Science.gov

Sample records for macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

  1. Macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome in a newborn with tetralogy of fallot and sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Tugba Erener; Oztunc, Funda; Celkan, Tiraje; Bor, Meltem; Kizilkilic, Osman; Vural, Mehmet; Perk, Yildiz; Islak, Civan; Tuysuz, Beyhan

    2013-01-01

    Macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome is characterized by cutaneous vascular malformations with associated anomalies as macrocephaly, macrosomia, hemihypertrophy, hypotonia, developmental delay, lax joints, loose skin, polysyndactyly, and neuroimaging abnormalities. We present a newborn with a prenatal diagnosis of macrosomia and tetralogy of Fallot. He also had macrocephaly; a high forehead; capillary hemangioma on the forehead, upper lip, and philtrum; generalized loose skin; postaxial polydactyly of both hands and feet, with neuroimaging findings of polymicrogyria and thrombosis in sagittal sinus and sinus rectus. His condition was diagnosed as macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome in the neonatal period and he died suddenly during sleep at 6 months of age. The clinical course in this syndrome is not as benign as was previously thought. Careful follow-up of these patients with particular emphasis on neuroradiologic and cardiologic evaluation might help decrease the risk of sudden death and to improve long-term outcome. PMID:22451530

  2. Macrocephaly-capillary malformation presenting with fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Kuint, Jacob; Globus, Omer; Ben Simon, Guy J; Greenberger, Shoshana

    2012-01-01

    Macrocephaly-capillary malformation (OMIM 602501) is a rare overgrowth and asymmetry syndrome. Cardiac arrhythmias were reported to occur in few patients. We present a case in which fetal arrhythmia was the presenting symptom of the syndrome. PMID:22329570

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chemical signals from outside the cell to the nucleus. These signals help control several important cell functions, ... differentiation ; gene ; heart failure ; inherited ; malformation ; migraine ; mutation ; nucleus ; oxygen ; prevalence ; proliferation ; protein ; RAS ; sign ; syndrome ; vascular ; ...

  4. A rare newly described overgrowth syndrome with vascular malformations-Cloves syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Balaji; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Selvaraj, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    There are many overgrowth syndromes described in the literature. Few are associated with vascular malformations. We describe a rare, newly described syndrome with features of overgrowth and vascular malformations. PMID:25709171

  5. Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome with spinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Yi?, Uluç; Kurul, Semra H; Güleryüz, Handan; Men, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) is a recently identified autosomal dominant disorder. Arteriovenous lesions have been reported in the brain, limbs, and face. We report a 7-year-old patient with CM-AVM with spinal AVM, which is a rarely reported association. PMID:25040073

  6. Capillary malformation--arteriovenous malformation syndrome: review of the literature, proposed diagnostic criteria, and recommendations for management.

    PubMed

    Orme, Charisse M; Boyden, Lynn M; Choate, Keith A; Antaya, Richard J; King, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the RASA1 gene and characterized by multiple small, round to oval capillary malformations with or without arteriovenous malformations. Ateriovenous malformations occur in up to one-third of patients and may involve the brain and spine. Although making the diagnosis is straightforward in some patients, there are other patients for whom diagnostic criteria may be helpful in their evaluation. Here we review the literature regarding capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, propose diagnostic criteria, and discuss the care of patients with this condition. PMID:23662773

  7. Oculocerebrocutaneous syndrome: the brain malformation defines a core phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Moog, U; Jones, M; Bird, L; Dobyns, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: Oculocerebrocutaneous syndrome (OCCS) is characterised by orbital cysts and anophthalmia or microphthalmia, focal aplastic or hypoplastic skin defects, skin appendages, and brain malformations. The eye and skin abnormalities are well described but the neuropathological features less so. To date, 28 patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of OCCS have been reported, with a preponderance of males. Objective: To evaluate the brain imaging studies, clinical records, photographs, and pathological material of two new and nine previously reported cases of OCCS. Results: There was a consistent pattern of malformations in eight of the 11 cases, consisting of frontal predominant polymicrogyria and periventricular nodular heterotopia, enlarged lateral ventricles or hydrocephalus, agenesis of the corpus callosum sometimes associated with interhemispheric cysts, and a novel mid-hindbrain malformation. The latter consisted of a giant and dysplastic tectum, absent cerebellar vermis, small cerebellar hemispheres in most cases, and a large posterior fossa fluid collection. Conclusions: The mid-hindbrain malformation appears pathognomonic for OCCS. The eye and skin features of OCCS show considerable overlap with several other syndromes, such as encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis, oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, and focal dermal hypoplasia, none of which has a comparable pattern of brain malformations. In particular the unique mid-hindbrain malformation also distinguishes OCCS from related syndromes with comparable forebrain anomalies. The pattern of malformation described thus helps in differentiating OCCS from other entities. The mid-hindbrain malformation points to a defect of the mid-hindbrain organiser as the underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:15879499

  8. Goldenhar Syndrome Associated with Extensive Arterial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Renee Frances; Barbeau, L. Daphna Yasova; Co-Vu, Jennifer; Beegle, Richard D.; Williams, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome is characterized by craniofacial, ocular and vertebral defects secondary to abnormal development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches and vertebrae. Other findings include cardiac and vascular abnormalities. Though these associations are known, the specific anomalies are not well defined. We present a 7-month-old infant with intermittent respiratory distress that did not improve with respiratory interventions. Echocardiogram suggested a double aortic arch. Cardiac CT angiogram confirmed a right arch and aberrant, stenotic left subclavian artery, dilation of the main pulmonary artery, and agenesis of the left thyroid lobe. Repeat echocardiograms were concerning for severely dilated coronary arteries. Given dilation, a rheumatologic workup ensued, only identifying few weakly positive autoantibodies. Further imaging demonstrated narrowing of the aorta below the renal arteries and extending into the common iliac arteries and proximal femoral arteries. Given a physical exam devoid of rheumatologic findings, only weakly positive autoantibodies, normal inflammatory markers, and presence of the coronary artery dilation, the peripheral artery narrowings were not thought to be vasculitic. This case illustrates the need to identify definitive anomalies related to Goldenhar Syndrome. Although this infant's presentation is rare, recognition of specific vascular findings will help differentiate Goldenhar Syndrome from other disease processes. PMID:26688769

  9. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a…

  10. [Epidermal nevus syndrome with multiple vascular hamartomas and malformations].

    PubMed

    Calzavara Pinton, P; Carlino, A; Manganoni, A M; Donzelli, C; Facchetti, F

    1990-06-01

    The authors described a 39 year old woman affected by epidermal nevus syndrome, with cutaneous (verrucous epidermal nevus), skeletal (thoracolumbar levoscoliosis and frontal bossing) and ocular (papillar coloboma and coroideal nevus) defects. Moreover the patient presented vascular malformations and hamartomas: lymphangioma circumscriptum of the mammary area, left peroneal Gorham's disease, artero-venous acral tumour of the left foot and multiple artero-venous shunts of the lower limbs. Since puberty, hemodynamic modifications have caused pseudo-Kaposi of Bluefarb-Stewart of legs and feet and malleolar painful ulcers. Solomon's epidermal nevus syndrome is an heterogeneous entity. In our opinion, this is the first case report with a severe vascular involvement. PMID:2279750

  11. A syndromal and an isolated form of uterine arteriovenous malformations: two case-reports.

    PubMed

    Geerinckx, I; Willemsen, W; Hanselaar, T

    2001-12-10

    Uterine arteriovenous malformations are rare lesions with a considerable risk potential. Clinical presentation varies from no signs over various degrees of menorrhagia to massive life threatening vaginal bleeding. This is the first report of congenital uterine arteriovenous malformations in two patients with primary infertility. In one case, the uterine lesions were found in conjunction with other congenital malformations suggesting the diagnosis of hemihyperplasia/lipomatosis syndrome. Etiology, symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic work-up are discussed; pathological findings are illustrated. PMID:11728664

  12. Arteriovenous and lymphatic malformations, linear verrucous epidermal nevus and mild overgrowth: another hamartoneoplastic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Hennekam, R C; Kwa, V I; van Amerongen, A

    1999-04-01

    We report a 22 year old female presenting with slowly progressive paraparesis, who appeared to have many (mainly subcutaneous) hamartomas. The neurological symptoms were caused by intraspinal masses and arteriovenous malformations. In addition, she had mild overgrowth of one leg and lymph vessel malformations. This combination of symptoms resembles Proteus syndrome, but is different in symptomatology and progression and may be yet another hamartoneoplastic syndrome. PMID:10319199

  13. Malformations in a cohort of 284 women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the spectrum of genital and associated malformations in women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome using evaluated diagnostic procedures and the Vagina Cervix Uterus Adnex – associated Malformation classification system (VCUAM). Methods 290 women with MRKH syndrome were clinically evaluated with using clinical examinations, abdominal and perineal/rectal ultrasound, MRI, and laparoscopy. Results Classification of female genital malformation according to the Vagina Cervix Uterus Adnex – associated Malformation classification system was possible in 284 women (97.9%). Complete atresia of Vagina (V5b) and bilateral atresia of Cervix (C2b) were found in 284 patients (100%). Uterus: bilateral rudimentary or a plastic uterine horns were found in 239 women (84.2%). Adnexa: normal Adnexa were found in 248 women (87.3%). Malformations: associated malformations were found in 126 of 282 evaluable women (44.7%), 84 women (29.6%) had malformations of the renal system. Of 284 women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome 212 women (74.7%) could be classified as V5bC2bU4bA0. The most frequent classification was V5bC2bU4bA0M0 (46.8%) diagnosed in 133 of 284 women. Conclusions Complete atresia of vagina and cervix were found in all patients, variable malformations were found with uterus and adnexa. A variety of associated malformations were present, predominantly of the renal system. It is therefore recommended that all patients with genital malformations should be evaluated for renal abnormalities. PMID:22906151

  14. Prepubertal diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome due to penoscrotal malformations: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hodhod, Amr; Umurangwa, Florence; El-Sherbiny, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of 4 months old infant diagnosed as Klinefelter syndrome associated with perineal hypospadias, severe ventral chordee and complete penoscrotal transposition. A review of previous reported cases was carried out. Penoscrotal malformations at birth are very rare in Klinefelter syndrome. Awareness of the current standard indications of Karyotyping can help early detection of these cases. PMID:26029310

  15. Familial Incidence of Cardiovascular Malformations in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Angela M; Qureshi, Muhammad Y; Olson, Timothy M; Eidem, Benjamin W; O'Leary, Patrick W

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive left-sided congenital heart lesions exhibit familial clustering, and familial echocardiographic screening for bicuspid aortic valve has become standard practice. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe left-sided obstructive lesion; however, familial screening is not universally recommended. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence of cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands. First-degree relatives were screened for CVM by transthoracic echocardiography. Screening was completed in 152 family members (97 parents and 55 siblings) of 52 probands. Of these, 17 of 152 (11%) had CVM. Anomalies detected included: bicuspid aortic valve in 5 (3%), isolated dilated ascending aorta in 4 (3%), coarctation of the aorta in 1, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in 1, anomalous, intramural coronary artery in 1, bicuspid pulmonary valve in 1, and other anomalies in 4. Most were previously undiagnosed (11 of 17, 65%). Fourteen of 52 families (27%) had ?1 relative with CVM. Overall, 7 of 55 siblings (13%), 5 of 46 fathers (11%) and 5 of 51 mothers (10%) had CVM. Although the incidence of CVM in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands was lower in this cohort than previously reported, it remained substantial, with at least one additional member having CVM in 27% of families. The frequent occurrence of undiagnosed CVM highlights the importance of routine familial screening in HLHS. In fact, even if screening was done in childhood, it may be appropriate to screen again in the third or fourth decade to exclude isolated enlargement of the ascending aorta. PMID:26433269

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... proper balance of protein production and breakdown (protein homeostasis) that cells need to function and survive. Studies ... cell ; degrade ; developmental delay ; egg ; endocytosis ; epilepsy ; gene ; homeostasis ; inheritance ; inherited ; malformation ; microcephaly ; myoclonus ; pattern of inheritance ; ...

  17. Vascular malformation and choroid plexus adrenal heterotopia: new findings in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome?

    PubMed

    Drut, Ricardo; Quijano, Graciela; Altamirano, María Eugenia; Jones, Marta C; Maffessoli, Orlando B

    2006-01-01

    Large congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVM) may result in heart failure and death. We are reporting such combination with the AVM localized to the right thoracobrachial region. Remarkable postmortem findings included right renal and adrenal hemihyperplasia; the right adrenal fetal cortex presenting cytomegaly, endocrine pancreas hyperplasia, and heterotopic adrenal cortex with cytomegaly in the left lateral ventricle choroids plexus. The combination appears to be unique. The only previously reported example of adrenal cortex in the choroid plexus presented several features strongly suggestive of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Therefore, we postulate that additional uncommon findings in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome may include arteriovenous malformations and heterotopic adrenal tissue in choroids plexus. PMID:17162526

  18. Clinical spectrum of capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome presenting to a pediatric dermatology practice: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Nicole A; Lauren, Christine T; Behr, Gerald G; Wu, June K; Kandel, Jessica J; Meyers, Philip M; Sultan, Sally; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Morel, Kimberly D; Garzon, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (CM-AVM) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by RASA1 mutations. The prevalence and phenotypic spectrum are unknown. Evaluation of patients with multiple CMs is challenging because associated AVMs can be life threatening. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of children presenting with features of CM-AVM to an academic pediatric dermatology practice. After institutional review board approval was received, a retrospective chart review was performed of patients presenting between 2009 and 2012 with features of CM-AVM. We report nine cases. Presenting symptoms ranged from extensive vascular stains and cardiac failure to CMs noted incidentally during routine skin examination. All demonstrated multiple CMs, two had Parkes Weber syndrome, and two had multiple infantile hemangiomas. Seven patients had family histories of multiple CMs; three had family histories of large, atypical CMs. Six had personal or family histories of AVMs. Genetic evaluation was recommended for all and was pursued by six families; four RASA1 mutations were identified, including one de novo. Consultations with neurology, cardiology, and orthopedics were recommended. Most patients (89%) have not required treatment to date. CM-AVM is an underrecognized condition with a wide clinical spectrum that often presents in childhood. Further evaluation may be indicated in patients with multiple CMs. This study is limited by its small and retrospective nature. PMID:25040287

  19. Clinical spectrum of eye malformations in four patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bourchany, A; Giurgea, I; Thevenon, J; Goldenberg, A; Morin, G; Bremond-Gignac, D; Paillot, C; Lafontaine, P O; Thouvenin, D; Massy, J; Duncombe, A; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Masurel-Paulet, A; Chehadeh, S El; Huet, F; Bron, A; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Lyonnet, S; Faivre, L

    2015-07-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by a specific facial gestalt, intellectual deficiency, Hirschsprung disease and multiple congenital anomalies. Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox2 gene (ZEB2) cause MWS. ZEB2 encodes for Smad-interacting protein 1, a transcriptional co-repressor involved in TGF-beta and BMP pathways and is strongly expressed in early stages of development in mice. Eye abnormalities have rarely been described in patients with this syndrome. Herein, we describe four patients (two males and two females; mean age 7 years) with MWS and eye malformations. Ocular anomalies included, iris/retinal colobomas, atrophy or absence of the optic nerve, hyphema, and deep refraction troubles, sometimes with severe visual consequences. All eye malformations were asymmetric and often unilateral and all eye segments were affected, similarly to the nine MWS cases with ophthalmological malformations previously reported (iris/chorioretinal/optic disc coloboma, optic nerve atrophy, retinal epithelium atrophy, cataract, and korectopia). In human embryo, ZEB2 is expressed in lens and neural retina. Using the present report and data from the literature, we set out to determine whether or not the presence of eye manifestations could be due to specific type or location of mutations. We concluded that the presence of eye malformations, although a rare feature in MWS, should be considered as a part of the clinical spectrum of the condition. PMID:25899569

  20. Upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cormier-Daire, V.; Iserin, L.; Sidi, D.

    1995-03-13

    We report on upper limb anomalies in two children with a complete DiGeorge sequence: conotruncal defects, hypocalcemia, thymic aplasia, and facial anomalies. One child had preaxial polydactyly, and the other had club hands with hypoplastic first metacarpal. In both patients, molecular analysis documented a 22q11 deletion. To our knowledge, limb anomalies have rarely been reported in DiGeorge syndrome, and they illustrate the variable clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: A family report.

    PubMed

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated. PMID:26518262

  2. NFIA Haploinsufficiency Is Associated with a CNS Malformation Syndrome and Urinary Tract Defects

    PubMed Central

    Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Donovan, Diana J; Xi, Qiongchao; Turbe-Doan, Annick; Li, Qing-Gang; Campbell, Craig G; Shanske, Alan L; Sherr, Elliott H; Ahmad, Ayesha; Peters, Roxana; Rilliet, Benedict; Parvex, Paloma; Bassuk, Alexander G; Harris, David J; Ferguson, Heather; Kelly, Chantal; Walsh, Christopher A; Gronostajski, Richard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Higgins, Anne; Ligon, Azra H; Quade, Bradley J; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Maas, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Complex central nervous system (CNS) malformations frequently coexist with other developmental abnormalities, but whether the associated defects share a common genetic basis is often unclear. We describe five individuals who share phenotypically related CNS malformations and in some cases urinary tract defects, and also haploinsufficiency for the NFIA transcription factor gene due to chromosomal translocation or deletion. Two individuals have balanced translocations that disrupt NFIA. A third individual and two half-siblings in an unrelated family have interstitial microdeletions that include NFIA. All five individuals exhibit similar CNS malformations consisting of a thin, hypoplastic, or absent corpus callosum, and hydrocephalus or ventriculomegaly. The majority of these individuals also exhibit Chiari type I malformation, tethered spinal cord, and urinary tract defects that include vesicoureteral reflux. Other genes are also broken or deleted in all five individuals, and may contribute to the phenotype. However, the only common genetic defect is NFIA haploinsufficiency. In addition, previous analyses of Nfia?/? knockout mice indicate that Nfia deficiency also results in hydrocephalus and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Further investigation of the mouse Nfia+/? and Nfia?/? phenotypes now reveals that, at reduced penetrance, Nfia is also required in a dosage-sensitive manner for ureteral and renal development. Nfia is expressed in the developing ureter and metanephric mesenchyme, and Nfia+/? and Nfia?/? mice exhibit abnormalities of the ureteropelvic and ureterovesical junctions, as well as bifid and megaureter. Collectively, the mouse Nfia mutant phenotype and the common features among these five human cases indicate that NFIA haploinsufficiency contributes to a novel human CNS malformation syndrome that can also include ureteral and renal defects. PMID:17530927

  3. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E.

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Ear malformation and hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Galloway, C; Armstrong, D; Posnick, J

    1993-01-01

    Although the hearing loss of patients with Treacher Collins syndrome is well documented, few studies have reported jointly on their hearing loss and ear pathology. This paper reports on the hearing loss and computerized tomography (CT) assessments of ear malformations in a large pediatric series of patients with Treacher Collins. Of the 29 subjects assessed by the Craniofacial Program between 1986 and 1990, paired audiologic and complete CT assessments were available for 23 subjects. The external ear canal abnormalities were largely symmetric, either bilaterally stenotic or atretic. In most cases, the middle ear cavity was bilaterally hypoplastic and dysmorphic, and ossicles were symmetrically dysmorphic or missing. Inner ear structures were normal in all patients. The majority of patients had a unilateral or bilateral moderate or greater degree of hearing loss and almost half had an asymmetric hearing loss. The hearing loss of all subjects was conductive, except for three whose loss was bilateral mixed. Two types of bilaterally symmetric hearing loss configurations, flat and reverse sloping, were noted. Conductive hearing loss in patients with Treacher Collins is mainly attributable to their middle ear malformations, which are similar for those of patients with malformed or missing ossicles. PMID:8418881

  5. CLOVE Syndrome (Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular Malformations, and Epidermal Nevi): CNS Malformations and Seizures may be a Component of this Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gucev, Zoran S.; Tasic, Velibor; Jancevska, Aleksandra; Konstantinova, Marina Krstevska; Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Trajkovski, Zoran; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2010-01-01

    A newborn girl was found to have a massive lymphatic truncal vascular malformation with overlying cutaneous venous anomaly associated with overgrown feet and splayed toes. These manifestations comprise the recently described CLOVE syndrome. She also had cranial asymmetry and developed generalized seizures, which were treated with anticonvulsants. Cranial CT showed encephalomalacia, widening of the ventricles and the sulci, hemimegalencephaly (predominantly white matter) and partial agenesis of corpus callosum. Review of the literature identified several other patients with CLOVE syndrome, some of whom were misdiagnosed as having Proteus syndrome, with strikingly similar manifestations. We conclude that CNS manifestations including hemimegalencephaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, neuronal migration defects, and the consequent seizures, may be a more common manifestation of CLOVE syndrome than is presently appreciated. PMID:18816642

  6. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    do Vale, Jorge Marques; Silva, Eloísa; Pereira, Isabel Gil; Marques, Catarina; Sanchez-Serrano, Amparo; Torres, António Simões

    2014-01-01

    The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery. PMID:25410846

  7. Etiology of craniofacial malformations in mouse models of blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heude, Églantine; Bellessort, Brice; Fontaine, Anastasia; Hamazaki, Manatsu; Treier, Anna-Corina; Treier, Mathias; Levi, Giovanni; Narboux-Nême, Nicolas

    2015-03-15

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus-inversus syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by narrow palpebral fissures and eyelid levator muscle defects. BPES is often associated to premature ovarian insufficiency (BPES type I). FOXL2, a member of the forkhead transcription factor family, is the only gene known to be mutated in BPES. Foxl2 is essential for maintenance of ovarian identity, but the developmental origin of the facial malformations of BPES remains, so far, unexplained. In this study, we provide the first detailed account of the developmental processes leading to the craniofacial malformations associated to Foxl2. We show that, during development, Foxl2 is expressed both by Cranial Neural Crest Cells (CNCCs) and by Cranial Mesodermal Cells (CMCs), which give rise to skeletal (CNCCs and CMCs) and muscular (CMCs) components of the head. Using mice in which Foxl2 is selectively inactivated in either CNCCs or CMCs, we reveal that expression of Foxl2 in CNCCs is essential for the development of extraocular muscles. Indeed, inactivation of Foxl2 in CMCs has only minor effects on muscle development, whereas its inactivation in CNCCs provokes a severe hypoplasia of the levator palpabrae superioris and of the superior and inferior oblique muscles. We further show that Foxl2 deletion in either CNCCs or CMCs prevents eyelid closure and induces subtle skeletal developmental defects. Our results provide new insights in the complex developmental origin of human BPES and could help to understand the origin of other ocular anomalies associated to this syndrome. PMID:25416281

  8. Lymphatic Malformation, Retinoblastoma, or Facial Cleft: Atypical Presentations of PHACE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ibieta, María; López-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by large cervicofacial infantile hemangiomas and associated anomalies: posterior fossa brain malformation, hemangioma, arterial cerebrovascular anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, and eye/endocrine abnormalities of the brain. When ventral developmental defects (sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe) are present the condition is termed PHACE. In this report, we describe three PHACE cases that presented unique features (affecting one of the organ systems described for this syndrome) that have not been described previously. In the first case, a definitive PHACE association, the patient presented with an ipsilateral mesenteric lymphatic malformation, at the age of 14 years. In the second case, an anomaly of the posterior segment of the eye, not mentioned before in PHACE literature, a retinoblastoma, has been described. Specific chemotherapy avoided enucleation. And, in the third case, the child presented with an unusual midline frontal bone cleft, corresponding to Tessier 14 cleft. Two patients' hemangiomas responded well to propranolol therapy. The first one was followed and treated in the pre-propranolol era and had a moderate response to corticoids and interferon. PMID:26221546

  9. Germline Mutations in RASA1 Are Not Found in Patients with Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome or Capillary Malformation with Limb Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Revencu, N.; Boon, L.M.; Dompmartin, A.; Rieu, P.; Busch, W.L.; Dubois, J.; Forzano, F.; van Hagen, J.M.; Halbach, S.; Kuechler, A.; Lachmeijer, A.M.A.; Lähde, J.; Russell, L.; Simola, K.O.J.; Mulliken, J.B.; Vikkula, M.

    2013-01-01

    The RASA1 gene encodes p120RASGAP, a multidomain cytoplasmic protein that acts as a negative regulator of the RAS signalling pathway. Heterozygous loss-of-function RASA1 mutations were identified in patients with Parkes Weber syndrome and multifocal capillary malformations. This syndrome is characterised by a capillary blush on an extremity, arteriovenous microfistulas, and bony and soft tissue hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to test RASA1 in 2 disorders characterised by asymmetric limb enlargement and vascular malformations, namely Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome and regional capillary malformation with overgrowth. We did not identify any clear pathogenic change in these patients. Thus, besides clinical and radiological criteria, RASA1 testing constitutes an additional tool to differentiate Parkes Weber syndrome of capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) from overlapping disorders. PMID:23801933

  10. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis: the skin as a clue to complex malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Praticò, Andrea D; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Ruggieri, Martino; Zollino, Marcella; Corsello, Giovanni; Neri, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is defined as an excessive growth in body hair beyond the normal variation compared with individuals of the same age, race and sex and affecting areas not predominantly androgen-dependent. The term hirsutism is usually referred to patients, mainly women, who show excessive hair growth with male pattern distribution.Hypertrichosis is classified according to age of onset (congenital or acquired), extent of distribution (generalized or circumscribed), site involved, and to whether the disorder is isolated or associated with other anomalies. Congenital hypertrichosis is rare and may be an isolated condition of the skin or a component feature of other disorders. Acquired hypertrichosis is more frequent and is secondary to a variety of causes including drug side effects, metabolic and endocrine disorders, cutaneous auto-inflammatory or infectious diseases, malnutrition and anorexia nervosa, and ovarian and adrenal neoplasms. In most cases, hypertrichosis is not an isolated symptom but is associated with other clinical signs including intellective delay, epilepsy or complex body malformations.A review of congenital generalized hypertrichosis is reported with particular attention given to the disorders where excessive diffuse body hair is a sign indicating the presence of complex malformation syndromes. The clinical course of a patient, previously described, with a 20-year follow-up is reported. PMID:26242548

  11. Atypical Cerebellar Slump Syndrome and External Hydrocephalus following Craniocervical Decompression for Chiari I Malformation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    THAKAR, Sumit; DADLANI, Ravi; TAWARI, Manish; HEGDE, Alangar S

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic cerebellar slump (CS) and external hydrocephalus (EH) are amongst the rarer complications of foramen magnum decompression (FMD) for Chiari I malformation (CM). CS typically presents with delayed onset headache related to dural traction or with neurological deficit offsetting the benefit of FMD. EH, consisting of ventriculomegaly along with subdural fluid collection(s) (SFCs), has been related to cerebrospinal fluid egress from a tiny breach in an otherwise intact arachnoid. We describe the case of a 21-year-old man with CM and syringomyelia who presented with impaired gag, spastic quadriparesis, and raised intracranial pressure 1 week following an uneventful FMD during which the arachnoid had been widely fenestrated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infratentorial SFC, dilated aqueduct and triventriculomegaly, features of CS, and a residual but resolving syrinx. His symptoms resolved following a high pressure ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. At a 6-month follow-up visit, he was asymptomatic and demonstrated partial resolution of the syrinx, with no recurrence of the SFC. The unusual features in the clinical course of this patient were an atypical CS syndrome presenting with concomitantly resolving syringomyelia, and the development of EH after a wide arachnoidal fenestration. This is the first case in indexed literature describing such a combination of unusual postoperative complications of a FMD. A hypothesis is presented to explain the clinico-radiological findings of the case. PMID:24257499

  12. Spinal cord detethering in children with tethered cord syndrome and Chiari type 1 malformations.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad; Cheema, Ahmed A; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Gross, Naina L; Martin, Michael D; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the association between tethered cord syndrome (TCS) and Chiari type 1 malformation (CM1), and report on the surgical outcomes of children with CM1 and TCS who underwent sectioning of the filum terminale (SFT). The relationship between TCS and CM1 is unclear. A retrospective review of 170 consecutive spinal cord detetherings between 2008 and 2012 was performed. We identified 17 children with CM1 who underwent SFT. Information regarding clinical presentation, radiographic findings, surgical procedures, and clinical outcomes was analyzed. A mean tonsillar herniation of 10.0mm (range: 5-21) was noted. Children with a fatty or thickened filum terminale demonstrated a greater amount of tonsillar displacement (p<0.005). A low conus medullaris was found in 12 children and a syrinx was present in three. The preoperative symptoms improved in all children. The postoperative MRI (mean 21.8 months) revealed an unchanged tonsillar position in all but one child. No worsening of neurologic function was noted. Pediatric patients who have both CM1 and TCS, but do not demonstrate classic Chiari-related symptoms, may experience symptomatic improvement after filum terminale sectioning. PMID:26165471

  13. CHD7 Deficiency in “Looper”, a New Mouse Model of CHARGE Syndrome, Results in Ossicle Malformation, Otosclerosis and Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, Jacqueline M.; Carpinelli, Marina R.; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Symons, R. C. Andrew; Kile, Benjamin T.; Burt, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare human disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7). Characteristics of CHARGE are varied and include developmental ear and hearing anomalies. Here we report a novel mouse model of CHD7 dysfunction, termed Looper. The Looper strain harbours a nonsense mutation (c.5690C>A, p.S1897X) within the Chd7 gene. Looper mice exhibit many of the clinical features of the human syndrome, consistent with previously reported CHARGE models, including growth retardation, facial asymmetry, vestibular defects, eye anomalies, hyperactivity, ossicle malformation, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Looper mice display an otosclerosis-like fusion of the stapes footplate to the cochlear oval window and blepharoconjunctivitis but not coloboma. Looper mice are hyperactive and have vestibular dysfunction but do not display motor impairment. PMID:24840056

  14. A FETAL RAT TESTIS ENDOCRINE AND GENOMIC "SIGNATURE"ACCURATELY PREDICTS THE PHTHALATE SYNDROME OF MALFORMATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Phthalate esters (PE) vary greatly in their potency to induce malformations during sexual differentiation in the male rat. Since in vitro assay batteries are currently unable to generate useful information on the potential of chemicals within this class to disrupt ...

  15. Detection of a mosaic PIK3CA mutation in dental DNA from a child with megalencephaly capillary malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDermott, John H; Byers, Helen; Clayton-Smith, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The megalencephaly capillary malformation syndrome (MCAP, OMIM 602501) is known to be associated with mosaic mutations in PIK3CA occurring during embryogenesis. Standard sequencing technologies are relatively poor at indentifying sequence changes that only affect a small percentage of cells, and the mutations are frequently not identified in lymphocyte DNA, with biopsies of the affected tissues often being required to detect mosaic mutations. Such invasive procedures are not always acceptable to parents. We describe the case of a patient in whom we were able to confirm a causative PIK3CA mutation, first found thorugh next-generation sequencing, in several tissue types including a secondary tooth. As part of this work, we were also able to begin validating dental tissue for potential use in genetic testing, as we achieved excellent DNA yields with minimal effort, even from deciduous teeth shed some years earlier. PMID:26351730

  16. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePLUS

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Types of brain malformations include missing parts ...

  17. Amphibian malformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    National Wildlife Health Center

    1998-01-01

    Frog malformations have been reported from 42 states. The broad geographic distribution of these malformations warrants national attention. Scientists at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin are studying this problem in an effort to document its scope and to determine the causes of the observed malformations.

  18. Survey of prenatal screening policies in Europe for structural malformations and chromosome anomalies, and their impact on detection and termination rates for neural tube defects and Down's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, PA; DeVigan, C; Khoshnood, B; Loane, M; Garne, E; Dolk, H

    2008-01-01

    Objective To ‘map’ the current (2004) state of prenatal screening in Europe. Design (i) Survey of country policies and (ii) analysis of data from EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) population-based congenital anomaly registers. Setting Europe. Population Survey of prenatal screening policies in 18 countries and 1.13 million births in 12 countries in 2002–04. Methods (i) Questionnaire on national screening policies and termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFA) laws in 2004. (ii) Analysis of data on prenatal detection and termination for Down's syndrome and neural tube defects (NTDs) using the EUROCAT database. Main outcome measures Existence of national prenatal screening policies, legal gestation limit for TOPFA, prenatal detection and termination rates for Down's syndrome and NTD. Results Ten of the 18 countries had a national country-wide policy for Down's syndrome screening and 14/18 for structural anomaly scanning. Sixty-eight percent of Down's syndrome cases (range 0–95%) were detected prenatally, of which 88% resulted in termination of pregnancy. Eighty-eight percent (range 25–94%) of cases of NTD were prenatally detected, of which 88% resulted in termination. Countries with a first-trimester screening policy had the highest proportion of prenatally diagnosed Down's syndrome cases. Countries with no official national Down's syndrome screening or structural anomaly scan policy had the lowest proportion of prenatally diagnosed Down's syndrome and NTD cases. Six of the 18 countries had a legal gestational age limit for TOPFA, and in two countries, termination of pregnancy was illegal at any gestation. Conclusions There are large differences in screening policies between countries in Europe. These, as well as organisational and cultural factors, are associated with wide country variation in prenatal detection rates for Down's syndrome and NTD. Please cite this paper as: Boyd P, DeVigan C, Khoshnood B, Loane M, Garne E, Dolk H, and the EUROCAT working group. Survey of prenatal screening policies in Europe for structural malformations and chromosome anomalies, and their impact on detection and termination rates for neural tube defects and Down's syndrome. BJOG 2008;115:689–696. PMID:18410651

  19. Dandy-Walker malformation and Wisconsin syndrome: novel cases add further insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of 3q23q25 deletions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is one of the commonest congenital cerebellar defects, and can be associated with multiple congenital anomalies and chromosomal syndromes. The occurrence of overlapping 3q deletions including the ZIC1 and ZIC4 genes in few patients, along with data from mouse models, have implicated both genes in the pathogenesis of DWM. Methods and results Using a SNP-array approach, we recently identified three novel patients carrying heterozygous 3q deletions encompassing ZIC1 and ZIC4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that only two had a typical DWM, while the third did not present any defect of the DWM spectrum. SNP-array analysis in further eleven children diagnosed with DWM failed to identify deletions of ZIC1-ZIC4. The clinical phenotype of the three 3q deleted patients included multiple congenital anomalies and peculiar facial appearance, related to the localization and extension of each deletion. In particular, phenotypes resulted from the variable combination of three recognizable patterns: DWM (with incomplete penetrance); blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome; and Wisconsin syndrome (WS), recently mapped to 3q. Conclusions Our data indicate that the 3q deletion is a rare defect associated with DWM, and suggest that the hemizygosity of ZIC1-ZIC4 genes is neither necessary nor sufficient per se to cause this condition. Furthermore, based on a detailed comparison of clinical features and molecular data from 3q deleted patients, we propose clinical diagnostic criteria and refine the critical region for WS. PMID:23679990

  20. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the back of the head or the neck and contains brain matter. The covering of the brain or spinal ... fusion of segments of the bones in the neck, and extra folds in the brain. How common are Chiari malformations? In the past, ...

  1. A Rare Case of Acroangiodermatitis Associated with a Congenital Arteriovenous Malformation (Stewart-Bluefarb Syndrome) in a Young Veteran: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Archie, Mark; Khademi, Saieh; Aungst, David; Nouvong, Aksone; Freeman, Shanna; Gelabert, Hugh; Rigberg, David; deVirgilio, Christian; Lewis, Michael; O'Connell, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AD) is a rare angioproliferative disease manifesting with cutaneous lesions clinically similar to Kaposi's sarcoma. AD is a benign hyperplasia of preexisting vasculature and may be associated with acquired or congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVM), or severe chronic venous insufficiency (because of hypostasis, elevated venous pressure, arteriovenous shunting). Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome is the rare syndrome in which AD is associated with a congenital AVM. We present the case of a young veteran with a painful, chronic nonhealing ulcer and ipsilateral popliteal artery occlusion likely because of trauma, who elected transmetatarsal amputation for symptomatic relief. A 24-year-old male veteran presented with a 5-year history of a nonhealing dorsal left foot ulcer, resulting from a training exercise injury. He ultimately developed osteomyelitis requiring antibiotics, frequent debridements, multiple trials of unsuccessful skin substitute grafting, and severe unremitting pain. He noted a remote history of left digital deformities treated surgically as a child, and an AVM, previously endovascularly treated at an outside facility. Arterial duplex revealed somewhat dampened left popliteal, posterior tibial (PT), and dorsalis pedis (DP) artery signals with arterial brachial index of 1.0. CT angiography showed occlusion of the proximal to mid popliteal artery with significant calcifications felt initially to be a result of prior trauma. Pedal pulses were palpable and transcutaneous oxygen measurements revealed adequate oxygenation. Because of unremitting pain, the patient opted for amputation. Pathology revealed vascular proliferation consistent with AD. This case illustrates an unusual diagnosis of acroangiodermatitis, and a rare syndrome when associated with his underlying AVM (Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome). This resulted in a painful, chronic ulcer and was further complicated by trauma-related arterial occlusive disease. AD disease can hinder wound healing even in the presence of clinically evident blood flow. Although rare, such unusual diagnoses should be entertained particularly in the unusually young vascular surgical patient. PMID:26100590

  2. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  3. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of "mitochondrial chaperonopathies" and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  4. Novel KIF7 missense substitutions in two patients presenting with multiple malformations and features of acrocallosal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tunovic, Sanjin; Barañano, Kristin W; Barkovich, James A; Strober, Jonathan B; Jamal, Leila; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    We present two children who both had two missense mutations in the Kinesin Family Member 7 (KIF7) gene. A seven year old female with severe developmental delays, failure to thrive and growth retardation, infantile spasms, a cardiac vascular ring and right-sided aortic arch, imperforate anus, hydronephrosis with a right renal cyst, syndactyly and abnormal white matter was a compound heterozygote for c.3365C?>?G, predicting p.(Ser1122Trp) that was maternally inherited and c.2482G?>?A, predicting p.(Val828Met) that was paternally inherited. An eight year old female with severe developmental delays, epilepsy, left postaxial polydactyly of the hand and abnormalities of brain development including hydrocephalus, pachygyria and absence of the body and splenium of the corpus callous was a compound heterozygote for c.461G?>?A, predicting p.(Arg154Gln) and c.2959 G?>?A, predicting p.(Glu987Lys) that was maternally inherited and her father was unavailable for testing. The presentations in these children include features of acrocallosal syndrome, such as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, enlarged ventricles, facial dysmorphism with a prominent forehead and broad halluces in the first child, but included atypical findings for individuals previously reported to have truncating mutations in KIF7, including imperforate anus, infantile spasms and severe growth retardation. We conclude that these phenotypes may result from the KIF7 sequence variants and abnormal hedgehog signaling, but that the full spectrum of KIF7-associated features remains to be determined. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26174511

  5. The retinal dehydrogenase/reductase retSDR1/DHRS3 gene is activated by p53 and p63 but not by mutants derived from tumors or EEC/ADULT malformation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Ralf D; Rother, Karen; Müller, Gerd A; Engeland, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Retinol and its metabolites have important roles in many processes including embryonic development, cellular differentiation, apoptosis and maintenance of epithelia. Retinal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase retSDR1, also known as dehydrogenase/reductase member 3 (DHRS3), is involved in maintaining the cellular supply of retinol metabolites. We observe that retSDR1 expression is activated by members of the p53 family. Particularly p53 and TAp63? regulate transcription through two separate response elements in the retSDR1 promoter. Both proteins bind the promoter in vitro and in vivo. Induction of DNA damage leads to recruitment of p53 and p63 to the retSDR1 promoter. A tumor-derived p53 mutant is unable to activate retSDR1 transcription. As mutants of p63 in humans exhibit phenotypes that cause several autosomal dominantly inherited syndromes leading to developmental malformations, we tested the transcriptional response of TAp63? mutants derived from the EEC, SHFM and ADULT syndromes. EEC syndrome-specific mutations of TAp63? fail to transactivate retSDR1 and an ADULT syndrome-derived mutant stimulates retSDR1 transcription significantly less than the wild-type variant of p63. Taken together, the results suggest a potential role of the p53/p63-mediated retSDR1 activation in tumor suppression as well as in developmental processes. PMID:20543567

  6. Management of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Mary E.; Meek, James C.; Beheshti, Michael V.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are rare lesions with significant clinical complications. These lesions are commonly seen in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (formerly Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome). Interventional radiologists are a key part of the treatment team in this complex disease, and a thorough understanding of the disease process is critical to providing good patient care. In this article, the authors review the disease course and its association with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, discusses the clinical evaluation and treatment of these complex patients, and outlines complications and follow-up. PMID:22379273

  7. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia/Triphalangeal thumb syndrome ... Jones KL, ed. Aase syndrome. In: Smith's Recognizable Patterns Of Human Malformation. 6th ed. Saunders. 2005. Clinton C, Gazda HT. Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. 2009 Jun 25 [Updated 2013 Jul ...

