Science.gov

Sample records for macrophage immunomodulatory activity

  1. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Gonzlez-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 ?g/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  2. Macrophage immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Opuntia polyacantha

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Xie, Gang; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Klein, Robyn A.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Opuntia polyacantha (prickly pear cactus) has been used extensively for its nutritional properties; however, less is known regarding medicinal properties of Opuntia tissues. In the present study, we extracted polysaccharides from O. polyacantha and used size-exclusion chromatography to fractionate the crude polysaccharides into four polysaccharide fractions (designated as Opuntia polysaccharides C-I to C-IV). The average Mr of fractions C-I through C-IV was estimated to be 733, 550, 310, and 168 kDa, respectively, and sugar composition analysis revealed that Opuntia polysaccharides consisted primarily of galactose, galacturonic acid, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Analysis of the effects of Opuntia polysaccharides on human and murine macrophages demonstrated that all four fractions had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6. Furthermore, modulation of macrophage function by Opuntia polysaccharides was mediated, at least in part, through activation of nuclear factor κB. Together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain a portion of the beneficial therapeutic properties of extracts from O. polyacantha and support the concept of using Opuntia polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant. PMID:18597716

  3. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  4. The potency of immunomodulatory herbs may be primarily dependent upon macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Groom, S N; Johns, T; Oldfield, P R

    2007-03-01

    Standardized extracts of Echinacea, cat's claw, and saw palmetto were each evaluated for ability to activate macrophage and natural killer cells, in vitro, using two independent measures of activation for each immune cell population. A standard series of exposure concentrations were tested for each herbal extract in a panel of four assays that evaluated macrophage phagocytosis, macrophage synthesis of interleukin-12, natural killer (NK) cell cytocidal activity (synthesis of granzyme B), and NK cell synthesis of interferon-gamma. Macrophage phagocytosis was stimulated by all three herbs tested: saw palmetto (up to 2.3-fold, P < .05), Echinacea (up to 3.6-fold, P < .01), and cat's claw (up to 4.7-fold, P < .01). Additionally, NK cell synthesis of interferon-gamma was stimulated by saw palmetto (up to 6.3-fold, P < .01) and Echinacea (up to 8.1 fold, P < .01) but not by exposure to cat's claw. None of the three herbs stimulated macrophage synthesis of interleukin-12 or NK cell synthesis of granzyme B. Comparison of the in vitro data with our earlier observations that cat's claw and Echinacea (but not saw palmetto) were each effective in reducing B16/F10 lung tumor colony formation in C57BL/6J mice suggests macrophage activation is the primary means by which these herbs modulate the immune system. Thus, macrophage activation (phagocytosis) may provide a potentially higher throughput method to identify herbal extracts with in vivo stimulatory effects. PMID:17472470

  5. Immunomodulatory Activities on RAW 264.7 Macrophages of a Polysaccharide from Veiled Lady Mushroom, Dictyophora indusiata (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Fu, Haitian; Deng, Chao; Teng, Liping; Yu, Li; Su, Tong; Xu, Xin; Chen, Jinghua; Yang, Chengjian

    2015-01-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide named DI was extracted from the fruiting bodies of gastroid mushroom Dictyophora indusiata with boiling water. The chemical and physical characteristics of DI were investigated by a combination of chemical and instrumental analysis methods. The immunomodulatory activities on RAW 264.7 macrophage of DI in vitro were also studied. The results showed that DI is a ?-(1?3)-glucan with side branches of ?-(1?6)-glucosyl units, and it has triple-helical structure. DI has no toxic effect on cells, but can promote macrophage multiplication. DI significantly affects the immune function by promoting the production of nitric oxide and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-1, -6, and -12, showing an obvious dose-effect relationship. This work extends the application scope of the polysaccharide from D. indusiata in the biomedical field. PMID:25746620

  6. Immunomodulatory activity of enzymatically synthesized glycogen and its digested metabolite in a co-culture system consisting of differentiated Caco-2 cells and RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Michiko; Furuyashiki, Takashi; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Kakutani, Ryo; Takata, Hiroki; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Previously, we developed enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) from starch, and showed its immunomodulatory and dietary fiber-like activities. In this study, we investigated the metabolism of ESG and its immunomodulatory activity using differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the intestinal barrier. In a co-culture system consisting of differentiated Caco-2 cells and RAW264.7 macrophages, mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1? and BAFF cytokines was up-regulated in Caco-2 cells and IL-8 production in basolateral medium was induced after 24 h apical treatment with 5 mg ml(-1) of ESG. The mRNA level of iNOS was also up-regulated in RAW264.7 macrophages. After characterization of the binding of anti-glycogen monoclonal antibodies (IV58B6 and ESG1A9) to ESG and its digested metabolite resistant glycogen (RG), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed to quantify ESG and RG. Using this system, we investigated the metabolism of ESG in differentiated Caco-2 cells. When ESG (7000 kDa, 5 mg ml(-1)) was added to the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers, ESG disappeared and RG (about 3000 kDa, 3.5 mg ml(-1)) appeared in the apical solution during a 24 h incubation. Neither ESG nor RG was detected in the basolateral solution. In addition, both ESG and RG were bound to TLR2 in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, we suggest that ESG is metabolized to a RG-like structure in the intestine, and this metabolite activates the immune system via stimulation of the intestinal epithelium, although neither ESG nor its metabolite could permeate the intestinal cells under our experimental conditions. These results provide evidence for the beneficial function of ESG as a food ingredient. PMID:23872795

  7. Immunomodulatory Effects of Cinobufagin on Murine Lymphocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Hui; Meng, Xianhua; Hao, Lu; Fu, Yue; Fang, Linlin; Shen, Dan; Yu, Xiaomeng; Li, Jingshung

    2015-01-01

    Cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of the traditional Chinese medicine ChanSu, has been reported to have potent pharmacological activity. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of CBG on the activity of immune cells in mice. Peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes from mice were prepared and cultured in RPMI1640 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Concanavalin (ConA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and CBG (0.0125, 0.05, 0.15, or 0.25 μg/mL) were added to the culture medium, and the phagocytic activity of macrophages was detected by MTT assays. Additionally, lymphocyte secretion of interleukin- (IL-)2 and IL-10 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the cell cycle distribution and cell surface markers were detected by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that CBG promoted lymphocyte proliferation; this effect was suppressed by combined treatment with ConA or LPS. Moreover, CBG also significantly improved the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in spleen lymphocytes and increased the percentage of spleen lymphocytes in the S phase. Finally, we found that CBG enhanced the secretion of IL-2 and IL-10 and increased the phagocytosis ability of macrophages. In summary, CBG could enhance activity of immune cells. PMID:26664411

  8. Permanent culture of macrophages at physiological oxygen attenuates the antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties of dimethyl fumarate.

    PubMed

    Haas, Benjamin; Chrusciel, Sandra; Fayad-Kobeissi, Sarah; Dubois-Rand, Jean-Luc; Azuaje, Francisco; Boczkowski, Jorge; Motterlini, Roberto; Foresti, Roberta

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesized that O2 tension influences the redox state and the immunomodulatory responses of inflammatory cells to dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an activator of the nuclear factor Nrf2 that controls antioxidant genes expression. This concept was investigated in macrophages permanently cultured at either physiological (5% O2) or atmospheric (20% O2) oxygen levels and then treated with DMF or challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammation. RAW 264.7 macrophages cultured at 20% O2 exhibited a pro-oxidant phenotype, reflected by a lower content of reduced glutathione, higher oxidized glutathione and increased production of reactive oxygen species when compared to macrophages continuously grown at 5% O2. At 20% O2, DMF induced a stronger antioxidant response compared to 5% O2 as evidenced by a higher expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxydoreductase-1 and superoxide dismutase-2. After challenge of macrophages with LPS, several pro-inflammatory (iNOS, TNF-?, MMP-2, MMP-9), anti-inflammatory (arginase-1, IL-10) and pro-angiogenic (VEGF-A) mediators were evaluated in the presence or absence of DMF. All markers, with few interesting exceptions, were significantly reduced at 5% O2. This study brings new insights on the effects of O2 in the cellular adaptation to oxidative and inflammatory stimuli and highlights the importance of characterizing the effects of chemicals and drugs at physiologically relevant O2 tension. Our results demonstrate that the common practice of culturing cells at atmospheric O2 drives the endogenous cellular environment towards an oxidative stress phenotype, affecting inflammation and the expression of antioxidant pathways by exogenous modulators. PMID:25303683

  9. Characterization of immunomodulatory activities of honey glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Mesaik, M Ahmed; Dastagir, Nida; Uddin, Nazim; Rehman, Khalid; Azim, M Kamran

    2015-01-14

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for natural honey in modulating immune response. To identify active components responsible, this study investigated the immunomodulatory properties of glycoproteins and glycopeptides fractionated from Ziziphus honey. Honey proteins/peptides were fractionated by size exclusion chromatography into five peaks with molecular masses in the range of 2-450 kDa. The fractionated proteins exhibited potent, concentration-dependent inhibition of reactive oxygen species production in zymosan-activated human neutrophils (IC50 = 6-14 ng/mL) and murine macrophages (IC50 = 2-9 ng/mL). Honey proteins significantly suppressed the nitric oxide production by LPS-activated murine macrophages (IC50 = 96-450 ng/mL). Moreover, honey proteins inhibited the phagocytosis latex bead macrophages. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1? and TNF-? by human monocytic cell line in the presence of honey proteins was analyzed. Honey proteins did not affect the production of IL-1?; however, TNF-? production was significantly suppressed. These findings indicated that honey glycoproteins and glycopeptides significantly interfere with molecules of the innate immune system. PMID:25496517

  10. Immunomodulatory activity of a chymotrypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Alex Yuen-Kam; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2006-09-01

    Serine protease inhibitors are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Many of them have been purified and characterized from different species. While the physicochemical properties of these protease inhibitors have been extensively investigated, their biological effects, e.g. immunomodulatory effect, remain relatively unexplored. Recently, we isolated a chymotrypsin-specific inhibitor (MCoCI) from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour) Spreng (Family Cucurbitaceae), the traditional Chinese medicine known as Mubiezhi, which has been used as an antiinflammatory agent. In the present study, the effects of MCoCI on different types of cells of the immune system, including splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes, neutrophils, bone marrow cells and macrophages, were investigated. MCoCI was shown to possess immuno-enhancing and antiinflammatory effects. MCoCI could stimulate the proliferation of different cells of the immune system, e.g. splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, in a manner comparable to that of Concanavalin A. Moreover, MCoCI could also suppress the formation of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils and macrophages. These immunomodulatory effects may explain some of the therapeutic actions of Mubiezhi. PMID:16733830

  11. Chemical Composition and Immunomodulatory Activity of Mycelia of the Hairy Bracket Mushroom, Trametes hirsuta (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongxia; Yang, Rongling; Liu, Xueming; Chen, Zhiyi; Yang, Chunying; Wang, Siyuan

    2015-01-01

    Trametes hirsuta is a medicinal mushroom that produces laccase. Its mycelium is a by-product when this species is used for laccase production. Aiming to develop its potential medicinal value, we investigated the chemical composition and immunomodulatory activity of T. hirsuta mycelia (THM). Dried THM contained 26.06% protein, 1.15% fat, 57.87% carbohydrates, and 5.47% ash. Sixteen free amino acids (2.63% total content) and 6 5'-nucleotides (adenosine 5'-monophosphate, cytidine 5'-monophosphate, guanosine 5'-monophosphate, uridine 5'-monophosphate, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, and inosine 5'-monophosphate) constituting 0.275% were detected. Dominant sugars and polyols were fructose (2.47%), mannitol (2.03%), and glucose (1.8%); trehalose and arabinose contents were less than 0.10%. Evaluation of immunomodulatory activity in mice showed that THM could improve macrophage phagocytic function and serum hemolysin concentrations, but only the low-dose group significantly enhanced the natural killer cell activity and increased the spleen index, and only the middle-dose group remarkably increased the thymus index. Therefore, T. hirsuta mycelia could enhance immune function in mice and have immunomodulatory activity. PMID:25954910

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is rendered enzymatically inactive by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants but retains its immunomodulatory function.

    PubMed

    Dickerhof, Nina; Schindler, Lisa; Bernhagen, Jrgen; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important player in the regulation of the inflammatory response. Elevated plasma MIF is found in sepsis, arthritis, cystic fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Immunomodulatory activities of MIF include the ability to promote survival and recruitment of inflammatory cells and to amplify pro-inflammatory cytokine production. MIF has an unusual nucleophilic N-terminal proline with catalytic tautomerase activity. It remains unclear whether tautomerase activity is required for MIF function, but small molecules that inhibit tautomerase activity also inhibit the pro-inflammatory activities of MIF. A prominent feature of the acute inflammatory response is neutrophil activation and production of reactive oxygen species, including myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid. We hypothesized that MPO-derived oxidants would oxidize the N-terminal proline of MIF and alter its biological activity. MIF was exposed to hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid and the oxidative modifications on MIF were examined by LC-MS/MS. Imine formation and carbamylation was observed on the N-terminal proline in response to MPO-dependent generation of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These modifications led to a complete loss of tautomerase activity. However, modified MIF still increased CXCL-8/IL-8 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and blocked neutrophil apoptosis, indicating that tautomerase activity is not essential for these biological functions. Pre-treatment of MIF with hypochlorous acid protected the protein from covalent modification by the MIF inhibitor 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP). Therefore, oxidant generation at inflammatory sites may protect MIF from inactivation by more disruptive electrophiles, including drugs designed to target the tautomerase activity of MIF. PMID:26453918

  13. Development of QSAR model for immunomodulatory activity of natural coumarinolignoids

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dharmendra K; Meena, Abha; Srivastava, Ankit; Chanda, D; Khan, Feroz; Chattopadhyay, SK

    2010-01-01

    Immunomodulation is the process of alteration in immune response due to foreign intrusion of molecules inside the body. Along with the available drugs, a large number of herbal drugs are promoted in traditional Indian treatments, for their immunomodulating activity. Natural coumarinolignoids isolated from the seeds of Cleome viscose have been recognized as having hepatoprotective action and have recently been tested preclinically for their immunomodulatory activity affecting both cell-mediated and humoral immune response. To explore the immunomodulatory compound from derivatives of coumarinolignoids, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) and molecular docking studies were performed. Theoretical results are in accord with the in vivo experimental data studied on Swiss albino mice. Immunostimulatory activity was predicted through QSAR model, developed by forward feed multiple linear regression method with leave-one-out approach. Relationship correlating measure of QSAR model was 99% (R2 = 0.99) and predictive accuracy was 96% (RCV2 = 0.96). QSAR studies indicate that dipole moment, steric energy, amide group count, lambda max (UV-visible), and molar refractivity correlates well with biological activity, while decrease in dipole moment, steric energy, and molar refractivity has negative correlation. Docking studies also showed strong binding affinity to immunomodulatory receptors. PMID:20856844

  14. Natural and semisynthetic diterpenoids with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities block the ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos Alberto; Michelini, Flavia Mariana; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Gómez, Catalina Arredondo; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Alché, Laura Edith

