1 gene can produce a spectrum of clinical manifestations encompassing the previously described MOTA and BNAR syndromes, and that features of both syndromes may be seen in the same individual. The phenotype of FREM1-related disorders is thus more pleiotropic than for MOTA and BNAR syndrome alone and more closely resembles the widespread clinical involvement seen with Fraser syndrome. Moreover, our first case demonstrates that vaginal atresia may be a feature of FREM1-related disorders. PMID:23401257

  2. Occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Moon, Seok-Whan; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Ki, Chang Seok

    2013-12-01

    An 8-year-old male presented with a cystic lung lesion in the left lower lobe, which was initially detected during surgery for a spontaneous rupture of the sigmoid colon at the age of 6 years. Tissue fragility and a tendency to bleed easily were noted during the surgery, which strongly suggested vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Although there was no abnormality in the hemostasis screening test, or any suspicious hereditary problem in his pedigree, genetic gene testing for vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was recommended, and showed a de novo mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This report presents the case of patient with occlusive vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome accompanying a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung, in addition to a duplicated infrarenal vena cava. PMID:23052746

  3. Two novel POC1A mutations in the primordial dwarfism, SOFT syndrome: Clinical homogeneity but also unreported malformations.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Iván Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos; Salamanca, Luis; Belinchón, Alberta; López-González, Vanesa; Sentchordi-Montané, Lucía; del Pozo, Ángela; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Lapunzina, Pablo; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; González-Casado, Isabel; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Heath, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    Primordial dwarfism encompasses rare conditions characterized by severe intrauterine growth retardation and growth deficiency throughout life. Recently, three POC1A mutations have been reported in six families with the primordial dwarfism, SOFT syndrome (Short stature, Onychodysplasia, Facial dysmorphism, and hypoTrichosis). Using a custom-designed Next-generation sequencing skeletal dysplasia panel, we have identified two novel homozygous POC1A mutations in two individuals with primordial dwarfism. The severe growth retardation and the facial profiles are strikingly similar between our patients and those described previously. However, one of our patients was diagnosed with severe foramen magnum stenosis and subglottic tracheal stenosis, malformations not previously associated with this syndrome. Our findings confirm that POC1A mutations cause SOFT syndrome and that mutations in this gene should be considered in patients with severe pre- and postnatal short stature, symmetric shortening of long bones, triangular facies, sparse hair and short, thickened distal phalanges. PMID:26374189

  4. Diffuse Venous Malformation of the Uterus in a Pregnant Woman with Klippel-Trénaunay Syndrome Diagnosed by DCE-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yara, Nana; Masamoto, Hitoshi; Iraha, Yuko; Wakayama, Akihiko; Chinen, Yukiko; Nitta, Hayase; Kinjo, Tadatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Background. We experienced a rare case of a pregnant woman with Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome complicated with diffuse venous malformation of the uterus. This is the first report on the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI for the diagnosis of diffuse venous malformation of the uterus. Case Presentation. A 23-year-old woman presented with convulsions and talipes equinus position of both lower limbs at 11 weeks of gestation. At 27 weeks, ultrasonography demonstrated tubular echolucent spaces throughout the myometrium. Dynamic MRI at 37 weeks revealed that the myometrial lesion was enhanced slowly and showed homogeneous enhancement even on a 10 min delayed image. Taken together with unilateral foot hypertrophy, varices, and port-wine stain, the patient was diagnosed as having Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome complicated with diffuse venous malformation of the pregnant uterus. The patient underwent elective cesarean section because of severe dystonia. The lower uterine segment was thickened and heavy venous blood flow was observed at the incision. Histological diagnosis of the myometrial biopsy specimen was venous malformation. Conclusions. Both diffuse venous malformation and Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome during pregnancy can involve considerable complications, in particular, massive bleeding during labor. Women who suffer from this syndrome should be advised about the risk of complications of pregnancy. PMID:27006845

  5. [Cerebral malformations in the oro-facio-digital syndrome of Papillon-Leage and Psaume (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Baraton, J

    1977-02-01

    Six children with an oro-facio-digital syndrome (Papillon-Leage and Psaume) underwent pneumoencephalography. In 3 cases, the examination was normal. In 3 cases, severe abnormalities were discovered. These abnormalities included: agenesis of the corpus callosum (3/3); a markedly asymmetric skull with enormous porencephalic cavities (2/3); heterotopia of the grey matter (2/3). There were no differences in neurological state nor I.Q. between the children with cerebral malformations and those with a normal pneumo-encephalogram. The association of agenesis of the corpus callosum and porencephaly is significant, and even more so if heterotopia is also present. In the presence of these abnormalities, the diagnosis of oro-facio-digital syndrome may be made even when the clinical picture is untypical. PMID:845839

  6. Duodenal atresia in 17q12 microdeletion including HNF1B: a new associated malformation in this syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Woo, Jennifer S; Bomberg, Eric M; Wallace, W Dean; Peredo, Jane; Dipple, Katrina M

    2014-12-01

    Deletions of chromosome 17q12 [OMIM 614527] encompass a wide range of phenotypes, including renal cysts, diabetes mellitus, pancreatic structural abnormalities, genital tract anomalies, developmental delay, learning difficulties, and more recently, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. To date, gastrointestinal malformations have not been fully characterized in this syndrome. In this case report, we describe a four-year-old girl with a 17q12 microdeletion who was born with duodenal atresia, bilateral renal cysts, left kidney dysplasia, a midline cystic structure at the conus medullaris, and dysmorphic features. Both the patient and her affected father were found to have a deletion of 17q12, which encompasses the HNF1B (hepatocyte nuclear factor beta). It is hypothesized that HNF1B may play a role in intestinal differentiation and development. Our clinical report further expands the pre-and post-natal presentation of this rare microdeletion syndrome. PMID:25256560

  7. A FETAL RAT TESTIS ENDOCRINE AND GENOMIC "SIGNATURE"ACCURATELY PREDICTS THE PHTHALATE SYNDROME OF MALFORMATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Phthalate esters (PE) vary greatly in their potency to induce malformations during sexual differentiation in the male rat. Since in vitro assay batteries are currently unable to generate useful information on the potential of chemicals within this class to disrupt ...

  8. Dlx5 Homeodomain:DNA Complex: Structure, Binding and Effect of Mutations Related to Split Hand and Foot Malformation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-03-27

    The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including split hand and foot malformation 1 in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain:(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A Q186H mutation linked to split hand and foot malformation 1 likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and they likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes. PMID:26829219

  9. A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Torisu, Shidow; Hagio, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Mizutani, Shinya; Naganobu, Kiyokazu

    2016-04-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS. PMID:26616155

  10. A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; HAGIO, Mitsuyoshi; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; MIZUTANI, Shinya; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS. PMID:26616155

  11. Cardiorenal Syndrome is Present in Human Fetuses with Severe, Isolated Urinary Tract Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Waltraut M.; Kübler, Kirsten; Fimmers, Rolf; Willruth, Arne; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Gembruch, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Objective We analyzed the association between renal and cardiovascular parameters in fetuses with isolated severe urinary tract malformations. Methods 39 fetuses at a mean gestational age of 23.6 weeks with nephropathies or urinary tract malformations and markedly impaired or absent renal function were prospectively examined. Fetal echocardiography was performed, and thicknesses of the interventricular septum, and left and right ventricular wall were measured. Blood flow velocity waveforms of the umbilical artery, middle cerebral artery, and ductus venosus were obtained by color Doppler ultrasound. Concentrations of circulating n-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (nt-proBNP), cystatin C, ß2-microglobulin, and hemoglobin were determined from fetal blood samples. Results Malformations included 21 cases of obstructive uropathy, 10 fetuses with bilateral nephropathy, and 8 cases of bilateral renal agenesis. Marked biventricular myocardial hypertrophy was present in all cases. The ratio between measured and gestational age-adjusted normal values was 2.01 (interventricular septum), 1.85, and 1.78 (right and left ventricular wall, respectively). Compared to controls, levels of circulating nt-proBNP were significantly increased (median (IQR) 5035 ng/L (5936 ng/L) vs. 1874 ng/L (1092 ng/L); p<0.001). Cystatin C and ß2-microglobulin concentrations were elevated as follows (mean ± SD) 1.85±0.391 mg/L and 8.44±2.423 mg/L, respectively (normal range 1.66±0.202 mg/L and 4.25±0.734 mg/L, respectively). No correlation was detected between cardiovascular parameters and urinary tract morphology and function. Despite increased levels of nt-proBNP cardiovascular function was preserved, with normal fetal Doppler indices in 90.2% of cases. Conclusion Urinary tract malformations resulting in severe renal impairment are associated with biventricular myocardial hypertrophy and elevated concentrations of circulating nt-proBNP during fetal life. Cardiovascular findings do not correlate with kidney function or morphology. PMID:23717461

  12. Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Pandey, Vaibhav

    2015-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) are among the more frequent congenital anomalies encountered in paediatric surgery, with an estimated incidence ranging between 1 in 2000 and 1 in 5000 live births. Antenatal diagnosis of an isolated ARM is rare. Most cases are diagnosed in the early neonatal period. There is a wide spectrum of presentation ranging from low anomalies with perineal fistula having simple management to high anomalies with complex management. Advances in the imaging techniques with improvement in knowledge of the embryology, anatomy and physiology of ARM cases have refined diagnosis and initial management. There has been marked improvement in survival of such patient over the last century. The management of ARM has moved forward from classical procedures to PSARP to minimal invasive procedures. But still the fecal and urinary incontinence can occur even with an excellent anatomic repair, mainly due to associated problems. There has been a paradigm shift in approach to these patients which involves holistic approach to the syndrome of Anorectal malformations with a long term goal of achievement of complete fecal and urinary continence with excellent quality of life. PMID:25552824

  13. The prune belly syndrome in a female foetus with urorectal septum malformation sequence: a case report on a rare entity with an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dibyajyoti; Kusre, Giriraj; Dutta, Hemonta Kumar; Sarma, Adity

    2013-08-01

    The prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly which is characterized by the triad of an absent or a deficient development of the abdominal muscle, bilateral cryptorchidism and an anomalous urinary tract. In its full form, this condition occurs only in males. However, a similar condition occurs in females in the absence of cryptorchidism. On the other hand, the urorectal septum malformation sequence is a lethal congenital malformation which is characterized by the development of a phallus like structure, a smooth perineum and the absence of urethral, vaginal and anal openings. We are reporting a case of a female foetus with the prune belly syndrome, which was associated with a urorectal septum malformation sequence. A dead foetus with a protruded abdomen and ambiguous genitalia, was born at 32 weeks of pregnancy. On autopsy, it was found to have female internal genital organs. The left kidney, the urinary bladder and the rectum were absent. The sigmoid colon, the ureters and the fallopian tubes opened into a common cloacal sac. The histopathological examination of the ovary showed the presence of Leydig's cells. The occurrence of the female counterpart of the prune belly syndrome is extremely rare and only few of such cases were found to be discussed in the details in the indexed English literature so far. Hence, we hope that this case report will contribute to the existing knowledge on the prune belly syndrome. PMID:24086893

  14. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... including those with Chiari I malformations. NIH Patient Recruitment for Chiari Malformation Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 March of Dimes 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue ...

  15. Syndrome of absent abdominal muscles: two cases with microcephaly, polymicrogyria, and cerebellar malformations

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Reid R.

    1970-01-01

    Two unique cases of the syndrome of absent abdominal muscles with central nervous system involvement are presented. Microcephaly, polymicrogyria, and cerebellar heterotopiae were present in both. In case 1 there was also absence of the corpus callosum and agenesis of the cerebellar vermis. In case 2 a count of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord showed a reduction of approximately 50% in the lower thoracic region. The pertinent literature is briefly discussed. The findings in the nervous system suggest that the syndrome is the result of defective embryogenesis during the first trimester. Images PMID:4250700

  16. Amphibian malformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    National Wildlife Health Center

    1998-01-01

    Frog malformations have been reported from 42 states. The broad geographic distribution of these malformations warrants national attention. Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin are studying this problem in an effort to document its scope and to determine the causes of the observed malformations.

  17. Potential Pitfalls on the 99mTc-Mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy in a Patient with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maestri Brittain, Jane; Borgwardt, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is an obliterative cholangiopathy affecting 1:10.000–14.000 of newborns. Infants with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation syndrome (BASM) are a subgroup of BA patients with additional congenital anomalies. Untreated the disease will result in fatal liver failure within the first years of life. Kasai portoenterostomy restores bile flow and delay the progressive liver damage thereby postponing liver transplantation. An early diagnosis is of most importance to ensure the effectiveness of the operation. The 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of the diagnostic strategy when an infant presents jaundice due to conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (>20 µmol/L total bilirubin of which 20% is conjugated) with its high sensitivity of 97%–100% in refuting BA. Rapid extraction of tracer by the liver and no visible tracer in the small bowl after 24 h is indicative of BA. Laparotomy with antegrade cholangiography is then performed giving the final diagnosis when the remains of the obliterated biliary tree are revealed in the case of BA. We present a case demonstrating some of the challenges of interpreting the 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy in an infant with BASM and stress the importance that the 99mTc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of a spectrum of imaging modalities in diagnosing BA. PMID:26838802

  18. Femoral-facial syndrome with malformations in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leal, Evelia; Macías-Gómez, Nelly; Rodríguez, Lisa; Mercado, F Miguel; Barros-Núñez, Patricio

    2003-01-01

    The femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FFS) is a very rare association of femoral and facial abnormalities. Maternal diabetes mellitus has been mainly involved as the causal agent. We report the second case of FFS with anomalies in the central nervous system (CNS) including corticosubcortical atrophy, colpocephaly, partial agenesis of corpus callosum, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri and absent septum pellucidum. The psychomotor development has been normal. We propose that the CNS defects observed in these patients are part of the spectrum of abnormalities in the FFS. PMID:12504316

  19. Submicroscopic terminal deletions and duplications in retarded patients with unclassified malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Riegel, M; Baumer, A; Jamar, M; Delbecque, K; Herens, C; Verloes, A; Schinzel, A

    2001-09-01

    Unbalanced submicroscopic subtelomeric chromosomal rearrangements represent a significant cause of unexplained moderate to severe mental retardation with and without phenotypic abnormalities. We investigated 254 patients (102 from Zürich, 152 from Liège) for unbalanced subtelomeric rearrangements by using fluorescence in situ hybridisation with probes mapping to 41 subtelomeric regions. Mental retardation combined with a pattern of dysmorphic features, with or without major malformations, and growth retardation and a normal karyotype by conventional G-banding were the criteria of inclusion. Selection criteria were more restrictive for the Zürich series in terms of clinical and cytogenetic pre-investigation. We found 13 unbalanced rearrangements and two further aberrations, which, following the investigation of other family members, had to be considered as variants without influence on the phenotype. The significant aberrations included three de novo deletions (two of 1pter, one of 5pter), three de novo duplications (8pter, 9pter, Xpter), one de novo deletion 13qter-duplication 4qter, and five familial submicroscopic translocations [(1q;18p), (2q;4p), (2p;7q), (3p;22q), (4q;10q), (12p;22q)], most of them with several unbalanced offspring with deletion-duplication. Although the incidence of abnormal results was higher (10/152) in the Liège versus the Zürich series (3/102), similar selection criteria in Zürich as in Liège would have resulted in an incidence of 7/106 and thus similar figures. In our series, submicroscopic unbalanced rearrangements explain the phenotype in 13/254 study probands. The most important selection criterion seems to be the presence of more than one affected member in a family. An examination of subtelomeric segments should be included in the diagnostic work-up of patients with unexplained mental retardation combined with physical abnormalities, when a careful conventional examination of banded chromosomes has yielded a normal result and a thorough clinical examination does not lead to another classification. The proportion of abnormal findings depends strongly on selection criteria: more stringent selection can eliminate some examinations but necessitates a high workload for experienced clinical geneticists. Once the costs and workload of screening are reduced, less selective approaches might finally be more cost-effective. PMID:11702209

  20. Focal dermal hypoplasia: report of a case with myelomeningocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus with a review of neurologic manifestations of Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tess; Perrier, Renee; Haber, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 305600) is a rare X-linked dominant congenital disorder involving defects of mesodermal- and ectodermal-derived structures. It is associated with mutations in the PORCN gene, a regulator of Wnt signaling proteins. The phenotype is highly variable, although all describe characteristic skin findings as a primary diagnostic feature. To date there are few case reports of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with central nervous system abnormalities. We report the second case of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with myelomenigocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus and the first in a male. Genetic testing identified a novel mosaic three base pair deletion within the PORCN gene (c.853_855delACG). This case highlights the importance of neurological evaluation in focal dermal hypoplasia and consideration of other syndromes more commonly associated with central nervous system abnormalities. In this report we summarize the literature on neurological manifestations in Goltz syndrome. PMID:24387693

  1. Severe desaturation while attempting one-lung ventilation for congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation with respiratory distress syndrome in neonate -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Seok, Ji-Hye; Kim, Eun-Ju; Ban, Jong-Seouk; Lee, Sang-Gon; Lee, Ji-Hyang; Seo, Da-Mi; Shim, Kwang-Seok

    2013-07-01

    There are many methods for achieving one-lung ventilation (OLV) during thoracic surgery in neonates and the accuracy of OLV may affect postoperative outcome. The authors have performed OLV using a 5 Fr Arndt endobronchial blocker (AEB, Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA) on a neonate diagnosed with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) associated with marked mediastinal shift. In spite of sufficient preoxygenation, sudden and severe fall in oxygen saturation had occurred. Since neonates with RDS may develop sudden and severe desaturation, rapid intubation with anticipation of potential difficulty is necessary as well as sufficient preoxygenation. PMID:23904945

  2. Transition issues for children with diffuse cortical malformations, multifocal postnatal lesions, (infectious and traumatic) and Lennox-Gastaut and similar syndromes.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter R; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-08-01

    Patients with epilepsy may have diffuse, serious brain disorders including genetically determined, multilobar malformations, traumatic brain injury, encephalitis and meningitis, and the many causes of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Transition to adult care needs to consider concomitant intellectual disability, refractory epilepsy, underlying cause, and other nonneurologic but significant problems, especially for genetic etiologies. Adult epilepsy care coupled with dedicated primary/family care is essential. A multidisciplinary setting may be optimal to address the many issues of clinical care, decision making, custody, and ongoing supervision. PMID:25209082

  3. Arteriovenous Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... secondary menu Home Disorders A - Z Arteriovenous Malformation Information Page Publications Organizations News Research literature Organizations Professional Societies Government Resources NINDS Clinical Trials En Español Order Brochures ...

  4. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have cranial nerve compression. This can result in apnea (cessation of breathing), gagging, swallowing difficulties, facial numbness ... Chiari malformation with or without syringomyelia . A genetic prevalence has been identified in some families. Researchers continue ...

  5. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePLUS

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  6. Heterochrony and human malformation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G N

    1988-02-01

    The role of altered developmental timing or heterochrony in morphologic evolution has intrigued classical and modern biologists. Analogous manifestations of developmental asynchrony occur in human dysmorphogenesis where they illustrate the residue and repertoire of phylogenetic change. Certain single malformations such as holoprosencephaly immediately suggest heterochrony by their resemblance to antecedent phylogenetic or embryologic structures. Multiple malformation syndromes of genetic, chromosomal, or teratogenic etiology may have altered developmental timing as an underlying theme. The persisting alpha-fetoprotein synthesis in ataxia-telangiectasia, the morphologic atavisms in Down or trisomy 13 syndromes, and the delayed growth or fetal to adult hemoglobin switch in diabetic embryopathy all exemplify developmental asynchrony. The perspective of heterochrony stresses the molecular history and hierarchy which is recapitulated with each pregnancy, and reconciles apparent discrepancies between the rates of molecular and morphologic evolution. Recognition of heterochrony places isolated anomalies in the context of pattern and suggests monitoring of teratogenesis through altered expression of ontogenetically regulated, phylogenetically relevant molecules. PMID:3281459

  7. Combined and complex vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Robert K; Pfammatter, Thomas; Meier, Thomas O; Alomari, Ahmad I; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-03-01

    The correct diagnosis of vascular malformations is obtainable by clinical assessment and patient history in the majority of cases. Nonetheless, confusion in nomenclature, existence of multiple classifications and rarity of these lesions leads to misdiagnosis and related wrong treatment. This is especially the case in combined or complex vascular malformations or vascular malformations that are part of syndromes as these have overlapping clinical and imaging features. New entities in the field of vascular anomalies have been described recently like fibro-adipose vascular anomaly or central conducting lymphatic anomalies. PMID:25698387

  8. Germline PTPN11 and somatic PIK3CA variant in a boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP)--pure coincidence?

    PubMed

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Spaich, Christiane; Gabriel, Heinz-Dieter; Zenker, Martin; Bartholdi, Deborah; Biskup, Saskia

    2015-03-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome that is diagnosed by clinical criteria. Recently, somatic and germline variants in genes that are involved in the PI3K-AKT pathway (AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA) have been described to be associated with MCAP and/or other related megalencephaly syndromes. We performed trio-exome sequencing in a 6-year-old boy and his healthy parents. Clinical features were macrocephaly, cutis marmorata, angiomata, asymmetric overgrowth, developmental delay, discrete midline facial nevus flammeus, toe syndactyly and postaxial polydactyly--thus, clearly an MCAP phenotype. Exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic de novo germline variant in the PTPN11 gene (c.1529A>G; p.(Gln510Arg)), which has so far been associated with Noonan, as well as LEOPARD syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing (>100 × coverage) did not reveal any alteration in the known megalencephaly genes. However, ultra-deep sequencing results from saliva (>1000 × coverage) revealed a 22% mosaic variant in PIK3CA (c.2740G>A; p.(Gly914Arg)). To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a PTPN11 germline variant in an MCAP patient. Data from experimental studies show a complex interaction of SHP2 (gene product of PTPN11) and the PI3K-AKT pathway. We hypothesize that certain PTPN11 germline variants might drive toward additional second-hit alterations. PMID:24939587

  9. Germline PTPN11 and somatic PIK3CA variant in a boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP) - pure coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Döcker, Dennis; Schubach, Max; Menzel, Moritz; Spaich, Christiane; Gabriel, Heinz-Dieter; Zenker, Martin; Bartholdi, Deborah; Biskup, Saskia

    2015-01-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome that is diagnosed by clinical criteria. Recently, somatic and germline variants in genes that are involved in the PI3K-AKT pathway (AKT3, PIK3R2 and PIK3CA) have been described to be associated with MCAP and/or other related megalencephaly syndromes. We performed trio-exome sequencing in a 6-year-old boy and his healthy parents. Clinical features were macrocephaly, cutis marmorata, angiomata, asymmetric overgrowth, developmental delay, discrete midline facial nevus flammeus, toe syndactyly and postaxial polydactyly—thus, clearly an MCAP phenotype. Exome sequencing revealed a pathogenic de novo germline variant in the PTPN11 gene (c.1529A>G; p.(Gln510Arg)), which has so far been associated with Noonan, as well as LEOPARD syndrome. Whole-exome sequencing (>100 × coverage) did not reveal any alteration in the known megalencephaly genes. However, ultra-deep sequencing results from saliva (>1000 × coverage) revealed a 22% mosaic variant in PIK3CA (c.2740G>A; p.(Gly914Arg)). To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a PTPN11 germline variant in an MCAP patient. Data from experimental studies show a complex interaction of SHP2 (gene product of PTPN11) and the PI3K-AKT pathway. We hypothesize that certain PTPN11 germline variants might drive toward additional second-hit alterations. PMID:24939587

  10. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the back of the head or the neck and contains brain matter. The covering of the brain or spinal ... fusion of segments of the bones in the neck, and extra folds in the brain. How common are Chiari malformations? In the past, ...

  11. Loss of Wnt5a disrupts second heart field cell deployment and may contribute to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Tanvi; Li, Ding; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Hutson, Mary R.; Kelly, Robert G.; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Outflow tract (OFT) malformation accounts for ∼30% of human congenital heart defects and manifests frequently in TBX1 haplo-insufficiency associated DiGeorge (22q11.2 deletion) syndrome. OFT myocardium originates from second heart field (SHF) progenitors in the pharyngeal and splanchnic mesoderm (SpM), but how these progenitors are deployed to the OFT is unclear. We find that SHF progenitors in the SpM gradually gain epithelial character and are deployed to the OFT as a cohesive sheet. Wnt5a, a non-canonical Wnt, is expressed specifically in the caudal SpM and may regulate oriented cell intercalation to incorporate SHF progenitors into an epithelial-like sheet, thereby generating the pushing force to deploy SHF cells rostrally into the OFT. Using enhancer trap and Cre transgenes, our lineage tracing experiments show that in Wnt5a null mice, SHF progenitors are trapped in the SpM and fail to be deployed to the OFT efficiently, resulting in a reduction in the inferior OFT myocardial wall and its derivative, subpulmonary myocardium. Concomitantly, the superior OFT and subaortic myocardium are expanded. Finally, in chick embryos, blocking the Wnt5a function in the caudal SpM perturbs polarized elongation of SHF progenitors, and compromises their deployment to the OFT. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for Wnt5a in deploying SHF progenitors from the SpM to the OFT. Given that Wnt5a is a putative transcriptional target of Tbx1, and the similar reduction of subpulmonary myocardium in Tbx1 mutant mice, our results suggest that perturbing Wnt5a-mediated SHF deployment may be an important pathogenic mechanism contributing to OFT malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. PMID:25410658

  12. AP1S2 is mutated in X-linked Dandy-Walker malformation with intellectual disability, basal ganglia disease and seizures (Pettigrew syndrome).

    PubMed

    Cacciagli, Pierre; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Girard, Nadine; Delepine, Marc; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Lévy, Nicolas; Ledbetter, David H; Dobyns, William B; Villard, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    MRXS5 or Pettigrew syndrome was described 20 years ago in a four generation family including nine affected individuals presenting with facial dysmorphism, intellectual disability, Dandy-Walker malformation and inconstant choreoathetosis. Four individuals had iron deposition in the basal ganglia seen on MRI or at autopsy. The mutation causing Pettigrew has remained elusive since the initial description of the condition. We report the identification of a mutation in the X-linked AP1S2 gene in the original Pettigrew syndrome family using X-chromosome exome sequencing. We report additional phenotype details for several of the affected individuals, allowing us to further refine the phenotype corresponding to this X-linked intellectual disability syndrome. The AP1S2 c.426+1 G>T mutation segregates with the disease in the Pettigrew syndrome family and results in loss of 46 amino acids in the clathrin adaptor complex small chain domain that spans most of the AP1S2 protein sequence. The mutation reported here in AP1S2 is the first mutation that is not predicted to cause a premature termination of the coding sequence or absence of the AP1S2 protein. Although most of the families affected by a mutation in AP1S2 were initially described as having different disorders assigned to at least three different OMIM numbers (MIM 300629, 300630 and 304340), our analysis of the phenotype shows that they are all the same syndrome with recognition complicated by highly variable expressivity that is seen within as well as between families and is probably not explained by differences in mutation severity. PMID:23756445

  13. Classification and diagnosis of ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva; Wulke, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    In the ENT region 50% of the malformations affect the ear. Malformations of the outer and middle ear are predominantly unilateral (ca. 70-90%) and mostly involve the right ear. Inner ear malformations can be unilateral or bilateral. The incidence of ear malformations is approximately 1 in 3800 newborns. Ear malformations may be genetic (associated with syndromes or not, with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired in nature. Malformations can affect the outer ear (pinna and external auditory canal, EAC), middle ear and inner ear, not infrequently in combination. Formal classification is advisable in order to be able to predict the prognosis and compare treatment schedules. Various classifications have been proposed: pinna and EAC malformations according to Weerda [1], middle ear malformations according to Kösling [2], and inner ear malformations according to Jackler [3], [4], to Marangos [5] and to Sennaroglu [6]. Additionally, we describe Altmann’s classification of atresia auris congenita [7] and the Siegert-Mayer-Weerda score [8] for EAC and middle ear malformations, systems of great practicability that are in widespread clinical use. The diagnostic steps include clinical examination, audiological testing, genetic analysis and, especially, CT and MRI. These imaging methods are most usefully employed in combination. Precise description of the malformations by means of CT and MRI is indispensable for the planning and successful outcome of operative ear reconstruction and rehabilitation procedures, including cochlear implantation. PMID:22073081

  14. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  15. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used. PMID:26631589

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations of Midbrain-Hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of malformations of midbrain and hindbrain. These can be classified as predominantly cerebellar malformations, combined cerebellar and brain stem malformations, and predominantly brain stem malformations. The diagnostic criteria for the majority of these morphological malformations are based on neuroimaging findings. The predominantly cerebellar malformations include predominantly vermian hypoplasia seen in Dandy-Walker malformation and rhombencephalosynapsis, global cerebellar hypoplasia reported in lissencephaly and microlissencephaly, and unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia seen in PHACES, vanishing cerebellum, and cerebellar cleft. Cerebellar dysplasias are seen in Chudley-McCullough syndrome, associated with LAMA1 mutations and GPR56 mutations; Lhermitte-Duclos disease; and focal cerebellar dysplasias. Cerebellar hyperplasias are seen in megalencephaly-related syndromes and hemimegalencephaly with ipsilateral cerebellomegaly. Cerebellar and brain stem malformations include tubulinopathies, Joubert syndrome, cobblestone malformations, pontocerebellar hypoplasias, and congenital disorders of glycosylation type Ia. Predominantly brain stem malformations include congenital innervation dysgenesis syndrome, pontine tegmental cap dysplasia, diencephalic-mesencephalic junction dysplasia, disconnection syndrome, and pontine clefts. PMID:26599961

  17. Treatment of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Yvonne; Rall, Katharina; Campo, Rudi; Oppelt, Peter; Isaacson, Keith

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of müllerian malformations is 1 in 200, or 0.5%. A third of the anomalies are septate, a third bicornuate uteri, 10% arcuate uterus, 10% didelphis and unicornuate uterus, and < 5% uterine and vaginal aplasia. Correct diagnosis of the malformation is most important but often very difficult. Correct treatment can only be performed if the malformation is clear. Longitudinal vaginal septums have to be removed due to potential obstetric problems. Transverse vaginal septums can cause hematocolpos and pain and have to be incised crosswise and excised so as not to shorten the vagina at the same time. Congenital vaginal agenesis occurs in Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome patients and in androgen insensitivity syndrome. The first choice for surgical treatment should be the new laparoscopic-assisted creation of a neovagina. Septate uterus has to be distinguished from a bicornuate uterus. Even if it is not proven to be a cause for infertility, the chance of miscarriage can be diminished by performing hysteroscopic metroplasty. Repair of a uterine septum in infertility patients often improves pregnancy rates. In contrast, surgical repair of a bicornuate uterus requires an abdominal metroplasty. This should only be performed if the patient has recurrent fetal loss due to the uterine structural defect. In a unicornuate uterus it is most important to determine if there is a second uterine horn that can cause cyclic pain if it has functioning endometrium. The only surgical option in these cases is to remove the rudimentary uterus with endometrium and hematometra, respectively. PMID:21437824

  18. Dlx5 homedomain/DNA complex; Structure, binding and effect of mutations related to split-hand and foot malformation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Geralt, Michael; Fletterick, Robert J; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Deacon, Ashley M.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Serrano, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The Dlx5 homeodomain is a transcription factor related to the Drosophila Distal-less gene that is associated with breast and lung cancer, lymphoma, Rett syndrome and osteoporosis in humans. Mutations in the DLX5 gene have been linked to deficiencies in craniofacial and limb development in higher eukaryotes, including Split Hand and Foot Malformation-1 (SHFM-1) in humans. Our characterization of a Dlx5 homeodomain–(CGACTAATTAGTCG)2 complex by NMR spectroscopy paved the way for determination of its crystal structure at 1.85 Å resolution that enabled rationalization of the effects of disease-related mutations on the protein function. A remarkably subtle mutation, Q186H, is linked to SHFM-1; this change likely affects affinity of DNA binding by disrupting water-mediated interactions with the DNA major groove. A more subtle effect is implicated for the Q178P mutation, which is not in direct contact with the DNA. Our data indicate that these mutations diminish the ability of the Dlx5 homeodomain to recognize and bind target DNAs, and likely destabilize the formation of functional complexes. PMID:26829219

  19. The syndrome of accelerated bone maturation in the newborn infant with dysmorphism and congenital malformations. (The so-called Marshall-Smith syndrome).

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Sutton, T; Mage, K; Limal, J M; Rappaport, R

    1976-10-26

    A new case of the syndrome of "accelerated skeletal maturation, facial dysmorphism, failure to thrive and psychomotor retardation" is presented. The syndrome was noted in the neonatal period. The diagnosis can be readily suggested by the radiologist because ossification centers show exceptionally early maturation. This case history increases to at least five the number of cases so far reported following the initial publication by Marchall and al. in 1971. If the two cases described in 1974 by Weaver and al. (as a distinct entity) are also included then the total of cases reported rises to seven. PMID:827733

  20. De Novo Loss-of-Function Mutations in USP9X Cause a Female-Specific Recognizable Syndrome with Developmental Delay and Congenital Malformations.

    PubMed

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Latour, Brooke; Jolly, Lachlan; Mancini, Grazia M; Pfundt, Rolph; Wu, Ka Man; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Anderlid, Britt-Marie M; Wood, Stephen A; Cheung, Sau Wai; Barnicoat, Angela; Probst, Frank; Magoulas, Pilar; Brooks, Alice S; Malmgren, Helena; Harila-Saari, Arja; Marcelis, Carlo M; Vreeburg, Maaike; Hobson, Emma; Sutton, V Reid; Stark, Zornitza; Vogt, Julie; Cooper, Nicola; Lim, Jiin Ying; Price, Sue; Lai, Angeline Hwei Meeng; Domingo, Deepti; Reversade, Bruno; Gecz, Jozef; Gilissen, Christian; Brunner, Han G; Kini, Usha; Roepman, Ronald; Nordgren, Ann; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in more than a hundred genes have been reported to cause X-linked recessive intellectual disability (ID) mainly in males. In contrast, the number of identified X-linked genes in which de novo mutations specifically cause ID in females is limited. Here, we report 17 females with de novo loss-of-function mutations in USP9X, encoding a highly conserved deubiquitinating enzyme. The females in our study have a specific phenotype that includes ID/developmental delay (DD), characteristic facial features, short stature, and distinct congenital malformations comprising choanal atresia, anal abnormalities, post-axial polydactyly, heart defects, hypomastia, cleft palate/bifid uvula, progressive scoliosis, and structural brain abnormalities. Four females from our cohort were identified by targeted genetic testing because their phenotype was suggestive for USP9X mutations. In several females, pigment changes along Blaschko lines and body asymmetry were observed, which is probably related to differential (escape from) X-inactivation between tissues. Expression studies on both mRNA and protein level in affected-female-derived fibroblasts showed significant reduction of USP9X level, confirming the loss-of-function effect of the identified mutations. Given that some features of affected females are also reported in known ciliopathy syndromes, we examined the role of USP9X in the primary cilium and found that endogenous USP9X localizes along the length of the ciliary axoneme, indicating that its loss of function could indeed disrupt cilium-regulated processes. Absence of dysregulated ciliary parameters in affected female-derived fibroblasts, however, points toward spatiotemporal specificity of ciliary USP9X (dys-)function. PMID:26833328

  1. Stratified Whole Genome Linkage Analysis of Chiari Type I Malformation Implicates Known Klippel-Feil Syndrome Genes as Putative Disease Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Markunas, Christina A.; Soldano, Karen; Dunlap, Kaitlyn; Cope, Heidi; Asiimwe, Edgar; Stajich, Jeffrey; Enterline, David; Grant, Gerald; Fuchs, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Chiari Type I Malformation (CMI) is characterized by displacement of the cerebellar tonsils below the base of the skull, resulting in significant neurologic morbidity. Although multiple lines of evidence support a genetic contribution to disease, no genes have been identified. We therefore conducted the largest whole genome linkage screen to date using 367 individuals from 66 families with at least two individuals presenting with nonsyndromic CMI with or without syringomyelia. Initial findings across all 66 families showed minimal evidence for linkage due to suspected genetic heterogeneity. In order to improve power to localize susceptibility genes, stratified linkage analyses were performed using clinical criteria to differentiate families based on etiologic factors. Families were stratified on the presence or absence of clinical features associated with connective tissue disorders (CTDs) since CMI and CTDs frequently co-occur and it has been proposed that CMI patients with CTDs represent a distinct class of patients with a different underlying disease mechanism. Stratified linkage analyses resulted in a marked increase in evidence of linkage to multiple genomic regions consistent with reduced genetic heterogeneity. Of particular interest were two regions (Chr8, Max LOD = 3.04; Chr12, Max LOD = 2.09) identified within the subset of “CTD-negative” families, both of which harbor growth differentiation factors (GDF6, GDF3) implicated in the development of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). Interestingly, roughly 3–5% of CMI patients are diagnosed with KFS. In order to investigate the possibility that CMI and KFS are allelic, GDF3 and GDF6 were sequenced leading to the identification of a previously known KFS missense mutation and potential regulatory variants in GDF6. This study has demonstrated the value of reducing genetic heterogeneity by clinical stratification implicating several convincing biological candidates and further supporting the hypothesis that multiple, distinct mechanisms are responsible for CMI. PMID:23620759

  2. Genetic causes of vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka

    2007-10-15

    Vascular malformations are localized defects of vascular development. They usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. Although most malformations are sporadic, inheritance is observed, enabling genetic analysis. Usually, sporadic forms present with a single lesion whereas multiple lesions are observed in familial cases. The last decade has seen unraveling of several causative genes and beginning of elucidation of the pathophysiological pathways involved in the inherited forms. In parallel, definition of the clinical phenotypes has improved and disorders such as Parkes-Weber syndrome (PKWS), first thought to be sporadic, is now known to be part of a more common inheritable phenotype. In addition, the concept of double-hit mechanism that we proposed earlier to explain the incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and multifocality of lesions in inherited venous anomalies is now becoming confirmed, as some somatic mutations have been identified in venous, glomuvenous and cerebral cavernous malformations. It is thus tempting to suggest that familial forms of vascular malformations follow paradominant inheritance and that sporadic forms, the etiopathogenic causes of which are still unelucidated, are caused by somatic mutations in the same genes. PMID:17670762

  3. [Hemangiomas and vascular malformations. Review and update].

    PubMed

    Lobato, R; Martínez, L; Leal, N; Díaz, M; Díez-Pascual, R; Velasco, B; Ros, Z; López-Gutiérrez, J C

    1997-07-01

    In 1982, Mulliken and Glowacki classificated congenital vascular lesions in two biological groups with different treatment, evolution and prognosis: Haemangiomas and Vascular malformations. We have seen 230 patients, 145 with haemangiomas and 85 with vascular malformations (74 with low flow and 11 with high flow). We have reviewed clinical, evolutive and ecographic findings. Depending on the type and localization of the lesion, we completed the study with CT, MRI and angiography. Among all the patients with haemangiomas; 45 were treated with local or systemic steroids because of bleeding, ulceration or affection in functional areas. In two more, we used interferon alfa 2a because of Kassabach-Merritt Syndrome. 23 were operated on with good aesthetic results. Patients with vascular malformations were managed with embolization, sclerotherapy, surgical approach or conservatively. Capillary malformations were treated with lasertherapy. We emphasize in correct classification of vascular lesions prior to start diagnosis, treatment or parents information. PMID:9376236

  4. ALOBAR HOLOPROSENCEPHALY, CLEFT LIP/PALATE, URORECTAL SEPTUM MALFORMATION SEQUENCE AND CONGENITAL PERINEAL HERNIA IN A FETUS.