  8. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J.; Pasztor, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome? autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; camptodactyly ; cell ; craniofacial ; differentiation ; DNA ; embryo ; embryonic ; gene ; hypertelorism ; inherited ; joint ; malformation ; ...

  10. Inherited CHST11/MIR3922 deletion is associated with a novel recessive syndrome presenting with skeletal malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sameer S; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Duzkale, Hatice; McLaughlin, Heather; Giovanni, Monica; Zhang, Chengsheng; Stitziel, Nathan; Fingeroth, Joyce; Joyce, Robin M; Lebo, Matthew; Rehm, Heidi; Vuzman, Dana; Maas, Richard; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Murray, Michael; Cassa, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin are ubiquitous disaccharide carbohydrate chains that contribute to the formation and function of proteoglycans at the cell membrane and in the extracellular matrix. Although GAG-modifying enzymes are required for diverse cellular functions, the role of these proteins in human development and disease is less well understood. Here, we describe two sisters out of seven siblings affected by congenital limb malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease. Using Whole-Genome Sequencing (WGS), we identified in the proband deletion of a 55 kb region within chromosome 12q23 that encompasses part of CHST11 (encoding chondroitin-4-sulfotransferase 1) and an embedded microRNA (MIR3922). The deletion was homozygous in the proband but not in each of three unaffected siblings. Genotyping data from the 1000 Genomes Project suggest that deletions inclusive of both CHST11 and MIR3922 are rare events. Given that CHST11 deficiency causes severe chondrodysplasia in mice that is similar to human limb malformation, these results underscore the importance of chondroitin modification in normal skeletal development. Our findings also potentially reveal an unexpected role for CHST11 and/or MIR3922 as tumor suppressors whose disruption may contribute to malignant lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26436107

  11. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  12. Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... decrease the pressure. The birthmark is treated with laser treatment. Frequently Asked Questions about SWS ? My first ... practice is to treat the malformation with a laser at a very young age. One of the ...

  13. Associated malformations in patients with limb reduction deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Alembik, Yves; Dott, Beatrice; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2010-01-01

    Infants with limb reduction deficiencies (LRD) often have other associated congenital malformations. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated malformations in a defined population. This study included special strengths: each affected child was examined by a geneticist, all elective terminations were ascertained, and the surveillance for malformations was continued until 1 year of age. The associated malformations in infants with LRD were collected in all livebirths, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 25 years in 347,810 consecutive births in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital malformations. Of the 271 LRD infants born during this period, representing a prevalence of 7.8 per 10,000, 57.9% had associated malformations. There were 17(6.3%) patients with chromosomal abnormalities including 10 trisomies 18, and 62 (22.9%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VA(C)TER(L) association. However numerous recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Poland, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting, oral-facial-digital, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, oculo-auriculo-vertebral defect spectrum, CHARGE, Townes-Brocks, Moebius, Du Pan, Smith-Lemli-Opitz, hypoglossia-hypodactyly, amniotic band, De Lange, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fanconi, radius aplasia- thrombocytopenia, Roberts, Holt-Oram, and fetal diethylstilbestrol. Seventy eight (28.8%) of the patients were multiply, non-syndromic, non chromosomal malformed infants (MCA). Malformations in the cardiac system, in the genital system, and in the central nervous system were the most common other malformations, 11.4%, 9.4%, and 7.7% of the associated malformations, respectively, followed by malformations in the renal system (4.8%), and in the digestive system (4.6%). Prenatal diagnosis was performed in 48.4% of dysmorphic syndromes with LRD. The overall prevalence of associated malformations, which was more than one in two infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of infants with LRD.A routine screening for other malformations especially cardiovascular system, urogenital system, central nervous system, and digestive system may be considered in infants and in fetuses with LRD. PMID:20670696

  14. Interventional treatment of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) are congenital vascular communications in the lungs. They act as right to left shunts so that the blood running through these malformations is not oxygenated or filtered. These patients are typically hypoxaemic with exercise intolerance and are at high risk of paradoxical emboli to the brain and other organs. These malformations are most commonly seen in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) (Mb. Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome). Nowadays, the generally accepted treatment strategy of first choice is embolization of the afferent arteries to the arteriovenous malformations. It is a minimally invasive procedure and at the same time a lung preserving treatment with a very high technical success, high effectiveness and low morbidity and mortality. Embolization prevents cerebral stroke and abscess as well as pulmonary haemorrhage and further raises the functional level. Embolization is a well-established method of treating PAVM, with a significant effect on oxygenation of the blood. Screening for PAVM in patients at risk is recommended, especially in patients with HHT. PMID:21160695

  15. Rare malformation of glans penis: arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Akin, Y; Sarac, M; Yucel, S

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric glans penis malformations, especially arteriovenous malformations (AVM), are very rare. Herein, we report two rare cases. A 14-year-old boy attended our outpatient clinic with chief complaints of purple swelling and rapidly growing lesion on the glans penis. The lesion was excised surgically after physical and radiological evaluations. Pathology reported AVM and the patient is being followed up. The second case is a 2-year-old boy who was admitted with a big lesion involving glans penis and genital area that has been present since birth. In physical and radiological evaluations, lesion on the glans penis was pulsatile. Parents of the patient did not want any surgery and patient has been in follow-up. Diagnosis of the vascular lesions on glans penis is very easy by physical and radiological examinations today. Long-term follow-up is very important for AVM. Clinicians must make a careful effort to document new glans lesions in the pediatric population and decrease anxiety in the parents of affected children. PMID:23771468

  16. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  17. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered. PMID:26399846

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with Costello syndrome is a childhood cancer called rhabdomyosarcoma, which begins in muscle tissue. Neuroblastoma, a tumor ... hypertrophic ; hypotonia ; malformation ; muscle tone ; mutation ; prevalence ; protein ; rhabdomyosarcoma ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ; tissue ; transitional cell carcinoma ; ...

  19. Evaluation and management of congenital peripheral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Naiem; Cirillo-Penn, Nolan C; Thomas, Jones

    2015-12-01

    The International Society for Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) broadly categorizes vascular anomalies into vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular malformations are further divided based on their flow properties into slow-flow venous and lymphatic malformations, high-flow arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and congenital mixed syndromes, which can include combinations thereof. Whether occurring in isolation or as part of a broader syndrome, congenital high-flow AVMs are arguably the most complicated, challenging, and gratifying of all vascular malformations to diagnose and manage. Various configurations exist depending on location and coexisting clinical features. Transcatheter embolization has evolved into the mainstay of treatment for most congenital peripheral AVMs with surgical excision playing a growingly limited role as an adjunctive modality. Successful treatment requires technical precision, creativity, patience, and persistence given the ever-evolving angioarchitecture and hemodynamic profile of these lesions. Despite these challenges, certain fundamental principles have been established as our understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history, hemodynamics, and treatment outcomes has expanded and evolved over the last few decades. These principles are crucial to adhere to in the overall management of these lesions and are highlighted and expanded upon herein. PMID:26598124

  20. The atrioventricular junctions in Ebstein malformation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, S; Goltz, D; McCarthy, K; Cook, A; Connell, M; Smith, A; Anderson, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To review the anatomical structure of the right atrioventricular junction, including the specialised atrioventricular conduction system, in hearts with Ebstein's malformation, to identify potential substrates for the abnormalities in conduction.?METHODS—Five heart specimens representing the morphological spectrum of Ebstein malformation were examined grossly and histologically.?RESULTS—On the endocardial surface, the atrioventricular junction was marked by a faint line in two hearts, and by a small ridge in the other three. Analysis of the right parietal junction in four hearts revealed only two accessory muscular atrioventricular connections. A plane of fibrofatty tissue separated atrial from ventricular myocardium in the right parietal junction in all hearts. The compact atrioventricular node was closer to the coronary sinus than usual. Accessory nodoventricular connections were present in four hearts, while accessory fasciculo-ventricular connections were found in one. The right bundle branch was hypoplastic or absent in four hearts.?CONCLUSIONS—In this small series, the parietal atrioventricular junction was better developed than previously thought. Structural abnormalities of the atrioventricular conduction system, however, were present. These may account for some of the conduction abnormalities frequently observed with the Ebstein malformation.???Keywords: Ebstein's anomaly; atrioventricular node; bundle branch block; Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome PMID:10722549

  1. Imaging features of lower limb malformations above the foot.

    PubMed

    Bergère, A; Amzallag-Bellenger, E; Lefebvre, G; Dieux-Coeslier, A; Mezel, A; Herbaux, B; Boutry, N

    2015-09-01

    Lower limb malformations are generally isolated or sporadic events. However, they are sometimes associated with other anomalies of the bones and/or viscera in patients with constitutional syndromes or disorders of the skeleton. This paper reviews the main imaging features of these abnormalities, which generally exhibit a broad spectrum. This paper focuses on several different bone malformations: proximal focal femoral deficiency, congenital short femur and femoral duplication for the femur, tibial hemimelia (aplasia/hypoplasia of the tibia) and congenital bowing for the tibia, fibular hemimelia (aplasia/hypoplasia) for the fibula, and aplasia, hypoplasia and congenital dislocation for the patella. PMID:25920687

  2. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  3. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ?200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  4. The Axenfeld syndrome and the Rieger syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, N; Kaback, M

    1978-01-01

    A family is reported in which both the syndrome of Axenfeld and the eye malformations of the syndrome of Rieger occur, indicating that both may be expressions of the same gene. We also review the associated anomalies already reported, emphasise their high incidence, suggest that these are not accidental associations, and propose some possible explanations for the high incidence. Images PMID:416212

  5. Controversies in Chiari I malformations

    PubMed Central

    Baisden, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis and management of Chiari I malformations (CMI) remains controversial, particularly since it is often an incidental finding on cervical MR scans performed for neck pain and/or headaches. Recently, some surgeons “over-operated” on asymptomatic patients with Chiari I malformations, or even on those without the requisite radiographic diagnostic features for Chiari I malformations: unfortunately, only a subset were admonished for indiscriminate surgery. Nevertheless, when this hindbrain malformation is truly symptomatic, contributing to impaired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation, various valid surgical management strategies may be adopted. Methods: This review focuses on the current literature regarding the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of Chiari I malformation. Variations in the surgical technique are also presented and critiqued. Results: The recommended treatment for Chiari I malformations I consists of decompressive suboccipital craniectomy and duroplasty when abnormal cine-flow MRI is observed preoperatively and blockage of CSF flow persists intraoperatively despite bony decompression. Conclusions: Controversy continues regarding the optimal surgical technique to address Chiari malformations I. Proper diagnostic studies and patient selection are needed to optimize patient outcomes, while avoiding unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:22905329

  6. MALFORMATIONS, MALFORMATIONS EVERYWHERE ... Prepared by Juan Swanepoel & Marieka Gryzenhout

    E-print Network

    agricultural crop, with a total gross value of R0.18 billion in South Africa for the 2010/11 marketing season afflicted by malformation symptoms are commercial pistachio in Iran and the South African native tree karee

  7. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  8. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ?1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  9. Sex and congenital malformations: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Alessandra; Botto, Lorenzo D; Rittler, Monica; Castilla, Eduardo; Bianca, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Botting, Beverley; De Walle, Hermien; Erickson, J David; Gatt, Miriam; De Vigan, Catherine; Irgens, Lorentz; Johnson, William; Lancaster, Paul; Merlob, Paul; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M; Ritvanen, Annukka; Robert, Elisabeth; Scarano, Gioacchino; Stoll, Claude; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2005-04-01

    The study evaluated the sex distribution of major isolated malformations and common trisomies among a large and geographically varied sample. Eighteen registries from 24 countries contributed cases, which were centrally reviewed and classified in three clinical types as isolated, associated, or syndromic. We selected cases of 26 major defects (n = 108,534); trisomy 21, 18, and 13 (n = 30,114); other syndromes (n = 2,898); and multiple congenital anomalies (n = 24,197), for a total of 165,743 cases. We observed a significant deviation of sex distribution (compared to a sex ratio of 1.06 or male proportion of 51.4%) for 24 of the 29 groups (a male excess in 16, a female excess in 8), and in 8 of such groups these estimates varied significantly across registries. A male excess was noted for two left obstructive cardiac defects (hypoplastic left heart and coarctation of the aorta) and a female excess for all the main types of neural tube defects. A male excess was seen for omphalocele but not gastroschisis. For neural tube defects the female excess tended to be stronger in areas with historically high prevalence for these defects. For 15 of the 26 birth defects the sex distribution differed among isolated, associated, and syndromic cases. Some of these epidemiologic commonalities are consistent with known or putative developmental processes. Further, the geographic variation for some defects may reflect local prevalence rates and risk factors. Finally, the findings underscore the need for clinical classification (e.g., into isolated, multiple, syndromes) in studies of birth defects. PMID:15704121

  10. Location of Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia Is Related to the Malformation Phenotype on MRI

    PubMed Central

    González, G.; Vedolin, L.; Barry, B.; Poduri, A.; Walsh, C.; Barkovich, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Periventricular nodular heterotopia are common malformations of cortical development that are associated with many clinical syndromes and with many different neuroimaging phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether specific malformation phenotypes may be related to location, side, or number of PNH as assessed by MR imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS MR images of 200 patients previously diagnosed with PNH were retrospectively analyzed. PNH were classified according to their location along the ventricles (anterior, posterior, or diffuse), side (unilateral or bilateral), and number of nodules (<5, 6–10, or >10). The cerebrum, brain stem and cerebellum were analyzed to assess associated anomalies. Associations between PNH location and the presence of other anomalies were tested by using Fisher exact test and ?2 test. RESULTS Posterior PNH were significantly associated with malformations of the cerebral cortex, diminished white matter volume, and mid-/hindbrain anomalies. Diffuse PNH were associated with diminished white matter volume, callosal “anomalies,” and the presence of megacisterna magna. Unilateral PNH were strongly associated with cortical malformations. CONCLUSIONS Certain malformation complexes are associated with PNH in specific locations: posterior PNH with cerebral cortical and mid-/hindbrain malformations and diffuse PNH with callosal anomalies and megacisterna magna. Knowledge of these associations should allow more directed analyses of brain MR imaging in patients with PNH. In addition, knowledge of these associations may help to direct studies to elucidate the causes of these malformation complexes. PMID:23064591

  11. Ohtahara syndrome associated with hemimegalencephaly and intracranial lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K.; Bhat, Ashwini; Bhat, Maya; Ramaswamy, Premalatha

    2015-01-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a disorder of cortical malformation and is associated with various disorders including various neurocutaneous syndromes and many seizure types. We present a case of hemimegalencephaly associated with Ohtahara syndrome and intracranial and facial lipoma. PMID:26167232

  12. Pseudotumour cerebri associated with arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O. C.; Lai, H. M.; Ross-Russell, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    The association of intracranial hypertension and arteriovenous malformations is described in two patients. Both patients had the typical clinical features of pseudotumour cerebri and were found to have intracranial arteriovenous malformations on arteriography. The mechanism of raised intracranial pressure in patients with arteriovenous malformations is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:8234111

  13. Renal malformations associated with mutations of developmental genes: messages from the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Adalat, Shazia; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Ledermann, Sarah E.; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2010-01-01

    Renal tract malformations (RTMs) account for about 40% of children with end-stage renal failure. RTMs can be caused by mutations of genes normally active in the developing kidney and lower renal tract. Moreover, some RTMs occur in the context of multi-organ malformation syndromes. For these reasons, and because genetic testing is becoming more widely available, pediatric nephrologists should work closely with clinical geneticists to make genetic diagnoses in children with RTMs, followed by appropriate family counseling. Here we highlight families with renal cysts and diabetes, renal coloboma and Fraser syndromes, and a child with microdeletion of chromosome 19q who had a rare combination of malformations. Such diagnoses provide families with often long-sought answers to the question “why was our child born with kidney disease”. Precise genetic diagnoses will also help to define cohorts of children with RTMs for long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:20603712

  14. Split-hand/feet malformation in three tamilian families and review of the reports from India

    PubMed Central

    Amalnath, S. Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Maya; Dutta, Tarun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a rare condition which can be either syndromic or nonsyndromic. We report three unrelated pedigrees, one with autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and the other two with autosomal recessive (AR) pattern. We also briefly review the published reports from India. PMID:24959024

  15. Neuroimaging of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Klostranec, J M; Krings, T

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations of the brain and brainstem that arise via a number of different mechanisms and can result in non-specific presentations. Therefore, medical imaging is essential in the diagnosis of these lesions and important to guide their clinical or surgical management. MRI is the modality of choice with newer protocols, such as susceptibility weighted imaging, playing an increasingly important role in the detection of CCMs. In this review we will discuss lesion structure, its proposed origins, and common lesion presentations and complications, before covering their expected appearances with different imaging modalities. We conclude with a discussion of insights about lesion behaviour acquired from advanced imaging techniques and provide a general approach to characterizing and diagnosing CCM lesions with neuroimaging. PMID:25968928

  16. Sonographic markers for early diagnosis of fetal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Renna, Maria Daniela; Pisani, Paola; Conversano, Francesco; Perrone, Emanuele; Casciaro, Ernesto; Renzo, Gian Carlo Di; Paola, Marco Di; Perrone, Antonio; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Fetal malformations are very frequent in industrialized countries. Although advanced maternal age may affect pregnancy outcome adversely, 80%-90% of fetal malformations occur in the absence of a specific risk factor for parents. The only effective approach for prenatal screening is currently represented by an ultrasound scan. However, ultrasound methods present two important limitations: the substantial absence of quantitative parameters and the dependence on the sonographer experience. In recent years, together with the improvement in transducer technology, quantitative and objective sonographic markers highly predictive of fetal malformations have been developed. These markers can be detected at early gestation (11-14 wk) and generally are not pathological in themselves but have an increased incidence in abnormal fetuses. Thus, prenatal ultrasonography during the second trimester of gestation provides a “genetic sonogram”, including, for instance, nuchal translucency, short humeral length, echogenic bowel, echogenic intracardiac focus and choroid plexus cyst, that is used to identify morphological features of fetal Down’s syndrome with a potential sensitivity of more than 90%. Other specific and sensitive markers can be seen in the case of cardiac defects and skeletal anomalies. In the future, sonographic markers could limit even more the use of invasive and dangerous techniques of prenatal diagnosis (amniocentesis, etc.). PMID:24179631

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Townes-Brocks Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and organs before birth. SALL proteins act as transcription factors, which means they attach (bind) to specific ... malformation ; mutation ; obstruction ; prevalence ; protein ; renal ; sensorineural ; syndrome ; transcription You may find definitions for these and many ...

  18. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  19. Acquired Chiari malformation type I associated with a supratentorial fistulous arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Wei; Kuo, Meng-Fai; Lee, Chung-Wei; Tu, Yong-Kwang

    2015-03-01

    A case of acquired Chiari malformation type I with frontal fistulous arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is presented, and the pathophysiology is discussed. The tonsillar herniation and hydrocephalus both resolved after AVM was excised. This case provides some insight into the complex hemodynamic change exerted by the fistulous AVM and the mechanism of the development of acquired Chiari malformation type I. PMID:25081218

  20. Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Adnan Aslam; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani

    2015-10-01

    Fraser's Syndrome (FS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a spectrum of malformations. The most consistent features are Cryptophthalmos (CO), syndactyly, genitourinary tract abnormalities, laryngeal and tracheal anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphism, malformations of the ear and nose, orofacial clefting and musculoskeletal defects. FS is genetically heterogeneous; so far mutations in FRAS1, FREM2and GRIP1genes have been linked to FS. FS can be diagnosed on clinical examination, pre-natal ultrasound or perinatal autopsy. We present a case of a 3 months old child born to consanguineous healthy parents with bilateral complete CO, unilateral microphthalmia, hypertelorism, syndactyly (hands and feet bilaterally), ambiguous genitalia with cryptorchidism and an umbilical hernia. We also present the criteria for diagnosing FS and the significant features on pre-natal ultrasonography. Around 200 case reports of patients with FS and CO have been published. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of FS in Pakistan. PMID:26522198

  1. Fourth case of cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal syndrome (CODAS), description of new features and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlin, S; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Le Merrer, M; Portnoi, M F; Chantot, S; Jonard, L; Mantel-Guiochon, A; Siffroi, J P; Garabedian, E N; Denoyelle, F

    2010-06-01

    Cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal syndrome (CODAS, OMIM 600373) is a very rare congenital malformation syndrome. This clinical entity is highly distinctive and associates mental retardation, cataract, enamel abnormalities, malformations of the helix, epiphyseal and vertebral malformations, and characteristic dysmorphic features. Since 1991, only three affected children have been reported. The etiology and pattern of inheritance of CODAS syndrome still remain unknown. We describe a new sporadic case presenting with all the characteristic features of CODAS syndrome associated with previously unreported malformations of the heart, larynx, and liver. All investigations such as karyotype, metabolic screening and array CGH were normal. PMID:20503327

  2. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  3. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    PubMed

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts. PMID:25737931

  4. Spinal dermoid sinus in a Dachshund with vertebral and thoracic limb malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dermoid sinus is an uncommon epithelial-lined fistula that may be associated with vertebral malformations. In humans, Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare condition characterized by congenital cervical vertebral fusion and may be associated with other developmental defects, including dermoid sinus. The present case report describes an adult Dachshund with cervical and cranial thoracic vertebral malformations as well as thoracic limb malformations resembling KFS with a concurrent type IV dermoid sinus. Case presentation A 1.5 year-old Dachshund with congenital thoracic limbs deformities and cervical-thoracic vertebral malformations presented with cervical hyperesthesia, rigidity of the cervical musculature and tetraparesis. Neurologic, radiographic, and computed tomography (CT) (2D, 3D, CT fistulography) examinations revealed skeletal anomalies, a dermoid sinus in the cranial thoracic region and epidural gas within the vertebral canal. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the sinus tract were performed and confirmed a type IV dermoid sinus. The clinical signs progressively recovered postoperatively, and no recurrent signs were observed after 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Cervical vertebral malformations associated with limbs anomalies have not been reported in dogs and may represent a condition similar to KFS in humans. KFS can occur concurrently with other congenital conditions including dermoid sinus and should be included among the complex congenital anomalies described in dogs. PMID:24593884

  5. Malformations in Infants of Diabetic Mothers

    PubMed Central

    MILLS, JAMES L.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal insulin-dependent diabetes has long been associated with congenital malformations. As other causes of mortality and morbidity have been eliminated or reduced, malformations have become increasingly prominent. Although there is not universal agreement, the great majority of investigators find a two- to threefold increase in malformations in infants of insulin-dependent diabetic mothers. This increase is not seen in infants of gestational diabetics. It probably is not present in women whose diabetes can be controlled by diet or oral hypoglycemic agents. The risk does not appear to be primarily genetic since diabetic fathers do not have an increased number of malformed offspring. Most studies show a generalized increase in malformations involving multiple organ systems. Multiple malformations seem to be more common in diabetic than non-diabetic infants. Caudal regression has the strongest association with diabetes, occurring roughly 200 times more frequently in infants of diabetic mothers than in other infants. The teratogenic mechanism in diabetes is not known. Hyperglycemia may be important but human studies focusing on the period of organogenesis are lacking. Hypoglycemia has also been suggested based mainly on animal experiments. Insulin appears unlikely. Numerous other factors including vascular disease, hypoxia, ketone and amino acid abnormalities, glycosylation of proteins, or hormone imbalances could be teratogenic. None has been studied in sufficient detail to make a judgment. A large-scale prospective study is required to determine early fetal loss rates, correlate metabolic status during organogenesis with outcome, and assess the effect of diabetic control on malformation rates. PMID:20973049

  6. Computed tomography of congenital brain malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book is illustrated showing each condition. This book is designed to correlate the pathology of CNS malformations with their CT scan appearance, mainly on the axial images. The author has drawn upon his personal experience and the information gleaned from the literature dealing with the description of the CT scan findings of these malformations. The emphasis is on simplicity of description. Since a large degree of morphological variation exists in each entity, numerous illustrations (wherever applicable) are shown to depict those variations. When appropriate, deficiency of the CT scan in the evaluation of these CNS malformations also is indicated. A description of CNS embryology is included as well.

  7. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  8. Antenatal diagnosis of aneurysmal malformation of the vein of Galen.

    PubMed

    Darji, Parth J; Gandhi, Viplav S; Banker, Hiral; Chaudhari, Hemang

    2015-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VGAM) results from an aneurysmal aberration with an arteriovenous shunting of blood. Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations are the most frequent arteriovenous malformations in infants and fetuses. The congenital malformation develops during weeks 6-11 of fetal development. Infants often die from high-output congestive heart failure. PMID:26643190

  9. Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, and intellectual disability in two families.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maha S; Masri, Amira; Gregor, Anne; Gleeson, Joseph G; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur

    2015-11-01

    We report on two families, each with documented consanguinity and two affected with overlapping features of Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, intellectual disability, and hearing deficit. This phenotype shares similar findings with many well-known syndromes. However, the clinical findings of this syndrome categorize this as a new syndrome as compared with the phenotype of already established syndromes. Due to parental consanguinity, occurrence in siblings of both genders and the absence of manifestations in obligate carrier parents, an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is more likely. The authors believe that these families suggest a novel autosomal recessive cerebello-genital syndrome. Array CGH analyses of an affected did not show pathological deletions or duplications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26109232

  10. Detection of a de novo duplication of 1q32-qter by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in a boy with multiple malformations: further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Duba, H C; Erdel, M; Löffler, J; Bereuther, L; Fischer, H; Utermann, B; Utermann, G

    1997-01-01

    We report a dysmorphic boy with a de novo partial trisomy 1q. The boy has microcephaly, bilateral cleft lip and palate, low set and dysmorphic ears, brain anomalies, pulmonary stenosis, duodenal obstruction, dysplastic kidneys, and bifid thumbs. The trisomic segment 1q32-qter is duplicated with an inverted insertion at 1p36.3. The aberration was initially detected at amniocentesis and confirmed and defined by GTG banding, chromosome microdissection, and FISH on postnatal blood samples. The parents had normal karyotypes. De novo partial duplications of chromosome 1q have rarely been reported. Comparison of our patient with other published pure trisomy 1q cases showed similarities which allowed the further delineation of the trisomy 1q syndrome. Images PMID:9138155

  11. Diffusion imaging of congenital brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Mike; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2009-09-01

    Diffusion imaging is a magnetic resonance imaging modality that measures the microscopic molecular motion of water to yield information about brain structure. The technique has been used increasingly in recent years to investigate congenital brain malformations. This article aims to provide a brief overview of diffusion imaging, and to review recent advances in our understanding of congenital brain malformations because of diffusion imaging. The technique has been successfully applied to conditions ranging from rare hindbrain malformations, such as horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, to conditions that are undetectable using conventional neuroimaging, such as grapheme-color synesthesia. Though diffusion imaging has already yielded considerable insight into the pathogenesis and clinical features of congenital malformations, recent advances in imaging techniques promise to provide much more extensive knowledge of these conditions in the future. PMID:19778708

  12. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-02-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  13. Genetic analysis of malformations causing perinatal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I D; Rickett, A B; Clarke, M

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of congenital malformations, other than neural tube defects, which have contributed to perinatal mortality in Leicestershire is presented for the years 1976 to 1982 inclusive. Chromosomal, single gene, or polygenic inheritance accounted for 67% of cases. PMID:3950936

  14. Current concepts in lymphatic malformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B; Kim, Y W; Seo, J M; Hwang, J H; Do, Y S; Kim, D I; Byun, H S; Lee, S K; Huh, S H; Hyun, W S

    2005-01-01

    A lymphatic malformation (LM) is the most common form of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). The new Hamburg classification of CVM distinguishes the truncular (T) form from the extratruncular (ET) form of LMs. Both are consequences of a developmental arrest at the different stages of lymphangiogenesis as a result of defective genes. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current management results of both forms of LMs. A retrospective review of the clinical data of 315 patients with a diagnosis of LMs treated between September 1994 and December 2001 was performed. Lymphoscintigraphy was the most frequent diagnostic test. The patients with the ET form were treated with sclerotherapy with OK-432 and/or ethanol. Combinations of CDP (complex decongestive physiotherapy) and/or compressotherapy were used to treat all the T-form patients. In addition, surgery, either reconstructive or ablative, was offered to patients with the T form who failed to respond to the proper CDP. A multidisciplinary team performed the management of LM, and the results were evaluated every 6 months. Among 797 patients with CVM, 315 were confirmed to have LMs, either as the T form (226) or the ET form (89). Another 66 LMs were diagnosed with hemolymphatic malformations (HLM). Most of the ET forms (89/315) were the cystic type (70/89), while the T forms included aplasia and/or an obstruction (204/226). The ET form was most frequent in the head, neck, and thorax (69/89). The T form was located most frequently to the extremities (202/226), mostly to the lower limb (180/202). Two hundred and twenty-six T forms belonged to the various clinical stages: stages I-32, II-104, III-48, IV-18, and an unclear stage-24. The ET form was treated with sclerotherapy using OK-432 (108/120) and absolute ethanol (12/120). Among the 11 patients with the multiple ET form, 7 patients underwent perioperative sclerotherapy with OK-432 and a subsequent surgical excision. The clinical response of the T form at the extremity to CDP was excellent to good in a majority of clinical stages I to II (121/136) but decreased to a good to fair degree in stages III to IV (31/66). The additional surgical therapy, either reconstructive (10/19) or ablative (9/19), provided limited success in improving CDP efficacy, owing mainly to poor compliance. The long-term outcome of the initial success through self-motivated home-maintenance care during the follow-up period of up to 48 months was totally dependent on patient compliance. OK-432 sclerotherapy to 51 ET forms has shown excellent results on 88.9% of the cystic type (40/45) and 50% (3/6) of the cavernous type (minimum follow-up for 24 months). Seventeen ET forms in 7 patients were treated with a preoperative OK-432 sclerotherapy and a subsequent surgical excision, which provided good to excellent results in 14 for a minimum of 24 months. Primary lymphedema, which is the T form of LMs, can be managed safely by a combination of CDP with compressotherapy. Patients with good compliance can benefit from additional surgical therapy, either reconstructive or ablative. The ET form, particularly the cystic type, can be treated with various scleroagents that are preferably less toxic as the primary therapy. A surgical excision with or without perioperative sclerotherapy provides good results for patients with the localized cavernous type of the ET form. A multidisciplinary team approach is essential for the proper care of LM. PMID:15696250

  15. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hamartomas are tumour-like malformations, consisting of disorganized normal tissues, typical of the site of tumour manifestation. Familial manifestation of hamartomatous polyps can be noted in juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS), Peutz-Jeghers’ syndrome (PJS), hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS) and PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (PHTS). All the aforementioned syndromes are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and form a rather heterogenous group both in respect to the number and localization of polyps and the risk of cancer development in the alimentary tract and other organs. Individual syndromes of hamartomatous polyposis frequently manifest similar symptoms, particularly during the early stage of the diseases when in several cases their clinical pictures do not allow for differential diagnosis. The correct diagnosis of the disease using molecular methods allows treatment to be implemented earlier and therefore more effectively since it is followed by a strict monitoring of organs that manifest a predisposition for neoplastic transformation. PMID:23724922

  16. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  17. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110? subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110?-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  18. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with Extensive Lymphangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mneimneh, Sirin; Tabaja, Ali; Rajab, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare disorder characterized by the triad of vascular malformations, venous varicosities, and bone and soft-tissue hypertrophy. We present a case of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with limb hypertrophy, port-wine stains, lymphangiomas, and venous varicosities in the limbs. PMID:26587303

  19. Study of ophthalmo acromelic syndromes in human and mouse 

    E-print Network

    Rainger, Joe

    2009-01-01

    The combination of severe ocular and distal limb malformations is rare. Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS; MIM 206920) is characterised by anophthalmia with lower limb oligodactyly. To date <40 cases of this autosomal ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: McKusick-Kaufman syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hypospadias), a downward-curving penis (chordee), and undescended testes (cryptorchidism). The signs and symptoms of McKusick-Kaufman ... malformation ; pelvis ; polydactyly ; population ; protein ; recessive ; renal ; syndrome ; testes You may find definitions for these and many ...

  1. Nature, frequency and natural history of intracranial cavernous malformations in adults 

    E-print Network

    Hall, Julie Maria

    2014-07-05

    Scottish Intracranial Vascular Malformation Study was the first prospective, population-based study of the major types of intracranial vascular malformations; arteriovenous, cavernous and venous malformations including ...

  2. Cataract surgery in Knobloch syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Carmen Sílvia; Ferreira, Carla Cristina Serra; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Silvério; Filho, João Borges Fortes; Tartarella, Márcia Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with early-onset ocular abnormalities and central nervous system malformations. Ocular abnormalities are usually severe, and include high myopia, vitreoretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, macular abnormalities, and cataract. The most frequent systemic changes are midline malformations of the brain, ventricular dilation, and occipital encephalocele. Cognitive delay may occur. We report a case of cataract in a child with Knobloch syndrome. Cataract surgery and follow-up are described. PMID:21691582

  3. Phlébolithes révélant des malformations veineuses multiples de la jambe: à propos d'un cas et revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Yacoubi, Hicham

    2013-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent le cas d'une jeune patiente de 27 ans, opérée dans l'enfance pour pied bot varus équin gauche, qui consulte dans notre formation pour syndrome douloureux aigu de la jambe gauche, sans notion de traumatisme. Le bilan radiographique standard a révélé de multiples phlébolithes disséminées dans les parties molles de la jambe, révélant des malformations veineuses profondes, confirmées par angioscanner et IRM. Une biopsie exérèse d'une masse à la face interne du 13 supérieur a confirmé le diagnostic histologique de malformation veineuse avec ablation de la calcification et d'un thrombus. PMID:24198893

  4. Two cases of hemihyperplasia-multiple lipomatosis syndrome and review of asymmetric hemihyperplasia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Craiglow, Brittany G; Ko, Christine J; Antaya, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Hemihyperplasia-multiple lipomatosis syndrome (HHML) is a condition characterized by asymmetric nonprogressive overgrowth, multiple lipomas, and superficial vascular malformations. We present two cases of HHML to enhance the diagnostic acumen of dermatologists and avoid potential misdiagnosis of this rare but probably underrecognized entity. We also provide a brief review of asymmetric overgrowth syndromes, which have overlapping yet distinct clinical manifestations. PMID:23458125

  5. Two sisters with a syndrome of ocular, skeletal, and abdominal abnormalities (OSA syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Mingarelli, R; Castriota Scanderbeg, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1996-01-01

    Two adult sisters are described who had a unique association of facial, ocular, and skeletal defects, and abdominal muscle hypoplasia, indicating autosomal recessive inheritance. Many of these features overlap those previously found in other malformation syndromes. However, the constellation of defects observed in these patients appears to represent a previously unreported syndrome and autosomal recessive inheritance is likely. Images PMID:8933348

  6. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  7. Anorectal Malformation: Paediatric Problem Presenting in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Rahulkumar N.; Chikkala, Bhargav; Das, Cinjini; Biswas, Somak; Sarkar, Diptendra Kumar; Pandey, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of 22-year-old girl admitted with abdominal distension, vomiting, and chronic constipation since birth. Abdomen was distended, and perineal examination revealed imperforate anus with vestibular fistula (ARM). So far worldwide very few cases have been reported about anorectal malformation presenting in adulthood, and thus extremely little data is available in the literature about an ideal management of anorectal malformation in adults. In our case in the treatment instead of conventional procedure of posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) anal transposition was done and till two years after the definitive treatment during follow-up patient has been doing well with Kelly's score of six. Our experience suggests that anal transposition provides satisfactory outcome in adults presenting late with anorectal malformation. PMID:26539301

  8. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  9. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Frederico Becker; Schultz, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is an hamartomatous congenital pulmonary airway malformation with incidence ranging between 1:10,000 and 1:35,000 newborns. Currently CCAM is classified into five groups according to clinical and pathological features. The clinical outcome varies depending on the subtype and the extent of involvement. The authors report the case of a premature male newborn with the prenatal diagnosis of CCAM Type 1 associated with cardiac right axis deviation, who died 67 hours after birth due to respiratory failure. In addition to the autopsy report of this rare entity, the authors present its classification and prognosis. PMID:26558243

  10. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  11. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christopher C.; Steinbacher, Derek M.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a genetic disorder resulting in congenital craniofacial malformation. Patients typically present with downslanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid colobomas, microtia, and malar and mandibular hypoplasia. This autosomal dominant disorder has a variable degree of phenotypic expression, and patients have no associated developmental delay or neurologic disease. Care for these patients requires a multidisciplinary team from birth through adulthood. Proper planning, counseling and surgical techniques are essential for optimizing patient outcomes. Here the authors review the features, genetics, and treatment of Treacher Collins syndrome. PMID:23633935

  12. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  13. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  14. Heart failure and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yu-Lin; Li, Sha; Huang, Jing; Luo, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominantly inherited vascular-malformation syndrome associated with gene mutations including ENG, ACVRL1 and SMAD4 gene. Clinically indistinguishable HHT1 and HHT2 are caused by mutations in ENG and ACVRL1 gene, respectively. Generally, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are rare manifestations of HHT related to ACVRL1 gene mutations. We described a female patient with HHT2 whose clinical features included epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectases, systemic AVMs and PAH. She also suffered from severe iron deficiency anemia and recurrent heart failure. A genetic mutation analysis disclosed a missense mutation in exon 7 of ACVRL1 gene in this patient and her daughter. A nonsense mutation in exon 7 of ACVRL1 gene was detected in her brother and her niece. This case supports that PAVMs and PAH can be rare manifestations of HHT2 patients. PMID:26245826

  15. A locus for cerebral cavernous malformations maps to chromosome 7q in two families

    SciTech Connect

    Marchuk, D.A.; Gallione, C.J.; Morrison, L.A.; Davis, L.E.; Clericuzio, C.L.

    1995-07-20

    Cavernous malformations (angiomas) affecting the central nervous system and retina can be inherited in autosomal dominant pattern (OMIM 116860). These vascular lesions may remain clinically silent or lead to a number of neurological symptoms including seizure, intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit, and migraine. We have mapped a gene for this disorder in two families, one of Italian-American origin and one of Mexican-American origin, to markers on proximal 7q, with a combined maximum lod score of 3.92 ({theta} of zero) with marker D7S479. Haplotype analysis of these families places the locus between markers D7S502 proximally and D7S515 distally, an interval of approximately 41 cM. The location distinguishes this disorder from an autosomal dominant vascular malformation syndrome where lesions are primarily cutaneous and that maps to 9p21. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Partial urorectal septum malformation sequence in a kitten with disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brice S; Pain, Amélie; Meynaud-Collard, Patricia; Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    A 2-month-old kitten exhibited simultaneously an imperforate anus, hypospadias, rectourethral fistula and genital dysgenesis (penis restricted to the glans, absence of prepuce and bifid scrotum). Surgical correction consisted of separation of the urinary and digestive tracts, perineal urethrostomy and connection of the rectum to the newly made anal opening. Pathological examination of the testes, conventionally removed at 9 months of age, showed no mature spermatozoa and underdevelopment of germ and Leydig cells. In humans, the absence of an anal opening in association with abnormal sexual development defines the urorectal septum malformation sequence. Here, we describe the first case of this syndrome in a kitten with a normal male karyotype (38,XY) and a normal coding sequence for the SRY gene. Both the rectourethral fistula and observed genital abnormalities might have been induced by a disturbance in the hedgehog signalling pathway. However, although four polymorphic sites were identified by DHH gene sequencing, none cosegregated with the malformation. PMID:24718294

  17. Mutation Prevalence of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Genes in Spanish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mondéjar, Rufino; Solano, Francisca; Rubio, Rocío; Delgado, Mercedes; Pérez-Sempere, Ángel; González-Meneses, Antonio; Vendrell, Teresa; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Martinez-Mir, Amalia; Lucas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular genetic and clinical features of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) in a cohort of Spanish patients. Methods We analyzed the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes by MLPA and direct sequencing of exons and intronic boundaries in 94 familial forms and 41 sporadic cases of CCM patients of Spanish extraction. When available, RNA studies were performed seeking for alternative or cryptic splicing. Results A total of 26 pathogenic mutations, 22 of which predict truncated proteins, were identified in 29 familial forms and in three sporadic cases. The repertoire includes six novel non-sense and frameshift mutations in CCM1 and CCM3. We also found four missense mutations, one of them located at the third NPXY motif of CCM1 and another one that leads to cryptic splicing of CCM1 exon 6. We found four genomic deletions with the loss of the whole CCM2 gene in one patient and a partial loss of CCM1and CCM2 genes in three other patients. Four families had mutations in CCM3. The results include a high frequency of intronic variants, although most of them localize out of consensus splicing sequences. The main symptoms associated to clinical debut consisted of cerebral haemorrhage, migraines and epileptic seizures. The rare co-occurrence of CCM with Noonan and Chiari syndromes and delayed menarche is reported. Conclusions Analysis of CCM genes by sequencing and MLPA has detected mutations in almost 35% of a Spanish cohort (36% of familial cases and 10% of sporadic patients). The results include 13 new mutations of CCM genes and the main clinical symptoms that deserves consideration in molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling of cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:24466005

  18. Lethal pallister-killian syndrome: Phenotypic similarity with fryns syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ignacio Rodriquez, J.; Garcia, I.; Alvarez, J.; Delicado, A.; Palacios, J.