    2015-10-01

    The pathogenesis of many viral infections lies on the damage caused by the immune response against the virus. Current antiviral drugs do not act on the inflammatory component of the disease. Thus, new compounds that inhibit both viral multiplication and the immunopathology elicited by the virus are an approach that should be considered. In the present study, we identified two jatropholones (2A and 5B) and one carnosic acid derivative (9C) that significantly inhibited multiplication of TK+ and TK- strains of HSV-1 in Vero cells. Compounds 2A, 5B and 9C also prevented HSV-1- and TLRs-induced inflammatory response in cultivated murine macrophages. In macrophages infected with HSV-1, the inhibitory effect of compounds 2A, 5B and 9C on TNF-α and IL-6 production could be associated with the block of ERK pathway, whereas NF-κB pathway was not hampered by any of the compounds. Besides, 2A, 5B and 9C also inhibited ERK pathway and reduced TNF-α production in macrophages stimulated with TLR2, TLR4 or TLR9 agonists and were able to hinder IL-6 secretion after activation with TLR2 or TLR4, but not with TLR9. The immunomodulatory effect of 2A, 5B and 9C in macrophages infected with HSV-1 may be a consequence of the inhibition of ERK pathway activated by TLRs. The availability of compounds with both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties which affect TLR signaling pathways might be a useful strategy to control the progress of virus-induced disease. PMID:25528328

  15. Isolation and characterization of exopolysaccharide with immunomodulatory activity from fermentation broth of Morchella conica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of this study Mushroom polysaccharides have traditionally been used for the prevention and treatment of a multitude of disorders like infectious illnesses, cancers and various autoimmune diseases. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that certain polysaccharides affect immune system function. Morchella conica (M. conica) is a species of rare edible mushroom whose multiple medicinal functions have been proven. Thus, the objective of this study is to isolate and characterize of exopolysaccharide from submerged mycelial culture of M. conica, and to evaluate its immunomodulatory activity. Methods A water-soluble Morchella conica Polysaccharides (MCP) were extracted and isolated from the fermentation broth of M. conica through a combination of DEAE-cellulose and Sephacryl S-300 HR chromatograph. NMR and IR spectroscopy has played a developing role in identification of polysaccharide with different structure and composition from fungal and plant sources, as well as complex glycosaminoglycans of animal origin. Thus, NMR and IR spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical structure and composition of the isolated polysaccharide. Moreover, the polysaccharide was tested for its immunomodulatory activity at different concentrations using in vitro model. Results The results showed that MCP may significantly modulate nitric oxide production in macrophages, and promote splenocytes proliferation. Analysis from HPLC, infrared spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that MCP was a homogeneous mannan with an average molecular weight of approximately 81.2 kDa. The glycosidic bond links is ?6)-?-D-Man p-(1?. Conclusion The results suggested that the extracted MCP may modulate nitric oxide production in macrophages and promote splenocytes proliferation, and it may act as a potent immunomodulatory agent. PMID:23351529

  16. Recognition of TLR2 N-glycans: critical role in ArtinM immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Vania Sammartino; Zorzetto-Fernandes, Andre Luiz; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Ruas, Luciana Pereira; Nohara, Lilian L; Almeida, Igor Correia de; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    TLR2 plays a critical role in the protection against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conferred by ArtinM administration. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, induces IL-12 production in macrophages and dendritic cells, which accounts for the T helper1 immunity that results from ArtinM administration. We examined the direct interaction of ArtinM with TLR2using HEK293A cells transfected with TLR2, alone or in combination with TLR1 or TLR6, together with accessory proteins. Stimulation with ArtinM induced NF-κB activation and interleukin (IL)-8 production in cells transfected with TLR2, TLR2/1, or TLR2/6. Murine macrophages that were stimulated with ArtinM had augmented TLR2 mRNA expression. Furthermore, pre-incubation of unstimulated macrophages with an anti-TLR2 antibody reduced the cell labeling with ArtinM. In addition, a microplate assay revealed that ArtinM bound to TLR2 molecules that had been captured by specific antibodies from a macrophages lysate. Notably,ArtinM binding to TLR2 was selectively inhibited when the lectin was pre-incubated with mannotriose. The biological relevance of the direct interaction of ArtinM with TLR2 glycans was assessed using macrophages from TLR2-KOmice, which produced significantly lower levels of IL-12 and IL-10 in response to ArtinM than macrophages from wild-type mice. Pre-treatment of murine macrophages with pharmacological inhibitors of signaling molecules demonstrated the involvement of p38 MAPK and JNK in the IL-12 production induced by ArtinM and the involvement ofPI3K in IL-10 production. Thus, ArtinM interacts directly with TLR2 or TLR2 heterodimers in a carbohydrate recognition-dependent manner and functions as a TLR2 agonist with immunomodulatory properties. PMID:24892697

  17. Chemistry and immunomodulatory activity of frankincense oil.

    PubMed

    Mikhaeil, Botros R; Maatooq, Galal T; Badria, Farid A; Amer, Mohamed M A

    2003-01-01

    The yield of steam distillation of frankincense essential oil (3%); and its physicochemical constants were determined. Capillary GC/MS technique was used for the analysis of the oil. Several oil components were identified based upon comparison of their mass spectral data with those of reference compounds published in literature or stored in a computer library. The oil was found to contain monoterpenes (13.1%), sesquiterpenes (1%), and diterpenes (42.5%). The major components of the oil were duva-3,9,13-trien-1,5alpha-diol-1-acetate (21.4%), octyl acetate (13.4%), o-methyl anisole (7.6%), naphthalene decahydro-1,1,4a-trimethyl-6-methylene-5-(3-methyl-2-pentenyl) (5.7%), thunbergol (4.1%), phenanthrene-7-ethenyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,7,8,9,10,10a-dodecahydro-1,1,4a,7-tetramethyl (4.1%), alpha-pinene (3.1%), sclarene (2.9%), 9-cis-retinal (2.8%), octyl formate (1.4%), verticiol (1.2%) decyl acetate (1.2%), n-octanol (1.1%). The chemical profile of the oil is considered as a chemotaxonomical marker that confirmed the botanical and geographical source of the resin. Biologically, the oil exhibited a strong immunostimulant activity (90% lymphocyte transformation) when assessed by a lymphocyte proliferation assay. PMID:12710734

  18. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed. PMID:25796474

  19. Macrophage Activation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ethan S; Clarke, Sarah L N; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially life-threatening complication of rheumatic diseases such as systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus. It is often considered a type of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and results from over-activation of T lymphocytes and macrophages leading to a "cytokine storm". Characteristic features are persistent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias (anemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia), raised C-reactive protein, falling erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hypofibrinogenemia, transaminitis, hypertriglyceridemia and extreme hyperferritinemia often associated with multi-organ impairment. Key to its management is early recognition of MAS which may be difficult due to similarity to systemic sepsis or flares of the underlying rheumatic disease. To aid with this process, criteria for the diagnosis of MAS in patients with sJIA derived by international consensus have been published. Although bone marrow biopsy showing hemophagocytosis is strongly supportive it is not essential for diagnosis. Together with appropriate supportive care, first-line treatment is high-dose intravenous corticosteroids with cyclosporin or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) added if there is not initial response. Although etoposide is used by hematologists in treatment of HLH, there are concerns regarding organ toxicity and bone marrow suppression which weigh against its use in initial management of MAS. With increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of MAS, use of drugs targeting specific cytokines has been reported in case series. The relatively rapid effectiveness of anakinra, a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist, has been documented. Further studies of this and other biologic agents are required to identify the most effective and safest treatment option for refractory MAS. PMID:26400031

  20. The nutritional supplement Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) has direct immunomodulatory actions on intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages involving TLR/MyD88 and NF-κB/MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Daddaoua, Abdelali; Martínez-Plata, Enrique; Ortega-González, Mercedes; Ocón, Borja; Aranda, Carlos J; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Suárez, María D; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2013-02-15

    Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is an immunostimulatory nutritional supplement. AHCC effects and mechanism of action on intestinal epithelial cells or monocytes are poorly described. AHCC was added to the culture medium of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC18 and HT29 cells) and monocytes (THP-1 cells) and assessed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by ELISA. Inhibitors of NFκB and MAPKs were used to study signal transduction pathways while TLR4 and MyD88 were silenced in IEC18 cells using shRNA. It was found that AHCC induced GROα and MCP1 secretion in IEC18 and IL-8 in HT29 cells. These effects depended on NFκB activation, and partly on MAPKs activation and on the presence of MyD88 and TLR4. In THP-1 cells AHCC evoked IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α secretion. The induction of IL-8 depended on JNK and NFκB activation. Therefore, AHCC exerts immunostimulatory effects on intestinal epithelial cells and monocytes involving TLR4/MyD88 and NFκB/MAPK signal transduction pathways. PMID:23194525

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity. PMID:23635526

  2. Antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities of polysaccharides from the roots of Sanguisorba officinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang Chul; Reddy, Narsimha; Smith, Paul T; Ananthan, R; Longvah, T

    2012-12-01

    The roots of Sanguisorba officinalis are used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of diseases such as inflammation and internal haemorrhage. Several scientific investigations involving extraction and pharmacological studies of terpenoids and triterpenoid glycosides from this herb have been carried out. However, little is known regarding the immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties of polysaccharides from S. officinalis. Hence the polysaccharides from this herb have been investigated here. The hot water extract of S. officinalis has been fractionated using size-exclusion chromatography to obtain four polysaccharide fractions designated as SOP-1, SOP-2, SOP-3 and SOP-4. The range of molecular masses of these fractions were from 280 Da to 2000 kDa, and their sugar compositions consisted mainly of fructose, glucose, xylose, arabinose, and rhamnose. The antioxidant activities of the crude polysaccharide fractions were evaluated in a biological assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas the radical scavenging activity was measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Analysis of the immunomodulatory activities of these polysaccharide fractions were measured by using mouse macrophages. Most of the polysaccharide fractions have stimulated the production of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), and also displayed antioxidant activities. These results suggest that the roots of S. officinalis are likely to have therapeutic value for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22944198

  3. Evaluation of immunomodulatory activity of two potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains by in vivo tests.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dayong; Li, Chang; Qin, Yanqing; Yin, Ronglan; Du, Shouwen; Liu, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yanfang; Wang, Cuiyan; Rong, Fengjun; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-10-01

    Here we evaluate the immunomodulatory function of two potential probiotic strains, Lactobacillus salivarius CICC 23174 and Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 1.557. Mice were fed with each Lactobacillus strain at different doses for several consecutive days. The effects of the two probiotic strains on immune organs, immune cells and immune molecules were investigated on days 10 and 20. Both Lactobacillus strains increased the spleen index, improved the spleen lymphocyte transformation rate, enhanced sIgA production and improved the number of CD11c(+) CD80(+) double-positive cells. L. plantarum CGMCC 1.557 was the more active strain in enhancing the phagocytic activity of macrophages, while, L. salivarius CICC 23174 was the more effective strain at maintaining the Th1/Th2 balance. This study suggests that these two Lactobacillus strains have beneficial effects on regulation of immune responses, which has promising implications for the development of ecological agents and functional foods. PMID:26143437

  4. Immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from Clerodendrum splendens: Beneficial effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts of leaves from Clerodendrum have been used for centuries to treat a variety of medicinal problems in tropical Africa. However, little is known about the high-molecular weight active components conferring therapeutic properties to these extracts. Methods Polysaccharides from the leaves of Clerodendrum splendens were extracted and fractionated by ion exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Molecular weight determination, sugar analysis, degree of methyl esterification, and other chemical characterization of the fractions were performed. Immunomodulatory activity of the fractions was evaluated by determining their ability to induce monocyte/macrophage nitric oxide (NO), cytokine production, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in C57BL/6 mice, and severity of EAE was monitored in mice treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the most active polysaccharide fraction. Lymph nodes (LN) and spleen were harvested, and levels of cytokines in supernatants from LN cells and splenocytes challenged with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide were determined. Results Fractions containing type II arabinogalactan had potent immunomodulatory activity. Specifically, the high-molecular weight sub-fraction CSP-AU1 (average of 38.5 kDa) induced NO and cytokine [interleukin (IL)-1α, -1β, -6, -10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF; designated previously as TNF-α), and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)] production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and monocyte/macrophages. CSP-AU1-induced secretion of TNF was prevented by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist LPS-RS, indicating a role for TLR4 signaling. Treatment with CSP-AU1 also induced phosphorylation of a number of MAPKs in human PBMC and activated AP-1/NF-κB. In vivo treatment of mice with CSP-AU1 and CSP-NU1 resulted in increased serum IL-6, IL-10, TNF, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α/CCL3, and MIP-1β/CCL4. CSP-AU1 treatment of mice with EAE (50 mg/kg, i.p., daily, 13 days) resulted in significantly reduced disease severity in this experimental model of multiple sclerosis. Levels of IL-13, TNF, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-17, and GM-CSF were also significantly decreased, whereas transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was increased in LN cells from CSP-AU1-treated EAE mice. Conclusions Polysaccharide CSP-AU1 is a potent natural innate immunomodulator with a broad spectrum of agonist activity in vitro and immunosupressive properties after chronic administration in vivo. PMID:23806004

  5. Immunomodulatory activities of different solvent extracts from Tricholoma matsutake (S. Ito et S. Imai) singer (higher basidiomycetes) on normal mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiulian; You, Qinghong; Jiang, Zhonghai

    2012-01-01

    The immunomodulatory activities of different solvent extracts from the culinary-medicinal mushroom Tricholoma matsutake were studied in vivo in normal mice. The extracts were prepared using different solvents in an order of increasing polarity. The immunomodulatory activities were investigated by measuring the thymus and spleen index, phagocytic rate of macrophage phagocytosis, delayed-type hypersensitivity, plaque-forming cell, and proliferation of splenocytes. Results demonstrated that water extract (WE) and n-butyl alcohol extract (BAE) of T. matsutake could enhance the immunity of mice significantly compared with the control group. Main components of WE and BAE were polysaccharides, proteins, and flavonoids; we presume that these may be the main immunomodulating and immuno-enhancing agents in T. matsutake. PMID:23510248

  6. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Albert; van Eldik, Mandy; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Hanne L. M.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2)-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives. PMID:26848845

  7. In vitro immunomodulatory activities of a newly concocted traditional Chinese medicine formula: VI-28.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K W; Wong, C K; Poon, P M K; Ip, P S P; Che, C T; Fung, K P; Leung, P C; Lam, C W K

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Vigconic VI-28, an anti-aging traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula containing Radix Ginseng and Cornu Cervi Pantotrichum, possesses immunological efficacy. This in vitro study further investigated the immunomodulatory effects of the hot water extracts of VI-28. The study included (1) colorimetric 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine proliferation ELISA for estimating mitogenicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), (2) immunofluorescence staining for measuring the expression of IL-2 receptor alpha (CD25) on lymphocytes, (3) cytometric bead array (CBA) for quantifying cytokine liberation from PBMC, and (4) intracellular immunophenotyping for macrophage phagocytosis and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production from monocytes. The results demonstrated that VI-28 (1) could dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide-activated PBMC but enhanced the proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-activated PBMC at concentrations of <1 mg/mL, (2) significantly augmented the expression of CD25 on lymphocytes at concentrations of 0.4 mg/mL or above (p < 0.05), (3) dose dependently (0.1-1.0 mg/mL) activated macrophage phagocytosis and monocyte synthesis of H(2)O(2) and (4) significantly increased the production of cytokines IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-1beta at various concentrations of VI-28 (p < 0.05). The results suggest that VI-28 is a potential immunomodulator which probably acts through the activation of lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:16909439

  8. Tumor-inhibitory effect and immunomodulatory activity of fullerol C60(OH)x.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiadan; Ji, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jing; Sun, Ronghua; Zhang, Xiang; Gao, Yang; Sun, Hongfang; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Aidong; Ma, Jie; Wang, Tiancheng; Jia, Guang; Gu, Yiqun