    PubMed

    Girish, K M; Nayak, S S; Shukla, A; Bhat, S K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a fetus with alobar holoprosencephaly, complete cleft lip and palate, urorectal septum malformation sequence and perineal hernia. To our knowledge this appears to be a novel fetal malformation syndrome. PMID:26625663

  5. Arteriovenous malformation in hypomelanosis of Ito.

    PubMed

    Urgelles, E; Pascual-Castroviejo, I; Roche, C; Moneo, J L; Martinez, M A; Vega, A

    1996-01-01

    Hypomelanosis of Ito (HI) is a neurocutaneous syndrome with multisystemic involvement. Its most frequent neurological abnormalities are mental retardation and seizures. EEG, CT and MRI findings are not characteristic enough to be diagnostic. In this report, we describe a patient with typical cutaneous lesions of HI and an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM), which has not been previously reported. PMID:8907350

  6. Evaluation and management of peripheral venous and lymphatic malformations.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Naiem; Thomas, Jones; Cirillo-Penn, Nolan C

    2016-04-01

    The International Society for Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) broadly categorizes vascular anomalies as vascular tumors or vascular malformations. The latter are congenital lesions that are further categorized by their flow properties and include high-flow arteriovenous malformations, slow-flow venous and lymphatic malformations, and congenital mixed syndromes, which can include a combination of malformations. Unlike vascular tumors, vascular malformations never regress and can persist and grow for the duration of the patient's lifespan. As our understanding of the natural history, hemodynamics, and treatment outcomes of these lesions has expanded and evolved over the last few decades, certain fundamental diagnostic and therapeutic principles have been established and are considered standard of care. These overarching principles are crucial to adhere to in the overall management of these lesions and are highlighted and expanded on in this report, which focuses exclusively on peripheral slow-flow venous and lymphatic malformations. PMID:26993876

  7. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  8. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected. PMID:18493797

  9. Combined Lymphedema and Capillary Malformation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, Reid A.; Chaudry, Gulraiz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphedema and capillary malformation are independent vascular malformations that can cause overgrowth of the lower extremity. We report a series of patients who had both types of malformations affecting the same leg. The condition is unique but may be confused with other types of vascular malformation overgrowth conditions (eg, Klippel–Trenaunay and Parkes Weber). Methods: Our Vascular Anomalies Center and Lymphedema Program databases were searched for patients with both capillary malformation and lymphedema. Diagnosis of lymphedema–capillary malformation was made by history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Because lymphedema–capillary malformation has phenotypical overlap with other conditions, only patients who had imaging confirming their diagnosis were included in the analysis. Clinical and radiological features, morbidity, and treatment were recorded. Results: Eight patients (4 females and 4 males) had confirmed lymphedema–capillary malformation. Referring diagnosis was Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (n = 4), diffuse capillary malformation with overgrowth (n = 3), or lymphatic malformation (n = 1). The condition was unilateral (n = 6) or bilateral (n = 2). Morbidity included infection (n = 6), difficulty fitting clothes (n = 6), bleeding or leaking vesicles (n = 5), leg length discrepancy (n = 4), and difficulty ambulating (n = 3). All patients were managed with compression regimens. Operative management was liposuction (n = 3), treatment of phlebectatic veins (n = 3), staged skin/subcutaneous excision (n = 1), and/or epiphysiodesis (n = 1). Conclusions: Lymphedema and capillary malformation can occur together in the same extremity. Both conditions independently cause limb overgrowth primarily because of subcutaneous adipose deposition. Compression garments and suction-assisted lipectomy can improve the condition. Lymphedema–capillary malformation should not be confused with other vascular malformation overgrowth diseases that have different morbidities and treatments. PMID:27014547

  10. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  11. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J.; Pasztor, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  12. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Capillary MalformationArteriovenous Malformation, a New Clinical and Genetic Disorder Caused by RASA1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Iiro; Boon, Laurence M.; Mulliken, John B.; Burrows, Patricia E.; Dompmartin, Anne; Watanabe, Shoji; Vanwijck, Romain; Vikkula, Miikka

    2003-01-01

    Capillary malformation (CM), or port-wine stain, is a common cutaneous vascular anomaly that initially appears as a red macular stain that darkens over years. CM also occurs in several combined vascular anomalies that exhibit hypertrophy, such as Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and Parkes Weber syndrome. Occasional familial segregation of CM suggests that there is genetic susceptibility, underscored by the identification of a large locus, CMC1, on chromosome 5q. We used genetic fine mapping with polymorphic markers to reduce the size of the CMC1 locus. A positional candidate gene, RASA1, encoding p120-RasGAP, was screened for mutations in 17 families. Heterozygous inactivating RASA1 mutations were detected in six families manifesting atypical CMs that were multiple, small, round to oval in shape, and pinkish red in color. In addition to CM, either arteriovenous malformation, arteriovenous fistula, or Parkes Weber syndrome was documented in all the families with a mutation. We named this newly identified association caused by RASA1 mutations CM-AVM, for capillary malformationarteriovenous malformation. The phenotypic variability can be explained by the involvement of p120-RasGAP in signaling for various growth factor receptors that control proliferation, migration, and survival of several cell types, including vascular endothelial cells. PMID:14639529

  14. Inherited CHST11/MIR3922 deletion is associated with a novel recessive syndrome presenting with skeletal malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sameer S; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Duzkale, Hatice; McLaughlin, Heather; Giovanni, Monica; Zhang, Chengsheng; Stitziel, Nathan; Fingeroth, Joyce; Joyce, Robin M; Lebo, Matthew; Rehm, Heidi; Vuzman, Dana; Maas, Richard; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Murray, Michael; Cassa, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin are ubiquitous disaccharide carbohydrate chains that contribute to the formation and function of proteoglycans at the cell membrane and in the extracellular matrix. Although GAG-modifying enzymes are required for diverse cellular functions, the role of these proteins in human development and disease is less well understood. Here, we describe two sisters out of seven siblings affected by congenital limb malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease. Using Whole-Genome Sequencing (WGS), we identified in the proband deletion of a 55 kb region within chromosome 12q23 that encompasses part of CHST11 (encoding chondroitin-4-sulfotransferase 1) and an embedded microRNA (MIR3922). The deletion was homozygous in the proband but not in each of three unaffected siblings. Genotyping data from the 1000 Genomes Project suggest that deletions inclusive of both CHST11 and MIR3922 are rare events. Given that CHST11 deficiency causes severe chondrodysplasia in mice that is similar to human limb malformation, these results underscore the importance of chondroitin modification in normal skeletal development. Our findings also potentially reveal an unexpected role for CHST11 and/or MIR3922 as tumor suppressors whose disruption may contribute to malignant lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26436107

  15. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  16. Variants in CUL4B are associated with cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M; Yntema, Helger G; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B A; Brunner, Han G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A James; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  17. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  18. [Radiosurgery for brain arteriovenous malformations].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Schlienger, M; Sabatier, J; Borius, P-Y; Bourdin, S; Menegalli, D; Cognard, C; Januel, A-C; Lotterie, J-A; Desal, H; Debono, B; Blond, S

    2012-06-01

    Radiosurgery as treatment for arteriovenous malformations has shown a good efficacy in reducing intracranial bleeding due to rupture. The choice of therapeutic modalities is based on evolutive risk and arteriovenous malformations volume, patient profile and risks stratification following therapeutic techniques (microsurgery, radiosurgery, embolization). Nidus size, arteriovenous malformations anatomical localization, prior embolization or bleeding, distributed dose are predictive factors for radiosurgery's good results and tolerance. This review article will highlight arteriovenous malformations radiosurgery indications and discuss recent irradiation alternatives for large arteriovenous malformation volumes. PMID:22721755

  19. Contribution of Rare Copy Number Variants to Isolated Human Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Cuscó, Ivon; Vendrell, Teresa; Camats, Núria; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital malformations are present in approximately 2–3% of liveborn babies and 20% of stillborn fetuses. The mechanisms underlying the majority of sporadic and isolated congenital malformations are poorly understood, although it is hypothesized that the accumulation of rare genetic, genomic and epigenetic variants converge to deregulate developmental networks. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected samples from 95 fetuses with congenital malformations not ascribed to a specific syndrome (68 with isolated malformations, 27 with multiple malformations). Karyotyping and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) discarded recurrent genomic and cytogenetic rearrangements. DNA extracted from the affected tissue (46%) or from lung or liver (54%) was analyzed by molecular karyotyping. Validations and inheritance were obtained by MLPA. We identified 22 rare copy number variants (CNV) [>100 kb, either absent (n = 7) or very uncommon (n = 15, <1/2,000) in the control population] in 20/95 fetuses with congenital malformations (21%), including 11 deletions and 11 duplications. One of the 9 tested rearrangements was de novo while the remaining were inherited from a healthy parent. The highest frequency was observed in fetuses with heart hypoplasia (8/17, 62.5%), with two events previously related with the phenotype. Double events hitting candidate genes were detected in two samples with brain malformations. Globally, the burden of deletions was significantly higher in fetuses with malformations compared to controls. Conclusions/Significance Our data reveal a significant contribution of rare deletion-type CNV, mostly inherited but also de novo, to human congenital malformations, especially heart hypoplasia, and reinforce the hypothesis of a multifactorial etiology in most cases. PMID:23056206

  20. Complex cardiac malformation in a case of trisomy 9.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T; Zardawi, I; Quaife, R; Young, I D

    1985-01-01

    A case of trisomy 9 showing a complex cardiac malformation is presented with a review of other published cases. A distinct trisomy 9 syndrome can be recognised with intrauterine growth retardation, short survival, consistent facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and abnormalities of the skeletal, genital, and renal systems. There is no evidence for a maternal age effect. Images PMID:4009647

  1. Complex cardiac malformation in a case of trisomy 9.

    PubMed

    Williams, T; Zardawi, I; Quaife, R; Young, I D

    1985-06-01

    A case of trisomy 9 showing a complex cardiac malformation is presented with a review of other published cases. A distinct trisomy 9 syndrome can be recognised with intrauterine growth retardation, short survival, consistent facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and abnormalities of the skeletal, genital, and renal systems. There is no evidence for a maternal age effect. PMID:4009647

  2. Congenital malformations in twins in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, P E; Beral, V; Botting, B; Wale, C J

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to compare congenital malformation rates in twin births with those in singleton births. DESIGN--The study was an analysis of malformation rates in singleton and twin births using data from the Office of Population Censuses and Survey's Congenital Malformation Notification Scheme. SETTING--This was a national survey of births in England and Wales in 1979-1980 and 1982-1985. PARTICIPANTS--The data comprised 95,510 reported malformations in 3.7 million singleton births, and 1925 reported malformations in 76,000 twin births. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Twin malformation ratios were calculated using maternal age specific singleton rates as standard. In comparison with singleton births, twins have significantly higher reported frequencies of indeterminate sex and pseudohermaphroditism; anencephaly; patent ductus arteriosis; exomphalos; hydrocephalus; anomalies of the umbilical vessels; atresia or stenosis of the large intestine or anus; and tracheo-oesophageal fistula, atresia or stenosis. Twins also have significant reported deficits of polydactyly and syndactyly; congenital dislocation of the hip; anomalies of the tongue, branchial cleft and auricular sinus; post-anal dimple; and Down's syndrome. CONCLUSIONS--Several major malformations were significantly more common in twins than in singletons. The excess of indeterminate sex and pseudohermaphroditism has not been described before and may be analogous to freemartinism in cattle. Most of the conditions less common in twins are minor, and the reported deficits may be due to underascertainment of the less serious conditions in twins. Down's syndrome is an exception, and the deficit may well be real. PMID:2045744

  3. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  4. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  5. Electroencephalography in congenital malformations of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Campos, P; Cruz, G; Lizarraga, R; Bancalari, E; Guillen, D; Castañeda, C

    1994-12-01

    We studied clinical and EEG features of 36 cases with congenital malformations of the CNS. Patients were followed at the outpatient clinic of Hospital Cayetano Heredia and of Hogar Clinica San Juan de Dios in Lima-Peru, from January 1984 to June 1992. Eighty percent of the patients had convulsive syndromes and mental retardation. The most frequent malformation was agenesis of corpus callosum, and it was not possible to find a "typical" EEG pattern. The second were porencephalic cysts, with a good clinical-EEG correlation. There were two typical cases of schizencephaly, one of hemimegalencephaly with good prognosis, and one of holoprosencephaly. The results are compared to those obtained for a series we previously reported. Data discussed take into account reports on the subject registered in the literature. It is concluded that EEG is an useful method to evaluate possible CNS malformations in developing countries. PMID:7611945

  6. Radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Friedman, William A; Bova, Frank J

    2011-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is the term coined by Lars Leksell to describe the application of a single, high dose of radiation to a stereotactically defined target volume. In the 1970s, reports began to appear documenting the successful obliteration of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) with radiosurgery. When an AVM is treated with radiosurgery, a pathologic process appears to be induced that is similar to the response-to-injury model of atherosclerosis. Radiation injury to the vascular endothelium is believed to induce the proliferation of smooth-muscle cells and the elaboration of extracellular collagen, which leads to progressive stenosis and obliteration of the AVM nidus thereby eliminating the risk of hemorrhage. The advantages of radiosurgery - compared to microsurgical and endovascular treatments - are that it is noninvasive, has minimal risk of acute complications, and is performed as an outpatient procedure requiring no recovery time for the patient. The primary disadvantage of radiosurgery is that cure is not immediate. While thrombosis of the lesion is achieved in the majority of cases, it commonly does not occur until two or three years after treatment. During the interval between radiosurgical treatment and AVM thrombosis, the risk of hemorrhage remains. Another potential disadvantage of radiosurgery is possible long term adverse effects of radiation. Finally, radiosurgery has been shown to be less effective for lesions over 10 cc in volume. For these reasons, selection of the optimal treatment for an AVM is a complex decision requiring the input of experts in endovascular, open surgical, and radiosurgical treatment. In the pages below, we will review the world's literature on radiosurgery for AVMs. Topics reviewed will include the following: radiosurgical technique, radiosurgery results (gamma knife radiosurgery, particle beam radiosurgery, linear accelerator radiosurgery), hemorrhage after radiosurgery, radiation induced complications, repeat radiosurgery, and radiosurgery for other types of vascular malformation. PMID:22004703

  7. Controversies in Chiari I malformations

    PubMed Central

    Baisden, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis and management of Chiari I malformations (CMI) remains controversial, particularly since it is often an incidental finding on cervical MR scans performed for neck pain and/or headaches. Recently, some surgeons “over-operated” on asymptomatic patients with Chiari I malformations, or even on those without the requisite radiographic diagnostic features for Chiari I malformations: unfortunately, only a subset were admonished for indiscriminate surgery. Nevertheless, when this hindbrain malformation is truly symptomatic, contributing to impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation, various valid surgical management strategies may be adopted. Methods: This review focuses on the current literature regarding the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of Chiari I malformation. Variations in the surgical technique are also presented and critiqued. Results: The recommended treatment for Chiari I malformations I consists of decompressive suboccipital craniectomy and duroplasty when abnormal cine-flow MRI is observed preoperatively and blockage of CSF flow persists intraoperatively despite bony decompression. Conclusions: Controversy continues regarding the optimal surgical technique to address Chiari malformations I. Proper diagnostic studies and patient selection are needed to optimize patient outcomes, while avoiding unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:22905329

  8. A familial venous malformation locus is on chromosome 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, L.M.; Mulliken, J.B.; Vikkula, M.

    1994-09-01

    Venous malformation is the most common vascular malformation affecting 0.2% of the population. Depending upon size and location, these slow-flow lesions may cause pain, anatomic distortion and threaten life. Most venous malformations occur sporadically and present as solitary lesions. For this reason, determining their pathogenic bases has proven elusive. However, venous malformations also occur in several rare syndromes, some of which demonstrate Mendelian inheritance. As a first step towards identifying the pathogenic bases for these lesions, we have mapped a locus for an autosomal dominant disorder in a three generation family that manifests as multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. This locus lies within a 24.5 cM interval on chromosome 9p, defined by the markers D9S157 and D9S163. A maximum LOD score of 4.11 at {theta} = 0.05 is obtained with several markers within the interval. The interferon gene cluster, which has previously been implicated in angiogenesis, and the multiple tumor suppressor gene, responsible for several types of malignant tumors, also lie within this interval and are potential candidates.

  9. Polymicrogyria: a common and heterogeneous malformation of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Stutterd, Chloe A; Leventer, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is one of the most common malformations of cortical development. It is characterized by overfolding of the cerebral cortex and abnormal cortical layering. It is a highly heterogeneous malformation with variable clinical and imaging features, pathological findings, and etiologies. It may occur as an isolated cortical malformation, or in association with other malformations within the brain or body as part of a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. Polymicrogyria shows variable topographic patterns with the bilateral perisylvian pattern being most common. Schizencephaly is a subtype of PMG in which the overfolded cortex lines full-thickness clefts connecting the subarachnoid space with the cerebral ventricles. Both genetic and non-genetic causes of PMG have been identified. Non-genetic causes include congenital cytomegalovirus infection and in utero ischemia. Genetic causes include metabolic conditions such as peroxisomal disorders and the 22q11.2 and 1p36 continguous gene deletion syndromes. Mutations in over 30 genes have been found in association with PMG, especially mutations in the tubulin family of genes. Mutations in the (PI3K)-AKT pathway have been found in association PMG and megalencephaly. Despite recent genetic advances, the mechanisms by which polymicrogyric cortex forms and causes of the majority of cases remain unknown, making diagnostic and prenatal testing and genetic counseling challenging. This review summarizes the clinical, imaging, pathologic, and etiologic features of PMG, highlighting recent genetic advances. PMID:24888723

  10. 35(th) Annual David W Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis: abstracts of the 2014 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Braddock, Stephen R; Lipinski, Robert J; Williams, Marc S; Carey, John C

    2015-08-01

    The 35(th) Annual David W Smith Workshop on Malformations and Morphogenesis was held on July 25-30, 2014 at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. The conference, which honors the legacy of David Smith, brought together over 130 clinicians and researchers interested in congenital malformations and their underlying mechanisms of morphogenesis. As is the tradition of the meeting, the Workshop highlighted five themes besides mechanisms of morphogenesis: Evolution and Development, Minor Malformations, CHARGE syndrome, Craniofacial Development/ Malformations, and Disorders of Chromatin Remodeling. This Conference Report includes the abstracts presented at the Workshop. PMID:26010070

  11. Renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia: an autosomal recessive malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Torra, R; Alós, L; Ramos, J; Estivill, X

    1996-01-01

    We report two brothers with a cystic malformation of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas. In both cases the malformation was fatal and the children died shortly after birth. The pathological findings, consisting of multicystic dysplastic kidneys, dilated and dysgenetic bile ducts, dilated pancreatic ducts, and polysplenia, correspond to those reported by Ivemark as renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia. Many polymalformation syndromes include cystic affectation of these three organs, so this syndrome could be an isolated entity or a final common pathway of response of these organs to a variety of developmental disturbances, which could also include splenic abnormalities. We propose an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance for renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia. Images PMID:8733053

  12. Vascular Malformation and Common Keratinocytic Nevus of the Soft Type: Phacomatosis Pigmentovascularis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laureano, André; Carvalho, Rodrigo; Amaro, Cristina; Freitas, Isabel; Cardoso, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis is a rare syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a pigmented nevus and a cutaneous vascular malformation. We report a 5-year-old boy with all the typical findings of phacomatosis pigmentovascularis type Ia. Although its existence according to the traditional classification has been questioned, this case represents a very rare association of a capillary vascular malformation and a common keratinocytic nevus of the soft type. PMID:25506441

  13. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yamabuki, Takumi; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Okamura, Kunishige; Kuroda, Aki; Takahashi, Ryo; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    An unusual case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (P-AVM) combined with esophageal cancer is reported. A 59-year-old man was admitted with upper abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed numerous strongly enhanced abnormal vessels and a hypovascular lesion in the area of the pancreatic tail. Angiographic study of the celiac artery confirmed racemose vascular networks in the tail of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography revealed narrowing and displacement of the main pancreatic duct in the tail of the pancreas. Screening esophagoscopy showed a 0-IIa+IIc type tumor in the lower thoracic esophagus. Histological examination of esophagoscopic biopsies showed squamous cell carcinoma. Based on these findings, P-AVM or pancreatic cancer and esophageal cancer were diagnosed. Video-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy and distal pancreatectomy were performed. Histological examination of the resected pancreas revealed abundant abnormal vessels with intravascular thrombi. In addition, rupture of a dilated pancreatic duct with pancreatic stones and both severe atrophy and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma were observed. The final diagnoses were P-AVM consequent to severe chronic pancreatitis and esophageal carcinoma. The patient's postoperative course was relatively good. PMID:24574946

  14. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  15. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2014-12-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ~1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  16. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  17. AUTISM WITH OPHTHALMOLOGIC MALFORMATIONS: THE PLOT THICKENS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marilyn T; Strömland, Kerstin; Ventura, Liana; Johansson, Maria; Bandim, Jose M; Gillberg, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To review the association of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in individuals manifesting thalidomide embryopathy and Möbius sequence and compare them with three new studies in which ASD was also associated with ocular and systemic malformations: (1) a Swedish study of individuals with CHARGE association (Coloboma, Heart, choanal Atresia, developmental or growth Retardation, Genital anomaly, and Ear involvement); (2) a Swedish study of Goldenhar syndrome; and (3) Brazilian Möbius syndrome (sequence) study. Methods In the Swedish CHARGE study, 31 patients met the inclusion criteria (3+ or 4 of the common characteristics of the CHARGE syndrome). The same team of investigators also evaluated 20 Swedish patients with Goldenhar syndrome. In the Brazilian Möbius study, 28 children with a diagnosis of Möbius sequence were studied; some children had a history of exposure during their mother’s pregnancy to the abortifacient drug misoprostol in an unsuccessful abortion attempt Results In the CHARGE study, five patients had the more severe autism disorder and five had autistic-like condition. In the Goldenhar study, two had autism disorder and one had autistic-like condition. In the Brazilian Möbius study, the systemic findings of the misoprostol-exposed and misoprostol-unexposed patients were almost undistinguishable, and ASD was present in both groups (autism disorder in five and autistic-like condition in three). Conclusion Autism spectrum disorder has been reported in two conditions with known early pregnancy exposure to the teratogenic agents thalidomide and misoprostol. In the Brazilian Möbius study, autism also occurred in both the misoprostol-exposed and misoprostol-unexposed groups. Autism also was present in patients with both CHARGE association and Goldenhar syndrome. PMID:15747750

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Apert syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Crouzon syndromes: clinical findings, genes and extracellular matrix. J Craniofac Surg. 2005 May;16(3):361- ... receptors, and human limb malformations: clinical and molecular correlations. Am J Med Genet. 2002 Oct 15;112( ...

  19. Evolutionary origin of cardiac malformations.

    PubMed

    Taussig, H B

    1988-10-01

    The author has proposed in previous publications that isolated cardiac malformations have an evolutionary origin. This is partly supported by the fact that isolated cardiac malformations found in humans occur also in other placental mammals as well as in birds. External gross examination of the heart in just over 5,000 birds was carried out during a 3 year period. Anomalies included one instance of duplicate hearts, two specimens in which no heart could be identified and in a fourth, a yellow-rumped warbler, the heart lay in the neck outside of the thoracic cavity. Published reports of similar occurrences of an ectopically placed heart concern birds, cattle and humans. The fact that various species of both placental mammals and birds show evidence of heritability for heart defects, and that these species cannot interbreed, combined with the fact that birds and mammals have many similar malformations, points to either a common external causative factor or a common origin. Genes that code the malformed heart must be transmitted with that part of the genetic makeup common to all birds and mammals. Malformations caused by teratogens produce widespread organ injury to a potentially normal embryo whereas the evolutionary malformation is an organ-specific anomaly in an otherwise normal mammal or bird and occurs in widely separated species. The implications of this theory are important for parents of children with an isolated congenital heart defect who may have ingested one or another drug or chemical or have been exposed to toxins or infectious agents before or after conception of the affected offspring. PMID:3047192

  20. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  1. Syndrome in Question.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  2. Congenital hypothyroidism in Rieger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Örnek, Nurgül; Oğurel, Reyhan; Örnek, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    Rieger syndrome (RS) is a multiple malformation syndrome characterized by ocular manifestations and extraocular defects. Herein, we report a 9-year-old boy who exhibited Rieger Syndrome phenotype as well as congenital hypothyroidism which may be an underappreciated feature of RS. PMID:24666291

  3. Arteriovenous malformation of nose-revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, C V; Kailash, N; Kailas, Gayattre; Divya Jyothi, N

    2012-12-01

    Areteriovenous malformations are rare in the head and neck region and generally arise from intracranial vessels. We present one rare case with spontaneous arteriovenous malformations related to the nose. PMID:24294582

  4. [Minor congenital malformations: prognostic indicator of ill-being of an infant born by alcoholic mother].

    PubMed

    Khatskel', S B; Popov, I V

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the results of a comparative analysis of risk factors and phenotypical characteristics of 228 children with fetal alcohol syndrome and of 347 children with hypoxicischemic encepalopathy. The study of a phenotype detected that an average number of minor congenital malformations in children with fetal alcohol syndrome was equal to 12.2 while in comparison group it was equal to 7.3. High prevalence of stigmata was associated with an increased frequency congenital malformations of internal organs and mental disorders in children by the age of 4. PMID:16381318

  5. Location of Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia Is Related to the Malformation Phenotype on MRI

    PubMed Central

    González, G.; Vedolin, L.; Barry, B.; Poduri, A.; Walsh, C.; Barkovich, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Periventricular nodular heterotopia are common malformations of cortical development that are associated with many clinical syndromes and with many different neuroimaging phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether specific malformation phenotypes may be related to location, side, or number of PNH as assessed by MR imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS MR images of 200 patients previously diagnosed with PNH were retrospectively analyzed. PNH were classified according to their location along the ventricles (anterior, posterior, or diffuse), side (unilateral or bilateral), and number of nodules (<5, 6–10, or >10). The cerebrum, brain stem and cerebellum were analyzed to assess associated anomalies. Associations between PNH location and the presence of other anomalies were tested by using Fisher exact test and χ2 test. RESULTS Posterior PNH were significantly associated with malformations of the cerebral cortex, diminished white matter volume, and mid-/hindbrain anomalies. Diffuse PNH were associated with diminished white matter volume, callosal “anomalies,” and the presence of megacisterna magna. Unilateral PNH were strongly associated with cortical malformations. CONCLUSIONS Certain malformation complexes are associated with PNH in specific locations: posterior PNH with cerebral cortical and mid-/hindbrain malformations and diffuse PNH with callosal anomalies and megacisterna magna. Knowledge of these associations should allow more directed analyses of brain MR imaging in patients with PNH. In addition, knowledge of these associations may help to direct studies to elucidate the causes of these malformation complexes. PMID:23064591

  6. Congenital Pulmonary Malformation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Montasser; Elnazir, Basil; Greally, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Pulmonary Malformations (CPMs) are a group of rare lung abnormalities affecting the airways, parenchyma, and vasculature. They represent a spectrum of abnormal development rather than discrete pathological entities. They are caused by aberrant embryological lung development which occurs at different stages of intrauterine life. PMID:24278678

  7. Management of perinatal lung malformations.

    PubMed

    Macardle, C A; Kunisaki, S M

    2015-02-01

    This review uses the most up-to-date literature to help guide obstetrical providers through the diagnosis and management of perinatal lung malformations. These lesions, which include congenital pulmonary airway malformation [CPAM, formerly congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM)] and bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS), are relatively rare but are becoming increasingly common because of the improved resolution and enhanced sensitivity of fetal ultrasound. Serial assessment throughout pregnancy remains the norm rather than the exception. Perinatal management strategies can differ based on the sonographic characteristics and dynamic growth patterns of lung masses. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and other diagnostic testing can sometimes be helpful in providing additional prognostic information. Over the last decade, the importance of echocardiography and utility of maternal steroids have been recognized in cases of non-immune hydrops. Fetal surgery is now rarely performed. Decisions regarding whether delivery of these fetuses should occur in a tertiary care center with pediatric surgery coverage versus delivery at a local community hospital are now highly relevant in most prenatal counseling discussions with families. Large lung malformations may require urgent surgical removal in the early postnatal period because of respiratory distress. Other complications, such as recurrent pneumonia, pneumothorax, and cancer, are indications for lung resection on an elective basis. In the vast majority of cases, the overall prognosis remains excellent. PMID:25310108

  8. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  9. Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium: Overview, Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Amy L.; Ball, Karen L.; Clancy, Marianne; Comi, Anne M.; Faughnan, Marie E.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kim, Helen; Krischer, Jeffrey; Marchuk, Douglas A.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Morrison, Leslie; Moses, Marsha; Moy, Claudia S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmilla; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Brain vascular malformations are resource-intensive to manage effectively, are associated with serious neurological morbidity, lack specific medical therapies, and have no validated biomarkers for disease severity and progression. Investigators have tended to work in research silos with suboptimal cross-communication. We present here a paradigm for interdisciplinary collaboration to facilitate rare disease research. The Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium (BVMC) is a multidisciplinary, inter-institutional group of investigators, one of 17 consortia in the Office of Rare Disease Research Rare Disease Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). The diseases under study are: familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations type 1, common Hispanic mutation (CCM1-CHM); Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS); and brain arteriovenous malformation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Each project is developing biomarkers for disease progression and severity, and has established scalable, relational databases for observational and longitudinal studies that are stored centrally by the RDCRN Data Management and Coordinating Center. Patient Support Organizations (PSOs) are a key RDCRN component in the recruitment and support of participants. The BVMC PSOs include Angioma Alliance, Sturge Weber Foundation, and HHT Foundation International. Our networks of clinical centers of excellence in SWS and HHT, as well as our PSOs, have enhanced BVMC patient recruitment. The BVMC provides unique and valuable resources to the clinical neurovascular community, and recently reported findings are reviewed. Future planned studies will apply successful approaches and insights across the three projects to leverage the combined resources of the BVMC and RDCRN in advancing new biomarkers and treatment strategies for patients with vascular malformations. PMID:25221778

  10. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: influence of associated malformations on survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sweed, Y; Puri, P

    1993-01-01

    The medical records of 116 consecutive cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CHD) among 368,772 live births at the three maternity hospitals in Dublin were examined and the incidence of associated malformations and their impact on survival analysed. The patients were divided into two groups: group I included 64 (55%) patients who died during resuscitation and stabilisation before surgery at a mean age of 11.2 hours and group II included 52 (45%) patients who were operated upon. All patients in group I underwent detailed postmortem examination as did the 45% patients who died in group II. The mean (SD) gestational age for group I patients (36.1 (4.5) weeks) was significantly lower than the mean gestational age of group II patients (39.0 (2.4) weeks). Similarly, the mean birth weight of group I patients (2415 (906) g) was significantly lower than that of group II patients (3140 (563) g). Of the newborns who died before surgery, 40 (62.5%) patients had 79 associated malformations. The major associated anomalies were: cardiac (n = 16), neural tube defects (n = 15), skeletal (n = 8), chromosomal (n = 5), urinary tract (n = 6), gastrointestinal (n = 3), omphalocele (n = 4), craniofacial (n = 5), pulmonary (n = 2), and syndromes (n = 2). Sixteen (40%) of these patients were found to have multiple anomalies. Of the 52 patients who were operated upon, only four (7.7%) had associated malformations. Our data shows that associated malformations in neonates with CDH is a major factor influencing outcome in this congenital malformation. PMID:8192736

  11. Arteriovenous Malformation of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, S. M.; Shetty, Sujan; Moon, Ninad J.; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Goyal, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumors. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. Arteriovenous malformation of the head and neck is a rare vascular anomaly but when present is persistent and progressive in nature and can represent a lethal benign disease. Here we present a case report of a 25-year-old male patient with arteriovenous malformation involving the base of tongue. PMID:24660070

  12. Galenic arteriovenous malformation with precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ventureyra, E C; Badejo, A

    1984-01-01

    Pineal lesions may appear with precocious puberty. In this report, a patient with precocious puberty and macrogenitosomia caused by an arteriovenous malformation in the pineal region is presented. This vascular malformation was not visualized during investigations 3 years before the present series. It appears that the vascular malformation increased considerably in size within a 3-year period. This case suggests that some arteriovenous malformations may take a malignant course, increasing rapidly in size and behaving like tumors by causing destruction and compression of surrounding structures. This case seems to be unique because, to the best of our knowledge, an arteriovenous malformation associated with precocious puberty has never been described previously. PMID:6689808

  13. [Eye developmental defects in Patau's syndrome (trisomy 13)].

    PubMed

    Siliaeva, N F

    1990-01-01

    The paper analyses results of pathomorphologic studies of eyes of 28 fetuses and newborns died from multiple malformations due to the Patau (trisomy 13) syndrome. Ocular malformations were recorded in 25 observations (89%). The most frequent and typical ocular malformations in this syndrome were microphthalmia, typical colobomas of the uveal tract, dysplasia of the retina, persistence and hyperplasia of the primary vitreous body, cataract and luxation of the lens. PMID:2092263

  14. Neuroimaging of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Klostranec, J M; Krings, T

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations of the brain and brainstem that arise via a number of different mechanisms and can result in non-specific presentations. Therefore, medical imaging is essential in the diagnosis of these lesions and important to guide their clinical or surgical management. MRI is the modality of choice with newer protocols, such as susceptibility weighted imaging, playing an increasingly important role in the detection of CCMs. In this review we will discuss lesion structure, its proposed origins, and common lesion presentations and complications, before covering their expected appearances with different imaging modalities. We conclude with a discussion of insights about lesion behaviour acquired from advanced imaging techniques and provide a general approach to characterizing and diagnosing CCM lesions with neuroimaging. PMID:25968928

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of cloacal malformation.

    PubMed

    Peiro, Jose L; Scorletti, Federico; Sbragia, Lourenco

    2016-04-01

    Persistent cloaca malformation is the most severe type of anorectal and urogenital malformation. Decisions concerning the surgical treatment for this condition are taken during the first hours of life and may determine the quality of life of these patients. Thus, prenatal diagnosis becomes important for a prompt and efficient management of the fetus and newborn, and accurate counseling of the parents regarding its consequences and the future of the baby. Careful evaluation by ultrasonography, and further in-depth analysis with MRI, allow prenatal detection of characteristic findings, which can lead to diagnose or at least suspect this condition. We reviewed our experience and the literature in order to highlight the most important clues that can guide the physician in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26969229

  16. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be...

  17. The Arnold-Chiari Malformation and Its Implications for Individuals with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittler, Joel E.

    1986-01-01

    The Arnold-Chiari malformation is present in most infants born with myelomeningocele (a form of spina bifida) and hydrocephalus. The syndrome is responsible for structural abnormalities in the brain, and peripheral nervous system. Etiology, symptoms, impact on central nervous system structures, surgical treatment, and implications for education…

  18. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear bone malformations with posterior labyrinth involvement: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Palomeque Vera, Juan Miguel; Platero Sánchez-Escribano, María; Gómez Hervás, Javier; Fernández Prada, María; González Ramírez, Amanda Rocío; Sainz Quevedo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Inner ear bone malformations are one cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss. This investigation focused on those affecting the posterior labyrinth, especially enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, which is associated with fluctuating and progressive hearing loss. The objectives of this study were to analyze the behavior of the electrical stimulation, auditory functionality and linguistic development in patients with inner ear malformations involving the posterior labyrinth. The study included ten patients undergoing cochlear implantation (cases: five with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, two with vestibular aqueduct stenosis/aplasia, and three with semicircular canal disorders). Post-implantation, data were gathered on the electrical stimulation threshold and maximum comfort levels and on the number of functioning electrodes. Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech (EARS) subtests were used to assess auditory functionality and language acquisition at 6, 12, and 24 months post-implantation. Results were compared with findings in a control group of 28 cochlear implantation patients without these malformations. No significant differences were found between case and control groups in electrical stimulation parameters; auditory functionality subtest scores were lower in cases than controls, although the difference was only statistically significant for some subtests. In conclusion, cochlear implantation patients with posterior labyrinth bone malformations and profound hearing loss, including those with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, showed no significant difference in electrical stimulation threshold with controls. Although some auditory functionality test results were lower in cases than in controls, cochlear implantation appears to be beneficial for all patients with these malformations. PMID:25971996

  19. Acute Porphyria in a Patient with Arnold Chiari Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianbin; O’Keefe, Kevin; Webb, Lisa B.; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 33 Final Diagnosis: Acute porphyria Symptoms: Abdominal pain • alternating bowel habits Medication: Metronidazole • bactrim • oxybutynin Clinical Procedure: EMG • porhyria workup Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation are both uncommon genetic disorders without known association. The insidious onset, non-specific clinical manifestations, and precipitating factors often cause diagnosis of acute porphyria to be missed, particularly in patients with comorbidities. Case Report: A women with Arnold Chiari malformation type II who was treated with oxybutynin and antibiotics, including Bactrim for neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infection, presented with non-specific abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea. After receiving Flagyl for C. difficile colitis, the patient developed psychosis, ascending paralysis, and metabolic derangements. She underwent extensive neurological workup due to her congenital neurological abnormalities, most of which were unremarkable. As a differential diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome, acute porphyria was then considered and ultimately proved to be the diagnosis. After hematin administration and intense rehabilitation, the patient slowly recovered from the full-blown acute porphyria attack. Conclusions: This case report, for the first time, documents acute porphyria attack as a result of a sequential combination of 3 common medications. This is the first case report of the concomitant presence of both acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation, 2 genetic disorders with unclear association. PMID:25697467

  20. Sonographic markers for early diagnosis of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Renna, Maria Daniela; Pisani, Paola; Conversano, Francesco; Perrone, Emanuele; Casciaro, Ernesto; Renzo, Gian Carlo Di; Paola, Marco Di; Perrone, Antonio; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Fetal malformations are very frequent in industrialized countries. Although advanced maternal age may affect pregnancy outcome adversely, 80%-90% of fetal malformations occur in the absence of a specific risk factor for parents. The only effective approach for prenatal screening is currently represented by an ultrasound scan. However, ultrasound methods present two important limitations: the substantial absence of quantitative parameters and the dependence on the sonographer experience. In recent years, together with the improvement in transducer technology, quantitative and objective sonographic markers highly predictive of fetal malformations have been developed. These markers can be detected at early gestation (11-14 wk) and generally are not pathological in themselves but have an increased incidence in abnormal fetuses. Thus, prenatal ultrasonography during the second trimester of gestation provides a “genetic sonogram”, including, for instance, nuchal translucency, short humeral length, echogenic bowel, echogenic intracardiac focus and choroid plexus cyst, that is used to identify morphological features of fetal Down’s syndrome with a potential sensitivity of more than 90%. Other specific and sensitive markers can be seen in the case of cardiac defects and skeletal anomalies. In the future, sonographic markers could limit even more the use of invasive and dangerous techniques of prenatal diagnosis (amniocentesis, etc.). PMID:24179631

  1. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  2. Acquired Chiari malformation type I associated with a supratentorial fistulous arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Fai; Lee, Chung-Wei; Tu, Yong-Kwang

    2015-03-01

    A case of acquired Chiari malformation type I with frontal fistulous arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is presented, and the pathophysiology is discussed. The tonsillar herniation and hydrocephalus both resolved after AVM was excised. This case provides some insight into the complex hemodynamic change exerted by the fistulous AVM and the mechanism of the development of acquired Chiari malformation type I. PMID:25081218

  3. Complete Maxillo-Mandibular Syngnathia in a Newborn with Multiple Congenital Malformations.

    PubMed

    Broome, M; Vial, Y; Jacquemont, S; Sergi, C; Kamnasaran, D; Giannoni, E

    2016-02-01

    Syngnathia is an extremely rare condition involving congenital fusion of the maxilla with the mandible. Clinical presentations vary from simple mucosal bands (synechiae) to complete bony fusion (synostosis). Most cases are unilateral incomplete fusions. We report the case of a severely growth-retarded newborn infant with complete synostosis of the mandible with the maxilla and the zygoma associated with cleft palate, choanal atresia, deafness, delayed cerebral white matter development, and genital and limb malformations. Extensive genetic analysis did not reveal any mutations. This association of multiple congenital malformations may represent an entity distinct from previously described syndromes associated with syngnathia. PMID:23778189

  4. Cloverleaf skull syndrome: case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Junio Marcos; Borém, Luciana Mendes Araújo

    2014-01-01

    The present report is aimed at describing a rare case of cranial malformation - cloverleaf skull syndrome -, whose presence was noticed after the birth of a child with signs of abnormality. Imaging diagnosis methods such as computed tomography and conventional radiography were used to characterize the syndrome. PMID:25741078

  5. Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in Lymphatic Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Kirsh, Andrew L.; Cushing, Sharon L.; Chen, Eunice Y.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Examine lymphatic malformation lymphoid aggregates for the expression of tertiary lymphoid organ markers. Determine how lymphoid aggregate density relates to lymphatic malformation clinical features. Methods and Results Retrospective cohort study. Tissue and clinical data were reviewed from 29 patients in the Vascular Anomaly Database who represented the spectrum of head and neck lymphatic malformations and had >5 years of follow-up. Archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lymphatic malformation tissue was immunohistochemically stained with antibodies for tertiary lymphoid organ markers, which included follicular and mature myeloid dendritic cells, high endothelial venules, segregated B and T-cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, and lymphoid homing chemokines (CXCL13, CCL21). Lymphoid aggregate density (count/mm2) was quantified by 2 independent, blinded reviewers. Lymphoid aggregate density and lymphatic malformation clinical features were characterized using analysis of variance. Larger lymphatic malformation tissue lymphoid aggregates stained consistently for tertiary lymphoid organ markers. In oral cavity and neck specimens from the same patients (n = 9), there were more tertiary lymphoid organ in oral cavity than in neck specimens (p = 0.0235). In lymphatic malformation neck tissue, de Serres stage 4 lymphatic malformations displayed the highest tertiary lymphoid organ density. No significant association was seen between tertiary lymphoid organ density and other clinical features. Conclusion This study demonstrates that some lymphoid aggregates within lymphatic malformations represent tertiary lymphoid organs. There was an association between tertiary lymphoid organ density and lymphatic malformation location. Further study is required to define the role of lymphoid neogenesis and tertiary lymphoid organ formation in lymphatic malformation pathogenesis. PMID:21688977

  6. Anesthesia and intracranial arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Prabhat Kumar; Neema, Praveen Kumar; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2004-06-01

    Anesthetic management of intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) poses multiple challenges to the anesthesiologist in view of its complex and poorly understood pathophysiology and multiple modalities for its treatment involving different sub-specialties. The diagnosis of AVM is based on clinical presentation as well as radiological investigation. Pregnant patients with intracranial AVM and neonates with vein of Galen malformation may also pose a special challenge and require close attention. Despite technological advancement, reported morbidity or mortality after AVM treatment remains high and largely depends on age of the patient, recruitment of perforating vessels, its size, location in the brain, history of previous bleed and post-treatment hyperemic complication. Anesthetic management includes a thorough preoperative visit with meticulous planning based on different modalities of treatment including anesthesia for radiological investigation. Proper attention should be directed while transporting the patient for the procedure. Protection of the airway, adequate monitoring, and maintaining neurological and cardiovascular stability, and the patient's immobility during the radiological procedures, appreciation and management of various complications that can occur during and after the procedure and meticulous ICU management is essential. PMID:15269462