    1994-11-01

    The Pallister-Killian syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, profound mental retardation, and epilepsy. Chromosomes of peripheral lymphocytes are usually normal, but tissue cultures show varying degrees of mosaicism for isochromosome 12p. In babies who die neonatally of severe malformations, including diaphragmatic hernia, and who also have a {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, and other internal anomalies, Fryns syndrome is more likely to be suspected than Pallister-Killian syndrome, especially if karyotyping is unavailable or if peripheral lumphocytes have a normal chromosome constitution. An initial diagnosis of Fryns syndrome had to be modified in 3 successive newborn infants since chromosome analysis or in situ hybridization with a chromosome 12 probe on kidney tissue demonstrated the mosaic aneuploidy characteristic of Pallister-Killian syndrome. These 3 patients confirm that a similar pattern of malformations can be present in both conditions at birth. It consists of {open_quotes}coarse{close_quotes} face, acral hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and other defects. Newborn infants who present this phenotype, but lack a conclusively normal chromosome test, may not have Fryns syndrome. A diagnosis of Fryns syndrome should be made carefully to avoid the risk of inappropriate genetic counseling. 31 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. [Craniofacial malformations in prenatal ultrasound evaluation. Literature review].

    PubMed

    Zieli?ski, Rafa?; Respondek-Liberska, Maria

    2013-09-01

    Fetal face is the key anatomical location, both psychologically and clinically for the mother and the clinician. Ultrasound prenatal examination of the maxillofacial region allows to evaluate the fetal face in the first weeks of gestation. In ambulatory intravaginal ultrasound, sensitivity of the facial defect detection is 20-30% in cases without the risk of TORCH and fetal abnormalities, which may arouse suspicion of the presence of facial malformation. Facial defects form a wide group of pathologies. Unfortunately challenges connected with 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging cause frequent misdiagnoses in early gestation. Maxillofacial abnormalities can be solitary or they can coexist with other abnormalities or syndromes. In case of detecting a facial defect, a precise and thorough ultrasound of whole fetal body is necessary whereas in case of detecting any fetal body abnormality a precise and thorough ultrasound examination of the fetal face is obligatory Unfortunately most contemporary prenatal ultrasound standards propose only the overall "face and orbits" evaluation of the fetal face. The evaluation is difficult at 23 and 24 weeks of gestation and seems to be rather challenging in the third trimester of gestation. Not only facial malformations but also facial dimorphic features may lead to the suspicion of genetic syndrome and they may be extremely important in making correct diagnosis. Attempts at standardization in fetal face ultrasound evaluation have proved to be extremely difficult. Advantages of 2D ultrasound over 3D ultrasound and 3D ultrasound over 2D ultrasound in fetal face evaluation have been a topic of much debate. Most typically fetal face is examined with 2D ultrasound in a few basic planes: coronary sagittal, frontal and oblique. The planes preferred in the evaluation of facial structures are discussed in details in the paper Fetal facial defects evaluated in the ultrasound examination may be divided into a few main groups: examination of the orbit and eyeball defects, examination of the external nose and nasal cavity defects, examination of the cleft defects involving the lip, hard and soft palate which may be unilateral or bilateral, examination of external ear defects, examination of mandibular defects and detection of fetal tumors. 3D ultrasound evaluation of the fetal face is extremely useful in visualization of the face, thus presenting a problem to parents and clinicians. Prenatal ultrasound examination provides necessary and extremely useful data concerning fetal facial abnormalities, which allows to plan care and further treatment including interventions in pediatric ENT, pediatric surgery and plastic surgery areas. Cooperation of ultrasound diagnostician and clinicians taking care of a child in the future is therefore necessary when designing treatment scheme in cases of fetal facial defects. PMID:24191520

  20. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  1. Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II with otolaryngological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Havle, A; Shedge, S; Malashetti, S; Jain, V

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of oro-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr's syndrome) which is characterized by malformations of the oral cavity, face and digits. The facial and oral features include tongue nodules, cleft or high-arched palate, missing teeth, broad nose; cleft lip. The digital features include clinodactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, brachydactyly and duplication of the hallux. PMID:26604509

  2. Simple risk predictions for arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, D; McLaughlin, M R; Kestle, J R

    1995-11-01

    We present a simple risk prediction formula for arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage. Natural history studies have shown an annual risk of hemorrhage of 2 to 4% for patients with brain arteriovenous malformations. Although decision analysis programs and biostatistical models are available to predict long-term risks of hemorrhage, we hypothesized that there was varying knowledge regarding the use of such programs within the general neurosurgical community. To obtain information on the current use of risk data, we performed a survey of neurosurgeons at national meetings in 1988 and 1994. Neurosurgeons were asked to define the risk for arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage in the young adult patient over a 20- to 30-year period, given a 3 or 4% annual risk of hemorrhage. A wide range of answers was obtained (1-100% risk), and many different methods of calculation were used. The use of the multiplicative law of probability formula requires only knowledge of patient age and annual hemorrhage risk. Risk of hemorrhage = 1 - (risk of no hemorrhage) expected years of remaining life. The assumptions pertaining to this multiplicative formula include a constant yearly risk of hemorrhage and the independent behavior of all years of observation. We calculated the predictions of risk of hemorrhage across all age groups, as modified by published survival data. We think the use of this formula is justified by published natural history data across different ages and populations and that it is a simple and reasonable alternative to other methods of calculation. PMID:8559331

  3. Giant Arteriovenous Malformation of the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Dieng, P. A.; Ba, P. S.; Gaye, M.; Diatta, S.; Diop, M. S.; Sene, E.; Ciss, A. G.; Ndiaye, A.; Ndiaye, M.

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) have a wide range of clinical presentations. Operative bleeding is one of the most hazardous complications in the surgical management of high-flow vascular malformations. In the cervical region, the presence of vital vascular structures, such as the carotid artery and jugular vein, may increase this risk. This is a case of massive arteriovenous malformation deforming the neck and the face aspect of this aged lady and growing for several years. A giant mass of the left neck occupied the carotid region and the subclavian region. The AVM was developed between the carotid arteries, jugular veins, and vertebral and subclavian vessels, with arterial and venous flux. The patient underwent surgery twice for the cure of that AVM. The first step was the ligation of the external carotid. Seven days later, the excision of the mass was done. In postoperative period the patient presented a peripheral facial paralysis which completely decreased within 10 days. The first ligation of the external carotid reduces significantly the blood flow into the AVM. It permitted secondarily the complete ablation of the AVM without major bleeding even though multiple ligations were done. PMID:26347847

  4. Systemic Supply to a Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation: Potential Explanation for Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Wispelaere, Jean-Francois De; Trigaux, Jean-Paul; Weynants, Patrick; Delos, Monique; Coene, Beatrice De

    1996-04-15

    A pregnant woman presented with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome) and a single pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) that had been embolized 5 years previously. Partly due to pregnancy, recanalization of the aneurysm occurred with subsequent hemoptysis. Despite successful therapeutic reembolization of the afferent pulmonary artery, hemoptysis recurred 5 days later. At this time, recanalization of the pulmonary artery was not demonstrated by pulmonary angiography, but a systemic angiogram revealed a bronchial arterial supply to the pulmonary AVM. A systemic supply should always be sought in cases of recurrent hemoptysis after technically successful embolization of the feeding pulmonary artery.

  5. Unilateral, Linear Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome (Bean's syndrome): An Unfamiliar Presentation: First Case from India

    PubMed Central

    Sancheti, Karan; Podder, Indrashis; Das, Anupam; Choudhury, Sourav; Chandra, Somodyuti; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) also called Bean's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple cutaneous venous malformations in association with visceral lesions, most commonly affecting the gastrointestinal tract. We report here, a 21-year-old woman patient, who presented with unilateral, blaschkoid distribution of cutaneous venous malformations along with blue rubber bleb nevus and recurrent episodes of hematochezia due to vascular lesions in the sigmoid colon; likely to be a case of BRBNS. The unusual unilateral, blaschkoid distribution of BRBNS prompted this present report. PMID:26677281

  6. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neurophatic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarly based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients. PMID:20018097

  7. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents – diagnosis, clinic, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be appropriate for arterio-venous malformations. Incurable findings are still a major challenge. Despite the introduction of antiangiogenetic drugs in oncology, the medicamentous therapeutic approach could not be established for arterio-venous malformations up to now. PMID:25587362

  8. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z.

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  9. Abnormal facial appearance, body asymmetry, limb deformities, and internal malformations.

    PubMed

    Oudesluijs, Grétel; Simon, Marleen E H; Burggraaf, Rianne H J; Waterham, Hans R; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2012-02-01

    We describe a newborn girl with multiple congenital anomalies and abnormal phenotype comprising underdeveloped corpus callosum with ventriculomegaly, chorioretinal atrophy, pulmonary arterial hypertension, annular pancreas, horseshoe kidney, asymmetric limb and chest anomalies, spinal segmentation defects, hypertrichosis, and unusual face with large anterior fontanel, high anterior hairline, broad forehead, mildly underdeveloped midface, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge, short and upturned nose, large mouth, retrognathia, and large and malformed ears. Work-up included cytogenetic studies of lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts, subtelomere Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), whole-genome oligo-array, and molecular analysis of SETBP1 and NSDHL: no abnormalities were found. Mucopolysaccharide urinary excretion was elevated. Results of metabolic studies for sterol and peroxisomal abnormalities in fibroblasts were normal. Additional electronic microscopy studies in skin fibroblasts did not show evidence for storage in fibroblasts or lysosomal changes. Nosologic considerations allowed exclusion of Schinzel-Giedion and Urioste syndrome. This condition seems not to have been described before; a segregating Mendelian mutation is assumed. PMID:22140078

  10. Somatic Activation of AKT3 Causes Hemispheric Developmental Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Elhosary, Princess Christina; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Hills, L. Benjamin; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hill, Anthony; Hill, R. Sean; Barry, Brenda J.; Bourgeois, Blaise F.D.; Riviello, James J.; Barkovich, A. James; Black, Peter M.; Ligon, Keith L.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hemimegalencephaly (HMG) is a developmental brain disorder characterized by an enlarged, malformed cerebral hemisphere, typically causing epilepsy that requires surgical resection. We studied resected HMG tissue to test whether the condition might reflect somatic mutations affecting genes critical to brain development. We found that 2/8 HMG samples showed trisomy of chromosome 1q, encompassing many genes, including AKT3, which is known to regulate brain size. A third case showed a known activating mutation in AKT3 (c.49G?A, creating p.E17K) that was not present in the patient’s blood cells. Remarkably, the E17K mutation in AKT3 is exactly paralogous to E17K mutations in AKT1 and AKT2 recently discovered in somatic overgrowth syndromes. We show that AKT3 is the most abundant AKT paralogue in brain during neurogenesis and that phosphorylated AKT is abundant in cortical progenitor cells. Our data suggest that somatic mutations limited to brain could represent an important cause of complex neurogenetic disease. PMID:22500628

  11. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel T; Robson, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:25573243

  12. Prevalence at birth of congenital malformations in communities near the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Hessol, N.A.; Gilbert, E.S.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of congenital malformations among births in Benton and Franklin counties, in southeastern Washington State, from 1968 through 1980. The Hanford Site is in this area and serves as a major employer. In addition, various agriculturally and chemically related activities are in the area. Hospital and vital records were used to identify 454 malformation cases among 23,319 births; this yielded a malformation rate of 19.6 per 1000 births, a rate similar to those reported in other studies. The rates of specific malformations ascertained during the first year of life were compared with combined rates from the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho from the Birth Defects Monitoring Program. Among defects that would be expected to be comparably ascertained, a statistically significant elevated rate of neural tube defects was observed (1.72 per 1000 births vs. 0.99 per 1000). Rates of cleft lip were significantly lower in Benton and Franklin counties than in the Birth Defects Monitoring Program (0.59 per 1,000 vs. 1.17 per 1000). For congenital heart defects, pyloric stenosis, and Down syndrome, which are often not diagnosed in the newborn period, Birth Defects Monitoring Program data did not offer appropriate comparisons. The rates of these defects did not appear to be elevated in relation to rates found in other relevant populations. When rates of neural tube defects were compared with those in populations other than the Birth Defects Monitoring Program, the Benton and Franklin county rates were still considered to be elevated. The increased bicounty rate cannot be explained by employment of the parents at Hanford or by the impact of plant emissions on the local population.

  13. Klippel–Trénaunay Syndrome – A Very Rare and Interesting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Lamba, Sachin; Pandita, Aakash; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome (KTS or KT) is an infrequently seen dermatological syndrome, which is often viewed as a triad of vascular malformation (capillary malformations or port-wine brands), venous varicosity, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy. We report a case of a 12-year-old male who presented to us with the symptoms of varicose plaques over both lower limbs and was diagnosed as a case of KTS. Management is normally conservative and includes stockings for compression of the branches to reduce edema because of chronic venous insufficiency; modern devices that cause on and off pneumatic compression; and rarely, surgical correction of varicose veins with lifelong follow-up. The orthopedic abnormalities are treated with epiphysiodesis in order to prevent (stop) overgrowing of limb and correction of bone deformity. PMID:25861232

  14. Epidermal nevus syndrome with maxillary involvement.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, I; Metzker, A; Calderon, S

    1993-10-01

    A female patient with epidermal nevus syndrome is reported. There were linear epidermal nevi, hemihyperplasia of the limbs and tongue, macrocephaly, several ophthalmic malformations, and multiple radiolucent lesions in the limbs and sacroiliac region. At age 14 years, she developed a giant cell granuloma of the maxilla. PMID:8245571

  15. Longevity and Patau syndrome: what determines survival?

    PubMed Central

    Peroos, Sherina; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pugh, Jennifer Harriet; Arthur-Farraj, Peter; Hodes, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The authors report of an 8-year-old girl with non-mosaic Patau syndrome. The median life expectancy of Patau syndrome is 7–10?days, and 90% die in the first year of life. Survival is often attributed to mosaicism and the severity of associated malformations. We delineate the developing phenotype and review the literature discussing potential contributory factors to longevity. PMID:23220825

  16. The value of England and Wales congenital malformation notification scheme data for epidemiology: male genital tract malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, A J; Melzer, D

    1988-01-01

    Data from the England and Wales national congenital malformation notification scheme were examined for associations of male genital tract malformations. For some of the malformations comparison of notification rates with the literature suggested gross undernotification. There was also evidence suggesting bias: examination of the relationships of the malformations to birth weight, maternal parity, and maternal age at delivery showed some highly significant trends in risk, most of which were at variance with findings in the literature, and several potential mechanisms for bias could be adduced. Direct investigation is needed, for this and other similar data sets, of the extent and mechanisms of biased undernotification. PMID:2901455

  17. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation. PMID:26578979

  18. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  19. Pediatric aneurysms and vein of Galen malformations

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. R. K.; Mathuriya, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are different from adult aneurysms – they are more rare, are giant and in the posterior circulation more frequently than in adults and may be associated with congenital disorders. Infectious and traumatic aneursyms are also seen more frequently. Vein of Galen malformations are even rarer entities. They may be of choroidal or mural type. Based on the degree of AV shunting they may present with failure to thrive, with hydrocephalus or in severe cases with heart failure. The only possible treatment is by endovascular techniques – both transarterial and transvenous routes are employed. Rarely transtorcular approach is needed. These cases should be managed by an experienced neurointerventionist. PMID:22069420

  20. Pretreatment imaging of peripheral vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joshua B; Cogswell, Petrice M; McKusick, Michael A; Binkovitz, Larry A; Riederer, Stephen J; Young, Phillip M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations (VMs) are complex and diverse vascular lesions which require individualized pretreatment planning. Pretreatment imaging using various modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging and time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography, is a valuable tool for classifying peripheral VMs to allow proper diagnosis, demonstrate complete extent, identify the nidus, and distinguish between low-flow and high-flow dynamics that determines the treatment approach. We discuss pretreatment imaging findings in four patients with peripheral VMs and how diagnostic imaging helped guide management. PMID:25625123

  1. Spinal arteriovenous malformation masquerating zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan; Yang, Jong Yeun

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  2. Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation Masquerating Zoster Sine Herpete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Ok, Se Jin; Oh, Chang Keun; Park, Sun Kyung; Kim, Do Wan

    2013-01-01

    Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is difficult to diagnosis during an acute period due to the absence of the characteristic zosteriform dermatomal rash; therefore, progression to postherpetic neuralgia is more common than typical zoster. In addition, misdiagnosis of other neuropathic pain as ZSH is common in clinical situations. Here, we report a case of spinal arteriovenous malformation that mimics ZSH. This is a rare condition; therefore, high clinical suspicion for a correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. However, early diagnosis and definitive treatment are essential to prevent neurologic deficit and mortality. PMID:23342212

  3. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  4. Congenital bronchopulmonary vascular malformations, “sequestration” and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Irodi, Aparna; Prabhu, Shailesh M; John, Reetu Amrita; Leena, RV

    2015-01-01

    Congenital bronchopulmonary vascular malformations (BPVMs) include a broad spectrum of disorders that involve abnormalities in the form of disruptions of normal communication and/or presence of abnormal communication between one or more of the three main systems of the lung, namely, the airways, arteries, and veins. The establishment of abnormal communications by means of small openings or anastomoses is termed as malinosculation. The aim of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the imaging appearances of the various types of pulmonary malinosculation. PMID:25709164

  5. Role of Embolization for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Lavine, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex high-flow lesions that can result in devastating neurological injury when they hemorrhage. Embolization is a critical component in the management of many patients with cerebral AVMs. Embolization may be used as an independent curative therapy or more commonly in an adjuvant fashion prior to either micro- or radiosurgery. Although the treatment-related morbidity and mortality for AVMs—including that due to microsurgery, embolization, and radiosurgery—can be substantial, its natural history offers little solace. Fortunately, care by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the comprehensive management of AVMs can offer excellent results in most cases. PMID:25624978

  6. Syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with neural tube defects (I).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as acrocallosal syndrome, autosomal dominant brachydactyly-clinodactyly syndrome, Manouvrier syndrome, short rib-polydactyly syndrome, Disorganization ( Ds )-like human malformations, isolated hemihyperplasia, X-linked NTDs, meroanencephaly, schisis association, diprosopus, fetal valproate syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, folic acid antagonists, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors may be different from those of non-syndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling. PMID:18400576

  7. SHORT COMMUNICATION Fusarium mangiferae associated with mango malformation

    E-print Network

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Fusarium mangiferae associated with mango malformation in the Sultanate of Oman /Published online: 20 October 2007 # KNPV 2007 Abstract Mango malformation, caused by Fusarium mangiferae, represents the most important floral disease of mango. The first symptoms of this disease were noticed

  8. Field Guide to Malformations of Frogs and Toads

    E-print Network

    Field Guide to Malformations of Frogs and Toads With Radiographic Interpretations U.S. Department recently metamorphosed frogs that were collected in Minnesota, Vermont, Wisconsin and Maine and examined on the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens). The malformations and the method of their classification are reported

  9. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  10. Congenital malformations in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) at Takasakiyama.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru; Kurita, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Kimoto, Satoshi; Egawa, Junko

    2014-01-29

    From the late 1960s to the early 1970s, many congenitally malformed infants were born into provisioned Japanese macaque troops. Although the exact cause of this problem was not determined, the occurrence of malformations decreased thereafter. We examined possible factors such as total population size, number of adult females, birth rate, and volume of provisioned food. Agrichemicals attached to provisioned food are suspected as the main cause, as other factors were found to have no influence. Many more malformations were seen in males compared with females, in feet compared with hands, and in the fourth compared with other digits. We confirmed that the frequency of congenital malformation was high during the 1960s through to the mid-1970s when increased levels of provisioned food were given and that the incidence of congenital malformations was also elevated among wild macaques during this time. PMID:24474604

  11. Syndrome in Question*

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sheila Itamara Ferreira do Couto; de Andrade, Sônia Maria Fonseca; Gomes, Maria Fernanda; Castro, Fernanda Almeida Nunes; Tebcherani, Antonio José

    2014-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber Syndrome also known as Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia is a rare systemic fibrovascular dysplasia, with dominant autosomal inheritance. It is characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasia, visceral arteriovenous malformation and positive family history. There may be hematologic, neurologic, dermatologic and gastrointestinal complications. Therapy is supportive and aimed at preventing complications. In this article we report a case of Rendu-Osler-Weber in a 64 year-old man, with history of mucocutaneous telangiectasia since the third decade of life, recurrent epistaxis, positive family history and vascular ectasia in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25054766

  12. Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia. Report on a new case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, L; Brayer, C; Attali, T; Samperiz, S; Tiran-Rajaofera, I; Ramful, D; Pilorget, H

    2005-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by coarse facies, diaphragmatic hernia, distal limb hypoplasia and malformations of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and central nervous systems. Diaphragmatic hernia is a leading diagnostic feature in Fryns syndrome, recorded in more than 80% of cases. We report a newborn with clinical features of Fryns syndrome except the diaphragmatic hernia. Cases of Fryns syndrome without diaphragmatic hernia are reviewed. Even in the absence of diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary anomalies are described in Fryns syndrome, especially pulmonary hypoplasia. Fetal mice, exposed to nitrofen, have a high incidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and other malformations similar to that seen in Fryns syndrome. Nitrofen might target molecular mechanisms similar to those involved in Fryns syndrome. PMID:16440878

  13. Hemihyperplasia with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome like skin changes.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Ashwin; Phadke, Shubha R

    2005-10-01

    Hemihyperplasia is a condition characterized by asymmetric overgrowth of one or more body parts. It may be an isolated finding or may be associated with various syndromes like Beckwith-Weidemann syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Proteus syndrome etc. Pigmentary skin lesions and capillary malformations are commonly seen in cases of hemihyperplasia. We report a case of hemihyperplasia with associated skin hyperextensibility, varicose veins, skin fragility, easy bruising and papery scars, on the side of hyperplasia. This is the first report of association of isolated hemihyperplasia with skin changes similar to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:16155424

  14. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  15. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  16. The prevalence at birth of cogenital malformations at a maternity hospital in Osaka City, 1948-1990.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Y; Yamamura, H; Nishikawa, M; Matsuoka, M; Moriyama, I

    1991-09-01

    The frequencies of congenital malformations at St. Barnabas' Hospital, Osaka were studied during the period 1948-1990. There were 1,418 malformed infants diagnosed during the first week of life among a total number of 131,996 births during the period. Of the 1.07% of malformed children, 0.90% had single and 0.17% had multiple malformations. The birth prevalence was 1.07% in singletons and 1.20% in twins. There was significant difference in prevalence between males (1.15%) and females (0.97%). The prevalence was 0.88% for the period 1948-1958 and increased with each year cohort up to the recent period when the value was 1.38%. Varus deformities of feet was the most common defect (23.4 per 10,000 births), followed by polydactyly (finger) (7.8), anencephaly (7.1), cleft lip and palate (6.5), syndactyly (toe) (6.5), cleft lip (6.3), and Down's syndrome (6.1). The prevalence of conjoined twins was 1 in 65,551 deliveries. Significant differences occurred between males and females for cleft palate, cleft lip and palate, syndactyly (finger), oligodactyly (finger), and hypoplastic auricle. The prevalences for valgus deformities of feet, syndactyly (toe) and atresia ani increased significantly with the year cohort, whereas the prevalence of cleft palate decreased significantly with the year cohort. Overall prevalence was significantly higher in 1970-1990 (1.28% than in 1948-1969 (0.88%). Similar results were examined for cleft lip and palate, syndactyly (finger), syndactyly (toe), hypospadias, hydrocele testis, and Down's syndrome. PMID:1753441

  17. Cardiac malformations are increased in infants of mothers with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S V; Ajaykumar, B; Sindhu, K; Francis, E; Namboodiri, N; Sivasankaran, S; Tharakan, J A; Sarma, P S

    2008-05-01

    We aimed to ascertain the prevalence of cardiac malformation (CM) and its association with antenatal exposure to an antiepileptic drug (AED) in infants of mothers with epilepsy (IMEs). Women with epilepsy (WWE) are enrolled in Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy (KREP) in the prepregnancy or early pregnancy period and are followed up with a standard protocol until the IMEs are 6 years old. At 3 months postpartum, a cardiologist, blinded to the AED exposure, carried out a clinical examination and echocardiography on all live-born babies. Patent foramen ovale (PFO) and interatrial septal defects of < 5 mm in size were excluded from CM. Details of maternal epilepsy, folate usage, AED exposure in the first trimester, and newborn characteristics were abstracted from the records of the KREP. We examined 462 babies. Maternal epilepsy was generalized in 201 (43.50%) or localization related in 241 (52.2%). The AED exposure was monotherapy in 262 (56.7%)--carbamazepine (112), valproate (71), phenobarbitone (43), phenytoin (31), and clonazepam (2)--and polytherapy in 126 (27.3%). Seventy-four infants (16.01%) had no AED exposure. There were 36 infants with CM (7.8%; 95% confidence interval: 5.5-10.6). CMs included atrial septal defect (26; 72.2%), tetrology of Fallot (3; 8.3%), patent ductus arteriosus and pulmonic stenosis (2 each; 5.6%), and ventricular septal defect, tricuspid regurgitation, transposition of great arteries (1 each; 2.8%). CMs were significantly more for IMEs with premature birth (p < .003). There was no association between CM and maternal age, epilepsy syndrome, seizure frequency during pregnancy, and folate use. CMs were more frequent with polytherapy (13; 10.3%) compared to monotherapy (17; 6.5%). Those with valproate exposure had a trend (not statistically significant) toward higher frequency of CM compared to IMEs on other AEDs as monotherapy. PMID:18188637

  18. Multidisciplinary management of complex vascular malformation invading bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Norris, Amber K; Richter, Gresham T; Canon, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    A 5-year-old African American male patient, with a history of complex vascular anomalies, underwent treatment for an infiltrating urinary bladder malformation initially misdiagnosed as a rhabdomyosarcoma. Neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser was used to treat the bladder wall before surgical resection. Vascular malformations of the bladder are rare. This report demonstrates a multimodal technique for management of large infiltrating bladder venous and lymphatic malformation. At the 3-month follow-up, his symptoms have resolved and his cystoscopy demonstrated no evidence of residual disease. PMID:25770726

  19. Fryns syndrome phenotype and trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Ladonne, J.M.; Gaillard, D.; Carre-Pigeon, F.; Gabriel, R.

    1996-01-02

    Trisomy 22 was detected in a 32-week-old fetus born to an overweight mother with hypertension. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was associated with phenotypic manifestations of Fryns Syndrome: Diaphragmatic hernia, facial defects, and nail hypoplasia with short distal fifth phalanges. This is the second report of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in trisomy 22. This case demonstrates the importance of karyotyping malformed fetuses or newborns, even if a nonchromosome syndrome seems identifiable on clinical grounds. To date, at least 10 cases of Fryns syndrome have been reported without chromosome analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous disorder, after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, and impacts approximately 1 in 20000 live births. Sturge-Weber syndrome is not inherited, but rather occurs exclusively sporadically, in both males and females and in all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sturge-Weber syndrome presents at birth with a capillary malformation on the face (port-wine birthmark) with later diagnosis of abnormal vasculature in the eye and the brain which result in a range of complications. The underlying somatic mosaic mutation causing both Sturge-Weber syndrome and isolated port-wine birthmarks was recently discovered and is an activating mutation in GNAQ. When a newborn presents with a facial port-wine birthmark on the upper face, that child has a 15-50% risk of developing Sturge-Weber syndrome brain and/or eye involvement, depending on the extent of the birthmark, and close monitoring and appropriate screening is essential for early diagnosis and optimal treatment. Treatment options include laser therapy for lightening of the birthmark, eye drops and surgery for glaucoma management, and aggressive anticonvulsant treatment, low dose aspirin, and neurosurgery where necessary. Future possible treatments based upon new knowledge of the somatic mutation and downstream pathways are currently being considered and studied. PMID:26564078

  1. Syndrome d'Apert chez un congolais de 60 ans: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Ngombe, Léon Kabamba; Kabamba, Christophe Mwamba; Nday, David Kakez; Fundi, Jimmy Ngoie; Kitenge, Tony Kayembe; Numbi, Luboya

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome d'Apert est une rare acrocéphalosyndactylie caractérisée par une dysmorphie crânio-faciale avec une crâniosténose, une syndactylie aux mains et aux pieds et d'autres malformations cérébrales. La coexistence de plusieurs malformations avec un important lot de préjudices esthétiques constitue la gravité de ce syndrome. Une prise en charge précoce et multidisciplinaire s'avère important. Les auteurs rapportent une observation rare d'un syndrome d'apert chez un patient congolais âgé de 60 ans qui n'a jamais bénéficié d'une prise en charge. Ainsi, cette observation décrit les aspects cliniques et évolutifs de cette affection. PMID:26309466

  2. Metric Analysis of the Hard Palate in Children with Down Syndrome--A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhagyalakshmi, Gopalan; Renukarya, Annappa Jai; Rajangam, Sayee

    2007-01-01

    The hard palate is viewed as playing an important role in the passive articulation of speech. Its probable role in the defective articulation of speech in individuals with Down syndrome has been examined in the present study. In individuals with Down syndrome, the hard palate is highly arched, constricted, and narrow and stair type with malformed

  3. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  4. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  5. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > Teens > Diabetes Center > Treatment & Prevention > Metabolic Syndrome ... applies to a condition known as metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome Is an Early Warning Sign Metabolic syndrome isn' ...

  6. Diagnosis and evaluation of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Conger, Andrew; Kulwin, Charles; Lawton, Michael T.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ideal management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) remains poorly defined. Decisions regarding management of AVMs are based on the expected natural history of the lesion and risk prediction for peritreatment morbidity. Microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, and endovascular embolization alone or in combination are all viable treatment options, each with different risks. The authors attempt to clarify the existing literature's understanding of the natural history of intracranial AVMs, and risk-assessment grading scales for each of the three treatment modalities. Methods: The authors conducted a literature review of the existing AVM natural history studies and studies that clarify the utility of existing grading scales available for the assessment of peritreatment risk for all three treatment modalities. Results: The authors systematically outline the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with intracranial AVMs and clarify estimation of the expected natural history and predicted risk of treatment for intracranial AVMs. Conclusion: AVMs are a heterogenous pathology with three different options for treatment. Accurate assessment of risk of observation and risk of treatment is essential for achieving the best outcome for each patient. PMID:25984390

  7. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  9. Arteriovenous malformation of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adam; Tsuji, Masao; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Hanabusa, Kenichiro; Ukita, Tohru; Miyake, Hiroji; Ohmura, Takehisa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embedded in the vestibulocochlear nerve presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated by microsurgical elimination of the main feeding artery and partial nidus volume reduction with no permanent deficits. This 70-year-old woman was incidentally diagnosed 4 years previously with two small unruptured tandem aneurysms (ANs) on the right anterior inferior cerebral artery feeding a small right cerebellopontine angle AVM. The patient was followed conservatively until she developed sudden headache, nausea and vomiting and presented to our outpatient clinic after several days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated findings suggestive of early subacute SAH in the quadrigeminal cistern. A microsurgical flow reduction technique via clipping between the two ANs and partial electrocoagulation of the nidus buried within the eighth cranial nerve provided radiographical devascularization of the ANs with residual AVM shunt flow and no major deficits during the 2.5 year follow-up. This is only the second report of an auditory nerve AVM. In the event of recurrence, reoperation or application of alternative therapies may be considered. PMID:26244159

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-07-28

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  11. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  12. Possible homozygous Waardenburg syndrome in a fetus with exencephaly

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-06

    This paper describes a pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome and an aborted fetus who had severe congenital malformations but no detected genetic mutations. The authors concluded that despite the fact that no homozygosity of the fetus was demonstrated, the phenotype pointed to homozygous mutations of the PAX3 gene. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Malignancy in Noonan syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Smpokou, P; Zand, D J; Rosenbaum, K N; Summar, M L

    2015-12-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and related disorders, such as NS with multiple lentigines (formerly called LEOPARD syndrome), cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, and Costello syndrome, constitute an important group of developmental malformation syndromes with variable clinical and molecular features. Their underlying pathophysiologic mechanism involves dysregulation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, an essential mediator of developmental and growth processes in the prenatal and postnatal setting. Malignant tumor development is an important complication encountered in other RASopathies, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, but the neoplastic risks and incidence of malignant tumors are less clearly defined in NS and related disorders of the Noonan spectrum. Malignant tumor development remains an important complication variably seen in the RASopathies and, thus, a clear understanding of the underlying risks is essential for appropriate clinical care in this patient population. This review discusses previously published reports of malignancies in individuals with RASopathies of the Noonan spectrum. PMID:25683281

  14. Surgical Strategies for Acutely Ruptured Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jaime L; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-11-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are focal neurovascular lesions consisting of abnormal fistulous connections between the arterial and venous systems with no interposed capillaries. This arrangement creates a high-flow circulatory shunt with hemorrhagic risk and hemodynamic abnormalities. While most AVMs are asymptomatic, they may cause severe neurological complications and death. Each AVM carries an annual rupture risk of 2-4%. Intracranial hemorrhage due to AVM rupture is the most common initial manifestation (up to 70% of presentations), and it carries significant morbidity and mortality. This complication is particularly important in the young and otherwise healthy population, in whom AVMs cause up to one-third of all hemorrhagic strokes. A previous rupture is the single most important independent predictor of future hemorrhage. Current treatment modalities for AVM are microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and radiosurgery. In acutely ruptured AVMs, early microsurgical excision is usually avoided. The standard is to wait at least 4 weeks to allow for patient recovery, hematoma liquefaction, and inflammatory reactions to subside. Exceptions to this rule are small, superficial, low-grade AVMs with elucidated angioarchitecture, for which early simultaneous hematoma evacuation and AVM excision is feasible. Emergent hematoma evacuation with delayed AVM excision (unless, as mentioned, the AVM is low grade) is recommended in patients with a decreased level of consciousness due to intracranial hemorrhage, posterior fossa or temporal lobe hematoma of >30 ml, or hemispheric hematoma of >60 ml. The applicability of endovascular techniques for acutely ruptured AVMs is not clear, but feasible options, until a definitive treatment is determined, include occluding intranidal and distal flow-related aneurysms and 'sealing' any rupture site or focal angioarchitectural weakness when one can be clearly identified and safely accessed. Radiosurgery is not performed in acutely ruptured AVMs because its therapeutic effects occur in a delayed fashion. PMID:26587641

  15. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pretreatment and Posttreatment in Symptomatic Children with Congenital Craniofacial Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Moraleda-Cibrián, Marta; Edwards, Sean P.; Kasten, Steven J.; Buchman, Steven R.; Berger, Mary; O'Brien, Louise M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep symptoms are common in children with craniofacial malformations (CFM). However objective data about obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is still limited. The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of OSA in symptomatic children with CFM and to determine improvement in severity of OSA after treatment. Methods: Symptomatic children with CFM referred for a diagnostic polysomnogram (PSG) were identified. Obstructive sleep apnea was defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ? 1, with moderate/severe OSA as an AHI ? 5. Results: Overall, 151 symptomatic children were identified; 87% were diagnosed with OSA, of whom 24% had moderate-to-severe OSA. Children with syndromic CFM, compared to non-syndromic CFM, were more likely to have an AHI ? 5 (syndromic 33% vs. non-syndromic 15%, p = 0.02). Of the 131 children with OSA, 64 were treated and 32 returned for a posttreatment PSG, with 22 treated with either positive airway pressure (PAP) or adenotonsillectomy (AT). Children treated with PAP demonstrated a decrease in AHI from 6.2 to 3.5 (p = 0.057) and an increase in SpO2 from 89.1% to 91.1% (p = 0.091). There were no significant improvements for those in the AT group for either AHI (2.5 to 1.8, p = 0.19) or SpO2 (90.4% to 91.3%, p = 0.46). Normalization of the AHI (AHI < 1) occurred in only one child in each group (7% and 14% of the PAP and AT groups, respectively). Conclusions: The vast majority of children with CFM referred for OSA evaluation are found to have objective evidence of OSA and a quarter of children have moderate-to-severe OSA. It is likely that many children with underlying OSA are not identified and referred for evaluation. Residual OSA after treatment is common in children with CFM. Citation: Moraleda-Cibrián M, Edwards SP, Kasten SJ, Buchman SR, Berger M, O'Brien LM. Obstructive sleep apnea pre and posttreatment in symptomatic children with congenital craniofacial malformations. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(1):37–43. PMID:25515281

  17. Defining anural malformations in the context of a developmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Cole, R.A.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Wolcott, M.; Helgen, J.C.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes terminology and general concepts involved in animal development for the purpose of providing background for the study and understanding of frog malformations. The results of our radiographic investigation of rear limb malformations in Rana pipiens provide evidence that frog malformations are the product of early developmental errors. Although bacteria, parasites and viruses were identified in these metamorphosed frogs, the relevant window to look for the teratogenic effect of these agents is in the early tadpole stage during limb development. As a result, our microbiological findings must be regarded as inconclusive relative to determining their contribution to malformations because we conducted our examinations on metamorphosed frogs not tadpoles. Future studies need to look at teratogenic agents (chemical, microbial, physical or mechanical) that are present in the embryo, tadpole, and their environments at the stages of development that are relevant for the malformation type. The impact of these teratogenic agents then needs to be assessed in appropriate animal models using studies that are designed to mimic field conditions. The results of these laboratory tests should then be analyzed in such a way that will allow comparison with the findings in the wild-caught tadpoles and frogs.