    2008-08-01

    The tumor-inhibitory effect of C60(OH)x was tested on the murine H22 hepatocarcinoma model. Doses of 0.2 and 1.0 mg kg(-1) body weight both showed significant antitumor activity with tumor inhibition rates of 31.9 and 38.4%, respectively, when mice were treated for 17 consecutive days. The damnification of liver was prominently reduced. Furthermore, histological examination indicated that an envelope of fibroblasts and lymphocytes was formed surrounding tumor tissues in the C60(OH)x-treated group, which inhibited the infiltration of tumor to the neighboring normal skeleton muscle tissues. To understand the antitumor mechanism, the immunomodulatory activity of C60(OH)x was investigated. The results indicate that C60(OH)x enhances the phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages and elevates the activity of arginase and acid phosphatase in vivo. The tumor necrosis factor alpha production of C60(OH)x-treated macrophages also increases in vitro. These results suggest that C60(OH)x can enhance the innate immunity of tumor-bearing mice, and therefore inhibits growth of the tumor. PMID:18574800

  9. Novel functional polysaccharides from Radix Polygoni Multiflori water extracted residue: Preliminary characterization and immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Xu, Yi; Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaodan; Cao, Kun; Fan, Qi

    2016-02-10

    The alkali-extractable polysaccharides (APMPs) were isolated from the water extracted residues of Radix Polygoni Multiflori, and further purified by DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography to obtain a homogeneous polysaccharide (APMP-2) with molecular weights of 7724.8Da. HPLC chromatography analysis identified that APMP-2 was a heteropolysaccharides and mainly composed of Galactose and Xylose with a molar ratio of 4.31: 1.06. It was shown that both APMP and APMP-2 were of activation effects on splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages, and also significantly restore the proliferation rate, phagocytic index and cytokine (IL-2 and TNF-?) production level of 5-FU-treated splenocytes/peritoneal macrophages in a dosage-dependent manner. The results suggested that polysaccharides presented in Radix Polygoni Multiflori water-extracted residues possessed immunomodulatory activity and could be used as potential immunomodulators, and this finding could be a reference for the utilization of Radix Polygoni Multiflori water extracted residues. PMID:26686172

  10. Purification, preliminary characterization and in vitro immunomodulatory activity of tiger lily polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Dan-Ni; Zhu, Qu; Yang, Qiu-Huizi; Han, Yong-Bin

    2014-06-15

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (LLPS) from tiger lily was extracted by ultrasonic wave-assisted extraction. The LLPS, which was isolated by alcohol precipitation, was further purified by DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow and Sephadex G-100 chromatography, which resulted in LLPS fractions in LLPS-1, LLPS-2 and LLPS-3, with molecular weights of 350.5, 403.3 and 146.2kDa, respectively. LLPS-1 and LLPS-2 primarily consisted of glucose and mannose in a molar ratio of nearly 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. In contrast, LLPS-3 was primarily composed of arabinose, galactose, glucose and mannose in a molar ratio of nearly 2:2:2:1. LLPS fractions could stimulate the proliferation of macrophages. The in vitro immunomodulatory activity of the fractions was evaluated. The results showed that treatment with 25-400 μg/mL of LLPS fractions could increase phagocytic activity and nitric oxide production of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24721071

  11. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Lpez-Garca, Sonia; Castaeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jimnez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domnguez-Lpez, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernndez-Sanchz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-? and TGF-?) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-?, suppressed TGF-? and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  12. Antitumor and immunomodulatory activity of a water-soluble polysaccharide from Grifola frondosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guang-Hua; Ren, Yi; Feng, Wei-Wei; Li, Qian; Wu, Hui-Yu; Jin, Dun; Zhao, Ting; Xu, Cai-Quan; Yang, Liu-Qing; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2015-12-10

    Grifola frondosa has long been known and respected as a medically important fungus. This study investigated the characterization, antitumor and immunomodulatory activity of a polysaccharide named GP11 purified from G. frondosa. The results revealed that GP11 was composed of ?1)-d-Manp-(6?,?1)-d-Glcp-(4?,?1)-d-Galp-(6?and?2,3,6)-d-Glcp-(1?, with branches attached at O-2,3 of 1,2,3,6-linked Glcp residues and terminal T-Glcp. GP11 exhibited indirect cytotoxic activity against HepG-2 cells in vitro, and it significantly inhibited the growth of Heps cells in vivo. GP11 increased the relative thymus and spleen weights as well as serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-2 levels. GP11 stimulated tumoricidal activity and the production of nitric oxide (NO), TNF-? and interleukin-1?, and it also stimulated the protein expression of iNOS and mRNA expression of iNOS and TNF-?. TLR-4 is a potential receptor for GP11-mediated macrophage activation. The results suggested that the antitumor activity of GP11 may be due to the improvement of immune functions through the TLR-4-mediated up-regulation of NO and TNF-?. PMID:26428141

  13. Immunomodulatory activity and partial characterisation of polysaccharides from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan-Yuan; Yi, Yang; Zhang, Li-Fang; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Zhen-Cheng; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Momordica charantia Linn. is used as an edible and medicinal vegetable in sub-tropical areas. Until now, studies on its composition and related activities have been confined to compounds of low molecular mass, and no data have been reported concerning the plant's polysaccharides. In this work, a crude polysaccharide of M. charantia (MCP) fruit was isolated by hot water extraction and then purified using DEAE-52 cellulose anion-exchange chromatography to produce two main fractions MCP1 and MCP2. The immunomodulatory effects and physicochemical characteristics of these fractions were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that intragastric administration of 150 or 300 mgkg-d? of MCP significantly increased the carbolic particle clearance index, serum haemolysin production, spleen index, thymus index and NK cell cytotoxicity to normal control levels in cyclophosphamide (Cy)-induced immunosuppressed mice. Both MCP1 and MCP2 effectively stimulated normal and concanavalin A-induced splenic lymphocyte proliferation in vitro at various doses. The average molecular weights of MCP1 and MCP2, which were measured using high-performance gel permeation chromatography, were 8.5510? Da and 4.4110? Da, respectively. Both fractions exhibited characteristic polysaccharide bands in their Fourier transform infrared spectrum. MCP1 is mainly composed of glucose and galactose, and MCP2 is mainly composed of glucose, mannose and galactose. The results indicate that MCP and its fractions have good potential as immunotherapeutic adjuvants. PMID:25178064

  14. Structure and Antitumor and Immunomodulatory Activities of a Water-Soluble Polysaccharide from Dimocarpus longan Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fa-Yan; Ning, Yuan-Ling; Qi, Jia; He, Zhou; Jie, Jiang; Lin, Juan-Juan; Huang, Yan-Jun; Li, Fu-Sen; Li, Xue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A new water-soluble polysaccharide (longan polysaccharide 1 (LP1)) was extracted and successfully purified from Dimocarpus longan pulp via diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose anion-exchange and Sephacryl S-300 HR gel chromatography. The chemical structure was determined using Infrared (IR), gas chromatography (GC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The results indicated that the molecular weight of the sample was 1.1 105 Da. Monosaccharide composition analysis revealed that LP1 was composed of Glc, GalA, Ara and Gal in a molar ratio of 5.39:1.04:0.74:0.21. Structural analysis indicated that LP1 consisted of a backbone of ?4)-?-d-Glcp-(1?4)-?-d-GalpA-(1?4)-?-d-Glcp-(1?4)-?-d-Glcp-(1? units with poly saccharide side chains composed of ?2)-?-d-Fruf-(1?2)-l-sorbose-(1? attached to the O-6 position of the ?-d-Glcp residues. In vitro experiments indicated that LP1 had significantly high antitumor activity against SKOV3 and HO8910 tumor cells, with inhibition percentages of 40% and 50%, respectively. In addition, LP1 significantly stimulated the production of the cytokine interferon-? (IFN-?), increased the activity of murine macrophages and enhanced B- and T-lymphocyte proliferation. The results of this study demonstrate that LP1 has potential applications as a natural antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity. PMID:24663085

  15. In vivo evidence of the immunomodulatory activity of orally administered Aloe vera gel.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun-A; Lee, Young-Ran; Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Myung-Koo; Park, Young In; Lee, Sungwon; Kim, Kyungjae; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2010-03-01

    The gels of Aloe species contain immunomodulatory components such as aloctin A and acemannan. Most studies on these gels were performed in in vitro cell culture systems. Although several studies examined their immunomodulatory activity in vivo, the route of administration was intraperitoneal or intramuscular. Here, we evaluated the in vivo immunomodulatory activity of processed Aloe vera gel (PAG) in mice. Oral administration of PAG significantly reduced the growth of C. albicans in the spleen and kidney following intravenous injection of C. albicans in normal mice. PAG administration also reduced the growth of C. albicans in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. PAG administration did not increase ovalbumin (OVA)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) generation in normal mice, but did increase it in high-fat-diet induced diabetic mice. These findings provide the first clear evidence for the immunomodulatory activity of orally administered Aloe vera gel. PMID:20361311

  16. Immunomodulatory Activity of Acidic Polysaccharides Isolated from Tanacetum vulgare L

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gang; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Tanacetum vulgare L. (Tansy) has been extensively used in folk medicine for treatment of a variety of medical disorders. In the present study, we isolated and purified four acidic polysaccharide fractions (designated T-I to T-IV) from Tansy florets by the sequential use of hot-water extraction, ethanol precipitation, ultra-filtration, anion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. The average Mr of fractions T-I through T-IV was estimated to be 326, 151, 64 and 9 kDa, respectively, as determined by high performance size-exclusion chromatography analysis. Sugar composition analysis revealed that Tansy polysaccharides consisted primarily of galacturonic acid, galactose, arabinose, and rhamnose. Fractions T-II through T-IV contained an arabinogalactan type II structure, as determined by reaction with Yariv reagent. High Mr fractions T-I and T-II exhibited potent macrophage/monocyte-activating activity, enhancing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by J774.A1 murine macrophages, and activating nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in THP-1 human monocytes. In addition, Tansy polysaccharides stimulated human neutrophil function by greatly enhancing neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) release. Furthermore, the low Mr fraction T-IV had potent complement-fixing activity, which may also contribute to the anti-inflammatory and would-healing properties of Tansy extracts. Taken together, our results provide a molecular basis to explain at least part of the beneficial therapeutic effects of Tansy extracts, and support the concept of using Tansy polysaccharides as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant. PMID:17996673

  17. Immunomodulatory activity of biopolymeric fraction BOS 2000 from Boswellia serrata.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Anamika; Gupta, Amit; Suden, Pankaj; Singh, Surjeet; Malik, Fayaz; Singh, Jaswant; Gupta, B D; Suri, K A; Srinivas, V K; Ella, Krishna; Qazi, G N

    2008-03-01

    Oral administration of BOS 2000 (1-10 mg/kg) elicited a dose related increase in the delayed hypersensitivity reaction (early 24 h and delayed 48 h) in mice. It also stimulated the IgM and IgG titre expressed in the form of plaques (PFC) and complement fixing antibody titre. The concentration of cytokines (IL-4, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) in serum with respect to T cell interactions, i.e. (CD4/CD8) and the proliferation of lymphocytes were significantly increased at 10 mg/kg compared with the control. The results in these studies demonstrated the immunostimulatory effect of BOS 2000 in a dose-dependent manner with respect to the macrophage activation possibly expressing the phagocytosis and nitrite production by the enhancement of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma production as a mode of action. PMID:18167047

  18. Immunomodulatory Activity of Oenothein B Isolated from Epilobium angustifolium1

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Jakiw, Larissa; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Blaskovich, Christie L.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    Epilobium angustifolium has been traditionally used to treat of a number of diseases; however, not much is known regarding its effect on innate immune cells. Here, we report that extracts of E. angustifolium activated functional responses in neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages. Activity-guided fractionation, followed by mass spectroscopy and NMR analysis, resulted in the identification of oenothein B as the primary component responsible for phagocyte activation. Oenothein B, a dimeric hydrolysable tannin, dose-dependently induced a number of phagocyte functions in vitro, including intracellular Ca2+ flux, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), chemotaxis, nuclear factor (NF)-?B activation, and proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, oenothein B was active in vivo, inducing keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) production and neutrophil recruitment to the peritoneum after intraperitoneal administration. Biological activity required the full oenothein B structure, as substructures of oenothein B (pyrocatechol, gallic acid, pyrogallol, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) were all inactive. The ability of oenothein B to modulate phagocyte functions in vitro and in vivo suggests that this compound is responsible for at least part of the therapeutic properties of E. angustifolium extracts. PMID:19846877

  19. Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 Cells Activate Expression of Immunomodulatory Genes in THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Sae; Goto, Hiroaki; Hirota, Tatsuhiko; Fukuda, Shinji; Ohno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    To understand the immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 cells suggested from our previous study of in vivo anti-allergy and anti-virus effects, host immune responses in macrophage-like THP-1 cells after 4?h (the early phase) and 24?h (the late phase) of cocultivation with L-92 cells were investigated by transcriptome analysis. In the early phase of L-92 treatment, various transcription regulator genes, such as, NFkB1, NFkB2, JUN, HIVEP2 and RELB, and genes encoding chemokines and cytokines, such as CCL4, CXCL11, CCL3 and TNF, were upregulated. Two transmembrane receptor genes, TLR7 and ICAM1, were also upregulated in the early phase of treatment. In contrast, many transmembrane receptor genes, such as IL7R, CD80, CRLF2, CD86, CD5, HLA-DQA1, IL2RA, IL15RA and CSF2RA, and some cytokine genes, including IL6, IL23A and CCL22, were significantly upregulated in the late phase after L-92 exposure. Some genes encoding cytokines, such as IL1A, IL1B and IL8, and the enzyme IDO1 were upregulated at both the early and the late phases of treatment. These results suggest that probiotic L-92 might promote Th1 and regulatory T-cell responses by activation of the MAPK signaling pathway, followed by the NOD-like receptor signaling pathway in THP-1 cells. PMID:25379363

  20. Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 Cells Activate Expression of Immunomodulatory Genes in THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    YANAGIHARA, Sae; GOTO, Hiroaki; HIROTA, Tatsuhiko; FUKUDA, Shinji; OHNO, Hiroshi; YAMAMOTO, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    To understand the immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 cells suggested from our previous study of in vivo anti-allergy and anti-virus effects, host immune responses in macrophage-like THP-1 cells after 4?h (the early phase) and 24?h (the late phase) of cocultivation with L-92 cells were investigated by transcriptome analysis. In the early phase of L-92 treatment, various transcription regulator genes, such as, NFkB1, NFkB2, JUN, HIVEP2 and RELB, and genes encoding chemokines and cytokines, such as CCL4, CXCL11, CCL3 and TNF, were upregulated. Two transmembrane receptor genes, TLR7 and ICAM1, were also upregulated in the early phase of treatment. In contrast, many transmembrane receptor genes, such as IL7R, CD80, CRLF2, CD86, CD5, HLA-DQA1, IL2RA, IL15RA and CSF2RA, and some cytokine genes, including IL6, IL23A and CCL22, were significantly upregulated in the late phase after L-92 exposure. Some genes encoding cytokines, such as IL1A, IL1B and IL8, and the enzyme IDO1 were upregulated at both the early and the late phases of treatment. These results suggest that probiotic L-92 might promote Th1 and regulatory T-cell responses by activation of the MAPK signaling pathway, followed by the NOD-like receptor signaling pathway in THP-1 cells. PMID:25379363

  1. Metabolic-epigenetic crosstalk in macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Baardman, Jeroen; Licht, Iris; de Winther, Menno Pj; Van den Bossche, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are emerging as crucial controllers of macrophages, innate immune cells that determine the outcome of many inflammatory diseases. Recent studies demonstrate that the activity of particular chromatin-modifying enzymes is regulated by the availability of specific metabolites like acetyl-coenzyme A, S-adenosylmethionine, ?-ketoglutarate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and polyamines. In this way chromatin-modifying enzymes could sense the macrophage's metabolic status and translate this into gene expression and phenotypic changes. Importantly, distinct macrophage activation subsets display particular metabolic pathways. IFN?/lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages (MIFN?/LPS or M1) display high glycolysis, which directly drives their inflammatory phenotype. In contrast, oxidative mitochondrial metabolism and enhanced polyamine production are hallmarks and requirements for IL-4-induced macrophage activation (MIL-4 or M2). Here we report how epigenetics could serve as a bridge between altered macrophage metabolism, macrophage activation and disease. PMID:26585710

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) constituents on macrophages: in vitro evaluations of aqueous and ethanolic components.