  7. Complicated pneumothorax and congenital lung cystic malformation.

    PubMed

    Attou, Rachid; Reper, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, also named congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), is a congenital lung abnormality which is uncommon in adults. The usual radiological appearance of CPAM is a cystic space-occupying lesion. We present one case of CPAM with unusual clinical and radiological findings, a complicated spontaneous pneumothorax with intracystic haemorrhage with successful conservative initial treatment, despite acute haemodynamic instability. PMID:24694267

  8. Chiari I malformation presenting as chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Amos, Louella B; Quintero, Diana R

    2008-10-01

    We present a 9-month-old infant with persistent cough refractory to conventional asthma therapy. An extensive evaluation eventually revealed a Chiari I malformation with syringohydromyelia. His cough resolved one month after surgical decompression, suggesting that brainstem compression from the Chiari malformation directly caused his symptoms. PMID:18785260

  9. Clinical, Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, P.F.; Raggio, C.L.; Blank, R.D.; McCarty, C.; Broeckel, U.; Pickart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) pose a significant health problem because they can be associated with spinal deformities, such as congenital scoliosis and kyphosis, in addition to various syndromes and other congenital malformations. Additional information remains to be learned regarding the natural history of congenital scoliosis and related health problems. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the process of somite formation, which gives rise to vertebral bodies, there is a wide gap in our understanding of how genetic factors contribute to CVM development. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy most commonly contributes to the occurrence of CVM, followed by other factors such as hypoxia and anticonvulsant medications. This review highlights several emerging clinical issues related to CVM, including pulmonary and orthopedic outcome in congenital scoliosis. Recent breakthroughs in genetics related to gene and environment interactions associated with CVM development are discussed. The Klippel-Feil syndrome which is associated with cervical segmentation abnormalities is illustrated as an example in which animal models, such as the zebrafish, can be utilized to provide functional evidence of pathogenicity of identified mutations. PMID:23653580

  10. Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, J C; Pilon, V A; Lee, J K

    1988-01-01

    The case of a 15-year-old white boy with a clinical diagnosis of von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis and a history of multiple fractures of long bones is presented. Radiographic studies and tissue biopsy revealed the presence of multiple nonossifying fibromas of bone. Review of the clinical features and correlation with the pathologic data support a diagnosis of Jaffe-Campanacci syndrome, a malformation syndrome different from but possibly related to von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis. PMID:3139710

  11. New insights into craniofacial malformations.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2015-10-15

    Development of the human skull and face is a highly orchestrated and complex three-dimensional morphogenetic process, involving hundreds of genes controlling the coordinated patterning, proliferation and differentiation of tissues having multiple embryological origins. Craniofacial malformations that occur because of abnormal development (including cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis and facial dysostoses), comprise over one-third of all congenital birth defects. High-throughput sequencing has recently led to the identification of many new causative disease genes and functional studies have clarified their mechanisms of action. We present recent findings in craniofacial genetics and discuss how this information together with developmental studies in animal models is helping to increase understanding of normal craniofacial development. PMID:26085576

  12. Capillary malformations: a classification using specific names for specific skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Happle, R

    2015-12-01

    The name capillary malformation has caused much confusion because it is presently used to designate numerous quite different disorders such as naevus flammeus, the salmon patch, the vascular naevus of the hereditary 'megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome' and the skin lesions of non-hereditary traits such as 'capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation' and 'microcephaly-capillary malformation'. To avoid such bewilderment, the present review describes the distinguishing clinical and genetic criteria of 20 different capillary malformations, and a specific name is given to all of them. The group of capillary naevi includes naevus flammeus, port-wine naevus of the Proteus type, port-wine naevus of the CLOVES type, naevus roseus, rhodoid naevus, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, congenital livedo reticularis, segmental angioma serpiginosum, naevus anaemicus, naevus vascularis mixtus and angiokeratoma circumscriptum. Capillary lesions that perhaps represent naevi are the mesotropic port-wine patch, Carter-Mirzaa macules, unilateral punctate telangiectasia and unilateral naevoid telangiectasia of the patchy type. Capillary malformations that do not represent naevi include X-linked angiokeratoma corporis diffusum (Fabry disease), autosomal dominant angiokeratoma corporis diffusum, hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, hereditary angioma serpiginosusm and the salmon patch. In this way, we are able to discriminate between various non-hereditary capillary naevi such as naevus roseus and the hereditary rhodoid naevus and several hereditary traits that do not represent naevi such as angiokeratoma corporis diffusum and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia; between four different types of port-wine stains, three of them being lateralized and one being mesotropic; between cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and congenital livedo reticularis; between telangiectatic naevi and the vasoconstrictive naevus anaemicus; and between two different types of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum. Finally, arguments are presented why the salmon patch ('stork bite', 'naevus simplex') cannot be categorized as a naevus. PMID:25864701

  13. Spinal dermoid sinus in a Dachshund with vertebral and thoracic limb malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dermoid sinus is an uncommon epithelial-lined fistula that may be associated with vertebral malformations. In humans, Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare condition characterized by congenital cervical vertebral fusion and may be associated with other developmental defects, including dermoid sinus. The present case report describes an adult Dachshund with cervical and cranial thoracic vertebral malformations as well as thoracic limb malformations resembling KFS with a concurrent type IV dermoid sinus. Case presentation A 1.5 year-old Dachshund with congenital thoracic limbs deformities and cervical-thoracic vertebral malformations presented with cervical hyperesthesia, rigidity of the cervical musculature and tetraparesis. Neurologic, radiographic, and computed tomography (CT) (2D, 3D, CT fistulography) examinations revealed skeletal anomalies, a dermoid sinus in the cranial thoracic region and epidural gas within the vertebral canal. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the sinus tract were performed and confirmed a type IV dermoid sinus. The clinical signs progressively recovered postoperatively, and no recurrent signs were observed after 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Cervical vertebral malformations associated with limbs anomalies have not been reported in dogs and may represent a condition similar to KFS in humans. KFS can occur concurrently with other congenital conditions including dermoid sinus and should be included among the complex congenital anomalies described in dogs. PMID:24593884

  14. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Tanmay H.; Badve, Manasi S.; Olajide, Kowe O.; Skorupan, Havyn M.; Waters, Jonathan H.; Vallejo, Manuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-year-old female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae) who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiber-optic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III) precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus. PMID:24765318

  15. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tanmay H; Badve, Manasi S; Olajide, Kowe O; Skorupan, Havyn M; Waters, Jonathan H; Vallejo, Manuel C

    2011-07-01

    Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-year-old female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae) who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiber-optic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III) precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus. PMID:24765318

  16. Computed tomography of congenital brain malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book is illustrated showing each condition. This book is designed to correlate the pathology of CNS malformations with their CT scan appearance, mainly on the axial images. The author has drawn upon his personal experience and the information gleaned from the literature dealing with the description of the CT scan findings of these malformations. The emphasis is on simplicity of description. Since a large degree of morphological variation exists in each entity, numerous illustrations (wherever applicable) are shown to depict those variations. When appropriate, deficiency of the CT scan in the evaluation of these CNS malformations also is indicated. A description of CNS embryology is included as well.

  17. Update on the management of anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Andrea; Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-three years ago, on 10 August 1980, in Mexico City, the first patient with an anorectal malformation was operated on using the posterior sagittal approach. At that time it was not obvious that we were actually opening a "Pandora's box" that continues to give many positive surprises, a few disappointments, and the constant hope that each day we can learn more about how to improve the quality of life of children born with all different types of anorectal malformations. In November 2012, patient number 3000 in our database was operated in the city of Cochabamba, Bolivia; during one of our International Courses of Anorectal Malformations and Colorectal Problems in Children. The goal of this article is to give a brief update on the current management of patients with anorectal malformation, based on the multiple lessons learned during this period. PMID:23913263

  18. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from mild to severe, and those with normal intelligence may have learning disabilities. Children with Dandy-Walker ... Dandy-Walker Malformation: A Clinical and Surgical Outcome Analysis. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2015 Jun;25( ...

  20. Detection of a de novo duplication of 1q32-qter by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in a boy with multiple malformations: further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duba, H C; Erdel, M; Löffler, J; Bereuther, L; Fischer, H; Utermann, B; Utermann, G

    1997-01-01

    We report a dysmorphic boy with a de novo partial trisomy 1q. The boy has microcephaly, bilateral cleft lip and palate, low set and dysmorphic ears, brain anomalies, pulmonary stenosis, duodenal obstruction, dysplastic kidneys, and bifid thumbs. The trisomic segment 1q32-qter is duplicated with an inverted insertion at 1p36.3. The aberration was initially detected at amniocentesis and confirmed and defined by GTG banding, chromosome microdissection, and FISH on postnatal blood samples. The parents had normal karyotypes. De novo partial duplications of chromosome 1q have rarely been reported. Comparison of our patient with other published pure trisomy 1q cases showed similarities which allowed the further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome. Images PMID:9138155

  1. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  2. Curing arteriovenous malformations using embolization.

    PubMed

    Potts, Matthew B; Zumofen, Daniel W; Raz, Eytan; Nelson, Peter K; Riina, Howard A

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular embolization is typically reserved as an adjuvant therapy in the management of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), either for preoperative devascularization or preradiosurgical volume reduction. Curative embolization plays a limited role in AVM treatment but several studies have shown that it is possible, especially with later-generation liquid embolic agents. Given the complexity of AVM anatomy and the recent controversies over the role of any intervention in AVM management, it is critical that the cerebrovascular community better define the indications of each treatment modality to provide quality AVM management. In this review, the authors evaluate the role of curative AVM embolization. Important considerations in the feasibility of curative AVM embolization include whether it can be performed reliably and safely, and whether it is a durable cure. Studies over the past 20 years have begun to define the anatomical factors that are amenable to complete endovascular occlusion, including size, feeding artery anatomy, AVM morphology, and endovascular accessibility. More recent studies have shown that highly selected patients with AVMs can be treated with curative intent, leading to occlusion rates as high as 100% of such prospectively identified lesions with minimal morbidity. Advances in endovascular technology and techniques that support the efficacy and safety of curative embolization are discussed, as is the importance of superselective diagnostic angiography. Finally, the durability of curative embolization is analyzed. Overall, while still unproven, endovascular embolization has the potential to be a safe, effective, and durable curative treatment for select AVMs, broadening the armamentarium with which one can treat this disease. PMID:25175438

  3. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  4. Delayed presentation of anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shandip Kumar; Kanojia, Ravi P.; Wakhlu, Ashish; Rawat, J. D.; Kureel, S. N.; Tandon, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Delayed management of anorectal malformation (ARM) increases the surgical and functional complications for the patient. We defined “delayed presentation of ARM” and reviewed our patients with ARM to find out the incidence and causes of delayed presentation. Materials and Methods: Patients satisfying the criteria of “delayed presentation of ARM” were involved. Detailed information of each patient including the mode of presentation, associated anomalies, plan of management and follow-up was obtained from the hospital records. Results: Between 2003 and 2006, 43 patients satisfied our criteria of “delayed presentation of ARM”. There were 21 males and 22 females. Seventeen of these males presented with low-type ARM. Eleven of them were managed by a single-stage procedure. These “delayed presenters” had to live with constipation, inadequate weight gain and parental anxiety for a greater time. Analysis of the outcomes showed more functional complications in patients who had undergone failed perineal surgery previously. In females with low ARM, the procedure of choice was anterior sagittal anorectoplasty (ASARP). Single stage surgery provides good outcomes for most of low type of ARMs. High-type ARMs in males and females were managed by a staged procedure. Conclusion: “Delayed presentation of ARM” is a major group of ARM in our setup. The management and results of their treatment are not different from those of the early presenters. The most common cause of delayed ARM is wrong advice given by the health care providers followed by inadequate treatment elsewhere. Corrective surgeries taking second attempt in perineum always produces poor outcomes. PMID:20011470

  5. Cardiovascular malformations and other cardiovascular abnormalities in neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, A E; Birch, P H; Korf, B R; Tenconi, R; Niimura, M; Poyhonen, M; Armfield Uhas, K; Sigorini, M; Virdis, R; Romano, C; Bonioli, E; Wolkenstein, P; Pivnick, E K; Lawrence, M; Friedman, J M

    2000-11-13

    Although it is well recognized that a peripheral vasculopathy may occur in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), it is unclear whether cardiovascular abnormalities are more common. We reviewed the frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, in particular, cardiovascular malformations (CVMs), among 2322 patients with definite NF1 in the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation International Database from 1991-98. Cardiovascular malformations were reported in 54/2322 (2.3%) of the NF1 patients, only 4 of whom had Watson syndrome or NF1-Noonan syndrome. There was a predominance of Class II "flow" defects [Clark, 1995: Moss and Adams' Heart Disease in Infants, Children, and Adolescents Including the Fetus and Young Adult. p 60-70] (43/54, 80%) among the NF1 patients with CVMs. Pulmonic stenosis, that was present in 25 NF1 patients, and aortic coarctation, that occurred in 5, constitute much larger proportions of all CVMs than expected. Of interest was the paucity of Class I conotruncal defects (2 patients with tetralogy of Fallot), and the absence of atrioventricular canal, anomalous pulmonary venous return, complex single ventricle and laterality defects. Besides the 54 patients with CVMs, there were 27 patients with other cardiac abnormalities (16 with murmur, 5 with mitral valve prolapse, 1 with intracardiac tumor, and 5 with electrocardiogram abnormalities). No patient in this study had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There were 16 patients who had a peripheral vascular abnormality without an intracardiac CVM, plus an additional 4 patients among those with a CVM who also had a peripheral vascular abnormality. PMID:11078559

  6. Meckel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases. Additional anomalies are frequent. A common characteristic of the parenchymal changes of many organs is a proliferation of the stromal connective tissue and increase and dilatation of the associated epithelial ducts. Autosomal recessive inheritance is well confirmed and the gene locus has been mapped to chromosome 17q21-24 by genome wide linkage study. The locus was later refined to within a less than 1 cM region (17q22), in which most of the Finnish MKS patients share a common chromosomal haplotype suggesting one major and relatively old mutation. However, in most of the non-Finnish MKS families studied, this linkage could not be confirmed. The linkage studies provide evidence that more than one locus is involved in bringing about the combination of CNS malformations, cystic kidneys, and polydactyly, maybe even in typical cases of MKS. Prenatal diagnosis of MKS by vaginal ultrasound scan is possible from 11-12 weeks of pregnancy, especially in families where there is a known risk. In those families where linkage to 17q22 is established, prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis is possible. Images PMID:9643292

  7. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with Extensive Lymphangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Sirin; Tabaja, Ali; Rajab, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare disorder characterized by the triad of vascular malformations, venous varicosities, and bone and soft-tissue hypertrophy. We present a case of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with limb hypertrophy, port-wine stains, lymphangiomas, and venous varicosities in the limbs. PMID:26587303

  8. Spectrum of urorectal septum malformation sequence.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Nayak, Shalini S; Shukla, Anju; Girisha, Katta M

    2016-05-01

    Urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS) is a rare spectrum of malformations involving various organ systems. Here, we present eight cases of URSMS, noted in autopsy, with different degrees of complexity, seven being the complete type and one being the partial type. All cases had gastrointestinal tract malformation in the form of the imperforate anus and indeterminate genitalia. Other gastrointestinal tract anomalies were anal agenesis in two cases, anorectal agenesis in two cases, and malformed lower intestinal tract in four cases. The associated renal abnormality was noted in five cases, which were unilateral renal agenesis, dysplastic kidney, hydronephrosis, horseshoe kidney, and unilateral hypoplastic ectopic kidney. External genital malformation, present in both male and female fetuses, included a knob-like structure at perineum in female fetuses, genital fold hypoplasia and penile aplasia or hypoplasia in male fetuses. Skeletal abnormalities included two cases of sacral agenesis and one case of lumbosacral dysraphism. Other anomalies included a case with alobar holoprosencephaly, truncus arteriosus with hypoplastic lungs in one case, and three cases with abdominal wall defects. It is our attempt to delineate a spectrum of abnormalities associated with URSMS. PMID:26663027

  9. Prenatal Diagnosis of Treacher-Collins Syndrome Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasonography and Differential Diagnosis with Other Acrofacial Dysostosis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniela Cardoso; Bussamra, Luiz Claudio Silva; Drummond, Carolina Leite; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Aldrighi, José Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Treacher-Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare dominant autosomal anomaly resulting from malformation or disruption of the development of the first and second branchial arches. It is characterized by micrognathia, malar hypoplasia, and malformations of the eyes and ears. The prenatal diagnosis using two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS) is characterized by identification of facial malformations together with polyhydramnios. Three-dimensional ultrasonography (3DUS) has the capacity to spatially display these facial malformations, thus making it easy for the parents to understand them. We present a case of TCS diagnosed in the 33rd week using 3DUS, with postnatal confirmation using cranial computed tomography and anatomopathological analysis. PMID:23653874

  10. Cataract surgery in Knobloch syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Carmen Sílvia; Ferreira, Carla Cristina Serra; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Silvério; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Tartarella, Márcia Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with early-onset ocular abnormalities and central nervous system malformations. Ocular abnormalities are usually severe, and include high myopia, vitreoretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, macular abnormalities, and cataract. The most frequent systemic changes are midline malformations of the brain, ventricular dilation, and occipital encephalocele. Cognitive delay may occur. We report a case of cataract in a child with Knobloch syndrome. Cataract surgery and follow-up are described. PMID:21691582

  11. Sex hormone exposure during pregnancy and malformations.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M H; Briggs, M

    1979-01-01

    This general review of the effects of exposure to sex hormones during pregnancy and subsequent fetal malformation presents summaries of animal studies, develops the data indicating virilization and feminization in humans, documents chromosome abnormalities, and presents data on the connection of steroid exposure in utero and somatic malformations. Fetal exposure can occur 3 different ways, through hormonal pregnancy test, via obstetrical use of hormones, or because of continued maternal use of oral contraceptives after conception. In the latter case, an ongoing prospective study indicates that accidental ingestion of oral contraceptives after conception is not harmful to the fetus if taken during early pregnancy. Tables present summaries of numerous large surveys and retrospective studies linking particular sex hormones (exogenous) to particular fetal malformations including neural tube defects and other constellations of developmental problems. The question of exogenous hormone effects on the personality of infants who were exposed in utero is addressed. PMID:400321

  12. Endovascular treatment of spinal cord arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Veznedaroglu, Erol; Nelson, Peter K; Jabbour, Pascal M; Rosenwasser, Robert H

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous malformations are rare lesions that represent one-tenth of the brain arteriovenous malformations. Depending on their location and relationship to the dura, these lesions are divided into four categories. Their clinical manifestations may vary from mild symptoms to severe motor deficits. Spinal angiography remains the "gold standard" for diagnosing spinal cord vascular lesions. Although the type of shunting remains difficult to determine by the magnetic resonance imaging, it is well analyzed by spinal angiography. The cure of the shunting is not by itself a therapeutic goal, but the objective is the creation of a new hemodynamic equilibrium between the lesion and the spinal cord to decrease the risk of hemorrhage and prevent the progression of the spinal cord ischemia. The endovascular tools seem to be a reasonable therapeutic option for the treatment of the majority of the spinal cord arteriovenous malformations. PMID:17053604

  13. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N.; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  14. A Single-Center Experience of CNS Anomalies or Neural Tube Defects in Patients With Jarcho-Levin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Peker, Erdal; Gülşen, İsmail; Ağengin, Kemal; Kaba, Sultan; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2016-03-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS) is a genetic disorder characterized by distinct malformations of the ribs and vertebrae, and/or other associated abnormalities such as neural tube defect, Arnold-Chiari malformation, renal and urinary abnormalities, hydrocephalus, congenital cardiac abnormalities, and extremity malformations. The study included 12 cases at 37-42 weeks of gestation and diagnosed to have had Jarcho-Levin syndrome, Arnold-Chiari malformation, and meningmyelocele. All cases of Jarcho-Levin syndrome had Arnold-Chiari type 2 malformation; there was corpus callosum dysgenesis in 6, lumbosacral meningmyelocele in 6, lumbal meningmyelocele in 3, thoracal meningmyelocele in 3, and holoprosencephaly in 1 of the cases. With this article, the authors underline the neurologic abnormalities accompanying Jarcho-Levin syndrome and that each of these abnormalities is a component of Jarcho-Levin syndrome. PMID:26239489

  15. Craniofacial malformation in Xenopus laevis tadpoles caused by the exposure of early embryos to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, N

    1983-10-01

    The principal features of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) include microcephaly, reduced body size, and characteristic facial malformation, most of which are associated with hypoplasticity of structures around the mouth. A recent study using pregnant mice suggested that the malformations in FAS are caused by the effects of ethanol on early embryos during gastrulation and neurulation. Exposure of Xenopus laevis early embryos to 1-2% ethanol until they developed to the late neurula stage produced craniofacial malformations in tadpoles which have many similarities with the described features of FAS. They include reduced length of brain, reduced body size, and hypoplasticity of the anterior end of the body around the mouth. Size reduction from the control group was about 20% in the mouth region, and 10% in other head regions. Ethanol inhibited migration of mesodermal cells toward the animal pole during gastrulation, thus inducing a smaller neural plate with reduced anterior-posterior length. These very early effects of ethanol in development seem to produce various craniofacial malformations in tadpoles, and possibly also in human infants with FAS. In contrast to mammalian embryos, one can conveniently study in detail the effects of ethanol on morphogenetic movements in various in vitro experiments by using a large number of amphibian embryos. Thus, amphibian embryos represent a valuable animal model for the study of mechanisms of the teratogenic effects of ethanol. PMID:6648833

  16. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  17. Retroperitoneal vascular malformation mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Indu Bhushan; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old man presented to the Department of Surgery with a painful groin swelling on right side. Exploration revealed a reddish-blue hemangiomatous mass in the scrotum extending through inguinal canal into the retroperitoneum. On further dissection swelling was found to be originating from right external iliac vein. The swelling was excised after ligating all vascular connections. The histopathological examination of excised mass confirmed the diagnosis of venous variety of vascular malformation. This is the first reported case of vascular malformation arising from retroperitoneum and extending into inguinoscrotal region, presenting as incarcerated inguinal hernia. PMID:21633582

  18. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Frederico Becker; Schultz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is an hamartomatous congenital pulmonary airway malformation with incidence ranging between 1:10,000 and 1:35,000 newborns. Currently CCAM is classified into five groups according to clinical and pathological features. The clinical outcome varies depending on the subtype and the extent of involvement. The authors report the case of a premature male newborn with the prenatal diagnosis of CCAM Type 1 associated with cardiac right axis deviation, who died 67 hours after birth due to respiratory failure. In addition to the autopsy report of this rare entity, the authors present its classification and prognosis. PMID:26558243

  19. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  20. Congenital Malformations Leading to Paradoxical Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-05-01

    The absolute separation of the right and left circulations and the filtration of blood by the pulmonary circulation are essential to prevent the passage of thrombotic material from the venous system into the systemic arterial circulation. Any breach of the intracardiac septae or circumvention of the pulmonary capillary network may cause a paradoxical embolus. The most common causes are atrial septal defects and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. This article discusses unusual connections and pathways related to congenital malformations. Although anticoagulation is necessary to prevent paradoxical emboli, the hematologic disturbances and the most appropriate therapy in these patients warrant further investigation. PMID:27150173

  1. Vascular malformations: localized defects in vascular morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, P; Vikkula, M

    2003-05-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized defects of the vasculature, and usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. They are subdivided into vascular malformations and vascular tumours. Most are sporadic, but Mendelian inheritance is observed in some families. By genetic analysis, several causative genes have been identified during the last 10 years. This has shed light into the pathophysiological pathways involved. Interestingly, in most cases, the primary defect seems to affect the characteristics of endothelial cells. Only mutations in the glomulin gene, responsible for hereditary glomuvenous malformations, are thought to directly affect vascular smooth-muscle cells. PMID:12752563

  2. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  3. Joubert syndrome labeled as hypotonic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Dekair, Lubna H.; Kamel, Hussein; El-Bashir, Haitham O.

    2014-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and complex brainstem malformation. The diagnosis of cases can be difficult as the presentation can be similar to cases of cerebral palsy. We present a case of JS in an 18-month-old girl who presented to pediatric rehabilitation with a diagnosis of hypotonic cerebral palsy and abnormal eye movements. The brain MRI confirmed the typical brain malformations. PMID:24983287

  4. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  5. Delleman (Oculocerebrocutaneous) Syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Basso, Tomás; Vigo, Rodolfo; Iacouzzi, Sebastián; Prémoli, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Delleman syndrome is an unusual entity, characterized by ocular cysts or microphthalmia, focal dermal anomalies and cerebral malformations. In the following article, we carry out a review of the disease and we present the case of a patient with microphthalmos and palpebral coloboma. As we could not put orbital expanders at an early stage, we performed reconstructive surgery. PMID:25005212

  6. Two unique TUBB3 mutations cause both CFEOM3 and malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Mary C; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Tischfield, Max A; Stasheff, Steven F; Brancati, Francesco; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma; Nuovo, Sara; Garaci, Francesco; MacKinnon, Sarah E; Hunter, David G; Grant, P Ellen; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2016-02-01

    One set of missense mutations in the neuron specific beta tubulin isotype 3 (TUBB3) has been reported to cause malformations of cortical development (MCD), while a second set has been reported to cause isolated or syndromic Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles type 3 (CFEOM3). Because TUBB3 mutations reported to cause CFEOM had not been associated with cortical malformations, while mutations reported to cause MCD had not been associated with CFEOM or other forms of paralytic strabismus, it was hypothesized that each set of mutations might alter microtubule function differently. Here, however, we report two novel de novo heterozygous TUBB3 amino acid substitutions, G71R and G98S, in four patients with both MCD and syndromic CFEOM3. These patients present with moderately severe CFEOM3, nystagmus, torticollis, and developmental delay, and have intellectual and social disabilities. Neuroimaging reveals defective cortical gyration, as well as hypoplasia or agenesis of the corpus callosum and anterior commissure, malformations of hippocampi, thalami, basal ganglia and cerebella, and brainstem and cranial nerve hypoplasia. These new TUBB3 substitutions meld the two previously distinct TUBB3-associated phenotypes, and implicate similar microtubule dysfunction underlying both. PMID:26639658

  7. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) [congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation] associated with tracheoesophageal fistula and agensesis of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Fassan, Matteo; Ludwig, Kathrin; Cassina, Matteo; Gervasi, Maria Teresa; Salmaso, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM) are a family of hamartomatous disorders due to the uncontrolled overgrowth of the terminal bronchioles. Congenital pulmonary airway malformations can co-exist with cardiovascular and/or urogenital malformations, but their association with thoracopulmonary malformations is extremely rare. We report the first case of CPAM type I, co-existing with tracheo-esophageal fistula and corpus callosum agenesis. PMID:22414029

  8. Coexistent arteriovenous malformation and hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; O'Toole, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous angiomas or cavernomas have been occasionally described in patients presenting with medically intractable epilepsy. Reports of cavernomas associated with a second pathology potentially causative of seizures have rarely been documented; most commonly, the second pathology is focal cortical dysplasia or less frequently, hippocampal sclerosis. To our knowledge, cases of arteriovenous malformation arising in this clinical setting and associated with hippocampal sclerosis have not been previously described. We report a 56-year-old woman who initially presented at age 24years with staring spells. Imaging studies revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe. At age 51years, she represented with signs and symptoms related to a hemorrhage from the malformation. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) of the lesion. She subsequently developed seizures, refractory to medical management. MRI studies showed atrophy in the right hippocampus. She underwent resection of the right parietal lobe and hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the right parietal lesion revealed an arteriovenous malformation marked by focally prominent vascular sclerosis, calcification and adjacent hemosiderin deposition. The hippocampus was marked by prominent neuronal loss and gliosis in the CA1 region, consistent with CA1 sclerosis or hippocampal sclerosis International League Against Epilepsy type 2. PMID:26899356

  9. Mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis in cortical malformations.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, K M; Kharazia, V N; Prince, D A

    1999-09-01

    The presence of developmental cortical malformations is associated with epileptogenesis and other neurological disorders. In recent years, animal models specific to certain malformations have been developed to study the underlying epileptogenic mechanisms. Teratogens (chemical, thermal or radiation) applied during cortical neuroblast division and migration result in lissencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia. Animals with these malformations have a lowered seizure threshold as well as histopathologies typical of those found in human dysgenic brains. Alterations that may promote epileptogenesis have been identified in lissencephalic brains, such as increased numbers of bursting types of neurons, and abnormal connections between hippocampus, subcortical heterotopia, and neocortex. A distinct set of pathological properties is present in animal models of 4-layered microgyria, induced with cortical lesions made during late stages of cortical neuroblast migration. Hyperexcitability has been demonstrated in cortex adjacent to the microgyrus (paramicrogyral zone) in in vitro slice preparations. A number of observations suggest that cellular differentiation is delayed in microgyric brains. Other studies show increases in postsynaptic glutamate receptors and decreases in GABA(A) receptors in microgyric cortex. These alterations could promote epileptogenesis, depending on which cell types have the altered receptors. The microgyrus lacks thalamic afferents from sensory relay nuclei, that instead appear to project to the paramicrogyral region, thereby increasing excitatory connectivity within this epileptogenic zone. These studies have provided a necessary first step in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms of epileptogenesis associated with cortical malformations. PMID:10515164

  10. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  11. Complete Currarino Syndrome Recognized in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Sinan; Battal, Bilal; Karaman, Bulent; Bozkurt, Yalcin

    2015-01-01

    Currarino syndrome is a hereditary pathology that is characterized by sacrococcygeal bone defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformation. Sacrococcygeal bone defect is almost always a part of the syndrome. The complete form of this entity displays all three abnormalities and is very uncommon. In this report, we present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a case with complete form of Currarino syndrome recognized in adulthood. PMID:25861544

  12. Median Facial Cleft in Amniotic Band Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debabrata; Das, Gobinda; Gayen, Sibnath; Konar, Arpita

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome manifests at birth with a variety of malformations ranging from constriction ring to defects incompatible to life, in various parts of the body. Although some theories have been proposed for the development of this syndrome, the exact cause remains unknown. The median facial cleft is an extremely rare manifestation of amniotic band syndrome with a relative paucity of reports available in the literature. Here, we report one such case. PMID:21731335

  13. Case-control study of congenital malformations and occupational exposure to low-level ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Gilbert, E.S.; Hessol, N.A.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    In a case-control study, the authors investigated the association of parental occupational exposure to low-level external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation and risk of congenital malformations in their offspring. Cases and controls were ascertained from births in two counties in southeastern Washington State, where the Hanford Site has been a major employer. A unique feature of this study was the linking of quantitative individual measurement of external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation exposure of employees at the Hanford Site, using personal dosimeters, and the disease outcome, congenital malformations. The study population included 672 malformation cases and 977 matched controls from births occurring from 1957 through 1980. Twelve specific malformation types were analyzed for evidence of association with employment of the parents at Hanford and with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Two defects, congenital dislocation of the hip and tracheoesophageal fistula, showed statistically significant associations with employment of the parents at Hanford, but not with parental radiation exposure. Neural tube defects showed a significant association with parental preconception exposure, on the basis of a small number of cases. Eleven other defects, including Down syndrome, for which an association with radiation was considered most likely, showed no evidence of such an association. When all malformations were analyzed as a group, there was no evidence of an association with employment of the parents at Hanford, but the relation of parental exposure to radiation before conception was in the positive direction (one-tailed p value between 0.05 and 0.10). Given the number of statistical tests conducted, some or all of the observed positive correlations are likely to represent false positive findings. 30 references.

  14. Partial urorectal septum malformation sequence in a kitten with disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brice S; Pain, Amélie; Meynaud-Collard, Patricia; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    A 2-month-old kitten exhibited simultaneously an imperforate anus, hypospadias, rectourethral fistula and genital dysgenesis (penis restricted to the glans, absence of prepuce and bifid scrotum). Surgical correction consisted of separation of the urinary and digestive tracts, perineal urethrostomy and connection of the rectum to the newly made anal opening. Pathological examination of the testes, conventionally removed at 9 months of age, showed no mature spermatozoa and underdevelopment of germ and Leydig cells. In humans, the absence of an anal opening in association with abnormal sexual development defines the urorectal septum malformation sequence. Here, we describe the first case of this syndrome in a kitten with a normal male karyotype (38,XY) and a normal coding sequence for the SRY gene. Both the rectourethral fistula and observed genital abnormalities might have been induced by a disturbance in the hedgehog signalling pathway. However, although four polymorphic sites were identified by DHH gene sequencing, none cosegregated with the malformation. PMID:24718294

  15. [A malformation to know: os odontoideum. Report on two pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Cherradi Lachhab, I; Dafiri, R

    2014-04-01

    The os odontoideum, or mobile odontoid apophysis, is a malformation of the cervico-occipital hinge caused by missing unity in the ossification center of the dens on the body of the axis. This malformation induces atloaxial instability and exposes the subject to the risk of bulbar-medullary compression. The true incidence of this condition is difficult to determine because many cases are asymptomatic. The pathogenesis is discussed. Congenital and traumatic theories have been advanced. Clinically, the defect can be discovered incidentally or revealed by neck pain, a stiff neck, dizziness, or deficient syndrome. CT and MRI imaging can detect the defects, and allow one to study the impact on the contents of the spinal canal and detect lesions. We report two new os odontoideum observations in children aged 5 and 14 years who were referred for equilibrium disorders and tetraparesis, respectively. PMID:24636591

  16. A locus for cerebral cavernous malformations maps to chromosome 7q in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, D.A.; Gallione, C.J.; Morrison, L.A.; Davis, L.E.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1995-07-20

    Cavernous malformations (angiomas) affecting the central nervous system and retina can be inherited in autosomal dominant pattern (OMIM 116860). These vascular lesions may remain clinically silent or lead to a number of neurological symptoms including seizure, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit, and migraine. We have mapped a gene for this disorder in two families, one of Italian-American origin and one of Mexican-American origin, to markers on proximal 7q, with a combined maximum lod score of 3.92 ({theta} of zero) with marker D7S479. Haplotype analysis of these families places the locus between markers D7S502 proximally and D7S515 distally, an interval of approximately 41 cM. The location distinguishes this disorder from an autosomal dominant vascular malformation syndrome where lesions are primarily cutaneous and that maps to 9p21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N

    2016-02-15

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  18. Genetics Home Reference: microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A, Isidor B, David A, Smyser CD, Paciorkowski AR, Willing M, Woulfe J, Das S, Beaulieu CL, Marcadier ... 2602. Epub 2013 Mar 31. Mirzaa GM, Paciorkowski AR, Smyser CD, Willing MC, Lind AC, Dobyns WB. ...

  19. A case of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis syndrome with epilepsy (Haberland syndrome).

    PubMed

    Zahariev, Zahari Iv; Peycheva, Marieta V; Dobrev, Hristo P

    2009-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by scalp, facial, and ocular lesions and multiple intracranial malformations. Approximately 50 cases have been described in the literature. We report a 34-year-old woman with a 6-year history of epilepsy, without mental retardation, with predominantly ipsilateral skin lesions evident at birth, with limbal lipodermoid of the left eye and multiple non-progressive, ipsilateral intracranial structures of soft, cystic components. The described malformations are congenital, mostly unilaterally located and with similar lipomatous structure. PMID:20232658

  20. Lethal pallister-killian syndrome: Phenotypic similarity with fryns syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ignacio Rodriquez, J.; Garcia, I.; Alvarez, J.; Delicado, A.; Palacios, J.

    1994-11-01

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, profound mental retardation, and epilepsy. Chromosomes of peripheral lymphocytes are usually normal, but tissue cultures show varying degrees of mosaicism for isochromosome 12p. In babies who die neonatally of severe malformations, including diaphragmatic hernia, and who also have a {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, and other internal anomalies, Fryns syndrome is more likely to be suspected than Pallister-Killian syndrome, especially if karyotyping is unavailable or if peripheral lumphocytes have a normal chromosome constitution. An initial diagnosis of Fryns syndrome had to be modified in 3 successive newborn infants since chromosome analysis or in situ hybridization with a chromosome 12 probe on kidney tissue demonstrated the mosaic aneuploidy characteristic of Pallister-Killian syndrome. These 3 patients confirm that a similar pattern of malformations can be present in both conditions at birth. It consists of {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and other defects. Newborn infants who present this phenotype, but lack a conclusively normal chromosome test, may not have Fryns syndrome. A diagnosis of Fryns syndrome should be made carefully to avoid the risk of inappropriate genetic counseling. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome-specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  2. Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heterotaxy is defined as an abnormality where the internal thoraco-abdominal organs demonstrate abnormal arrangement across the left-right axis of the body. This broad term includes patients with a wide variety of very complex cardiac lesions. Patients with heterotaxy can be stratified into the subsets of asplenia syndrome and polysplenia syndrome, or the subsets of heterotaxy with isomerism of the right atrial appendages and heterotaxy with isomerism of the left atrial appendages. Treatment of patients with isomerism is determined by the nature and severity of the associated cardiac and extracardiac lesions. Most cardiac operations for patients with isomerism are palliative in nature, since normal anatomy is rarely achieved and mortality rates remain high for patients with heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with left isomerism in general have less severe cardiac malformations than those with right isomerism and, hence, more chance of biventricular repair. For almost all patients with right isomerism, and for many with left isomerism, biventricular repair will not be feasible, and all palliative protocols are then staging procedures prior to a Fontan-type repair. Recent advances in medical management, and improvements in surgical techniques have resulted in improved survival for these patients, and the surgical outcomes are comparable to those with Fontan circulation irrespective of the presence or absence of heterotaxy. PMID:21731561

  3. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Val-Bernal, José-Fernando; Hermana, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    A uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon cause of uterine bleeding. Location of this lesion in the uterine cervix is exceptional. We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who presented with chronic menorrhagias and hypochromic anemia. A sonographic study revealed a 10-cm, fundal, intramural, uterine well-circumscribed mass that distorted the endometrial cavity. The patient underwent hysterectomy for a large uterine leiomyoma. The pathological study revealed an incidental AVM of the posterior half of the cervix measuring 5.5cm in major diameter. We suggest that in our case cervical AVM might have occurred due to a large corporal leiomyoma distorting the uterine circulation. Differential diagnosis includes capillary hemangioma, venous malformation, or arteriovenous fistula. PMID:26810780

  4. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  5. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term "arteriovenous malformation," limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  6. Floating-Harbor syndrome complicated by tethered cord: a new association and potential contribution from growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Esko; Wickremesekera, Agadha; Dixon, Joanne

    2005-07-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome is a rare syndrome with short stature, severely delayed bone age, typical facies and delay in expressive speech. Structural malformations are uncommon, and tethered cord or other forms of spinal dysraphism have not previously been reported. We report on a case of Floating-Harbor syndrome, complicated by tethered cord and discuss the possibility that growth hormone therapy may contribute to the development of symptoms of this malformation. PMID:15889416

  7. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Moncreieff, M. W.; Cameron, A. H.; Astley, R.; Roberts, K. D.; Abrams, L. D.; Mann, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Nine cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung are described. One was stillborn: two presented in the newborn period (one of them surviving after a lobectomy), and the remaining six were older children all of whom survived after lobectomy. There have been only three cases previously reported in children outside the newborn period. The pathological, clinical, and radiological features are discussed and compared with previously reported cases. Images PMID:5815941

  8. Congenital lung malformations: an ongoing controversy

    PubMed Central

    Burge, DM; Marven, SS

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Congenital lung malformations are rare lesions that are most commonly diagnosed antenatally. Management of such lesions, particularly those that are asymptomatic, remains controversial. We undertook a survey to ascertain current practice of surgeons in the UK and Ireland. Methods All consultant members of the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons were asked to complete a survey on congenital lung malformations with respect to antenatal management, symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions, and operative techniques. Results Responses were received from 20 paediatric surgical centres and highlighted the ongoing variability in management of such lesions, particularly those that are asymptomatic. Twenty per cent of surgeons never resect an asymptomatic lesion and twenty-four per cent always do. The remainder intervene selectively, with size being the most commonly stated indication. Most resections are undertaken via thoracotomy although 35% of surgeons use thoracoscopy for some procedures. Conclusions National data based on congenital anomaly registers are needed to determine the natural history of these malformations and to guide future management. PMID:23484999

  9. Parkes weber syndrome involving right lower limb: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kondapavuluri, Benod Kumar; Bharadwaj, R N; Shaikh, Shama; Chand, Akshay; Chaturvedi, Vidyasagar

    2015-04-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) are developmental abnormalities of the vascular system. Malformations may involve any segment of the vascular tree: arteries, capillaries, veins or lymphatics. High-flow arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are associated with shunting of large amounts of arterial blood into the venous system; these lesions can have dynamic and dramatic hemodynamic manifestations, such as massive arteriolisation with gross venous engorgement, organomegaly of concerned anatomical region and high-output cardiac failure. Patients with Parkes Weber syndrome have clinically significant micro- or macrofistulous arteriovenous shunts, affecting usually one extremity. The patient has dilated, frequently visible pulsatile varicose veins and other visible signs of AV shunting. The abnormality is sporadic; it is likely a somatic mutation. There is frequent intraosseous involvement. The presence of high AV shunts differentiates Parkes Weber syndrome from Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome which is a clinical triad of capillary malformation, soft tissue and bone hypertrophy and venous and lymphatic malformations. The mutations in RASA 1 gene leads to Parkes Weber syndrome characterised by the presence of multiple, small (1-2 cm in diameter) capillary malformations mostly localized on the face and limbs. We report a case of congenital AVM of the lower limb causing cardiac decompensation. The patient was safely and successfully treated by performing a knee disarticulation. PMID:25972672

  10. A novel mutation in two Hmong families broadens the range of STRA6-related malformations to include contractures and camptodactyly.