  18. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  19. Neurodevelopmental Malformations of the Cerebellar Vermis in Genetically Engineered Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raddy L; Van Dine, Sarah E; Gilbert, Mary E; Leheste, Joerg R; Torres, German

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformations are almost exclusively found along the primary fissure and are indicative of deficits of neuronal migration during cerebellar development. In the present report, we test the prediction that genetically engineered rats on Sprague-Dawley or Long-Evans backgrounds will also exhibit the same cerebellar malformations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that three different transgenic lines on two different backgrounds had cerebellar malformations. Heterotopia in transgenic rats had identical cytoarchitecture as that observed in wild-type rats including altered morphology of Bergmann glia. In light of the possibility that heterotopia could affect results from behavioral studies, these data suggest that histological analyses be performed in studies of cerebellar function or development when using genetically engineered rats on these backgrounds in order to have more careful interpretation of experimental findings. PMID:25700682

  20. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  1. Microcephaly, Intellectual Impairment, Bilateral Vesicoureteral Reflux, Distichiasis and Glomuvenous Malformations Associated with a 16q24.3 Contiguous Gene Deletion and a Glomulin Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew G.; Dagenais, Susan L.; Garcia-Perez, José L.; Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka; Strouse, Peter; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Glover, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Two hereditary syndromes, lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LD) and blepharo-chelio-dontic (BCD) syndrome include the aberrant growth of eyelashes from the meibomian glands, known as distichiasis. LD is an autosomal dominant syndrome primarily characterized by distichiasis and the onset of lymphedema usually during puberty. Mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXC2 are the only known cause of LD. BCD syndrome consists of autosomal dominant abnormalities of the eyelid, lip, and teeth, and the etiology remains unknown. In this report, we describe a proband that presented with distichiasis, microcephaly, bilateral grade IV vesicoureteral reflux requiring ureteral re-implantation, mild intellectual impairment and apparent glomuvenous malformations. Distichiasis was present in three generations of the proband’s maternal side of the family. The glomuvenous malformations were severe in the proband, and maternal family members exhibited lower extremity varicosities of variable degree. A GLMN (glomulin) gene mutation was identified in the proband that accounts for the observed glomuvenous malformations; no other family member could be tested. TIE2 sequencing revealed no mutations. In the proband, an additional submicroscopic 265 kb contiguous gene deletion was identified in 16q24.3, located 609 kb distal to the FOXC2 locus, which was inherited from the proband’s mother. The deletion includes the C16ORF95, FBXO31, MAP1LC3B, and ZCCHC14 loci and 115 kb of a gene desert distal to FOXC2 and FOXL1. Thus, it is likely that the microcephaly, distichiasis, vesicoureteral and intellectual impairment in this family may be caused by the deletion of one or more of these genes and/or deletion of distant cis-regulatory elements of FOXC2 expression. PMID:22407726

  2. Proteus syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Talari, Keerthi; Subbanna, Praveen Kumar Arinaganhalli; Amalnath, Deepak; Suri, Subrahmanyam Dharanitragada Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartomatous disorder characterized by various cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions, including vascular malformations, lipomas, hyperpigmentation, and several types of nevi. Partial gigantism with limb or digital overgrowth is pathognomonic of PS. We report a rare case of PS in a 50-year-old man who presented with inferior wall myocardial infarction and was incidentally detected to have hypertrophy of index and middle fingers of both the hands. PMID:23716948

  3. Syndromes with focal overgrowth in infancy: Diagnostic approach and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Altmann, Silke; Lenz-Scharf, Olivia; Muschke, Petra; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2010-02-17

    Abstract Syndromes with focal overgrowth are sporadic diseases and comprise Proteus syndrome and congenital lipomatous overgrowth, vascular malformations, and epidermal naevi (CLOVE) syndrome, and isolated hemihyperplasia. We describe 3 children classified according to standard criteria with dysregulated growth of various tissues that was excised, together with excess toes, and tumours. Correct classification facilitates diagnosis and operations. Interdisciplinary treatment and follow-up are recommended to prevent disfiguration. PMID:19634071

  4. Syndromes with focal overgrowth in infancy: diagnostic approach and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Altmann, Silke; Lenz-Scharf, Olivia; Muschke, Petra; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Syndromes with focal overgrowth are sporadic diseases and comprise Proteus syndrome and congenital lipomatous overgrowth, vascular malformations, and epidermal naevi (CLOVE) syndrome, and isolated hemihyperplasia. We describe 3 children classified according to standard criteria with dysregulated growth of various tissues that was excised, together with excess toes, and tumours. Correct classification facilitates diagnosis and operations. Interdisciplinary treatment and follow-up are recommended to prevent disfiguration. PMID:21446802

  5. Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    DeBarber, Andrea E.; Eroglu, Yasemen; Merkens, Louise S.; Pappu, Anuradha S.; Steiner, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple congenital malformation/intellectual disability syndrome, with clinical characteristics encompassing a wide spectrum and great variability. Elucidation of the biochemical and molecular genetic basis for the autosomal recessively inherited SLOS, specifically, understanding SLOS as a cholesterol deficiency syndrome caused by mutations in DHCR7, opened up enormous possibilities for therapeutic intervention. When cholesterol was discovered to be the activator of sonic hedgehog, cholesterol deficiency with inactivation of this developmental patterning gene was thought to be the cause of SLOS malformations, yet this explanation is overly simplistic. Still, despite these important research breakthroughs, there is no proven treatment for SLOS. Better animal models are needed to allow potential treatment testing and the study of disease pathophysiology, which is incompletely understood. Creation of human cellular models will surely be useful, especially models of brain cells. In vivo human studies are essential as well. There have only been limited natural history studies of SLOS to date. Biomarker development will be critical in facilitating clinical trials in this rare condition, since clinical phenotype may change over many years. Additional research in these and other areas is critical if we are to make headway towards ameloriating the effects of this devastating condition. PMID:21777499

  6. Familial ectrodactyly syndrome in a nigerian child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Durowaye, Mathew; Adeboye, Muhammed; Yahaya-Kongoila, Sefiyah; Adaje, Adeline; Adesiyun, Omotayo; Ernest, Samuel Kolade; Mokuolu, Olugbenga Ayodeji; Adegboye, Abdulrasheed

    2011-07-01

    Ectrodactyly, also known as Split-Hand/Split-Foot Malformation (SHFM) is a rare genetic condition characterized by defects of the central elements of the autopod. It has a prevalence of 1:10,000-1:90,000 worldwide. The X-linked and autosomal dominant types have been described. It can occur as an isolated malformation or in combination with other anomalies, such as tibial aplasia, craniofacial defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome (EEC) is an example of ectrodactyly syndrome accompanied by multiple organ defects. Ectrodactyly has been reported in Africa, especially in several families in remote areas of central Africa but there has not been any published work on ectrodactyly in Nigeria. A baby was born in Ilorin, North Central Zone of Nigeria, with an uneventful prenatal and delivery history but was noticed to have malformation of the two hands and the two lower limbs at birth which are replica of the father's malformation. We present this case to highlight familial ectrodactyly in Nigeria and prepare us to improve upon simple prenatal diagnosis and management of the challenges associated with patients with congenital malformation in Nigeria and other developing countries. PMID:22043435

  7. Updates and Future Horizons on the Understanding, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Sturge-Weber Syndrome Brain Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Warren; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Ball, Karen L.; Juhasz, Csaba; Jordan, Lori C.; Ewen, Joshua B.; Comi, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To review recent developments in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Method: Members of the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium Sturge-Weber Syndrome National Workgroup contributed their expertise to review the literature and present promising directions for research. Results: The increasing number…

  8. Deletion of 4q28.3-31.23 in the background of multiple malformations with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 4q deletion syndrome shows a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations consisting of key features comprising growth failure, developmental delay, craniofacial dysmorphism, digital anomalies, and cardiac and skeletal defects. We have identified a de novo interstitial distal deletion in a 9 month-old girl with growth failure, developmental delay, ventricular septum defect in the subaortic region, patent foramen ovale and patent ductus arteriosus, vascular malformation of the lung, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and craniofacial dysmorphism using array-comparative genomic hybridization. This de novo deletion is located at 4q28.3-31.23 (136,127,048 - 150,690,325), its size is 14.56 Mb, and contains 8 relevant genes (PCDH18, SETD7, ELMOD2, IL15, GAB1, HHIP, SMAD1, NR3C2) with possible contributions to the phenotype. Among other functions, a role in lung morphogenesis and tubulogenesis can be attributed to the deleted genes in our patient, which may explain the unique feature of vascular malformation of the lung leading to pulmonary hypertension. With the detailed molecular characterization of our case with 4q- syndrome we hope to contribute to the elucidation of the genetic spectrum of this disorder. PMID:24959202

  9. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  10. Ultrasound features in trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in a consecutive series of 47 cases

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, I.; Janssens, S.; Defoort, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine and list the variety of the predominant appeal signs leading to referral and their accompanying features found during specialized ultrasound evaluation in foetuses with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. Materials and Methods: In a period of thirty years, 1110 cases of foetal malformations were detected during specialized echographic evaluation. 47 Of these cases were foetuses with trisomy 13 or trisomy 18. We evaluated the predominant signs leading to referral, the difference and overlap in presenting signs between both syndromes and when the data were available, we also compared the echographic signs with the foetal pathology. Results: In foetuses with trisomy 13 the most common malformations were craniofacial defects, cerebral malformations and genitourinary tract anomalies. The most common malformations associated with trisomy 18 were limb abnormalities and intrauterine growth restriction. Most malformations were predominant in trisomy 18, except for genitourinary tract anomalies. In most cases the sonographic signs correlated with the pathology findings. Conclusion: Trisomy 13 as well as trisomy 18 are characterized by a number of various malformations in the foetus. Most of the ultrasound features were predominant in foetuses with trisomy 18. Mostly the foetal pathology correlated with the sonographic evaluation. PMID:25593701

  11. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Th M e etabolic Syndrome What is the metabolic syndrome? The term metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase ... high blood sugar). The exact cause of the metabolic syndrome is not known but genetic factors, too much ...

  12. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Cushing's Syndrome Overview What is Cushing's syndrome? Cushing's syndrome occurs when your body is exposed to high levels ... they can cause problems with your eyesight. Diagnosis & Tests How is Cushing's syndrome diagnosed? Your doctor may ...

  13. ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS POTENTIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR MALFORMATIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN ANURAN AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of species of anuran amphibians from different regions across North America have recently exhibited an increased occurrence of, predominantly, hind limb malformations. Research concerning factors potentially responsible for these malformations has focused extensively on ...

  14. Consequences of an amphibian malformity for development and fitness in complex environments

    E-print Network

    Notre Dame, University of

    and predation risk from larval water beetles (Dytiscus spp.) affect the development of malformations in tadpoles of tadpoles to predation. 3. The risk of predation decreased the frequency of malformities in both low

  15. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  16. Arteriovenous malformation within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Grace; Muller, Karra A.; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The co-occurrence of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and cerebral neoplasms is exceedingly rare but may harbor implications pertaining to the molecular medicine of brain cancer pathogenesis. Case Description: Here, we present a case of de novo AVM within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma (WHO Grade III) and review the potential contribution of this mutation to aberrant angiogenesis as an interesting case study in molecular medicine. Conclusion: The co-occurrence of an IDH1 mutated neoplasm and AVM supports the hypothesis that IDH1 mutations may contribute to aberrant angiogenesis and vascular malformation. PMID:26167373

  17. A rare case of the lenz syndrome.

    PubMed

    T, Sohil; K, Ketki; M S, Rukmini; K, Nutan; M, Poornima

    2013-02-01

    We are reporting here, a case of the Lenz syndrome in a neonate who was brought to the Paediatric OPD, Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Attavar, Mangalore India, with the complaints of poor suckling since birth and abnormal facial features. Altogether, the characteristic congenital abnormal findings in Lenz syndrome, which comprise of microophthalmia, ear anomalies, microcephaly, skeletal and digital deformities, and urogenital malformations were observed, with an exception of a dental anomaly. Dental abnormalities were not pertinent, as the patient was a neonate. PMID:23543842

  18. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome complicating pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    González-Mesa, Ernesto; Blasco, Marta; Andérica, José; Herrera, José

    2012-01-01

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare congenital disorder that affects one or more limbs. It is characterised by cutaneous vascular nevi, venous malformations and hypertrophy of soft tissues and bone. There are very few cases reported in pregnant women, so the level of uncertainty is high when it appears during gestation. It is a disease that increases obstetric risk and can exacerbate complications, mainly thromboembolic and haemorrhagic. We report below the case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with this syndrome and the multidisciplinary management held in our centre. PMID:22854239

  19. Syndromes microdélétionnels (syndrome de Williams et syndrome de la délétion 22q11) au CHU Hassan II de Fès: à propos de 3 observations

    PubMed Central

    Ouldim, Karim; Bouguenouch, Laila; Samri, Imane; El Otmani, Ihsan; Hamdaoui, Hasna; Bennis, Sanae; Lakhdar, Mounia Idrissi; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    Les syndromes microdélétionnels sont définis par la présence d’une anomalie chromosomique de taille mineure (inférieure à 5 mégabases) ou aneusomie segmentaire, décelable par cytogénétique moléculaire (FISH : Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization). Les syndromes microdélétionnels représentent des syndromes cliniques avec des phénotypes suffisamment caractéristiques pour être reconnus cliniquement. Actuellement la FISH est la technique de choix pour rechercher ces syndromes. Plusieurs syndromes microdélétionnels peuvent être confirmés aisément, les plus recherchés sont Le syndrome de Williams (microdélétion en 7q11.23) et le syndrome de la délétion 22q11 (microdélétion en 22q11.2). Le syndrome de Williams est caractérisé par une anomalie du développement qui associe un retard psycho-moteur, une dysmorphie du visage évocatrice et un profil cognitif et comportemental spécifique, une sténose aortique supravalvulaire -SASV- le plus souvent. Le Syndrome de la délétion 22q11 se caractérise par l’association de plusieurs malformations d’expression variable: une cardiopathie congénitale de type conotroncal, une dysmorphie faciale discrète mais caractéristique et une hypoplasie du thymus et des parathyroïdes. Nous rapportons nos premières observations au CHU Hassan II confirmées par FISH : Syndrome de la délétion 22q11 (n:2) et un syndrome de Williams. Le but de cet article est la mise à jour de nos connaissances sur ces deux syndromes et la mise en valeur du rôle de la cytogénétique moléculaire dans le diagnostic et le conseil génétique des syndromes microdélétionnels. PMID:22368746

  20. Syndrome of arachnomelia in Simmental cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buitkamp, Johannes; Luntz, Bernhard; Emmerling, Reiner; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Weppert, Myriam; Schade, Benjamin; Meier, Norbert; Götz, Kay-Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Background The syndrome of arachnomelia is an inherited malformation mainly of limbs, back and head in cattle. At present the arachnomelia syndrome has been well known mainly in Brown Swiss cattle. Nevertheless, the arachnomelia syndrome had been observed in the Hessian Simmental population during the decade 1964–1974. Recently, stillborn Simmental calves were observed having a morphology similar to the arachnomelia syndrome. The goal of this work was the characterization of the morphology and genealogy of the syndrome in Simmental to establish the basis for an effective management of the disease. Results The first pathologically confirmed arachnomelia syndrome-cases in the current Simmental population appeared in the year 2005. By 2007, an additional 140 calves with the arachnomelia syndrome were identified. The major pathological findings were malformed bones affecting the head, long bones of the legs and the vertebral column. It could be shown that, with the exception of two cases that were considered as phenocopies, all of the paternal and about two-third of the maternal pedigrees of the affected calves could be traced back to one common founder. Together with the data from experimental matings, the pedigree data support an autosomal recessive mutation being the etiology of the arachnomelia syndrome. The frequency of the mutation in the current population was estimated to be 3.32%. Conclusion We describe the repeated occurrence of the arachnomelia syndrome in Simmental calves. It resembles completely the same defect occurring in the Brown Swiss breed. The mutation became relatively widespread amongst the current population. Therefore, a control system has to be established and it is highly desirable to map the disease and develop a genetic test system. PMID:18828914

  1. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity.

  2. Mimosa tenuiflora as a Cause of Malformations in Ruminants in the Northeastern Brazilian Semiarid Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Craniofacial anomalies, eye malformations, and permanent flexures of the forelimbs are common malformations seen in ruminants grazing semiarid rangelands of Northeastern Brazil. To investigate the cause of these malformations, we fed 2 suspected plants, Mimosa tenuiflora or Prosopis juliflora, to gr...

  3. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,…

  4. Fusarium species associated with waterberry (Syzygium cordatum) floral malformation

    E-print Network

    or in swampy spots. This evergreen tree has white, fluffy flowers that bloom from August to November. Its fruit is an edible berry that turns dark-purple when ripe. In rural areas the tree is used as a remedy large numbers of flowers. With time these malformed inflorescences dry out without ever bearing fruit

  5. Diagnosis and Nonsurgical Management of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, R. D.; Moloney, J. C.; Anderson, H. J.

    2007-11-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon problem and traditional treatment by hysterectomy excludes the possibility of future pregnancy. Developments in interventional techniques make transcatheter embolization of the feeding vessel(s) a therapeutic alternative, potentially preserving the patient's fertility. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of uterine AVM.

  6. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the midbrain on…

  7. Chromosome 20 long arm deletion in an elderly malformed man.

    PubMed Central

    Shabtai, F; Ben-Sasson, E; Arieli, S; Grinblat, J

    1993-01-01

    A 46,XY/46,XY,del(20)(q13-->q13.33) mosaicism was identified in a 68 year old man who had mild mental retardation and severe malformation of the limbs. The clinical findings of the patient are compared to those of the very few cases of 20q deletion published to date. Images PMID:8445626

  8. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  9. LIMITED PCB ANTAGONISM OF TCDD-INDUCED MALFORMATIONS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    C57BL/6N mice, used to model induction of cleft palate and kidney malformations in offspring following maternal treatment with TCDD, were dosed on gestation day (gd) 9 with ,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachloro-biphenyl (HCB) (62.5, 125, 250, 500. 1000 mg/kg) and/or gd 10 with 2,3,7,8-tetrach...

  10. Appendicitis Presenting Concurrently with Cecal Arteriovenous Malformation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Eric; Portalatin, Manuel E; Fakhoury, Elias; Madlinger, Robert V

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a commonly diagnosed surgical problem in the pediatric population. Arterio-venous malformations (AVM) of the colonic tract are rarely reported in the pediatric literature. A 13-year old boy who presented with acute appendicitis with concurrent cecal AVM is reported in whom appendectomy was done. Later on radiological investigations AVM was confirmed.

  11. The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, R.; Hennekam, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is one of the archetypical multiple congenital malformation syndromes. The recent discovery of the biochemical cause of SLOS and the subsequent redefinition of SLOS as an inborn error of cholesterol metabolism have led to important new treatment possibilities for affected patients. Moreover, the recent recognition of the important role of cholesterol in vertebrate embryogenesis, especially with regard to the hedgehog embryonic signalling pathway and its effects on the expression of homeobox genes, has provided an explanation for the abnormal morphogenesis in the syndrome. The well known role of cholesterol in the formation of steroid hormones has also provided a possible explanation for the abnormal behavioural characteristics of SLOS.???Keywords: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome; cholesterol metabolism; 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase; clinical history; management PMID:10807690

  12. Hoffman syndrome: New patients, new insights.

    PubMed

    Hügle, Boris; Hoffman, Hal; Bird, Lynne M; Gebauer, Corinna; Suchowerskyj, Philipp; Sack, Ulrich; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Schuster, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Hypogammaglobulinemia or agammaglobulinemia are major features of specific syndromes, including X-linked agammaglobulinemia and common variable immunodeficiency. However, the combination of hypogammaglobulinemia with specific dysmorphic features is less common, with only a few reported cases. One such report was a sporadic case of humoral immunodeficiency, facial dysmorphism, and limb anomalies in a young girl, later referred to as Hoffman syndrome. We report on a 7-year-old girl with almost complete loss of B cells, facial dysmorphism, and malformation of the limbs and genitalia, whose mother shows similar dysmorphic features with an attenuated version of the B-cell deficiency. We believe that all three cases described above represent the same condition. The features of the three affected individuals with Hoffman syndrome are reviewed. Further investigations in this recently recognized B-cell immunodeficiency syndrome are warranted. PMID:21204224

  13. Pathogenesis of cerebral malformations in human fetuses with meningomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Olga A; den Dunnen, Wilfred FA; Sollie, Krystyne M; Muñoz, Rosa Iris; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; Rodríguez, Esteban M; Sival, Deborah A

    2008-01-01

    Background Fetal spina bifida aperta (SBA) is characterized by a spinal meningomyelocele (MMC) and associated with cerebral pathology, such as hydrocephalus and Chiari II malformation. In various animal models, it has been suggested that a loss of ventricular lining (neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation) may trigger cerebral pathology. In fetuses with MMC, little is known about neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation and the initiating pathological events. The objective of this study was to investigate whether neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation occurs in human fetuses and neonates with MMC, and if so, whether it is associated with the onset of hydrocephalus. Methods Seven fetuses and 1 neonate (16–40 week gestational age, GA) with MMC and 6 fetuses with normal cerebral development (22–41 week GA) were included in the study. Identification of fetal MMC and clinical surveillance of fetal head circumference and ventricular width was performed by ultrasound (US). After birth, MMC was confirmed by histology. We characterized hydrocephalus by increased head circumference in association with ventriculomegaly. The median time interval between fetal cerebral ultrasound and fixing tissue for histology was four days. Results At 16 weeks GA, we observed neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation in the aqueduct and telencephalon together with sub-cortical heterotopias in absence of hydrocephalus and/or Chiari II malformation. At 21–34 weeks GA, we observed concurrence of aqueductal neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation and progenitor cell loss with the Chiari II malformation, whereas hydrocephalus was absent. At 37–40 weeks GA, neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation coincided with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus. Sub-arachnoidal fibrosis at the convexity was absent in all fetuses but present in the neonate. Conclusion In fetal SBA, neuroepithelial/ependymal denudation in the telencephalon and the aqueduct can occur before Chiari II malformation and/or hydrocephalus. Since denuded areas cannot re-establish cell function, neuro-developmental consequences could induce permanent cerebral pathology. PMID:18312688

  14. [Maffucci's syndrome with giant tumor of the thoracic wall].

    PubMed

    Strza?ka, Marcin; Drozdz, W?odzimierz; Kulawik, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Maffucci's syndrome is a rare nonhereditary malformation of mesodremal dysplasia origin which consists of multiple hemangiomas of the soft tissue and multiple enchondromas. Only approximately 170 cases of this disease have been reported in the literature. Maffucci's syndrome is known to be associated with tumors of mesodermal origin. Chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma and angiosarcoma are the most common malignant neoplasms and the benign tumors consist of pituitary adenoma, adrenal cortical adenoma, parathyroid adenoma, thyroid adenoma and breast fibroadenoma. We present a case report of a 26-year old female patient with Maffucci's syndrome and a giant thorax tumor composed of fibroadenoma and canalicular adenoma. PMID:14679700

  15. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  16. Treatment strategy in Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bogusiak, Katarzyna; Arkuszewski, Piotr; Skorek-Stachnik, Katarzyna; Kozakiewicz, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is a rare congenital defect characterized by ocular symptoms including (epibulbar dermoids, microphthalmia, anophthalmia, eyes asymmetry/dysmorphy, cleft eyelid, exophthalmia, strabismus), auricular symptoms (dacryocystitis), preauricular appendages, preauricular fistulas, ear asymmetry, microtia, atresia of the external auditory canal), craniofacial deformities (cleft face, cleft lip, cleft palate, macrostomia, bifid tongue, hypoplasia of the mandible, hypoplasia of the maxilla, asymmetry of the mandible and maxilla, malocclusion, tooth discrepancies, agenesis of third molars and second premolars, supernumerary teeth, enamel and dentin malformations, delay in tooth development), and skeletal abnormalities (cleft spine, microcephaly, dolichocephaly, plagiocephaly, vertebral defects) or abnormalities of internal organs. The degree of abnormalities vary from severe to mild. In this article, we present a long-term observation of a patient with Goldenhar syndrome. During the patient's life, the intensification of anomalies varied. We describe preoperative and postoperative orthodontic treatment and surgical correction procedures of maxillofacial deformation. PMID:24406574

  17. Recurrent pseudo-TORCH appearances of the brain presenting as "Dandy-Walker" malformation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marta C; Karaman, Ilgin; Squier, Waney; Farrel, Tom; Whitby, Elspeth H

    2012-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is a developmental abnormality characterized by cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, complete or partial agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, and enlarged posterior fossa with upward displacement of the lateral sinuses, tentorium, and torcula. Calcification of brain tissue is a feature of congenital infection, particularly those involving the TORCH ( Toxoplasma gondii , rubella virus, Cytomegalovirus, and herpesvirus) group. An autosomal-recessive congenital infection-like syndrome with intracranial and extracranial calcifications has been categorized as pseudo-TORCH syndrome. We describe two male siblings diagnosed as DWM by ultrasound and by in utero and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but in whom the neuropathology revealed features of intracranial necrosis and calcification in the absence of extracranial calcific deposition. The fetal anomaly was identified by routine prenatal ultrasound scan at 16 weeks. In both cases the postmortem MRI showed bilateral ventriculomegaly with distortion of the overlying cortices, enlarged posterior fossa with a cyst related to small cerebellar hemispheres, and an incomplete cerebellar vermis. The diagnosis of DWM was offered. The histology revealed hypoplastic cerebral hemispheres with poorly cellular developing cortex. The white matter and periventricular matrix were disrupted by areas of necrosis and calcification not associated with any inflammatory infiltration, organisms, inclusions, or giant cells. To our knowledge, these two male siblings are the 1st cases that show pseudo-TORCH syndrome with distinctive intracranial calcification presenting as DWM. An autosomal-recessive or X-linked inheritance needs to be considered. Our study confirms the relevance of the multidisciplinary teamwork involved in the diagnosis of these complex cases. PMID:21762029

  18. Potential pitfalls in volume reduction for the treatment of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tsue, C; Sakamoto, Y; Nakajima, Y; Kishi, K

    2012-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous condition that is characterised by a wide range of malformations. Skin and skeletal developmental malformations are common and may manifest as significant physical anomalies. However, few reports have discussed surgical treatment. A 37-year-old woman presented with disproportionate enlargement of the right buttock, which required volume reduction. The overgrown tissue was combined with vascular malformations, which in our patient were extremely thick. The patient experienced massive blood loss during the procedure, due to which a blood transfusion was performed. Pathological findings revealed partial lipohyperplasia with venous malformations. Thus, during operations including incomplete excision, massive bleeding is always a possibility, but is not commonly described in these instances. PMID:24960753

  19. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  20. Metabolic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a name for a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the chance ... Metabolic syndrome is becoming very common in the United States. Doctors are not sure whether the syndrome is ...

  1. Gardner Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gardner syndrome? Gardner syndrome is a subtype of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP or classic FAP) , which usually causes benign, ... is linked to Gardner syndrome; APC stands for adenomatous polyposis coli. A mutation, meaning an alteration in the APC ...

  2. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  3. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Down Syndrome KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems > Birth Defects & Genetic Problems > ... skills. Continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  4. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Cushing's Syndrome? Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine ... and cure the disorder. NIH Patient Recruitment for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the ...

  5. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  6. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  7. Current Therapeutic Options in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a vascular malformation syndrome consisting of a facial port-wine birthmark associated with malformed leptomeningeal blood vessels and a choroid "angioma" of the eye. It is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that occurs sporadically, is not inherited, and is caused by a somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ. In patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome, brain involvement typically presents in infancy with seizures, strokes, and stroke-like episodes, and a range of neurologic impairments. Standard treatment includes laser therapy for the birthmark, control of glaucoma through eyedrops or surgery, and the use of anticonvulsants. Increasingly low-dose aspirin is offered. Treatment with propranolol has been tried generally without the dramatic results seen in hemangiomas. Treatment with an anticonvulsant or low-dose aspirin or both before the onset of seizures is an option. Surgical resection may be offered to those whose seizures are medically refractory. Endocrine, medical rehabilitation and cognitive comorbidities are important to manage. In the future, new therapeutic options are likely to be offered stemming from preclinical studies and small pilot clinical trials currently ongoing. Discovery of the causative somatic mosaic mutation suggests new insights into the pathophysiology of this vascular malformation disorder, and potential novel treatment strategies for future study. The mutation results in constitutive overactivation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and the HIPPO-YAP pathways and inhibitors of these pathways may in the future prove useful in the treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:26706016

  8. Baraitser and Winter syndrome with growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Zellagui, Hadjer

    2014-01-01

    Baraitser–Winter syndrome (BWS), first reported in 1988, is apparently due to genetic abnormalities that are still not well-defined, although many gene abnormalities are already discovered and de novo missense changes in the cytoplasmic actin-encoding genes (called ACTB and ACTG1) have been recently discovered. The syndrome combines facial and cerebral malformations. Facial malformations totally or partially present in the same patient are: Iris coloboma, bilateral ptosis, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds. The various brain malformations are probably responsible for growth and mental retardation. To the best of our knowledge, the syndrome is very rare as few cases have been reported so far. Our aim was to describe a child with a phenotype that looks like BWS with proved partial growth hormone (GH) deficiency which was not reported before. A girl aged 7-year-old of consanguineous parents was referred for short stature and mental retardation. Clinical examination showed dwarfism and a delay in her mental development. Other clinical features included: Strabismus, epicanthic folds, broad nasal bridge, and brain anomalies such as lissencephaly, bilateral hygroma, and cerebral atrophy. Hormonal assessment showed partial GH deficiency without other endocrine disorders. Our case looks exactly like BWS. However, apart from facial and cerebral abnormalities, there is a partial GH deficiency which can explain the harmonious short stature. This case seems worth to be reported as it adds GH deficiency to the very rare syndrome. PMID:25624931

  9. Arteriovenous malformation as a consequence of a scar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rygh, Astrid B; Greve, Ole J; Fjetland, Lars; Berland, Jannicke M; Eggebø, Torbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    A scar pregnancy is an ectopic pregnancy implanted in a previous lower segment cesarean scar, and the incidence of this complication may be expected to rise along with increasing cesarean section rates. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus may be congenital, associated with early pregnancy loss, trophoblastic disease, or surgical procedures. We describe a case of uterine arteriovenous malformation as a consequence of a scar pregnancy, complicated by recurrent, serious bleeding. The condition was diagnosed using three-dimensional ultrasound with color Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging and appears not to have been described before. Selective embolization was performed, but eventually surgical intervention with resection of the affected uterine segment was necessary, and the patient recovered. The diagnosis was confirmed by pathologic-anatomical diagnosis showing trophoblastic cells in the resected area. Because of collateral formation, non-surgical options may be limited and not successful. PMID:19452327

  10. Arteriovenous malformation of the spine as a cause of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Hains, François; Dzus, Anne K; Cassidy, J David

    1992-01-01

    Spinal arteriovenous malformations are rare abnormalities that are difficult to recognize and treat. They represent 3.3 to 11 percent of all spinal cord tumours. The signs and symptoms most commonly encountered consist of progressive upper and lower motoneuron deficits, eventually leading to severe crippling disability. Ten to twenty percent of these patients will present with an associated spinal deformity that must be differentiated from idiopathic scoliosis. The case presented in this paper illustrates the diagnostic difficulties when spinal arteriovenous malformation is associated with scoliosis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 (a)Figure 2 (b)Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9p212-aFigure 11

  11. Chiari malformation, syringomyelia and bulbar palsy in X linked hypophosphataemia.

    PubMed

    Watts, Laura; Wordsworth, Paul

    2015-01-01

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) is a rare condition with numerous musculoskeletal complications. It may mimic other more familiar conditions, such as vitamin D deficiency, ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. We describe two cases with Chiari type 1 malformations and syringomyelia, neither of which is well recognised in XLH. The first presented late with the additional complications of spinal cord compression, pseudofracture, renal stones and gross femoroacetabular impingement requiring hip replacement. The second also had bulbar palsy; the first case to be described in this condition, to the best of our knowledge. We wish to raise awareness of the important neurological complications of syringomyelia, Chiari malformation, spinal cord compression and bulbar palsy when treating these patients. We also wish to draw attention to the utility of family history and genetic testing when making the diagnosis of this rare but potentially treatable condition. PMID:26561226

  12. Behavioral effects of congenital ventromedial prefrontal cortex malformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A detailed behavioral profile associated with focal congenital malformation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has not been reported previously. Here we describe a 14 year-old boy, B.W., with neurological and psychiatric sequelae stemming from focal cortical malformation of the left vmPFC. Case Presentation B.W.'s behavior has been characterized through extensive review Patience of clinical and personal records along with behavioral and neuropsychological testing. A central feature of the behavioral profile is severe antisocial behavior. He is aggressive, manipulative, and callous; features consistent with psychopathy. Other problems include: egocentricity, impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of empathy, lack of respect for authority, impaired moral judgment, an inability to plan ahead, and poor frustration tolerance. Conclusions The vmPFC has a profound contribution to the development of human prosocial behavior. B.W. demonstrates how a congenital lesion to this cortical region severely disrupts this process. PMID:22136635

  13. [Hemihypertrophy and scoliosis revealing a Chiari 1 malformation with syringomyelia].

    PubMed

    Benjamin, M-D; Santiago, J; Hebert, J-C; Thirion, S; Ranaivojaona, S; Alvarez, C; Atallah, A; Sibille, G; Bataille, H; Porlys, M; Ebrad, P

    2011-11-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with progressive thoracic scoliosis and crossed hemihypertrophy who was discovered with a Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. These disorders are connected by complex physiopathological mechanisms; their association deserves attention. This observation reviews the importance of the clinical examination, particularly the neurological exam, in childhood scoliosis. The features suggesting a neurogenic background of spine deformation should be sought. Scoliosis with hemihypertrophy can be the sign of an underlying neurological abnormality. PMID:21982271

  14. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  15. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation presenting as a large aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, S Ganesh; Vivek, G; Borkar, Shirish; Ramachandran, Padmakumar

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness on exertion and iron deficiency anaemia. Evaluation revealed a large mass in the right lung which on further investigation was determined to be a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) with a large aneurysmal sac. The patient subsequently underwent a lobectomy with an uneventful recovery. The pathophysiology of PAVM and its varied presentations are also discussed. PMID:23076692

  16. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation presenting as a large aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S Ganesh; Vivek, G; Borkar, Shirish; Ramachandran, Padmakumar

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness on exertion and iron deficiency anaemia. Evaluation revealed a large mass in the right lung which on further investigation was determined to be a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) with a large aneurysmal sac. The patient subsequently underwent a lobectomy with an uneventful recovery. The pathophysiology of PAVM and its varied presentations are also discussed. PMID:23076692

  17. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  18. A gene prenature ovarian failure associated with eyelid malformation maps to chromosomes 3q22-q23

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure and XX gonadal dysgenesis leading to female infertility have been reported in association with an autosomal dominantly inherited malformation of the eyelids: blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES; MIM 110100). This association distinguishes BPES type I from BPES type II, in which affected females are fertile and the transmission occurs through both sexes. Recently, a gene responsible for BPES type II has been mapped to chromosome 3q22-q23, and the critical region for the gene location has been reduced to the interval between loci D3S1615 and D3S1316. Hitherto, however, no information regarding the localization of the gene for BPES type I, in which female ovarian failure is associated with eyelid malformation, has been available. We have studied two independent families affected with BPES type I, including a total of 12 affected individuals (6 infertile women) and 6 healthy relatives. The diagnostic criteria for the ophthalmological anomaly included (1) reduced horizontal diameter of palpebral fissures, (2) drooping of the upper eyelids, and (3) an abnormal skinfold running from the lower lids. Telecanthus and a flat nasal bridge were present in most cases. In both families the disease was transmitted only by the male, and no affected woman of childbearing age was fertile. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Neonatal diagnosis of 49, XXXXY syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Katayoon; Basir, Behnaz; Ghahremani, Safieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: 49, XXXXY syndrome is a rare sex chromosomal disorder, occurring in 1 per 85,000-100,000 male births. The classical phenotype is ambiguous genitalia, facial dysmorphism, mental retardation and a combination of cardiac, skeletal and other malformations. Case: A two month-old boy with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and low birth weight, facial dysmorphism, clinodactyly in feet, microphallus, and right undescendent testis were seen by neonatologist. Chromosomal studies via techniques of GTG-banding showed the constitution to be 49,XXXXY in all cells. He was visited by the pediatric cardiologist for congenital heart disease. No obvious malformation and congenital heart disease were seen. Conclusion: In the case, the main presentation of IUGR and low birth weight, clinodactyly with facial dysmorphism and genital abnormalities led to a suspicion of a sex chromosome aneuploidy which was subsequently confirmed by chromosomal analysis. PMID:26000009

  20. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  1. Pathophysiological analyses of cortical malformation using gyrencephalic mammals

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Kosuke; Toda, Tomohisa; Shinmyo, Yohei; Ebisu, Haruka; Hoshiba, Yoshio; Wakimoto, Mayu; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of the cerebral cortex of higher mammals is the presence of gyri. Because malformations of the cortical gyri are associated with severe disability in brain function, the mechanisms underlying malformations of the cortical gyri have been of great interest. Combining gyrencephalic carnivore ferrets and genetic manipulations using in utero electroporation, here we successfully recapitulated the cortical phenotypes of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) by expressing fibroblast growth factor 8 in the ferret cerebral cortex. Strikingly, in contrast to TD mice, our TD ferret model showed not only megalencephaly but also polymicrogyria. We further uncovered that outer radial glial cells (oRGs) and intermediate progenitor cells (IPs) were markedly increased. Because it has been proposed that increased oRGs and/or IPs resulted in the appearance of cortical gyri during evolution, it seemed possible that increased oRGs and IPs underlie the pathogenesis of polymicrogyria. Our findings should help shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and malformation of cortical gyri in higher mammals. PMID:26482531

  2. Heterozygous Mutations of OTX2 Cause Severe Ocular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ragge, Nicola K.; Brown, Alison G.; Poloschek, Charlotte M.; Lorenz, Birgit; Henderson, R. Alex; Clarke, Michael P.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Fielder, Alistair; Gerrelli, Dianne; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Ruddle, Piers; Hurst, Jane; Collin, J. Richard O.; Salt, Alison; Cooper, Simon T.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Williamson, Kathleen A.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Heyningen, Veronica van; Hanson, Isabel M.

    2005-01-01

    Major malformations of the human eye, including microphthalmia and anophthalmia, are examples of phenotypes that recur in families yet often show no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern. Defining loci by mapping is therefore rarely feasible. Using a candidate-gene approach, we have identified heterozygous coding-region changes in the homeobox gene OTX2 in eight families with ocular malformations. The expression pattern of OTX2 in human embryos is consistent with the eye phenotypes observed in the patients, which range from bilateral anophthalmia to retinal defects resembling Leber congenital amaurosis and pigmentary retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed defects of the optic nerve, optic chiasm, and, in some cases, brain. In two families, the mutations appear to have occurred de novo in severely affected offspring, and, in two other families, the mutations have been inherited from a gonosomal mosaic parent. Data from these four families support a simple model in which OTX2 heterozygous loss-of-function mutations cause ocular malformations. Four additional families display complex inheritance patterns, suggesting that OTX2 mutations alone may not lead to consistent phenotypes. The high incidence of mosaicism and the reduced penetrance have implications for genetic counseling. PMID:15846561

  3. Environmental monitoring using malformed embryos of the amphipod Monoporeia affinis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundelin, B.; Eriksson, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    Reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis, such as embryonic malformation were confirmed as the most sensitive variable, when soft bottom microcosms were exposed to metals such as cadmium and lead, arsenic, organic compounds such as 4,5,6 trichloroguaiacol, contaminated sediment from areas impacted by heavy metals and pulp mill effluents. The effects were demonstrated also in low concentrations that did not significantly affect the meiofauna community. The microcosm test-system with high ecological realism could offer a possibility to translate laboratory results to the natural environments. Field surveys outside different types of pulp mills and metal works on the coast of the Gulf of Bothnia have confirmed the laboratory results. Significantly higher levels of malformed embryos of Monoporeia affinis were demonstrated in the impacted areas in comparison with reference areas. The reproduction variables of Monoporeia affinis have been used in the national environmental monitoring program during two years and results indicated possibilities to distinguish between effects of xenobiotica and secondary eutrophication effects, such as unsaturated oxygen condition and occurrence of sulfides, which resulted in increased frequencies of dead eggs but not affected the frequencies of malformed eggs and embryos.