    PubMed

    Dibazar, Shaghayegh Pishkhan; Fateh, Shirin; Daneshmandi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The present work sought to investigate potential suppressive effects on mouse macrophages by in vitro treatment with clove (Syzygium aromaticum) ethanolic extracted essential oil (containing eugenol) or its water-soluble extract. Using doses (ranging from 0.001-1000 µg/ml) of each material freshly prepared in the laboratory, cell survival and production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-12 by the treated cells (that in all cases also had received LPS stimulation) were measured. Results indicated that, except at doses ≥100 µg/ml, viability was unaffected in all groups. NO release by LPS-stimulated macrophages was generally significantly suppressed by either material; in contrast, low (i.e. 0.001-1 µg/ml) doses of either extract class appeared to enhance NO release by non-LPS (unstimulated)-treated macrophages. Among LPS-stimulated cells, TNFα release was also significantly affected by each extract; the ethanolic extract was suppressive at all doses tested, while the aqueous material was so up to 1 µg/ml and then became stimulatory. In contrast, nearly every dose of either extract appeared to stimulate IL-6 release from the LPS-treated cells. Effects on IL-12 production were overall inconsistent; in general, the ethanolic extract tended to be stimulatory of production by the LPS-treated cells. The data for the aqueous material showed no discernable pattern of effect. The results suggest that clove extracts do not have a distinct cytotoxic activity, but do impart potential anti- and pro-oxidant effects in cells, depending on their concentrations and on the activation state of the macrophages themselves at the time of exposure to the extracts. The impact of the extracts on macrophage cytokine release also displays a pattern of dose-relatedness. PMID:24873744

  3. QSAR and Docking Studies on Capsazepine Derivatives for Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Aparna; Sharma, Pooja; Prakash, Om; Singh, Monika; Kalani, Komal; Khan, Feroz; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar Umrao; Luqman, Suaib; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Capsazepine, an antagonist of capsaicin, is discovered by the structure and activity relationship. In previous studies it has been found that capsazepine has potency for immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory activity and emerging as a favourable target in quest for efficacious and safe anti-inflammatory drug. Thus, a 2D quantitative structural activity relationship (QSAR) model against target tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) was developed using multiple linear regression method (MLR) with good internal prediction (r2?=?0.8779) and external prediction (r2pred?=?0.5865) using Discovery Studio v3.5 (Accelrys, USA). The predicted activity was further validated by in vitro experiment. Capsazepine was tested in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation in peritoneal mouse macrophages. Anti-inflammatory profile of capsazepine was assessed by its potency to inhibit the production of inflammatory mediator TNF-?. The in vitro experiment indicated that capsazepine is an efficient anti-inflammatory agent. Since, the developed QSAR model showed significant correlations between chemical structure and anti-inflammatory activity, it was successfully applied in the screening of forty-four virtual derivatives of capsazepine, which finally afforded six potent derivatives, CPZ-29, CPZ-30, CPZ-33, CPZ-34, CPZ-35 and CPZ-36. To gain more insights into the molecular mechanism of action of capsazepine and its derivatives, molecular docking and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) studies were performed. The results of QSAR, molecular docking, in silico ADMET screening and in vitro experimental studies provide guideline and mechanistic scope for the identification of more potent anti-inflammatory & immunomodulatory drug. PMID:25003344

  4. Lipoteichoic Acid in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: Structural Model and Immunomodulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cot, Marlne; Ray, Aurlie; Gilleron, Martine; Vercellone, Alain; Larrouy-Maumus, Grald; Armau, Elise; Gauthier, Sophie; Tiraby, Grard; Puzo, Germain; Nigou, Jrme

    2011-01-01

    Gram positive bacteria produce cell envelope macroamphiphile glycopolymers, i.e. lipoteichoic acids or lipoglycans, whose functions and biosynthesis are not yet fully understood. We report for the first time a detailed structure of lipoteichoic acid isolated from a Streptomyces species, i.e. Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T. Chemical, MS and NMR analyses revealed a polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituted with ?-glucosaminyl and ?-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl residues but devoid of any amino-acid substituent. This structure is very close, if not identical, to that of the wall teichoic acid of this organism. These data not only contribute to the growing recognition that lipoteichoic acid is a cell envelope component of Gram positive Actinobacteria but also strongly support the recently proposed hypothesis of an overlap between the pathways of lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid synthesis in these bacteria. S. hygroscopicus lipoteichoic acid induced signalling by human innate immune receptor TLR2, confirming its role as a microbe-associated molecular pattern. Its activity was partially dependant on TLR1, TLR6 and CD14. Moreover, it stimulated TNF-? and IL-6 production by a human macrophage cell line to an extent similar to that of Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. These results provide new clues on lipoteichoic acid structure/function relationships, most particularly on the role of the polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituents. PMID:22028855

  5. In vitro investigation of the potential immunomodulatory and anti-cancer activities of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum).

    PubMed

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Carr, Ronald I

    2010-04-01

    Although the immunomodulatory effects of many herbs have been extensively studied, research related to possible immunomodulatory effects of various spices is relatively scarce. Here, the potential immunomodulatory effects of black pepper and cardamom are investigated. Our data show that black pepper and cardamom aqueous extracts significantly enhance splenocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent, synergistic fashion. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments reveal that black pepper and cardamom significantly enhance and suppress, respectively, T helper (Th)1 cytokine release by splenocytes. Conversely, Th2 cytokine release by splenocytes is significantly suppressed and enhanced by black pepper and cardamom, respectively. Experimental evidence suggests that black pepper and cardamom extracts exert pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively. Consistently, nitric oxide production by macrophages is significantly augmented and reduced by black pepper and cardamom, respectively. Remarkably, it is evident that black pepper and cardamom extracts significantly enhance the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, indicating their potential anti-cancer effects. Our findings strongly suggest that black pepper and cardamom exert immunomodulatory roles and antitumor activities, and hence they manifest themselves as natural agents that can promote the maintenance of a healthy immune system. We anticipate that black pepper and cardamom constituents can be used as potential therapeutic tools to regulate inflammatory responses and prevent/attenuate carcinogenesis. PMID:20210607

  6. Evaluation of immunomodulatory activity of ShirishavalehaAn Ayurvedic compound formulation in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shyamlal Singh; Galib; Prajapati, P. K.; Ashok, B. K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2011-01-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of Shirishavaleha prepared from two different parts of Shirisha (Albizia lebbeck Benth), i.e., Twak (Bark) and Sara (Heartwood) as main ingredients was evaluated for humoral antibody formation and cell-mediated immunity in established experimental models. The study used Wistar rats of either sex weighing 200 40 g, while the test drug was administered orally at a dose of 1.8 g/kg. Hemagglutination titer and body weight were recorded to assess effects on humoral immunity; immunological paw edema was assessed for cell-mediated immunity. Shirishavaleha prepared from heartwood shows significant enhancement in antibody formation, attenuation of body weight changes, and suppression of immunological paw edema, while Shirishavaleha prepared from bark shows weak immunomodulatory activity. The study therefore concludes that Shirishavaleha prepared from heartwood has significant immunomodulatory activity. PMID:22253509

  7. Evaluation of immunomodulatory activity of "Shirishavaleha"-An Ayurvedic compound formulation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shyamlal Singh; Galib; Prajapati, P K; Ashok, B K; Ravishankar, B

    2011-10-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of Shirishavaleha prepared from two different parts of Shirisha (Albizia lebbeck Benth), i.e., Twak (Bark) and Sara (Heartwood) as main ingredients was evaluated for humoral antibody formation and cell-mediated immunity in established experimental models. The study used Wistar rats of either sex weighing 200 40 g, while the test drug was administered orally at a dose of 1.8 g/kg. Hemagglutination titer and body weight were recorded to assess effects on humoral immunity; immunological paw edema was assessed for cell-mediated immunity. Shirishavaleha prepared from heartwood shows significant enhancement in antibody formation, attenuation of body weight changes, and suppression of immunological paw edema, while Shirishavaleha prepared from bark shows weak immunomodulatory activity. The study therefore concludes that Shirishavaleha prepared from heartwood has significant immunomodulatory activity. PMID:22253509

  8. Different Effects of the Immunomodulatory Drug GMDP Immobilized onto Aminopropyl Modified and Unmodified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles upon Peritoneal Macrophages of Women with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Antsiferova, Yuliya; Sotnikova, Nataliya

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to compare in vitro the possibility of application of unmodified silica nanoparticles (UMNPs) and modified by aminopropyl groups silica nanoparticles (AMNPs) for topical delivery of immunomodulatory drug GMDP to the peritoneal macrophages of women with endometriosis. The absence of cytotoxic effect and high cellular uptake was demonstrated for both types of silica nanoparticles. The immobilization of GMDP on the UMNPs led to the suppression of the stimulatory effect of GMDP on the membrane expression of scavenger receptors SR-AI and SR-B, mRNAs expression of NOD2 and RAGE, and synthesis of proteolytic enzyme MMP-9 and its inhibitor TIMP-1. GMDP, immobilized onto AMNPs, enhanced the initially reduced membrane expression of SRs and increased NOD2, RAGE, and MMP-9 mRNAs expression by macrophages. Simultaneously high level of mRNAs expression of factors, preventing undesirable hyperactivation of peritoneal macrophages (SOCS1 and TIMP-1), was observed in macrophages incubated in the presence of GMDP, immobilized onto AMNPs. The effect of AMNPs immobilized GMDP in some cases exceeded the effect of free GMDP. Thus, among the studied types of silica nanoparticles, AMNPs are the most suitable nanoparticles for topical delivery of GMDP to the peritoneal macrophages. PMID:24455738

  9. Exploring the full spectrum of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Mosser, David M.; Edwards, Justin P.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages display remarkable plasticity and can change their physiology in response to environmental cues. These changes can give rise to different populations of cells with distinct functions. In this Review we suggest a new grouping of macrophage populations based on three different homeostatic activitieshost defence, wound healing and immune regulation. We propose that similarly to primary colours, these three basic macrophage populations can blend into various other shades of activation. We characterize each population and provide examples of macrophages from specific disease states that have the characteristics of one or more of these populations. PMID:19029990

  10. Macrophage activation in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Joachim L; Schmieder, Astrid; Goerdt, S

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly accepted that macrophages play a crucial role in many diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, cancer, skin diseases, and even neurodegenerative diseases. It is therefore not surprising that macrophages in human diseases have gained significant interest during the last years. Molecular analysis combined with more sophisticated murine disease models and the application of genome-wide technologies has resulted in a much better understanding of the role of macrophages in human disease. We highlight important gain of knowledge during the last years for tumor-associated macrophages, and for macrophages in atherosclerosis, obesity and wound healing. Albeit these exciting findings certainly pave the way to novel diagnostics and therapeutics, several hurdles still need to be overcome. We propose a general outline for future research and development in disease-related macrophage biology based on integrating (1) genome-wide technologies, (2) direct human sampling, and (3) a dedicated use of in vivo model systems. PMID:26303100

  11. Mechanisms of triglyceride accumulation in activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Kenneth R.; Shigenaga, Judy K.; Kazemi, Mahmood R.; McDonald, Carol M.; Patzek, Sophie M.; Cross, Andrew S.; Moser, Arthur; Grunfeld, Carl

    2012-01-01

    LPS treatment of macrophages induces TG accumulation, which is accentuated by TG-rich lipoproteins or FFA. We defined pathways altered during macrophage activation that contribute to TG accumulation. Glucose uptake increased with activation, accompanied by increased GLUT1. Oxidation of glucose markedly decreased, whereas incorporation of glucose-derived carbon into FA and sterols increased. Macrophage activation also increased uptake of FFA, associated with an increase in CD36. Oxidation of FA was markedly reduced, whereas the incorporation of FA into TGs increased, associated with increased GPAT3 and DGAT2. Additionally, macrophage activation decreased TG lipolysis; however, expression of ATGL or HSL was not altered. Macrophage activation altered gene expression similarly when incubated with exogenous FA or AcLDL. Whereas activation with ligands of TLR2 (zymosan), TLR3 (poly I:C), or TLR4 (LPS) induced alterations in macrophage gene expression, leading to TG accumulation, treatment of macrophages with cytokines had minimal effects. Thus, activation of TLRs leads to accumulation of TG in macrophages by multiple pathways that may have beneficial effects in host defense but could contribute to the accelerated atherosclerosis in chronic infections and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22753953

  12. Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Activity of Hydroalcoholic Extract and its Fractions of Leaves of Ficus benghalensis Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Bhanwase, Anil Subhash; Alagawadi, Kallanagouda Ramappa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ficus benghalensis is a folk medicine indigenous plant of India. Several studies on this plant reported and focused on the biological profile of the plant. Objectives: This study is aimed to evaluate the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity of F. benghalensis leaf extract using various in vitro screening methods of both parameters. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic (FB1) extract and it's four fractions viz. n-hexane (FB2), n-butanol (FB3), chloroform (FB4), and water (FB5) of leaves of F. benghalensis investigated for their free radical scavenging activity using 1-1-diphneyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2, 2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. A dose-response curve was plotted and IC50 values were determined to assess antioxidant activity. Nitroblue tetrazolium test, phagocytosis of killed Candida albicans and candidacidal assay were carried out to assess the immunomodulatory activity. Positive non-lymphoid cell number, mean particle number of killed C. albicans, percent value of killed C. albicans by neutrophils were calculated and presented. Results: All extracts showed antioxidant and prominent immunomodulatory activity with compared to standard. Conclusions: Hydroalcoholic (FB1) extract and its four fractions viz. n-hexane (FB2), n-butanol (FB3), chloroform (FB4), and water (FB5) showed promising antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity. SUMMARY Hydroalcoholic extract and its fractions of F. benghalensis Linn exhibited different DPPH and ABTS scavenging activity in concentration dependent manner.The extract, fractions and reference antioxidants showed DPPH scavenging effect in the order of Vit-C > Quercetin > FB2 > FB1 > FB5 > FB4> FB3 and ABTS scavenging effect in the order of Vit-C > Quercetin > FB1> FB2 > FB5 > FB3> FB4.FB2 and FB3 showed promising immunomodulatory activity at all concentrations. PMID:26941536

  13. Effects of Ferumoxides – Protamine Sulfate Labeling on Immunomodulatory Characteristics of Macrophage-like THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Janic, Branislava; Iskander, A. S. M.; Rad, Ali M.; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Arbab, Ali S.