    PubMed

    Marcadier, Julien L; Mears, Alan J; Woods, Elizabeth A; Fisher, Jamie; Airheart, Cory; Qin, Wen; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Dyment, David A; Innes, A Micheil; Curry, Cynthia J

    2016-01-01

    PDAC (also termed Matthew Wood) syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pulmonary hypoplasia/aplasia, diaphragmatic defects, bilateral anophthalmia, and cardiac malformations. The disorder is caused by mutations in STRA6, an important regulator of vitamin A and retinoic acid metabolism. We describe six cases from four families of Hmong ancestry, seen over a 30 years period in California. These include: (i) consanguineous siblings with a combination of bilateral anophthalmia, diaphragmatic abnormalities, truncus arteriosus, and/or pulmonary agenesis/hypoplasia; (ii) a singleton fetus with bilateral anophthalmia, pulmonary agenesis, cardiac malformation, and renal hypoplasia; (iii) a sibling pair with a combination of antenatal contractures, camptodactyly, fused palpebral fissures, pulmonary agenesis, and/or truncus arteriosus; (iv) a fetus with bilateral anophthalmia, bushy eyebrows, pulmonary agenesis, heart malformation, and abnormal hand positioning. The phenotypic spectrum of PDAC syndrome has until now not included contractures or camptodactyly. Sequencing of STRA6 in unrelated members of families three and four identified a novel, shared homozygous splice site alteration (c.113 + 3_4delAA) that is predicted to be pathogenic. We hypothesize this may represent a unique disease allele in the Hmong. We also provide a focused review of all published PDAC syndrome cases with confirmed or inferred STRA6 mutations, illustrating the phenotypic and molecular variability that characterizes this disorder. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26373900

  11. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents - diagnosis, clinic, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be appropriate for arterio-venous malformations. Incurable findings are still a major challenge. Despite the introduction of antiangiogenetic drugs in oncology, the medicamentous therapeutic approach could not be established for arterio-venous malformations up to now. PMID:25587362

  12. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents – diagnosis, clinic, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be appropriate for arterio-venous malformations. Incurable findings are still a major challenge. Despite the introduction of antiangiogenetic drugs in oncology, the medicamentous therapeutic approach could not be established for arterio-venous malformations up to now. PMID:25587362

  13. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neurophatic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarly based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients. PMID:20018097

  14. The diagnostic value of MRI fistulogram and MRI distal colostogram in patients with anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Kavalcova, Lucie; Skaba, Richard; Kyncl, Martin; Rouskova, Blanka; Prochazka, Ales

    2013-08-01

    Contrast fistulogram (FG) and distal pressure colostogram (DPCG) are standard diagnostic methods for the assessment of anorectal malformations. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) earned a place among essential diagnostic methods in preoperative investigations after the Currarino syndrome and a high incidence of associated spinal dysraphism were described. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of substituting FG and DPCG by a modified pelvic MRI, e.g. MRI fistulogram (MRI-FG) and MRI colostogram (MRI-DPCG). The prospective study involved 29 patients with anorectal malformations who underwent a modified pelvic MRI. The length and course of fistulas and rectum, and the presence of sacral anomalies were studied on MRI images and compared with images obtained by radiologic examinations. Modified MRI brought identical results as contrast studies in 25 patients when related to the fistula and rectum length and course. MRI was more accurate for the detection of sacral anomalies. MRI-FG was the only imaging method used in the four most recent patients. The results support the assumption that conventional contrast examinations for the assessment of anorectal malformations can be replaced by MRI, thus reducing the radiation dose. PMID:23932626

  15. Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations: Current Theory and Management

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Gresham T.; Friedman, Adva B.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumor. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. This paper reviews current theory and practice in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these more common vascular anomalies. PMID:22611412

  16. Joubert syndrome associated with multicystic kidney disease and hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, D M; Zacharowicz, L; Edelman, M; Lee, S C; Greifer, I; Rapin, I

    1997-12-01

    There are several diseases characterized by renal cysts and neurological abnormalities. Joubert syndrome is distinguished by hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, hypotonia, retinal dystrophy characterized by abnormal eye movements, and impaired psychomotor development, together with abnormal respiratory pattern. We describe a boy with Joubert syndrome associated with multicystic renal dysplasia and hepatic fibrosis. We speculate that the association of malformations of the renal and nervous systems in this syndrome and others are not random. Concomitant malformations of these systems are likely based upon their common developmental and genetic features. PMID:9438658

  17. Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II with otolaryngological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Havle, A; Shedge, S; Malashetti, S; Jain, V

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of oro-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr's syndrome) which is characterized by malformations of the oral cavity, face and digits. The facial and oral features include tongue nodules, cleft or high-arched palate, missing teeth, broad nose; cleft lip. The digital features include clinodactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, brachydactyly and duplication of the hallux. PMID:26604509

  18. Fetal hydantoin syndrome with rheumatic valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Godbole, K G; Gambhir, P S; Deshpande, A S; Kurlekar, S U; Phadke, M A

    1999-01-01

    Research has shown that anticonvulsants are teratogens and pose a risk for fetal malformations. Though Fetal Hydantoin Syndrome (FHS) was first reported by Langhman and others, wide phenotypic variability of this syndrome has lead many clinicians to question its very existence. We report a twelve year old girl with FHS with rheumatic valvular heart disease. PMID:10798072

  19. Occipital neuromodulation for refractory headache in the Chiari malformation population.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Bolognese, Paolo; Milhorat, Thomas H; Mogilner, Alon Y

    2011-01-01

    Chronic occipital and suboccipital headache is a common symptom in patients with Chiari I malformation (CMI). These headaches may persist despite appropriate surgical treatment of the underlying pathology via suboccipital decompression, duraplasty and related procedures. Occipital stimulation has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a variety of occipital headache/pain syndromes. We present our series of 18 patients with CMI and persistent occipital headaches who underwent occipital neurostimulator trials and, following successful trials, permanent stimulator placement. Seventy-two percent (13/18) of patients had a successful stimulator trial and proceeded to permanent implant. Of those implanted, 11/13 (85%) reported continued pain relief at a mean follow-up of 23 months. Device-related complications requiring additional surgeries occurred in 31% of patients. Occipital neuromodulation may provide significant long-term pain relief in selected CMI patients with persistent occipital pain. Larger and longer-term studies are needed to further define appropriate patient selection criteria as well as to refine the surgical technique to minimize device-related complications. PMID:21422782

  20. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z.

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  1. Somatic activation of AKT3 causes hemispheric developmental brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D; Cai, Xuyu; Elhosary, Princess Christina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lehtinen, Maria K; Hills, L Benjamin; Heinzen, Erin L; Hill, Anthony; Hill, R Sean; Barry, Brenda J; Bourgeois, Blaise F D; Riviello, James J; Barkovich, A James; Black, Peter M; Ligon, Keith L; Walsh, Christopher A

    2012-04-12

    Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged, malformed cerebral hemisphere, typically causing epilepsy that requires surgical resection. We studied resected HMG tissue to test whether the condition might reflect somatic mutations affecting genes critical to brain development. We found that two out of eight HMG samples showed trisomy of chromosome 1q, which encompasses many genes, including AKT3, a gene known to regulate brain size. A third case showed a known activating mutation in AKT3 (c.49G→A, creating p.E17K) that was not present in the patient's blood cells. Remarkably, the E17K mutation in AKT3 is exactly paralogous to E17K mutations in AKT1 and AKT2 recently discovered in somatic overgrowth syndromes. We show that AKT3 is the most abundant AKT paralog in the brain during neurogenesis and that phosphorylated AKT is abundant in cortical progenitor cells. Our data suggest that somatic mutations limited to the brain could represent an important cause of complex neurogenetic disease. PMID:22500628

  2. Somatic Activation of AKT3 Causes Hemispheric Developmental Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Elhosary, Princess Christina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Hills, L. Benjamin; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hill, Anthony; Hill, R. Sean; Barry, Brenda J.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.D.; Riviello, James J.; Barkovich, A. James; Black, Peter M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged, malformed cerebral hemisphere, typically causing epilepsy that requires surgical resection. We studied resected HMG tissue to test whether the condition might reflect somatic mutations affecting genes critical to brain development. We found that 2/8 HMG samples showed trisomy of chromosome 1q, encompassing many genes, including AKT3, which is known to regulate brain size. A third case showed a known activating mutation in AKT3 (c.49G→A, creating p.E17K) that was not present in the patient’s blood cells. Remarkably, the E17K mutation in AKT3 is exactly paralogous to E17K mutations in AKT1 and AKT2 recently discovered in somatic overgrowth syndromes. We show that AKT3 is the most abundant AKT paralogue in brain during neurogenesis and that phosphorylated AKT is abundant in cortical progenitor cells. Our data suggest that somatic mutations limited to brain could represent an important cause of complex neurogenetic disease. PMID:22500628

  3. Anorectal Malformations: Finding the Pathway out of the Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Leonor; Meyrat, Blaise J; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Meuli, Reto A; Gudinchet, François

    2013-01-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMs) are a complex group of congenital anomalies involving the distal anus and rectum, as well as the urinary and genital tracts in a significant number of cases. Most ARMs result from abnormal development of the urorectal septum in early fetal life. In most cases, the anus is not perforated and the distal enteric component ends blindly (atresia) or as a fistula into the urinary tract, genital tract, or perineum. ARMs are also present in a great number of syndromes and associations of congenital anomalies. The classification of ARMs is mainly based on the position of the rectal pouch relative to the puborectal sling, the presence or absence of fistulas, and the types and locations of the fistulas. All of this information is crucial in determining the most appropriate surgical approach for each case. Imaging studies play a key role in evaluation and classification of ARMs. In neonates, clinical and radiologic examinations in the first 3 days of life help determine the type of ARM and the need for early colostomy. In older children, preoperative pelvic magnetic resonance imaging is the most efficient diagnostic method for evaluating the size, morphology, and grade of development of the sphincteric musculature. PMID:23479709

  4. Genetic Considerations Relevant to Intracranial Hemorrhage and Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Helen; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Chen, Yongmei; Su, Hua; Yang, GY; Young, William L.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM) cause intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), especially in young adults. Molecular characterization of lesional tissue provides evidence for involvement of both angiogenic and inflammatory pathways, but the pathogenesis remain obscure and medical therapy is lacking. Abnormal expression patterns have been observed for proteins related to angiogenesis (e.g., VEGF, Angiopoietin-2, MMP-9), and inflammation (e.g., IL-6 and MPO). Macrophage and neutrophil invasion has also been observed in the absence of prior ICH. Candidate gene association studies have identified a number of germline variants associated with clinical ICH course and AVM susceptibility. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in ALK-1 is associated with AVM susceptibility, and SNPs in IL-6, TNF-? and APOE are associated with AVM rupture. These observations suggest that even without a complete understanding of the determinants of AVM development, the recent discoveries of downstream derangements in vascular function and integrity may offer potential targets for therapy development. Further, biomarkers can now be established for assessing ICH risk. Finally, these data will generate hypotheses that can be tested mechanistically in model systems, including surrogate phenotypes, such as vascular dysplasia and/or models recapitulating the clinical syndrome of recurrent spontaneous ICH. PMID:19066109

  5. Congenital malformations and genetic diseases in comic books.

    PubMed

    Mégarbané, A; Adib, S M

    2003-01-01

    Medical syndromes have often been represented in fine arts, but rarely have clinical diagnoses been discussed in comic book characters. Since their first appearance in Europe in the middle of the 19th century and in America in 1895, comic books have been considered as "the 9th art". In many comic books, the appearance and/or the behavior of central or support characters are suggestive of already well-defined medical disorders. The representation of five particular groups or clinical features: mental retardation, abnormal stature, abnormal hair, obesity, and cranial malformations is discussed from mostly European comic series. Whether comic authors intended to describe specific clinical entities while drawing their characters or whether such situations appeared by mere luck, is open to debate. In many series from the first half of the 20th century characters with remarkable clinical features were also painted as psycho-social deviants. Such stereotypes are found much less frequently nowadays. Writers of comic books, realizing the major impact of their work especially in adolescent age groups, have increasingly been using their series to actually promote issues of equity and well being for physically or mentally impaired people. PMID:12725585

  6. Anesthetic Implications of an Obstetric Patient with Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galey, Jessica; Bharadwaj, Shobana; Crimmins, Sarah; Hong, Caron M; Malinow, Andrew M

    2016-03-15

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, a syndrome of multifocal venous malformations, has been reported rarely during pregnancy. This syndrome has been associated with airway lesions in some patients and neuraxial abnormalities in other patients. We report the anesthetic and obstetric management of a patient with an extensive distribution of both airway and neuraxial lesions. PMID:26579613

  7. Prevalence at birth of congenital malformations in communities near the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Hessol, N.A.; Gilbert, E.S.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of congenital malformations among births in Benton and Franklin counties, in southeastern Washington State, from 1968 through 1980. The Hanford Site is in this area and serves as a major employer. In addition, various agriculturally and chemically related activities are in the area. Hospital and vital records were used to identify 454 malformation cases among 23,319 births; this yielded a malformation rate of 19.6 per 1000 births, a rate similar to those reported in other studies. The rates of specific malformations ascertained during the first year of life were compared with combined rates from the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho from the Birth Defects Monitoring Program. Among defects that would be expected to be comparably ascertained, a statistically significant elevated rate of neural tube defects was observed (1.72 per 1000 births vs. 0.99 per 1000). Rates of cleft lip were significantly lower in Benton and Franklin counties than in the Birth Defects Monitoring Program (0.59 per 1,000 vs. 1.17 per 1000). For congenital heart defects, pyloric stenosis, and Down syndrome, which are often not diagnosed in the newborn period, Birth Defects Monitoring Program data did not offer appropriate comparisons. The rates of these defects did not appear to be elevated in relation to rates found in other relevant populations. When rates of neural tube defects were compared with those in populations other than the Birth Defects Monitoring Program, the Benton and Franklin county rates were still considered to be elevated. The increased bicounty rate cannot be explained by employment of the parents at Hanford or by the impact of plant emissions on the local population.

  8. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  9. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation. PMID:26578979

  10. Syndromes and disorders associated with omphalocele (III): single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects and others.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2007-06-01

    Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick-Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall-Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai-Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello-Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosismental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders. PMID:17638618

  11. Pediatric aneurysms and vein of Galen malformations

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. R. K.; Mathuriya, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are different from adult aneurysms – they are more rare, are giant and in the posterior circulation more frequently than in adults and may be associated with congenital disorders. Infectious and traumatic aneursyms are also seen more frequently. Vein of Galen malformations are even rarer entities. They may be of choroidal or mural type. Based on the degree of AV shunting they may present with failure to thrive, with hydrocephalus or in severe cases with heart failure. The only possible treatment is by endovascular techniques – both transarterial and transvenous routes are employed. Rarely transtorcular approach is needed. These cases should be managed by an experienced neurointerventionist. PMID:22069420

  12. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  13. Toward postnatal reversal of ocular congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Aniridia is a panocular disorder that severely affects vision in early life. Most cases are caused by dominantly inherited mutations or deletions of the PAX6 gene, which encodes a transcription factor that is essential for the development of the eye and the central nervous system. In this issue of the JCI, Gregory-Evans and colleagues demonstrate that early postnatal topical administration of an ataluren-based formulation reverses congenital malformations in the postnatal mouse eye, providing evidence that manipulation of PAX6 after birth may lead to corrective tissue remodeling. These findings offer hope that ataluren administration could be a therapeutic paradigm applicable to some major congenital eye defects. PMID:24355915

  14. Spinal arteriovenous malformation masquerating zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan; Yang, Jong Yeun

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  15. Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation Masquerating Zoster Sine Herpete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  16. Genetic and Developmental Basis of Cardiovascular Malformations.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Mohamad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) are the most common birth defect, occurring in 1% to 5% of all live births. Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors all influence the development of CVMs, and an improved understanding of the causation of CVMs is a prerequisite for prevention. Cardiac development is a complex, multistep process of morphogenesis that is under genetic regulation. Although the genetic contribution to CVMs is well recognized, the genetic causes of human CVMs are still identified infrequently. This article discusses the key genetic concepts characterizing human CVMs, their developmental basis, and the critical developmental and genetic concepts underlying their pathogenesis. PMID:26876120

  17. [Early stage of a cloverleaf skull malformation].

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Hori, A; Ulbrich, R; Rath, W

    1982-12-01

    Cloverleaf skull anomaly was diagnosed sonographically and in the fetogram, together with concomitant chondrodystrophy. This resulted in an indication for intentional abortion in the 29th week. Consequently, this rare form of skull monstrosity could be examined pathologico-anatomically for the first time in a very early stage of foetal development. Contrary to the widely held opinion that the reason for such hideous malformation is a hydrocephalus internus due to a deformation of the skull base, we found a practically negligible hydrocephalus, although the cloverleaf skull had already developed in a very marked manner. Hence, this case contradicts the generally adopted formal pathogenetic interpretation of cloverleaf skull monstrosity. PMID:7178767

  18. Lymphatic and other vascular malformative/overgrowth disorders are caused by somatic mutations in PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    Luks, Valerie L.; Kamitaki, Nolan; Vivero, Matthew P.; Uller, Wibke; Rab, Rashed; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Guevara, Carlos J.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Greene, Arin K.; Fishman, Steven J.; Kozakewich, Harry P.W.; Maclellan, Reid A.; Mulliken, John B.; Rahbar, Reza; Spencer, Samantha A.; Trenor, Cameron C.; Upton, Joseph; Zurakowski, David; Perkins, Jonathan A.; Kirsh, Andrew; Bennett, James T; Dobyns, William B; Kurek, Kyle C.; Warman, Matthew L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Murillo, Rudy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that somatic PIK3CA mutations would be found in patients with more common disorders including isolated lymphatic malformation (LM) and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS). Study design We used next generation sequencing, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and single molecule molecular inversion probes (smMIPs) to search for somatic PIK3CA mutations in affected tissue from patients seen at Boston Children’s Hospital who had an isolated LM (n=17), KTS (n=21), fibro-adipose vascular anomaly (FAVA; n=8), or congenital lipomatous overgrowth with vascular, epidermal, and skeletal anomalies syndrome (CLOVES; n = 33), the disorder for which we first identified somatic PIK3CA mutations. We also screened 5 of the more common PIK3CA mutations in a second cohort of patients with LM (n=31) from Seattle Children’s Hospital. Results Most individuals from Boston Children’s Hospital who had isolated LM (16/17) or LM as part of a syndrome, such as KTS (19/21), FAVA (4/8), and CLOVES (30/32) were somatic mosaic for PIK3CA mutations, with 5 specific PIK3CA mutations accounting for ~ 80% of cases. Seventy-four percent of patients with LM from Seattle Children’s Hospital also were somatic mosaic for 1 of 5 specific PIK3CA mutations. Many affected tissue specimens from both cohorts contained fewer than 10% mutant cells. Conclusions Somatic PIK3CA mutations are the most common cause of isolated lymphatic malformations and disorders in which lymphatic malformation is a component feature. Five PIK3CA mutations account for most cases. The search for causal mutations requires sampling of affected tissues and techniques that are capable of detecting low-level somatic mosaicism, because the abundance of mutant cells in a malformed tissue can be low. PMID:25681199

  19. Noonan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BHAMBHANI, VIKAS; MUENKE, MAXIMILIAN

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome–specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  20. Cleft Lip and Palate Associated with Other Malformations in a Neotropical Primate (Saimiri ustus)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Beatriz; Lopes, Claudia AA; Moura, Marina; Nogueira, Denise M; Gonçalves, Miguel AB; Fasano, Daniele M; Andrade, Marcia CR; Nascimento, Laine WF; Marinho, Antonio M

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) has been documented in several species of nonhuman primates, which in general are susceptible at similar doses and stages of gestation to the same teratogens as humans. Cleft lip can be unilateral or bilateral, isolated, syndromic, familial, or genetic. Here we report the first case of syndromic cleft lip and palate in a male bare-eared squirrel monkey (Saimiri ustus). Associated with the orofacial clefts, the monkey manifested absence of bones, malformation of vertebrae L3, only 4 fingers in each hand, and shortening of tendons leading to inflection of the hands and fingers. Previous reports describing cleft lip and palate in other squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in other breeding units have suggested consanguineous mating as a possible cause. Although the etiology in the case we present is unknown, we discuss factors associated with orofacial clefts in humans and various nonhuman primates. PMID:20587169

  1. Catel-Manzke palatodigital syndrome in a second trimester female foetus with nuchal oedema, costovertebral anomalies and radial ray defect.

    PubMed

    Petit, P; Moerman, P; Legius, E; Fryns, J P

    1994-01-01

    We present a female fetus with combination of Pierre Robin anomaly and nuchal oedema, bilateral radial defects, multiple hand malformations including bilateral hyperphalangy, brachymesophalangy, costovertebral abnormalities, and complex cardiac malformation. The present findings constitute a true MCA syndrome with uncertain pattern of inheritance. PMID:7888142

  2. Management of Femoral Shaft Fracture in Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogendra; Jha, Ranjib Kumar; Karn, Navin Kumar; Sah, Sanjaya Kumar; Mishra, Bibhuti Nath; Bhattarai, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare complex malformation characterized by the clinical triad of capillary malformations, soft tissue and bone hypertrophy, and venous/lymphatic malformation. Fractures of long bones in such cases are challenging to treat. A 12-year-old female with this syndrome presented with femoral shaft fracture of right thigh. She was initially kept on skeletal traction for two weeks and then she underwent closed reduction and immobilization with external fixator with uneventful intraoperative and postoperative period. Fracture united at four and half months. PMID:26885423

  3. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity. PMID:26757792

  4. Variations of some elements in cadmium-induced malformed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, S.

    1981-08-01

    Reports of malformation induced by cadmium such as the appearance of vertebral anomalies in carp have been described by the present author. In this paper, the appearance of such malformed fish by exposure to cadmium was confirmed in a repeat experiment. Decalcification of the fish was studied from spinal x-ray photographs and the results of some elements analysis.

  5. Phenotypic subregions within the split-hand/foot malformation 1 locus.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Malene B; Kreiborg, Sven; Jensen, Per; Bak, Mads; Mang, Yuan; Lodahl, Marianne; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Tommerup, Niels; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2016-03-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation 1 (SHFM1) is caused by chromosomal aberrations involving the region 7q21.3, DLX5 mutation, and dysregulation of DLX5/DLX6 expression by long-range position effects. SHFM1 can be isolated or syndromic with incomplete penetrance and a highly variable clinical expression, possibly influenced by sex and imprinting. We report on a new family with five affected individuals with syndromic SHFM1 that includes split-hand/foot malformations, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, and an inv(7)(q21.3q35) present both in the proband and her affected son. The proximal inversion breakpoint, identified by next generation mate-pair sequencing, truncates the SHFM1 locus within the regulatory region of DLX5/6 expression. Through genotype-phenotype correlations of 100 patients with molecularly characterized chromosomal aberrations from 32 SHFM1 families, our findings suggest three phenotypic subregions within the SHFM1 locus associated with (1) isolated SHFM, (2) SHFM and hearing loss, and (3) SHFM, hearing loss, and craniofacial anomalies, respectively (ranked for increasing proximity to DLX5/6), and encompassing previously reported tissue-specific enhancers for DLX5/6. This uniquely well-characterized cohort of SHFM1 patients allowed us to systematically analyze the recently suggested hypothesis of skewed transmission and to confirm a higher penetrance in males vs. females in a subgroup of patients with isolated SHFM. PMID:26839112

  6. Novel copy number variants and major limb reduction malformation: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Shamseldin, Hanan E; Anazi, Shams; Wakil, Salma M; Faqeih, Eissa; El Khashab, Heba Y; Salih, Mustafa A; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Hashem, Mais; Alsedairy, Haifa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    Limb reduction malformations are highly heterogeneous in their clinical presentation and so, predicting the underlying mutation on a clinical basis can be challenging. Molecular karyotyping is a powerful genomic tool that has quickly become the mainstay for the study of children with malformation syndromes. We describe three patients with major limb reduction anomalies in whom pathogenic copy number variants were identified on molecular karyotyping. These include a patient with hypoplastic phalanges and absent hallux bilaterally with de novo deletion of 11.9 Mb on 7p21.1-22.1 spanning 63 genes including RAC1, another patient with severe Holt-Oram syndrome and a large de novo deletion 2.2 Mb on 12q24.13-24.21 spanning 20 genes including TBX3 and TBX5, and a third patient with acheiropodia who had a nullizygous deletion of 102 kb on 7q36.3 spanning LMBR1. We discuss the potential of these novel genomic rearrangements to improve our understanding of limb development in humans. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26749485

  7. Syndromic Scoliosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Neurofibromatosis (NF) Noonan Syndrome VATER/VACTERL Syndrome Angelman Syndrome Rett Prader Willi Osteogenesis Imperfecta Trisomy 21 (Down's Syndrome) Symptoms Highly variable based on underlying syndrome and ...

  8. Eight patients with Williams syndrome and craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kimiko; Yamada, Junji; Takemoto, Osamu; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a well-known genetic syndrome caused by a microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23 encompassing the elastin gene. It is characterized by distinctive facies, congenital cardiovascular malformations, intellectual disabilities, and various other manifestations. Some patients were reported with craniosynostosis. Here, we report 8 WS cases diagnosed with craniosynostosis using three-dimensional cranial computed tomography. These findings suggest that craniosynostosis may occur more frequently in WS patients than expected. PMID:26002408

  9. Longevity and Patau syndrome: what determines survival?

    PubMed

    Peroos, Sherina; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pugh, Jennifer Harriet; Arthur-Farraj, Peter; Hodes, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The authors report of an 8-year-old girl with non-mosaic Patau syndrome. The median life expectancy of Patau syndrome is 7-10 days, and 90% die in the first year of life. Survival is often attributed to mosaicism and the severity of associated malformations. We delineate the developing phenotype and review the literature discussing potential contributory factors to longevity. PMID:23220825

  10. [Kidney anomalies in Ullrich-Turner-syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aguigha, G; Buchinger, G; Gekle, D

    1976-03-01

    Intravenous urography was performed in fourteen children with Ullrich-Turners syndrome. Renal abnormalities have been noted in twelve cases (85,7%). The most frequent kidney anomalies were malrotations (28,5%), horseshoe kidneys (21,4%) and double kidneys (21,4%). Malformations of kidney are thus a very frequent feature in Ullrich-Turners syndrome. It is therefore recommendable to perform in any case of Ullrich-Turners syndrome an intravenous urography, since these abnormalities are clinically latent. PMID:944347

  11. PHACE syndrome and congenitally absent thyroid gland at MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Mark D; Yu, John-Paul J; Asch, Sarah; Mathes, Erin F

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and abnormalities of the eye. Thyroid disorders associated with PHACE syndrome have been described, although there are limited reports of this rare occurrence. We report a case of PHACE syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism in an infant, for which absent thyroid gland was diagnosed at magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26995578

  12. Extensive comedonal and cystic acne in Patau syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio; Fernandez-Crehuet, Pablo; Del Prado, Elena; Martes, Pilar; Hernández-Martín, Angela; De Diego, Verónica; Carapeto, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Patau syndrome is a chromosomal disorder associated with multiple malformations caused by inheritance of an extra chromosome (trisomy 13). Some skin defects have been reported in patients with Patau syndrome, such as scalp defects, glabellar stains, deep palmar creases, rocker-bottom feet, convex soles, hyperconvextity of the nails, and multiple hemangiomas. To our knowledge, widespread comedonal and cystic acne have not been previously reported in Patau syndrome. PMID:20537076

  13. Birth malformations in Babylon and Assyria.

    PubMed

    Pangas, J C

    2000-04-10

    In this paper, we intend to study the oldest systematic descriptions of birth malformations in the history of medicine, as they appear in cuneiform texts written four millennia ago in the land between the two rivers, Mesopotamia, the cradle of civilization, the land of Assyro-Babylonian culture. The core of our work will be an omen text, which was published in 1970 and, since then, has remained confined to the field of Assyriological studies; thus, the history of medicine and disease have not taken advantage of its knowledge. This text is known in Assyriology by its Akkadian name: "shumma izbu" (Izbu), "if an anomaly" [Leichty, 1970: The Omen series shumma izbu, Texts from Cuneiform Sources IV]. PMID:10766990

  14. Coil embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J E; Whyte, M K; Allison, D J; Hughes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Sixteen patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) have been treated by percutaneous transvenous coil embolization. In the ten patients who have had all their angiographically demonstrable PAVM's embolised there has been a reduction of right to left shunting from a mean of 28.1% to 13% and an improvement in mean arterial oxygen saturation from 87.4% to 92.4%. Eight of these ten patients now have oxygen saturations of more than 90%. All patients have shown symptomatic improvement. There have been three complications relating to the embolizations, none of which has been serious. Coil embolization of PAVM's is an effective, safe and well tolerated procedure. Embolization should be performed in all cases of PAVM's to prevent paradoxical embolization. PMID:2209021

  15. Multimodality imaging of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Wendy; Maximin, Suresh; Shriki, Jabi E; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation of the pancreas (PAVM) is a very rare entity, although it may be increasingly diagnosed with the expanding use of cross-sectional imaging of the abdomen. PAVM is characterized by a network of tangled vasculature within and surrounding all or part of the pancreas, resulting in the shunting of the arteries of the pancreas directly into the portal venous system. Here, we present a patient with chronic abdominal pain and pancreatitis found to have PAVM, based on the findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and angiography. Differential considerations are discussed. Although PAVM is uncommon, it should be considered in the differential of patients with recurrent abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25262988

  16. Computational analyses of arteriovenous malformations in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Boukadoum, Mounir; Lahmiri, Salim; Cusimano, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been investigated for the analysis of the physiopathology and morphology of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in recent years. Special emphasis has been given to image fusion in multimodal imaging and 3-dimensional rendering of the AVM, with the aim to improve the visualization of the lesion (for diagnostic purposes) and the selection of the nidus (for therapeutic aims, like the selection of the region of interest for the gamma knife radiosurgery plan). Searching for new diagnostic and prognostic neuroimaging biomarkers, fractal-based computational models have been proposed for describing and quantifying the angioarchitecture of the nidus. Computational modeling in the AVM field offers promising tools of analysis and requires a strict collaboration among neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, clinicians, computer scientists, and engineers. We present here some updated state-of-the-art exemplary cases in the field, focusing on recent neuroimaging computational modeling with clinical relevance, which might offer useful clinical tools for the management of AVMs in the future. PMID:25521662

  17. [Rhythm disorders and cardiac crypto-malformations].

    PubMed

    Davy, J M; Raczka, F; Cung, T T; Combes, N; Bortone, A; Gaty, D

    2005-12-01

    Faced with a cardiac arrhythmia occuring in an apparently healthy heart, it is necessary to perform an anatomical investigation to detect any unsuspected anomalies. Congenital cardiopathy must certainly be excluded, as this is often responsible for rhythm disorders and/or cardiac conduction defects. Similarly, any acquired conditions, cardiomyopathy, or cardiac tumour must be sought. However, the possibility should always be considered of a minimal congenital malformation, which could be repsonsible for: any type of cardiac arrhythmia: rhythm disorder or conduction defect at the atrial, junctional or ventricular level, with a benign or serious prognosis. Unexpected therapeutic difficulties during radiofrequency ablation procedures or at implantation of pacemakers or defibrillators. Together with rhythm studies, the investigation of choice is high quality imaging, either the classic left or right angiography or the more modern cardiac CT or intracardiac mapping. PMID:16433240

  18. [Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung or congenital pulmonary airway malformation].

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vítor; Carvalho, Lina

    2003-01-01

    The cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is an hamartomatous lesion, easily identifiable by its morphology through the application of Stocker's et al (1977) classification (type 1, 2 and 3) and also following the criteria of Yousem, to understand the five types dependent on the level of malformation in the airway and lung. The three morphological types described by Stocker were identified in 6 cases of the archive of the Department of Pathology of Coimbra's University Hospital, studied morphologically by the use of Movat's pentachromic stain and the application of the antibody anti-CK7 and anti-body anti-TTF1. In the three morphological types the elastic alveolar net is absent. The CK7 identifies the epithelial distribution and is useful to evaluate the extension of the inflammatory lesion. The antibody anti-TTF1, apparently absent in type 3 cases, is easily identified in type 1 and 2 cases and overexpressed in inflammatory areas. It seems that the absence of cells identified by the antibody anti-TTF1 prevents overdiagnosing of type 4 in Yousem's classification of congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM). PMID:14685634

  19. [Mohr's syndrome : type II orofaciodigital syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ajacques, J C

    1981-01-01

    Mohr's syndrome consists of an association of three types of malformation : oral, facial, and digital. It is very similar, therefore, to the syndrome of Papillon-Léage and Psaume. Apart from this, precise, constant characteristics can be recognized which identify it as a separate entity. Firstly, the genetic mode of transmission differs. Secondly, clinical signs are dominated by the frequency and severity of the distal lesions, such that bilateral syndactyly of the big toe is a key element in the differential diagnosis. PMID:6269173

  20. Temporary umbilical loop colostomy for anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshinori; Takada, Kohei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Sato, Masahito; Kwon, A-Hon

    2012-11-01

    Transumbilical surgical procedures have been reported to be a feasible, safe, and cosmetically excellent procedure for various pediatric surgical diseases. Umbilical loop colostomies have previously been created in patients with Hirschsprung's disease, but not in patients with anorectal malformations (ARMs). We assessed the feasibility and cosmetic results of temporal umbilical loop colostomy (TULC) in patients with ARMs. A circumferential skin incision was made at the base of the umbilical cord under general anesthesia. The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia were cored out vertically, and the umbilical vessels and urachal remnant were individually ligated apart from the opening in the fascia. A loop colostomy was created in double-barreled fashion with a high chimney more than 2 cm above the level of the skin. The final size of the opening in the skin and fascia was modified according to the size of the bowel. The bowel wall was fixed separately to the peritoneum and fascia with interrupted 5-0 absorbable sutures. The bowel was opened longitudinally and everted without suturing to the skin. The loop was divided 7 days postoperatively, and diversion of the oral bowel was completed. The colostomy was closed 2-3 months after posterior saggital anorectoplasty through a peristomal skin incision followed by end-to-end anastomosis. Final wound closure was performed in a semi-opened fashion to create a deep umbilicus. TULCs were successfully created in seven infants with rectourethral bulbar fistula or rectovestibular fistula. Postoperative complications included mucosal prolapse in one case. No wound infection or spontaneous umbilical ring narrowing was observed. Skin problems were minimal, and stoma care could easily be performed by attaching stoma bag. Healing of umbilical wounds after TULC closure was excellent. The umbilicus may be an alternative stoma site for temporary loop colostomy in infants with intermediate-type anorectal malformations, who undergo radical anorectoplasty via a non-abdominal approach. PMID:23001137

  1. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Barwad, Parag; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Gupta, Saurabh K; Juneja, Rajnish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Jagia, Priya; Sharma, Sanjiv

    2013-01-01

    Background: Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs) are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs). Aims: To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods: All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. Results: A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33%) were AVP type I and 23 (59%) were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (n = 7), aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7), closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5), systemic AVM (n = 5), coronary AVM (n = 4), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (n = 3), pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3), and venovenous collaterals (n = 2). Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 – 7F Judkin's right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. Conclusions: AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow. PMID:24688229

  2. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended. PMID:24407715

  3. Maternal Hypothyroidism in Early Pregnancy and Infant Structural Congenital Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Norstedt Wikner, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Background. The question is debated on whether maternal hypothyroidism or use of thyroxin in early pregnancy affects the risk for infant congenital malformations. Objectives. To expand the previously published study on maternal thyroxin use in early pregnancy and the risk for congenital malformations. Methods. Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register were used for the years 1996–2011 and infant malformations were identified from national health registers. Women with preexisting diabetes or reporting the use of thyreostatics, anticonvulsants, or antihypertensives were excluded from analysis. Risk estimates were made as odds ratios (ORs) or risk ratios (RRs) after adjustment for year of delivery, maternal age, parity, smoking, and body mass index. Results. Among 23 259 infants whose mothers in early pregnancy used thyroxin, 730 had a major malformation; among all 1 567 736 infants, 48012 had such malformations. The adjusted OR was 1.06 (95% CI 0.98–1.14). For anal atresia the RR was 1.85 (95% CI 1.00–1.85) and for choanal atresia 3.14 (95% CI 1.26–6.47). The risk of some other malformations was also increased but statistical significance was not reached. Conclusions. Treated maternal hypothyroidism may be a weak risk factor for infant congenital malformations but an association with a few rare conditions is possible. PMID:24744955

  4. Cleft palate in Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Domenico, Scopelliti; Orlando, Cipriani; Graziana, Fatone Flavia Maria; Papi, Piero; Giulia, Amodeo

    2013-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genomic neurodevelopmental disorder, estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 persons. It is caused by a deletion of the “elastin” gene on chromosome 7q11.23 and was described officially in 1961 by Williams, Barrat-Boyes, and Lowe. Cleft palate is not considered in the medical literature as a part of the multisystem disorders of the Williams syndrome but it was yet described. We present our experience of a patient who presents cleft palate among other congenital malformations. PMID:23662266

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of Robinow syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Simon; Peraza, Efren; Barraza, Astrid; Zapata, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Robinow syndrome, also known as fetal face syndrome, is a rare genetically heterogeneous condition characterized mainly by mesomelic limb shortening, facial malformations, and genital abnormalities. This report describes the sonographic findings in a case of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome diagnosed at 23.1 weeks' gestation, in a patient with no history of affected relatives. Here we describe the sonographic characteristics of this syndrome from the diagnosis until birth. The prenatal and postnatal findings, the differential diagnosis, and the prognosis of patients with this syndrome are discussed. 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound, 42:297-300, 2014. PMID:24151023

  6. Megalocornea and mental retardation syndrome: clinical and instrumental follow-up of a case.

    PubMed

    Margari, Lucia; Presicci, Anna; Ventura, Patrizia; Buttiglione, Maura; Dicuonzo, Franca; Lattarulo, Caterina; Perniola, Tommaso

    2006-10-01

    Megalocornea-mental retardation syndrome, otherwise known as Neuhauser syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Only 36 cases have been reported in the literature. We describe the clinical and instrumental follow-up, lasting 5 years, of a case showing the typical features of the syndrome, associated with transient hypothyroidism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy with choreoathetotic movements, and brain malformation. Our report might help better delineate the phenotype and natural history of the syndrome. PMID:17005108

  7. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Usher syndrome Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause Inheritance ... pigmentosa syndrome Dystrophia retinae pigmentosa-dysostosis syndrome Graefe-Usher syndrome Hallgren syndrome Usher's syndrome Related Diseases Usher ...