  4. Operative Management of OSAS in a Complex Case of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Elena; Cavaliere, Michele; Castagna, Giovanni; Marino, Anna; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Iengo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in childhood with high prevalence in syndromic subjects with craniofacial malformations. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartoneoplastic disorder associated with disproportionate and asymmetric overgrowth of body parts and hypertrophy or malformation of lymphatic tissues, such as palatine tonsils. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with Proteus Syndrome (PS) and suffering from OSAS due to asymmetric palatine tonsillar hypertrophy, treated with partial resection of left tonsil. To avoid the risk of a general anesthesia and remove only the obstructive portion of the palatine tonsil bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFITT) under local anesthesia was performed. Recovery of the obstructive respiratory disease was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of partial tonsillar resection performed in a patient with PS suffering from OSAS under local anesthesia. PMID:26199778

  5. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, Ö; Özgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  6. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, O; Ozgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  7. A case report of aphallia with urorectal septum malformation sequence in a newborn: a very rarely seen condition

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Ravinder; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Aphallia (absence of penis) is an extremely rare abnormality which has rarely been described in medical literature and can be part of the urorectal septum malformation sequence (URSMS). URSMS has hardly been reported in medical literature and includes the absence of perineal and anal openings in association with ambiguous genitalia and urogenital, colonic, and lumbosacral anomalies. This case report tells the importance of detailed examination of infants that are diagnosed with aphallia. We report a case of a newborn who was diagnosed as aphallia with the URSMS syndrome after birth. The neonate had an endocardial cushion defect (atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect) and bilateral agenesis of the kidney. The neonate succumbed to death secondary to hypoplastic lung leading to respiratory failure. PMID:26673776

  8. "One More for My Baby": Foetal Alcohol Syndrome and Its Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Wendy; Wells, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Foetal alcohol syndrome has been described as the commonest preventable cause of mental retardation in the Western world. It refers to a pattern of malformations, growth retardation and central nervous system impairments found in children of mothers who drink large amounts of alcohol while they are pregnant. This paper describes the nature of…

  9. Unilateral hypertrophic skin lesions, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma: The many faces of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Niharika R.; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Sarkar, Asim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare condition with a wide spectrum of abnormalities. It is characterized by hamartomatous malformations involving multiple organs. Serious complications may ensue, such as pulmonary embolism, cystic lung disease, and various neoplasms such as parotid adenomas, ovarian cystadenomas, and meningiomas. We report here a case of Proteus syndrome in a 21-year-old woman who had facial hemihypertrophy, cerebriform plantar hyperplasia, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma for the rarity of the entity. PMID:26500869

  10. Unilateral hypertrophic skin lesions, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma: The many faces of Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lal, Niharika R; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Sarkar, Asim K

    2015-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare condition with a wide spectrum of abnormalities. It is characterized by hamartomatous malformations involving multiple organs. Serious complications may ensue, such as pulmonary embolism, cystic lung disease, and various neoplasms such as parotid adenomas, ovarian cystadenomas, and meningiomas. We report here a case of Proteus syndrome in a 21-year-old woman who had facial hemihypertrophy, cerebriform plantar hyperplasia, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma for the rarity of the entity. PMID:26500869

  11. Emerging role of contrast-enhanced MRI in diagnosing vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Turley, Ryan S; Lidsky, Michael E; Markovic, Jovan N; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Vascular malformations comprise a diverse and rare group of lesions which generally pose a formidable treatment challenge. Requisite for optimal surgical planning are imaging modalities capable of delineating involved anatomy and malformation flow characteristics. In this regard, we and others have purported the advantages of contrast-enhanced MRI. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding the emerging of role of contrast enhanced MRI for the management of vascular malformations. PMID:25301311

  12. Thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation as a rare cause of isolated intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Entwistle, John J; Arnold, Michael A; Pierson, Christopher R; Governale, Lance S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare vascular lesions that most frequently present with back pain, radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy. Neurological decline is typically secondary to progressive radiculopathy, myelopathy, venous thrombosis, and stroke. Few case reports have described thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformations that present with both subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. This is the first reported case of a thoracolumbar spinal vascular malformation presenting with isolated intraventricular hemorrhage on initial imaging followed by acute and fatal rehemorrhage. PMID:24784978

  13. Ruptured spinal arteriovenous malformation: Presenting as stunned myocardium and neurogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mehesry, Tasneem H.; Shaikh, Nissar; Malmstrom, Mohammad F.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome usually defined as an acute pulmonary edema occurring shortly after a central neurologic insult. NPE was identified 100 years ago, but it is still underappreciated in the clinical setup. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury. It has a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated appropriately. Similarly, neurogenic shock is a known complication of spinal cord injury reported incidence is more than 20% in isolated upper cervical spinal injury. But NPE is rare to occur, and stunned myocardium (SM) is not reported in spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) rupture. SM is a reversible cardiomyopathy resulting in transient left ventricular dysfunction which has been described to occur in the setting of catecholamine release during situations of physiologic stress. We report a case of high spinal AVM rupture presenting as SM, NPE, and neurogenic shock. Case Description: A 32-year-old male who presented with sudden onset of pain and weakness in upper limbs. Imaging studies showed AVM rupture by imaging techniques. Initially, the patient had severe hypertension, respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilation, then he developed hypotension, bradycardia, and asystole, which required immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation and atropine. He remained with quadriplegia and suffered from frequent episodes of bradycardia and asystole. Conclusions: Spinal AVM rupture can present as neurogenic shock, stunned myocardium, and pulmonary edema. Early recognition of AVM rupture and prompt surgical intervention, as well as aggressive treatment of shock, may enhance recovery and decrease the long-term morbidity. PMID:26539315

  14. A Clinical Evaluation of the Surgical Treatment of Anorectal Malformations (Imperforate Anus)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E. Ide; Tunell, William P.; Williams, G. Rainey

    1978-01-01

    The surgical correction of anorectal malformations remains a serious problem despite their relatively frequent occurrence. Our surgical experience with 90 patients, seen in the past ten years, includes abdominal-perineal or sacro-abdominal-perineal repair in 28 patients, complete perineal anoplasty in 13 patients, and “cut-back” perineal anoplasty in 38 patients. Secondary surgical procedures for “fecal reservoir syndrome” (seven patients), revision for stricture (11 patients) and excision of redundant mucous membrane (ten patients). The observations made from this clinical study are: 1) The importance of thorough urological and neurological evaluation of “high” abnormalities and the value of the cremasteric and bulbocavernosus reflexes as indicators of sacral innervation. 2) Increasing satisfaction with the “cut-back” anoplasty as a definitive procedure or as a temporary stage in low recto-vaginal or recto-vestibular fistulas. The technique for the “cut-back” is improved by the use of Burow's triangles and the use of nonabsorbable sutures. 3) The advisability of the complete perineal anoplasty with posterior positioning of the anus and construction of a perineal body in patients with low recto-vaginal and recto-vestibular fistulas. 4) A concern over the functional capacity of the distal bowel segment in high abnormalities. This is emphasized by the experience with six secondary resections of the rectosigmoid or left colon for “fecal reservoir syndrome.” 5) Heartening results with secondary operations for stricture and redundant mucous membrane which suggest the desirability of an earlier surgical approach to these complications. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:646498

  15. Medullary Sponge Kidney and Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Masciovecchio, Stefano; Saldutto, Pietro; Paradiso Galatioto, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The medullary sponge kidney is also known as Lenarduzzi's kidney or Cacchi and Ricci's disease from the first Italian authors who described its main features. A review of the scientific literature underlines particular rarity of the association of MSK with developmental abnormalities of the lower urinary tract and genital tract such as hypospadias and bilateral cryptorchidism. The work presented is the only one in the scientific literature that shows the association between the medullary sponge kidney and the testicular dysgenesis syndrome. A question still remains unanswered: are the MSK and TDS completely independent malformation syndromes occurring, in this case, simultaneously for a rare event or are they different phenotypic expressions of a common malformative mechanism? In the future we hope that these questions will be clarified. PMID:24716085

  16. [Syndromes 12. Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Verdonck, A; van Erum, R

    1999-07-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal disorders. The incidence is about 1 on 2,500 till 1 on 10,000 living female young births. Short stature is the most common finding in patients with Turner syndrome. Besides short stature and gonadal dysgenesis, typical craniofacial and dental features are also present. Disturbance of the enchondral ossification results in abnormal craniofacial morphology. Oestrogen medication, to induce their puberty, and recombinant human growth therapy, to improve final height of these patients, are the most common treatment possibilities. It is the intention of this short paper to inform the dentist/orthodontist about the general aspects of the Turner syndrome. This information can be used in their treatment plan. PMID:11930372

  17. Osteopetrosis and Chiari type I malformation: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; C?kla, Ula?; Bauer, Andrew; Ba?kaya, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis (OP) is hereditary X-linked, autosomal recessive (ARO), or autosomal dominant (ADO) skeletal disease. ARO has two subtypes, which are infantile malignant and intermediate type. ARO and X-linked OP have poor clinical outcome. ADO is called adult benign type because of the normal life expectancy, which has type I and type II. Here, the authors present an ADO patient with Chiari type I. Concomitant ADO with Chiari type I malformation is an extremely rare condition. Literature research yielded only one case report to date. PMID:26503583

  18. Vasospasm after intraventricular hemorrhage caused by arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wei-Lung; Tsai, Yi-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) induced vasospasm is rare in clinical practice. We report a case with vasospasm 10 days after IVH due to thalamic bleeding from an arteriovenous malformation. The vasospasm was so severe that transarterial embolization failed. Follow-up angiography could not reveal the vascular lesion and spontaneous thrombosis was considered. The discussion includes literature review and possible mechanism of such phenomenon. IVH-related vasospasm is rare but should always be kept in mind. Early detection with proper treatment provides better clinical outcome in such cases. PMID:25972942

  19. Vascular Malformations and Their Treatment in the Growing Patient.

    PubMed

    Kolokythas, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Vascular anomalies consisting of 2 groups of lesions, vascular tumors and vascular malformations, frequently arise in the head and neck and often occur in the pediatric age group. This classification is based on the differences in natural history, histologic features, and cellular turnover of the 2 groups. The management of these anomalies can be challenging, and evidence-based decisions about treatment are complicated by an inconsistency in the nomenclature for these lesions found in the literature. This article covers the clinical presentation, etiology, and pathophysiology and treatment approaches of the vascular anomalies in the pediatric population. PMID:26362365

  20. Cesarean scar pregnancy: a rare cause of uterine arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Akbayir, Ozgur; Gedikbasi, Ali; Akyol, Alpaslan; Ucar, Adem; Saygi-Ozyurt, Sezin; Gulkilik, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    A 38-year-old gravida 4, para 2 woman with a history of two Cesarean sections and one curettage was referred to our hospital, because of painless vaginal bleeding and 6 weeks + 2 days of amenorrhea. The first diagnosis was Cesarean scar pregnancy, managed with methotrexate. Subsequently, an arteriovenous malformation developed, which was diagnosed with color Doppler imaging. The diagnosis was confirmed with angiography. Successful bilateral uterine artery embolization was performed with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx), n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl), and gelfoam. PMID:21647920

  1. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  2. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  3. Vascular Integrity in the Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Wan; Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) is an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), particularly in the young population. ICH is the first clinical symptom in about 50 % of bAVM patients. The vessels in bAVM are fragile and prone to rupture, causing bleeding into the brain. About 30 % of unruptured and non-hemorrhagic bAVMs demonstrate microscopic evidence of hemosiderin in the vascular wall. In bAVM mouse models, vascular mural cell coverage is reduced in the AVM lesion, accompanied by vascular leakage and microhemorrhage. In this review, we discuss possible signaling pathways involved in abnormal vascular development in bAVM. PMID:26463919

  4. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ? 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  5. Genomic variants and variations in malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Jamuar, Saumya S; Walsh, Christopher A

    2015-06-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are a common cause of neurodevelopmental delay and epilepsy and are caused by disruptions in the normal development of the cerebral cortex. Several causative genes have been identified in patients with MCD. There is increasing evidence of role of de novo mutations, including those occurring post fertilization, in MCD. These somatic mutations may not be detectable by traditional methods of genetic testing performed on blood DNA. Identification of the genetic cause can help in guiding families in future pregnancies. Research has highlighted how elucidation of key molecular pathways can also allow for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:26022163

  6. Cavernous malformation of the internal auditory canal. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bricolo, A; De Micheli, E; Gambin, R; Alessandrini, F; Iuzzolino, P

    1995-09-01

    A 51 year-old male, complaining of progressive left-sided hearing loss, tinnitus, and unsteady gait, underwent surgery with a probable diagnosis of intracanalicular acoustic neuroma, based on neurological, neurotologic, Computed Tomography (CT), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings. During surgery, the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC) was opened and a reddish-colored, soft, vascular lesion was found within the VII and VIII cranial nerve complex. The lesion, which resulted to be a cavernous malformation, was removed without any postoperative deficits. This report stresses the diagnostic difficulty to differentiate preoperatively the more frequent acoustic neuromas from other lesions that may develop within the IAC. PMID:8965122

  7. Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome: dermatological approach*

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Aline Blanco; Hans Filho, Günter; Vicari, Carolina Faria dos Santos; Medeiros, Marcelo Zanolli; Couto, Daíne Vargas; Takita, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome is a rare systemic fibrovascular dysplasia, recognized by mucocutaneous telangiectasias, arteriovenous malformations, epistaxis and family history. Recurrent bleeding, hypoxemia, congestive heart failure, portosystemic encephalopathy, and symptoms related to angiodysplasia of the central nervous system may occur. Since the treatment is based on supportive measures, early recognition is of utmost importance. This article reports the case of a 53-year-old male patient who presented telangiectasias on fingers, oral cavity and nasal mucosa for 10 years, with a history of recurrent epistaxis of varying severity since childhood. Mother, sister and daughter have similar lesions. PMID:26312724

  8. Hypothalamic Glioma in a Patient With Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Julia W; Walter, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by vascular malformations involving brain, skin, and occasionally eyes. There is no recognized tumor predisposition in patients with SWS as there is with some other phakomatoses. We present a patient with SWS who developed a low-grade glioma (LGG). We hypothesize that there could be an association between SWS and LGG formation, noting that GNAQ mutations have been implicated in the underlying biology of both SWS and a subset of pediatric LGG. It is suggested that SWS may be a cancer predisposition syndrome. PMID:26422287

  9. COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF RETINOIC ACID ON AMPHIBIAN LIMB DEVELOPMENT AND LETHALITY: CHRONIC EXPOSURE RESULTS IN LETHALITY NOT LIMB MALFORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, high frequencies of malformations have been reported in amphibians across the United States. It has been suggested that the malformations may be the result of xenobiotic disruption of retinoid signaling pathways during embryogenesis and tadpole development. Therefore, a...

  10. Leaping lopsided: a review of the current hypotheses regarding etiologies of limb malformations in frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loeffler, I.K.; Stocum, D.L.; Fallon, J.F.; Meteyer, C.U.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in the investigation of limb malformations in free-living frogs has underlined the wide range in the types of limb malformations and the apparent spatiotemporal clustering of their occurrence. Here, we review the current understanding of normal and abnormal vertebrate limb development and regeneration and discuss some of the molecular events that may bring about limb malformation. Consideration of the differences between limb development and regeneration in amphibians has led us to the hypothesis that some of the observed limb malformations come about through misdirected regeneration. We report the results of a pilot study that supports this hypothesis. In this study, the distal aspect of the right hindlimb buds of X. laevis tadpoles was amputated at the pre-foot paddle stage. The tadpoles were raised in water from a pond in Minnesota at which 7% of surveyed newly metamorphosed feral frogs had malformations. Six percent (6 of 100) of the right limbs of the tadpoles raised in pond water developed abnormally. One truncated right limb was the only malformation in the control group, which was raised in dechlorinated municipal water. All unamputated limbs developed normally in both groups. Three major factors under consideration for effecting the limb malformations are discussed. These factors include environmental chemicals (primarily agrichemicals), encysted larvae (metacercariae) of trematode parasites, and increased levels of ultraviolet light. Emphasis is placed on the necessary intersection of environmental stressors and developmental events to bring about the specific malformations that are observed in free-living frog populations.

  11. MALFORMATION VERSUS MORTALITY, A STUDY OF NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG DEVELOPMENT IN SITU.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were designed to compare the relative incidence of mortality and malformation of developing northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) at two Minnesota (MN)Lake sites. Site selection was based on survey data that indicated one site had a high incidence of malformations (CWB) versus low inci...

  12. MALFORMATION, MORTALITY AND PARASITES IN NORTHERN LEOPARD FROGS IN MN AND ND.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2000 a field study compared the relative incidence of mortality and malformation of developing northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) at two Minnesota (MN)lake sites, one site with history of high incidence of malformations (CWB)and one with low incidence (BUT). Tadpoles were reared in enclosures ...

  13. Arteriovenous Malformation in a Child with Extensive Involvement of the Mandible and Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Andrew L.; George, Augustine; Long, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation of both the maxilla and mandible in a pediatric patient is a very rare phenomenon that carries with it a high mortality rate. Arteriovenous malformations, sometimes known as simple vascular tumors, can be present from birth or acquired over time due to trauma, surgery, or any kind of vascular manipulation of an area of the body. PMID:20671863

  14. Somatic Uniparental Isodisomy Explains Multifocality of Glomuvenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Amyere, Mustapha; Aerts, Virginie; Brouillard, Pascal; McIntyre, Brendan A.S.; Duhoux, François P.; Wassef, Michel; Enjolras, Odile; Mulliken, John B.; Devuyst, Olivier; Antoine-Poirel, Hélène; Boon, Laurence M.; Vikkula, Miikka

    2013-01-01

    Inherited vascular malformations are commonly autosomal dominantly inherited with high, but incomplete, penetrance; they often present as multiple lesions. We hypothesized that Knudson’s two-hit model could explain this multifocality and partial penetrance. We performed a systematic analysis of inherited glomuvenous malformations (GVMs) by using multiple approaches, including a sensitive allele-specific pairwise SNP-chip method. Overall, we identified 16 somatic mutations, most of which were not intragenic but were cases of acquired uniparental isodisomy (aUPID) involving chromosome 1p. The breakpoint of each aUPID is located in an A- and T-rich, high-DNA-flexibility region (1p13.1–1p12). This region corresponds to a possible new fragile site. Occurrences of these mutations render the inherited glomulin variant in 1p22.1 homozygous in the affected tissues without loss of genetic material. This finding demonstrates that a double hit is needed to trigger formation of a GVM. It also suggests that somatic UPID, only detectable by sensitive pairwise analysis in heterogeneous tissues, might be a common phenomenon in human cells. Thus, aUPID might play a role in the pathogenesis of various nonmalignant disorders and might explain local impaired function and/or clinical variability. Furthermore, these data suggest that pairwise analysis of blood and tissue, even on heterogeneous tissue, can be used for localizing double-hit mutations in disease-causing genes. PMID:23375657

  15. Treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: combined neurosurgical and neuroradiologic approach.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, L D; Harris, A B

    1983-01-01

    Experience with 31 intraoperative embolizations performed on 23 patients is reported. The procedure involves the direct injection of embolic material into the main arterial feeders during craniotomy. The combined effort involves the exposure of the lesion at craniotomy, standard arteriotomy, and fluoroscopically monitored intravascular infusion of contrast material followed by the injection of bucrylate (IBCA, Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) mixed with tantalum or Pantopaque into the feeding vessels and into the interstices of the malformation. It was concluded that the procedure significantly diminishes operating time and blood loss for the lesions that were subsequently resected. Fluoroscopy coupled with high-quality stop-frame videotape recording allows a detailed study of the flow characteristics of the malformation so that polymerization time can be regulated appropriately. Follow-up varied from 3 months to 4 1/2 years. There were two deaths related to the procedure and one additional complication of cortical blindness that partially resolved. None of the survivors rebled. Most of the survivors improved. PMID:6410746

  16. Free radicals and antioxidants status in neonates with congenital malformation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Bedabrata; Gongopadhyay, Ajay Narayan; Rani, Anjali; Gavel, Roshni; Mishra, Surendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies using animal models have shown that oxidative stress during pregnancy may play an important role in causing birth defects. Congenital anomalies affect an estimated 270,000 newborns who die during the first 28 days of life every year from different birth defects. Hence, at present many research works are going on to reduce the infant mortality from congenital anomaly.[1] Objective: The objective was to measure the oxidant and antioxidant level in the serum of newborn babies with the congenital anomaly and compare these levels with age and sex matched normal neonates. This is to identify any role of oxidative stress in the causation of congenital anomaly. Materials and Methods: This case-control study included 159 participants: 106 newborns with the congenital anomaly and 53 healthy newborns. The markers of oxidative stress like serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level, protein carbonyl (PC) level, and the activity of antioxidants such as Vitamin C, glutathione were measured in both cases (neonates with congenital anomaly) and controls (normal healthy neonates). These parameters were statistically compared. Results: MDA levels and PC levels were significantly higher (P < 0.0001), and Vitamin C and reduced glutathione levels were significantly lower (P < 0.0001), in newborns with congenital malformation than in healthy newborns. Conclusions: Increased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation might play an important role in the pathogenesis of congenital anomaly. Impairment of the free radical/antioxidant balance is leading to increased free radical damage in neonates with congenital malformation. PMID:26628809

  17. Morphological and functional aspects of progenitors perturbed in cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Bizzotto, Sara; Francis, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular mechanisms important for the function of neuronal progenitors during development, revealed by their perturbation in different cortical malformations. We focus on a class of neuronal progenitors, radial glial cells (RGCs), which are renowned for their unique morphological and behavioral characteristics, constituting a key element during the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. We describe how the particular morphology of these cells is related to their roles in the orchestration of cortical development and their influence on other progenitor types and post-mitotic neurons. Important for disease mechanisms, we overview what is currently known about RGC cellular components, cytoskeletal mechanisms, signaling pathways and cell cycle characteristics, focusing on how defects lead to abnormal development and cortical malformation phenotypes. The multiple recent entry points from human genetics and animal models are contributing to our understanding of this important cell type. Combining data from phenotypes in the mouse reveals molecules which potentially act in common pathways. Going beyond this, we discuss future directions that may provide new data in this expanding area. PMID:25729350

  18. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... brought about by birth defect, disease or trauma. Apert syndrome Carpenter syndrome Carpenter Syndrome belongs to a group ... FAQs CCAkids Blog CCA Web Store Cher Syndromes • Apert syndrome • Carpenter syndrome • Cleft lip and/or palate • Craniosynostosis • ...

  19. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  20. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... form: Mild to no mental deficiency Both forms: Carpal tunnel syndrome Coarse features of the face Deafness (gets worse ... Airway obstruction Carpal tunnel syndrome Hearing loss that gets worse ... to complete daily living activities Joint stiffness that ...

  1. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Klinefelter Syndrome (KS): Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is KS? The term "Klinefelter (pronounced KLAHYN-fel-ter ) syndrome," ...

  2. Rett syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Rett syndrome occurs almost always in girls. It may be diagnosed as autism or cerebral palsy. Most Rett syndrome cases are due to a problem in the gene called MECP2. This gene is on the X chromosome. Females ...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndrome is a condition in which your body's connective tissue is abnormal. Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It ... and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects the connective tissue of the heart and blood vessels, eyes, bones, ...

  5. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a high level of the hormone cortisol. ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... of this type of medicine. Glucocorticoids mimic the action ...

  6. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  7. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... heads, jerky movements, protruding tongues, and bouts of laughter." Infants with Angelman syndrome appear normal at birth, ... Is there any treatment? There is no specific therapy for Angelman syndrome. Medical therapy for seizures is ...

  8. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography. PMID:24601202

  9. Treatment of Virgin OHVIRA Syndrome with Haematometrocolpos by Complete Incision of Vaginal Septum without Hymenotomy.

    PubMed

    Tug, Niyazi; Sargin, Mehmet Akif; Çelik, Ayhan; Alp, Turgut; Yenidede, Ilter

    2015-11-01

    Mullerian malformations result from defective fusion of the Mullerian ducts during development of the female reproductive system and have an incidence of 2-3%. The American Fertility Society classification of Mullerian anomalies is the most commonly utilized standardized classification. The least common form of these malformations is Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome characterized by obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA). This syndrome has been described with case reports since 1922. Early diagnosis and surgery that include drainage of fluid and resection of the vaginal septum is necessary for OHVIRA to prevent late complications (i.e. pyocolpos, chronic cryptomenorrhea). Here in we report a case of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome that hymen has been preserved during the operation of non-fenestrated transverse vaginal septum resection with hysteroscopy. PMID:26676254

  10. Down syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called Trisomy 21. ...

  11. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  12. Hind limb malformations in free-living northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) from Maine, Minnesota, and Vermont suggest multiple etiologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Loeffler, I.K.; Fallon, J.F.; Converse, K.A.; Green, E.; Helgen, J.C.; Kersten, S.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Background Reports of malformed frogs have increased throughout the North American continent in recent years. Most of the observed malformations have involved the hind limbs. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the hind limb malformations in wild frogs as an important step toward understanding the possible etiologies. Methods During 1997 and 1998, 182 recently metamorphosed northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were collected from Minnesota, Vermont, and Maine. Malformed hind limbs were present in 157 (86%) of these frogs, which underwent necropsy and radiographic evaluation at the National Wildlife Health Center. These malformations are described in detail and classified into four major categories: (1) no limb (amelia); (2) multiple limbs or limb elements (polymelia, polydactyly, polyphalangy); (3) reduced limb segments or elements (phocomelia, ectromelia, ectrodactyly, and brachydactyly; and (4) distally complete but malformed limb (bone rotations, bridging, skin webbing, and micromelia). Results Amelia and reduced segments and/or elements were the most common finding. Frogs with bilateral hind limb malformations were not common, and in only eight of these 22 frogs were the malformations symmetrical. Malformations of a given type tended to occur in frogs collected from the same site, but the types of malformations varied widely among all three states, and between study sites within Minnesota. Conclusions Clustering of malformation type suggests that developmental events may produce a variety of phenotypes depending on the timing, sequence, and severity of the environmental insult. Hind limb malformations in free-living frogs transcend current mechanistic explanations of tetrapod limb development.

  13. A newborn with overlapping features of AEC and EEC syndromes.

    PubMed

    Celik, Tolga Hasan; Buyukcam, Ayse; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Utine, Gulen Eda; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel; Korkmaz, Ayse; Yntema, Helger G; Bodugroglu, Koray; Yurdakok, Murat

    2011-12-01

    Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting (EEC) syndrome is the prototype of several p63 conditions, which include ankyloblepharon, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting (AEC) syndrome, limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS), ADULT syndrome, and others. All these disorders include combinations of ectodermal dysplasia, orofacial clefting and limb malformations in variable severity. A newborn patient is presented with diffuse erythematous and desquamating skin lesions and anal atresia. She also had sparse and lightly colored thin hair, deeply set eyes, hypoplastic alae nasi, and a short philtrum. Cleft lip/palate and ankyloblepharon were not present. Complete cutaneous syndactyly was present on both hands in between the third and fourth fingers. Mild ectrodactyly was evident on all four extremities in between first and second digits. There was post-axial polydactyly on both feet. Anal atresia was present and defecation occurred through a rectovaginal fistula. The patient represented an interesting overlapping clinical condition between AEC and EEC syndromes. Diffuse skin lesions with excoriation and desquamation suggest AEC syndrome, despite the absence of ankyloblepharon, however; ectrodactyly and polydactyly strongly suggest the EEC syndrome. C308Y mutation in exon 8 of TP63 gene was detected, which was previously described to lead only to EEC syndrome and not to any of the other allelic conditions. These data emphasize the large degree of clinical variability that may be seen for specific TP63 mutations. PMID:22065614

  14. Sturge-Weber syndrome: presentation with partial hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Jammula, Sruti; Krishna, Surabhi Venkata Satya; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare disorder involving central nervous system abnormalities. It manifests with a facial port-wine birthmark and a vascular malformation of the brain. Infants and children present with seizures and stroke-like episodes with focal neurologic deficits. Patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome carry the additional risk of developing hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, secondary to their central nervous system dysfunction. Although one would suspect the hypothalamic-pituitary axis would be at risk for impairment given the abnormalities that often occur in Sturge-Weber syndrome, they are not commonly recognized by clinicians. Increased awareness of this potential complication in patients with this rare disease of Sturge-Weber syndrome is needed. We hereby report a case of SWS with partial hypopituitarism and consider it to be important that these patients should undergo routine evaluation of pituitary function in the face of any relevant clinical manifestations. PMID:23155711

  15. A Case of Newly Diagnosed Klippel Trenaunay Weber Syndrome Presenting with Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cebeci, Egemen; Demir, Secil; Gursu, Meltem; Sumnu, Abdullah; Yamak, Mehmet; Doner, Bar?s; Karadag, Serhat; Uzun, Sami; Behlul, Ahmet; Ozkan, Oktay; Ozturk, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Klippel Trenaunay Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare disease characterized by hemihypertrophy, variceal enlargement of the veins, and arteriovenous (AV) malformations. Renal involvement in KTWS is not known except in rare case reports. Herein, we present a case of KTWS with nephrotic syndrome. A 52-year-old male was admitted due to dyspnea and swelling of the body for the last three months. The pathological physical findings were diffuse edema, decreased lung sounds at the right basal site, increased diameter and decreased length of the left leg compared with the right one, diffuse variceal enlargements, and a few hemangiomatous lesions on the left leg. The pathological laboratory findings were hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, increased creatinine level (1.23?mg/dL), and proteinuria (7.6?g/day). Radiographic pathological findings were cystic lesions in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, splenomegaly, AV malformation on the left posterolateral thigh, and hypertrophy of the soft tissues of the proximal left leg. He was diagnosed to have KTWS with these findings. Renal biopsy was performed to determine the cause of nephrotic syndrome. The pathologic examination was consistent with focal segmental sclerosis (FSGS). He was started on oral methylprednisolone at the dosage of 1?mg/kg and began to be followedup in the nephrology outpatient clinic. PMID:26000182

  16. A case of newly diagnosed klippel trenaunay weber syndrome presenting with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Egemen; Demir, Secil; Gursu, Meltem; Sumnu, Abdullah; Yamak, Mehmet; Doner, Bar?s; Karadag, Serhat; Uzun, Sami; Behlul, Ahmet; Ozkan, Oktay; Ozturk, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Klippel Trenaunay Weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare disease characterized by hemihypertrophy, variceal enlargement of the veins, and arteriovenous (AV) malformations. Renal involvement in KTWS is not known except in rare case reports. Herein, we present a case of KTWS with nephrotic syndrome. A 52-year-old male was admitted due to dyspnea and swelling of the body for the last three months. The pathological physical findings were diffuse edema, decreased lung sounds at the right basal site, increased diameter and decreased length of the left leg compared with the right one, diffuse variceal enlargements, and a few hemangiomatous lesions on the left leg. The pathological laboratory findings were hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, increased creatinine level (1.23?mg/dL), and proteinuria (7.6?g/day). Radiographic pathological findings were cystic lesions in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, splenomegaly, AV malformation on the left posterolateral thigh, and hypertrophy of the soft tissues of the proximal left leg. He was diagnosed to have KTWS with these findings. Renal biopsy was performed to determine the cause of nephrotic syndrome. The pathologic examination was consistent with focal segmental sclerosis (FSGS). He was started on oral methylprednisolone at the dosage of 1?mg/kg and began to be followedup in the nephrology outpatient clinic. PMID:26000182

  17. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes. PMID:19280943

  18. Serous retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema in a patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome.

    PubMed

    Onder, Halil Ibrahim; Alisan, Sibel; Tunc, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a rare phacomatosis characterized by unilateral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the brain, retina, and (rarely) the skin. The diagnosis is concluded with dilated fundus examination and markedly dilated tortuous vascular loops with arteriovenous communications on fluorescent angiography. We present a 14-year-old male patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome who developed serous macular neuroretinal detachment, cystoid macular edema (CME), and consequent visual deterioration in the left eye. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with Wyburn-Mason syndrome who developed serous retinal detachment and CME. PMID:24171831

  19. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in adulthood: extending the clinical spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andreu, Joaquín; Ray, Victor Glenn; Arribas, José María; Sánchez, Sergio Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive malformation disorder. Cardiac defects are observed in about 50% of EvC cases. Surgical data is lacking on the prognosis and life expectancy of EvC patients. Herein, we report the case of a 38-year-old man with EvC syndrome who underwent two surgical corrections for cardiac anomalies. This report supplements the available information on the clinical course of EvC syndrome in older patients. PMID:26106249

  20. Quantification of intracerebral steal in patients with arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Homan, R W; Devous, M D; Stokely, E M; Bonte, F J

    1986-08-01

    Eleven patients with angiographically and/or pathologically proved arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were studied using dynamic, single-photon-emission computed tomography (DSPECT). Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow in structurally normal areas remote from the AVM disclosed areas of decreased flow compared with normal controls in eight of 11 patients examined. Areas of hypoperfusion correlated with altered function as manifested by epileptogenic foci and impaired cognitive function. Dynamic, single-photon-emission computed tomography provides a noninvasive technique to monitor quantitatively hemodynamic changes associated with AVMs. Our findings suggest that such changes are present in the majority of patients with AVMs and that they may be clinically significant. The potential application of regional cerebral blood flow imaging by DSPECT in the management of patients with AVMs is discussed. PMID:3488052

  1. Vascular changes in hard palate sialolipoma: Sialoangiolipoma or vascular malformation?

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Palate sialolipomas are rare. Less than 10 cases located in the hard palate are reported to our knowledge. We report a case of hard palate sialolipoma, peculiar by the intratumor vascular patterns. A 67-year-old man presented with a 1.5 cm lesion of the oral hard palate. The lesion was surgically resected. On microscopy, the lesion, partly encapsulated, consisted of a proliferation of mature adipocytes containing normal minor salivary gland tissue and branching intratumoral vessels of varied size with irregularly thickened wall and papillary projections or tufts. The microscopic features of the tumor we report suggest that vascular malformation-like patterns may occur in sialolipomas of the hard palate. This morphological vascular peculiarity should be acknowledged since it may represent source of hemorrhage. PMID:26604516

  2. Management of bulbous exophytic malformations of permanent mandibular incisors.

    PubMed

    Kotsanos, Nikolaos; Velonis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the diagnosis and management of a rare case of bulbous exophytic malformation of three permanent mandibular incisors. An 8-year-old Caucasian girl presented with concerns on the appearance of these teeth. Medical history was noncontributory, and there was no recall of relevant past trauma. Upon clinical examination, 3 permanent mandibular incisors exhibited hard bulbous protuberances in the crown's middle and cervical areas. Radiographic examination assisted by dental computed tomography revealed that these were continuous with the tooth structure, contained no pulpal tissue, and the teeth displayed normal root development. They were excised and the teeth were restored with a thin composite facing. They remained asymptomatic with acceptable esthetics for 4 years. Scanning electron microscopy and histology of the biopsied hard tissue revealed a nonhomogeneous structure resembling anomalously intertwined enamel with predentin and dentin. The etiology of this disturbance of dental development remains unknown. PMID:23265170

  3. Quantification of intracerebral steal in patients with arteriovenous malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, R.W.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Stokely, E.M.; Bonte, F.J.

    1986-08-01

    Eleven patients with angiographically and/or pathologically proved arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were studied using dynamic, single-photon-emission computed tomography (DSPECT). Quantification of regional cerebral blood flow in structurally normal areas remote from the AVM disclosed areas of decreased flow compared with normal controls in eight of 11 patients examined. Areas of hypoperfusion correlated with altered function as manifested by epileptogenic foci and impaired cognitive function. Dynamic, single-photon-emission computed tomography provides a noninvasive technique to monitor quantitatively hemodynamic changes associated with AVMs. Our findings suggest that such changes are present in the majority of patients with AVMs and that they may be clinically significant. The potential application of regional cerebral blood flow imaging by DSPECT in the management of patients with AVMs is discussed.

  4. Expanding the phenotype of IFAP/BRESECK syndrome: a new case with severe hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Corujeira, Susana; Águeda, Sofia; Monteiro, Georgina; Canelhas, Aurea; Sampaio, Mafalda; Rocha, Ruben; Leão, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The ichthyosis follicular with atrichia and photophobia syndrome (IFAP) is a rare X-linked multiple congenital malformation syndrome. Some male patients have additional features including brain anomalies, intellectual disability, ectodermal dysplasia, skeletal deformities, ear or eye anomalies and kidney dysplasia/hypoplasia (BRESEK syndrome) sometimes associated with Hirschsprung disease and cleft palate or cryptorchidism (BRESHECK syndrome). We report a 5 months-old male patient with the p.R429H mutation in MBTPS2 protein, which has been reported to be associated with the most severe phenotype of patients with IFAP/BRESHECK syndrome. This patient presented with a severe IFAP/BRESHECK phenotype including ichthyosis follicular, atrichia, photophobia, brain anomalies, global developmental delay, Hirschsprung disease and kidney hypoplasia. Additional features not previously reported in IFAP syndrome, include severe hypogammaglobulinemia and congenital rectourethral fistula. PMID:24090718

  5. Clinical differentiation between Proteus syndrome and hemihyperplasia: description of a distinct form of hemihyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Biesecker, L G; Peters, K F; Darling, T N; Choyke, P; Hill, S; Schimke, N; Cunningham, M; Meltzer, P; Cohen, M M

    1998-10-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare and highly variable hamartomatous syndrome that can affect multiple organ systems. It is characterized by hyperplastic lesions of connective tissue, vascular malformations, linear verrucous epidermal nevi, and hyperostoses. The cause of the disorder is unknown, but the current working hypothesis is that it is caused by a mosaic alteration that leads to a highly variable phenotype, equal sex ratio, sporadic occurrence, and discordant monozygotic twins. Herein we describe our experience with 18 patients with a referring diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. It was found that imaging studies are very useful for the characterization of the syndrome. One finding was that splenic hyperplasia can be a manifestation of Proteus syndrome. Analysis of the clinical data shows that Proteus syndrome is frequently confused with "hemihyperplasia." A distinct subtype of hemihyperplasia is defined that includes static or mildly progressive hemihyperplasia and multiple lipomata. PMID:9781913

  6. Left-sided CHILD syndrome caused by a nonsense mutation in the NSDHL gene.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Marybeth; Cunningham, David; Mullett, Charles J; Kelley, Richard I; Herman, Gail E

    2003-10-15

    Congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects (CHILD) syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant malformation syndrome characterized by unilaterally distributed ichthyosiform nevi, often sharply delimited at the midline, and ipsilateral limb defects. At least two-thirds of cases demonstrate involvement of the right side. Mutations in an essential enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, NAD(P)H steroid dehydrogenase-like [NSDHL], have been reported in five unrelated patients with right-sided CHILD syndrome and in a sixth patient with bilaterally, symmetric nevi and mild skeletal anomalies, but not with CHILD syndrome as originally defined. Although all of the molecularly diagnosed cases with the CHILD phenotype to date have had right-sided disease, we report here a novel nonsense mutation (E151X) of NSDHL in an infant with left-sided CHILD syndrome. This result demonstrates that both right- and left-sided CHILD syndrome can be caused by mutations in the same gene. PMID:12966526

  7. A Description of Spina Bifida Cases and Co-Occurring Malformations, 1976–2011

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Samantha E.; Yazdy, Mahsa M.; Mitchell, Allen A.; Demmer, Laurie A.; Werler, Martha M.