    2008-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO) complexed with cationic transfection agent is used to label various mammalian cells. Labeled cells can then be utilized as an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes. However, certain number of in vivo administered labeled cells may be cleared from tissues by the host's macrophages. For successful translation to routine clinical application of SPIO labeling method it is important that this mode of in vivo clearance of iron does not elicit any diverse immunological effects. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that SPIO agent ferumoxides-protamine sulfate (FePro) incorporation into macrophages does not alter immunological properties of these cells with regard to differentiation, chemotaxis, and ability to respond to the activation stimuli and to modulate T cell response. We used THP-1 cell line as a model for studying macrophage cell type. THP-1 cells were magnetically labeled with FePro, differentiated with 100 nM of phorbol ester, 12-Myristate-13-acetate (TPA) and stimulated with 100 ng/ml of LPS. The results showed 1) FePro labeling had no effect on the changes in morphology and expression of cell surface proteins associated with TPA induced differentiation; 2) FePro labeled cells responded to LPS with slightly higher levels of NFκB pathway activation, as shown by immunobloting; TNF-α secretion and cell surface expression levels of CD54 and CD83 activation markers, under these conditions, were still comparable to the levels observed in non-labeled cells; 3) FePro labeling exhibited differential, chemokine dependent, effect on THP-1 chemotaxis with a decrease in cell directional migration to MCP-1; 4) FePro labeling did not affect the ability of THP-1 cells to down-regulate T cell expression of CD4 and CD8 and to induce T cell proliferation. Our study demonstrated that intracellular incorporation of FePro complexes does not alter overall immunological properties of THP-1 cells. The described experiments provide the model for studying the effects of in vivo clearance of iron particles via incorporation into the host's macrophages that may follow after in vivo application of any type of magnetically labeled mammalian cells. To better mimic the complex in vivo scenario, this model may be further exploited by introducing additional cellular and biological, immunologically relevant, components. PMID:18575575

  14. Macrophage activation by OM-85 BV.

    PubMed

    Maul, J

    1992-01-01

    Peritoneal or bone-marrow-derived murine macrophages were exposed for 24 h in vitro to dilutions of the bacterial extract OM-85 BV, in the presence or absence of other added compounds [macrophage-activating factor (MAF), recombinant murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)]. Various metabolic responses and functional activities were then measured. Glucose oxidation through the hexose monophosphate shunt pathway was markedly stimulated in OM-85 BV-treated macrophages compared to control macrophages. Similarly, OM-85 BV primed macrophages for superoxide production upon triggering by phorbol myristate acetate. Both effects were further enhanced by simultaneous treatment of the cells with MAF with OM-85 BV. The bacterial extract also induced macrophages to release large amounts of nitrite (a marker of the activated state). As regards functional responses, coincubation with MAF and OM-85 BV activated macrophages to destroy target cells as well as intracellular microorganisms; in the latter case, similar results were obtained when MAF was replaced by IFN-gamma. In all these tests, the possibility that the observed effects were due to contamination of the bacterial extracts by endotoxin could be excluded. The above results indicate that OM-85 BV induces metabolic and functional properties in macrophages that are characteristic of the activated state and are important for host defence. PMID:1332156

  15. Immunomodulatory Effects of Chitotriosidase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Elmonem, Mohamed A.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2016-01-01

    Chitotriosidase enzyme (EC: 3.2.1.14) is the major active chitinase in the human body. It is produced mainly by activated macrophages, in which its expression is regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Chitotriosidase was confirmed as essential element in the innate immunity against chitin containing organisms such as fungi and protozoa; however, its immunomodulatory effects extend far beyond innate immunity. In the current review, we will try to explore the expanding spectrum of immunological roles played by chitotriosidase enzyme in human health and disease and will discuss its up-to-date clinical value. PMID:26881065

  16. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide access for the non-expert. PMID:26257737

  17. Antinociceptive, Immunomodulatory and Antipyretic Activity of Nymphayol Isolated from Nymphaea stellata (Willd.) Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Subash-Babu; Paul, Antony Samy; Savarimuthu, Ignacimuthu; Ali, Alshatwi A

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to analyze the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and antipyretic activities of nymphayol were investigated in wistar rats and mice. Antinociceptive effect was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing, formalin induced paw licking and hot-plate tests. Immunomodulatory activity was assessed by neutrophil adhesion test, humoral response to sheep red blood cells, delayed-type hypersensitivity, phagocytic activity and cyclophosphamide induced myelosuppression. Antipyretic activity was evaluated by yeast induced hyperthermia in rats. Nymphayol produced signifi cant (p<0.05) antinociceptive activity in acetic acid induced writhing response and late phase of the formalin induced paw licking response. Pre-treatment with nymphayol (50 mg/kg, oral) evoked a signifi cant increase in neutrophil adhesion to nylon fi bres. The augmentation of humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells by nymphayol (50 mg/kg) was evidenced by increase in antibody titres in rats. Oral administration of nymphayol (50 mg/kg) to rats potentiated the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by sheep red blood cells. Treatment with nymphayol showed a signifi cant (p<0.05) reduction in pyrexia in rats. The results suggest that nymphayol possesses potent anti-nociceptive, immunomodulatory and antipyretic activities. PMID:24244827

  18. Effects of Brazilian and Bulgarian propolis on bactericidal activity of macrophages against Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Ricardo O; Sforcin, José M; Funari, Sílvia R C; Bankova, Vassya

    2005-02-01

    Propolis has been used in folk medicine since ancient times due to its many biological properties, such as antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, immunomodulatory activities, among others. Macrophages play an important role in the early phase of Salmonella infection. In this work, macrophages were prestimulated with Brazilian or Bulgarian propolis and subsequently challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium at different macrophage/bacteria ratio. After 60 min of incubation, cells were harvested with Triton-X to lyse the macrophages. To assess the bactericidal activity, the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of S. typhimurium was determined by plating 0.1 mL in Mueller Hinton agar. After 24 h, CFU were counted, and the percentage of bactericidal activity was obtained. Propolis from Brazil and Bulgaria enhanced the bactericidal activity of macrophages, depending on its concentration. Brazilian propolis seemed to be more efficient than that from Bulgaria, because of their different chemical composition. In Bulgaria, bees collect the material mainly from the bud exudate of poplar trees, while in Brazil, Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. was shown to be the main propolis source. Our data also showed that the increased bactericidal activity of macrophages involved the participation of oxygen (H(2)O(2)) and nitrogen (NO) intermediate metabolites. PMID:15652765

  19. Immunomodulatory Activity of the Water Extract from Medicinal Mushroom Inonotus obliquus

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of aqueous extract of Inonotus obliquus, called as Chaga, was tested on bone marrow cells from chemically immunosuppressed mice. The Chaga water extract was daily administered for 24 days to mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide (400 mg/kg body weight), immunosuppressive alkylating agent. The number of colony-forming unit (CFU)-granulocytes/macrophages (GM) and erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), increased almost to the levels seen in non-treated control as early as 8 days after treatment. Oral administration of the extract highly increased serum levels of IL-6. Also, the level of TNF-? was elevated by the chemical treatment in control mice, whereas was maintained at the background level in the extract-treated mice, indicating that the extract might effectively suppress TNF-? related pathologic conditions. These results strongly suggest the great potential of the aqueous extract from Inonotus obliquus as immune enhancer during chemotherapy. PMID:24049493

  20. Immunomodulatory Activity of the Water Extract from Medicinal Mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Ran

    2005-09-01

    The immunomodulatory effect of aqueous extract of Inonotus obliquus, called as Chaga, was tested on bone marrow cells from chemically immunosuppressed mice. The Chaga water extract was daily administered for 24 days to mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide (400 mg/kg body weight), immunosuppressive alkylating agent. The number of colony-forming unit (CFU)-granulocytes/macrophages (GM) and erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), increased almost to the levels seen in non-treated control as early as 8 days after treatment. Oral administration of the extract highly increased serum levels of IL-6. Also, the level of TNF-? was elevated by the chemical treatment in control mice, whereas was maintained at the background level in the extract-treated mice, indicating that the extract might effectively suppress TNF-? related pathologic conditions. These results strongly suggest the great potential of the aqueous extract from Inonotus obliquus as immune enhancer during chemotherapy. PMID:24049493

  1. Polysaccharides from Umbilicaria esculenta cultivated in Huangshan Mountain and immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Qun; Liu, Yong; Wang, Jun-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Umbilicaria esculenta cultivated in Huangshan Mountain (HSSE) is precious edible and medicinal lichen. In this study, four polysaccharide fractions designated as UEP1, UEP2, UEP3, and UEP4 were isolated from HSSE with water extraction at different temperature. The physico-chemical properties and immunomodulatory activities of polysaccharide fractions were investigated. The results indicated that UEP1, UEP2, UEP3 and UEP4 were acid polysaccharide with 0.50%, 0.62%, 0.63%, and 0.83% of uronic acid contents, respectively. Four polysaccharide fractions were mainly composed of glucose, galactose and mannose with different molar ratio. In the in vitro immunomodulatory assay, all the polysaccharide fractions (20-500 μg/mL) could increase the NO production and phagocytic activity of RAW 264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This work demonstrated that the polysaccharides from HSSE could be used as potential biological response modifier. PMID:25316425

  2. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide access for the non-expert. PMID:26257737

  3. Immunomodulatory and antioxidative activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Yu; Feng, Cui-Ping; Li, Xing; Chang, Ming-Chang; Meng, Jun-Long; Xu, Li-Jing

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the immune activation and reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (CMP) in vivo, 24 male and 24 female Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The mice in the four experimental groups were administered 0 (normal control), 50, 100, or 200mg/kg/d body weight CMP via gavage. After 30 days, the viscera index, leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, immunoglobulin (IgG) levels, and biochemical parameters were measured. The effect of CMP on the expression of tumor necrosis (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-1β in the spleens of experimental mice was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the administration of CMP improved the immune function in mice, significantly increased the spleen and thymus indices, the spleen lymphocyte activity, the total quantity of white blood cells, and IgG function in mice serum. CMP exhibited significant antioxidative activity in mice, and decreased malondialdehyde levels in vivo. CMP upregulated the expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β mRNA in high-dose groups compared to that observed for the control mice. We can thus conclude that CMP effectively improved the immune function through protection against oxidative stress. CMP thus shows potential for development as drugs and health supplements. PMID:26853825

  4. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activity of selected osthole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Włodarczyk, Maciej; Gleńsk, Michał

    2009-01-01

    From osthole [7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-but-2-enyl)-chromen-2-one] (I), obtained by selective extraction of Peucedanum ostruthium (L.) W. Koch roots, ostholic acid (II) was synthetized as a result of its oxidation with chromium trioxide. From ostholic acid, through its chloride, four amides were obtained: the morpholide 1, the p-chloro-benzylamide 2, the piperidine 3 and the N-methyl-piperazide 4. Except for 1, other compounds have not been described before. The amides 1-4 and their precursor osthole (I) were tested for their potential activities in selected immunological assays. The compounds showed moderate inhibitory activity in the humoral immune response to sheep erythrocytes in mice in vitro, and 4 was the most suppressive. The effects of 1 and 3 on concanavalin A- and pokeweed mitogen-induced mouse splenocyte proliferation were inhibitory and those of 4 stimulatory. The compounds were also tested for their activity on tumour necrosis factor a and interleukin 6 production, induced by lipopolysaccharide, in cultures of rat peritoneal cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Compounds 1, 3 and 4 inhibited tumour necrosis factor a (rat cells), whereas compound 2 stimulated the production of both cytokines. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 were also strongly inhibitory on tumour necrosis factor a production in human blood cells (73, 78 and 80% inhibition at 10 microg/ml, respectively). On the other hand, 2 and 4 stimulated the interleukin 6 production (2- to 3-fold stimulation). In addition, 2 and 4 suppressed the carrageenan-induced inflammation in mice (56.5% and 68.3% inhibition, respectively). In summary, the compounds predominantly displayed suppressive and antiinflammatory activities in the investigated models. PMID:19678539

  5. Immunomodulatory activity of boswellic acids of Boswellia serrata Roxb.

    PubMed

    Pungle, Pratibha; Banavalikar, M; Suthar, A; Biyani, M; Mengi, S

    2003-12-01

    Extract of gum resin of B. serrata containing 60% acetyl 11-keto beta boswellic acid (AKBA) along with other constituents such as 11-keto beta-boswellic acid (KBA), acetyl beta-boswellic acid and beta-boswellic acid has been evaluated for antianaphylactic and mast cell stabilizing activity using passive paw anaphylaxis and compound 48/80 induced degranulation of mast cell methods. The extract inhibited the passive paw anaphylaxis reaction in rats in dose-dependant manner (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg, po). However, the standard dexamethasone (0.27 mg/kg, po) revealed maximum inhibition of edema as compared to the extract. A significant inhibition in the compound 48/80 induced degranulation of mast cells in dose-dependant manner (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg, po) was observed thus showing mast cell stabilizing activity. The standard disodium cromoglycate (50 mg/kg, ip) was found to demonstrate maximum per cent protection against degranulation as compared to the extract containing 60% AKBA. The results suggest promising antianaphylactic and mast cell stabilizing activity of the extract. PMID:15320503

  6. Immunomodulation of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage functions and antioxidant activities of 11 plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Ghonime, Mohammed; Emara, Mohamed; Shawky, Riham; Soliman, Hesham; El-Domany, Ramadan; Abdelaziz, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A group of 11 medicinal plants, including Lavandula pubescens, Trigonella foenugricium, Salsola schweinforthi, Calligonum comosum, Silene succulenta, Silene villosa, Bogonvillea glabra, Cakile maritime, Gomphrene celesoids, Mirabilis jalaba, and Silene nocturna growing in Egypt, were extracted and examined for their immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities. RAW 264.7 cells were recruited to investigate the immunomodulatory effect through multiple parameters analysis. First, the proliferation index of macrophages cells was evaluated revealing that Trigonella foenugricium, Silene succulenta and Silene villosa have a significant cytotoxic effect on RAW cells. Interestingly, we observed enhancement of macrophages phagocytic function of by all extracts except Cakile maritime, Gomphrena celosioides and Silene nocturna. Afterwards, macrophages were challenged by incubation with LPS and the effect of various extracts on inflammatory responses was investigated; the generation of NO from activated macrophage was substantially suppressed by 7 extracts namely, Trigonella foenugricium, Calligonum comosum, Silene succulenta, Bougainvillea glabra, Mirabilis jalaba, Gomphrena celosioides and Silene nocturna. TNF-? was decreased by percentage range from 3.8 to 85.8% and Trigonella foenugricium extract showed the highest inhibition of TNF-? release. All extracts except Trigonella foenugricium, Salsola schweinforthi, Silene succulenta and Mirabilis jalaba significantly inhibited COX-2 production from stimulated macrophage. Moreover, evaluating the potential antioxidant activity of these extracts showed that Trigonella foenugricium, Salsola schweinforthi, Calligonum comosum, Bogonvillea glabra and Mirabilis jalaba exhibited some antioxidant activities. Taken together, our results suggest that some of these extracts may have a considerable antinflammatory and antioxidant effects and may be a potential therapeutic choice in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25564700

  7. Immunomodulatory activity of plant residues on ovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Farinacci, Maura; Colitti, Monica; Sgorlon, Sandy; Stefanon, Bruno

    2008-11-15

    Neutrophils play an essential role in host defense and inflammation. Plants have long been used to improve the immune function, but for most of them specific investigations on animal health are lacking. In the present study, water and hydroethanolic extracts from 11 plant wastes have been screened on immune responses of ovine neutrophils. Eight sheep clinically healthy, not lactating, non-pregnant were selected and used for the experiment. Freshly isolated neutrophils were incubated with the extracts of the residues at increasing doses, and then they were tested for adhesion and superoxide production induced with PMA. The residues of Larix decidua, Thymus vulgaris, Salix alba, Sinupret, Helianthus annuus, Mangifera indica modulated the neutrophil immune functions, moreover, Larix decidua, Thymus vulgaris and Salix alba presented the highest anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:18667240