  8. Prenatal Diagnosis of Unusual Fetal Pial Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Auyeung, K.M.; Laughlin, S.; TerBrugge, K.G.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (C-AVMs) are rarely diagnosed in utero. Most prenatal imaging of intracranial vascular malformations relates to Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (VGAMs) or Dural Arteriovenous Malformations (D-AVMs). We report a case of a fetal pial AVF with multiple fistulae and venous pouches, which appeared as an anechoic lesion on the prenatal ultrasound scan. The patient was asymptomatic with normal postnatal growth. No haemodynmaic disturbance was evident. Postnatal Computed tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and catheter Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) confirmed the presence of a pial AVF. The angiographic findings and family history of nose bleeds suggests the diagnosis of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. The largest AVF was embolized with tissue adhesive; the residual AVF subsequently removed by surgical excision. PMID:20591266

  9. Management strategy after diagnosis of Abernethy malformation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Abernethy malformation is a rare anomaly with a widely variable clinical presentation. Many diagnostic dilemmas have been reported. Nowadays, with the evolution of medical imaging, diagnosis can be made more easily, but management of patients with an Abernethy malformation is still open for discussion. Case presentation In this case study, we describe a 34-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a large hepatocellular carcinoma in the presence of an Abernethy malformation, which was complicated by the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Conclusion This case underlines the importance of regular examination of patients with an Abernethy malformation, even in older patients, to prevent complications and to detect liver lesions at an early stage. PMID:22742057

  10. The Chiari malformations: a review with emphasis on anatomical traits.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Loukas, Marios; Hogan, Elizabeth; Kralovic, Sara; Tubbs, R Shane; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-03-01

    Hindbrain herniations come in many forms and have been further subdivided as their original descriptions. For cerebellar tonsillar ectopia, they can be divided into two categories, acquired and congenital. Acquired hindbrain herniations are due to increased intracranial pressure caused by certain conditions such as trauma or brain tumor. Although the mechanism for their formation is not clear, congenital hindbrain herniation makes up the majority of these congenital malformations. Furthermore, these malformations are often found to harbor additional anatomical derailments in addition to the hindbrain herniation whether it be the cerebellar tonsils (Chiari I malformation) or the cerebellar vermis (Chiari II malformation). This article reviews these forms of cerebellar ectopia and describes the details of their anomalous anatomy. Moreover, this article compares and contrasts the differing embryological theories found in this literature. PMID:25065525

  11. Mesenteric lymphatic malformation associated with acute appendicitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Mesenteric lymphatic malformations are rare, benign tumors that are most commonly found in children. The presentation of these tumors is variable and may either be innocuous or life threatening. It has been suggested that mesenteric lymphatic malformations are congenital; however, there is evidence that their growth may be stimulated by local trauma. Case presentation We describe the first case of a mesenteric lymphatic malformation associated with acute appendicitis in a 13-year-old Caucasian boy. The patient is well six months after surgical excision of the tumor. Conclusion The reader should be aware that growth and/or development of mesenteric lymphatic malformations may be associated with trauma and other pro-inflammatory processes. PMID:19918284

  12. Current concepts of the etiology of central nervous system malformations.

    PubMed

    Melnick, M

    1979-01-01

    We have seen that what must be applied to dysmorphology is the doctrine of multifactorial causality, ie dysmorphogenetic events have both genetic and nongenetic etiologic components to varying degrees. Complicating matters is the extent to which there is etiologic and/or mechanistic heterogeneity (Fig. 1). This is nicely illustrated by the holoprosencephaly anomaly. In addition, there are numerous CNS malformations that have major single gene, chromosomal, or environmental initiating agents of malformation mechanisms. Still a mystery is the common neural tube malformations. It is now clear that the "multifactorial/threshold" model is an inadequate explanation of the observed data and until the etiologic heterogeneity of these malformations is clearly defined, our knowledge remains primarily empiric. A potential area of fruitful investigation is likely to be the identification of maternal genotypes which do not allow detoxification of potential environmental teratogens. PMID:380680

  13. [Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cobos Barroso, N; Boix Ochoa, J; Corominas Casaramona, J M; Liñán Cortés, S; Lucaya Layret, J; Torán Fuentes, N

    1979-01-01

    Four cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation are presented. The age of the patients ranged from 1 day to 7 years. All cases were treated surgically and 3 of them survived. The only death in the group corresponded to the neonatal case. The clinical, radiological and patological features of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation are also reviewed. Occasionally the clinical manifestations will be hardly noticeable or non existent and the malformation may be diagnosed beyond the neonatal period in the course of a radiological examination performed as routine or because of repeated respiratory infections. Surgery is the treatment of choice. In the group of neonates where the cystic adenomatoid malformation doesn't cause respiratory difficulty the authors feel that it might be advisable to postpone surgery until a later date. PMID:484942

  14. Array-CGH analysis in patients with intellectual disability and/or congenital malformations in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vianna, G S; Medeiros, P F V; Alves, A F; Silva, T O; Jehee, F S

    2016-01-01

    In several patients, intellectual disability and/or congenital malformation may be attributed to chromosomal changes. In this study, we conducted an array-CGH test of 200 patients from the Northeast of Brazil with intellectual disability and/or congenital malformation. Blood samples were collected from the proband and from their parents when possible. DNA was extracted and investigated using the array-CGH test. Findings were evaluated for the pathogenicity in databases of benign and pathogenic changes (ISCA, UCSC, DGV, and DECIPHER). Forty-seven copy number variations (CNVs) were identified in 43/200 (21.5%) patients, including 25/98 (25.5%) in males and 22/102 (21.57%) in females. We considered 33 of these to be clinically significant, reaching a diagnosis rate of 16.5%. The sizes of the CNVs varied from 102 kb to 24 Mb in deletions and from 115 kb to 140 Mb in duplications. In 10/47 (21.3%) patients, the rearrangement involved a sex chromosome. Thirty-nine patients had one chromosomal aberration, while 2 concomitant abnormalities were detected in 4 patients. Ten of 47 CNVs (21.3%) were > 5Mb in size. Fifteen patients had CNVs related to known syndromes. This research highlights the contribution of submicroscopic chromosomal changes to the etiology of intellectual disability and/or congenital malformation, particularly the implication of chromosomal abnormalities detected using an array-CGH test, with a high rate of 16.5%. Thus, our results support the use of array-CGH replacing standard karyotype as the first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test for patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or intellectual disability. PMID:26909975

  15. Kousseff syndrome: A fifth case?

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, R.A.; Hamilton, W.; Pinette, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kousseff originally described three siblings with an open sacral myelomeningocele, conotruncal cardiac malformations, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, retrognathia, a short neck with a low posterior hairline, and renal agenesis as a new autosomal recessive condition. Open neural tube lesions and complex conotruncal cardiac defects are relatively common malformations, both as isolated defects and individually as components of syndromes, but they have been found together only rarely, as part of chromosomal syndromes or following maternal exposures. Toriello et al. reported a fourth case and suggested the eponym Kousseff syndrome for myelomeningcocele, conotruncal defects and minor facial abnormalies. We report a fifth probable case. This male infant was born by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 38 weeks gestation to a 23-year-old G{sub 2}P{sub 1001} mother. Pregnancy was complicated by an elevated alpha-fetoprotein at 16 weeks gestation, followed by an ultrasound diagnosis of an open disease. After birth, physical examination also revealed dysmorphic facies, with a bulbous nose and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly and hypotonia. Echocardiogram demonstrated complex conotruncal malformations. The patient underwent closure of the myelomeningocele but died at one month of age. Chromosomal analysis was normal (46,XY). Because conotruncal heart defects have been associated with deletions on chromosome 22, FISH analysis using a probe for the DiGeorge syndrome on the long arm of chromosome 22 was performed. It indicated no detectable deletion within this critical region on 22q11. Nonetheless there remains the possibility of a gene (or genes) located on 22q that could produce findings of this rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome when disrupted. Therefore, further investigation on this chromosome is warranted.

  16. Oral encapsulated vascular malformation: An undescribed presentation in the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Márcio-Américo; Dias, Pedro-de Souza; Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2016-01-01

    Vascular lesions have been classified in two broad categories, hemangiomas and malformations. Encapsulated vascular lesions have not been reported in the oral cavity, but they were described in other sites, mainly in the orbit. Herein, we present a case of an oral encapsulated vascular lesion located in the right buccal mucosa of a 69-year-old male, including histological and immunohistochemical description and a literature review. Key words:Buccal mucosa, hemangioma, vascular malformation, oral cavity. PMID:26855712

  17. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  18. [Anorectal and external genitalia malformation associated with perineal hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Peláez Mata, D J; García Crespo, J M; Fernández Toral, J

    2001-10-01

    We describe a girl with anorectal and genitourinary malformation with perineal hemangioma. Posterior sagittal anorectoplasty was performed at 21 months of age with good functional results. The hemangioma required no treatment and involuted spontaneously when the patient was 6 years old. Although anorectal malformations are frequently associated with multiple congenital anomalies, the association described herein is uncommon and we found only three similar cases reported in the medical literature. PMID:11578543

  19. 576 kb deletion in 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI is associated with limb malformation, congenital heart disease and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-Fu; Yang, Yi-Feng; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-10

    1p36 deletion (monosomy 1p36) is one of the most common terminal deletions observed in humans, characterized by special facial features, mental retardation, heart defects, development delay and epilepsy. Previously, we reported molecular findings in patients with limb, congenital heart disease (CHD) and other malformations with SNP-array. In a syndromic patient of the same cohort, we detected a small deletion of 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI (Sloan-Kettering Institute protooncoprotein). Recently, dominant mutations in SKI were identified to be correlated with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. Retrospective examination revealed this patient with limb malformations, CHD, epilepsy and mild development delay. Together with previous reports, our study suggests that the 1p36.33-1p36.32 deletion encompassing SKI may represents a previous undescribed microdeletion disorder. PMID:23892090

  20. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  1. Proteus syndrome: evaluation of the immunological profile.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Cutrupi, Maricia; Baronio, Manuela; Moratto, Daniele; Pizzino, M R; Mankad, Kshitij; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Plebani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare and complex disease characterized by malformations and overgrowth of different tissues. Prognosis of affected patients may be complicated by premature death, mostly due to pulmonary embolism and respiratory failure. To date, immunological data in Proteus syndrome are scarse.We report on the novel immunologic findings of a 15 years old girl affected with PS. Detailed T and B cell evaluation revealed maturational alterations for both subsets and functional hyperactivation for the latter. Such findings have not been reported previously in PS and may be the spy of more complex immune abnormalities in this syndrome. PMID:26758562

  2. Lissencephaly and mongolian spots in Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panteliadis, Christos P; Karatza, Eliza D; Tzitiridou, Maria K; Koliouskas, Dimitrios E; Spiroglou, Kleomenis S

    2003-07-01

    Hurler disease or syndrome is a disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism, inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. We describe a case of a 15-month-old female exhibiting with clinical and laboratory characteristics of the syndrome, central nervous system lesions (lissencephaly, excessive ventricular enlargement and Dandy Walker malformation with vermis atrophy, cerebellar cyst) and mongolian spots in the trunk and extremities. The combination of mongolian spots and severe central nervous system lesions in Hurler syndrome is considered a rare clinical occurrence, while the association with lissencephaly has never been reported. PMID:13679124

  3. Fryns syndrome phenotype and trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Ladonne, J.M.; Gaillard, D.; Carre-Pigeon, F.; Gabriel, R.

    1996-01-02

    Trisomy 22 was detected in a 32-week-old fetus born to an overweight mother with hypertension. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was associated with phenotypic manifestations of Fryns Syndrome: Diaphragmatic hernia, facial defects, and nail hypoplasia with short distal fifth phalanges. This is the second report of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in trisomy 22. This case demonstrates the importance of karyotyping malformed fetuses or newborns, even if a nonchromosome syndrome seems identifiable on clinical grounds. To date, at least 10 cases of Fryns syndrome have been reported without chromosome analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Congenital brain abnormalities: an update on malformations of cortical development and infratentorial malformations.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2014-07-01

    In the past two decades, significant progress in neuroimaging and genetic techniques has allowed for advances in the correct definition/classification of congenital brain abnormalities, which have resulted in a better understanding of their pathogenesis. In addition, new groups of diseases, such as axonal guidance disorders or tubulinopathies, are increasingly reported. Well-defined neuroimaging diagnostic criteria have been suggested for the majority of congenital brain abnormalities. Accurate diagnoses of these complex abnormalities, including distinction between malformations and disruptions, are of paramount significance for management, prognosis, and family counseling. In the next decade, these advances will hopefully be translated into deeper understanding of these disorders and more specific treatments. PMID:25192502

  5. Implications of an Incidental Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Van K.; Shah, Nirav G.; Verceles, Avelino C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have been associated with life-threatening complications, such as stroke and massive hemoptysis, thus posing significant morbidity if left untreated. We report a case of an incidental finding of a PAVM in a trauma patient newly recognized to have suspected hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case Description. A 34-year-old man with a history of recurrent epistaxis presented with a sudden fall associated with seizure-like activity. Trauma imaging showed a large subdural hematoma and, incidentally, a serpiginous focus within the right upper lobe with a prominent feeding artery consistent with a PAVM. The patient was diagnosed with a simple PAVM related to possible or suspected HHT, an autosomal dominant trait with age-related penetrance. He underwent a pulmonary arteriography of the right upper and lower lobe with the use of a microcatheter system; however, the PAVM could not be visualized. Thus, he was managed medically. The patient was educated on the need for prophylactic antibiotics prior to dental procedures and surveillance imaging. Discussion. Our case highlights the importance of obtaining a complete past medical and family history in young patients with a history of recurrent epistaxis to elicit features of HHT. The diagnosis can be made clinically and directly affects family members, who would otherwise not receive appropriate screening. PMID:27027094

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-07-28

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  7. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  8. The management of asymptomatic congenital lung malformations.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Laberge JM; Bratu I; Flageole H

    2004-01-01

    Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation (CPAM) and lung sequestration are often discovered on routine prenatal sonography. While some lesions may be large and cause serious complications in the fetus or newborn, many will be asymptomatic at birth. Some authors advocate simple observation because of the lack of data on the incidence of long-term complications. However, there are very few described cases where CPAM and intralobar sequestration (ILS) have remained asymptomatic throughout life; complications eventually develop in virtually all patients. The most common complication is pneumonia, which may respond poorly to medical treatment. Other complications include the development of malignancies (carcinomas and pleuropulmonary blastomas), pneumothorax and hemoptysis or hemothorax. Since lung resection will be required sooner or later for CPAM and ILS, it is best not to wait for complications to occur. We recommend surgery at 3 to 6 months of life at the latest, to allow compensatory lung growth to occur. At this age the postoperative course is usually smooth and long-term follow- up has shown normal respiratory function. The management of small non- communicating extralobar sequestrations is more controversial; it is known that these can remain asymptomatic throughout life but complications may develop and they are sometimes difficult to differentiate from neuroblastoma.

  9. The management of asymptomatic congenital lung malformations.

    PubMed

    Laberge, Jean-Martin; Bratu, Ioana; Flageole, Hélène

    2004-01-01

    Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation (CPAM) and lung sequestration are often discovered on routine prenatal sonography. While some lesions may be large and cause serious complications in the fetus or newborn, many will be asymptomatic at birth. Some authors advocate simple observation because of the lack of data on the incidence of long-term complications. However, there are very few described cases where CPAM and intralobar sequestration (ILS) have remained asymptomatic throughout life; complications eventually develop in virtually all patients. The most common complication is pneumonia, which may respond poorly to medical treatment. Other complications include the development of malignancies (carcinomas and pleuropulmonary blastomas), pneumothorax and hemoptysis or hemothorax. Since lung resection will be required sooner or later for CPAM and ILS, it is best not to wait for complications to occur. We recommend surgery at 3 to 6 months of life at the latest, to allow compensatory lung growth to occur. At this age the postoperative course is usually smooth and long-term follow- up has shown normal respiratory function. The management of small non- communicating extralobar sequestrations is more controversial; it is known that these can remain asymptomatic throughout life but complications may develop and they are sometimes difficult to differentiate from neuroblastoma. PMID:14980288

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  11. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe. PMID:26636249

  12. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Livia; Mainardi, Paola Cerruti

    2007-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin), moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1). To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require precocious clinical investigation with intervention of several specialists (including neonatologists and pediatricians). Psychomotor development is delayed in all patients, therefore rehabilitation (physical therapy, psychomotor and speech therapy) should be started as soon as possible. PMID:17958891

  13. Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, Livia; Mainardi, Paola Cerruti

    2007-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin), moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1). To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require precocious clinical investigation with intervention of several specialists (including neonatologists and pediatricians). Psychomotor development is delayed in all patients, therefore rehabilitation (physical therapy, psychomotor and speech therapy) should be started as soon as possible. PMID:17958891

  14. Compound heterozygous PKHD1 variants cause a wide spectrum of ductal plate malformations.

    PubMed

    Courcet, Jean-Benoît; Minello, Anne; Prieur, Fabienne; Morisse, Laurent; Phelip, Jean-Marc; Beurdeley, Alain; Meynard, Daniel; Massenet, Denis; Lacassin, Flore; Duffourd, Yannis; Gigot, Nadège; St-Onge, Judith; Hillon, Patrick; Vanlemmens, Claire; Mousson, Christiane; Cerceuil, Jean-Pierre; Guiu, Boris; Thevenon, Julien; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Michel-Calemard, Laurence; Faivre, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    Ductal plate malformations (DPM) present with a wide phenotypic spectrum comprising Von Meyenburg complexes (VMC), Caroli disease (CD), Caroli syndrome (CS), and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). Variants in PKHD1 are responsible for ARPKD and CS with a high inter- and intra-familial phenotypic variability. Rare familial cases of CD had been reported and exceptional cases of CD are associated with PKHD1 variants. In a family of three siblings presenting with a wide spectrum of severity of DPM, we performed whole exome sequencing and identified two PKHD1 compound heterozygous variants (c.10444G>A; p.Arg3482Cys and c.5521C>T; p.Glu1841Lys), segregating with the symptoms. Two compound heterozygous PKHD1 variants, including one hypomorphic variant, were identified in two other familial cases of DPM with at least one patient presenting with CD. This report widens the phenotypic variability of PKHD1 variants to VMC, and others hepatic bile ducts malformations with inconstant renal phenotype in adults and highlights the important intra-familial phenotypic variability. It also showed that PKHD1 might be a major gene for CD. This work adds an example of the contribution of exome sequencing, not only in the discovery of new genes but also in expanding the phenotypic spectrum of well-known disease-associated genes, using reverse phenotyping. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26385851

  15. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Cerebellopontine Angle Arteriovenous Malformation Treated With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yilmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakin, Akin; Kiliç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a facial pain syndrome characterized as sudden onset and lightening-like sensation over somatosensorial branch(es) of fifth cranial nerve. Rarely, some underlying diseases or disorders could be diagnosed, such as multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and vascular malformations. The authors present a 47-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia over left V2 and V3 dermatomes. He had a previous transarterial embolization and long use of carbamazepine with partial response to treatment. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was planned. A marginal dose of 15 Gy was given to 50% isodose line. His pain was relieved by GKR in 1.5 years. Treatment of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations causing trigeminal neuralgia, with GKR has a very limited use in the literature. It, however, is obvious that success rate as pain relief, in a very challenging field of functional neurosurgery, is satisfactory. Large series, however, are in need to make a more comprehensive statement about efficacy and safety of the procedure in these pathologies. PMID:26674920

  16. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. PMID:26564078

  17. [Biliary atresia and polysplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Yosra; Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayet; Belghith, Mohsen; Lassad, Sahnoun; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare malformation characterized by the association of multiple rates and other congenital anomalies dominated by cardiac, vascular, intestinal and bile malformations. We report the observation of a patient operated in the neonatal period (3 days) for an upper intestinal obstruction with situs inversus. Surgical exploration noted the presence of multiple rates, a preduodenal vein, a biliary atresia and a duodenal atresia. The surgical procedures performed were a latero-lateral duodeno-duodenostomy and hepatoportoenterostomy of KASAI with simple immediate and delayed outcomes. The follow up was of 23 years. We recall the epidemiological characteristics of this malformative association and we discuss the role played by the prognosis of polysplenia syndrome in the evolution of biliary atresia. The diagnosis and treatment of biliary atresia are always urgent to increase the chances of success of the Kasai, and the chances of prolonged survival with native liver. However, almost all long-term survivors (even anicteric) have biliary cirrhosis, which requires lifelong follow up. PMID:26815511

  18. A NEW OBSERVATION OF 13q DELETION SYNDROME: SEVERE UNDESCRIBED FEATURES.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rodriguez, E; Garcia-Garcia, E; Perez-Sanchez, A; Pavon-Delgado, A

    2015-01-01

    A new observation of 13q deletion syndrome: severe undescribed features: 13q deletion syndrome is characterized by a wide phenotypic spectrum resulting from a partial deletion-of the long arm of chromosome 13. It consists predominantly of mental and motor retardation, craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, and several congenital malformations. We present a new case with 13q deletion syndrome phenotypically characterized by severe major malformations, some of them still undescribed, consisting of left diaphragmatic hernia, right pulmonary sequestration, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pancreatic agenesis, polysplenia, and catastrophic central nervous system malformations: semilobar holoprosencephaly, occipital myelomeningocele, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum and agenesis of olfactory bulbs. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique using the probe LSI D13S319 (13q1l4) SO/ LSI 13q34 SG determined partial monosomy of chromosome 13 in 39/100 cells (mosaicism). PMID:26349191

  19. Surgical Strategies for Acutely Ruptured Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jaime L; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are focal neurovascular lesions consisting of abnormal fistulous connections between the arterial and venous systems with no interposed capillaries. This arrangement creates a high-flow circulatory shunt with hemorrhagic risk and hemodynamic abnormalities. While most AVMs are asymptomatic, they may cause severe neurological complications and death. Each AVM carries an annual rupture risk of 2-4%. Intracranial hemorrhage due to AVM rupture is the most common initial manifestation (up to 70% of presentations), and it carries significant morbidity and mortality. This complication is particularly important in the young and otherwise healthy population, in whom AVMs cause up to one-third of all hemorrhagic strokes. A previous rupture is the single most important independent predictor of future hemorrhage. Current treatment modalities for AVM are microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and radiosurgery. In acutely ruptured AVMs, early microsurgical excision is usually avoided. The standard is to wait at least 4 weeks to allow for patient recovery, hematoma liquefaction, and inflammatory reactions to subside. Exceptions to this rule are small, superficial, low-grade AVMs with elucidated angioarchitecture, for which early simultaneous hematoma evacuation and AVM excision is feasible. Emergent hematoma evacuation with delayed AVM excision (unless, as mentioned, the AVM is low grade) is recommended in patients with a decreased level of consciousness due to intracranial hemorrhage, posterior fossa or temporal lobe hematoma of >30 ml, or hemispheric hematoma of >60 ml. The applicability of endovascular techniques for acutely ruptured AVMs is not clear, but feasible options, until a definitive treatment is determined, include occluding intranidal and distal flow-related aneurysms and 'sealing' any rupture site or focal angioarchitectural weakness when one can be clearly identified and safely accessed. Radiosurgery is not performed in acutely ruptured AVMs because its therapeutic effects occur in a delayed fashion. PMID:26587641

  20. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  1. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as MPS I S. See also: MPS I H (Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) ... individuals with Scheie syndrome, and also Hurler and Hurler-Scheie syndromes. Early detection and treatment of spinal cord compression ...

  2. Defining anural malformations in the context of a developmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Cole, R.A.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Wolcott, M.; Helgen, J.C.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes terminology and general concepts involved in animal development for the purpose of providing background for the study and understanding of frog malformations. The results of our radiographic investigation of rear limb malformations in Rana pipiens provide evidence that frog malformations are the product of early developmental errors. Although bacteria, parasites and viruses were identified in these metamorphosed frogs, the relevant window to look for the teratogenic effect of these agents is in the early tadpole stage during limb development. As a result, our microbiological findings must be regarded as inconclusive relative to determining their contribution to malformations because we conducted our examinations on metamorphosed frogs not tadpoles. Future studies need to look at teratogenic agents (chemical, microbial, physical or mechanical) that are present in the embryo, tadpole, and their environments at the stages of development that are relevant for the malformation type. The impact of these teratogenic agents then needs to be assessed in appropriate animal models using studies that are designed to mimic field conditions. The results of these laboratory tests should then be analyzed in such a way that will allow comparison with the findings in the wild-caught tadpoles and frogs.

  3. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  4. Van der Woude Syndrome with Short Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Pallavi K.; Deshmukh, Kiran; Mangalgi, Anand; Patil, Subhash; Hugar, Deepa; Kodangal, Saraswathi Fakirappa

    2014-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition with high penetrance and variable expression. Clinical manifestation of this autosomal dominant clefting syndrome includes bilateral midline lower lip pits, cleft lip, and cleft palate along with hypodontia. These congenital lip pits appear as a malformation in the vermilion border of the lip, with or without excretion. Discomfort caused by spontaneous or induced drainage of saliva/mucus when pressure is applied or during a meal as well as poor aesthetic match is one of the main complaints of patients with congenital lip fistula. The pits are treated by surgical resection. Dentists should be aware of the congenital lip pits as in Van der Woude syndrome because they have been reported to be associated with a variety of malformations or other congenital disorders. Here, the authors report a rare case of Van der Woude syndrome with short review of the literature. PMID:25050184

  5. Isolated and syndromic brachydactylies: Diagnostic value of hand X-rays.

    PubMed

    David, A; Vincent, M; Quéré, M-P; Lefrançois, T; Frampas, E; David, A

    2015-05-01

    Brachydactyly, or shortening of the digits, is due to the abnormal development of phalanges, metacarpals and/or metatarsals. This congenital malformation is common, easily detectable clinically but often requires additional radiological exploration. Radiographs are essential to characterize the type of brachydactyly and to show the location of the bone shortening, as well as any associated malformation. This article reviews the radiological findings for isolated brachydactylies (according to the types classified by Bell, and Temtamy and McKusick) and for brachydactylies that are part of complex multisystem malformation syndromes. If warranted by the clinical and radiological examinations, a genetic analysis (molecular and/or cytogenetic) can confirm the etiologic diagnosis. PMID:25758756

  6. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-12-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder. PMID:25606393

  7. Syndrome de blpharophimosis: une forme particulire du ptosis congnital

    PubMed Central

    Handor, Hanan; Hafidi, Zouheir; Laghmari, Mina; Sabrane, Ihsane; Mastanga, Olive Rosine; Daoudi, Rajae

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome de blpharophimosis est une malformation palpbrale congnitale caractrise par l'association d'un ptosis majeur bilatral d'autres anomalies palpbrales. Il constitue une forme particulire du ptosis congnital qui doit tre connue par tout ophtalmologue afin d'optimiser la prise en charge des patients prsentant cette affection. PMID:26161205

  8. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  9. Possible homozygous Waardenburg syndrome in a fetus with exencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-06

    This paper describes a pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome and an aborted fetus who had severe congenital malformations but no detected genetic mutations. The authors concluded that despite the fact that no homozygosity of the fetus was demonstrated, the phenotype pointed to homozygous mutations of the PAX3 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Spinal arteriovenous malformations: Is surgery indicated?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bikramjit; Behari, Sanjay; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K.; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Mehrotra, Anant; Mohan, B. Madan; Phadke, Rajendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify clinico-radiological distinguishing features in various types of spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an aim to define the role of surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: Hero's modified Di Chiro classification differentiated four types of spinal AVMs on digital subtraction angiogram (DSA) in 74 patients: I. Dural arteriovenous fistulae (n = 35, 47.3%); II. Glomus/intramedullary (n = 13, 17.6%); III. Juvenile/metameric (n = 4, 5.4%); and, IV. Ventral perimedullary fistula (n = 21, 28.4%). A patient with extradural AVM remained unclassified. Demographic profiles, DSA features and reason for surgical referral were recorded. Statistical comparison of discrete variables like gender, spinal cord level, presentation and outcome was made using Chi-square test; and, continuous variables like age, feeder number, duration of symptoms and number of staged embolizations by one way analysis of variance with Boneferoni post hoc comparison. Embolization alone (n = 39, 52.7%), surgery alone (n = 16, 21.6%), and combined approach (n = 4, 5.4%) were the treatments offered (15 were treated elsewhere). Results: Type I-AVM occurred in significantly older population than other types (P = 0.01). Mean duration of symptoms was 13.18 ± 12.8 months. Thoracic cord involvement predominated in type-I and III AVMs (P = 0.01). Number of feeding arteries were 1 in 59.7%; 2 in 29.0%; and, multiple in 11.3% patients, respectively. Staged embolization procedures in type-III AVM were significant (P < 0.01). Surgical referral was required due to: Vessel tortuosity/insufficient parent vessel caliber (n = 7); residual AVM (n = 4); low flow AVM (n = 3); and, multiple feeders (n = 2). Check DSA (n = 34) revealed complete AVM obliteration in 26 and minor residual lesion in eight patients. Neurological status improved in 26 and stabilized in 25 patients. Conclusions: Differentiating between Type I-IV AVMs has a significant bearing on their management. Surgical intervention should be considered as an important adjunct/alternative to therapeutic embolization. PMID:27057219

  11. Revision Stapedectomy in a Female Patient with Inner Ear Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tirth R.; Moberly, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an unusual case of surgical management of congenital mixed hearing loss in a female patient with inner ear malformation. This report outlines the role of temporal bone imaging and previous surgical history in evaluating a patient's risk of perilymph gusher during stapes surgery. Methods. A 68-year-old female patient with a history of profound bilateral mixed hearing loss due to ossicular and cochlear malformation presented to our otology clinic. She had undergone multiple unsuccessful previous ear surgeries. Computed tomography revealed bilateral inner ear malformations. She elected to proceed with revision stapedectomy. Results. The patient received modest benefit to hearing, and no operative complications occurred. Conclusions. Although stapedectomy has been shown to improve hearing in patients with stapes fixation, there is risk of perilymph gusher in patients with inner ear abnormalities. Evaluation and counseling of the risk of gusher during stapes surgery should be done on a case-by-case basis. PMID:27144044

  12. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  13. Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders and the Chiari 1 Malformation.

    PubMed

    Leu, Roberta M

    2015-11-01

    The Chiari 1 malformation is characterized by > 5-mm herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Consequent compression of the brain stem and nearby neuronal structures involved in respiratory control and maintenance of pharyngeal wall muscle tone may result in respiratory changes during sleep. These changes include respiratory failure and arrest, as well as sleep-related breathing disorders (ie, OSA and central sleep apnea). Although data have accrued on the significance of sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with the Chiari 1 malformation, many management questions remain unanswered. This article reviews the available literature on prevalence and management of sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with the Chiari 1 malformation. PMID:26158759

  14. Genes and brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jeffrey J; Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal positioning is a fundamental process during brain development. Abnormalities in this process cause several types of brain malformations and are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Little is known about the pathogenesis of developmental brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning, which has hindered research into potential treatments. However, recent advances in neurogenetics provide clues to the pathogenesis of aberrant neuronal positioning by identifying causative genes. This may help us form a foundation upon which therapeutic tools can be developed. In this review, we first provide a brief overview of neural development and migration, as they relate to defects in neuronal positioning. We then discuss recent progress in identifying genes and brain malformations associated with aberrant neuronal positioning during human brain development. PMID:26541977

  15. Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zawar, Ifrah; Khan, Ashfa A.; Sultan, Tipu; Rathore, Ahsan W.

    2015-01-01

    The Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome (DDMS) results from an insult to the growing brain in utero or early infancy, which lead to loss of neurons compromising the growth of the brain. Clinical presentation includes seizures, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, and learning disability. Radiological findings include cerebral atrophy on one side. Here, we present a case with status epilepticus who had underlying DDMS. It is a rare syndrome and uncommon cause for status epilepticus. Infections of CNS, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial bleed, trauma, congenital vascular malformations are the common causes of this syndrome. Diagnosis is established after clinical history, examination, and MRI. Intractable seizures can be controlled with appropriate anticonvulsants. Subsequently, these children may require physiotherapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy in addition to the anticonvulsant medication. Outcome is better if the seizures are controlled. PMID:26492121

  16. Sturge–Weber syndrome – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Shahid M.; Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS), also called as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis is an uncommon congenital neurological disorder & frequent among the neurocutaneous syndromes specifically with vascular predominance. This disorder is characterized by facial capillary malformation & other neurological condition. The oral manifestations are gingival hemangiomatosis restricting to either side in upper and lower jaw, sometimes bilateral. We report a case of SWS with oral, ocular and neurological features. PMID:25853049

  17. Microcephaly, Intellectual Impairment, Bilateral Vesicoureteral Reflux, Distichiasis and Glomuvenous Malformations Associated with a 16q24.3 Contiguous Gene Deletion and a Glomulin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew G.; Dagenais, Susan L.; Garcia-Perez, José L.; Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka; Strouse, Peter; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Glover, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Two hereditary syndromes, lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LD) and blepharo-chelio-dontic (BCD) syndrome include the aberrant growth of eyelashes from the meibomian glands, known as distichiasis. LD is an autosomal dominant syndrome primarily characterized by distichiasis and the onset of lymphedema usually during puberty. Mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXC2 are the only known cause of LD. BCD syndrome consists of autosomal dominant abnormalities of the eyelid, lip, and teeth, and the etiology remains unknown. In this report, we describe a proband that presented with distichiasis, microcephaly, bilateral grade IV vesicoureteral reflux requiring ureteral re-implantation, mild intellectual impairment and apparent glomuvenous malformations. Distichiasis was present in three generations of the proband’s maternal side of the family. The glomuvenous malformations were severe in the proband, and maternal family members exhibited lower extremity varicosities of variable degree. A GLMN (glomulin) gene mutation was identified in the proband that accounts for the observed glomuvenous malformations; no other family member could be tested. TIE2 sequencing revealed no mutations. In the proband, an additional submicroscopic 265 kb contiguous gene deletion was identified in 16q24.3, located 609 kb distal to the FOXC2 locus, which was inherited from the proband’s mother. The deletion includes the C16ORF95, FBXO31, MAP1LC3B, and ZCCHC14 loci and 115 kb of a gene desert distal to FOXC2 and FOXL1. Thus, it is likely that the microcephaly, distichiasis, vesicoureteral and intellectual impairment in this family may be caused by the deletion of one or more of these genes and/or deletion of distant cis-regulatory elements of FOXC2 expression. PMID:22407726

  18. Models of cortical malformation-Chemical and physical.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-02-15

    Pharmaco-resistant epilepsies, and also some neuropsychiatric disorders, are often associated with malformations in hippocampal and neocortical structures. The mechanisms leading to these cortical malformations causing an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory system are largely unknown. Animal models using chemical or physical manipulations reproduce different human pathologies by interfering with cell generation and neuronal migration. The model of in utero injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate mimics periventricular nodular heterotopia. The freeze lesion model reproduces (poly)microgyria, focal heterotopia and schizencephaly. The in utero irradiation model causes microgyria and heterotopia. Intraperitoneal injections of carmustine 1-3-bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea (BCNU) to pregnant rats produces laminar disorganization, heterotopias and cytomegalic neurons. The ibotenic acid model induces focal cortical malformations, which resemble human microgyria and ulegyria. Cortical dysplasia can be also observed following prenatal exposure to ethanol, cocaine or antiepileptic drugs. All these models of cortical malformations are characterized by a pronounced hyperexcitability, few of them also produce spontaneous epileptic seizures. This dysfunction results from an impairment in GABAergic inhibition and/or an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The cortical region initiating or contributing to this hyperexcitability may not necessarily correspond to the site of the focal malformation. In some models wide-spread molecular and functional changes can be observed in remote regions of the brain, where they cause pathophysiological activities. This paper gives an overview on different animal models of cortical malformations, which are mostly used in rodents and which mimic the pathology and to some extent the pathophysiology of neuronal migration disorders associated with epilepsy in humans. PMID:25850077

  19. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Louisiana: an association between race and sex and the prevalence of specific cardiac malformations.

    PubMed

    Storch, T G; Mannick, E E

    1992-09-01

    We hypothesized that susceptibility to the genetic and environmental factors that disrupt cardiac development is associated with race and sex. To evaluate this hypothesis, we asked whether the prevalence of specific cardiac malformations differs by race and sex. We attempted to include all infants born alive in the State of Louisiana from January 1, 1988, through December 31, 1989, and diagnosed by echocardiography, catheterization and/or autopsy within a year of birth as having one of ten specific cardiac malformations. The prevalence of atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) per 1,000 live births was significantly higher for black females (.744) compared to black males (.198) and for white females (.414) compared to white males (.116). Complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA) was significantly higher for white males (.559) compared to white females (.122); in contrast, TGA was not significantly different for black males (.198) and black females (.169). Obstructive left heart syndrome (OLHS)--aortic stenosis and/or coarctation of the aorta--was significantly higher for white males (.652) compared to white females (.317); in contrast, OLHS was not significantly different for black males (.264) and black females (.169). Single ventricle (SV) was significantly higher for whites (.202) compared to blacks (.067). We did not find that race and sex were associated with differences in the prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The numbers of infants with anomalous pulmonary venous return, tricuspid atresia, double outlet right ventricle, or truncus arteriosus were too small to measure an association with race and sex. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of a subset of cardiac malformations differs by race and sex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1523585

  20. Jugular foraminal stenosis in Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, D; Vander Woude, D L; Barnes, P D; Scott, R M; Mulliken, J B

    1996-11-01

    We describe a 4-year-old boy with Crouzon syndrome, with associated acanthosis nigricans and Chiari-I malformation, who developed increased intracranial pressure necessitating posterior cranial expansion. Postoperatively, an arteriovenous fistula appeared over the mastoid region. Cerebral angiography demonstrated bilateral atresia of the jugular veins and occlusion of the left sigmoid and right transverse sinuses. We propose that increased intracranial venous pressure, secondary to bilateral jugular foraminal stenosis, caused hydrocephaly and venous dilation in the scalp vasculature. The latter set the stage for a traumatic arteriovenous fistula of the scalp, probably resulting from laceration of an adjacent artery and vein. Jugular atresia is a basilar malformation common to achondroplasia and certain eponymous syndromic craniosynostoses. Our patient has a mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3, a different locus in the same gene mutated in achondroplasia. PMID:9309789

  1. Malignancy in Noonan syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Smpokou, P; Zand, D J; Rosenbaum, K N; Summar, M L

    2015-12-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and related disorders, such as NS with multiple lentigines (formerly called LEOPARD syndrome), cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, and Costello syndrome, constitute an important group of developmental malformation syndromes with variable clinical and molecular features. Their underlying pathophysiologic mechanism involves dysregulation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, an essential mediator of developmental and growth processes in the prenatal and postnatal setting. Malignant tumor development is an important complication encountered in other RASopathies, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, but the neoplastic risks and incidence of malignant tumors are less clearly defined in NS and related disorders of the Noonan spectrum. Malignant tumor development remains an important complication variably seen in the RASopathies and, thus, a clear understanding of the underlying risks is essential for appropriate clinical care in this patient population. This review discusses previously published reports of malignancies in individuals with RASopathies of the Noonan spectrum. PMID:25683281

  2. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations presenting as refractory heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai-Hong; Huang, Guo-Yong; Song, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old young man with a history of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) was admitted to our hospital due to difficult-to-control heart failure. A thoracic X-ray showed multiple nodules at the both pulmonary hilus and upper lobe of the right lung. Computed tomography (CT) angiography of the thorax confirmed arteriovenous malformation (AVM). However, effective treatment was impossible due to the poor physical condition; he died a few days later. Here we reported on the case of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) being misdiagnosed as refractory heart failure. PMID:25276390

  3. Arteriovenous malformation within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Grace; Muller, Karra A.; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The co-occurrence of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and cerebral neoplasms is exceedingly rare but may harbor implications pertaining to the molecular medicine of brain cancer pathogenesis. Case Description: Here, we present a case of de novo AVM within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma (WHO Grade III) and review the potential contribution of this mutation to aberrant angiogenesis as an interesting case study in molecular medicine. Conclusion: The co-occurrence of an IDH1 mutated neoplasm and AVM supports the hypothesis that IDH1 mutations may contribute to aberrant angiogenesis and vascular malformation. PMID:26167373

  4. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation presenting as visual deterioration in a child.

    PubMed

    Kaye, L C; Kaye, S B; Lagnado, R; Boothroyd, A; Morton, C; May, P

    2000-10-01

    A rare case of visual loss as the presenting feature of a central arteriovenous malformation involving the vein of Galen is reported. A 5-year-old girl with a history of deteriorating vision for the past 6 months was examined. Ocular examination showed a left hemianopia, left optic atrophy, and dilated vessels of the right optic disc. MRI revealed a massive deep-seated central arteriovenous malformation involving the vein of Galen. The mechanism of visual loss is likely to be a combination of ischaemic optic atrophy associated with a steal phenomenon and direct compression of the right optic radiation. PMID:11085301

  5. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  6. Deletion of 4q28.3-31.23 in the background of multiple malformations with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 4q deletion syndrome shows a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations consisting of key features comprising growth failure, developmental delay, craniofacial dysmorphism, digital anomalies, and cardiac and skeletal defects. We have identified a de novo interstitial distal deletion in a 9 month-old girl with growth failure, developmental delay, ventricular septum defect in the subaortic region, patent foramen ovale and patent ductus arteriosus, vascular malformation of the lung, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and craniofacial dysmorphism using array-comparative genomic hybridization. This de novo deletion is located at 4q28.3-31.23 (136,127,048 - 150,690,325), its size is 14.56 Mb, and contains 8 relevant genes (PCDH18, SETD7, ELMOD2, IL15, GAB1, HHIP, SMAD1, NR3C2) with possible contributions to the phenotype. Among other functions, a role in lung morphogenesis and tubulogenesis can be attributed to the deleted genes in our patient, which may explain the unique feature of vascular malformation of the lung leading to pulmonary hypertension. With the detailed molecular characterization of our case with 4q- syndrome we hope to contribute to the elucidation of the genetic spectrum of this disorder. PMID:24959202

  7. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  8. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Min, Hong-Gi; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2015-12-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  9. Intestinal malrotation in a child with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C H; Fujimoto, A

    1997-06-13

    We present a child with cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome with inadequate weight gain due to inadequate food intake. After correction of hyperemesis due to intestinal malrotation, she continued to fail to feed due to poor suck reflex. A review documented digestive system findings in 26 of 57 reported patients with CFC syndrome. Thus, digestive system dysfunction and malformation may represent an additional manifestation of the CFC syndrome. PMID:9188667

  10. Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    DeBarber, Andrea E.; Eroglu, Yasemen; Merkens, Louise S.; Pappu, Anuradha S.; Steiner, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple congenital malformation/intellectual disability syndrome, with clinical characteristics encompassing a wide spectrum and great variability. Elucidation of the biochemical and molecular genetic basis for the autosomal recessively inherited SLOS, specifically, understanding SLOS as a cholesterol deficiency syndrome caused by mutations in DHCR7, opened up enormous possibilities for therapeutic intervention. When cholesterol was discovered to be the activator of sonic hedgehog, cholesterol deficiency with inactivation of this developmental patterning gene was thought to be the cause of SLOS malformations, yet this explanation is overly simplistic. Still, despite these important research breakthroughs, there is no proven treatment for SLOS. Better animal models are needed to allow potential treatment testing and the study of disease pathophysiology, which is incompletely understood. Creation of human cellular models will surely be useful, especially models of brain cells. In vivo human studies are essential as well. There have only been limited natural history studies of SLOS to date. Biomarker development will be critical in facilitating clinical trials in this rare condition, since clinical phenotype may change over many years. Additional research in these and other areas is critical if we are to make headway towards ameloriating the effects of this devastating condition. PMID:21777499

  11. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,…

  12. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,

  13. Mimosa tenuiflora as a Cause of Malformations in Ruminants in the Northeastern Brazilian Semiarid Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Craniofacial anomalies, eye malformations, and permanent flexures of the forelimbs are common malformations seen in ruminants grazing semiarid rangelands of Northeastern Brazil. To investigate the cause of these malformations, we fed 2 suspected plants, Mimosa tenuiflora or Prosopis juliflora, to gr...