    2015-01-01

    Mandatory folic acid fortification in the United States corresponded with a decline in the prevalence of spina bifida (SB). The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiologic characteristics of isolated versus non-isolated SB cases in both pre- and post-fortification periods. SB cases in the Slone Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study from 1976 to 2011 without chromosomal anomalies and syndromes were included. A maternal interview, conducted within 6 months of delivery, collected information on demographics, reproductive history, diet, and supplement use. Daily folic acid intake in the periconceptional period was calculated using both dietary and supplement information and categorized as low intake (<400 ?g/day) or high intake (?400 ?g/day). SB cases (n=1170) were classified as isolated (80.4%) or non-isolated (19.1%). Non-isolated cases were further divided into subgroups based on accompanying major malformations (midline, renal, genital, heart, laterality). Compared to non-isolated cases, isolated cases were more likely to be white, non-Hispanic and have more than 12 years of education. Cases in the renal, genital, and heart subgroups had the lowest proportions of mothers with a high folic acid intake. The change from pre- to post-fortification was associated with a decrease in the proportion of isolated cases from 83% to 72%, though in both periods isolated cases were more likely to be female and their mothers were more likely to have high folic acid intake. These findings highlight the importance of separating isolated and non-isolated cases in etiologic research of SB. PMID:24357196

  8. Task-Specific and General Cognitive Effects in Chiari Malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Philip A.; Houston, James R.; Pollock, Joshua W.; Buzzelli, Christopher; Li, Xuan; Harrington, A. Katherine; Martin, Bryn A.; Loth, Francis; Lien, Mei-Ching; Maleki, Jahangir; Luciano, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to use episodic memory and executive function tests to determine whether or not Chiari Malformation Type I (CM) patients experience cognitive dysfunction. Background CM is a neurological syndrome in which the cerebellum descends into the cervical spine causing neural compression, severe headaches, neck pain, and number of other physical symptoms. While primarily a disorder of the cervico-medullary junction, both clinicians and researchers have suspected deficits in higher-level cognitive function. Design and Methods We tested 24 CM patients who had undergone decompression neurosurgery and 24 age- and education-matched controls on measures of immediate and delayed episodic memory, as well as three measures of executive function. Results The CM group showed performance decrements relative to the controls in response inhibition (Stroop interference), working memory computational speed (Ospan), and processing speed (automated digit symbol substitution task), but group differences in recall did not reach statistical significance. After statistical control for depression and anxiety scores, the group effects for working memory and processing speed were eliminated, but not for response inhibition. This response inhibition difference was not due to overall general slowing for the CM group, either, because when controls' data were transformed using the linear function fit to all of the reaction time tasks, the interaction with group remained statistically significant. Furthermore, there was a multivariate group effect for all of the response time measures and immediate and delayed recall after statistical control of depression and anxiety scores. Conclusion These results suggest that CM patients with decompression surgery exhibit cognitive dysfunction compared to age- and education-matched controls. While some of these results may be related to anxiety and depression (likely proxies for chronic pain), response inhibition effects, in particular, as well as a general cognitive deficit persisted even after control for anxiety and decompression. PMID:24736676

  9. Chiari Malformation Type I: A Case-Control Association Study of 58 Developmental Genes

    PubMed Central

    Urbizu, Aintzane; Toma, Claudio; Poca, Maria A.; Sahuquillo, Juan; Cuenca-León, Ester; Cormand, Bru; Macaya, Alfons

    2013-01-01

    Chiari malformation type I (CMI) is a disorder characterized by hindbrain overcrowding into an underdeveloped posterior cranial fossa (PCF), often causing progressive neurological symptoms. The etiology of CMI remains unclear and is most likely multifactorial. A putative genetic contribution to CMI is suggested by familial aggregation and twin studies. Experimental models and human morphometric studies have suggested an underlying paraxial mesoderm insufficiency. We performed a case-control association study of 303 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) across 58 candidate genes involved in early paraxial mesoderm development in a sample of 415 CMI patients and 524 sex-matched controls. A subgroup of patients diagnosed with classical, small-PCF CMI by means of MRI-based PCF morphometry (n?=?186), underwent additional analysis. The genes selected are involved in signalling gradients occurring during segmental patterning of the occipital somites (FGF8, Wnt, and retinoic acid pathways and from bone morphogenetic proteins or BMP, Notch, Cdx and Hox pathways) or in placental angiogenesis, sclerotome development or CMI-associated syndromes. Single-marker analysis identified nominal associations with 18 SNPs in 14 genes (CDX1, FLT1, RARG, NKD2, MSGN1, RBPJ1, FGFR1, RDH10, NOG, RARA, LFNG, KDR, ALDH1A2, BMPR1A) considering the whole CMI sample. None of these overcame corrections for multiple comparisons, in contrast with four SNPs in CDX1, FLT1 and ALDH1A2 in the classical CMI group. Multiple marker analysis identified a risk haplotype for classical CMI in ALDH1A2 and CDX1. Furthermore, we analyzed the possible contributions of the most significantly associated SNPs to different PCF morphometric traits. These findings suggest that common variants in genes involved in somitogenesis and fetal vascular development may confer susceptibility to CMI. PMID:23437350

  10. NPHP4 Variants are Associated with Pleiotropic Heart Malformations

    PubMed Central

    French, Vanessa M.; van de Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Wessels, Marja W.; Rohe, Christan; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Wang, Guangliang; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M.E.; Severijnen, Lies-Anne; de Graaf, Bianca M.; Schot, Rachel; Breedveld, Guido; Mientjes, Edwin; van Tienhoven, Marianne; Jadot, Elodie; Jiang, Zhengxin; Verkerk, Annemieke; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Venselaar, Hanka; Rahimi, Zohreh; Najmabadi, Hossein; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; de Graaff, Esther; Helbing, Wim A.; Willemsen, Rob; Devriendt, Koen; Belmont, John W.; Oostra, Ben A.; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Congenital heart malformations are a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in young children. Failure to establish normal left-right (L-R) asymmetry often results in cardiovascular malformations and other laterality defects of visceral organs. Objective To identify genetic mutations causing cardiac laterality defects. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis in patients with cardiac laterality defects from a consanguineous family. The patients had combinations of defects that included dextrocardia, transposition of great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, atrio-ventricular septal defects and caval vein abnormalities. Sequencing of positional candidate genes identified mutations in NPHP4. We performed mutation analysis of NPHP4 in 146 unrelated patients with similar cardiac laterality defects. Forty-one percent of these patients also had laterality defects of the abdominal organs. We identified eight additional missense variants that were absent or very rare in controls. To study the role of nphp4 in establishing L-R asymmetry, we used antisense morpholinos to knockdown nphp4 expression in zebrafish. Depletion of nphp4 disrupted L-R patterning as well as cardiac and gut laterality. Cardiac laterality defects were partially rescued by human NPHP4 mRNA, whereas mutant NPHP4 containing genetic variants found in patients failed to rescue. We show that nphp4 is involved in the formation of motile cilia in Kupffer’s vesicle (KV), which generate asymmetric fluid flow necessary for normal L-R asymmetry. Conclusions NPHP4 mutations are associated with cardiac laterality defects and heterotaxy. In zebrafish, nphp4 is essential for the development and function of KV cilia and is required for global L-R patterning. PMID:22550138

  11. Intraoperative Micro-Doppler in Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Till; Siasios, Giannis; Schmidt, Nils Ole; Reitz, Mathias; Regelsberger, Jan; Westphal, Manfred

    2015-11-01

    Introduction?Intraoperative micro-Doppler (IOMD), intraoperative digital substraction angiography (DSA), and microscope-integrated indocyanine green angiography are methods that guide neurosurgical resection of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in the brain and minimize the trauma of healthy tissue. In this study we emphasize the use of IOMD in AVM surgery, analyzing the advantages and the limitations of this method. Patients and Methods?A total of 32 patients were diagnosed with an AVM. Supplying arteries and draining veins were analyzed regarding hemodynamic profiles, flow velocities, pulsatility index (PI), and resistance index (RI). Venous drainages were accompanied by arterial blood flow disturbances that showed typical characteristics in all cases. We set an angle of 60 degrees between the examined vessel and the probe to achieve a more reliable and comparable measurement. Postoperative DSA was performed in all patients. Results?Supplying arterial blood vessels of AVMs could be identified by their characteristic blood flow profiles with PI?malformations, but systolic and diastolic flow velocities may vary to a greater extent. This phenomenon has never been elucidated previously and therefore needs to be emphasized when using this technique intraoperatively. PMID:26140418

  12. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  13. A xenograft animal model of human arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a type of high-flow vascular malformations that most commonly occurs in the head and neck. They are present at birth but are usually clinically asymptomatic until later in life. The pathogenesis of AVMs remains unclear and therapeutic approaches to AVMs are unsatisfied. In order to provide a tool for studying the pathogenesis and therapies of this disease, we established and studied a xenograft animal model of human AVMs. Methods Fresh human AVMs specimens harvested from 4 patients were sectioned (5x5x5 mm) and xenografted subcutaneously in 5 immunologically naïve nude mice (Athymic Nude-Foxn1nu). Each mouse had four pieces specimens in four quadrants along the back. The grafts were observed weekly for volume, color and texture. The grafts were harvested at every 30 days intervals for histologic examination. All grafts (n?=?20) were sectioned and stained for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Comparative pathologic evaluation of the grafts and native AVMs were performed by two blinded pathologists. Immunohistochemical examination of human-specific nuclear antigen, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and Ki-67 was performed. Results Clinical characteristics and pathologic diagnosis of native human derived AVMs were confirmed. 85% (n?=?17) of AVM xenografts survived although the sizes decreased after implantation. Histological examination demonstrated numerous small and medium-size vessels and revealed structural characteristics matching the native AVMs tissue.76.5% (n?=?13) of the surviving xenografts were positive for Ki-67 and human-specific nuclear antigen suggesting survival of the human derived tissue, 52.9% (n?=?9) were positive for VEGFR-2. Conclusions This preliminary xenograft animal model suggests that AVMs can survive in the nude mouse. The presence of human-specific nuclear antigen, VEGFR-2, and Ki-67 demonstrates the stability of native tissue qualities within the xenografts. PMID:24377858

  14. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kalal, Goud Iravathy; Raina, Vimarsh P; Nayak, Veerabhadra S; Teotia, Pooja; Gupta, Bhushan V

    2009-02-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CDLS) is a relatively common multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation disorder with an unknown genetic and molecular pathogenesis. The essential features of this developmental malformation syndrome are retardation in growth, developmental delay, various structural limb abnormalities, and distinctive facial features. Most cases are sporadic and are thought to result from a new dominant mutation. Consequently, hypotheses regarding the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the two distinct phenotypes, classic and mild, are purely speculative. The recent discovery of molecular techniques and identification of the NIPBL gene has allowed etiologic diagnosis of this disorder. In this article, we describe a patient with CDLS in whom conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and NIPBL gene mutation analysis determined an etiologic diagnosis, providing precise genetic counseling and facilitated the family to make an evidence-based decision for conception and also alleviated the extreme degree of anxiety associated with the thought of having a second child in this set of circumstances. PMID:19309268

  15. Linkage study of embryopathy-polygenic inheritance of diabetes-induced skeletal malformations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Niklas; Luthman, Holger; Pettersson, Ulf; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2012-06-01

    We developed an inbred rat model of diabetic embryopathy, in which the offspring displays skeletal malformations (agnathia or micrognathia) when the mother is diabetic, and no malformations when she is not diabetic. Our aim was to find genes controlling the embryonic maldevelopment in a diabetic environment. We contrasted the fetal outcome in inbred Sprague-Dawley L rats (20% skeletal malformations in diabetic pregnancy) with that of inbred Wistar Furth rats (denotedW, no skeletal malformations in diabetic pregnancy). We used offspring from the backcross F(1)×L to probe for the genetic basis for malformation of the mandible in diabetic pregnancy. A set of 186 fetuses (93 affected, 93 unaffected) was subjected to a whole genome scan with 160 micro satellites. Analysis of genotype distribution indicated 7 loci on chromosome 4, 10 (3 loci), 14, 18, and 19 in the teratogenic process (and 14 other loci on 12 chromosomes with less strong association to the malformations), several of which contained genes implicated in other experimental studies of diabetic embryopathy. These candidate genes will be scrutinized in further experimentation. We conclude that the genetic involvement in rodent diabetic embryopathy is polygenic and predisposing for congenital malformations. PMID:22227068

  16. Exposure to nitrofurantoin during the first trimester of pregnancy and the risk for major malformations.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ori; Koren, Gideon; Landau, Daniella; Lunenfeld, Eitan; Matok, Ilan; Levy, Amalia

    2013-09-01

    Antibacterial drugs are among the most common medications used by pregnant women. While medical literature generally defines nitrofurantoin as an antibiotic that is safe for use during the first trimester of pregnancy, new concerns about a possible association between congenital malformations following exposure to nitrofurantoin during the first trimester of pregnancy have recently surfaced. To address these concerns, we conducted a large population-based retrospective cohort study to assess this possible association (including cases of medical terminations of pregnancy or stillbirth) and congenital malformations. A computerized database for medications dispensed to pregnant women in southern Israel was linked with records from the district hospital. Associations between exposure to nitrofurantoin during the first trimester and major malformations were assessed. Our research included a total of 105,492 pregnancies, 1,112 of which involved pregnancy terminations for medical reasons. A total of 1,329 infants and abortuses had been exposed to nitrofurantoin during the first trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to nitrofurantoin was not associated with increased risk of major malformations in general (adjusted OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.67-1.08) or with specific malformations. First trimester exposure to nitrofurantoin was not associated with increased risk for total major congenital malformations or with specific malformations. PMID:23873250

  17. Cerebral venous development in relation to developmental venous anomalies and Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Monica; Gregg, Lydia; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2011-06-01

    Cerebrovascular venous development and intracranial vascular malformations are extensive topics for which volumes of text may be devoted. However, a basic knowledge of the embryology of cerebral venous system and venous architecture is essential for understanding of cerebral vascular malformations. The aim of this work is to provide the reader with a brief overview of the development of the cranial venous anatomy. We will highlight the superficial and deep venous systems with special attention to developmental venous anomalies and vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations. PMID:21596280

  18. CONGENITAL MACROVESSEL ASSOCIATED WITH CYSTOID MACULAR EDEMA AND AN IPSILATERAL INTRACRANIAL VENOUS MALFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Sanfilippo, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Purpose: To report a case of congenital retinal macrovessel associated with cystoid macular edema and an ipsilateral intracranial venous malformation. Methods: Case report. Results: A 58-year-old woman with decreased vision was found to have a congenital retinal venous macrovessel associated with cystoid macular edema because of tributary venous occlusion. The patient underwent neuroimaging and an ipsilateral venous malformation of the frontal lobe was discovered. Conclusion: Congenital retinal macrovessel can occasionally be complicated by vascular occlusion and macular edema. The authors report a case of congenital retinal macrovessel associated with an intracranial venous malformation. Clinicians should be aware of this potential association, and further studies are warranted. PMID:26421894

  19. Joubert syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics of nine patients

    PubMed Central

    Elhassanien, Ahmed Farag; Alghaiaty, Hesham Abdel-Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Background: Joubert Syndrome (JS) is a rare genetic developmental disorder, first identified in 1969. In patients with JS, certain regions of the brain (mainly cerebellar vermis and brainstem) are underdeveloped or malformed. This can lead to impaired attention, visual, spatial, motor, language and social functional skills. JS is characterized by a host of features, many of which do not occur in every patient. Aim of the Study: To spotlight and increase awareness of clinical profile and neuroimaging findings of children with Joubert syndrome. Methods: This is a retrospective case series study of patients with JS who attended the Pediatric Neurology Clinic in Aladan and Alfarawanya Hospitals in Kuwait, from September 2007 to September 2012. Clinical and radiological data were obtained from the patient medical records. Results: Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia/aplasia and apnea were present in all patients, polydactly in 3 of 16, renal problems with cysts in 5 patients and 11 of 16 had abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs). Blood investigations of organic acids, amino acids and very-long-chain fatty acid, were normal in the all the nine patients. Conclusion: JS is a rare genetic brain malformation with association of retinal dystrophy and renal abnormalities. The retinal dystrophy may be progressive. The prognosis of patients depends mainly on the degree of brain malformation. PMID:23956573

  20. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:19434382

  1. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome: a clinical genetic study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, K; Howell, R; Bottani, A; Ancliff, P; Brunner, H; Verschuuren-Bemel..., C; Vernon, E; Brown, K; Newbury-Ecob, R

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to describe this condition, but it was Hall et al in 1969 who reported the first major series of patients. Since then most reports have been based on single or small numbers of cases. We report the results of a clinical study looking at the phenotype of 34 patients with TAR syndrome. All cases had a documented thrombocytopenia and bilateral radial aplasia, 47% had lower limb anomalies, 47% cow's milk intolerance, 23% renal anomalies, and 15% cardiac anomalies. Congenital anomalies not previously described in association with TAR syndrome included facial capillary haemangiomata, intracranial vascular malformation, sensorineural hearing loss, and scoliosis. Karyotype analysis, chromosome breakage studies including premature centromeric separation and fluorescence in situ hybridisation studies looking for a deletion of chromosome 22q11 were undertaken. Two abnormal karyotypes were identified. PMID:12471199

  2. Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters Updated:Jul 24,2014 Metabolic syndrome may ... Diabetes High Blood Pressure My Life Check Heart360® Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  3. Fetal malformations and early embryonic gene expression response in cynomolgus monkeys maternally exposed to thalidomide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was performed to determine experimental conditions for thalidomide induction of fetal malformations and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying thalidomide teratogenicity in cynomolgus monkeys. Cynomolgus monkeys were orally administered (±)-thalidomid...

  4. Ethical language and decision-making for prenatally diagnosed lethal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dominic; de Crespigny, Lachlan; Xafis, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Summary In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethal’ reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic concept of ‘futility’. We recommend avoiding the term ‘lethal’ and suggest that counseling should focus on salient prognostic features instead. For conditions with a high chance of early death or profound impairment in survivors despite treatment, perinatal and neonatal palliative care would be ethical. However, active obstetric and neonatal management, if desired, may also sometimes be appropriate. PMID:25200733

  5. Surgical Treatment for a Complex Congenital Arteriovenous Malformation of the Lower Limb

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Ali Vefa; Boysan, Emre; Isikli, Osman Yasar; Goksin, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula is defined as an abnormal communication between the arterial and venous systems. The complexity of congenital arteriovenous malformations makes treatment challenging. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who had a complex congenital arteriovenous malformation in her left leg and a history of 2 unsuccessful coil-embolization procedures. We ligated all the feeding arteries of the arteriovenous malformation in the region of the superficial femoral artery, and the surgery was successful without sequelae. The patient returned 2 years later with thrombosis of the great saphenous vein and underwent a second operation. The thrombosed vein and all varicosities were excised successfully. Surgery can be an effective method for correcting complex congenital arteriovenous malformations, especially in the lower limbs. A 2-staged surgical approach like ours might be a good option in suitable patients. PMID:24391339

  6. Constitutively active Notch4 receptor elicits brain arteriovenous malformations through enlargement of capillary-like vessels

    E-print Network

    Kim, Tyson N.

    Arteriovenous (AV) malformation (AVM) is a devastating condition characterized by focal lesions of enlarged, tangled vessels that shunt blood from arteries directly to veins. AVMs can form anywhere in the body and can cause ...

  7. Atlas Assimilation Patterns in Different Types of Adult Craniocervical Junction Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This is a cross-sectional analysis of resonance magnetic images of 111 patients with craniocervical malformations and those of normal subjects. Objective. To test the hypothesis that atlas assimilation is associated with basilar invagination (BI) and atlas's anterior arch assimilation is associated with craniocervical instability and type I BI. Summary of Background Data. Atlas assimilation is the most common malformation in the craniocervical junction. This condition has been associated with craniocervical instability and BI in isolated cases. Methods. We evaluated midline Magnetic Resonance Images (MRIs) (and/or CT scans) from patients with craniocervical junction malformation and normal subjects. The patients were separated into 3 groups: Chiari type I malformation, BI type I, and type II. The atlas assimilations were classified according to their embryological origins as follows: posterior, anterior, and both arches assimilation. Results. We studied the craniometric values of 111 subjects, 78 with craniocervical junction malformation and 33 without malformations. Of the 78 malformations, 51 patients had Chiari type I and 27 had BI, of whom 10 presented with type I and 17 with type II BI. In the Chiari group, 41 showed no assimilation of the atlas. In the type I BI group, all patients presented with anterior arch assimilation, either in isolation or associated with assimilation of the posterior arch. 63% of the patients with type II BI presented with posterior arch assimilation, either in isolation or associated with anterior arch assimilation. In the control group, no patients had atlas assimilation. Conclusion. Anterior atlas assimilation leads to type I BI. Posterior atlas assimilation more frequently leads to type II BI. Separation in terms of anterior versus posterior atlas assimilation reflects a more accurate understanding of the clinical and embryological differences in craniocervical junction malformations. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID:26165213

  8. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca2+ transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca2+ transients, with a further Ca2+ transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca2+ signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca2+ signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. PMID:25907787

  9. Multispectral assessment of skin malformations using a modified video-microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Diebele, I.; Rubins, U.; Zaharans, J.; Derjabo, A.; Spigulis, J.

    2012-10-01

    A simplified method is proposed for alternative clinical diagnostics of skin malformations. A modified digital microscope, additionally equipped with a fourcolour LED (450 nm, 545 nm, 660 nm and 940 nm) subsequent illumination system, was applied for assessment of skin cancerous lesions and cutaneous inflammations. Multispectral image analysis was performed to map distributions of skin erythema index, bilirubin index, melanoma/nevus differentiation parameter, and fluorescence indicator. The skin malformation monitoring has shown that it is possible to differentiate melanoma from other pathologies.

  10. [Shunting operations in the hypertensive hydrocephalic syndrome in children with developmental defects of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Sufianov, A A; Komarevski?, A V; Belik, A A; Noskov, A P; Chimytova, E A; Seliverstov, P V

    1999-01-01

    By analyzing the outcomes of surgical treatment of 105 children with hypertensive syndrome of various genesis, the authors present their data on the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of children with malformations of the central nervous system (CNS). The paper defines the present feasibilities of neurosonography, magnetic resonance imaging, neuroendoscopic verification of CNS malformations and their place in determining the policy and choice of a surgical treatment. The rationale for and the efficiency of cerebrospinal fluid corrective operations in children with these abnormalities are defined. Less good prognosis and a higher risk of surgery for hydrocephalic complications have been revealed and statistically evidenced. PMID:10335569

  11. Severe malformations of eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) fry are induced by maternal estrogenic exposure during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morthorst, Jane E; Korsgaard, Bodil; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2016-02-01

    Pregnant eelpout were exposed via the water to known endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) to clarify if EDCs could be causing the increased eelpout fry malformation frequencies observed in coastal areas receiving high anthropogenic input. The presence of a teratogenic window for estrogen-induced malformations was also investigated by starting the exposure at different times during eelpout pregnancy. Both 17?-ethinylestradiol (EE2) (17.8 ng/L) and pyrene (0.5 ?g/L) significantly increased fry malformation frequency whereas 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) up to 14.3 ?g/L did not. Vitellogenin was significantly induced by EE2 (5.7 and 17.8 ng/L) but not by 4-t-OP and pyrene. A critical period for estrogen-induced fry malformations was identified and closed between 14 and 22 days post fertilization (dpf). Exposure to 17?-estradiol (E2) between 0 and 14 dpf caused severe malformations and severity increased the closer exposure start was to fertilization, whereas malformations were absent by exposure starting later than 14 dpf. Data on ovarian fluid volume and larval length supported the suggested teratogenic window. Larval mortality also increased when exposure started right after fertilization. PMID:26613261

  12. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-01-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  13. [Congenital malformations among offspring of the liquidators of the consequences from Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Liaginskaia, A M; Tukov, A R; Osipov, V A; Ermalitski?, A P; Prokhorova, O N

    2009-01-01

    The frequency and the structure of congenital malformations at children of the liquidators of the consequences from Chernobyl accident, undergone to an external scale gamma-irradiation in dozes up to 25 cGy. In total is surveyed 2379 newborn at which is revealed 318 intrauterine development defects. The received results are compared to the earlier published data on birth of congenital malformations in families of the fathers who have undergone to an irradiation in connection with professional activity at the enterprises of a nuclear industry, with emergency irradiation, with irradiation as a result of explosions of nuclear bombs in Japan, and are discussed from positions of the basic rules (situations) of radiating genetics. Total frequency, the frequency of forms 21 of inherent defects of development, taken into account in the International register of congenital malformations and frequency 9 forms heaviest of congenital intrauterine development defects with the high contribution mutation components at children of the liquidators authentically is higher than on the average on Russian Federation. The dependence of the frequency congenital malformations at children from dozes of an irradiation of the fathers--liquidators is revealed. The curve of dependence of the frequency of congenital malformations from time, past after work up to copulation carries arched character with peak of rise of frequency of congenital malformations in 2-3 years and decrease in 6-7 years. PMID:20143582

  14. Is preeclampsia associated with fetal malformation? A review and report of original research

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David B.; Chalak, Lina F.; McIntire, Donald D.; Leveno, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine fetal malformations in mother–infant pairs with and without pregnancy-related hypertension. Methods This was an observational, population-based study of women delivering a singleton at our hospital. Specific fetal malformations identified in women with gestational hypertension or preeclampsia were compared to those without pregnancy-related hypertension. Women with chronic hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia on chronic hypertension and pregestational diabetes were excluded. Results Between March 2002 and December 2012, a total of 151 997 women delivered, and 10 492 (7%) had preeclampsia, 4282 (3%) had gestational hypertension and 137 223 (90%) were referent normotensive controls. Women with preeclampsia were significantly more likely to deliver infants with malformations when compared to normotensive controls (2.5% versus 1.6%, p < 0.001), whereas women with gestational hypertension were not (1.9% versus 1.6%, p = 0.16). The overall risk for fetal malformation associated with preeclampsia remained significant following logistic regression for age, race, parity and maternal body-habitus (adjusted OR 1.5; 95% CI: 1.3–1.7). Only single-organ system malformations – microcephaly and hypospadias – remained associated with preeclampsia (p < 0.001), and fetal growth restriction was a co-factor for both. Conclusions Preeclampsia was associated with increased rates of fetal malformations when compared to normotensive women – specifically microcephaly and hypospadias. These associations appear predominantly as a consequence of impaired fetal growth. PMID:25354285

  15. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyung Min; Lee, Seok Jong; Lee, Jong Min; Huh, Seung; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Yang, Jung Dug; Cho, Byung Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center. Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered. Results The sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47%) males and 10 (53%) females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years). Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients. Conclusions KTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management. PMID:26430625

  16. Reiter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joseph M; Matthews, Jeanette H; Graham, Bradley S

    2003-03-01

    Reiter's syndrome is a multisystem disease commonly triggered by a genitourinary infection or bacterial enteric infection. After a short latent period, ocular symptoms, oligoarthritis, and mucocutaneous involvement may occur. Classic cutaneous manifestations of Reiter's syndrome include keratoderma blennorrhagicum and balanitis circinata, both of which are microscopically similar to pustular psoriasis. PMID:12661746

  17. Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations. PMID:26259326

  18. Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is caused by mutations in FREM1

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Baranzini, Sergio E; Schanze, Denny; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Short, Kieran M; Chao, Ryan; Yahyavi, Mani; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Chu, Catherine; Musone, Stacey; Wheatley, Ashleigh; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Marles, Sandra; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Maga, A Murat; Hassan, Mohamed G; Gould, Douglas B; Madireddy, Lohith; Li, Chumei; Cox, Timothy C; Smyth, Ian; Chudley, Albert E; Zenker, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is a rare condition defined by eyelid colobomas, cryptophthalmos and anophthalmia/ microphthalmia, an aberrant hairline, a bifid or broad nasal tip, and gastrointestinal anomalies such as omphalocele and anal stenosis. Autosomal recessive inheritance had been assumed because of consanguinity in the Oji-Cre population of Manitoba and reports of affected siblings, but no locus or cytogenetic aberration had previously been described. Methods and results This study shows that MOTA syndrome is caused by mutations in FREM1, a gene previously mutated in bifid nose, renal agenesis, and anorectal malformations (BNAR) syndrome. MOTA syndrome and BNAR syndrome can therefore be considered as part of a phenotypic spectrum that is similar to, but distinct from and less severe than, Fraser syndrome. Re-examination of Frem1bat/bat mutant mice found new evidence that Frem1 is involved in anal and craniofacial development, with anal prolapse, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, a shortened snout and reduced philtral height present in the mutant mice, similar to the human phenotype in MOTA syndrome. Conclusions The milder phenotypes associated with FREM1 deficiency in humans (MOTA syndrome and BNAR syndrome) compared to that resulting from FRAS1 and FREM2 loss of function (Fraser syndrome) are also consistent with the less severe phenotypes resulting from Frem1 loss of function in mice. Together, Fraser, BNAR and MOTA syndromes constitute a clinically overlapping group of FRAS–FREM complex diseases. PMID:21507892

  19. Surgical management of dural arteriovenous malformations of the cranium.

    PubMed

    Michael, K M; Drummond, K J; Sorby, W; Grinnell, V

    1998-07-01

    Ten patients undergoing surgical treatment of dural arteriovenous malformations of the cranium between June 1992 and June 1995 are presented. Indications for surgery were prevention of intracranial haemorrhage in eight cases and palliation of neurological deficits in two cases. The aim of surgery was attempted complete cure when considered technically feasible. Six patients underwent aggressive surgical resection in an ablation attempt and four underwent leptomeningeal venous disconnection only. In those undergoing aggressive surgical resection, one patient died, one was rendered disabled and angiographic cure was achieved in four without mishap. In those undergoing leptomeningeal venous disconnection, there was no mortality or morbidity but angiographic cure was achieved in only one of four patients. As a result of our experience our policy has changed. When the indications for surgery are to palliate leptomeningeal venous hypertension or as prophylaxis against future haemorrhage, interruption of the involved leptomeningeal venous drainage in the subarachnoid space without attempted cure is now the sole aim of surgery. The surgical technique employed should be based on the pathophysiological disturbance requiring correction rather than the resectability of the lesion. PMID:18639039

  20. Decompressive craniectomy for arteriovenous malformation-related intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-03-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM)-related intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the cause of approximately 2-3% of ICH and is an important factor in the significant morbidity and mortality in patients with AVM. Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical procedure to relieve malignant elevation of intracranial pressure. The use of DC to treat patients with AVM-ICH has been much less common. The present study describes our experience with DC for AVM-ICH and discusses the safety of this procedure. The present retrospective analysis compared 12 consecutive patients treated with DC for AVM-ICH with 23 patients treated with DC for hypertensive ICH. Nine patients were male and three were female, aged from 11 to 53 years (mean, 31.7 years). Hematoma volumes ranged from 50 to 106 ml (mean, 75.8 ml). The outcomes were good recovery in one patient, moderate disability in three, severe disability in seven, and vegetative state in one. Complications after DC included subdural hygroma in four patients, hydrocephalus in one, intracranial infection in two, and intracranial hemorrhage in one. No significant difference was found in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. In conclusion, the present study found no significant difference in the incidence of complications between DC for large AVM-ICH and DC for hypertensive ICH. Further investigations including a prospective randomized trial are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of DC for the treatment of large AVM-ICH. PMID:25564272

  1. Endovascular Embolization of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations with Eudragit-E

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Goichiro; KATO, Noriyuki; YAMAZAKI, Tomosato; AKUTSU, Yoshimitsu; HOSOO, Hisayuki; KASUYA, Hiromichi; SONOBE, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Eudragit-E was originally developed as a non-adhesive liquid embolic material in the late 1990s and is a copolymer of methyl and butyl methacrylate and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate that is dissolved in ethanol and iopamidol. This material has been used for endovascular embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for some time but is currently not widely used. Because safety and feasibility of Eudragit-E has not been well documented, we here report our experience using this material for treating 22 human brain AVMs. From June 1998 to February 2014, 30 endovascular procedures using Eudragit-E were performed to treat 22 patients, including 14 men and 8 women with a mean age of 41.1 years (15–70 years). The mean follow-up period was 56 months (12–129 months), and the Spetzler-Martin grades were I (4 patients), II (9 patients), III (5 patients), and IV (4 patients). Residual AVMs were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery. The rate of complete obliteration with embolization alone was 27.3%. The overall obliteration rate after endovascular embolization with/without subsequent stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery was 72.7%. Eudragit-E caused two cases of cerebral infarction. One case of intracerebral hemorrhage due to postoperative hemodynamic changes also occurred. The rate of complications directly related to embolization was 10.0%. The safety and effectiveness of Eudragit-E embolization were satisfactory. PMID:25739432

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Perrini, Paolo; Miccoli, Mario; Baggiani, Angelo; Nardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims. To evaluate optic nerve head with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with Chiari I malformation (CMI) compared to healthy controls. Methods. Cross-sectional study. OCT of the optic nerve head of 22 patients with CMI and 22 healthy controls was quantitatively analyzed. The healthy controls were matched for age and sex with the study population. Mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was calculated for both eyes; the mean thickness value was also registered for each quadrant and for each subfield of the four quadrants. Results. CMI patients showed a reduction of the RNFL thickness in both eyes. This reduction was more statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the inferior quadrant in the right eye and in each quadrant than nasal one in the left eye. Conclusion. A distress of the retinal nerve fibers could explain the observed reduction of the RNFL thickness in patients with CMI; in our series the reduction of the RNFL thickness seems lower when CMI is associated with syringomyelia. PMID:25815335

  3. Neocortical malformation as consequence of nonadaptive regulation of neuronogenetic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caviness, V. S. Jr; Takahashi, T.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    Variations in the structure of the neocortex induced by single gene mutations may be extreme or subtle. They differ from variations in neocortical structure encountered across and within species in that these "normal" structural variations are adaptive (both structurally and behaviorally), whereas those associated with disorders of development are not. Here we propose that they also differ in principle in that they represent disruptions of molecular mechanisms that are not normally regulatory to variations in the histogenetic sequence. We propose an algorithm for the operation of the neuronogenetic sequence in relation to the overall neocortical histogenetic sequence and highlight the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle as the master regulatory control point for normal coordinate structural variation across species and importantly within species. From considerations based on the anatomic evidence from neocortical malformation in humans, we illustrate in principle how this overall sequence appears to be disrupted by molecular biological linkages operating principally outside the control mechanisms responsible for the normal structural variation of the neocortex. MRDD Research Reviews 6:22-33, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. ADVANCED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Zhao, Jin-cheng; Shi, Changbin; Akers, Amy; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Awad, Issam A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the appearance of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in murine Ccm1 and Ccm2 gene knockout models, and to develop a technique of lesion localization for correlative pathobiologic studies Methods Brains from eighteen CCM mutant mice (Ccm1+/-Trp53-/- and Ccm2+/-Trp53-/-) and 28 controls were imaged by gradient recalled echo (T2*)-weighted MR at 4.7 T and 14.1 T in vivo and/or ex vivo. After MR imaging, the brains were removed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and cells were laser microdissected for molecular biologic studies. Results T2*-weighted MR imaging of brains in vivo and ex vivo revealed lesions similar to human CCMs in mutant mice, but not in control animals. Stereotactic localization and hematoxylin and eosin-staining of correlative tissue sections confirmed lesion histology, and revealed other areas of dilated capillaries in the same brains. Some lesions were identified by MR imaging at 14.1 T, but not at 4.7 T. PCR amplification from Ccm1 and ?-actin genes was demonstrated from nucleic acids extracted from laser microdissected lesional and perilesional cells. Conclusions The high field MR imaging techniques offer new opportunities for further investigation of disease pathogenesis in vivo, and the localization, staging and histobiologic dissection of lesions, including the presumed earliest stages of CCM lesion development. PMID:18981891

  5. Gastric foregut cystic developmental malformation: Case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yan-Hua; Wang, Chang-Xing; Li, Jiang-Tao; Chen, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Pan, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Foregut cystic developmental malformation (FCDM) is a very rare lesion of the alimentary tract, especially in the stomach. We discuss the concepts of gastric duplication cyst, bronchogenic cysts, and FCDM. Nomenclature has been inconsistent and confusing, but, by some definitions, gastric duplication cysts involve gastric mucosa and submucosal glands, bronchogenic cysts involve respiratory mucosa with underlying cartilage and glands, and FCDM lacks gastric mucosa or underlying glands or cartilage but has pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium (PCCE). We searched our departmental case files from the past 15 years and identified 12 cases of FCDM in the alimentary tract. We summarize the features of these 12 cases including a report in detail on a 52-year-old man with a submucosal cyst lined with simple PCCE and irregular and stratified circular muscle layers that merged with gastric smooth muscle bundles near the lesser curvature of the gastric cardia. A literature review of cases with this histology yielded 25 cases. We propose the term gastric-FCDM for such cases. Our own series of 12 cases confirms that preoperative recognition of the entity is infrequent and problematic. The rarity of this developmental disorder, as well as a lack of understanding of its embryologic origins, may contribute to missing the diagnosis. Not appreciating the diagnosis preoperatively can lead to an inappropriate surgical approach. In contrast, presurgical recognition of the entity will contribute to a good outcome and reduced risk of complications. PMID:25593458

  6. Cortical plasticity in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Liu, Kenneth C; Crowley, R Webster

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this review is to ascertain the evidence for cortical plasticity in arteriovenous malformation (AVM) patients. Chronic hypoperfusion due to vascular steal from cerebral AVM can result in a translocation of eloquent neurological functions to other brain areas, a phenomenon known as cortical plasticity. We performed a systematic literature review of the studies that have evaluated cortical plasticity in AVM patients. A total of 22 studies from 1996 to 2014 were included for the analyses. The evaluation of cortical plasticity was performed prior to AVM intervention in 109 patients, and during or after AVM intervention in 18. The most commonly assessed neurological functions were motor in 85% and language in 11% of the former cohort, and motor in 78% and language, cognition, and memory each in 39% of the latter cohort. Functional MRI was the most frequently used method for evaluating cortical plasticity, and was performed in 63% of the former and 56% of the latter cohort. In conclusion, cortical plasticity appears to be influenced by both AVM pathogenesis and intervention. Given the limited evidence that is currently available for cortical plasticity in AVM patients, further studies are warranted to determine its incidence and impact on long term clinical outcomes. PMID:26256067

  7. Phenotypic Delineation of Emanuel Syndrome (Supernumerary Derivative 22 syndrome): Clinical features of 63 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melissa T; Pierre, Stephanie A St.; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Boycott, Kym M

    2009-01-01

    Emanuel syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and developmental disability. It is caused by the presence of a supernumerary derivative chromosome that contains material from chromosomes 11 and 22. The origin of this imbalance is 3:1 malsegregation of a parental balanced translocation between chromosomes 11 and 22, which is the most common recurrent reciprocal translocation in humans. Little has been published on the clinical features of this syndrome since the 1980s and information on natural history is limited. We designed a questionnaire to collect information from families recruited through an international online support group, Chromosome 22 Central. Data gathered include information on congenital anomalies, medical and surgical history, developmental and behavioural issues, and current abilities. We received information on 63 individuals with Emanuel syndrome, ranging in age from newborn to adulthood. As previously recognized, congenital anomalies were common, the most frequent being ear pits (76%), micrognathia (60%), heart malformations (57%), and cleft palate (54%). Our data suggest that vision and hearing impairment, seizures, failure to thrive and recurrent infections, particularly otitis media, are common in this syndrome. Psychomotor development is uniformly delayed, however the majority of individuals (over 70%) eventually learn to walk with support. Language development and ability for self-care are also very impaired. This study provides new information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of Emanuel syndrome for families and physicians caring for these individuals. PMID:19606488

  8. Relationship between Rust Mites, Calepitrimerus vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae), Bud Mites Colomeris vitis (Acari: Eriophyidae) and Short Shoot Syndrome in Oregon Vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The short shoot syndrome (SSS) causes severe crop losses in Oregon vineyards due to bunch necrosis during the early part of the season. Other symptoms include malformed leaves, unusually short and angled shoots, scar tissue and bronzed leaves close to harvest time. It was determined that SSS found...

  9. Isolated facial hemihyperplasia: manifestation of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sathienkijkanchai, Achara; Prucka, Sandra K; Grant, John H; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2008-01-01

    Facial asymmetry is a common finding in infants and can be the result of a number of distinctive conditions such as hemifacial microsomia, overgrowth syndromes, a soft tissue tumor, and a vascular malformation. However, overgrowth syndromes such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) typically manifest more extensive involvement; it rarely presents as isolated facial overgrowth.Here, we present a 7-year-old boy who presented with facial asymmetry. He was found to have isolated facial hemihyperplasia, involving his right cheek and teeth. No abnormalities were seen in the rest of his examination. The diagnosis of BWS was considered and was confirmed by detection of a methylation abnormality in H19 (DMR1). This case demonstrates that BWS should be considered, even with isolated facial involvement. This is important, as affected patients are predisposed to certain malignancies, especially in the first 5 to 8 years of life. Therefore, specialized surveillance is recommended as the part of management. PMID:18216702

  10. Novel variant syndrome associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Yusuf; Yonem, Ozlem; Varl?, Kubilay; Taylan, Hande; Shorbagi, Ali; Sokmensuer, Cenk

    2015-10-16

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is part of many different malformation syndromes, of which oculo-encephalo-hepato-renal syndrome is the most common. These syndromes largely overlap, and so accurate classification of individual patients may be difficult. We present herein three syndromic siblings who were products of a consanguineous marriage. We investigated in detail at least six organ systems in these patients, namely the liver, brain, eye, kidneys, skeleton, and gonads. The common features observed in these three cases were congenital hepatic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, truncal obesity, rotatory nystagmus, mental retardation, advanced myopia, and high-arched palate. The clinical dysmorphology in these patients was distinct and lacked the major features of the known syndromes associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis. Although some features of these presented cases are similar to those found in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), the absence of some major criteria of BBS (polydactyly, renal abnormality, and hypogonadism) suggests that this may be a new syndrome. All three patients remain under follow-up in the departments of Gastroenterology, Ophthalmology, and Neurology at Hacettepe University. PMID:26488028

  11. Mutations in KCTD1 Cause Scalp-Ear-Nipple Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marneros, Alexander G.; Beck, Anita E.; Turner, Emily H.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Edwards, Matthew J.; Field, Michael; de Macena Sobreira, Nara Lygia; Perez, Ana Beatriz A.; Fortes, Jose A.R.; Lampe, Anne K.; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Gordon, Christopher T.; Plessis, Ghislaine; Le Merrer, Martine; Amiel, Jeanne; Reichenberger, Ernst; Shively, Kathryn M.; Cerrato, Felecia; Labow, Brian I.; Tabor, Holly K.; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Scalp-ear-nipple (SEN) syndrome is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by cutis aplasia of the scalp; minor anomalies of the external ears, digits, and nails; and malformations of the breast. We used linkage analysis and exome sequencing of a multiplex family affected by SEN syndrome to identify potassium-channel tetramerization-domain-containing 1 (KCTD1) mutations that cause SEN syndrome. Evaluation of a total of ten families affected by SEN syndrome revealed KCTD1 missense mutations in each family tested. All of the mutations occurred in a KCTD1 region encoding a highly conserved bric-a-brac, tram track, and broad complex (BTB) domain that is required for transcriptional repressor activity. KCTD1 inhibits the transactivation of the transcription factor AP-2? (TFAP2A) via its BTB domain, and mutations in TFAP2A cause cutis aplasia in individuals with branchiooculofacial syndrome (BOFS), suggesting a potential overlap in the pathogenesis of SEN syndrome and BOFS. The identification of KCTD1 mutations in SEN syndrome reveals a role for this BTB-domain-containing transcriptional repressor during ectodermal development. PMID:23541344

  12. [Multiple bladder diverticula caused by occipital horn syndrome].