  8. Host defence peptides: antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity and potential applications for tackling antibiotic-resistant infections

    PubMed Central

    Nijnik, A; Hancock, REW

    2009-01-01

    The rapidly increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant infections and the alarmingly low rate of discovery of conventional antibiotics create an urgent need for alternative strategies to treat bacterial infections. Host defence peptides are short cationic molecules produced by the immune systems of most multicellular organisms; they are a class of compounds being actively researched. In this review, we provide an overview of the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of natural host defence peptides, and discuss strategies for creating artificial derivatives with improved biological and pharmacological properties, issues of microbial resistance, and challenges associated with their adaptation for clinical use. PMID:22460279

  9. Brazilian Propolis Antileishmanial and Immunomodulatory Effects

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Suelen Santos; Thom, Graciele da Silva; Cataneo, Allan Henrique Depieri; Miranda, Milena Menegazzo; Felipe, Ionice; Andrade, Clia Guadalupe Tardeli de Jesus; Watanabe, Maria Anglica Ehara; Piana, Gilce Maria; Sforcin, Jos Maurcio; Pavanelli, Wander Rogrio; Conchon-Costa, Ivete

    2013-01-01

    The antileishmanial and immunomodulatory effects of propolis collected in Botucatu, So Paulo State, Brazil, were evaluated in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis experimental infection. The antileishmanial effect of propolis on promastigote forms was verified by reducing growth and by promoting morphologic alterations observed by scanning electron microscopy. In in vitro immunomodulatory assays, macrophages were pretreated with propolis and then infected with L. (V.) braziliensis. In vivo, supernatants from liver cells and peritoneal exudate of BALB/c mice pretreated with propolis and infected with Leishmania (107/mL promastigotes) were collected, and TNF-? and IL-12 were measured by ELISA. Macrophages incubated with propolis showed a significant increase in interiorization and further killing of parasites. An increased TNF-? production was seen in mice pretreated with propolis, whereas IL-12 was downregulated during the infection. In conclusion, Brazilian propolis showed a direct action on the parasite and displayed immunomodulatory effects on murine macrophages, even though the parasite has been reported to affect the activation pathways of the cell. The observed effects could be associated with the presence of phenolic compounds (flavonoids, aromatic acids, and benzopyranes), di- and triterpenes, and essential oils found in our propolis sample. PMID:23762152

  10. Immunomodulatory activity of purified arabinoxylans from finger millet (Eleusine coracana, v. Indaf 15) bran.

    PubMed

    Savitha Prashanth, M R; Shruthi, R R; Muralikrishna, G

    2015-09-01

    Biological activities of alkali extracted (Barium hydroxide: BE-480kDa, Potassium hydroxide: KE1-1080 and KE2-40kDa), purified arabinoxylans (AX) from the finger millet bran varying in their molecular weight, phenolic acid content, arabinose to xylose ratios were evaluated for their immune-stimulatory activities using murine lymphocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages. All three purified AX displayed significant (p?activity and activation of macrophages including phagocytosis. Among these BE has shown higher enhancing lymphocyte proliferation (>2 fold) and macrophage phagocytosis than KE1 and KE2. The above results clearly documented that the immunostimulatory activity of arabinoxylans is directly proportional to the amount of ferulic acid content (0.11mg/100g), whereas molecular weight as well as arabinose/xylose ratio, did not have any bearing. Purified AX from the finger millet bran can be explored as a potent natural immunomodulator. PMID:26345027

  11. Immunomodulatory activity of Āmalaki Rasāyana: An experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Jignesh; Ashok, B.K.; Galib; Patgiri, B.J.; Prajapati, P.K.; Ravishankar, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ayurvedic system of medicine holds a number of drugs that improves the immunity. Āmalaki (Emblica officinalis) is one such drug. Researches with crude extracts of Āmalaki have proven the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. But, works on Āmalaki Rasāyana are not found reported. Aims: Considering this, two samples of Āmalaki Rasāyana (AR7 and AR21) were studied to evaluate comparative immunomodulatory activity against the cyclophosphamide immunosuppression in rats. Materials and Methods: Test drugs were prepared by following classical guidelines. Wistar strain albino rats of either sex were used in the study. Statistical Analysis: For comparison of data from cyclophosphamide control group with remaining cyclophosphamide plus test drug administered groups one way ANOVA with Dunnett's multiple t-test (DMTT) was employed. Results and Conclusions: Āmalaki Rasāyana possesses significant immunostimulant activity and moderate cytoprotective activity. AR21 was found to have better activity profile in terms of both immunostimulant as well as cytoprotective activity. PMID:24167334

  12. PROTEASOME ACTIVITY DECLINES IN AGED MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in regulation of a variety of biologically important processes including antigen presentation by macrophages (Mf). Age-related decrease in proteasome activity has been reported in other tissues. However, the effect of aging on the ubiquitin-proteasome pat...

  13. PROTEASOME ACTIVITY DECLINES IN AGED MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in regulation of a variety of biologically important processes including antigen presentation by macrophages. Age-related decrease in proteasome activity has been reported in other tissues. However, the effect of aging on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway ...

  14. Evaluation of in vitro anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory activities of compounds isolated from Curcuma longa

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Grace G. L.; Chan, Ben C. L.; Hon, Po-Ming; Lee, Mavis Y. H.; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Lau, Clara B. S.

    2010-01-01

    The rhizome of Curcuma longa (CL) has been commonly used in Asia as a potential candidate for the treatment of different diseases, including inflammatory disorders and cancers. The present study evaluated the anti-proliferative activities of the isolated compounds (3 curcuminoids and 2 turmerones) from CL, using human cancer cell lines HepG2, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The immunomodulatory activities of turmerones (α and aromatic) isolated from CL were also examined using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Our results showed that the curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin) and α-turmerone significantly inhibited proliferation of cancer cells in dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values of these compounds in cancer cells ranged from 11.0–41.8 μg/ml. Alpha-turmerone induced MDA-MB-231 cells to undergo apoptosis, which was confirmed by annexin-V & propidium iodide staining, and DNA fragmentation assay. The caspase cascade was activated as shown by a significant decrease of procaspases-3, -8 and -9 in α-turmerone treated cells. Both α-turmerone and aromatic-turmerone showed stimulatory effects on PBMC proliferation and cytokine production. The anti-proliferative effect of α-turmerone and immunomodulatory activities of ar-turmerone were shown for the first time. The findings revealed the potential use of CL crude extract (containing curcuminoids and volatile oil including turmerones) as chemopreventive agent. PMID:20438793

  15. Brazilian Green Propolis: Anti-Inflammatory Property by an Immunomodulatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Joleen Lopes; da Silva, Mayara Cristina Pinto; dos Reis, Aramys Silva; Costa, Graciomar Conceição; Arruda, Diêgo de Sousa; Rocha, Bruno Alves; Vaz, Mirela Mara de Oliveira Lima Leite; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade; Guerra, Rosane Nassar Meireles; Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; do Nascimento, Flávia Raquel Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of green propolis extracts from Apis mellifera were investigated using acute and chronic inflammation models. Swiss mice were anesthetized and a cotton pellet granuloma was implanted in subcutaneous tissue. Then the mice were divided into six groups and received apyrogenic water or different propolis extracts by oral route (5 mg/kg). According to the treatment the groups were designated as E1A, E1B, E10, E11, and E12. The control group received apyrogenic water. The treatment was performed by six days when the mice were killed. The blood and the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were collected to measure the leukocyte recruitment. In acute pulmonary inflammation, Balb/c mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli by intranasal route for three days. Concomitantly the mice received by oral route apyrogenic water (control) or E10 and E11 propolis extracts. BAL was performed to assess the inflammatory infiltrate and cytokine quantification. The results showed that the E11 extract has anti-inflammatory property in both models by the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines and increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines suggesting an immunomodulatory activity. PMID:23320022

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Immunomodulatory Activity of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huricha; Jiao, Hanwei; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Kailian; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Qiaoyun; Guo, Shiyu; Wang, Manchuriga; Du, Li; Wang, Fengyang

    2016-03-01

    Crude okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) polysaccharide (RPS) was obtained by water extraction and alcohol precipitation. Three purified fractions of RPS, designated RPS-1, RPS-2, and RPS-3, were fractioned by diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose chromatography. Their molecular weights, monosaccharide compositions, infrared (Fourier transform infrared [FT-IR]) spectra, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were analyzed. Their immunomodulatory activity was evaluated with an in vitro cell model (RAW264.7 cells). In vivo immunomodulatory activity of RPS-2 was evaluated in normal and cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppressed mice. The results showed that the molecular weights of RPS-1, RPS-2, and RPS-3 were 600, 990, and 1300 kDa, respectively. RPS-1 and RPS-2 were mainly composed of galactose, rhamnose, galacturonic acid, and glucuronic acid, while RPS-3 was mainly composed of galactose, rhamnose, galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, and glucose. FT-IR and NMR spectrum data indicated a rhamnogalacturonan I characteristic of polysaccharide. Both RPS and its purified fractions RPS-1, RPS-2, and RPS-3 significantly increased RAW264.7 cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-10 secretion (P < .05). The purified fraction RPS-2 also increased the spleen index, splenocyte proliferation, and cytokine secretion in vivo. These results indicate that okra polysaccharides may potentially serve as novel immunomodulators. PMID:26836029

  17. Assessment of Physicochemical Properties of Rituximab Related to Its Immunomodulatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Hernández, Mariana P.; López-Morales, Carlos A.; Ramírez-Ibáñez, Nancy D.; Piña-Lara, Nelly; Pérez, Nestor O.; Molina-Pérez, Aarón; Revilla-Beltri, Jorge; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody employed for the treatment of CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis. It binds specifically to the CD20 antigen expressed on pre-B and consequently on mature B-lymphocytes of both normal and malignant cells, inhibiting their proliferation through apoptosis, CDC, and ADCC mechanisms. The immunomodulatory activity of rituximab is closely related to critical quality attributes that characterize its chemical composition and spatial configuration, which determine the recognition of CD20 and the binding to receptors or factors involved in its effector functions, while regulating the potential immunogenic response. Herein, we present a physicochemical and biological characterization followed by a pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity study to demonstrate comparability between two products containing rituximab. The physicochemical and biological characterization revealed that both products fit within the same response intervals exhibiting the same degree of variability. With regard to clinical response, both products depleted CD20+ B-cells until posttreatment recovery and no meaningful differences were found in their pharmacodynamic profiles. The evaluation of anti-chimeric antibodies did not show differential immunogenicity among products. Overall, these data confirm that similarity of critical quality attributes results in a comparable immunomodulatory activity. PMID:25973441

  18. Intracellular multiplication of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in macrophages: killing and restriction of multiplication by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of coculturing yeast-form Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with murine cells was studied. Coculture of resident peritoneal or pulmonary macrophages with P. brasiliensis for 72 h dramatically enhanced fungal multiplication 19.3 +/- 2.4- and 4.7 +/- 0.8-fold, respectively, compared with cocultures with lymph node cells or complete tissue culture medium alone. Support of P. brasiliensis multiplication by resident peritoneal macrophages was macrophage dose dependent. Lysates of macrophages, supernatants from macrophage cultures, or McVeigh-Morton broth, like complete tissue culture medium, did not support multiplication of P. brasiliensis in 72-h cultures. Time course microscopic studies of cocultures in slide wells showed that macrophages ingested P. brasiliensis cells and that the ingested cells multiplied intracellularly. In sharp contrast to resident macrophages, lymphokine-activated peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages not only prevented multiplication but reduced inoculum CFU by 96 and 100%, respectively, in 72 h. Microscopic studies confirmed killing and digestion of P. brasiliensis ingested by activated macrophages in 48 h. These findings indicate that resident macrophages are permissive for intracellular multiplication of P. brasiliensis and that this could be a factor in pathogenicity. By contrast, activated macrophages are fungicidal for P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:2744848

  19. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-Guérin) activates disabled naïve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions. PMID:26429502

  20. Screening of immunomodulatory and adhesive Lactobacillus with antagonistic activities against Salmonella from fermented vegetables.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junchang; Liu, Pilong; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to select strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) by their in vitro adhesive and immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics. In this study, 16 randomly selected LAB strains from fermented vegetables (sauerkraut, bean and cabbage) were first screened for their tolerance to acid, bile salts, pepsin and pancreatin, bacterial inhibitory activities and abilities to adherence to Caco-2 cells. Then, 4 strains with the highest adhesion abilities were selected for further studies of their immunomodulatory properties and inhibitory effects against Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro. The results showed that these 16 LAB strains effectively survived in simulated gastrointestinal condition and inhibited growth of six tested pathogens. Lactobacillus rhamnosus P1, Lactobacillus plantarum P2, Lactobacillus rhamnosus P3 and Lactobacillus casei P4 had the highest abilities to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, L. plantarum P2 strain showed higher abilities to induce expression of tumor necrosis factor-? and interleukin-12 by splenic monocytes and strongly inhibited the adhesion and invasion of S. enteritidis ATCC13076 to Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that Lactobacillus strains P2 could be used as a probiotic candidate in food against Salmonella infection. PMID:26340935

  1. In vitro immunomodulatory activity of plants used by the Tacana ethnic group in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Deharo, E; Baelmans, R; Gimenez, A; Quenevo, C; Bourdy, G

    2004-09-01

    One hundred and seventy-eight ethanolic plant extracts from the pharmacopoeia of the Tacana, an ethnic group from Bolivia, were screened for immunomodulatory activity using complement cascade inhibition and ADP-induced platelet aggregation inhibition assays. Six impaired both complement pathways (classical and alternative): stem bark from Astronium urundeuvea (Anacardiaceae), Cochlospermum vitifolium (Cochlospermaceae), Terminalia amazonica (Combretaceae), Triplaris americana (Polygonaceae), Uncaria tomentosa (Rubiaceae) and Euterpe precatoria (Arecaceae) roots. Inhibition of complement cascade was independent of essential ion complexation, and was not due to direct hemolytic activity on target red blood cells. For A. urundeuvea, C. vitifolium, and T. amazonica, anti-inflammatory activity relied on cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. Four of these species (A. urundeuva, T. americana, U. tomentosa and E. precatoria) are used traditionally to treat inflammatory processes. PMID:15500263

  2. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bisong; Qiu, Jianping; Wu, Changsheng; Li, Yunxia; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2015-12-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have attracted a considerable attention due to their unique structural characteristics, physicochemical properties and biological activities. In this study, iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex Na12H[Fe(HPW7O28)2]44H2O (IHTPO) was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities on human hepatoma HepG2, leukemia K562, lung carcinoma A549, and large cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells, therapeutic efficacies on mice transplantable tumor, and immunomodulatory potentials on the immune response in tumor-bearing mice. IHTPO exhibited lower in vitro cytotoxic activities against four human tumor cell lines, with the IC50 values being higher than 62.5?M (ca. 300?g/ml). IHTPO, however, significantly inhibited the growth of S180 sarcoma transplanted in mice. It was further showed that IHTPO could not only significantly promote splenocytes proliferation, NK cell and CTL activity from splenocytes, but remarkably enhance serum antigen-specific IgG, IgG2a and IgG2b antibody levels in S180-bearing mice. IHTPO also significantly promoted Th1 cytokines IFN-? and IL-2 production, and up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of IFN-?, IL-2 and Th1 transcription factors T-bet and STAT-4 in splenocytes from the S180-bearing mice. These results suggested that IHTPO significantly inhibited the growth of mice transplantable tumor, and that its in vivo antitumor activity might be achieved by improving Th1 protective cell-mediated immunity. IHTPO could act as antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity. PMID:26590115