  14. Ultrasound features in trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in a consecutive series of 47 cases

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, I.; Janssens, S.; Defoort, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine and list the variety of the predominant appeal signs leading to referral and their accompanying features found during specialized ultrasound evaluation in foetuses with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. Materials and Methods: In a period of thirty years, 1110 cases of foetal malformations were detected during specialized echographic evaluation. 47 Of these cases were foetuses with trisomy 13 or trisomy 18. We evaluated the predominant signs leading to referral, the difference and overlap in presenting signs between both syndromes and when the data were available, we also compared the echographic signs with the foetal pathology. Results: In foetuses with trisomy 13 the most common malformations were craniofacial defects, cerebral malformations and genitourinary tract anomalies. The most common malformations associated with trisomy 18 were limb abnormalities and intrauterine growth restriction. Most malformations were predominant in trisomy 18, except for genitourinary tract anomalies. In most cases the sonographic signs correlated with the pathology findings. Conclusion: Trisomy 13 as well as trisomy 18 are characterized by a number of various malformations in the foetus. Most of the ultrasound features were predominant in foetuses with trisomy 18. Mostly the foetal pathology correlated with the sonographic evaluation. PMID:25593701

  15. Updates and Future Horizons on the Understanding, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sturge-Weber Syndrome Brain Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Warren; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Ball, Karen L.; Juhasz, Csaba; Jordan, Lori C.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Comi, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To review recent developments in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Method: Members of the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium Sturge-Weber Syndrome National Workgroup contributed their expertise to review the literature and present promising directions for research. Results: The increasing number…

  16. Major malformations after first trimester exposure to aspirin and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Nakhai-Pour, Hamid Reza; Bérard, Anick

    2008-09-01

    The use of aspirin and other NSAIDs during the first trimester of pregnancy is widespread, despite inconclusive evidence regarding the possible risks for the baby. We present an overview of the current evidence relating to the associations between aspirin or NSAID use during the first trimester of pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformations. We systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the reference lists of all relevant articles from 1966 to March 2008 that examined the association between aspirin and NSAID use during the first trimester of pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformations in humans. We analyzed 30 studies that met the predefined inclusion criteria: 22 case-control studies, seven cohort studies and one randomized, controlled trial. There are not enough human data available to assess the effect of high-dose aspirin and NSAIDs in pregnant women, such as those used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and pain relief. This review suggests that the exposure to aspirin or NSAIDs during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of gastroschisis (aspirin), cardiac malformations (NSAIDs) and orofacial malformations (naproxen). PMID:24422733

  17. Surgical and Technical Modalities for Hearing Restoration in Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Thomas, Jan Peter; Volkenstein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Malformations of the external and middle ear often go along with an aesthetic and functional handicap. Independent of additional aesthetic procedures, a successful functional hearing restoration leads to a tremendous gain in quality of life for affected patients. The introduction of implantable hearing systems (bone conduction and middle ear devices) offers new therapeutic options in this field. We focus on functional rehabilitation of patients with malformations, either by surgical reconstruction or the use of different implantable hearing devices, depending on the disease itself and the severity of malformation as well as hearing impairment. Patients with an open ear canal and minor malformations are good candidates for surgical hearing restoration of middle ear structures with passive titanium or autologous implants. In cases with complete fibrous or bony atresia of the ear canal, the most promising functional outcome and gain in quality of life can be expected with an active middle ear implant or a bone conduction device combined with a surgical aesthetic rehabilitation in a single or multi-step procedure. Although the surgical procedure for bone conduction devices is straightforward and safe, more sophisticated operations for active middle ear implants (e.g., Vibrant Soundbridge, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) provide an improved speech discrimination in noise and the ability of sound localization compared with bone conduction devices where the stimulation reaches both cochleae. PMID:26667632

  18. Diagnosis and Nonsurgical Management of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, R. D.; Moloney, J. C.; Anderson, H. J.

    2007-11-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon problem and traditional treatment by hysterectomy excludes the possibility of future pregnancy. Developments in interventional techniques make transcatheter embolization of the feeding vessel(s) a therapeutic alternative, potentially preserving the patient's fertility. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of uterine AVM.

  19. Paraspinal arteriovenous malformation Onyx embolization via an Ascent balloon.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Galdámez, Mario; Rodriguez-Arias, Carlos A; Utiel, Elena; Arreba, Emilio; Gonzalo, Miguel; Arenillas, Juan F

    2014-04-01

    Purely extradural lumbar spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions that have diverse presentations and imaging features. The treatment of a symptomatic high flow paraspinal AVM with multiple feeders remains a challenge. We report the first use of an Ascent balloon (dual lumen balloon catheter) to deliver Onyx with excellent penetration to a paraspinal AVM. PMID:23543731

  20. Paraspinal arteriovenous malformation Onyx embolization via an Ascent balloon.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Galdámez, Mario; Rodriguez-Arias, Carlos A; Utiel, Elena; Arreba, Emilio; Gonzalo, Miguel; Arenillas, Juan F

    2013-01-01

    Purely extradural lumbar spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions that have diverse presentations and imaging features. The treatment of a symptomatic high flow paraspinal AVM with multiple feeders remains a challenge. We report the first use of an Ascent balloon (dual lumen balloon catheter) to deliver Onyx with excellent penetration to a paraspinal AVM. PMID:23524491

  1. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  2. LIMITED PCB ANTAGONISM OF TCDD-INDUCED MALFORMATIONS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    C57BL/6N mice, used to model induction of cleft palate and kidney malformations in offspring following maternal treatment with TCDD, were dosed on gestation day (gd) 9 with ,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachloro-biphenyl (HCB) (62.5, 125, 250, 500. 1000 mg/kg) and/or gd 10 with 2,3,7,8-tetrach...

  3. Embryonic Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 Causes Malformations in Axial Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Minsub; Foley, Julie; Anna, Colleen; Mishina, Yuji; Eling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) have important functions in various physiological and pathological processes. COX-2 expression is highly induced by a variety of stimuli and is observed during certain periods of embryonic development. In this report, the direct effect of COX-2 expression on embryonic development is examined in a novel COX-2 transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses human COX-2 from the early stages of embryonic development. COX-2 transgenic fetuses exhibit severe skeletal malformations and die shortly after birth. Skeletal malformations are localized along the entire vertebral column and rib cage and are linked to defective formation of cartilage anlagen. The cartilage anlagen of axial skeleton fail to properly develop in transgenic embryos because of impaired precartilaginous sclerotomal condensation, which results from the reduction of cell number in the sclerotome. Despite the ubiquitous expression of COX-2, the number of apoptotic cells is highly increased in the sclerotome of transgenic embryos but not in other tissues, suggesting that it is a tissue-specific response. Therefore, the loss of sclerotomal cells due to an increased apoptosis is probably responsible for axial skeletal malformations in transgenic fetuses. In addition, the sclerotomal accumulation of p53 protein is observed in transgenic embryos, suggesting that COX-2 may induce apoptosis via the up-regulation of p53. Our results demonstrate that the aberrant COX-2 signaling during embryonic development is teratogenic and suggest a possible association of COX-2 with fetal malformations of unknown etiology. PMID:20236942

  4. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  5. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on

  6. Coiling of a vulvar arterio-venous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Van der Woude, Daisy Adriana Annejan; Stegeman, Marjan; Seelen, Jan L

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 13-year-old girl with a painful vulvar swelling and abnormal vaginal bleeding, increasing in size after trauma. With MRI (GE Signa HDx 1.5 Tesla), it is diagnosed as an arterio-venous malformation arising from the left superior femoral artery. It is treated by embolisation using a coil. PMID:22674935

  7. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Tourette Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Tourette Syndrome Print A A ... Act Around Someone Who Has It? What Is Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a condition that affects a ...

  9. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as MPS III. See also: MPS I H (Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) ... unlike the cloudy corneas seen in persons with Hurler syndrome (MPS I H). Neurological testing will reveal signs ...

  10. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Rett Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Rett Syndrome? Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that ...

  11. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  12. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  13. Diaphragmatic hernia in Denys-Drash syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Deloof, E.; Moerman, P.

    1995-05-22

    We report on a newborn infant with male pseudohermaphroditism and glomerular lesions (Denys-Drash syndrome) but without Wilms tumor. A constitutional heterozygous mutation in the WT1 gene ({sup 366} Arg to His) was identified. In addition the child had a large diaphragmatic hernia, so far not described in Denys-Drash syndrome. The expression of the WT1 gene in pleural and abdominal mesothelium and the occurrence of diaphragmatic hernia in transgenic mice with a homozygous WT1 deletion strongly suggests that the diphragmatic hernia in this patient is part of the malformation pattern caused by WT1 mutations. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Correlation between ultrasound diagnosis and autopsy findings of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vimercati, Antonella; Grasso, Silvana; Abruzzese, Marinella; Chincoli, Annarosa; de Gennaro, Alessandra; Miccolis, Angela; Serio, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Luigi; Fascilla, Fabiana Divina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective to compare ultrasound (US) and autopsy findings of fetal malformations in second trimester terminations of pregnancy to evaluate the degree of agreement between US and fetal autopsy. Methods in this study, all second trimester termination of pregnancy between 2003–2010 were considered. US and autopsy findings were compared and all cases were classified into five categories according to the degree of agreement between US and pathology (A1: full agreement between US and autopsy; A2: autopsy confirmed all US findings but revealed additional anomalies ‘rarely detectable’ prenatally; B: autopsy demonstrated all US findings but revealed additional anomalies ‘detectable’ prenatally; C: US findings were only partially demonstrated at fetal autopsy; D: total disagreement between US and autopsy). Results 144 cases were selected. In 49% of cases there was total agreement between US and autopsy diagnosis (A1). In 22% of cases additional information were about anomalies ‘not detectable’ by US (A2). In 12% of cases autopsy provided additional information about anomalies not observed but ‘detectable’ by US (B). In 13% of cases some anomalies revealed at US, such as valve insufficiencies, pericardial and pleural effusions, were not verified at autopsy (C). Total lack of agreement was noted only in 4% of cases (D). Main areas of disagreement concerned cardiovascular, CNS and complex malformations. The degree of agreement was higher if malformations were diagnosed in a tertiary center. Conclusions this study shows an overall high degree of agreement between definitive US and autopsy findings in second trimester termination of pregnancy for fetal malformations. Autopsy reveals to be the best tool to diagnose malformations and often showed other abnormalities of clinical importance not detected by US, but sometimes also US could provide additional information about functional anomalies because US is a dynamic examination. PMID:22905306

  15. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia and mesencephalic malformation in a Hanoverian foal.

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Schmidt, M J; Preis, S; Klumpp, S; Köhler, K; Kuchelmeister, K; Herden, C

    2013-01-01

    Neurological cases, especially in foals, are rare in the daily practical work. The most common causes are traumata and infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). This case report provides further insights into the wide spectrum of possible neuropathological lesions by detailing a complex malformation with unilateral neurological signs that occurred later post natum. Thus, clinicians should also be aware of malformations in case of respective neurological patients. A Hanoverian foal was presented with progressive ataxia. General and blood examination revealed no further alterations. By neurologic examination, a unilateral hypermetria was diagnosed and a cysternography of the head was performed. A cerebellar malformation was assumed and the foal was euthanized due to poor prognosis. At necropsy, a unilateral absence of a cerebellar hemisphere and vermis accompanied by contralateral malformation of the mesencephalon was diagnosed. The missing areas of the right cerebellar hemisphere were replaced by a cystic formation. The left part of the mesencephalic lamina quadrigemina was reduced in size and the corpus callosum was hypoplastic. Additional microscopical findings were most obvious near the cyst formation and included angiofibrosis in remaining cerebellar and mesencephalic parenchyma and leptomeninges, heterotopia of cerebellar neurons, sclerosis in cerebellar cortex, focal proliferation of meningeal cells and mild mononuclear perivascular infiltrates. Occassional irregular neuronal arrangement in the mesencephalon was also present. Infectious agents such as Borna disease virus, rabies virus, and equine herpesvirus were not detected. Therefore, the complex malformation in this foal might have been caused by a destructive, possibly ischemic event, or could represent a sequel of a primary retrocerebellar cyst with accompanying compression of adjacent parenchyma. PMID:23608891

  16. The trisomy 18 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The trisomy 18 syndrome, also known as Edwards syndrome, is a common chromosomal disorder due to the presence of an extra chromosome 18, either full, mosaic trisomy, or partial trisomy 18q. The condition is the second most common autosomal trisomy syndrome after trisomy 21. The live born prevalence is estimated as 1/6,000-1/8,000, but the overall prevalence is higher (1/2500-1/2600) due to the high frequency of fetal loss and pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of trisomy 18 rises with the increasing maternal age. The recurrence risk for a family with a child with full trisomy 18 is about 1%. Currently most cases of trisomy 18 are prenatally diagnosed, based on screening by maternal age, maternal serum marker screening, or detection of sonographic abnormalities (e.g., increased nuchal translucency thickness, growth retardation, choroid plexus cyst, overlapping of fingers, and congenital heart defects ). The recognizable syndrome pattern consists of major and minor anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, an increased risk of neonatal and infant mortality, and marked psychomotor and cognitive disability. Typical minor anomalies include characteristic craniofacial features, clenched fist with overriding fingers, small fingernails, underdeveloped thumbs, and short sternum. The presence of major malformations is common, and the most frequent are heart and kidney anomalies. Feeding problems occur consistently and may require enteral nutrition. Despite the well known infant mortality, approximately 50% of babies with trisomy 18 live longer than 1 week and about 5-10% of children beyond the first year. The major causes of death include central apnea, cardiac failure due to cardiac malformations, respiratory insufficiency due to hypoventilation, aspiration, or upper airway obstruction and, likely, the combination of these and other factors (including decisions regarding aggressive care). Upper airway obstruction is likely more common than previously realized and should be investigated when full care is opted by the family and medical team. The complexity and the severity of the clinical presentation at birth and the high neonatal and infant mortality make the perinatal and neonatal management of babies with trisomy 18 particularly challenging, controversial, and unique among multiple congenital anomaly syndromes. Health supervision should be diligent, especially in the first 12 months of life, and can require multiple pediatric and specialist evaluations. PMID:23088440

  17. Syndrome of arachnomelia in Simmental cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buitkamp, Johannes; Luntz, Bernhard; Emmerling, Reiner; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Weppert, Myriam; Schade, Benjamin; Meier, Norbert; Götz, Kay-Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Background The syndrome of arachnomelia is an inherited malformation mainly of limbs, back and head in cattle. At present the arachnomelia syndrome has been well known mainly in Brown Swiss cattle. Nevertheless, the arachnomelia syndrome had been observed in the Hessian Simmental population during the decade 1964–1974. Recently, stillborn Simmental calves were observed having a morphology similar to the arachnomelia syndrome. The goal of this work was the characterization of the morphology and genealogy of the syndrome in Simmental to establish the basis for an effective management of the disease. Results The first pathologically confirmed arachnomelia syndrome-cases in the current Simmental population appeared in the year 2005. By 2007, an additional 140 calves with the arachnomelia syndrome were identified. The major pathological findings were malformed bones affecting the head, long bones of the legs and the vertebral column. It could be shown that, with the exception of two cases that were considered as phenocopies, all of the paternal and about two-third of the maternal pedigrees of the affected calves could be traced back to one common founder. Together with the data from experimental matings, the pedigree data support an autosomal recessive mutation being the etiology of the arachnomelia syndrome. The frequency of the mutation in the current population was estimated to be 3.32%. Conclusion We describe the repeated occurrence of the arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental calves. It resembles completely the same defect occurring in the Brown Swiss breed. The mutation became relatively widespread amongst the current population. Therefore, a control system has to be established and it is highly desirable to map the disease and develop a genetic test system. PMID:18828914

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery for deep intracranial arteriovenous malformations, part 2: Basal ganglia and thalamus arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Ding, Dale; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze the outcomes following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of the basal ganglia and thalamus. The management of these deep-seated lesions continues to challenge neurosurgeons. Basal ganglia and thalamic AVM show a higher risk of hemorrhage, and an associated devastating morbidity and mortality, as compared to AVM in more superficial locations. Any of the currently available treatment modalities may fail or result in iatrogenic neurologic deterioration. Recent evidence from A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain AVM (ARUBA) further deters aggressive approaches that carry a significant risk of treatment-related adverse events. Microsurgical resection, endovascular embolization and SRS all play a role in the treatment of AVM. SRS is an effective therapeutic option for AVM of the thalamus and basal ganglia that are deemed high risk for resection. SRS offers acceptable obliteration rates, with generally lower risks of hemorrhage occurring during the latency period compared to the AVM natural history. Considering that incompletely obliterated lesions still harbor the potential for rupture, additional treatments such as repeat SRS and microsurgical resection should be considered when complete obliteration is not achieved by an initial SRS procedure. Patients with AVM of the basal ganglia and thalamus require continued clinical and radiologic observation and follow-up after SRS, even after angiographic obliteration has been confirmed. PMID:26732284

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for deep intracranial arteriovenous malformations, part 1: Brainstem arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Ding, Dale; Chen, Ching-Jen; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    The management of brainstem arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are one of the greatest challenges encountered by neurosurgeons. Brainstem AVM have a higher risk of hemorrhage compared to AVM in other locations, and rupture of these lesions commonly results in devastating neurological morbidity and mortality. The potential morbidity associated with currently available treatment modalities further compounds the complexity of decision making for affected patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has an important role in the management of brainstem AVM. SRS offers acceptable obliteration rates with lower risks of hemorrhage occurring during the latency period. Complex nidal architecture requires a multi-disciplinary treatment approach. Nidi partly involving subpial/epipial regions of the dorsal midbrain or cerebellopontine angle should be considered for a combination of endovascular embolization, micro-surgical resection and SRS. Considering the fact that incompletely obliterated lesions (even when reduced in size) could still cause lethal hemorrhages, additional treatment, including repeat SRS and surgical resection should be considered when complete obliteration is not achieved by first SRS. Patients with brainstem AVM require continued clinical and radiological observation and follow-up after SRS, well after angiographic obliteration has been confirmed. PMID:26740034

  20. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  1. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  2. Congenital pulmonary malformations in pediatric patients: review and update on etiology, classification, and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y; Dorkin, Henry; Vargas, Sara O

    2011-09-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a heterogeneous group of developmental disorders affecting the lung parenchyma, the arterial supply to the lung, and the lung's venous drainage. In both asymptomatic and symptomatic pediatric patients with congenital pulmonary malformations, the diagnosis of such malformations usually requires imaging evaluation, particularly in cases of surgical lesions for preoperative assessment. The goal of this article is to review the current imaging techniques for evaluating congenital pulmonary malformations and their characteristic imaging findings, which can allow differentiation among various congenital pulmonary malformations in pediatric patients. PMID:21889015

  3. Klippel–Trénaunay Syndrome – A Very Rare and Interesting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Lamba, Sachin; Pandita, Aakash; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome (KTS or KT) is an infrequently seen dermatological syndrome, which is often viewed as a triad of vascular malformation (capillary malformations or port-wine brands), venous varicosity, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy. We report a case of a 12-year-old male who presented to us with the symptoms of varicose plaques over both lower limbs and was diagnosed as a case of KTS. Management is normally conservative and includes stockings for compression of the branches to reduce edema because of chronic venous insufficiency; modern devices that cause on and off pneumatic compression; and rarely, surgical correction of varicose veins with lifelong follow-up. The orthopedic abnormalities are treated with epiphysiodesis in order to prevent (stop) overgrowing of limb and correction of bone deformity. PMID:25861232

  4. The Many Faces of Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sukarova-Angelovska, E; Angelkova, N; Palcevska-Kocevska, S; Kocova, M

    2012-01-01

    The oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome is a heterogeneous group of abnormalities that share anomalies of the oral cavity, face and digits of hands and feet. On the basis of other anomalies of brain, kidneys, limbs, eyes and other organs, at least 13 subgroups have been described. We here describe four unrelated patients with this syndrome, who have the typical facial, oral and digital anomalies and also anomalies of other organs and systems. Facial features, digital malformations, as well as the existence of additional malformations all of which can be classified into different subgroups. The report points out the difficulty in delineation of the subtypes of OFD syndrome because of the overlapping features between OFD subgroups. PMID:24052721

  5. [New chromosomal syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schluth-Bolard, C; Till, M; Edery, P; Sanlaville, D

    2008-09-01

    Mental retardation occurs in 2-3% of the general population either in isolation or in combination with facial dysmorphism and/or malformations. Chromosomal abnormalities are a most common etiology. Karyotype displays chromosome aberrations in about 10% of patients but it has a limited resolution (5 Mb). Recently, the development of new molecular cytogenetic tools, especially array CGH, allowed to detect smaller abnormalities and increased the diagnosis capability of 15-20%. Among these newly detected rearrangements, some of them are recurrent and define new recognized syndromes. We will first briefly explain the non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mechanism that underlines the origin of recurrent microdeletions and microduplications. Then we will describe eight new syndromes, four microdeletions (del 17q21.31, del 3q29, del 15q24, del 2q32.3q33) and four microduplications (dup 22q11.2, dup 7q11.23, dup 17p11.2, duplication of MECP2). A better knowledge of these new recurrent chromosomal syndromes will allow to improve care for patients, to develop targeted chromosomal diagnosis and to identify genes involved in neurocognitive functions. PMID:18467039

  6. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Chetan A; Ghige, Suvarna K; Kalaskar, Ritesh R; Gosavi, Suchitra R

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and musculoskeletal malformations. A rare case of this syndrome observed in a 13-year-old male patient is presented in which multiple OKCs were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the teeth. Early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome is important to reduce the severity of complications including cutaneous and cerebral malignancy and oromaxillofacial deformation and destruction due to jaw cysts. PMID:24403808

  7. Mowat-Wilson syndrome in a Moroccan consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Chafai Siham; Dastot-Le, Moal Florence; Goossens, Michel; Giurgea, Irina; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2007-09-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome is a mental retardation-multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a typical facies, developmental delay, epilepsy, and variable congenital malformations, including Hirschsprung disease, urogenital anomalies, congenital heart disease, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. This disorder is sporadic and is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of the ZFHX1B gene located in the 2q22 region. We report here the first Moroccan patient, born to consanguineous parents, with Mowat-Wilson syndrome, due to a de novo, unreported mutation of the ZFHX1B gene. PMID:21957361

  8. [Osteosarcoma and ATR-16 syndrome: association or coincidence?].

    PubMed

    Regueiro Garca, A; Saborido Fiao, R; Gonzlez Calvete, L; Vzquez Donsin, M; Couselo Snchez, J M; Fernndez Sanmartn, M

    2015-01-01

    ATR-16 syndrome is due to alterations on chromosome 16p13.3, and is usually accompanied by alpha-thalassemia, mild-moderate mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, skeletal and genitourinary malformations. There are no references of the combination of ATR-16 syndrome and osteosarcoma in the literature. Osteosarcoma usually has a complex karyotype, characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity of chromosomal aberrations, among which is the involvement of chromosome 16. We report a case of a patient with ATR-16 syndrome diagnosed with femoral osteosarcoma. PMID:24631100

  9. The diagnosis and interventional management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth J; Qureshi, Shakeel A

    2016-05-17

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) describe a broad group of complex vascular malformations, often associated with multi-system diseases and with palliated complex congenital heart disease. They can have major clinical consequences, resulting in strokes, cerebral abscesses, cyanosis and, infrequently, rupture into the pleural space. The best approach to their investigation and interventional treatment is via a multidisciplinary pathway which should be focused in high-volume centres with on-site thoracic and cardiovascular surgical back-up. The availability of computed tomography (CT) and a broad cathlab inventory aid procedural planning and success. The results of interventional treatment are very encouraging and are applicable to an increasingly broad group of patients thanks to improvements in interventional techniques and a significant expansion of the inventory of vascular occlusion devices. PMID:27174107

  10. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bolde, Saroj; Pudale, Smita; Pandit, Gopal; Ruikar, Kirti; Ingle, Sachin B

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a congenital disorder of the lung similar to bronchopulmonary sequestration. In CPAM, usually an entire lobe of lung is replaced by a non-working cystic piece of abnormal lung tissue. This abnormal tissue will never function as normal lung tissue. The underlying cause for CPAM is not known. It occurs in approximately 1 in every 30000 pregnancies. The association between CPAM and malignancy has been well documented. There is a small risk (0.7%) of malignant transformation within the cyst. So early diagnosis and surgical resection is important to prevent the grave complications. Herein, we are reporting two interesting cases of CPAM and one belonged to Type II and other belonged to Type III of Stocker’s classification. PMID:25984523

  11. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bolde, Saroj; Pudale, Smita; Pandit, Gopal; Ruikar, Kirti; Ingle, Sachin B

    2015-05-16

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a congenital disorder of the lung similar to bronchopulmonary sequestration. In CPAM, usually an entire lobe of lung is replaced by a non-working cystic piece of abnormal lung tissue. This abnormal tissue will never function as normal lung tissue. The underlying cause for CPAM is not known. It occurs in approximately 1 in every 30000 pregnancies. The association between CPAM and malignancy has been well documented. There is a small risk (0.7%) of malignant transformation within the cyst. So early diagnosis and surgical resection is important to prevent the grave complications. Herein, we are reporting two interesting cases of CPAM and one belonged to Type II and other belonged to Type III of Stocker's classification. PMID:25984523

  12. Stereotactic radiosurgery with the linear accelerator: treatment of arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Betti, O O; Munari, C; Rosler, R

    1989-03-01

    An original stereotactic radiosurgical approach coupling a) Talairach's stereotactic methodology, b) a specially devised mechanical system, and c) a linear accelerator is detailed. The authors present their preliminary results on 66 patients with nonsurgical intracranial arteriovenous malformations. The doses delivered for treatment varied from 20 to 70 Gy. Doses of no more than 40 Gy were used in 80% of patients. An angiographic study was performed when the computed tomographic scan controls showed relevant modifications of the lesion volume. Total obliteration was obtained in 27 of the 41 patients (65.8%) who were followed up for at least 24 months. The percentage of the cured patients is significantly higher when a) the entire malformation is included in the 75% isodose (96%) and b) the maximum diameter of the lesion is less than 12 mm (81%). Two patients died of rebleeding at 18 and 29 months after treatment. PMID:2648180

  13. Behavioral effects of congenital ventromedial prefrontal cortex malformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A detailed behavioral profile associated with focal congenital malformation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has not been reported previously. Here we describe a 14 year-old boy, B.W., with neurological and psychiatric sequelae stemming from focal cortical malformation of the left vmPFC. Case Presentation B.W.'s behavior has been characterized through extensive review Patience of clinical and personal records along with behavioral and neuropsychological testing. A central feature of the behavioral profile is severe antisocial behavior. He is aggressive, manipulative, and callous; features consistent with psychopathy. Other problems include: egocentricity, impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of empathy, lack of respect for authority, impaired moral judgment, an inability to plan ahead, and poor frustration tolerance. Conclusions The vmPFC has a profound contribution to the development of human prosocial behavior. B.W. demonstrates how a congenital lesion to this cortical region severely disrupts this process. PMID:22136635

  14. Congenital malformations of the vertebral column in ancient amphibians.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, F; Rothschild, B M; Hampe, O; Sobral, G; Gubin, Y M; Asbach, P

    2014-04-01

    Temnospondyls, the largest group of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic amphibians, primitively possess rhachitomous vertebrae with multipartite centra (consisting of one horse-shoe-shaped inter- and paired pleurocentra). In a group of temnospondyls, the stereospondyls, the intercentra became pronounced and disc-like, whereas the pleurocentra were reduced. We report the presence of congenital vertebral malformations (hemi, wedge and block vertebrae) in Permian and Triassic temnospondyls, showing that defects of formation and segmentation in the tetrapod vertebral column represent a fundamental failure of somitogenesis that can be followed throughout tetrapod evolution. This is irrespective of the type of affected vertebra, that is, rhachitomous or stereospondylous, and all components of the vertebra can be involved (intercentrum, pleurocentrum and neural arch), either together or independently on their own. This is the oldest known occurrence of wedge vertebra and congenital block vertebra described in fossil tetrapods. The frequency of vertebral congenital malformations in amphibians appears unchanged from the Holocene. PMID:23551141

  15. Spontaneous thrombosis of a vein of galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Chandan B.; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Sampath, Somanna

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly, comprising about 1% of all intracranial vascular anomalies, predominantly affecting the children less than 1 year of age. A 6-month-old infant presented with complaints of increasing head size of 3 months duration and multiple episodes of vomiting associated with refusal to feed since 7 days. He was a known case of VOGM who had initially refused treatment. Investigations revealed a spontaneously thrombosed VOGM with obstructive hydrocephalous. Child improved uneventfully with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Spontaneous thrombosis of a VOGM is a rare occurrence and carries a better prognosis. The relevant literature is discussed with emphasis on etiopathogenesis, mechanism, and management of spontaneous thrombosis of the malformation. PMID:26889287

  16. Pediatric lymphatic malformations: evolving understanding and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Defnet, Ann M; Bagrodia, Naina; Hernandez, Sonia L; Gwilliam, Natalie; Kandel, Jessica J

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal treatment of lymphatic malformations continues to expand as new information about the biology and genetics of these lesions is discovered, along with knowledge gained from clinical practice. A patient-centered approach, ideally provided by a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team, should guide timing and modality of treatment. Current treatment options include observation, surgery, sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and laser therapy. New medical and surgical therapies are emerging, and include sildenafil, propranolol, sirolimus, and vascularized lymph node transfer. The primary focus of management is to support and optimize these patients' quality of life. Researchers continue to study lymphatic malformations with the goal of increasing therapeutic options and developing effective clinical pathways for these complicated lesions. PMID:26815877

  17. Clinical and etiological heterogeneity in patients with tracheo-esophageal malformations and associated anomalies.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Erwin; Ploeg, Mirjam; van Bever, Yolande; Koopmans, Anna E; IJsselstijn, Hanneke; Rottier, Robbert J; Wijnen, Rene; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies

    2014-08-01

    Esophageal Atresia (EA) is a severe developmental defect of the foregut that presents with or without a Tracheo-Esophageal Fistula (TEF). The prevalence of EA/TEF over time and around the world has been relatively stable. EA/TEF is manifested in a broad spectrum of anomalies: in some patients it manifests as an isolated atresia or fistula, but in over half it affects several organ systems. While the associated malformations are often those of the VACTERL spectrum (Vertebral, Anorectal, Cardiac, Tracheo-Esophageal, Renal and Limb), many patients are affected by other malformations, such as microcephaly, micrognathia, pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia, a single umbilical artery, and anomalies of the genitourinary, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Though EA/TEF is a genetically heterogeneous condition, recurrent genes and loci are sometimes affected. Tracheo-Esophageal (TE) defects are in fact a variable feature in several known single gene disorders and in patients with specific recurrent Copy Number Variations and structural chromosomal aberrations. At present, a causal genetic aberration can be identified in 11-12% of patients. In most, EA/TEF is a sporadic finding; the familial recurrence rate is low (1%). As this suggests that epigenetic and environmental factors also contribute to the disease, non-syndromic EA/TEF is generally believed to be a multifactorial condition. Several population-based studies and case reports describe a wide range of associated risks, including age, diabetes, drug use, herbicides, smoking and fetal alcohol exposure. The phenotypical and genetic heterogeneity seen in EA/TEF patients indicates not one underlying cause, but several. Unraveling the complex multifactorial and heterogeneous etiology of EA/TEF and associated features will require large cohorts of patients. Combined statistical analysis of component findings, genome sequencing, and genome wide association studies will elucidate new causal genetic defects and predisposing loci in the etiology within specific sub-populations. Improved knowledge of environmental risk factors, genetic predisposition and causal genetic syndromes may improve prediction and parental counseling, and prevent co-morbidity. PMID:24931924

  18. Clinical features in adult patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, E; Rodríguez-González, F

    2014-06-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) encompasses deletions at the distal part of the short arm of one chromosome 4 (4p16 region). Clinical signs frequently include a typical facial appearance, mental retardation, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia with decreased muscle bulk and seizures besides congenital heart malformations, midline defects, urinary tract malformations and brain, hearing and ophthalmologic malformations. Pathogenesis of WHS is multigenic and many factors are involved in prediction of prognosis such as extent of deletion, the occurrence of severe chromosome anomalies, the severe of seizures, the existence of serious internal, mainly cardiac, abnormalities and the degree of mental retardation. The phenotype of adult with WHS is in general similar to that of childhood being facial dysmorphism, growth retardation and mental retardation the rule in both adults and children. Avoid long-term complications and provide rehabilitation programs and genetic counseling may be essential in these patients. PMID:24656633

  19. A malformed newborn with 9p and 4q trisomy.

    PubMed

    Fryns, J P; Azou, M; Devliegher, H; Eggermont, E; van den Berghe, H

    1981-01-01

    A malformed male newborn with partial trisomy 9p (qter-9q13) and distal 4q trisomy (4qter-4q31), being the unbalanced product of a balanced reciprocal translocation in the mother karyotype: 46,XX,t(4;9)(q31;q13) is reported. Besides the typical craniofacial stigmata of pure 9q trisomy the child presented with poor neurological condition and failure to thrive. PMID:6971619

  20. Arteriovenous malformations of the brain: natural history in unoperated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, P M; West, C R; Chadwick, D W; Shaw, M D

    1986-01-01

    Two-hundred and seventeen patients from a total population of 343 patients with arteriovenous malformations, were managed without surgery. Follow up was for a mean of 10.4 years. Using life survival analyses, there was a 42% risk of haemorrhage, 29% risk of death, 18% risk of epilepsy and a 27% risk of having a neurological handicap by 20 years after diagnosis in unoperated patients. PMID:3958721

  1. Thoracoscopic anatomical resection of congenital lung malformations in adults

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Lidia; Ojanguren, Amaia; Dahdah, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lung malformations (CLM) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that may require surgical resection to prevent complications. Thoracoscopic resection of CLM has been reported in infants. Our goal was to state whether it can also be a viable option in adults. Between 2007 and 2014, 11 patients had a thoracoscopic resection of a CLM (six lobectomies and five anatomic segmentectomies) with satisfactory results. Although being more challenging in adults due to infectious sequellae, this approach is safe. PMID:25922729

  2. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation presenting as a large aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, S Ganesh; Vivek, G; Borkar, Shirish; Ramachandran, Padmakumar

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness on exertion and iron deficiency anaemia. Evaluation revealed a large mass in the right lung which on further investigation was determined to be a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) with a large aneurysmal sac. The patient subsequently underwent a lobectomy with an uneventful recovery. The pathophysiology of PAVM and its varied presentations are also discussed. PMID:23076692

  3. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  4. [Anorectal malformations: their diagnosis and the initial decisions].

    PubMed

    de Espinosa, H

    1994-05-01

    The author presents the salient aspects of anorectal malformation which allow us to simplify their anatomical diagnosis. In many cases only clinical means are used while in others adequate use of technical studies are necessary. This enables us to reach therapeutic decisions in the simplest and most orderly fashion so that patients with these anomalies may be given the opportunity of attaining normal or near normal function. PMID:7991806

  5. Recurrent giant cell fibroblastoma: Malignancy predisposition in Kabuki syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Stergidou, Dorothea; Fryssira, Helena; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by distinctive facial phenotype, mental retardation, and internal organ malformations. Mutations of the epigenetic genes KMT2D and KDM6A cause dysregulation of certain developmental genes and account for the multiple congenital anomalies of the syndrome. Eight cases of malignancies have been reported in young patients with Kabuki syndrome although a causative association to the syndrome has not been established. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with Kabuki syndrome who developed a tumor on the right side of her neck. A relapsing tumor 19 months after initial excision, proved to be giant cell fibroblastoma. Τhis is the first report of giant cell fibroblastoma -a rare tumor of childhood- in a patient with Kabuki syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26898171

  6. Developmental outcome in Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaux, Keith K; Jones, Kenneth L; Jones, Marilyn C; Schelley, Susan; Hudgins, Louanne

    2005-01-30

    Over the last 20 years, a wide spectrum of congenital anomalies have been described in association with Kabuki syndrome (KS). However, very little information is available on developmental outcome. As more individuals with this syndrome are recognized and reported, it appears that as many as one-sixth may have normal intelligence. The purpose of this report is to describe the developmental outcome in 15 patients with KS, to determine whether a recognizable pattern of disabilities exist, and whether developmental outcome correlates with the presence of malformations. We ascertained 15 patients with KS from three dysmorphology and clinical genetics services in which developmental milestones and formal developmental testing were available. Based on these patients and a review of the literature, in the absence of major structural brain anomalies, the average intelligence quotient (IQ) in patients with this condition fall within the mild mental retardation range, however, specific developmental outcomes are widely variable, ranging from severe MR to normal intelligence. The presence or absence of hearing loss or major malformations, other than those involving the brain, was not predictive of developmental outcome. PMID:15523636

  7. Computational modelling for the embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Summers, Paul; Noble, J Alison; Byrne, James; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2012-09-01

    Treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain often requires the injection of a liquid embolic material to reduce blood flow through the malformation. The type of the liquid and the location of injection have to be carefully planned in a pre-operative manner. We introduce a new model of the interaction of liquid embolic materials with blood for the simulation of their propagation and solidification in the AVM. Solidification is mimicked by an increase of the material's viscosity. Propagation is modelled by using the concept of two-fluids modelling and that of scalar transport. The method is tested on digital phantoms and on one anatomically derived patient AVM case. Simulations showed that intuitive behaviour of the two-fluid system can be confirmed and that two types of glue propagation through the malformation can be reproduced. Distinction between the two types of propagation could be used to identify fistulous and plexiform compartments composing the AVM and to characterize the solidification of the embolic material in them. PMID:22056793

  8. Congenital malformations of the central nervous system in spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed Central

    Creasy, M R; Alberman, E D

    1976-01-01

    A study of 2620 pregnancies ending in spontaneous abortion revealed a CNS defect in 3.6% of embryos and fetuses, and 3% of all complete conceptuses. The type of malformation observed varied with the gestational age at expulsion, encephaloceles being predominant in earlier specimens, while more typical anencephalus and spina bifida were more common among later abortions. Chromosome abnormalities were found in 40% of abortuses with CNS defects, but were almost entirely confined to those which were still at the embryonic stage of development. 53% of the latter were chromosomally abnormal, which is the same as the proportion found among embryos without a CNS malformation. Using published life-tables of recognized pregnancies it was estimated that the prevalence of anencephalus, spina bifida, or related malformation (other than hydrocephalus), without a chromosome anomaly, is 5.3 per thousand conceptuses at the beginning of the eighth week of gestation. By comparing this with the prevalence in total births, it was further estimated that only 24% of these are born alive, with 54% aborting spontaneously and 22% being stillborn. PMID:775092

  9. Sulindac metabolites decrease cerebrovascular malformations in CCM3-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bravi, Luca; Rudini, Noemi; Cuttano, Roberto; Giampietro, Costanza; Maddaluno, Luigi; Ferrarini, Luca; Adams, Ralf H.; Corada, Monica; Boulday, Gwenola; Tournier-Lasserve, Elizabeth; Dejana, Elisabetta; Lampugnani, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a disease of the central nervous system causing hemorrhage-prone multiple lumen vascular malformations and very severe neurological consequences. At present, the only recommended treatment of CCM is surgical. Because surgery is often not applicable, pharmacological treatment would be highly desirable. We describe here a murine model of the disease that develops after endothelial-cell–selective ablation of the CCM3 gene. We report an early, cell-autonomous, Wnt-receptor–independent stimulation of β-catenin transcription activity in CCM3-deficient endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo and a triggering of a β-catenin–driven transcription program that leads to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. TGF-β/BMP signaling is then required for the progression of the disease. We also found that the anti-inflammatory drugs sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone, which attenuate β-catenin transcription activity, reduce vascular malformations in endothelial CCM3-deficient mice. This study opens previously unidentified perspectives for an effective pharmacological therapy of intracranial vascular cavernomas. PMID:26109568

  10. Advances in ultrasound imaging for congenital malformations during early gestation

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, William F.; Jolley, Jennifer A.; Simpson, Lynn L.