    PubMed

    Legros, L; Revencu, N; Nassogne, M-C; Wese, F-X; Feyaerts, A

    2015-11-01

    We report on the case of a child who presented with recurrent, multiple, and voluminous bladder diverticula. Bladder diverticula are defined as a herniation of the mucosa through the bladder muscle or the detrusor. Causes are numerous and diverticula can be classified into primary congenital diverticula (para-ureteral - or Hutch diverticula - and posterolateral diverticula); secondary diverticula (resulting from chronic mechanical obstruction or from neurological disease; and diverticula secondary to connective tissue or muscle fragility. The latter is seen in disease entities such as prune belly syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cutis laxa syndrome, OHS (occipital horn syndrome), Menkes disease, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. In this patient, the cause of these diverticula was OHS, a genetic, recessive X-chromosome-linked syndrome, responsible for abnormal tissue caused by a disorder in copper metabolism. This case reminds us of the importance of pushing the diagnostic workup when presented with multiple and/or large bladder diverticula, and in particular to search for rare malformation syndromes after exclusion of an obstacle. PMID:26386812

  13. Novel variant syndrome associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Yusuf; Yonem, Ozlem; Varl?, Kubilay; Taylan, Hande; Shorbagi, Ali; Sokmensuer, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis is part of many different malformation syndromes, of which oculo-encephalo-hepato-renal syndrome is the most common. These syndromes largely overlap, and so accurate classification of individual patients may be difficult. We present herein three syndromic siblings who were products of a consanguineous marriage. We investigated in detail at least six organ systems in these patients, namely the liver, brain, eye, kidneys, skeleton, and gonads. The common features observed in these three cases were congenital hepatic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, truncal obesity, rotatory nystagmus, mental retardation, advanced myopia, and high-arched palate. The clinical dysmorphology in these patients was distinct and lacked the major features of the known syndromes associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis. Although some features of these presented cases are similar to those found in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), the absence of some major criteria of BBS (polydactyly, renal abnormality, and hypogonadism) suggests that this may be a new syndrome. All three patients remain under follow-up in the departments of Gastroenterology, Ophthalmology, and Neurology at Hacettepe University. PMID:26488028

  14. Rat Model of Parkes Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Janusz, Gabriela; Grabowska, Iwona; Zegrocka-Stendel, Oliwia; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Maciejko, Dorota; Koziak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The Parkes Weber syndrome is a congenital vascular malformation, characterized by varicose veins, arterio-venous fistulas and overgrown limbs. No broadly accepted animal model of Parkes Weber syndrome has been described. We created side-to-side arterio-venous fistula between common femoral vessels with proximal non-absorbable ligature on common femoral vein limiting the enlargement of the vein diameter in Wistar rats. Contralateral limb was sham operated. Invasive blood pressure measurements in both iliac and inferior cava veins were performed in rats 30 days after fistula creation. Tight circumference and femoral bone length were measured. Histopathology and morphology of soleus muscle, extensor digitorum longus muscle, and the common femoral vessel were analyzed. 30 days following arterio-venous fistula creation, a statistically significant elevation of blood pressure in common iliac vein and limb overgrowth was observed. Limb enlargement was caused by muscle overgrowth, varicose veins formation and bone elongation. Arterio-venous fistula with proximal outflow limitation led to significant increase of femoral vein circumference and venous wall thickness. Our study indicates that the described rat model mimics major clinical features characteristic for the human Parkes Weber syndrome: presence of arterio-venous fistula, venous hypertension and dilatation, varicose veins formation, and the limb hypertrophy. We reveal that limb overgrowth is caused by bone elongation, muscle hypertrophy, and venous dilatation. The newly established model will permit detailed studies on the mechanisms underlying the disease and on the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for the Parkes Weber syndrome treatment. PMID:26217941

  15. Rat Model of Parkes Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Janusz, Gabriela; Grabowska, Iwona; Zegrocka-Stendel, Oliwia; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Kowalewska, Magdalena; Maciejko, Dorota; Koziak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The Parkes Weber syndrome is a congenital vascular malformation, characterized by varicose veins, arterio-venous fistulas and overgrown limbs. No broadly accepted animal model of Parkes Weber syndrome has been described. We created side-to-side arterio-venous fistula between common femoral vessels with proximal non-absorbable ligature on common femoral vein limiting the enlargement of the vein diameter in Wistar rats. Contralateral limb was sham operated. Invasive blood pressure measurements in both iliac and inferior cava veins were performed in rats 30 days after fistula creation. Tight circumference and femoral bone length were measured. Histopathology and morphology of soleus muscle, extensor digitorum longus muscle, and the common femoral vessel were analyzed. 30 days following arterio-venous fistula creation, a statistically significant elevation of blood pressure in common iliac vein and limb overgrowth was observed. Limb enlargement was caused by muscle overgrowth, varicose veins formation and bone elongation. Arterio-venous fistula with proximal outflow limitation led to significant increase of femoral vein circumference and venous wall thickness. Our study indicates that the described rat model mimics major clinical features characteristic for the human Parkes Weber syndrome: presence of arterio-venous fistula, venous hypertension and dilatation, varicose veins formation, and the limb hypertrophy. We reveal that limb overgrowth is caused by bone elongation, muscle hypertrophy, and venous dilatation. The newly established model will permit detailed studies on the mechanisms underlying the disease and on the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies for the Parkes Weber syndrome treatment. PMID:26217941

  16. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in an Indian child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jagadishchandra, H.; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Chatra, Laxmikanth

    2011-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is a rare congenital genetic disorder having autosomal recessive inheritance. It is a syndrome affecting the Amish population of Pennsylvania in USA with prevalence rate of 1/5,000 live at birth. In non-Amish population, the birth prevalence is 7/1,000,000. The syndrome is characterized by bilateral postaxial polydactyly of the hands, chondrodysplasia of long bones resulting in acromesomelic dwarfism, ectodermal dysplasia affecting nails as well as teeth and congenital heart malformation. There were very rare reports of this syndrome in dentistry. The present case focuses on the striking and constant oral findings of these patients, which are the main diagnostic features of this syndrome. Since the oral manifestations affect the esthetic, speech, and jaw growth of the child, the dentists have an important role to play in proper management of such case. PMID:22232726

  17. Acquired retinal pigmentary degeneration in a child with 13q deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Zenia P; Belin, Peter J; Cavuoto, Kara M; Jayakar, Parul; McKeown, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Orbeli syndrome, or 13q deletion syndrome, is a rare condition caused by a distal deletion in the long arm of chromosome 13. The syndrome is characterized by severe physical malformations and developmental delays and has been associated with numerous ocular manifestations. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with 13q deletion syndrome, who was evaluated for impaired vision and found to have bilateral retinal pigmentary changes resembling those seen in retinitis pigmentosa. There has only been one other case of retinal pigment variation in association with 13q deletion syndrome; however, this represents the first case of bilateral symmetric retinal pigmentary changes with corresponding rod and cone dysfunction on electroretinography. PMID:26486039

  18. A Rare Cause of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension Resistant to Therapy in The Newborn: Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Nihat; Peker, Erdal; Ece, ?brahim; Kaba, Sultan; A?engin, Kemal; Tuncer, O?uz

    2015-01-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndrome is an autosomal recessively inherited lethal skeletal dysplasia. The syndrome is characterized by marked narrow fetal thorax, short extremities, micromelia, cleft palate/lip, polydactyly, cardiac and renal abnormalities, and genital malformations. In cases with pulmonary hypoplasia, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn can develop. In this paper, we present a term newborn with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, which has developed secondary to short-rib polydactyly syndrome and was resistant to therapy with inhaled nitric oxide and oral sildenafil. PMID:26078906

  19. Syndrome designations.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, M M

    1976-01-01

    Because syndrome designations permit the collection of data, they are much more than just lables. As new syndromes become delineated, their names connote (1) their phenotypic spectra, (2) their natural histories, and (3) their modes of inheritance or risk of recurrence. Various methods for designating new syndromes are reviewed, including naming them after (1) the basic defect, (2) an eponym, (3) one or more striking features, (4) an acronym, (5) a numeral, (6) a geographic term, and (7) some combination of the above. None of these systems of nomenclature is without fault. The advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. PMID:957375

  20. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and present in the general population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9497944

  1. Proteus syndrome: a case report and a case study review in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Bao; Li, Chang-Xing; He, Yu-Qing; Zhang, San-Quan; Cai, Yan-Xia

    2010-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is a rare and sporadic disorder characterized by overgrowth of multiple tissues and a propensity to develop particular neoplasms. The clinical manifestations of PS include macrodactyly, vertebral abnormalities, asymmetric limb overgrowth and length discrepancy, hyperostosis, abnormal and asymmetric fat distribution, asymmetric muscle development, connective tissue nevi, and vascular malformations. We report a 16-year old female patient who manifested a number of these complications and review the Chinese literature about the diagnosis, natural history, and management of PS. PMID:25386239

  2. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Wyszynski, D.F.; Lewanda, A.F.; Beaty, T.H.

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Split cord malformations: A two years experience at AIIMS

    PubMed Central

    Borkar, Sachin A.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over a 2-year period, 2008-2009, a total of 53 cases of split cord malformation (SCM) were treated at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS). This study is a retrospective analysis of clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: During this period, 53 cases of SCM were treated at AIIMS. They constitute around 27% of all spinal dysraphism surgeries performed at the department of Neurosurgery, AIIMS; as 200 cases of spinal dysraphism were operated during the study period. The data was obtained from case files, operation notes, discharge summaries, and follow-up files. Observations: There were 30 cases of SCM type I and 23 cases of type II SCM. Seven patients were adult above 18 years of age. Except 7 patients, remaining 46 were symptomatic. Bony deformity of spine was recorded in 24 patients; of them, 19 had scoliosis and 4 had kyphosis. Deformity of foot was recorded in 10 patients. Thirteen patients had hypertrichosis, while four had dermal sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in all patients. MRI revealed syringomyelia in 14 patients; however, only one patient had associated Chiari malformation. Six patients had meningomyelocele. Intra-operative; thick filum was noticed in 10 cases and in another 9 cases, there was filum lipoma. Dermoid was encountered in 4 patients, one patient had epidermoid tumor. Site of split was thoracic in 22, followed by lumbar region in 21 patients. Only 3 patients had split in cervical spinal cord. Seven patients had two separate splits at two different levels. Two patients had posteriorly located bony spur. All patients underwent surgery. Seven patients, those who had no neurological deficits pre-op, remained unchanged post-op. Amongst the 46 patients who had preoperative neurological deficits, eight had neurological deterioration post-op; five had deterioration in motor power and three had urinary problem. Five of these patients had type Id split, 2 had type Ic split, and one had type Ib split. However, among 8 patients who deteriorated post-op, four improved to preoperative status by the time of discharge. Thus, 4/53(7%) patients had long-term deficits, all with type Id split. Follow-up data was available for 36 patients (68%) and mean follow-up period was 12 months (range 6-24 months). Follow-up MRI revealed decrease in syringomyelic cavity in 6 of the 14 patients (44%) who had syringomyelia on preoperative MRI scans. Conclusion: Overall, SCM is an uncommon condition. In all cases of progressive scoliosis, MRI must be carried out. We subjected all asymptomatic patients to surgery and none developed post-op deterioration. Overall post-op neurological deterioration was noticed in 15% patients, of which 8% had transient post-operative deterioration. The new Type I SCM subclassification system proposed by Mahapatra and Gupta is found to have a significant prognostic value in assessing post-operative neurological deterioration in patients with type I SCM. PMID:22870152

  4. Ophthalmic Alterations in the Sturge-Weber Syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome, and the Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis: An Independent Group of Conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Scavella, Vittorio; Felli, Lorenzo; Cruciani, Filippo; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2015-01-01

    The phakomatoses have been traditionally defined as a group of hereditary diseases with variable expressivity characterized by multisystem tumors with possible malignant transformation. The Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and the phakomatosis pigmentovascularis have the facial port-wine stain in common. Numerous pathophysiogenetic mechanisms have been suggested such as venous dysplasia of the emissary veins in the intracranial circulation, neural crest alterations leading to alterations of autonomic perivascular nerves, mutation of the GNAO gene in the Sturge-Weber syndrome, PIK3CA mutation in malformative/overgrowth syndromes such as the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and the twin-spotting phenomenon in phakomatosis pigmentovascularis. Other features linked to the port-wine stain and typical to all of the three conditions are glaucoma and choroidal alterations. Glaucoma can be due to malformations of the anterior chamber or high episcleral venous pressure and in phakomatosis pigmentovascularis it can also be associated with angle hyperpigmentation. The choroid can be thickened in all diseases. Furthermore, choroidal melanocytosis in the phakomatosis pigmentovascularis can lead to malignant transformation. Although the multiple pathophysiological mechanisms still require clarification, similarities in ophthalmic manifestations make it reasonable to classify these diseases in an independent group. PMID:26451379

  5. Stereological and Morphometric Analysis of MRI Chiari Malformation Type-1

    PubMed Central

    Alkoç, Ozan Alper; Songur, Ahmet; Eser, Olcay; Toktas, Muhsin; Esi, Ertap; Haktanir, Alpay

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to investigate the underlying ethiological factors in chiari malformation (CM) type-I (CMI) via performing volumetric and morphometric length-angle measurements. Methods A total of 66 individuals [33 patients (20-65 years) with CMI and 33 control subjects] were included in this study. In sagittal MR images, tonsillar herniation length and concurrent anomalies were evaluated. Supratentorial, infratentorial, and total intracranial volumes were measured using Cavalieri method. Various cranial distances and angles were used to evaluate the platybasia and posterior cranial fossa (PCF) development. Results Tonsillar herniation length was measured 9.09±3.39 mm below foramen magnum in CM group. Tonsillar herniation/concurrent syringomyelia, concavity/defect of clivus, herniation of bulbus and fourth ventricle, basilar invagination and craniovertebral junction abnormality rates were 30.3, 27, 18, 2, 3, and 3 percent, respectively. Absence of cisterna magna was encountered in 87.9% of the patients. Total, IT and ST volumes and distance between Chamberlain line and tip of dens axis, Klaus index, clivus length, distance between internal occipital protuberance and opisthion were significantly decreased in patient group. Also in patient group, it was found that Welcher basal angle/Boogard angle increased and tentorial slope angle decreased. Conclusion Mean cranial volume and length-angle measurement values significantly decreased and there was a congenital abnormality association in nearly 81.5 percent of the CM cases. As a result, it was concluded that CM ethiology can be attributed to multifactorial causes. Moreover, congenital defects can also give rise to this condition. PMID:26713146

  6. Human gene copy number spectra analysis in congenital heart malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Donna K.; Struble, Craig A.; Tuffnell, Maureen E.; Stamm, Karl D.; Hidestrand, Mats; Harris, Susan E.; Goetsch, Mary A.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Bick, David P.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Pelech, Andrew N.; Tweddell, James S.; Mitchell, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical significance of copy number variants (CNVs) in congenital heart disease (CHD) continues to be a challenge. Although CNVs including genes can confer disease risk, relationships between gene dosage and phenotype are still being defined. Our goal was to perform a quantitative analysis of CNVs involving 100 well-defined CHD risk genes identified through previously published human association studies in subjects with anatomically defined cardiac malformations. A novel analytical approach permitting CNV gene frequency “spectra” to be computed over prespecified regions to determine phenotype-gene dosage relationships was employed. CNVs in subjects with CHD (n = 945), subphenotyped into 40 groups and verified in accordance with the European Paediatric Cardiac Code, were compared with two control groups, a disease-free cohort (n = 2,026) and a population with coronary artery disease (n = 880). Gains (?200 kb) and losses (?100 kb) were determined over 100 CHD risk genes and compared using a Barnard exact test. Six subphenotypes showed significant enrichment (P ? 0.05), including aortic stenosis (valvar), atrioventricular canal (partial), atrioventricular septal defect with tetralogy of Fallot, subaortic stenosis, tetralogy of Fallot, and truncus arteriosus. Furthermore, CNV gene frequency spectra were enriched (P ? 0.05) for losses at: FKBP6, ELN, GTF2IRD1, GATA4, CRKL, TBX1, ATRX, GPC3, BCOR, ZIC3, FLNA and MID1; and gains at: PRKAB2, FMO5, CHD1L, BCL9, ACP6, GJA5, HRAS, GATA6 and RUNX1. Of CHD subjects, 14% had causal chromosomal abnormalities, and 4.3% had likely causal (significantly enriched), large, rare CNVs. CNV frequency spectra combined with precision phenotyping may lead to increased molecular understanding of etiologic pathways. PMID:22318994

  7. Aberrant Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors in Lymphatic Malformation Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, June K.; Kitajewski, Christopher; Reiley, Maia; Keung, Connie H.; Monteagudo, Julie; Andrews, John P.; Liou, Peter; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Wong, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4), circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2), and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3). Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133? cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133? LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133? LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs. PMID:25719418

  8. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Evaluation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Hart, B. L.; Taheri, S.; Rosenberg, G. A.; Morrison, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22–76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E–6 to 9.63E–4 min?1, mean 3.55E–4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E–4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E–4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  10. Outcome of cerebral arteriovenous malformations after linear accelerator reirradiation

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Paulo L.; Dias, Rodrigo S.; Weltman, Eduardo; Giordani, Adelmo J.; Benabou, Salomon; Segreto, Helena R. C.; Segreto, Roberto A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients undergoing single-dose reirradiation using the Linear Accelerator (LINAC) for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Methods: A retrospective study of 37 patients with brain AVM undergoing LINAC reirradiation between April 2003 and November 2011 was carried out. Patient characteristics, for example, gender, age, use of medications, and comorbidities; disease characteristics, for example, Spetzler–Martin grading system, location, volume, modified Pollock–Flickinger score; and treatment characteristics, for example, embolization, prescription dose, radiation dose–volume curves, and conformity index were analyzed. During the follow-up period, imaging studies were performed to evaluate changes after treatment and AVM cure. Complications, such as edema, rupture of the blood–brain barrier, and radionecrosis were classified as symptomatic and asymptomatic. Results: Twenty-seven patients underwent angiogram after reirradiation and the percentage of angiographic occlusion was 55.5%. In three patients without obliteration, AVM shrinkage made it possible to perform surgical resection with a 2/3 cure rate. A reduction in AVM nidus volume greater than 50% after the first procedure was shown to be the most important predictor of obliteration. Another factor associated with AVM cure was a prescription dose higher than 15.5 Gy in the first radiosurgery. Two patients had permanent neurologic deficits. Factors correlated with complications were the prescription dose and maximum dose in the first procedure. Conclusion: This study suggests that single-dose reirradiation is safe and feasible in partially occluded AVM. Reirradiation may not benefit candidates whose prescribed dose was lower than 15.5 Gy in the first procedure and initial AVM nidus volume did not decrease by more than 50% before reirradiation. PMID:26110078

  11. Bone deformities and skeletal malformations in the Roman Imperial Age.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Simona; Catalano, Paola; Pantano, Walter; Caldarini, Carla; Fornaciari, Gino

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes some cases of individuals affected by skeletal deformities resulting in "freak" appearance. The skeletal remains were found during large archaeological excavations in the Roman territory, carried out by the Special Superintendence to the Archeological Heritage of Rome in the last years, dated back to the Imperial Age. The first cases reported are referred to two growth disorders with opposite effects: a case of dwarfism and another of gigantism. The former concerns a young man from the Collatina necropolis with very short and malformed limbs, which allowed a diagnosis of acondroplasic dwarfism, a rare congenital disorder that limits height below 130 cm. The latter case comes from the necropolis of Torre Serpentana in Fidenae, and is instead referred to a young person of very high stature, about 204 cm, suffering from Gigantism, a rare condition which in this case seems to have been linked to a hormonal dysfunction due to a pituitary adenoma. A third case regards a joint disease affecting the vertebral column and causing severe deformities. The skeleton was found in the Collatina necropolis and belongs to an old woman, suffering from ankylosing spondylitis. Finally, the last and very peculiar case is related to an individual recovered in the necropolis of Castel Malnome. The skeletal remains belong to an adult man with a complete fusion of the temporo-mandibular joint, which compromised mastication and caused severe deformation of the maxillofacial complex. These cases are described in detail together with the possible implications that these deformities could have on in the social context. PMID:25702379

  12. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1?. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned. PMID:21541834

  13. Aicardi syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3 and 5 months. The condition causes jerking (infantile spasms), a type of childhood seizure. Aicardi syndrome may ... completely missing Female sex Seizures (typically beginning as infantile spasms) Sores on the retina (retinal lesions) or optic ...

  14. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tourette (pronounced: tuh-RET) syndrome, named for the French doctor Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first ... get the condition. Doctors and researchers are continually learning new information about TS and what might lead ...

  15. Postthrombotic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndrome. Blood . 2009 ; 114 : 4624 –4631. Abstract / FREE Full Text ? Vazquez SR, Freeman A, VanWoerkom RC, Rondina MT. ... CIRCULATIONAHA.109.925651 Extract Free Figures Only Free » Full Text Free PDF Free PPT Slides of All Figures ...

  16. Reye syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Reye syndrome: Confusion Lethargy Loss of consciousness or coma Mental changes Nausea and vomiting Seizures Unusual placement ... breathing machine may be needed during a deep coma) Fluids by IV to provide electrolytes and glucose ...

  17. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  18. Potter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  19. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmenal disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. It is characterized by normal early ... occur, although breathing usually improves during sleep. Some girls also display autistic-like symptoms such as loss ...

  20. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Learning new skills such as lip reading or sign language and getting hearing aids may help. Young men with Alport syndrome should use hearing protection in noisy environments. Genetic counseling may be recommended because the disorder is inherited.

  1. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called retinitis pigmentosa, or RP. RP causes night-blindness and a loss of peripheral vision (side vision) ... to progress rapidly until the person is completely blind. Type 2 Children with type 2 Usher syndrome ...

  2. Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... local hospital or university for seminars or informational classes about neurocutaneous syndromes. Education can help you be ... site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and ...

  3. Serotonin syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndrome will be considered. Tests may include: Blood cultures (to check for infection) Complete blood count (CBC) CT scan of the brain Drug (toxicology) and alcohol screen Electrolyte levels Electrocardiogram (ECG) Kidney and liver ...

  4. Sjogren's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recurrent mouth infections, swollen parotid glands, hoarseness, and difficulty in swallowing and eating. Debilitating fatigue and joint pain can seriously impair quality of life. What research is being done? The goals of research on disorders such as Sjögren's syndrome ...

  5. Bartter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndrome include: High levels of potassium , calcium, and chloride in the urine High levels of the hormones renin and aldosterone in the blood Low blood chloride Metabolic alkalosis These same signs and symptoms can ...

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... de fácil lectura) Other Information Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue, Q&A Order a NIAMS publication to be ... syndrome is a heritable condition that affects the connective tissue. The primary purpose of connective tissue is to ...

  7. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorder in 1896. Marfan syndrome affects the body's connective tissue. Connective tissue is found everywhere in the body. Think of ... a special type of protein that's found in connective tissue. Weakened connective tissue can lead to problems in ...

  8. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. One of these proteins is fibrillin. A problem with the ...

  9. Cushing Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The syndrome is named after a brain surgeon, Harvey Cushing, who identified the condition in 1932. 2 ... Shlomo, M., Polonsky, K.S, Larsen, P.R., eds. Williams. Textbook of Endocrinology. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

  10. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The most common symptoms ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  11. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and guys' bodies begin to make sex hormones, boys with Klinefelter usually don't produce as much ... can affect things like penis and testicle growth. Boys with Klinefelter syndrome may also have problems with ...

  12. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Web version Metabolic Syndrome Overview What is insulin resistance? Your body changes most of the food you ... to insulin. Doctors refer to this condition as insulin resistance. If you have insulin resistance, your body will ...

  13. Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ systems. Patients of Marfan syndrome portray very typical physical and orofacial characteristics, suggesting obvious recognition, but due to variable phenotypic expression, cases often go unnoticed unless a full range of attributing features is apparent. Dental practitioners are very likely to encounter patients of Marfan syndrome at an early age as they frequently present for dental treatment. The present case report illustrates the preliminary screening of Marfan syndrome in a dental office followed by timely diagnosis and appropriate referrals. PMID:24336584

  14. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arthritis , and Sjogren syndrome Breast cancer in men Depression Learning disabilities, including dyslexia, which affects reading A rare type of tumor called an extragonadal germ cell tumor Lung disease Osteoporosis Varicose veins

  15. Fanconi syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... common cause of Fanconi syndrome in children. Other causes in children include: Exposure to heavy metals such as lead, mercury, or cadmium Lowe's disease, a rare genetic disorder of the eyes, brain, and kidneys Wilson's disease ...

  16. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or problems with their heart, stomach or eyes. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ... a baby who has Down syndrome will be. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ...

  17. Prenatal Diagnosis of EEC Syndrome with “Lobster Claw” Anomaly by 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Livia T.; Araujo, Edward; Caetano, Ana C. R.; Nardozza, Luciano M.; Moron, Antonio F.; Martins, Marília G.

    2012-01-01

    The EEC syndrome is a genetic anomaly characterized by the triad: ectodermal dysplasia (development of anomalies of the structures derived from the embryonic ectodermal layer), ectrodactyly (extremities, hands and feet malformations) and cleft lip and/or palate; these malformations can be seen together or in isolation. The prenatal diagnosis can be made by two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS) that identifies the facial and/or limb anomalies, most characteristic being the “lobster-claw” hands. The three-dimensional ultrasonography (3DUS) provides a better analysis of the malformations than the 2DUS. A 25-year-old primigravida, had her first transvaginal ultrasonography that showed an unique fetus with crow-rump length of 47 mm with poorly defined hands and feet,. She was suspected of having sporadic form of EEC syndrome. The 2DUS performed at 19 weeks confirmed the EEC syndrome, showing a fetus with lobster-claw hands (absence of the 2nd and 3rd fingers), left foot with the absence of the 3rd toe and the right foot with syndactyly, and presence of cleft lip/palate. The 3DUS defined the anomalies much better than 2DUS including the lobster-claw hands. PMID:22919554

  18. Prenatal Diagnosis of EEC Syndrome with "Lobster Claw" Anomaly by 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rios, Livia T; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Caetano, Ana C R; Nardozza, Luciano M; Moron, Antonio F; Martins, Marília G

    2012-01-01

    THE EEC SYNDROME IS A GENETIC ANOMALY CHARACTERIZED BY THE TRIAD: ectodermal dysplasia (development of anomalies of the structures derived from the embryonic ectodermal layer), ectrodactyly (extremities, hands and feet malformations) and cleft lip and/or palate; these malformations can be seen together or in isolation. The prenatal diagnosis can be made by two-dimensional ultrasonography (2DUS) that identifies the facial and/or limb anomalies, most characteristic being the "lobster-claw" hands. The three-dimensional ultrasonography (3DUS) provides a better analysis of the malformations than the 2DUS. A 25-year-old primigravida, had her first transvaginal ultrasonography that showed an unique fetus with crow-rump length of 47 mm with poorly defined hands and feet,. She was suspected of having sporadic form of EEC syndrome. The 2DUS performed at 19 weeks confirmed the EEC syndrome, showing a fetus with lobster-claw hands (absence of the 2(nd) and 3(rd) fingers), left foot with the absence of the 3rd toe and the right foot with syndactyly, and presence of cleft lip/palate. The 3DUS defined the anomalies much better than 2DUS including the lobster-claw hands. PMID:22919554

  19. Endoscopic Ho laser interstitial therapy for pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations in adults.

    PubMed

    Xiuwen, Jiang; Jianguo, Tang

    2015-04-01

    Many methods have been used to treat venous malformations, including sclerotherapy, laser therapy, and surgery. Nowadays, endoscopic laser surgery has become a popular therapeutic modality for most of pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations. There are various kinds of lasers that have been applied, but Holmium:YAG laser (Ho laser) has not been reported yet. Ho laser is produced by a kind of iraser which is made of yttrium aluminum garnet mixed with holmium, chromium and thulium. Aim of the current work is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ho laser interstitial therapy in pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations in adults. The clinical data of 42 patients with pharyngolaryngeal venous malformation treated with endoscopic Ho laser interstitial therapy over a 12-year period were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The wave length of Ho laser was 2.1 µm and the diameter of optical fiber was 550 µm. The pulse energy was 0.5 J and the time of duration was 600 µs. The highest output power was 100 W. Outcomes were graded as cure (complete resolution), considerable reduction (>60-80 % reduction), and no obvious change (<50 % reduction). The lesions were well controlled without severe complications. Complete resolution of the lesion was observed in 95.1 % of the patients, while 4.9 % patients showed considerable reduction of the swelling. Complications occurred in 4.8 % of patients. No respiratory troubles or other severe complications occurred. Endoscopic Ho laser interstitial therapy is an effective and safe treatment modality for pharyngolaryngeal venous malformations in adults. PMID:25534288

  20. A fuzzy system for helping medical diagnosis of malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Alayón, Silvia; Robertson, Richard; Warfield, Simon K; Ruiz-Alzola, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Malformations of the cerebral cortex are recognized as a common cause of developmental delay, neurological deficits, mental retardation and epilepsy. Currently, the diagnosis of cerebral cortical malformations is based on a subjective interpretation of neuroimaging characteristics of the cerebral gray matter and underlying white matter. There is no automated system for aiding the observer in making the diagnosis of a cortical malformation. In this paper a fuzzy rule-based system is proposed as a solution for this problem. The system collects the available expert knowledge about cortical malformations and assists the medical observer in arriving at a correct diagnosis. Moreover, the system allows the study of the influence of the various factors that take part in the decision. The evaluation of the system has been carried out by comparing the automated diagnostic algorithm with known case examples of various malformations due to abnormal cortical organization. An exhaustive evaluation of the system by comparison with published cases and a ROC analysis is presented in the paper. PMID:17197247

  1. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Job syndrome; Hyper IgE syndrome ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome, after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was tested by an affliction with draining skin sores and pustules . People with this ...

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Carpal tunnel syndrome is a painful condition caused ...

  3. Post-Polio Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Post-Polio Syndrome ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Post-Polio Syndrome? Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a condition ...

  4. Shaken Baby Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Shaken Baby Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Shaken Baby Syndrome? Is there ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Shaken Baby Syndrome? Shaken baby syndrome is a type of ...

  5. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at the tip Reifenstein syndrome (also known as Gilbert-Dreyfus syndrome or Lubs syndrome) Infertile male syndrome ... F, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al., eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, ...

  6. Facts about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts about Down Syndrome Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... families affected by Down syndrome » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a ...

  7. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Miller Fisher Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Fisher Syndrome Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Miller Fisher ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What is Miller Fisher Syndrome? Miller Fisher syndrome is a rare, acquired ...

  8. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  9. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome. PMID:24860761

  10. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-04-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome. PMID:24860761

  11. Coronary Artery Involvement of Williams Syndrome in Infants and Surgical Revascularization Strategy.

    PubMed

    Federici, Duccio; Ranghetti, Arianna; Merlo, Maurizio; Terzi, Amedeo; Di Dedda, Giovanni Battista; Marcora, Simona; Marrone, Chiara; Ciuffreda, Matteo; Seddio, Francesco; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder due to deficiency of elastin gene expression. It is characterized by typical somatic abnormalities and a wide range of cardiovascular malformations. Coronary artery involvement is a frequent finding of the syndrome, particularly in those patients with severe supravalvular aortic stenosis. We present the case of an 11-month-old infant affected by WS who developed severe coronary artery disease 2 months after the surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis. The clinical picture and successful surgical revascularization strategy is also described. PMID:26694280

  12. Unusual manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome type I in two Yemeni siblings.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Alshami

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a group of genodermatoses characterized by malformations of tissues derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, its appendages (hair, nails, sweat glands), teeth, and the breasts. Ectodermal dysplasia syndactyly syndrome (EDSS) is a rare, newly described type of ED involving syndactyly. We report 2 Yemeni siblings with typical EDSS manifestations, including bilateral, partial cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and toes; sparse, coarse, brittle scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes; and conical, widely spaced teeth with enamel notches. In addition, the siblings presented with other features hitherto not described for this syndrome, such as adermatoglyphia, onychogryphosis, hypoplastic widely spaced nipples, hypoplastic thumbs, and red scalp hair. PMID:25612123

  13. PET/CT in a Patient Diagnosed With Dandy-Walker Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Infante, Jose R; Garcia, Lucia; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Moreno, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a rare congenital posterior fossa malformation characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa. We present a 52-year-old Caucasian man diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumor and submitted to F-FDG PET/CT as a staging procedure. The patient was previously diagnosed with DWS in brain CT scan. PET/CT images revealed an ametabolic large cyst in the posterior fossa and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis. The case is presented with the aim to show the appearance of this syndrome on PET/CT study. PMID:26053730

  14. Clinical results of stereotactic heavy-charged-particle radiosurgery for intracranial angiographically occult vascular malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Phillips, M.H.; Frankel, K.A.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.; Lyman, J.T.

    1989-12-01

    Angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain have been recognized for many years to cause neurologic morbidity and mortality. They generally become symptomatic due to intracranial hemorrhage, focal mass effect, seizures or headaches. The true incidence of AOVMs is unknown, but autopsy studies suggest that they are more common than high-flow angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have developed stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery for the treatment of inoperable intracranial vascular malformations, using the helium ion beams at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 184-inch Synchrocyclotron and Bevatron. This report describes the protocol for patient selection, radiosurgical treatment planning method, clinical and neuroradiologic results and complications encountered, and discusses the strengths and limitations of the method. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations presenting as difficult-to-control asthma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are relatively rare disorders, they are an important part of the differential diagnosis of common pulmonary problems, such as hypoxemia, dyspnea on exertion and pulmonary nodules. Case presentation An 11-year-old Croatian boy of Mediterranean origin with a history of asthma since childhood was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of difficult-to-control asthma during the previous six months. A chest X-ray showed a homogeneous soft tissue mass in the lingual area. Computed tomography angiography of the thorax showed two pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, one on each side of the lungs. Diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was made clinically by Curaçao criteria. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation in the endoglin gene. The patient was treated with embolotherapy with good clinical outcome. Conclusion We present a case of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations masquerading as refractory asthma. PMID:23351611

  16. A developmental and genetic classification for malformations of cortical development: update 2012

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Renzo; Kuzniecky, Ruben I.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Malformations of cerebral cortical development include a wide range of developmental disorders that are common causes of neurodevelopmental delay and epilepsy. In addition, study of these disorders contributes greatly to the understanding of normal brain development and its perturbations. The rapid recent evolution of molecular biology, genetics and imaging has resulted in an explosive increase in our knowledge of cerebral cortex development and in the number and types of malformations of cortical development that have been reported. These advances continue to modify our perception of these malformations. This review addresses recent changes in our perception of these disorders and proposes a modified classification based upon updates in our knowledge of cerebral cortical development. PMID:22427329

  17. Coil embolization for a vast and complex arteriovenous malformation in the posterior mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Ye, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a kind of life threatened disease. Especially AVM in the posterior mediastinum is a rare, painful and it is difficult for treatment. We report a 44-year-old male patient who developed arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the posterior mediastinum. The patient complained 3 years of mild left back pain and chest congestion, and his pain increased over the last 3 months. Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations showed an enhancing vascular lesion in the left posterior mediastinum which in contact with the descending thoracic aorta. It was initially misdiagnosed as lung mass. It was considered to be vascular malformations. His pain was completely resolved after steel coil embolization was successfully administered.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia in the Griffon Bruxellois Dog

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, Susan P.; McFadyen, Angus K.; Freeman, Courtenay; Kent, Marc; Platt, Simon R.; Kibar, Zoha; Rusbridge, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a system of quantitative analysis of canine Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia on variable quality MRI. We made a series of measurements from magnetic resonance DICOM images from Griffon Bruxellois dogs with and without Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia and identified several significant variables. We found that in the Griffon Bruxellois dog, Chiari-like malformation is characterized by an apparent shortening of the entire cranial base and possibly by increased proximity of the atlas to the occiput. As a compensatory change, there appears to be an increased height of the rostral cranial cavity with lengthening of the dorsal cranial vault and considerable reorganization of the brain parenchyma including ventral deviation of the olfactory bulbs and rostral invagination of the cerebellum under the occipital lobes. PMID:24533070

  19. Effect of resection of an orbital arteriovenous malformation on central venous pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Grant; Hise, Joseph; Thacker, Ike; Layton, Kennith F.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first utilization of intraoperative central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring in the resection of an orbital arteriovenous malformation. A 24-year-old woman with a history of a left orbital mass who had previously undergone resection of a cranio-orbital arteriovenous malformation presented with gradual recurrence in the left orbit. She visited the emergency department with sudden vision loss, which resolved over several hours. This transient vision loss was thought to be due to a steal phenomenon from the ophthalmic artery due to the residual vascular malformation. Further surgical resection was undertaken. A preoperative angiogram identified residual feeding vessels, and the larger vessels were embolized. At the start of the procedure, her CVP was elevated (29 mm Hg), as measured by a central venous line. The remaining feeding vessels were surgically ligated, and an intraoperative arteriogram confirmed their successful ablation. At the conclusion of the procedure, the CVP had decreased to 9 mm Hg. PMID:25829648

  20. Effect of resection of an orbital arteriovenous malformation on central venous pressure.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria S; Gilliland, Grant; Hise, Joseph; Thacker, Ike; Layton, Kennith F

    2015-04-01

    We report the first utilization of intraoperative central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring in the resection of an orbital arteriovenous malformation. A 24-year-old woman with a history of a left orbital mass who had previously undergone resection of a cranio-orbital arteriovenous malformation presented with gradual recurrence in the left orbit. She visited the emergency department with sudden vision loss, which resolved over several hours. This transient vision loss was thought to be due to a steal phenomenon from the ophthalmic artery due to the residual vascular malformation. Further surgical resection was undertaken. A preoperative angiogram identified residual feeding vessels, and the larger vessels were embolized. At the start of the procedure, her CVP was elevated (29 mm Hg), as measured by a central venous line. The remaining feeding vessels were surgically ligated, and an intraoperative arteriogram confirmed their successful ablation. At the conclusion of the procedure, the CVP had decreased to 9 mm Hg. PMID:25829648

  1. Congenital malformations and developmental disabilities in ataxia-telangiectasia, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum families.

    PubMed Central

    Welshimer, K; Swift, M

    1982-01-01

    Heterozygous carriers of an ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi anemia (FA), or xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) gene may be predisposed to some of the same congenital malformations or developmental disabilities that are common among homozygotes. To test this hypothesis, medical records, death certificates, and questionnaires from 27 A-T families, 25 FA families, and 31 XP families were reviewed. Eleven XP blood relatives (out of 1,100) were found with moderate or severe unexplained mental retardation, a significant excess compared to the FA and A-T families (3/1,439). There were four microcephalic XP blood relatives and none in the FA or A-T families. In the A-T families, idiopathic scoliosis and vertebral anomalies were in excess, while genitourinary and distal limb malformations were found in the FA families. A-T, FA, or XP heterozygotes may constitute an important proportion of individuals at risk for specific malformations or developmental abnormalities. PMID:7124732

  2. De Novo Aneurysm Formation Following Gamma Knife Surgery for Arteriovenous Malformation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Akai, Takuya; Torigoe, Keiichiro; Fukushima, Manna; Iizuka, Hideaki; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background?Stereotactic radiosurgery plays a critical role in the treatment of central nervous system neoplasm and cerebrovascular malformations. This procedure is purportedly less invasive, but problems occurring later including tumor formation, necrosis, and vasculopathy-related diseases have been reported. Clinical Presentation?We report on a 65-year-old man who had experienced a de novo aneurysm in an irradiated field and an acute onset of right hemiparesis and aphasia. He had undergone gamma knife radiosurgery to treat an arteriovenous malformation 15 and 12 years prior, with 18 and 22?Gy marginal doses. At current admission, radiologic studies showed a de novo aneurysm in the irradiated field without recurrence of malformation. The aneurysm was resected. Histologic findings showed a disruption of the internal elastic lamina accompanied by fibrous degeneration. Conclusion?Stereotactic radiosurgery is a promising treatment tool, but long-term risks have not been fully researched. The treatment procedure for benign lesions should be chosen prudently. PMID:26251783

  3. Nasopharyngeal venous malformation: A rare condition managed with Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Lee, David R; Richter, Gresham T

    2015-10-01

    Venous malformations are benign but symptomatic vascular lesions of the head and neck that undergo soft tissue infiltration and relentless growth. Here we present a 31-year-old female referred for an obstructing and painful right posterior nasal mass. Flexible nasopharyngoscopy and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 3 cm × 4 cm enhancing mucosal and submucosal venous malformation of the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Three staged episodes of transnasal endoscopically guided Nd:YAG laser therapy were performed with dramatic and sustained reduction in size and symptoms. No bleeding or complications occurred. Nd:YAG laser treatment of nasopharyngeal venous malformations is a safe and effective alternative to open surgical excision and sclerotherapy. PMID:25684672

  4. Clinical-radiological evaluation of sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Steinberg, G.K.; Marks, M.P.; DeLaPaz, R.L.; Chuang, F.Y.S.