  3. Macrophage activation induced by Orbignya phalerata Mart.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Flávia R F; Barroqueiro, Elizabeth S B; Azevedo, Ana Paula S; Lopes, Adelson S; Ferreira, Susanne C P; Silva, Lucilene A; Maciel, Márcia C G; Rodriguez, Dunia; Guerra, Rosane N M

    2006-01-01

    Babassu is the popular name of Orbignya phalerata Mart. [Arecaceae (Palmae)], which fruits mesocarp has been used in Brazil as medicine for the treatment of pains, constipation, obesity, leukemia, rheumatism, ulcerations, tumors and inflammations. In this study, we investigated the effect of babassu mesocarp flour aqueous extract (BM) on C3H/HePas mice peritoneal cellular migration and macrophage activation by measuring the nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release, spreading activity and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression. Our results demonstrate that BM injected once ip in mice at 10 and 20 mg/kg increased the cellular influx to the peritoneal cavity, the MHC class II expression and the spreading ability, and also induced the production of NO, TNF and H(2)O(2). The increase in NO-production and MHC expression was also observed after the addition of BM to resident macrophage cultures (100 microg/ml). Thus, BM-treatment was able to activate peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo inducing the production of inflammatory and cytotoxic metabolites, which could justify the popular use of babassu mesocarp in the treatment of tumor diseases, but not in inflammatory pathologies. PMID:16154304

  4. Immunomodulatory and Hemagglutinating Activities of Acidic Polysaccharides Isolated from Combretum racemosum

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kouakou, Koffi; Yapi, Ahoua; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Jutila, Mark A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Extracts of leaves of different species of the genus Combretum have been used historically to treat a variety of medicinal problems. However, little is known about the active components conferring therapeutic properties to these extracts. In the present studies, we evaluated biochemical properties and immunomodulatory activity of polysaccharides isolated from the leaves of Combretum racemosum. Water-soluble polysaccharides from leaves of C. racemosum were extracted and fractionated by DEAE-cellulose and Diaion HP-20 to obtain a Diaion-bound fraction, designated Combretum polysaccharide-acidic bound or CP-AB, which was eluted with methanol, and an unbound fraction, designated as CP-AU. Molecular weight determination, sugar analysis, and other physical and chemical characterization of the fractions were performed. Fraction CP-AU (mol. weight 5.0 kDa) contained type II arabinogalactan and had potent immunomodulatory activity, inducing the production of interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and MonoMac-6 monocytic cells. Likewise, intraperitoneal administration of CP-AU increased in vivo serum levels of IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in mice. CP-AU-induced secretion of TNF-α in PBMC was prevented by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist LPS-RS. Treatment with CP-AU induced phosphorylation of Akt2, Akt3, GSK-3β, HSP27, mTOR, and all p38 MAPK isoforms (α, β, δ, and γ), as well as stimulation of AP-1/NF-κB transcriptional activity. In addition, CP-AU effectively agglutinated erythrocytes from several species, including human, mouse, and rabbit. In contrast, fraction CP-AB was inactive in all biological tests, including cytokine production and hemagglutination. These data suggest that at least part of the beneficial therapeutic effects reported for the water extracts of leaves from C. racemosum are due to modulation of leukocyte functions. PMID:23380150

  5. Self-assembled betulinic acid augments immunomodulatory activity associates with IgG response.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Tripathy, Satyajit; Dash, Shib Shankar; Das, Balaram; Mandal, Debasis; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Bag, Braja Gopal; Roy, Somenath

    2015-10-01

    Studies relating to the adjuvanic role of self assembly, nanosized betulinic acid (SA-BA) are relatively limited. The concept of immunostimulatory activity of SA-BA is based on the activation of immune system against cancer antigen. This study showed that SA-BA, a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the bark of the Ziziphus jujube tree, elevated the immunological functions of cancer antigen in anticancer immunotherapy. We found that, SA-BA pulsed human macrophages secreted elevated level of pro-inflammatory cytokines with an increased CD4(+) cell population. Pulse macrophages were also significantly arrested the KG-1A and K562 cell growth in vitro setup at 1:10 ratio for 48h. The use of TNF-? inhibitors confirmed the association between SA-BA with TNF-? function. SA-BA pulsed macrophages displayed substantial T cell allostimulatory capacity and promoted the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The adjuvanticity of SA-BA was proved by the generation of in vivo IgG response. Collectively, these findings will enrich the biomedical applications of SA-BA as a potent immune stimulating agent. Moreover, the macrophage stimulating efficacy of SA-BA might be an effective way in the cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26256937

  6. Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Derek E.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are the most abundant immune cell population in normal lung tissue and serve critical roles in innate and adaptive immune responses as well as the development of inflammatory airway disease. Studies in a mouse model of chronic obstructive lung disease and translational studies of humans with asthma and COPD have shown that a special subset of macrophages is required for disease progression. This subset is activated by an alternative pathway that depends on production of IL-4 and IL-13, in contrast to the classic pathway driven by interferon-?. Recent and unexpected results indicate that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) can also become a major source of IL-13 production and, thereby, drive the increased mucus production and airway hyperreactivity that is characteristic of airway disease. Although the normal and abnormal functions of AAMs are still being defined, it is already apparent that markers of this immune cell subset can be useful to guide stratification and treatment of patients with chronic airway diseases. Here, we review basic and clinical research studies that highlight the importance of AAMs in the pathogenesis of asthma, COPD, and other chronic airway diseases. PMID:21896520

  7. Enhanced Immunomodulatory Activity of Gelatin-Encapsulated Rubus coreanus Miquel Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong Chang; Choi, Woon Yong; Lee, Choon Geun; Cha, Seon Woo; Kim, Young Ock; Kim, Jin-Chul; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the immunomodulatory activities of Rubus coreanus Miquel extract-loaded gelatin nanoparticles. The mean size of the produced nanoparticles was 143 18 nm with a bandwidth of 76 nm in the size distribution and a maximum size of ~200 nm, which allows effective nanoparticle uptake by cells. Confocal imaging confirmed this, since the nanoparticles were internalized within 30 min and heterogeneously distributed throughout the cell. Zeta-potential measurements showed that from pH = 5 onwards, the nanoparticles were highly negatively charged, which prevents agglomeration to clusters by electrostatic repulsion. This was confirmed by TEM imaging, which showed a well dispersed colloidal solution. The encapsulation efficiency was nearly 60%, which is higher than for other components encapsulated in gelatin nanoparticles. Measurements of immune modulation in immune cells showed a significant effect by the crude extract, which was only topped by the nanoparticles containing the extract. Proliferation of B-, T- and NK cells was notably enhanced by Rubus coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles and in general ~23 times higher than control and on average ~2 times higher than ferulic acid. R. coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles induced cytokine secretion (IL-6 and TNF-?) from B- and T-cells on average at a ~23 times higher rate compared with the extract and ferulic acid. In vivo immunomodulatory activity in mice fed with R. coreanus-gelatin nanoparticles at 1 mL/g body weight showed a ~5 times higher antibody production compared to control, a ~1.3 times higher production compared to the extract only, and a ~1.6 times higher production compared to ferulic acid. Overall, our results suggest that gelatin nanoparticles represent an excellent transport vehicle for Rubus coreanus extract and extracts from other plants generally used in traditional Asian medicine. Such nanoparticles ensure a high local concentration that results in enhancement of immune cell activities, including proliferation, cytokine secretion, and antibody production. PMID:22272118

  8. Expression of surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D in murine decidua and immunomodulatory effects on decidual macrophages.

    PubMed

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Marri, Eswari Dodagatta-; Kouser, Lubna; Jamil, Kaiser; Alhamlan, Fatimah S; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D are pattern recognition innate immune molecules that belong to the C-type lectin family. In lungs, they play an important role in the clearance of pathogens and control of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D are also expressed in the female reproductive tract where they play an important role in pregnancy and parturition. However, the role of SP-A and SP-D expressed at the feto-maternal interface (decidua) remains unclear. Here, we have examined the expression of SP-A and SP-D in the murine decidua at 17.5 (pre-parturition) and 19.5dpc (near parturition) and their effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated decidual macrophages. SP-A and SP-D were localized to stromal cells in the murine decidua at 17.5 and 19.5dpc in addition to cells lining the maternal spiral artery. Purified pre-parturition decidual cells were challenged with LPS with and without SP-A or SP-D, and expression of F4/80 and TNF-? were measured by flow cytometry. On their own, SP-A or SP-D did not affect the percentage of F4/80 positive cells while they suppressed the percentage of TNF-? positive cells. However, simultaneous addition of SP-A or SP-D, together with LPS, reduced TNF-? secreting F4/80 positive cells. It is likely that exogenous administration of SP-A and SP-D in decidua can potentially control infection and inflammation mediators during spontaneous term labor and infection-induced preterm labor. Thus, the presence of SP-A and SP-D in the murine decidua is likely to play a protective role against intrauterine infection during pregnancy. PMID:26421960

  9. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermdez-Humarn, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24242245

  10. Macrophage activation and induction of macrophage cytotoxicity by purified polysaccharide fractions from the plant Echinacea purpurea.

    PubMed Central

    Stimpel, M; Proksch, A; Wagner, H; Lohmann-Matthes, M L

    1984-01-01

    Purified polysaccharides (EPS) prepared from the plant Echinacea purpurea are shown to strongly activate macrophages. Macrophages activated with these substances develop pronounced extracellular cytotoxicity against tumor targets. The activation is brought about by EPS alone and is independent of any cooperative effect with lymphocytes. Also the production and secretion of oxygen radicals and interleukin 1 by macrophages is increased after activation with EPS. Cells of the macrophages lineage seem to be the main target for the action of these polysaccharides. EPS has no effect on T lymphocytes. B lymphocytes show a comparatively modest proliferation after incubation with E. purpurea EPS. Thus, these compounds, which are at least in tissue culture completely nontoxic, may be suited to activate in vivo cells of the macrophage system to cytotoxicity. They may therefore be of relevance in tumor and infectious systems. PMID:6389368

  11. The immunomodulatory activity of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Dongming; Luo, Fei; Liang, Wenjie; Guo, Shuquan; Xu, Jianzhong

    2009-02-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) are currently being investigated in preclinical and clinical settings because of their self-renewal and multipotent differentiative capacity or their immunosuppressive function. However, BM may be detrimental because of the highly invasive donation procedure and BM-MSC decline with age. Therefore, MSC derived from other sources have been considered as an alternative. However, there is only limited knowledge on their immunomodulatory properties. Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells are good substitutes for BM-MSC because of the immaturity of newborn cells. In this study, we successfully isolated MSC from UCB. The morphological phenotypes, cell cycle status, surface markers and differentiation potential of these clonally expanded cells are consistent with BM-MSC. Furthermore, UCB-MSC expanded in vitro retain low immunogenicity and an immunomodulatory effect. Flow cytometry analysis showed that UCB-MSC did not express CD40, CD40 ligand, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. We have demonstrated that UCB-MSC are incapable of inducing allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and have a dose-dependent inhibition of PBMC immune responses in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and phytohaemagglutinin activation assays, even after interferon-gamma treatment. Additionally, we have found that UCB-MSC can suppress the function of mature dendritic cells. Using transwell systems, we have demonstrated an inhibition mechanism that depends on both cell contact and soluble factors. Based on the findings we conclude that banked UCB could serve as a potential alternative source of MSC for allogeneic application in the future. PMID:18624725

  12. [THE IMMUNOMODULATORY ACTIVITY OF PLASMA OF PATIENTS INFECTED WITH HUMAN HIV VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Selimova, L M; Kalnina, L B; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Gulyaeva, A N; Nosik, D M

    2015-10-01

    The study was carried out to investigate impact of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus receiving and not receiving highly active antiviral therapy on: expression of phenotypic markers of lymphocytes (CD3+, CD3+/CD4+, CD3+/CD8+, CD19+, CD3-/CD (16+56)+, CD3+/CD(16+56)+, CD3+/HLA-DR+, CD4+/CD62L+, CD8+/CD38+) in mononuclear cells of blood of donors and secretion of pro-inflammatory (interleukin-1?, interferon-?, tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) cytokines. After 24 hours of activation of mononuclear cells with plasmas it was demonstrated that as compared with control groups, in of plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy increasing of number of CD4+ T-cells and decreasing of CD8+ T-cells is observed. The plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy activate in most instances CD4+ T-cells whereas plasmas of patients without treatment--CD8+ T-cells. The results of detection of cytokines in blood indicate that in patients without treatment inflammatory potential is increased as compared with group of highly active antiviral therapy. The data concerning accumulation of interleukin-1? under cultivation of mononuclear cells with plasmas indicates at its role in preservation of vitality of natural killers. The analysis of immunomodulatory activity of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus can be recommended as an additional technique of evaluation of functioning of immune system. PMID:26841673

  13. Screening of immunomodulatory activity of total and protein extracts of some Moroccan medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, Abdeljlil; Aarab, Lotfi; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2013-04-01

    Herbal and traditional medicines are being widely used in practice in many countries for their benefits of treating different ailments. A large number of plants in Morocco were used in folk medicine to treat immune-related disorders. The objective of this study is to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of protein extracts (PEs) of 14 Moroccan medicinal plants. This activity was tested on the proliferation of immune cells. The prepared total and PEs of the plant samples were tested using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay on the splenocytes with or without stimulation by concanavalin-A (Con-A), a mitogenic agent used as positive control. The results of this study indicated different activity spectra. Three groups of activities were observed. The first group represented by Citrullus colocynthis, Urtica dioica, Elettaria cardamomum, Capparis spinosa and Piper cubeba showed a significant immunosuppressive activity. The second group that showed a significant immunostimulatory activity was represented by Aristolochia longa, Datura stramonium, Marrubium vulgare, Sinapis nigra, Delphynium staphysagria, Lepidium sativum, Ammi visnaga and Tetraclinis articulata. The rest of the plant extracts did not alter the proliferation induced by Con-A. This result was more important for the PE than for the total extract. In conclusion, this study revealed an interesting immunomodulating action of certain PEs, which could explain their traditional use. The results of this study may also have implications in therapeutic treatment of infections, such as prophylactic and adjuvant with cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22301818

  14. High throughput screening methods for assessing antibiofilm and immunomodulatory activities of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Haney, Evan F; Mansour, Sarah C; Hilchie, Ashley L; de la Fuente-Nez, Csar; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-09-01

    The recent observation that certain cationic peptides possess potent antibiofilm activity demonstrated that small peptides could be used to treat biofilm-associated infections. Other so-called innate defense regulator peptides possess potent immunomodulatory properties such as leukocyte recruitment and suppression of harmful inflammation. A peptide that directly targets biofilm cells while favorably modulating the immune response would be particularly advantageous for treating serious skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus. In the present work, using SPOT-synthesized peptide arrays on cellulose membranes, we outline a strategy for systematically assessing the antibiofilm activity of hundreds of IDR-1002 (VQRWLIVWRIRK-NH2) and IDR-HH2 (VQLRIRVAVIRA-NH2) peptide variants against MRSA biofilms. In addition, the ability of these peptides to stimulate production of a monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and suppress LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-1? production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was evaluated. These results informed the synthesis of second-generation peptides resulting in a new peptide, IDR-2009 (KWRLLIRWRIQK-NH2), with enhanced MCP-1 stimulatory activity, favorable IL-1? suppression characteristics and strong antibiofilm activity against MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. This work provides a proof-of-concept that multiple peptide activities can be optimized simultaneously to generate novel sequences that possess a variety of biological properties. PMID:25836992