    2015-01-01

    With refinement in ultrasound technology, detection of fetal structural abnormalities has improved and there have been detailed reports of the natural history and expected outcomes for many anomalies. The ability to either reassure a high-risk woman with normal intrauterine images or offer comprehensive counseling and offer options in cases of strongly suspected lethal or major malformations has shifted prenatal diagnoses to the earliest possible gestational age. When indicated, scans in early gestation are valuable in accurate gestational dating. Stricter sonographic criteria for early nonviability guard against unnecessary intervention. Most birth defects are without known risk factors, and detection of certain malformations is possible in the late first trimester. The best time for a standard complete fetal and placental scan is 18–20 weeks. In addition, certain soft anatomic markers provide clues to chromosomal aneuploidy risk. Maternal obesity and multifetal pregnancies are now more common and further limit early gestation visibility. Other advanced imaging techniques during early gestation in select cases of suspected malformations include fetal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25820190

  11. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  12. Multimodality intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during Onyx embolization of cerebrovascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Deshaies, Eric M; Singla, Amit; Allott, Geoffrey; Villwock, Mark R; Li, Fenghua; Gorji, Reza

    2015-03-01

    General anesthesia prohibits neurological examination during embolization of cerebrovascular malformations when provocative testing prior to pedicle occlusion is needed. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) has the potential to fill this gap but remains relatively unexplored. We conduct a retrospective review of consecutive patients with cerebrovascular malformations treated with Onyx (ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide) embolization under general anesthesia with IONM from 2009 to 2012. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), transcranial motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs), visual evoked potential (VEPs), auditory brainstem response (ABR), and electroencephalography (EEG) were used selectively in all patients depending on the location of the malformation. Provocative testing combined with IONM was performed in 28 patients over 75 sessions. Three patients demonstrated changes in TcMEPs or ABR during provocative testing, which halted the planned embolization. Two patients demonstrated changes in baseline SSEPs after embolization, despite normal IONM during provocative testing, correlating with postprocedural contralateral weakness. Six patients developed visual deficits after arterial occlusion despite unchanged VEPs and occipital EEG during provocative testing and embolization. We therefore conclude that the sensitivity of TcMEPs and SSEPs is preferable to EEG, and we strongly caution against relying on occipital recorded VEPs to predict visual deficits. PMID:26036117

  13. Sequelae and support after termination of pregnancy for fetal malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J; Laurence, K M

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective study examined the reactions to the termination of pregnancy for fetal malformation and the follow up services that were available. Women resident in Mid Glamorgan who had had a termination between 1977 and 1981 because of positive findings after midtrimester prenatal diagnostic tests for neural tube defect or chromosome abnormalities were interviewed at home using a semistructured interview schedule. Three retrospective internal comparison groups were formed from those women who had also had a spontaneous abortion, previous stillbirth, or neonatal death or previous termination for medicosocial reasons early in pregnancy. Of the 48 women interviewed, 37 (77%) experienced an acute grief reaction after the index pregnancy was ended. This reaction was akin to that documented after stillbirth or neonatal death. Twenty two women (46%) remained symptomatic six months after the pregnancy had been ended, some requiring psychiatric support, compared with no such reaction after spontaneous abortion or termination for medicosocial reasons. All the women who had previously had a stillbirth or neonatal death were visited at home either by the general practitioner or by the midwife after that event but such follow up was limited to only eight of the study group after termination for fetal malformation. The findings suggest that support is inadequate for these patients and that improved follow up and counselling services may lessen the adverse sequelae of termination for fetal malformation. PMID:3919839

  14. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  15. Environmental monitoring using malformed embryos of the amphipod Monoporeia affinis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundelin, B.; Eriksson, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis, such as embryonic malformation were confirmed as the most sensitive variable, when soft bottom microcosms were exposed to metals such as cadmium and lead, arsenic, organic compounds such as 4,5,6 trichloroguaiacol, contaminated sediment from areas impacted by heavy metals and pulp mill effluents. The effects were demonstrated also in low concentrations that did not significantly affect the meiofauna community. The microcosm test-system with high ecological realism could offer a possibility to translate laboratory results to the natural environments. Field surveys outside different types of pulp mills and metal works on the coast of the Gulf of Bothnia have confirmed the laboratory results. Significantly higher levels of malformed embryos of Monoporeia affinis were demonstrated in the impacted areas in comparison with reference areas. The reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis have been used in the national environmental monitoring program during two years and results indicated possibilities to distinguish between effects of xenobiotica and secondary eutrophication effects, such as unsaturated oxygen condition and occurrence of sulfides, which resulted in increased frequencies of dead eggs but not affected the frequencies of malformed eggs and embryos.

  16. Heterozygous Mutations of OTX2 Cause Severe Ocular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ragge, Nicola K.; Brown, Alison G.; Poloschek, Charlotte M.; Lorenz, Birgit; Henderson, R. Alex; Clarke, Michael P.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Fielder, Alistair; Gerrelli, Dianne; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Ruddle, Piers; Hurst, Jane; Collin, J. Richard O.; Salt, Alison; Cooper, Simon T.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Williamson, Kathleen A.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Heyningen, Veronica van; Hanson, Isabel M.

    2005-01-01

    Major malformations of the human eye, including microphthalmia and anophthalmia, are examples of phenotypes that recur in families yet often show no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern. Defining loci by mapping is therefore rarely feasible. Using a candidate-gene approach, we have identified heterozygous coding-region changes in the homeobox gene OTX2 in eight families with ocular malformations. The expression pattern of OTX2 in human embryos is consistent with the eye phenotypes observed in the patients, which range from bilateral anophthalmia to retinal defects resembling Leber congenital amaurosis and pigmentary retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed defects of the optic nerve, optic chiasm, and, in some cases, brain. In two families, the mutations appear to have occurred de novo in severely affected offspring, and, in two other families, the mutations have been inherited from a gonosomal mosaic parent. Data from these four families support a simple model in which OTX2 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause ocular malformations. Four additional families display complex inheritance patterns, suggesting that OTX2 mutations alone may not lead to consistent phenotypes. The high incidence of mosaicism and the reduced penetrance have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:15846561

  17. [Frequency, dynamics, and structure of congenital malformations in populations under long-term exposure to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Sviatova, G S; Abil'dinova, G Zh; Berezina, G M

    2001-12-01

    Information on the dynamics, frequency, and structure of congenital malformations (CMs) and chromosomal diseases in two generations of rural populations from the Semipalatinsk region was obtained for the first time. The tests performed in the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (STS) for many years were demonstrated to deteriorate the genetic health of the populations of the zones of extreme and maximum radiation risks. Mutagenic and teratogenic effects of long-term ionizing irradiation were detected. These were mainly expressed as an increase in the frequencies of strictly registered CMs (SR CMs), including the Down syndrome, multiple malformations (MMs) and microcephaly (1.45 +/- 0.11, 1.39 +/- 0.01, and 0.77 +/- 0.05 per 1000 births, respectively). SR CMs exhibited linear trends toward higher frequencies in two generations of exposed persons after surface nuclear tests in 1949-1963. Their frequency was strongly correlated with the effective population dose of radiation; the main population genetic parameters (inbreeding coefficient, endogamy index, etc.) had less pronounced effects on Cms. PMID:11785298

  18. A gene prenature ovarian failure associated with eyelid malformation maps to chromosomes 3q22-q23

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure and XX gonadal dysgenesis leading to female infertility have been reported in association with an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation of the eyelids: blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES; MIM 110100). This association distinguishes BPES type I from BPES type II, in which affected females are fertile and the transmission occurs through both sexes. Recently, a gene responsible for BPES type II has been mapped to chromosome 3q22-q23, and the critical region for the gene location has been reduced to the interval between loci D3S1615 and D3S1316. Hitherto, however, no information regarding the localization of the gene for BPES type I, in which female ovarian failure is associated with eyelid malformation, has been available. We have studied two independent families affected with BPES type I, including a total of 12 affected individuals (6 infertile women) and 6 healthy relatives. The diagnostic criteria for the ophthalmological anomaly included (1) reduced horizontal diameter of palpebral fissures, (2) drooping of the upper eyelids, and (3) an abnormal skinfold running from the lower lids. Telecanthus and a flat nasal bridge were present in most cases. In both families the disease was transmitted only by the male, and no affected woman of childbearing age was fertile. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Mutations in B9D1 and MKS1 cause mild Joubert syndrome: expanding the genetic overlap with the lethal ciliopathy Meckel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by a typical cerebellar and brainstem malformation (the “molar tooth sign”), and variable multiorgan involvement. To date, 24 genes have been found mutated in Joubert syndrome, of which 13 also cause Meckel syndrome, a lethal ciliopathy with kidney, liver and skeletal involvement. Here we describe four patients with mild Joubert phenotypes who carry pathogenic mutations in either MKS1 or B9D1, two genes previously implicated only in Meckel syndrome. PMID:24886560

  20. Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome: a clinical analysis.

    PubMed

    Greally, M T; Carey, J C; Milewicz, D M; Hudgins, L; Goldberg, R B; Shprintzen, R J; Cousineau, A J; Smith, W L; Judisch, G F; Hanson, J W

    1998-03-19

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome is one of a group of disorders characterized by craniosynostosis and marfanoid habitus. Eleven cases were reported previously. We present 4 new patients and review one of the patients of the original report of Shprintzen and Goldberg [1982: J Craniofac Genet Dev Biol 2:65-74], 15 years later. The clinical and radiologic findings on our patients are compared with those of the previously reported patients and also with those of Furlong et al. [1987: Am J Med Genet 26:599-604] and Lacombe and Battin [1993: Clin Dysmorphol 2: 220-224], who share many of the characteristics of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. Some of the clinical data are helpful in determining if the patients of Furlong et al. [1987: Am J Med Genet 26:599-604] and Lacombe and Battin [1993: Clin Dysmorphol 2: 220-224] have a separate syndrome or represent a variant of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. However, radiologic investigations appear to be more specific, since an abnormality of the first and second cervical vertebrae, hydrocephalus, dilatation of the lateral ventricles, and a Chiari-I malformation of the brain were found only in the patients with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. The apparently diagnostic findings of the 15 patients with this syndrome may be helpful in differentiating between Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome and other syndromes with craniosynostosis and marfanoid habitus. PMID:9508238

  1. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable. PMID:26049589

  2. Current Therapeutic Options in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a vascular malformation syndrome consisting of a facial port-wine birthmark associated with malformed leptomeningeal blood vessels and a choroid "angioma" of the eye. It is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that occurs sporadically, is not inherited, and is caused by a somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ. In patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome, brain involvement typically presents in infancy with seizures, strokes, and stroke-like episodes, and a range of neurologic impairments. Standard treatment includes laser therapy for the birthmark, control of glaucoma through eyedrops or surgery, and the use of anticonvulsants. Increasingly low-dose aspirin is offered. Treatment with propranolol has been tried generally without the dramatic results seen in hemangiomas. Treatment with an anticonvulsant or low-dose aspirin or both before the onset of seizures is an option. Surgical resection may be offered to those whose seizures are medically refractory. Endocrine, medical rehabilitation and cognitive comorbidities are important to manage. In the future, new therapeutic options are likely to be offered stemming from preclinical studies and small pilot clinical trials currently ongoing. Discovery of the causative somatic mosaic mutation suggests new insights into the pathophysiology of this vascular malformation disorder, and potential novel treatment strategies for future study. The mutation results in constitutive overactivation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and the HIPPO-YAP pathways and inhibitors of these pathways may in the future prove useful in the treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:26706016

  3. Bill malformations in double-crested cormorants with low exposure to organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, T.; Fox, G.A.; Danesik, K.L.

    1999-12-01

    Eight of 20 newly hatched double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), captured at Dore Lake (Saskatchewan, Canada) and raised in captivity, developed malformed bills when they were 2 to 3 weeks old. Malformation was characterized by abnormal flexure and rotation of the maxilla and mandible, resulting in a crossed bill. By radiography, the premaxillary and dental bones were misshapen. Morphologically similar malformed bills in free-living comorants have been attributed to exposure to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. However, the concentrations of total PCBs in the livers of these captive cormorants with malformed bills and in their diet were lower than have been previously associated with such malformations and were considered too low to have been the cause. The bill malformations may have been caused by deficiency of vitamin D{sub 3}, because the cormorants were kept indoors without exposure to ultraviolet light and were fed frozen fish that may have been deficient in this vitamin.

  4. Congenital Brain and Spinal Cord Malformations and Their Associated Cutaneous Markers.

    PubMed

    Dias, Mark; Partington, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The brain, spinal cord, and skin are all derived from the embryonic ectoderm; this common derivation leads to a high association between central nervous system dysraphic malformations and abnormalities of the overlying skin. A myelomeningocele is an obvious open malformation, the identification of which is not usually difficult. However, the relationship between congenital spinal cord malformations and other cutaneous malformations, such as dimples, vascular anomalies (including infantile hemangiomata and other vascular malformations), congenital pigmented nevi or other hamartomata, or midline hairy patches may be less obvious but no less important. Pediatricians should be aware of these associations, recognize the cutaneous markers associated with congenital central nervous system malformations, and refer children with such markers to the appropriate specialist in a timely fashion for further evaluation and treatment. PMID:26416933

  5. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fine motor coordination, slurred speech, memory loss, vision problems, sleep disturbances, dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, stiff-person syndrome, encephalomyelitis, myasthenia ...

  6. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... If you have a malabsorption syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to remove ...

  7. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  8. A case report of aphallia with urorectal septum malformation sequence in a newborn: a very rarely seen condition

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Ravinder; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Aphallia (absence of penis) is an extremely rare abnormality which has rarely been described in medical literature and can be part of the urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS). URSMS has hardly been reported in medical literature and includes the absence of perineal and anal openings in association with ambiguous genitalia and urogenital, colonic, and lumbosacral anomalies. This case report tells the importance of detailed examination of infants that are diagnosed with aphallia. We report a case of a newborn who was diagnosed as aphallia with the URSMS syndrome after birth. The neonate had an endocardial cushion defect (atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect) and bilateral agenesis of the kidney. The neonate succumbed to death secondary to hypoplastic lung leading to respiratory failure. PMID:26673776

  9. Arteriovenous malformation of the forearm as a result of a persistent median artery.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, L; Murison, M S; Sykes, P J

    1998-12-01

    Most arteriovenous malformations usually arise from pre-existing named vessels. We report an unusual variant of an arteriovenous malformation. An 18-year-old man presented with a painful swelling of the right forearm. Arteriograms suggested branches of the anterior interosseous artery were feeding the malformation. Operative findings however, revealed the presence of a persistent median artery, which was contributing branches to the swelling. PMID:9888694

  10. Split cord malformations of the lumbar region. A model for the neurosurgical management of all types of 'occult' spinal dysraphism?

    PubMed

    Andar, U B; Harkness, W F; Hayward, R D

    1997-01-01

    From a group of 84 patients with split cord malformations presenting to our Department between 1976 and 1990, we have selected 47 cases in whom the split cord was confined to the lower dorsal-lumbar region and in whom there were no other dysraphic features such as meningocele, lipoma or dermoid cyst. We have studied these cases of 'pure split cord malformation' in an attempt to decipher its natural history and the effects of surgical procedures designed to untether the spinal cord. We conclude that the 'neuro-orthopaedic syndrome' (which includes lower limb asymmetry, talipes and modest sensory and motor problems) is, in most cases, an inevitable consequence of the abnormal functional anatomy of the split cord and is not due to any mechanical effects of tethering of the spinal cord. Its emergence as a child grows (assuming that it was not obvious at birth) is not influenced by surgery. True neurological deterioration (defined as the loss of a previously established neurological or urological function) is a rarer event. It may occur at any age--including well into adulthood--but in children the average age at presentation is 6.8 years (range 2 years 9 months to 11 years). It is due to the mechanical effects of tethering of the spinal cord and is more likely to be arrested than improved by surgery. 'True' deterioration did not occur in any of our cases who had undergone prophylactic untethering of the spinal cord and we have concluded, therefore, that surgery has a role in the prevention of late neurological problems affecting the lower limbs and bladder. Surgery to untether the spinal cord will not, however, have any affect upon the emergence of the neuro-orthopaedic syndrome. PMID:9361113

  11. Prevalence of complex vertebral malformation carriers among Polish Holstein-Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Ruść, Anna; Kamiński, Stanisław

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of Holstein calf births exhibiting vertebral deformations has been detected in Denmark since 1999 by a program monitoring the incidence of genetic diseases. Pedigree analysis demonstrated that the affected calves originated from a family afflicted by an autosomally recessively inherited complex vertebral malformation (CVM) syndrome. To determine the actual carrier frequency of the CVM-determining mutation in a population of Polish Holstein-Friesian (=Polish Black-and-White) cattle, we examined 202 proven bulls (active in 2001-2005) used by 4 domestic artificial insemination companies and 403 unproven bulls (under evaluation for breeding value). Out of the 605 bulls examined, 150 T/G heterozygotes were diagnosed, including 118 that were sons of known CVM carriers. Identification of a gene polymorphism in a bovine solute carrier family 35 member 3, termed SLC35A3, was conducted with the use of a new PCR-SSCP method (polymerase chain reaction - single stranded conformation polymorphism), which - due to its ease of use and high reliability - can be applied in widespread screening programs aimed at reducing the incidence of the CVM defect. PMID:17666777

  12. Trematode infection causes malformations and population effects in a declining New Zealand fish.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David W; Thomas, Harriet; Thieltges, David W; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    1. Animal malformations engender wide public and scientific concern because of associated environmental health risks. This is highlighted by increased incidence of limb malformations in amphibians associated with trematode infections and disturbance. Malformations may signal new emerging disease threats, but whether the phenomenon is broadly applicable across taxa, or has population-scale impacts, is unknown. 2. Malformations are widely reported in fish and, until now, have been attributed mainly to contaminants. We tested whether the trematode Telogaster opisthorchis caused severe malformations, leading to population effects, in Galaxias anomalus, a threatened New Zealand freshwater fish. 3. Experimental infection of larval fish caused increasing spinal malformation and mortality with infection intensity that closely matched field patterns. Field malformation frequency peaked in January (65%), before declining sharply in February (25%) and remaining low thereafter. 4. The peak occurred during a 'critical window' of larval development, with the decline coincident with a population crash, indicating that malformation was causing mortality in the field. 5. The occurrence of such critical developmental windows may explain why this mechanism of population impact has been overlooked. With global environmental stressors predicted to enhance trematode infections, our results show that parasite-induced malformation, and its population-scale impacts, could be more widespread than previously considered. PMID:19886894

  13. Extralobar sequestration associated with congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), type I: an autopsy report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kirti; Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Das, Ashim; Kumar, Praveen

    2011-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) type I occurring within an extralobar sequestrated segment in a neonate with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. PMID:21355683

  14. [Monitoring of pregnancies exposed to drugs in France: the experience of the registries of congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Doray, Bérénice

    2014-01-01

    Registries of congenital malformations were implemented in many industrialized countries following the drama of thalidomide. In 2013, four French registries of congenital malformations in France provide the systematic epidemiological surveillance of birth defects. All are part of international networks of registries, especially European surveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT). If the development of prevention actions including prenatal diagnosis has gradually led the registries to play a key role of assessment on the impact of public health policies, one of the major roles of registries of congenital malformations remains early detection of clusters of malformations secondary to teratogenic effects. PMID:24698188

  15. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5–8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs. PMID:22929023

  16. Operative Management of OSAS in a Complex Case of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Elena; Cavaliere, Michele; Castagna, Giovanni; Marino, Anna; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Iengo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in childhood with high prevalence in syndromic subjects with craniofacial malformations. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartoneoplastic disorder associated with disproportionate and asymmetric overgrowth of body parts and hypertrophy or malformation of lymphatic tissues, such as palatine tonsils. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with Proteus Syndrome (PS) and suffering from OSAS due to asymmetric palatine tonsillar hypertrophy, treated with partial resection of left tonsil. To avoid the risk of a general anesthesia and remove only the obstructive portion of the palatine tonsil bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFITT) under local anesthesia was performed. Recovery of the obstructive respiratory disease was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of partial tonsillar resection performed in a patient with PS suffering from OSAS under local anesthesia. PMID:26199778

  17. Giant canine with dentine anomalies in oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome.

    PubMed

    Larhant, Matthieu; Sourice, Sophie; Grimaud, Fanny; Cordoba, Luis; Leveau, Sophie; Huet, Pascal; Corre, Pierre; Khonsari, Roman Hossein

    2014-06-01

    Radiculomegaly affecting incisors, canines or premolars is a rare radiological finding (Maden et al., 2010) but is pathognomomic of a rare x-linked dominant syndrome called oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome (OFCDS). As this syndrome includes cardiac malformations and can lead to blindness due to congenital glaucoma, oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of the somatic anomalies potentially associated with radiculomegaly. We report a typical case of OFCDS and provide the first description of the microscopic dental anomalies associated with this syndrome. PMID:23827343

  18. Speech and Language in Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: A Case-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; De Grande, Sigrid; Van Buggenhout, Griet; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), a condition resulting from a distal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4, is usually associated with a severe phenotypic expression including multiple malformations, delayed psychomotor development, and profound learning disabilities. As far as communicative development is concerned, speech is usually absent…

  19. "One More for My Baby": Foetal Alcohol Syndrome and Its Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Wendy; Wells, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Foetal alcohol syndrome has been described as the commonest preventable cause of mental retardation in the Western world. It refers to a pattern of malformations, growth retardation and central nervous system impairments found in children of mothers who drink large amounts of alcohol while they are pregnant. This paper describes the nature of…

  20. Case Report: Atypical Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leanza, Vito; Rubbino, Gabriella; Leanza, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) (also called Bushy Syndrome or Amsterdam dwarfism), is a genetic disorder that can lead to several alterations. This disease affects both physical and neuropsychiatric development. The various abnormalities include facial dysmorphia (arched eyebrows, synophrys, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, down-turned angles of the mouth), upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, and gastrointestinal alterations. The prevalence of this syndrome is approximately one per 15,000. Ultrasound is not the perfect means to diagnose CdLS, however, many abnormalities can be detected prenatally by scrupulous image observation. We report an atypical CdLS case characterized by increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester, normal karyotype, saddle nose, micrognathia with receding jaw, low set ears, facies senilis, arthrogryposis of the hands, absence of the Aranzio ductus venous, dilatation of gallbladder and bowel, a unique umbilical artery, increased volume of amniotic fluid, and intrauterine growth retardation ending with the interruption of pregnancy. PMID:26834972

  1. Poland syndrome involving the left hemithorax with dextrocardia and herniation of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Bajpai, Minu; Singh, Amit; Jana, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    Poland syndrome is characterised by unilateral absence of the large pectoral muscle, ipsilateral symbrachydactyly and occasionally other malformations of the anterior chest wall and breast. The condition is more frequent among men and usually occurs on the right hemithorax in the unilateral form. This case is unique because we believe it is a rare case of Poland syndrome involving the left hemithorax along with dextrocardia and herniation of the spleen from the left subcostal region. PMID:24567179

  2. Goldenhar syndrome with right circumflex aortic arch, severe coarctation and vascular ring in a twin pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Elaheh Malakan

    2014-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome (GS) or oculo-auriculo-vertebral dysplasia (OAVD), involves a wide variety of organ systems. Cardiovascular anomalies are among the frequent malformations. The purpose of this report is to introduce a male case of a dizygotic twin pregnancy with GS and right circumflex aortic arch (RCAA), severe coarctation, hypoplastic aortic arch, aberrant right subclavian artery, vascular ring, bilateral renal artery stenosis, and mild Dandy-Walker syndrome. The embryology of RCAA and coarctation is revisited. PMID:25298700

  3. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: A rare and lethal anomaly with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Parelkar, Sandesh V.; Kapadnis, Satish P.; Sanghvi, Beejal V.; Joshi, Prashant B.; Mundada, Dinesh; Oak, Sanjay N.

    2013-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive lethal malformation characterized by typical manifestations of occipital encephalocele, bilateral polycystic kidneys and post axial polydactyly. The worldwide incidence varies from 1 in 13,250 to 1 in 140,000 live births. Highest incidence was reported in Gujarati Indians. We report a rare case of Meckel-Gruber syndrome and review of literature. PMID:24082939

  4. Right Bochdalek Hernia Associated with Kartagener Syndrome: Developmental and Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Carmelo; Turiaco, Nunzio; Gitto, Eloisa; Borruto, Francesca Astra; Santoro, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel case of the association of right-sided Bochdalek hernia, a diaphragmatic life-threatening malformation, and Kartagener syndrome, which is characterized by congenital bronchiectasis, chronic sinusitis, and situs inversus. The developmental and clinical findings are discussed. When an association of diaphragmatic hernia with situs viscerum inversus is encountered, physicians should be mindful of the possibility of Kartagener syndrome because this condition could significantly affect the morbidity of the patient. PMID:25755941

  5. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  6. Congenital bronchopulmonary vascular malformations, “sequestration” and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Irodi, Aparna; Prabhu, Shailesh M; John, Reetu Amrita; Leena, RV

    2015-01-01

    Congenital bronchopulmonary vascular malformations (BPVMs) include a broad spectrum of disorders that involve abnormalities in the form of disruptions of normal communication and/or presence of abnormal communication between one or more of the three main systems of the lung, namely, the airways, arteries, and veins. The establishment of abnormal communications by means of small openings or anastomoses is termed as malinosculation. The aim of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the imaging appearances of the various types of pulmonary malinosculation. PMID:25709164

  7. Osteopetrosis and Chiari type I malformation: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; Cıkla, Ulaş; Bauer, Andrew; Başkaya, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis (OP) is hereditary X-linked, autosomal recessive (ARO), or autosomal dominant (ADO) skeletal disease. ARO has two subtypes, which are infantile malignant and intermediate type. ARO and X-linked OP have poor clinical outcome. ADO is called adult benign type because of the normal life expectancy, which has type I and type II. Here, the authors present an ADO patient with Chiari type I. Concomitant ADO with Chiari type I malformation is an extremely rare condition. Literature research yielded only one case report to date. PMID:26503583

  8. The biological resolution of malformations of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    McLone, D G

    1998-12-01

    It has been known for years that the assembly of the nervous system is under genetic control. During the last 10 years, the genes that direct the formation of the brain and spinal cord have begun to be discovered at an amazing pace. Mutations in the fruit fly and advances in molecular genetics have led the way. Gene mutations that cause many of the malformations of the human brain and spinal cord are now known. This has many physician-scientists hoping that an understanding of cause might lead to cure. PMID:9848852

  9. Synovial Sarcoma-AV Malformation Collision in the Anterior Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Bakula, Aneta; Fiel-Gan, Mary; Levinson, Michael; Buckley, Tinera; Volpe, John; Lowe, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and synovial sarcomas are both rare lesions in the mediastinum. Rarer still is a collision tumor in that region. Herein we present a case of a collision tumor comprised of AVM and synovial sarcoma in a 76-year-old man, presenting with pneumonia. Imaging showed a vascular lesion that spontaneously ruptured, causing enlargement of the mass and hemothorax. The resected specimen revealed the malignant second component. This report is a discussion of the never-before reported lesion. PMID:26244206

  10. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation embolization: how we do it.

    PubMed

    Greben, Craig R; Setton, Avi; Putterman, Daniel; Caplin, Drew; Lenner, Roberta; Gandras, Eric J

    2013-03-01

    We report our experience with an embolization technique that allows safe, controllable exclusion of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations using detachable coils, a single venous access site, coaxial catheter guidance, and 1 or 2 microcatheters. This technique is particularly useful when treating central lesions with a short feeding artery and when high flow increases the risk of coil migration and nontarget embolization. It affords precise placement and repositioning of coils prior to detachment. The technique facilitates safe and successful endovascular closure of these challenging lesions. PMID:23499130

  11. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  12. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  13. Transvenous Embolization of a Ruptured Deep Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, V.M.; Marcos-Gonzalez, A.; Radovanovic, I.; Bijlenga, P.; Narata, A.P.; Moret, J.; Schaller, K.; Lovblad, K.O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ruptured cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) usually require treatment to avoid re-bleeding. Depending on the angioarchitecture and center strategy, the treatment can be surgical, endovascular, radiosurgical or combined methods. The classic endovascular approach is transarterial, but sometimes it is not always applicable. The transvenous approach has been described as an alternative for the endovascular treatment of small AVMs when arterial access or another therapeutic method is not possible. This approach can be considered when the nidus is small and if there is a single draining vein. We present a technical note on a transvenous approach for the treatment of a ruptured AVM in a young patient. PMID:23472720

  14. Type I Chiari malformation presenting with laryngomalacia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Christopher; Ulualp, Seckin O

    2015-08-01

    We describe clinical features of an infant with laryngomalacia and dysphagia caused by type I Chiari malformation (CM-I). A 12-month-old child presented with a 6 month history of progressive stridor, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux. Examination of the airway and swallowing function indicated mild laryngomalacia and aspiration with all consistencies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated CM-I. Symptoms were resolved after posterior fossa decompression. CM-I, typically diagnosed later in life, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of laryngomalacia and dysphagia. High clinical suspicion and thorough search for abnormalities ensure early diagnosis and proper management of children with neurologic variant laryngomalacia. PMID:26031456

  15. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  16. [Pasqualini's syndrome: hypoandrogenism with spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Valdés Socin, Hernán; Beckers, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Pasqualini and Bur published the first case of eunuchoidism with preserved spermatogenesis in 1950 in Revista de la Asociación Médica Argentina. The hypoandrogenism with spermatogenesis syndrome included: (a) eunuchoidism, (b) testis with normal spermatogenesis and full volume, with mature spermatozoa in a high proportion of seminiferous tubes and undifferentiated and immature Leydig cells (c) full functional compensation through the administration of chorionic gonadotropin hormone, while hCG is administered (d) total urinary gonadotrophins within normal limits (e) this definition supposes the normal activity of the pituitary and the absence of congenital malformations in general. A first step in the understanding of the physiopathogeny of Pasqualini syndrome or the so called "fertile eunuch" syndrome was the absence of LH in plasma and urine of patients. The second breakthrough was the functional and genetic studies that validated the hypothesis of a functional deficit of LH in these men: it will then also be described in some women. Different groups including ours demonstrated in these cases a LH with varying degrees of immunological activity but biologically inactive in most of the patients, due to one or more inactivating mutations in the LHB gene. Finally, the full comprehension of Pasqualini syndrome allowed to reverse the hypoandrogenic phenotype and to restore fertility in these patients through the use of chorionic gonadotropin and the modern in-vitro fertility techniques. This article is an historical review and a tribute to the memory of Rodolfo Q. Pasqualini. PMID:25637904

  17. Ivemark syndrome-a rare entity with specific anatomical features.

    PubMed

    Hrusca, Adrian; Rachisan, Andreea Liana; Lucian, Bogdan; Oprita, Simona; Manole, Simona; Cainap, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Ivemark syndrome (IS) is a rare embryological disorder which results from failure of development of the left-right asymmetry of organs. It is often associated with cardiac and other organ abnormalities, which are the usual causes of death in early neonatal life. We report a 3 months old girl with IS with dextrocardia, transposition of the great vessels, atrio-ventricular connection, total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage, a right atrial and right pulmonary isomerism, a midline liver, a midline gallbladder, asplenia, intestinal malrotation and vena cava anomalies. To our knowledge, complete right heterotaxia syndrome has been rarely described in literature. Lateralization defects such as situs inversus, asplenia or polysplenia due to defective left-right axis development are considered as defects of the primary developmental field. Therefore, additional malformations in IS can be synchronic defects in the primary developmental field rather than causally independent malformations. PMID:26005826

  18. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F.; Gal, A.

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  20. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  1. [Proteus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benichou, J J; Labrune, B; Formanek, A; Denoix, C; Oger, P

    1990-01-01

    Two new cases of Proteus syndrome are reported. This congenital syndrome, first described in 1983, comprises gigantism of extremities, body hemihypertrophy, pigmented nevi and multiple tumors (subcutaneous, lipomas, hamartomas). This syndrome belongs to the same group as Recklinghausen disease, Maffucci or Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes. The prognosis is not well known but mostly depends on functional and psychologic consequences of important deformations. PMID:2206106

  2. Surgical treatment for kyphoscoliosis in Cohen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imagama, Shiro; Tsuji, Taichi; Ohara, Tetsuya; Katayama, Yoshito; Goto, Manabu; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kawakami, Noriaki

    2013-08-01

    Cohen syndrome is a very rare disease. Complication by spinal deformity has been reported, but management and surgery for spinal deformity in Cohen syndrome has not been previously described. The objective of this study was to examine the outcome of surgical treatment for kyphoscoliosis of Cohen syndrome with a literature review. The patient was a 14-year-old male with the characteristics of Cohen syndrome: truncal obesity, mental retardation, arachnodactyly, microcephalia, and a facial malformation. Scoliosis was conservatively treated with a brace at 13 years of age, but the spinal deformity rapidly progressed within a year. Plain radiographs before surgery showed scoliosis of 47 degrees (T5-T11) and 79 degrees (T11-L3), and kyphosis of 86 degrees (T7-L1). One-stage anteroposterior corrective fusion of T4-L3 was scheduled after 2-week Halo traction. Postoperative respiratory management was carefully performed because of Cohen syndrome-associated facial malformation, obesity, and reduced muscle tonus. Respiration was managed with intubation until the following day and no respiratory problems occurred. After surgery, thoracolumbar scoliosis was 28 degrees (correction rate: 65%). Kyphosis was markedly improved from 86 degrees to 20 degrees, achieving a favorable balance of the trunk. The outcome is favorable at 6.5 years after surgery. In conclusion, Cohen syndrome is often complicated by spinal deformity, particularly kyphosis, that is likely to progress even in adulthood. In our patient, spinal deformity progressed within a short period, even with brace treatment. Surgery should be required before progression to the severe spinal deformity with careful attention to general anesthesia. PMID:24640185

  3. Cerebrovascular disease associated with Aarskog-Scott syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diluna, Michael L; Amankulor, Nduka M; Johnson, Michele H; Gunel, Murat

    2007-05-01

    Faciogenital dysplasia, also known as Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), is an X-linked dominant congenital disorder characterized by multiple facial, musculoskeletal, dental, neurological and urogenital abnormalities, ocular manifestations, congenital heart defects, low IQ and behavioral problems. Here we describe an unusual presentation of dysplastic carotid artery, basilar artery malformation or occlusion and posterior circulation aneurysm in a 13-year-old male with AAS. PMID:17294235

  4. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO THALIDOMIDE, ALTERED VASCULOGENESIS, AND CNS MALFORMATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Hallene, K. L.; Oby, E.; Lee, B. J.; Santaguida, S.; Bassanini, S.; Cipolla, M.; Marchi, N.; Hossain, M.; Battaglia, G.; Janigro, D.

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) result from abnormal neuronal positioning during corticogenesis. MCD are believed to be the morphological and perhaps physiological bases of several neurological diseases, spanning from mental retardation to autism and epilepsy. In view of the fact that during development, an appropriate blood supply is necessary to drive organogenesis in other organs, we hypothesized that vasculogenesis plays an important role in brain development and that E15 exposure in rats to the angiogenesis inhibitor thalidomide would cause postnatal MCD. Our results demonstrate that thalidomide inhibits angiogenesis in vitro at concentrations that result in significant morphological alterations in cortical and hippocampal regions of rats prenatally exposed to this vasculotoxin. Abnormal neuronal development was associated with vascular malformations and a leaky blood–brain barrier. Protein extravasation and uptake of fluorescent albumin by neurons, but not glia, was commonly associated with abnormal cortical development. Neuronal hyperexcitability was also a hallmark of these abnormal cortical regions. Our results suggest that prenatal vasculogenesis is required to support normal neuronal migration and maturation. Altering this process leads to failure of normal cerebrovascular development and may have a profound implication for CNS maturation. PMID:16859833

  5. Treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: combined neurosurgical and neuroradiologic approach.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, L D; Harris, A B

    1983-01-01

    Experience with 31 intraoperative embolizations performed on 23 patients is reported. The procedure involves the direct injection of embolic material into the main arterial feeders during craniotomy. The combined effort involves the exposure of the lesion at craniotomy, standard arteriotomy, and fluoroscopically monitored intravascular infusion of contrast material followed by the injection of bucrylate (IBCA, Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) mixed with tantalum or Pantopaque into the feeding vessels and into the interstices of the malformation. It was concluded that the procedure significantly diminishes operating time and blood loss for the lesions that were subsequently resected. Fluoroscopy coupled with high-quality stop-frame videotape recording allows a detailed study of the flow characteristics of the malformation so that polymerization time can be regulated appropriately. Follow-up varied from 3 months to 4 1/2 years. There were two deaths related to the procedure and one additional complication of cortical blindness that partially resolved. None of the survivors rebled. Most of the survivors improved. PMID:6410746

  6. Diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia: a novel recessive brain malformation

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic–mesencephalic junction with a characteristic ‘butterfly’-like contour of the midbrain on axial sections. Additional imaging features included variable degrees of supratentorial ventricular dilatation and hypoplasia to complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. Diffusion tensor imaging showed diffuse hypomyelination and lack of an identifiable corticospinal tract. All patients displayed severe cognitive impairment, post-natal progressive microcephaly, axial hypotonia, spastic quadriparesis and seizures. Autistic features were noted in older cases. Talipes equinovarus, non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous were additional findings in two families. One of the patients required shunting for hydrocephalus; however, this yielded no change in ventricular size suggestive of dysplasia rather than obstruction. We propose the term ‘diencephalic–mesencephalic junction dysplasia’ to characterize this autosomal recessive malformation. PMID:22822038

  7. Morphological and functional aspects of progenitors perturbed in cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Bizzotto, Sara; Francis, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular mechanisms important for the function of neuronal progenitors during development, revealed by their perturbation in different cortical malformations. We focus on a class of neuronal progenitors, radial glial cells (RGCs), which are renowned for their unique morphological and behavioral characteristics, constituting a key element during the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. We describe how the particular morphology of these cells is related to their roles in the orchestration of cortical development and their influence on other progenitor types and post-mitotic neurons. Important for disease mechanisms, we overview what is currently known about RGC cellular components, cytoskeletal mechanisms, signaling pathways and cell cycle characteristics, focusing on how defects lead to abnormal development and cortical malformation phenotypes. The multiple recent entry points from human genetics and animal models are contributing to our understanding of this important cell type. Combining data from phenotypes in the mouse reveals molecules which potentially act in common pathways. Going beyond this, we discuss future directions that may provide new data in this expanding area. PMID:25729350

  8. Somatic Uniparental Isodisomy Explains Multifocality of Glomuvenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Amyere, Mustapha; Aerts, Virginie; Brouillard, Pascal; McIntyre, Brendan A.S.; Duhoux, François P.; Wassef, Michel; Enjolras, Odile; Mulliken, John B.; Devuyst, Olivier; Antoine-Poirel, Hélène; Boon, Laurence M.; Vikkula, Miikka

    2013-01-01

    Inherited vascular malformations are commonly autosomal dominantly inherited with high, but incomplete, penetrance; they often present as multiple lesions. We hypothesized that Knudson’s two-hit model could explain this multifocality and partial penetrance. We performed a systematic analysis of inherited glomuvenous malformations (GVMs) by using multiple approaches, including a sensitive allele-specific pairwise SNP-chip method. Overall, we identified 16 somatic mutations, most of which were not intragenic but were cases of acquired uniparental isodisomy (aUPID) involving chromosome 1p. The breakpoint of each aUPID is located in an A- and T-rich, high-DNA-flexibility region (1p13.1–1p12). This region corresponds to a possible new fragile site. Occurrences of these mutations render the inherited glomulin variant in 1p22.1 homozygous in the affected tissues without loss of genetic material. This finding demonstrates that a double hit is needed to trigger formation of a GVM. It also suggests that somatic UPID, only detectable by sensitive pairwise analysis in heterogeneous tissues, might be a common phenomenon in human cells. Thus, aUPID might play a role in the pathogenesis of various nonmalignant disorders and might explain local impaired function and/or clinical variability. Furthermore, these data suggest that pairwise analysis of blood and tissue, even on heterogeneous tissue, can be used for localizing double-hit mutations in disease-causing genes. PMID:23375657

  9. Historical aspects of the study of malformations in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Baljet, B; Oostra, R J

    1998-05-01

    The collection of malformed ("teratological") specimens of man and other mammals of Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859) and his son Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), dating from the beginning of the 19th century, continues to function as a central part of the Department of Anatomy and Embryology in the Academic Medical Center at the University of Amsterdam. Recently, many specimens in the collection were reexamined, using radiographic, CT scan, and MRI methods. In order to provide background information concerning Dutch teratological research and anatomical cabinets, some aspects of the history of Dutch morphology during the 17th-19th centuries are briefly described in this paper. Special attention is paid to the scientific work and cabinet of Frederik Ruijsch (1638-1731), who sold this cabinet to Czar Peter the Great; Bernard Siegfried Albinus (1697-1770); Wouter van Doeveren (1733-1783), Andreas Bonn (1738-1818), and Sebald Justinus Brugmans (1763-1819), who sold or donated parts of their collections of malformed specimens to Leiden University; Petrus Camper (1722-1789) and Jan Bleuland (1756-1838), whose collections are still in the Department of Anatomy at Groningen University and the Departments of Anatomy and Pathology of Utrecht University; and Gerard and Willem Vrolik. PMID:9605283

  10. Hemorrhage risk and clinical features of multiple intracranial arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Boone, Christine E; Caplan, Justin M; Yang, Wuyang; Ye, Xiaobu; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report is to examine clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, and annual hemorrhage incidence rate for patients with multiple arteriovenous malformations (MAVM). The PubMed and EMBASE databases and the arteriovenous malformations (AVM) database at The Johns Hopkins Hospital were searched to identify patients with MAVM. Data related to demographics, clinical features, management, and treatment outcomes were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Thirty-eight patients met the inclusion criteria. The annual hemorrhage incidence rate was 6.7%. Surgical intervention remained the most common single-modality treatment from 1949-2011. Between 1990 and 2011, multiple-modality treatment strategies (36% of cases) were employed more frequently. The most common presenting features were neurological deficit (74%) and hemorrhage (63%). In patients undergoing staged treatment of MAVM, hemorrhage of an untreated nidus (n=5), visualization of a new nidus (n=9), and disappearance of an untreated nidus (n=2) were observed. Limitations of this study include small sample size and reporting bias. The annual hemorrhage incidence rate for MAVM patients was approximately two- to three-fold greater than the reported annual hemorrhage rates for solitary AVM. Combining different treatment modalities has become the most common management strategy. The potential instability of remaining nidi with staged or incomplete treatment necessitates close follow-up in these cases. PMID:26461910

  11. Embolization-induced angiogenesis in cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Webster Crowley, R; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-11-01

    Endovascular occlusion of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is often utilized as adjunctive therapy in combination with radiosurgery or microsurgery. Evidence supports that partial occlusion of AVM via endovascular embolization leads to increased angiogenesis. This phenomenon may be a contributing factor to the decreased efficacy of AVM radiosurgery following embolization. We review the literature for potential mechanisms of embolization-induced angiogenesis. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed to identify studies that sought to elucidate the pathophysiology behind embolization-induced angiogenesis. The terms "arteriovenous malformation", "embolization", and "angiogenesis" were used to search for relevant publications individually and together. Three distinct mechanisms for embolization-induced angiogenesis were described in the literature: (1) hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis, (2) inflammatory-mediated angiogenesis, and (3) hemodynamic-mediated angiogenesis. Embolization-induced angiogenesis of cerebral AVM likely results from a combination of the three aforementioned mechanisms. However, future research is necessary to determine the relative contribution of each individual mechanism to overall post-embolization AVM neovascularization. PMID:25001989

  12. Cervicofacial Lymphatic Malformations: A Retrospective Review of 40 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung Chae; Kim, Jae Bong; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Yong-Sun; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic malformation (LM) is a form of congenital vascular malformation with a low incidence. Although LM has been studied, no consensus has emerged regarding its cause or treatment. Methods In this study, we retrospectively evaluated 40 patients who visited our vascular anomalies center for the treatment of cervicofacial LM, which is a common manifestation of LM. The medical records of patients over a period of 12 years were reviewed and analyzed for commonalities regarding the diagnosis and the results of treatment. Results Suspected cervicofacial LM was confirmed through imaging studies. No difference in incidence was observed according to sex, and 73% of patients first presented with symptoms before the age of two years. The left side and the V2–V3 area were most commonly affected. No significant differences in incidence were observed among the macrocystic, microcystic, and combined types of LM. A total of 28 out of 36 patients received sclerotherapy as the first choice of treatment, regardless of the type of lesion. Complete resolution was achieved in only 25% of patients. Conclusions LM is important to confirm the diagnosis early and to choose an appropriate treatment strategy according to the stage of the disease and each individual patient's symptoms. When treatment is delayed or an incorrect treatment is administered, patient discomfort increases as the lesion gradually spreads. Therefore, more so than is the case for most other diseases, a team approach on a case-by-case basis is important for the accurate and appropriate treatment of LM. PMID:26848440

  13. PDCD10 Gene Mutations in Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P.; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype. PMID:25354366

  14. Cerebral cavernous malformation: new molecular and clinical insights

    PubMed Central

    Revencu, N; Vikkula, M

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a vascular malformation causing neurological problems, such as headaches, seizures, focal neurological deficits, and cerebral haemorrhages. CCMs can occur sporadically or as an autosomal dominant condition with variable expression and incomplete penetrance. Familial forms have been linked to three chromosomal loci, and loss of function mutations have been identified in the KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3 genes. Recently, many new pieces of data have been added to the CCM puzzle. It has been shown that the three CCM genes are expressed in neurones rather than in blood vessels. The interaction between CCM1 and CCM2, which was expected on the basis of their structure, has also been proven, suggesting a common functional pathway. Finally, in a large series of KRIT1 mutation carriers, clinical and neuroradiological features have been characterised. These data should lead to more appropriate follow up, treatment, and genetic counselling. The recent developments will also help to elucidate the precise pathogenic mechanisms leading to CCM, contributing to a better understanding of normal and pathological angiogenesis and to the development of targeted treatment. PMID:16571644

  15. Somatic uniparental isodisomy explains multifocality of glomuvenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Amyere, Mustapha; Aerts, Virginie; Brouillard, Pascal; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Duhoux, Franois P; Wassef, Michel; Enjolras, Odile; Mulliken, John B; Devuyst, Olivier; Antoine-Poirel, Hlne; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2013-02-01

    Inherited vascular malformations are commonly autosomal dominantly inherited with high, but incomplete, penetrance; they often present as multiple lesions. We hypothesized that Knudson's two-hit model could explain this multifocality and partial penetrance. We performed a systematic analysis of inherited glomuvenous malformations (GVMs) by using multiple approaches, including a sensitive allele-specific pairwise SNP-chip method. Overall, we identified 16 somatic mutations, most of which were not intragenic but were cases of acquired uniparental isodisomy (aUPID) involving chromosome 1p. The breakpoint of each aUPID is located in an A- and T-rich, high-DNA-flexibility region (1p13.1-1p12). This region corresponds to a possible new fragile site. Occurrences of these mutations render the inherited glomulin variant in 1p22.1 homozygous in the affected tissues without loss of genetic material. This finding demonstrates that a double hit is needed to trigger formation of a GVM. It also suggests that somatic UPID, only detectable by sensitive pairwise analysis in heterogeneous tissues, might be a common phenomenon in human cells. Thus, aUPID might play a role in the pathogenesis of various nonmalignant disorders and might explain local impaired function and/or clinical variability. Furthermore, these data suggest that pairwise analysis of blood and tissue, even on heterogeneous tissue, can be used for localizing double-hit mutations in disease-causing genes. PMID:23375657

  16. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation in a 36 year-old female

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Timothy J.; Henn, Lucas; Ingnam, Sisham; Sypert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM), is an inborn abnormality of the lower respiratory system. Most often diagnosed in the perinatal period, these anomalies usually present with tachypnea, cyanosis, and respiratory distress. However, rare cases are asymptomatic and undiagnosed until adulthood.