    1989-12-01

    Stereotactic heavy-charged-particle Bragg peak radiosurgery has been used to treat 322 patients with surgically-inaccessible intracranial vascular malformations. (The clinical results of this method for the treatment of angiographically demonstrable arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and angiographically occult vascular malformations (AOVMs) of the brain are described in separate reports of this symposium). The great majority of patients have had an uneventful post-treatment course with satisfactory health outcomes. However, several categories of delayed sequelae of stereotactic radiosurgery have been identified, involving the vascular structures essential for the integrity of the brain tissue and the brain parenchyma directly. These categories reflect both reaction to injury and to alterations in regional hemodynamic status, and include vasogenic edema, occlusion of functional vasculature, radiation necrosis, and local or remote effects on cerebral arterial aneurysms. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP) for the reconstruction of Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Pratap, Akshay; Tiwari, Awadhesh; Kumar, Anand; Adhikary, Shailesh; Singh, Satyendra Narayan; Paudel, Bishnu Hari; Bartaula, Rajiv; Mishra, Brijesh

    2007-01-01

    Background This report describes a new technique of sphincter saving anorectoplasty (SSARP) for the repair of anorectal malformations (ARM). Methods Twenty six males with high ARM were treated with SSARP. Preoperative localization of the center of the muscle complex is facilitated using real time sonography and computed tomography. A soft guide wire is inserted under image control which serves as the route for final pull through of bowel. The operative technique consists of a subcoccygeal approach to dissect the blind rectal pouch. The separation of the rectum from the fistulous communication followed by pull through of the bowel is performed through the same incision. The skin or the levators in the midline posteriorly are not divided. Postoperative anorectal function as assessed by clinical Wingspread scoring was judged as excellent, good, fair and poor. Older patients were examined for sensations of touch, pain, heat and cold in the circumanal skin and the perineum. Electromyography (EMG) was done to assess preoperative and postoperative integrity of external anal sphincter (EAS). Results The patients were separated in 2 groups. The first group, Group I (n = 10), were newborns in whom SSARP was performed as a primary procedure. The second group, Group II (n = 16), were children who underwent an initial colostomy followed by delayed SSARP. There were no operative complications. The follow up ranged from 4 months to 18 months. Group I patients have symmetric anal contraction to stimulation and strong squeeze on digital rectal examination with an average number of bowel movements per day was 3–5. In group II the rate of excellent and good scores was 81% (13/16). All patients have an appropriate size anus and regular bowel actions. There has been no rectal prolapse, or anal stricture. EAS activity and perineal proprioception were preserved postoperatively. Follow up computed tomogram showed central placement the pull through bowel in between the muscle complex. Conclusion The technique of SSARP allows safe and anatomical reconstruction in a significant proportion of patients with ARM's without the need to divide the levator plate and muscle complex. It preserves all the components contributing to superior faecal continence, and avoids the potential complications associated with the open posterior sagittal approach. PMID:17892560

  6. Congenital Malformations among Babies Born Following Letrozole or Clomiphene for Infertility Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Ghosh, Sanghamitra; Singh, Soma; Chakravarty, Astha; Ganesh, Ashalatha; Rajani, Shweta; Chakravarty, B. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context Clomiphene citrate (CC) is the first line drug for ovulation induction but because of its peripheral antiestrogenic effect, letrozole was introduced as the 2nd line drug. It lacks the peripheral antiestrogenic effect and is associated with similar or even higher pregnancy rates. Since letrozole is a drug for breast cancer, its use for the purpose of ovulation induction became controversial in the light of studies indicating an increased incidence of congenital malformations. Aims To evaluate and compare the incidence of congenital malformations among offsprings of infertile couples who conceived naturally or with clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment. Settings and Design A retrospective cohort study done at a tertiary infertility centre. Methods and Material A total of 623 children born to infertile women who conceived naturally or following clomiphene citrate or letrozole treatment were included in this study. Subjects were sorted out from medical files of both mother and newborn and follow up study was done based on the information provided by parents through telephonic conversations. Babies with suspected anomaly were called and examined by specialists for the presence of major and minor congenital malformations. Other outcomes like multiple pregnancy rate and birth weight were also studied. Results Overall, congenital malformations, chromosomal abnormalities were found in 5 out of 171 (2.9%) babies in natural conception group and 5 out of 201 babies in the letrozole group (2.5%) and in 10 of 251 babies in the CC group (3.9%). Conclusions There was no significant difference in the overall rate of congenital malformations among children born to mothers who conceived naturally or after letrozole or CC treatment. Key Messages Congenital malformations have been found to be comparable following natural conception, letrozole and clomiphene citrate. Thus, the undue fear against letrozole may be uncalled for. PMID:25272289

  7. The Incidence of Cardiac Lesions among Children with Down's Syndrome in Jamaica – A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C; Thame, M

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: This study aimed to define the incidence of Down's syndrome and to describe the epidemiology of cardiac lesions in Jamaican children with Down's syndrome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 53 infants during the period January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007, at the Bustamante Hospital for Children, Kingston, Jamaica. A medical history, physical examination and echo Doppler was performed on each child. Results: Forty-six thousand babies were born in Jamaica in 2007, of which 53 infants were diagnosed with Down's syndrome, giving an incidence of 1:868. Forty-two (79.2%) infants had congenital heart lesions. Of the 42 patients with cardiac lesions, 50% had an isolated cardiac lesion while 50% had multiple defects. The most common single defect was the atrioventricular septal defect found in 10 (24%) patients. The most frequent concomitant malformation was a patent ductus arteriosus, found in 16 (38.1%) of the patients. The median age of diagnosis with Down's syndrome was 0.14 weeks (interquartile range (IQR) 0 to 68 weeks). The median age of diagnosis with the cardiac lesion was 15.1 weeks (IQR 0 to 40.0 weeks). Conclusions: The incidence of Down's syndrome in Jamaica is similar to the reported international experience. The distribution of cardiac malformations is similar to that in other countries; however, the main difference is the higher incidence of congenital heart disease and a higher incidence of combined lesions. PMID:25867555

  8. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE CAUSES OF AMPHIBIAN MALFORMATIONS IN THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN BASIN OF NEW ENGLAND (AWARDED PROJECT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concurrent geographic extent and rate of amphibian malformations appear to have markedly increased above background levels in recent years in many states and Canadian provinces as documented by the North American Reporting Center for Amphibian Malformations (www.npwrc.usgs.go...

  9. [Elective cerebral arteriovenous malformation treatment with onyx after coil embolization of ruptured, flow-realeted aneurysm of the posterior circulation].

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Falkowski, Aleksander; Ra?, Monika; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous posterior circulation malformation was planned to embolize by onyx injection after acute coil embolization of ruptured flow-realeted aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery. Control angiography revealed completely embolized malformation with normal vessel patency at the end of procedure. There were no adverse events related to this procedure and no neurologic deficit at the discharge. PMID:23276020

  10. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon; Mohan, P. Chandra; Liew, Wendy Kein Meng; Mahadev, Arjandas; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed.

  11. Fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and congenital malformations in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W

    2001-01-01

    Investigators estimate that the population exposure that resulted from the Chernobyl fallout is in the range of natural background radiation for most European countries. Given current radiobiologic knowledge, health effects-if any-would not be measurable with epidemiologic tools. In several independent reports, however, researchers have described isolated peaks in the prevalence of congenital malformations in the cohort conceived immediately after onset of the fallout. The consistency of the time pattern and the specific types of malformation raise concern about their significance. In this study, the author summarizes findings from Turkey, Belarus, Croatia, Finland, Germany, and other countries, and implications for radiation protection and public health issues are discussed. PMID:11958546

  12. Endoscopic endonasal transclival approach to a pontine cavernous malformation: case report.

    PubMed

    Dallan, Iacopo; Battaglia, Paolo; de Notaris, Matteo; Caniglia, Michele; Turri-Zanoni, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Cavernous malformations of the brainstem are difficult to manage because of their location in eloquent tissue and their high propensity for symptomatic bleeding. Traditional neurosurgical approaches are often associated with significant morbidities. Here we present the case of a 15 year-old male patient with an acute onset of severe cephalalgia associated with neurological signs (right cranial nerve VI, VII and VIII palsies). MRI revealed a ventral pontine cavernous malformation with signs of recent bleeding. The lesion was removed by way of an endoscopic endonasal transclival approach. Post-operative neurological examination showed a dramatic improvement in cranial nerves function. The patient remains stable two years after surgery. PMID:26154899

  13. Coil Embolotherapy of Unilateral Diffuse Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations in a Nineteen-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Rokni Yazdi, Hadi; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Saberi, Hazhir; Salahi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare vascular malformations of the lung that usually led to a notable risk of serious and life-threatening complications. There is considerable debate about the best management of strategies for the group of patients with diffuse AVMs. Several therapeutic options have been reported for management of this abnormality among which coil embolization is currently the preferred ones. This report describes our experience with the use of coiling method for treatment of multiple AVMs in an adult patient. PMID:26528389

  14. Recurrent spontaneous compartment syndrome of the thigh.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Lebur; Chan, Sheung; Hadi, Saifullah; Maruszewski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Acute comparment syndrome (ACS) is a surgical emergency, in which tissue pressure becomes greater than perfusion pressure leading to tissue ischaemia. It is typically a consequence of trauma. We present a case in which a patient suffers blunt trauma to the thigh, but develops ACS 2?years after this injury and consequently endures 10-episodes of ACS (no perciptating event or cause) in the same thigh over 10?years. On the 10th presentation the patient was found to have arteriovenous malformation on MR angiography which were embolised and the fasciotomy wound closed with a split-thickness skin graft. A thorough literature search deemed this case to be the first reported recurrent spontaneous ACS of the thigh. Prompt recognition and treatment of ACS is vital. Clinicians should thoroughly investigate such patients postoperatively and involve vascular/plastic surgeons and interventianal radiologist to provide optimum care and prevent recurrence. PMID:25150230

  15. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  16. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  17. Flammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Konieczka, Katarzyna; Ritch, Robert; Traverso, Carlo Enrico; Kim, Dong Myung; Kook, Michael Scott; Gallino, Augusto; Golubnitschaja, Olga; Erb, Carl; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Kida, Teruyo; Kurysheva, Natalia; Yao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  18. Oral findings in Midline Syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tallón-Walton, Victòria; Nieminen, Pekka; Arte, Sirpa; Ustrell-Torrent, Josep Maria; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina

    2010-07-01

    We describe a female patient with a midline syndrome. The patient presents agenesis of the corpus callosum, encephalocele, iris coloboma, hypertelorism, submucosal cleft palate and dental anomalies. Despite being very characteristic, her phenotypical traits do not coincide exactly with those reported to date in the literature. The karyotype and the molecular cytogenetic study do not show mutations. We identify the presence of dental anomalies in the mother and other family members, not being identified MSX1 and PAX9 mutations that could the related with their etiology. Despite the fact that dental agenesis has been related to a large number of other malformation syndromes and congenital conditions, dental anomalies have only rarely been mentioned when reporting midline syndromes. These dental phenotypical traits, present in the patient and her family, could be considered part of the midline syndrome in carriers as well as in the patients. PMID:20173721

  19. Hallerman-Streiff-like syndrome presenting with laterality and cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Morice-Picard, Fanny; Marlin, Sandrine; Rooryck, Caroline; Fayon, Mickael; Thambo, Jeao-Benoît; Demarquez, Jean-Louis; Fauroux, Brigitte; Denoyelle, Francoise; Lacombe, Didier

    2009-04-01

    We report two patients considered to have an atypical presentation of Hallerman-Streiff syndrome (HSS) associated with laterality and cardiac defects. Clinical features include typical facial gestalt, atrophy of the skin, and hypotrichosis. Ophthalmologic abnormalities, normally present in HSS, are only found in one of the two patients. Both of them have respiratory problems secondary to the classical narrow upper airway described in this syndrome. Both these patients have laterality defects and one has additional structural cardiac malformations. Cardiac defects have occasionally been reported in the HSS literature, but are not considered as a classical feature of the syndrome. Situs inversus has never been reported in this syndrome. Almost all HSS cases have been sporadic and their origin and inheritance pattern remain unknown. PMID:19057381

  20. Constellation of congenital abnormalities in an infant: A new syndrome or tissue-specific mosaicism for trisomy 18?

    SciTech Connect

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; von Kap-Herr, C.; Wilson, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    A newborn infant born to consanguineous (first cousin) parents was noted to have complex cogenital heart defect and minor anomalies suggestive of trisomy 18. Blood lymphocyte and skin fibroblast karyotypes were normal. He died in the neonatal period of postoperative complications. On interphase fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) using autopsy specimens, a significant number of cells in the liver (17%) were trisomic for chromosome 18, compared to normal control liver tissue. However, interphase FISH analyses of blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and kidney tissue were normal. It is our opinion that this apparent mosaicism for trisomy 18 in the patient`s liver may be spurious, though it brings into focus the issue of possible tissue/organ-specific mosaicism. The anomalies in this infant do not resemble a previously described malformation syndrome. Parental consanguinity raises the possibility that this represents a new autosomal recessive malformation syndrome. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  2. Levator Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Normal (News) Small Hospitals Seeing More Drug-Resistant E. Coli Infections Additional Content Medical News Levator Syndrome By Parswa ... News HealthDay Small Hospitals Seeing More Drug-Resistant E. Coli Infections WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drug-resistant ...

  3. Alport Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... older the risk of kidney failure increases. All boys and girls with the autosomal recessive type of Alport Syndrome ... with this disease have the X-linked type. Boys with this type are severely ... in their lives. Girls with this type usually have milder symptoms than ...

  4. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to gain communication skills, such as learning sign language or cued speech or learning to use a hearing aid . Most people with Pendred syndrome will have hearing loss significant enough to be considered ... speech, and language. Use the following keywords to help you find ...

  5. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection and management of clinical complications such as scoliosis and febrile seizures. An adequate psychological and educational program with speech therapy and motor stimulation plays an important role in the global development of the patients. Final body height is difficult to predict but growth tends to normalize after puberty. PMID:17825104

  6. Longterm followup in 12 children with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: confirmation of hereditary

    E-print Network

    Institut des Sciences Cognitives, CNRS

    hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). STUDY DESIGN: This study was a review of 12 children (sex ratio = 1Longterm followup in 12 children with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: confirmation) including family history, mutation analysis, and longterm followup. RESULTS: Five children were under age 3

  7. Chiari Type I Malformations in Young Adults: Implications for the College Health Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Mary Jane; Vaughn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe 2 cases of Chiari type I malformation (CM-I) in students presenting to a college health center within a 6-month period. A review of CM-I, including epidemiology, typical presentation, evaluation, and management, is followed by a discussion of the clinical and functional implications of the disorder in an…

  8. Recurrent subdural hygromas after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Steele, Louise F; Magdum, Shailendra A

    2014-06-01

    A paediatric case of foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation complicated by recurrent subdural hygromas (SH) and raised intracranial pressure without ventriculomegaly is described. SH pathogenesis is discussed, with consideration given to arachnoid fenestration. We summarise possibilities for treatment and avoidance of this unusual consequence of foramen magnum decompression. PMID:23952134

  9. MODE OF ACTION: INHIBITION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR FUNCTION--VINCLOZOLIN-INDUCED MALFORMATIONS IN REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide that has been shown to cause Leydig cell tumors and atrophy of the accessory sex glands in adult rodents. In addition, exposure of rats during pregnancy causes a pattern of malformations in the male urogenital tract. A wealth of standard toxicological s...

  10. Transcatheter Embolization of a Large Symptomatic Pelvic Arteriovenous Malformation with Glubran 2 Acrylic Glue

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, R.; Angelopoulos, G. Konda, D.; Messina, M.; Chiocchi, M.; Perretta, T.; Simonetti, G.

    2008-09-15

    A young patient affected by a pelvic arteriovenous malformation (pAVM) with recurrent episodes of hematuria following exercise, underwent transcatheter embolization using Glubran 2 acrylic glue (GEM, Viareggio, Italy). All branches of the pAVM were successfully occluded. The patient showed prompt resolution of symptoms and persistent occlusion of the pAVM at the 6 month follow-up.

  11. [Liquid embolization for arteriovenous malformation with temporary balloon occlusion of another feeders].

    PubMed

    Abe, H; Koike, T; Minakawa, T; Tanaka, R

    1989-06-01

    A case of frontal arteriovenous malformation, embolized using a new balloon catheter technique, was reported. During liquid embolization of the main feeder from anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery was temporary occluded with another balloon catheter, to decrease blood flow from branches of middle cerebral artery. About 90% of the AVM could be obliterated by this technique. PMID:2614983

  12. Identification and characterization of Fusarium mexicanum causing mango malformation disease in México

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herein we summarize the results of fusaria we discovered associated with mango malformation disease (MMD) in México (Otero-Colina et al., 2010). From 2002 to 2009, 142 strains were isolated from symptomatic mango inflorescences and vegetative tissues from various cultivars in eight geographically di...

  13. Lymphatic Malformation in Newborns as the First Sign of Diffuse Lymphangiomatosis: Successful Treatment with Sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Laforgia, Nicola; Schettini, Federico; De Mattia, Delia; Martinelli, Domenico; Ladisa, Grazia; Favia, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma and lymphangioma, currently defined as 'lymphatic malformations', are developmental abnormalities of the lymphoid system with potential for rapid expansion. The management of these abnormalities depends on the site and extent of the lesion. A different disease is diffuse lymphangiomatosis. It is very rare at birth and its treatment remains controversial. A lymphatic malformation (cystic hygroma) of the neck of a newborn girl as the first sign of diffuse lymphangiomatosis and treatment of the latter condition with sirolimus are presented. A newborn girl with a presumed isolated lymphatic malformation of the neck and significant respiratory involvement was diagnosed via total-body nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to be affected by diffuse lymphangiomatosis; she was treated with sirolimus. The treatment with sirolimus was found to be very effective, with complete resolution of the disease, good tolerability, and no side effects. This report suggests the need to explore the possibility of diffuse lymphangiomatosis in neonates with apparently isolated lymphatic malformations. In the presence of clinical deterioration, sirolimus treatment may achieve excellent results with no adverse events. PMID:26506225

  14. Proanthocyanidins Prevent High Glucose-Induced Eye Malformation by Restoring Pax6 Expression in Chick Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rui-Rong; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Yao, Nan; Hong, Mo; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Mao, Zhong-Fu; Tang, Lu-Ping; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of offspring malformations, in which eye malformation is an important disease. It has raised demand for therapy to improve fetal outcomes. In this study, we used chick embryo to establish a GDM model to study the protective effects of proanthocyanidins on eye development. Chick embryos were exposed to high glucose (0.2 mmol/egg) on embryo development day (EDD) 1. Proanthocyanidins (1 and 10 nmol/egg) were injected into the air sac on EDD 0. Results showed that both dosages of proanthocyanidins could prevent the eye malformation and rescue the high glucose-induced oxidative stress significantly, which the similar effects were showed in edaravone. However, proanthocyanidins could not decrease the glucose concentration of embryo eye. Moreover, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, was down-regulated by high glucose. Proanthocyanidins could restore the suppressed expression of Pax6. These results indicated proanthocyanidins might be a promising natural agent to prevent high glucose-induced eye malformation by restoring Pax6 expression. PMID:26262640

  15. Proanthocyanidins Prevent High Glucose-Induced Eye Malformation by Restoring Pax6 Expression in Chick Embryo.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui-Rong; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Yao, Nan; Hong, Mo; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Mao, Zhong-Fu; Tang, Lu-Ping; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of offspring malformations, in which eye malformation is an important disease. It has raised demand for therapy to improve fetal outcomes. In this study, we used chick embryo to establish a GDM model to study the protective effects of proanthocyanidins on eye development. Chick embryos were exposed to high glucose (0.2 mmol/egg) on embryo development day (EDD) 1. Proanthocyanidins (1 and 10 nmol/egg) were injected into the air sac on EDD 0. Results showed that both dosages of proanthocyanidins could prevent the eye malformation and rescue the high glucose-induced oxidative stress significantly, which the similar effects were showed in edaravone. However, proanthocyanidins could not decrease the glucose concentration of embryo eye. Moreover, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, was down-regulated by high glucose. Proanthocyanidins could restore the suppressed expression of Pax6. These results indicated proanthocyanidins might be a promising natural agent to prevent high glucose-induced eye malformation by restoring Pax6 expression. PMID:26262640

  16. Red blood cell malformations Cell shapes Modeling and simulation of red blood cell light scattering

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Red blood cell malformations Cell shapes Modeling and simulation of red blood cell light to various diseases and acute conditions, the shape and composition of erythrocytes (red blood cells. To the right is a figure depicting the initial stages of a beam traversal through a sample of blood cells

  17. Transcatheter coil embolisation of a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in a neonate.

    PubMed Central

    Grady, R. M.; Sharkey, A. M.; Bridges, N. D.

    1994-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) are a rare cause of cyanosis in neonates. A large PAVM in a neonate was successfully occluded by transcatheter embolisation. At six months follow up the PAVM was undetectable and no new lesions were found. Transcatheter embolisation should be considered as the primary treatment for a PAVM in a child of any age. Images PMID:8198890

  18. Screening for Developmental Neurotoxicity in Zebrafish Larvae: Assessment of Behavior and Malformations.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental toxicity. As part of this approach, it is important to be able to separate overt toxicity (Le., malformed larvae) from the more specific neurotoxic...

  19. Estimation of the frequency of malformed sperm by slit scan flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Halamka, J.; Gray, J.W.; Gledhill, B.L.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of the utility of Slit Scan Flow Cytometry (SSFCM) for measuring the frequencies of malformed sperm heads in control and mutagen treated B6C3F1/CRL mice. In SSFCM, fluorescence profiles of sperm heads stained with the DNA-specific fluorescent dye acriflavine were recorded for sperm flowing lengthwise through a 2.5-..mu..m-thick laser beam. Malformed sperm were detected as having fluorescence profiles that differed substantially from an average fluorescence profile for sperm from untreated mice. Fluorescence profiles were measured for 500 sperm per mouse from five control mice, five mice injected intraperitoneally daily for 5 days with a total of 375 mg/kg of body weight methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), and for 30 mice injected intraperitoneally daily for 5 days with total doses of procarbazine ranging from 125 mg/kg to 1250 mg/kg. Sperm were collected from the caudae epididymides 35 days after the last injection. Frequencies of malformed sperm in these samples were also estimated by visual analysis. All samples were analyzed in double blind fashion. The visual and SSFCM malformed sperm frequencies for the samples from control, MMS-treated, and procarbazine-treated mice were correlated. A dose effect was seen with both the visual and SSFCM estimates for the sperm from the procarbazine-treated mice. 8 references 3 figures.

  20. THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ: IN VITRO ANDROGEN ANTAGONISM, PARTURITION DELAYS, AND MALE REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fungicide Prochloraz: In vitro Androgen Antagonism, Parturition Delays, and Male Reproductive Malformations in Rats.
    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr.,
    noriega.nigel@epa.gov
    US EPA
    Prochloraz (PZ) is an imid...

  1. A Developmental and Genetic Classification for Malformations of Cortical Development: Update 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkovich, A. James; Guerrini, Renzo; Kuzniecky, Ruben I.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Malformations of cerebral cortical development include a wide range of developmental disorders that are common causes of neurodevelopmental delay and epilepsy. In addition, study of these disorders contributes greatly to the understanding of normal brain development and its perturbations. The rapid recent evolution of molecular biology, genetics…

  2. Atrophie cérébrale diffuse au cours d'un syndrome de Goldenhar: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Asani, Yogolelo; Mulenga, Cilundika; Ngombe, Léon Kabamba; Mbuyi-Musansayi; Muenze, Kalenga; Borasisi, Chenge; Speeg-Schatz

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent un cas d'un syndrome de Goldenhar non décris dans la littérature chez un nourrisson de 3 mois, de sexe féminin présentant une atrophie cérébrale diffuse. Cette observation permet de décrire cette malformation rare et d'attirer l'attention de l'opinion scientifique à mettre en marche des études poussées afin de comprendre la survenue de cette pathologie. PMID:25767659

  3. Holoprosencephalie alobaire dans un contexte de syndrome polymalformatif: apport de l'imagerie, à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    Amadou, Dia Aliou; Franck, D'Almeida; Mamadou, Mbodji; Mourtalla, Ka Mamadou

    2013-01-01

    L'holoprosencéphalie est une malformation cérébrale rare, d’étiologies multiples et souvent associée à des anomalies faciales évocatrices. Cette pathologie, résultant d'un défaut de développement précoce du prosencéphale, est de pronostic fœtal extrêmement réservé en particulier pour la forme alobaire. Nous rapportons à travers ce cas clinique, une holoproséncéphalie alobaire diagnostiquée à l'imagerie (ETF, tomodensitométrie) et relevée par un syndrome polymalformatif chez un nouveau-né de 03 mois. PMID:24171066

  4. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  5. Application of Surface-Water Microlayer Sampler in the Hydrologic Assessment of Frog Malformations in Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. M.; Menheer, M. A.; Taylor, H.; Aiken, G.; Peart, D.; Thurman, E. M.; Scribner, E. A.; Weishaar, J.; Rostad, C.; Rosenberry, D.

    2001-12-01

    Since the summer of 1993, frog malformations have been reported throughout North America, including over 150 sites in 54 counties of Minnesota. Water-quality analyses of bulk water (grab) samples collected at more than 20 frog malformation sites have yet to indicate any direct relationships between water quality and frog malformation rates. However, many potential contaminants to frog egg masses, metamorphs, and adults are hydrophobic or have a strong association with floating particles that may accumulate in microlayers found on the surface of water bodies. To assess surface microlayer chemistry, a radio-controlled catamaran sampler was developed to collect hydrophobic microlayer samples using a rotating Teflon-coated drum. The drum was positioned to sit approximately 0.5 inch in the surface-water body. Samples were collected on the rotating drum, extracted off the rotating drum using a series of wiper-blades, and funneled into Teflon collection pans. A series of water samples were collected using three different techniques to determine if any relationships exist between the water quality of the surface microlayer and/or lower waters and frog malformation rates. Grab, upper-surface, and microlayer samples were collected during June, August and October 2001 at four surface-water bodies. Grab samples were collected through Teflon tubing held throughout the vertical water column, while upper-surface water samples were collected through Teflon tubing held at the water surface. Microlayer samples were collected using the designed sampler. Collected water samples were analyzed for major ions, trace elements, nutrients, total mercury, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, hormones, isoflavones, and a series of waste-water constituents. In 2000, frog malformation rates were above 5% at two of the sites, and rates were less than 1% at the other two sites. Available results from water-quality analyses will be presented.

  6. Clinical manifestations of Deletion 22q11.2 syndrome (DiGeorge/Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Digilio, MC; Marino, B; Capolino, R; Dallapiccola, B

    2005-01-01

    Deletion 22q11.2 syndrome (Del22) (DiGeorge/Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome) is characterized by congenital heart defect (CHD), palatal anomalies, facial dysmorphisms, neonatal hypocalcemia, immune deficit, speech and learning disabilities. CHD is present in 75% of patients with Del22. The most frequently seen cardiac malformations are “conotruncal” defects, including tetralogy of Fallot (TF), pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD), truncus arteriosus (TA), interrupted aortic arch (IAA), and ventricular septal defect (VSD). The study of the specific “cardiac phenotype” in patients with Del22 shows that a particular cardiac anatomy can be identied in these subjects. In addition to CHD, various organ systems can be involved, so that a multidisciplinary approach is needed in the evaluation of patients with Del22. PMID:22368650

  7. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  8. Dumping Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasler, William L.

    2002-04-01

    The dumping syndrome consists of early postprandial abdominal and vasomotor symptoms, resulting from osmotic fluid shifts and release of vasoactive neurotransmitters, and late symptoms secondary to reactive hypoglycemia. Effective relief of symptoms of dumping syndrome can be achieved with dietary modifications to minimize ingestion of simple carbohydrates and to exclude fluid intake during ingestion of the solid portion of the meal. More severely affected individuals may respond to agents such as pectin and guar, which increase the viscosity of intraluminal contents, or to drugs such as the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which blunts the rapid absorption of glucose, and the somatostatin analog octreotide, which alters gut transit and impairs release of vasoactive mediators into the bloodstream. PMID:11879594

  9. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  10. Connective tissue, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s), and head and cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a growing group of hereditary disorders of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and vascular and internal organ fragility. In contrast with other well known heritable connective tissue disorders with severe cardiovascular involvement (e.g., Marfan syndrome), most EDS patients share a nearly normal life span, but are severely limited by disabling features, such as pain, fatigue and headache. In this work, pertinent literature is reviewed with focus on prevalence, features and possible pathogenic mechanisms of headache in EDSs. Gathered data are fragmented and generally have a low level of evidence. Headache is reported in no less than 1/3 of the patients. Migraine results the most common type in the hypermobility type of EDS. Other possibly related headache disorders include tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, headache attributed to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage, headache secondary to Chiari malformation, cervicogenic headache and neck-tongue syndrome, whose association still lacks of reliable prevalence studies. The underlying pathogenesis seems complex and variably associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia, cervical spine and temporomandibular joint instability/dysfunction, meningeal fragility, poor sleep quality, pain-killer drugs overuse and central sensitization. Particular attention is posed on a presumed subclinical cervical spine dysfunction. Standard treatment is always symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. Assessment and management procedures are discussed in order to put some basis for ameliorating the actual patients' needs and nurturing future research. PMID:25655119

  11. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness. This is called carpal tunnel syndrome. ... Some people who develop carpal tunnel syndrome were born with a small carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel syndrome can also be caused by making the same hand and ...

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... a key nerve in the wrist. What is carpal tunnel syndrome? Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve, ...

  14. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eye problems. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  15. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > Teens > Sexual Health > For Girls > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print A A A Text ... Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had her period, you may have heard ...

  16. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, Causalgia Condensed from Complex Regional ... Tel: 813-907-2312 Fax: 813-830-7446 Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association (RSDSA) P.O. Box ...

  17. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. - www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke - www. ...

  18. Ramsay Hunt syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Hunt syndrome; Herpes oticus ... The varicella zoster virus that causes Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the same virus that causes chickenpox and shingles. In people with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, the virus is believed to infect the ...

  19. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  20. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Down Syndrome KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Genetic, Chromosomal & Metabolic Conditions > ... Screening and Diagnosis Resources That Can Help About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is ...

  1. National Down Syndrome Society

    MedlinePLUS

    donate Entire Site Down Syndrome Resources Ways to Give My Great Story Buddy Walk® Advocacy About NDSS The National Advocate for People with Down Syndrome Since 1979 National Down Syndrome Society 666 Broadway, ...

  2. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry? . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  3. Ectopic Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in which a tumor outside the pituitary or adrenal glands produces a hormone called adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). ... syndrome include: Cushing disease Cushing syndrome caused by adrenal tumor Exogenous Cushing syndrome

  4. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Down Syndrome Managing Behavior Sexuality Sexuality & Down Syndrome Social and Sexual Education Recreation & Friendship Education Education & Down Syndrome Schooling from Preschool to Age 21 Implementing Inclusion College & Postsecondary Options Looking for Postsecondary Education O' ...

  5. Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sturge-Weber Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Encephalotrigeminal Angiomatosis Table of ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Sturge-Weber Syndrome? Sturge-Weber syndrome is a neurological disorder ...

  6. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  7. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Legs Syndrome Overview What is restless legs syndrome (RLS)? Restless legs syndrome (also called RLS) is a condition in which your legs feel ... age and becomes a problem for older adults. RLS can make sleeping and traveling difficult and uncomfortable. ...

  8. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for the mothers of infants with Down syndrome. Intelligence in individuals with Down syndrome ranges from low ... is not possible to tell the level of intelligence a baby with Down syndrome will have. All ...

  9. Startle syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Truong, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Startle refers to a sudden involuntary movement of the body in response to a surprising and unexpected stimulus. It is a fast twitch of facial and body muscles evoked by a sudden and intense tactile, visual, or acoustic stimulus. While startle can be considered to be a protective function against injury, startle syndromes are abnormal responses to startling events, consisting of three heterogeneous groups of disorders. The first is hyperekplexia, characterized by brisk and generalized startle in response to trivial stimulation. The major form of hereditary hyperekplexia has a genetic basis, frequently due to mutations in the ?1 subunit of the glycine receptor (GLRA1) on chromosome 5q. In the second group, normal startle induces complex but stereotyped motor and/or behavioral abnormalities lasting several seconds, termed as startle epilepsy. It usually occurs in the setting of severe brain damage, particularly perinatal hypoxia. The third group is characterized by nonhabituating hyperstartling, provoked by loud noises, sudden commands, or gestures. The intensity of startle response tends to increase with frequency of stimulation, which often leads to injury. Interestingly, its occurrence is restricted to certain social or ethnic groups in different parts of the world, such as jumping Frenchmen of Maine among Franco-Canadian lumberjack communities, and Latah in Southeast Asia. So far, no neurological abnormalities have been reported in association with these neuropsychiatric startle syndromes. In this chapter, the authors discuss the clinical presentation, physiology, and the neuronal basis of the normal human startle as well as different groups of abnormal startle syndromes. The aim is to provide an overview of hyperstartling with some diagnostic hints and the distinguishing features among these syndromes. PMID:21496599

  10. [Nager syndrome].

    PubMed

    Opitz, C; Shetty, D K; Witkowski, R

    1998-05-01

    In this publication, Nager syndrome was analyzed in the literature and six patients from our clinic were evaluated in relation to symptoms, etiology and pathogenesis. The diseases to be considered when making a differential diagnosis are pointed out. Clarification of the etiology is still pending. Molecular genetic research in these patients is possibly the key for new findings. A case report illustrates the results of interdisciplinary treatment by the surgeon and orthodontist. Possibilities and problems in relation to therapy are demonstrated. PMID:9658800

  11. Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ANTZELEVITCH, CHARLES

    2007-01-01

    First introduced as a new clinical entity in 1992, the Brugada syndrome is associated with a relatively high risk of sudden death in young adults, and occasionally in children and infants. Recent years have witnessed a striking proliferation of papers dealing with the clinical and basic aspects of the disease. Characterized by a coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram (ECG), the Brugada syndrome has a genetic basis that thus far has been linked only to mutations in SCN5A, the gene that encodes the ?-subunit of the sodium channel. The Brugada ECG is often concealed, but can be unmasked or modulated by a number of drugs and pathophysiological states including sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, tricyclic antidepressants, as well as cocaine and propranolol intoxication. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis or sudden death is 40 ± 22, with the youngest patient diagnosed at 2 days of age and the oldest at 84 years. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular, and cellular aspects of the Brugada syndrome, incorporating the results of two recent consensus conferences. Controversies with regard to risk stratification and newly proposed pharmacologic strategies are discussed. PMID:17038146

  12. Nutcracker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gulleroglu, Kaan; Gulleroglu, Basak; Baskin, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The nutcracker phenomenon [left renal vein (LRV) entrapment syndrome] refers to compression of the LRV most commonly between abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Term of nutcracker syndrome (NCS) is used for patients with clinical symptoms associated with nutcracker anatomy. LRV entrapment divided into 2 types: anterior and posterior. Posterior and right-sided NCSs are rare conditions. The symptoms vary from asymptomatic hematuria to severe pelvic congestion. Symptoms include hematuria, orthostatic proteinuria, flank pain, abdominal pain, varicocele, dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, fatigue and orthostatic intolerance. Existence of the clinical features constitutes a basis for the diagnosis. Several imaging methods such as Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography and retrograde venography are used to diagnose NCS. The management of NCS depends upon the clinical presentation and the severity of the LRV hypertension. The treatment options are ranged from surveillance to nephrectomy. Treatment decision should be based on the severity of symptoms and their expected reversibility with regard to patient’s age and the stage of the syndrome. PMID:25374822

  13. Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotovio, Patricia; Silva, Cristina; Oliveira, Nuno; Costa, Fátima

    2013-01-01

    Hypokalaemia is a common clinical disorder, the cause of which can usually be determined by the patient's clinical history. Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy that must be considered in some settings of hypokalaemia. We present the case of a 60-year-old male patient referred to our nephrology department for persistent hypokalaemia. Clinical history was positive for symptoms of orthostatic hypotension and polyuria. There was no history of drugs consumption other than potassium supplements. Complementary evaluation revealed hypokalaemia (2.15 mmol/l), hypomagnesaemia (0.29 mmol/l), metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.535, bicarbonate 34.1 mmol/l), hypereninaemia (281.7 U/ml), increased chloride (160 mmol/l) and sodium (126 mmol/l) urinary excretion and reduced urinary calcium excretion (0.73 mmol/l). Renal function, remainder serum and urinary ionogram, and renal ultrasound were normal. A diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome was established. We reinforced oral supplementation with potassium chloride and magnesium sulfate. Serum potassium stabilised around 3 mmol/l. The aim of our article is to remind Gitelman syndrome in the differential diagnosis of persistent hypokalaemia. PMID:23585506

  14. Anserine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein, Milton; Kuromoto, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB) has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome. Overweight and osteoarthritis seem to represent additional risk factors; however, their role in the pathophysiology of the disease is not yet understood. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses, from 10 days to 36 months to achieve recovery. The lack of knowledge about its epidemiological, etiological, and pathophysiological aspects requires future studies for this common and intriguing disorder. PMID:21125167

  15. Morvan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management.

  16. Klippel-Feil syndrome with other associated anomalies in a medieval Portuguese skeleton (13th–15th century)

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Teresa; Costa, Catarina

    2007-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome, or synostosis of the cervical spine, is the result of an abnormal division of somites during embryonic development. This report analyses an adult male (exhumed from a Portuguese graveyard dating from the 13th to the 15th century) with malformations in the cranium and vertebral column. Besides the lesions that are typical of Klippel-Feil syndrome type II, other defects usually linked to this pathology are described (occipito-atlantal fusion, hemivertebrae, butterfly vertebrae, cervical rib, changes in normal number of vertebral segments and a possible Sprengel deformity). PMID:17850283

  17. Prune belly anomaly on prenatal ultrasound as a presenting feature of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome (EEC).

    PubMed

    Janssens, S; Defoort, P; Vandenbroecke, C; Scheffer, H; Mortier, G

    2008-01-01

    We report on a fetus with prune belly anomaly presenting at 16 weeks gestation. Clinical evaluation after birth revealed other malformations reminiscent of the EEC syndrome. This diagnosis was also suspected in the mother and finally confirmed in both relatives by identification of a heterozygous mutation (p.R204W) in the p63 gene. With this paper we confirm the previously reported occurrence of prune belly anomaly in the EEC syndrome, however here in this family proven by genetic analysis. PMID:19239089

  18. Types of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Myelodysplastic Syndromes + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » What Is Myelodysplastic Syndrome? TOPICS ...

  19. Une fistule recto-vaginale rentrant dans le cadre d'un syndrome de Currarino

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Mounia Lakhdar; Babakhoya, Abdeladim; Bouabdellah, Youssef; Hida, Mostapha

    2011-01-01

    Le syndrome de Currarino (SC) est défini par une triade rassemblant une malformation ano-rectale, une agénésie sacrée et une tumeur pré-sacrée. Nous rapportons le cas d'une fille de 4 ans et demi ayant été admise en consultation de gastro-entérologie pédiatrique pour constipation avec issue de selle à travers un orifice vulvaire. La radiographie du rachis avait montré une agénésie sacrée. Le fistulo-scanner a mis en évidence une fistule recto-vaginale et l'IRM pelvienne a confirmé l'agénésie sacrée et a retrouvé une méningocèle antérieure. La découverte d'une malformation ano-rectale doit faire chercher une autre anomalie de la triade de Currarino. Cette affection, rare, nécessite une prise en charge médico-chirurgicale assez complexe. PMID:22384297

  20. Prevalence of adults with brain arteriovenous malformations: a community based study in Scotland using capture-recapture analysis 

    E-print Network

    Al-Shahi, Rustam; Fang, J S Y; Lewis, S C; Warlow, Charles P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a population based study of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) prevalence. Methods: Multiple, overlapping sources of case ascertainment were used to establish the point prevalence of brain AVMs ...