  17. Fetal MRI as Complementary Study of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation During Pregnancy: A Single Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Paanakker, Alberto; Gomez-Leal, Paloma; Navarro-Sanchez, Patricia; Bueno-Crespo, Andres; Martinez-Cendan, Juan Pedro; Remezal-Solano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fetal lung masses are rare findings in prenatal ultrasound scanning in general population, of which congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is the most commonly diagnosed type. This paper reports a single case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation detected at our hospital and the subsequent clinical follow-up using ultrasound scanning and fetal magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27186452

  18. MALFORMATION, MORTALITY AND PARASITES IN NORTHERN LEOPARD FROGS IN MN AND ND.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2000 a field study compared the relative incidence of mortality and malformation of developing northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) at two Minnesota (MN)lake sites, one site with history of high incidence of malformations (CWB)and one with low incidence (BUT). Tadpoles were reared in enclosures ...

  19. MALFORMATION VERSUS MORTALITY, A STUDY OF NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG DEVELOPMENT IN SITU.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were designed to compare the relative incidence of mortality and malformation of developing northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) at two Minnesota (MN)Lake sites. Site selection was based on survey data that indicated one site had a high incidence of malformations (CWB) versus low inci...

  20. Congenital malformations of the brain: Pathological, embryological, clinical, radiological, and genetic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.G.; McGillivray, B.; Kalousek, D.K.; Hill, A.; Poskitt, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although I can quibble with the treatment of a few topics, this is by far the best book ever written on human brain malformations. The senior author has studied the pathology of human brain malformations throughout her career and has strengthened the book greatly by seeking coauthors to help with critical areas such as brain imaging, clinical management, and, especially, genetics.

  1. Leaping lopsided: a review of the current hypotheses regarding etiologies of limb malformations in frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loeffler, I.K.; Stocum, D.L.; Fallon, J.F.; Meteyer, C.U.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in the investigation of limb malformations in free-living frogs has underlined the wide range in the types of limb malformations and the apparent spatiotemporal clustering of their occurrence. Here, we review the current understanding of normal and abnormal vertebrate limb development and regeneration and discuss some of the molecular events that may bring about limb malformation. Consideration of the differences between limb development and regeneration in amphibians has led us to the hypothesis that some of the observed limb malformations come about through misdirected regeneration. We report the results of a pilot study that supports this hypothesis. In this study, the distal aspect of the right hindlimb buds of X. laevis tadpoles was amputated at the pre-foot paddle stage. The tadpoles were raised in water from a pond in Minnesota at which 7% of surveyed newly metamorphosed feral frogs had malformations. Six percent (6 of 100) of the right limbs of the tadpoles raised in pond water developed abnormally. One truncated right limb was the only malformation in the control group, which was raised in dechlorinated municipal water. All unamputated limbs developed normally in both groups. Three major factors under consideration for effecting the limb malformations are discussed. These factors include environmental chemicals (primarily agrichemicals), encysted larvae (metacercariae) of trematode parasites, and increased levels of ultraviolet light. Emphasis is placed on the necessary intersection of environmental stressors and developmental events to bring about the specific malformations that are observed in free-living frog populations.

  2. Congenital Cystic Lesions of the Lung: Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation and Bronchopulmonary Sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Sfakianaki, Anna K; Copel, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cystic lesions of the lung in fetuses are rare. The most common malformations of the lower respiratory tract are congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and bronchopulmonary sequestration. With the increased use of obstetric ultrasound, cystic lung lesions are detected more often antenatally, which allows for proper planning of peripartum and neonatal management. This article discusses a range of diagnostic and management options. PMID:22866187

  3. Congenital Malformations in Perinatal Autopsies – A Study of 100 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Andola, Uma S; AM, Anita; Ahuja, Mukta; Andola, Sainath K

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital malformations remain a common cause of perinatal deaths and even though ultrasonogram can give fairly accurate diagnosis, perinatal autopsy is essential to confirm the diagnosis and look for associated malformations. Objectives To emphasize the importance of perinatal autopsy in diagnosing congenital malformations and to compare the same with the prenatal ultrasound findings. Methods The present study comprises 100 consecutive perinatal autopsies conducted after obtaining the approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee. In cases where prenatal ultrasound findings were available they were compared with the autopsy findings. Results Out of 100 perinatal autopsies, 44 cases were congenital anomalies with M:F = 1:1.5. Majority of the fetuses with congenital malformations (36.36%) were therapeutically terminated, Cental nervous system malformations being the commonest indication. The most common timing of therapeutic termination being 20 -24weeks. Congenital malformations were common between 35-39 weeks gestational age and birth weight range 350- 1000g. The malformations involving the central nervous system were commonest, seen in 15 cases (34.09%) followed by renal anomalies in 9 cases (20.45%) and multiple malformations in 7cases ( 15.91%). Autopsy confirmed the prenatal ultrasound findings in 50% of the cases, added to diagnosis in 29.54%, while it completely changed the primary diagnosis in 9.09% of the cases. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of perinatal autopsy in confirming the diagnosis of congenital anomalies by prenatal ultrasound findings. PMID:23373038

  4. Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformations associated with fetal pleural effusion and ascites.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Elisa; Cordoro, Kelly M; Barat, Muriel; Rousseau, Thierry; Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka; Frieden, Ilona J; Vabres, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Glomuvenous malformations are hereditary vascular anomalies, usually without extracutaneous involvement. We report two cases of extensive thoracic plaque-type glomuvenous malformation in newborns who had previously been diagnosed in utero with pleural effusion and ascites, suggesting a pathogenic link between the two conditions. PMID:21133993

  5. COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF RETINOIC ACID ON AMPHIBIAN LIMB DEVELOPMENT AND LETHALITY: CHRONIC EXPOSURE RESULTS IN LETHALITY NOT LIMB MALFORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, high frequencies of malformations have been reported in amphibians across the United States. It has been suggested that the malformations may be the result of xenobiotic disruption of retinoid signaling pathways during embryogenesis and tadpole development. Therefore, a...

  6. Cerebral volumetric analysis over time in children with malformations of cortical development: a quantitative investigation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Linsey M; Poduri, Annapurna; Chang, Bernard S

    2011-02-01

    Malformations of cortical development are common neurological disorders characterized by disruptions in the normal development of cerebral gray and white matter during fetal life. We performed a quantitative, partly longitudinal investigation of cerebral volumes in a cohort of children with cortical malformations to investigate how their anatomical abnormalities change over time. Cortical malformation subjects showed volumetric curves that were comparable with those reported for healthy individuals, and reached peak cerebral volume, gray matter volume, and white matter volume at ages similar to those reported for healthy children. Volumes of heterotopic gray matter, however, demonstrated increases that were out of proportion to changes in cortical volume or caudate nucleus volume, suggesting that misplaced gray matter can have a unique pattern of maturation. Our findings demonstrate that overall brain growth in children with cortical malformations appears to mirror that of the healthy population, although malformed regions can show distinct growth patterns. PMID:21189336

  7. Treatment of hematuria caused by renal arteriovenous malformation in pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuedong; Liu, Fei; Xing, Jinchun; Liu, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate hematuria in pregnant patients caused by renal arteriovenous malformation and to evaluate the efficacy of superselective renal angiography and embolization used for treatment of renal arteriovenous malformation. Two cases of hematuria in pregnant patients caused by renal arteriovenous malformation were enrolled. Case 1 was a 28-year-old woman with repeatedly intermittent hematuria at week 7 during gestation. Case 2 was a 30-year-old woman with repeatedly intermittent hematuria at week 8 during gestation. B ultrasound and CT were performed to detect hydronephrosis. Renal arteriovenous malformation was diagnosed by selective angiography. Both the patients were treated with embolization. The 2 cases were successfully embolized with different materials including gelfoam and coils. Both of the 2 patients were recovered well and discharged successful after the operation. In conclusion, superselective renal angiography and embolization are effective methods for diagnosis and treatment of renal arteriovenous malformation in pregnant patients. PMID:25932278

  8. Growing Dural Sinus Malformation with Associated Developmental Venous Anomaly, Multiple Cavernomas and Facial Venous Malformation in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Z.; Batista, LL.; Sachet, M.; Mahadevan, J.; Alvarez, H.; Lasjaunias, P.

    2002-01-01

    Summary This is an unusual case report of an infant, who initially presented with a facial haemangioma and was later diagnosed to have a dural sinus malformation (DSM) involving the torcula. The DSM increased in size lateralising to the right transverse sinus at three months of age. Postnatal enlargement of the dural sinus has not been described before suggesting a delay in the maturation of the dural sinus which normally would occur antenatally. There was a further association with a complex developmental venous anomaly (DVA) draining the right cerebral hemisphere into the deep cerebral vein and multiple cavernous malformations. The DVA was not clearly demonstrated at age one month but was more obvious at age three months. This would be the first reported case of DSM associated with a DVA. Increasing venous hypertension probably contributed to the poor opacification of the DVA on follow-up angiography at age six months and to the haemorrhagic changes within the cavernomas on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The therapeutic goal was to correct venous hypertension by partially embolising the dural shunts to remodel the cerebral vasculature and preserve the patent sinus. The treatment strategy and possible link between the complex disease entities presented in this infant are discussed. Despite these attemps, the lesion continued to grow compressing the posterior fossa structures. The infant died at nine months of age. PMID:20594504

  9. Hind limb malformations in free-living northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) from Maine, Minnesota, and Vermont suggest multiple etiologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Loeffler, I.K.; Fallon, J.F.; Converse, K.A.; Green, E.; Helgen, J.C.; Kersten, S.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Background Reports of malformed frogs have increased throughout the North American continent in recent years. Most of the observed malformations have involved the hind limbs. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the hind limb malformations in wild frogs as an important step toward understanding the possible etiologies. Methods During 1997 and 1998, 182 recently metamorphosed northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were collected from Minnesota, Vermont, and Maine. Malformed hind limbs were present in 157 (86%) of these frogs, which underwent necropsy and radiographic evaluation at the National Wildlife Health Center. These malformations are described in detail and classified into four major categories: (1) no limb (amelia); (2) multiple limbs or limb elements (polymelia, polydactyly, polyphalangy); (3) reduced limb segments or elements (phocomelia, ectromelia, ectrodactyly, and brachydactyly; and (4) distally complete but malformed limb (bone rotations, bridging, skin webbing, and micromelia). Results Amelia and reduced segments and/or elements were the most common finding. Frogs with bilateral hind limb malformations were not common, and in only eight of these 22 frogs were the malformations symmetrical. Malformations of a given type tended to occur in frogs collected from the same site, but the types of malformations varied widely among all three states, and between study sites within Minnesota. Conclusions Clustering of malformation type suggests that developmental events may produce a variety of phenotypes depending on the timing, sequence, and severity of the environmental insult. Hind limb malformations in free-living frogs transcend current mechanistic explanations of tetrapod limb development.

  10. Low flow venous malformation lesion presented with medial canthal swelling simulating swelling of the lacrimal sac origin: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ALSwaina, Nayef F.; ALSuhaibani, Adel H.

    2015-01-01

    Low flow venous malformation lesions (e.g. cavernous venous malformations) are commonly seen in the orbit and peri-orbital area. Common conditions may present with unexpected presentation. Here we report a 50 years old male patient with low flow venous malformation lesion presented with medial canthal swelling similar to the swelling typically seen in lacrimal sac related pathologies. PMID:26309438

  11. Hypothalamic Glioma in a Patient With Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Julia W; Walter, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by vascular malformations involving brain, skin, and occasionally eyes. There is no recognized tumor predisposition in patients with SWS as there is with some other phakomatoses. We present a patient with SWS who developed a low-grade glioma (LGG). We hypothesize that there could be an association between SWS and LGG formation, noting that GNAQ mutations have been implicated in the underlying biology of both SWS and a subset of pediatric LGG. It is suggested that SWS may be a cancer predisposition syndrome. PMID:26422287

  12. Cervico-oculo-acoustic (Wildervanck) syndrome: clinicoradiological findings.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Farouk Bassam

    2013-01-01

    We describe a girl presented with facial asymmetry and oral mucosal cleft and with further investigations other anomalies were found including hearing loss, Duane syndrome, Klippel-Feil anomaly, Chiari malformation and accessory bone mass in mandibular ramus leading to the clinical diagnosis of cervico-oculo-acoustic (Wildervanck) syndrome (COAS). The patient underwent surgical occipital decompression by preforming suboccipital craniectomy and C1 posterior laminectomy to relieve the cerebellar tonsillar herniation. Surgical removal of mandibular bony mass was done and the patient is now under orthodontic treatment to correct facial asymmetry and malocclusion. PMID:23616324

  13. Cervico-oculo-acoustic (Wildervanck) syndrome: clinicoradiological findings

    PubMed Central

    Rihani, Farouk Bassam

    2013-01-01

    We describe a girl presented with facial asymmetry and oral mucosal cleft and with further investigations other anomalies were found including hearing loss, Duane syndrome, Klippel-Feil anomaly, Chiari malformation and accessory bone mass in mandibular ramus leading to the clinical diagnosis of cervico-oculo-acoustic (Wildervanck) syndrome (COAS). The patient underwent surgical occipital decompression by preforming suboccipital craniectomy and C1 posterior laminectomy to relieve the cerebellar tonsillar herniation. Surgical removal of mandibular bony mass was done and the patient is now under orthodontic treatment to correct facial asymmetry and malocclusion. PMID:23616324

  14. Blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES) is linked to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Bradles, K.; Reimer, R.; Lessner, A.

    1994-09-01

    Blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES, blepharophimosis eyelid syndrome) is a distinctive congenital eyelid malformation which can occur sporadically or inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Previous reports have described associated chromosome 3q abnormalities. We ascertained two small autosomal dominant families with BPES and tested for linkage with 17 polymorphic markers on 3q. Multipoint analysis generated a maximum LOD score of 3.23 centered around markers RHO, ACPP and D3S1238. No evidence of genetic heterogeneity was observed. The defective gene responsible for BPES is located on 3q.

  15. [Genetic syndromes recognizable in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a neonatal neurological lesion associated or not with dysmorphism or with a particular phenotype can be caused by a) prenatal infections (Group TORCH) toxic or teratotoxic agents (alcohol, cocain, antiepileptics, inhalants such as toluene, etc.), vascular defects or genetic anomalies; b) perinatal isquemic hypoxic lesions, infectious or metabolic disorders, etc. In this paper we analyze all entities of genetic origin neonatally recognizable by their phenotype which must be included in the differential diagnosis of all children neurologically compromised. In order to simplify the diagnosis, these entities will be divided according to the prevalence of the phenotype present at birth, dividing them into two large groups: 1) Genic alterations which include: Syndromes with characteristic facies and member malformations, Supra growth syndrome, Syndrome with neonatal growth deficit, Neuro-ectodermic syndromes, Syndromes with characteristic facies and ocular compromise, Syndromes with characteristic facies including those that bear MIM number, and 2) Chromosomal alterations (autosomal in number, mosaic, deletion, and sex chromosomes). The detection of these anomalies through phenotype studies involving congenital encephalopathies of genetic origin is of major importance because it will permit the orientation of specific diagnostic studies, the prevention of difficult and expensive maneuvers, and furthermore, it will offer adequate family counseling and control eventual complications. PMID:19239999

  16. The genetics of auricular development and malformation: new findings in model systems driving future directions for microtia research

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy C.; Camci, Esra D.; Vora, Siddharth; Luquetti, Daniela V.; Turner, Eric E.

    2014-01-01

    Microtia is a term used to describe a wide array of phenotypic presentations of the outer ear. Although the majority of the cases are isolated in nature, much of our understanding of the causes of microtia has been driven by the identification of genes underlying syndromic forms where the anomaly co-presents with various other craniofacial and extra-craniofacial structural defects. In this review we discuss recent findings in mice deficient in Hoxa2, a key regulator of branchial arch patterning, which has necessitated a revision to the canonical model of pinna morphogenesis. The revised model will likely impact current classification schemes for microtia and, as we argue in this review, the interpretation of the developmental basis for various auricular malformations. In addition, we highlight recent studies in other mammalian species that are providing the first clues as to possible causes of at least some isolated anomalies and thus should now accelerate the search for the more elusive genetic contributions to the many isolated and non-syndromic cases of microtia. These findings, together with the application of new genome-level sequencing technologies and more thorough quantitative assessment of available mutant mouse resources, promise an exciting future for genetic studies in microtia. PMID:24880027

  17. Double trisomy (48,XXX,+18) with features of Roberts syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Descartes, M.; Longshore, J.W.; Crawford, E.

    1994-09-01

    We report an infant with double trisomy 48,XXX,+18, who also displayed features of Roberts syndrome. All previously published cases with similar double trisomy have presented with features of trisomy 18 syndrome. The chromosome analysis done at birth revealed the double trisomy; parental chromosomes were normal. The proband presented with microbrachycephaly, unilateral cleft lip and palate, choanal atresia, midfacial capillary hemanioma, thin nares, shallow orbits, malformed ears, sparse hair, hypomelia of the upper limbs, rocker-bottom feet, auricular septal defect and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Characteristic features of Roberts syndrome included hypomelia, midfacial defects, and severe growth deficiency. Among the many different features reported in the literature for patients with trisomy 18 syndrome, the most consistent were growth deficiency, clenched fingers and congenital heart defects (e.g. VSD, ASD, PDA). Although some of our patient`s features such as cleft lip and cleft palate, low-set malformed ears, ASD, defects of the corpus callosum, choanal atresia, radial aplasia could also be seen in trisomy 18 syndrome (in 10-50% of the cases), her phenotype was more typical of Roberts syndrome because of symmetrical hypomelia and midfacial defects. Our patient`s chromosomes did not show premature separation of centromeric heterochromatin, a feature reported to occur in approximately one-half of individuals with Roberts syndrome. Sporadic aneuploidy involving different chromosomes has been found in lymphocyte cultures from some Roberts syndrome patients and is considered by some authors as a mitotic mutant. This aneuploidy is most likely to be chromosome gain. The simultaneous occurrence of trisomy X and 18 is extremely rare with only 11 cases having been reported in the literature. Our patient is unique since she has the double trisomy in addition to the characteristic features of Roberts syndrome.

  18. Novel occurrence of Axenfeld: Rieger syndrome in a patient with blepharophimosis ptosis epicanthus inversus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhavin M; Dada, Tanuj; Panda, Anita; Tanwar, Mukesh; Bhartiya, Shibal; Dada, Rima

    2014-01-01

    Blepharophimosis ptosis epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) is a complex eyelid malformation characterized by the classical tetrad of blepharophimosis, telecanthus, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus. It has been reported to be associated with other ocular anomalies such as euryblepharon, strabismus, nystagmus, amblyopia, microphthalmos, lacrimal drainage apparatus abnormality, extra ocular muscle abnormalities, microcornea, trabecular dysgenesis, optic nerve hypoplasias, and colobomas of the optic disk. We describe a case of BPES with Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, a neurocristopathy characterized by maldevelopment of the anterior segment with predisposition to development of glaucoma. Interestingly, both syndromes are caused by mutations in the same class of genes, namely the winged-helix/forked transcription factors (FOX) involved in a variety of developmental processes. PMID:24722273

  19. 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY and 49,XXXXY syndromes: not just variants of Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Ayari, Natalie; Howell, Susan; D’Epagnier, Cheryl; Zeitler, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosome tetrasomy and pentasomy conditions occur in 1:18 000–1:100 000 male births. While often compared with 47,XXY/Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features including tall stature and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY and 49,XXXXY syndromes are associated with additional physical findings, congenital malformations, medical problems and psychological features. While the spectrum of cognitive abilities extends much higher than originally described, developmental delays, cognitive impairments and behavioural disorders are common and require strong treatment plans. Future research should focus on genotype–phenotype relationships and the development of evidence-based treatments. Conclusion The more complex physical, medical and psychological phenotypes of 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY and 49,XXXXY syndromes make distinction from 47,XXY important; however, all of these conditions share features of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and the need for increased awareness, biomedical research and the development of evidence-based treatments. PMID:21342258

  20. A giant frontal cavernous malformation with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular anomalies with dilated spaces called caverns. These spaces are lined by endothelial cells and collage and devoid of smooth muscle or intervening neural tissue, and filled with blood at various stages of stasis, thrombosis, organization, and calcification. Most CMs are relatively small in size but when they are large enough they can produce sing of mass effect and may simulate neoplastic, vascular, inflammatory pathology. Giant CM (size >6 cm) are very rare lesions and very few cases are reported in world literature. We are reporting such a rare case of a 16 year male. Our case is also unique in the sense that it is the largest reported CM in Indian population. PMID:27114662

  1. Arteriovenous malformation of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Haga, Junichirou; Azami, Ayaka; Todate, Yukitoshi; Waragai, Mitsuru; Sato, Atai; Takano, Yoshinao; Kawakura, Kenji; Imai, Shigeki; Sakuma, Hideo; Teranishi, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is uncommon in the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of AVM of the pancreatic head in a 59-year-old male. He was admitted to a hospital with hematemesis and tarry stool and referred to our hospital in March 2014 on the diagnosis of pancreatic artery pseudoaneurysm. A computed tomography scan showed the presence of irregular dilated and/or stenotic vessels with meandering in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed strong enhancement of the conglomeration in the pancreatic head. Selective angiography showed the proliferation of a vascular network in the pancreatic head and an early visualization of the portal vein at the arterial phase. The patient qualified for surgery with a preoperative diagnosis of AVM of the pancreatic head. We performed pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histological results confirmed the presence of irregular dilated tortuous arteries and veins in the pancreatic head. Surgical treatment may represent definitive management of symptomatic AVM. PMID:26943682

  2. Quantification of intracerebral steal in patients with arteriovenous malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, R.W.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Stokely, E.M.; Bonte, F.J.

    1986-08-01

    Eleven patients with angiographically and/or pathologically proved arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were studied using dynamic, single-photon-emission computed tomography (DSPECT). Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow in structurally normal areas remote from the AVM disclosed areas of decreased flow compared with normal controls in eight of 11 patients examined. Areas of hypoperfusion correlated with altered function as manifested by epileptogenic foci and impaired cognitive function. Dynamic, single-photon-emission computed tomography provides a noninvasive technique to monitor quantitatively hemodynamic changes associated with AVMs. Our findings suggest that such changes are present in the majority of patients with AVMs and that they may be clinically significant. The potential application of regional cerebral blood flow imaging by DSPECT in the management of patients with AVMs is discussed.

  3. Accuracy of prenatal diagnosis of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, M; MacConnachie, I; Garvie, D; Dykes, E

    1994-01-01

    A series of 13 consecutive patients with a prenatal diagnosis of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) were reviewed with respect to prenatal ultrasound findings, clinical features at birth, and postnatal outcome. In two cases (15%) the abnormality regressed in utero. Only three infants (23%) showed any respiratory distress at birth. After a mean of 25 months postnatal follow up, 11 patients (85%) were found to have a definite pulmonary abnormality. In seven patients (54%) the specific prenatal diagnosis of CCAM has been confirmed (five histologically, two radiologically). Four infants (31%) were found to have other types of pulmonary abnormality and in two (15%) the lungs remain apparently normal. Prenatal ultrasound appears reliable in the detection of pulmonary abnormalities but the variety of conditions identified postnatally suggests that specific prenatal diagnoses and prognoses should be avoided; prenatal counselling and perinatal management should be adapted accordingly.

  4. Semilobar Holoprosencephaly Associated with Multiple Malformations in a Foal.

    PubMed

    Pintore, M D; Cantile, C

    2016-04-01

    A full-term male foal born in a farm holidays in Maremma (Tuscany, Italy) was euthanized shortly after birth due to the presence of several malformations. The rostral maxilla and the nasal septum were deviated to the right (wry nose), and a severe cervico-thoracic scoliosis and anus atresia were evident. Necropsy revealed ileum atresia and agenesis of the right kidney. The brain showed an incomplete separation of the hemispheres of the rostral third of the forebrain and the olfactory bulbs and tracts were absent (olfactory aplasia). A diagnosis of semilobar holoprosencephaly (HPE) was achieved. This is the first case of semilobar HPE associated with other organ anomalies in horses. PMID:25712180

  5. Type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Blanca Estela; Furuya, María Elena Yuriko; Martínez-Muñiz, Irma; Vargas, Mario H; Flores-Salgado, Rosalinda

    2013-01-01

    A seven-month-old girl, born prematurely (birth weight 1000 g) from a twin pregnancy, was admitted to hospital due to recurrent pneumonia and atelectasis. She experienced cough and respiratory distress during feeding. The right hemithorax was smaller than the left, with diminished breath sounds and dullness. Chest x-rays revealed decreased lung volume and multiple radiolucent images in the right lung, as well as overdistention of the left lung. An esophagogram revealed three bronchial branches arising from the lower one-third of the esophagus, corresponding to the right lung and ending in a cul-de-sac. A diagnosis of esophageal lung was established. On bronchography, the right lung was absent and the trachea only continued into the left main bronchus. Echocardiography and angiotomography revealed agenesis of the pulmonary artery right branch. The surgical finding was an esophageal right lung, which was removed; the histopathological diagnosis was type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung. PMID:23762890

  6. A case of scrotal venous malformation mimicking a failed varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chong K; Derosa, Raffaella; Sterbis, Joseph R; Ching, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented to interventional radiology department with several years of left scrotal pain, which exacerbated by prolonged standing and walking. The patient had undergone a left varicocelectomy at the age of 10, after which he had a persistent scrotal mass. As he grew older, the left scrotal mass continued to increase in size, and symptoms progressively worsened. Physical examination revealed a non-tender, firm left scrotal mass which remained unchanged in size after Valsalva manoeuvres. Initial ultrasound examination revealed an extratesticular, intrascrotal mass with minimal internal flow. MRI revealed a heterogeneously enhancing, low-flow venous malformation centred in the midscrotum involving multiple tissue planes. Two sessions of percutaneous sclerotherapy failed to relieve his pain. Three months after the second sclerotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection. At the time of his postoperative visit, his left scrotal pain had significantly improved and pain with prolonged standing and walking had resolved completely. PMID:24654244

  7. Digital subtraction angiography for arteriovenous malformations in stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Piovan, E; Dal Sasso, M; Urbani, G P; Sartori, R; Foroni, R; Benati, A

    1996-01-01

    Images coming from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are affected by a perspective distortion due to the use of image intensifiers. As a result, DSA cannot be used for the accurate definition of stereotactic coordinates. A correction method has been developed to enable the use of DSA for the radiosurgery of arteriovnous malformations. A software program and a special phantom tool were employed. The phantom is made by a computer-controlled drilling machine which makes holes in a Plexiglas plate. It has 865 calibration steel spheres with coordinates determined with a precision of 0.01 mm. A calibration image is acquired by a personal computer, and the software calculates the transformation algorithm to superimpose the image on the known positions of the phantom. This algorithm is saved and then recalled to transform the diagnostic images. PMID:9032845

  8. Phenotypic analysis of triphalangeal thumb and associated hand malformations.

    PubMed

    Zguricas, J; Snijders, P J; Hovius, S E; Heutink, P; Oostra, B A; Lindhout, D

    1994-06-01

    Triphalangeal thumb (TPT), a long, finger-like thumb with three phalanges instead of two, is regarded as a subtype of preaxial polydactyly. It can occur as a sporadic disorder, but is more often seen as a dominant familial trait. We describe four white Dutch families in which triphalangeal thumb has variable expression and is sometimes associated with preaxial extra rays, rudimentary postaxial polydactyly, cutaneous syndactyly of the hands, and, rarely, postaxial polydactyly and syndactyly of the feet. A comparison with similar familial conditions reported during the past 10 years is provided. The potential significance of linkage and molecular genetic analysis for better insight into the pathogenesis of complex hand malformations is discussed. PMID:8071973

  9. The Challenges of the European Anorectal Malformations-Net Registry.

    PubMed

    Jenetzky, Ekkehart; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Aminoff, Dalia; Schwarzer, Nicole; Reutter, Heiko; Schmiedeke, Eberhard; Midrio, Paola; de Blaauw, Ivo

    2015-12-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARM) have a low prevalence, patients need specialized surgical care, and in many cases, patients born with ARM even need life-long aftercare. Due to its low prevalence most patients are still treated in low-volume pediatric surgical centers without any adequate monitoring of the outcome. Data on prevalence, comparison of different surgical techniques, and prospective outcome measurements are still scarce and difficult to interpret. In 2010, a consortium was founded (ARM-Net consortium) including several European pediatric surgical centers to collaborate more in research and share knowledge on ARM. One of the structures started by the consortium was an ARM-Net registry for the inclusion of all future patients treated in these centers. With this review, we report the structure of the ARM-Net registry, some of the results, and discuss the challenges we faced and still face after its introduction in 2010. PMID:26642384

  10. Le syndrome d'apert

    PubMed Central

    Benmiloud, Sarra; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2013-01-01

    Le syndrome d'Apert est une affection congénitale rare, caractérisée par une sténose cranio-faciale associée à une syndactylie des mains et des pieds. Sa prise en charge doit être précoce et multidisciplinaire. Sa gravité réside dans la coexistence de plusieurs malformations avec un risque d'hypertension intracrânienne chronique responsable d'une cécité et d'une débilité mentale. Les auteurs rapportent une nouvelle observation à travers laquelle ils illustrent les aspects cliniques et évolutifs ainsi que les difficultés thérapeutiques de cette affection. PMID:23565313

  11. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  12. Advanced Echocardiographic Imaging of the Congenitally Malformed Heart

    PubMed Central

    Black, D; Vettukattil, J

    2013-01-01

    There have been significant advancements in the ability of echocardiography to provide both morphological and functional information in children with congenitally malformed hearts. This progress has come through the development of improved technology such as matrix array probes and software which allows for the off line analysis of images to a high standard. This article focuses on these developments and discusses some newer concepts in advanced echocardiography such is multi-planar reformatting [MPR] and tissue motion annular displacement [TMAD]. Our aim is to discuss important aspects related to the quality and reproducibility of data, to review the most recent published data regarding advanced echocardiography in the malformed heart and to guide the reader to appropriate text for overcoming the technical challenges of using these methods. Many of the technical aspects of image acquisition and post processing have been discussed in recent reviews by the authors and we would urge readers to study these texts to gain a greater understanding [1]. The quality of the two dimensional image is paramount in both strain analysis and three dimensional echocardiography. An awareness of how to improve image quality is vital to acquiring accurate and usable data. Three dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is an attempt to visualise the dynamic morphology of the heart. Although published media is the basis for theoretical knowledge of how to practically acquire images, electronic media [eg.www.3dechocardiography.com] is the only way of visualising the advantages of this technology in real time. It is important to be aware of the limitations of this technology and that much of the data gleaned from using these methods is at a research stage and not yet in regular clinical practice. PMID:23228075

  13. Stereotactic proton beam therapy for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Vernimmen, Frederik J.A.I. . E-mail: fv@sun.ac.za; Slabbert, Jacobus P.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Fredericks, Shaheeda

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypofractionated stereotactic proton therapy of predominantly large intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by analyzing retrospectively the results from a cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Since 1993, a total of 85 patients with vascular lesions have been treated. Of those, 64 patients fulfilled the criteria of having an arteriovenous malformation and sufficient follow-up. The AVMs were grouped by volume: <14 cc (26 patients) and {>=}14 cc (38 patients). Treatment was delivered with a fixed horizontal 200 MeV proton beam under stereotactic conditions, using a stereophotogrammetric positioning system. The majority of patients were hypofractionated (2 or 3 fractions), and the proton doses are presented as single-fraction equivalent cobalt Gray equivalent doses (SFEcGyE). The overall mean minimum target volume dose was 17.37 SFEcGyE, ranging from 10.38-22.05 SFEcGyE. Results: Analysis by volume group showed obliteration in 67% for volumes <14 cc and 43% for volumes {>=}14 cc. Grade IV acute complications were observed in 3% of patients. Transient delayed effects were seen in 15 patients (23%), becoming permanent in 3 patients. One patient also developed a cyst 8 years after therapy. Conclusions: Stereotactic proton beam therapy applied in a hypofractionated schedule allows for the safe treatment of large AVMs, with acceptable results. It is an alternative to other treatment strategies for large AVMs. AVMs are likely not static entities, but probably undergo vascular remodeling. Factors influencing angiogenesis could play a new role in a form of adjuvant therapy to improve on the radiosurgical results.

  14. Spag17 Deficiency Results in Skeletal Malformations and Bone Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Cohen, David J.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Kajan, Illya; Maczis, Melissa; Zhang, Zhibing; Costanzo, Richard M.; Zweit, Jamal; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2015-01-01

    Height is the result of many growth and development processes. Most of the genes associated with height are known to play a role in skeletal development. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SPAG17 gene have been associated with human height. However, it is not clear how this gene influences linear growth. Here we show that a targeted mutation in Spag17 leads to skeletal malformations. Hind limb length in mutants was significantly shorter than in wild-type mice. Studies revealed differences in maturation of femur and tibia suggesting alterations in limb patterning. Morphometric studies showed increased bone formation evidenced by increased trabecular bone area and the ratio of bone area to total area, leading to reductions in the ratio of marrow area/total area in the femur. Micro-CTs and von Kossa staining demonstrated increased mineral in the femur. Moreover, osteocalcin and osterix were more highly expressed in mutant mice than in wild-type mice femurs. These data suggest that femur bone shortening may be due to premature ossification. On the other hand, tibias appear to be shorter due to a delay in cartilage and bone development. Morphometric studies showed reduction in growth plate and bone formation. These defects did not affect bone mineralization, although the volume of primary bone and levels of osteocalcin and osterix were higher. Other skeletal malformations were observed including fused sternebrae, reduced mineralization in the skull, medial and metacarpal phalanges. Primary cilia from chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from knockout mice were shorter and fewer cells had primary cilia in comparison to cells from wild-type mice. In addition, Spag17 knockdown in wild-type MEFs by Spag17 siRNA duplex reproduced the shorter primary cilia phenotype. Our findings disclosed unexpected functions for Spag17 in the regulation of skeletal growth and mineralization, perhaps because of its role in primary cilia of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. PMID:26017218

  15. MEF2C haploinsufficiency caused by either microdeletion of the 5q14.3 region or mutation is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Nathalie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jaillard, Sylvie; Goldenberg, Alice; Joriot, Sylvie; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Guichet, Agnès; Barth, Magalie; Charollais, Aude; Journel, Hubert; Auvin, Stéphane; Boucher, Cécile; Kerckaert, Jean-Pierre; David, Véronique; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Frébourg, Thierry; Dubourg, Christèle; Andrieux, Joris; Bonneau, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, array-CGH has remarkably improved the ability to detect cryptic unbalanced rearrangements in patients presenting with syndromic mental retardation. Using whole genome oligonucleotide array-CGH, we detected 5q14.3 microdeletions ranging from 216 kb to 8.8 Mb in 5 unrelated patients showing phenotypic similarities, namely severe mental retardation with absent speech, hypotonia and stereotypic movements. Most of the patients presented also with facial dysmorphic features, epilepsy and/or cerebral malformations. The minimal common deleted region of these 5q14 microdeletions encompassed only MEF2C, known to act in brain as a neurogenesis effector which regulates excitatory synapse number. In a patient presenting a similar phenotype, we subsequently identified a MEF2C nonsense mutation. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that haploinsufficiency of MEF2C is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements, seizures and/or cerebral malformations. PMID:19592390

  16. Serotonin syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medicines that caused the syndrome In life-threatening cases, medicines that keep your muscles still (paralyze them) and ... Syndrome. Am J Psychiatry . 1991: 148:705. US Food and Drug Administration. FDA Public Health Advisory: Combined Use of ...

  17. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  18. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  19. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  20. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...