  15. Dextrans produced by lactic acid bacteria exhibit antiviral and immunomodulatory activity against salmonid viruses.

    PubMed

    Ncher-Vzquez, Montserrat; Ballesteros, Natalia; Canales, ngeles; Rodrguez Saint-Jean, Sylvia; Prez-Prieto, Sara Isabel; Prieto, Alicia; Aznar, Rosa; Lpez, Paloma

    2015-06-25

    Viral infections in the aquaculture of salmonids can lead to high mortality and substantial economic losses. Thus, there is industrial interest in new molecules active against these viruses. Here we describe the production, purification, and the physicochemical and structural characterization of high molecular weight dextrans synthesized by Lactobacillus sakei MN1 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides RTF10. The purified dextrans, and commercial dextrans with molecular weights ranging from 10 to 2000kDa, were assayed in infected BF-2 and EPC fish cell-line monolayers for antiviral activity. Only T2000 and dextrans from MN1 and RTF10 had significant antiviral activity. This was similar to results obtained against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus. However the dextran from MN1 showed ten-fold higher activity against hematopoietic necrosis virus than T2000. In vivo assays using the MN1 polymer confirmed the in vitro results and revealed immunomodulatory activity. These results together with the high levels of dextran production (2gL(-1)) by Lb. sakei MN1, indicate the compounds potential utility as an antiviral agent in aquaculture. PMID:25839823

  16. The FGL2/fibroleukin prothrombinase is involved in alveolar macrophage activation in COPD through the MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanling; Xu, Sanpeng; Xiao, Fei; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sui; Yan, Weiming; Ning, Qin

    2010-05-28

    Fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2)/fibroleukin has been reported to play a vital role in the pathogenesis of some critical inflammatory diseases by possessing immunomodulatory activity through the mediation of 'immune coagulation' and the regulation of maturation and proliferation of immune cells. We observed upregulated FGL2 expression in alveolar macrophages from peripheral lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and found a correlation between FGL2 expression and increased macrophage activation markers (CD11b and CD14). The role of FGL2 in the activation of macrophages was confirmed by the detection of significantly decreased macrophage activation marker (CD11b, CD11c, and CD71) expression as well as the inhibition of cell migration and inflammatory cytokine (IL-8 and MMP-9) production in an LPS-induced FGL2 knockdown human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Increased FGL2 expression co-localized with upregulated phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) in the lung tissues from COPD patients. Moreover, FGL2 knockdown in THP-1 cells significantly downregulated LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK while upregulating phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Thus, we demonstrate that FGL2 plays an important role in macrophage activation in the lungs of COPD patients through MAPK pathway modulation.

  17. Role of complement activation and antibody in the interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, S; Rao, Narayan V; Ramanathan, V D

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antibodies possess immunomodulatory effects during tuberculosis infection. Prior sensitization to environmental mycobacteria is known to suppress immune responses against BCG and M. tuberculosis. Mycobacteria-induced antibodies can influence events such as complement activation and phagocytosis during infectious process. In the present study role of anti-M. tuberculosis IgG (anti-M. tb IgG) antibody during interaction between M. tuberculosis and human macrophages mediated through complement has been examined in vitro. Anti-M. tb IgG antibody significantly enhanced complement activation by M. tuberculosis. Phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis by macrophages increased significantly in the presence of complement and/or antibody. Moreover, antibody enhanced phagocytosis in the presence of complement. Addition of antibody alone or in combination with complement also augmented intracellular viability of bacilli within macrophages. Results of this study showed that anti-mycobacterial antibody enhances complement activation and anti-M. tb IgG antibody probably modulates effects of complement during early stages of tuberculosis infection. PMID:23016491

  18. Immunomodulatory Effects of Ethanolic Extract of Thyphonium flagelliforme (Lodd) Blume in Rats Induced by Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Nurrochmad, Arief; Ikawati, Muthi; Sari, Ika Puspita; Murwanti, Retno; Nugroho, Agung Endro

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to examine the immunomodulatory effect of ethanolic extract of Typhonium flagelliforme (Lodd) Blume in cyclophosphamide-treated rats. The immunomodulatory effects were determined by lymphocytes proliferation, phagocytic activity of macrophages, plasma cytokines of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α, interleukin-10 levels, and killer T cells (CD8+ T cells) counts. The results showed that the administration of ethanolic extract of T flagelliforme reduced immunosupessive effect on lymphocyte proliferation, increase the number and phagocytic activity of macrophages in cyclophosphamide-treated rats. Moreover, the ethanolic extract of T flagelliforme also significantly (P < .05) improved the immune system activities especially the proliferation of CD8+T cells and reduced the suppressive effects on cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1α. In conclusion, the ethanolic extract of T flagelliforme has immunomodulatory properties in cyclophosphamide-treated rats. The results suggest that T flagelliforme can reduce immunosuppresive effect caused by a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:25613330

  19. Proteins with abortifacient, ribosome inactivating, immunomodulatory, antitumor and anti-AIDS activities from Cucurbitaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Chan, W Y; Yeung, H W

    1992-07-01

    1. The biochemical characteristics and biological activities of eight Cucurbitaceae plant proteins designated trichosanthin (isolated from tubers of Trichosanthes kirilowii), beta-trichosanthin (isolated from tubers of Trichosanthes cucumeroides), alpha- and beta-momorcharins (isolated from seeds of Momordica charantia), momorchochin (isolated from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis), luffaculin (isolated from seeds of Luffa acutangula) and luffin-a and luffin-b (isolated from seeds of Luffa cylindrica), were reviewed. 2. The isolation procedures for all eight proteins are based on aqueous extraction, acetone fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. Ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration are steps which may be included to improve purification. 3. The proteins are basic in nature and possess a molecular weight of approx. 30,000. All except trichosanthin are glycoproteins. The content of Asx and Glx residues is high. The N-terminal amino acid residue is Asp. Their amino acid compositions and N-terminal amino acid sequences are similar. 4. Circular dichroism spectroscopic studies revealed that trichosanthin, alpha- and beta-momorcharins possess similar secondary but different tertiary structures. 5. Most of the proteins are immunologically distinct. 6. The proteins exhibit abortifacient, antitumor, ribosome inactivating and immunomodulatory activities. Trichosanthin manifests anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity. PMID:1397965

  20. Jagged-2 enhances immunomodulatory activity in adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xishan, Zhu; Bin, Zhang; Haiyue, Zhao; Xiaowei, Dou; Jingwen, Bai; Guojun, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Adipose derived Mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) are able to expand in vitro and undergo differentiation into multiple cell lineages, yet have low immunogenicity while exhibiting several immunoregulatory characteristics. We sought to investigate the immunomodulatory mechanisms of AMSCs to better understand their immunogenic properties. Following 10 days of chondrogenic differentiation or 48 hours of IFN-γ pretreatment, AMSCs retained low level immunogenicity but prominent immunoregulatory activity and AMSC immunogenicity was enhanced by chondrogenic differentiation or IFN-γ treatment. We found Jagged-2 expression was significantly elevated following chondrogenic differentiation or IFN-γ pretreatment. Jagged-2-RNA interference experiments suggested that Jagged-2-siRNA2 suppresses Jagged-2 expression during chondrogenic differentiation and in IFN-γ pretreated AMSCs. Besides, Jagged-2 interference attenuated immunosuppressive activity by mixed lymphocyte culture and mitogen stimulation experiments. So, the immunoregulatory activity of AMSCs, to some extent dependent upon Jagged-2, might be stronger after multilineage differentiation or influence from inflammatory factors. This may also be why rejection does not occur after allogeneic AMSCs differentiate into committed cells. PMID:26412454

  1. Effect of macrophage activation on phagocyte-Plasmodium interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, K M; Kreier, J P

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the effect of both immune and normal sera on the binding of free Plasmodium berghei by resident and activated macrophages. Resident macrophages bound plasmodia to a greater extent than did activated macrophages, regardless of treatment. Resident macrophages bound free plasmodia, predominantly trophozoites, in the presence of normal serum by a mechanism inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmannosamine. Macrophages activated through treatment with Propionibacterium acnes ("Corynebacterium parvum"), on the other hand, did not bind free plasmodia in the presence of normal serum through systems inhibited by N-acetylmannosamine or N-acetylglucosamine. The binding of free plasmodia by activated macrophages was greatest in the presence of immune serum and could be inhibited by immune complexes but not by N-acetylmannosamine or N-acetylglucosamine. These results suggest that a receptor for a carbohydrate component of a normal serum opsonin mediates initial adherence of plasmodial antigen onto resident macrophages, triggering both the immunological cascade and macrophage activation. After activation, the macrophages no longer have the carbohydrate-specific receptor but do have functional Fc receptors which mediate the adherence of immune-serum-opsonized plasmodia. Images PMID:3512432

  2. Immunomodulatory and anticancer activities of flavonoids extracted from litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn) pericarp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mouming; Yang, Bao; Wang, Jinshui; Liu, Yang; Yu, Limei; Jiang, Yueming

    2007-02-01

    The litchi pericarp extract was subjected to partition by hexane, ethyl acetate and water. Epicatechin, proanthocyanidin B2 and proanthocyanidin B4 were isolated and purified from the ethyl acetate fraction by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The immunomodulatory activities of epicatechin, proanthocyanidin B2, proanthocyanidin B4 and the ethyl acetate fraction were examined using proliferation of mouse splenocytes. The results showed all these samples had much higher stimulatory effects on splenocyte proliferation than that of the reference, rutin. Epicatechin and the ethyl acetate fraction showed a significantly (P<0.05) stimulatory effect when the concentration was up to 12.5 micro g/ml. Proanthocyanidin B2 and proanthocyanidin B4 exhibited little lower stimulatory effects than epicatechin and the ethyl acetate fraction. The anti-breast cancer activities of epicatechin, proanthocyanidin B2, proanthocyanidin B4 and the ethyl acetate fraction were also evaluated. Epicatechin and proanthocyanidin B2 had lower cytotoxicities to human breast cancer cell MCF-7 and human embryolic lung fibroblast than paclitaxel. PMID:17178382

  3. Characterization of two homogalacturonan pectins with immunomodulatory activity from green tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijun; Wei, Guodong; Liu, Fei; Banerjee, Gautam; Joshi, Manoj; Bligh, S W Annie; Shi, Songshan; Lian, Hui; Fan, Hongwei; Gu, Xuelan; Wang, Shunchun

    2014-01-01

    Two natural homogalacturonan (HG) pectins (MW ca. 20 kDa) were isolated from green tea based on their immunomodulatory activity. The crude tea polysaccharides (TPS1 and TPS2) were obtained from green tea leaves by hot water extraction and followed by 40% and 70% ethanol precipitation, respectively. Two homogenous water soluble polysaccharides (TPS1-2a and TPS1-2b) were obtained from TPS1 after purification with gel permeation, which gave a higher phagocytic effect than TPS2. A combination of composition, methylation and configuration analyses, as well as NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy revealed that TPS1-2a and TPS1-2b were homogalacturonan (HG) pectins consisting of a backbone of 1,4-linked α-D-galacturonic acid (GalA) residues with 28.4% and 26.1% of carboxyl groups as methyl ester, respectively. The immunological assay results demonstrated that TPS1-2, which consisted mainly of HG pectins, showed phagocytosis-enhancing activity in HL-60 cells. PMID:24901527

  4. Evaluation of a topical herbal drug for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vaibhav D.; Shah, Tejas M.; Nauriyal, Dev S.; Kunjadia, Anju P.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics have been in use in the treatment of bovine mastitis since decades; however, their use is associated with cost issues and human health concern. Use of herbal drugs does not generally carry these disadvantages. Many plants/herbs have been evaluated in the treatment of bovine mastitis with additional property of immunomodulation in affected mammary gland. Aim: To evaluate a topical herbal drug in two breeds of cattle for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis. Materials and Methods: The response to treatment was evaluated by enumerating somatic cell count (SCC), determining total bacterial load, and studying the expression of different cytokines (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8, IL-12, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, interferon (IFN)-? and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-?). Results: The pre- and post-treatment SCC in mastitic quarters statistically did not differ significantly, however, total bacterial load declined significantly from day 0 onwards in both the breeds. Highly significant differences (P < 0.01) were observed in all the cytokines on day 0, 5, and 21 postlast treatment in both the breeds. The expression level of all the cytokines showed a significant increase on day 5, while a decrease was noticed on day 21 in both the breeds of cattle. The comparison of cytokine expression profiles between crossbred and Gir cattle revealed a significant difference in expression of IL-6 and TNF-?. However, other cytokines exhibited a similar pattern of expression in both breeds, which was non-significant. Conclusion: The topical herbal drug exhibited antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities in subclinical mastitis and thus the work supports its use as alternative herbal therapy against subclinical udder infection in bovines. PMID:25558168

  5. Immunomodulatory activity of Bengkoang (Pachyrhizus erosus) fiber extract in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumalasari, Ika Dyah; Nishi, Kosuke; Harmayani, Eni; Raharjo, Sri; Sugahara, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Bengkoang (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) is one of the most popular edible root vegetables in Indonesia. Bengkoang contains fairly large amounts of carbohydrates and crude fiber. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of the bengkoang fiber extract (BFE) in vitro and in vivo. BFE was prepared by heating the powder of bengkoang fiber suspended in distilled water at 121C for 20min. BFE facilitated IgM production by the human hybridoma cell line HB4C5 cells. In addition, production of IgM, IgG, and IgA by mouse primary splenocytes was facilitated by BFE in a dose-dependent manner. BFE also significantly facilitated production of both interleukin-5 and interleukin-10 by splenocytes. Immunoglobulin production by lymphocytes from the spleen, Peyer's patch, and mesenteric lymph node were significantly activated by oral administration of BFE to mice for 14days. The serum immunoglobulin levels of IgG, IgM, and IgA were also significantly enhanced. Furthermore, cytokine production by lymphocytes from the spleen, Peyer's patch, and mesenteric lymph node were also facilitated by oral administration of BFE. These results suggest that BFE has positive effects on the immune system in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23361525

  6. Structural characterization and immunomodulatory activity of a new heteropolysaccharide from Prunella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; You, Lijun; Fu, Xiong; Huang, Qiang; Yu, Shujuan; Liu, Rui Hai

    2015-05-01

    A new heteropolysaccharide, here called P1, was isolated from the fruit clusters of Prunella vulgaris using a hot water extraction method. Chemical and physical analyses indicated that P1 had a spherical conformation with an average molecular weight of 1750 kDa and consisted of arabinose (28.37%), xylose (54.67%), mannose (5.61%), glucose (5.46%), and galactose (5.89%). The main types of P1 linkages were proved to be (1→5)-linked α-L-Ara, (1→)-linked α-L-Ara, (1→3)-linked α-D-xyl, (1→3)-linked β-D-Gal, (1→3,6)-linked β-D-Gal, (1→3,6)-linked α-D-Man and (1→6)-linked α-D-Glc according to the periodate oxidation-Smith degradation and NMR analyses. P1 could significantly enhance the secretion of NO, TNF-α, and IL-6 in murine RAW 264.7 cells, involving the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4 and complement receptor 3 (CR3). Further studies showed that P1 exhibited stable immune activities in the pH range of 4.0-10.0 and below 121 °C. The results suggested that P1 could be used as a potent immunomodulatory agent in functional foods and pharmacological fields. PMID:25825862

  7. The immunomodulatory activities of pullulan and its derivatives in human pDC-like CAL-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Qiao, Linan; Chen, Liwei; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ning

    2016-05-01

    In this study, acidic and alkaline pullulan derivates were synthesized and their immunomodulatory activities compared to pullulan were investigated in human pDC-like CAL-1 cell line. Pullulan was reacted respectively with succinic anhydride and N-(-2-aminoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine/N,N-carbonyl diimidazole to form acidic pullulan monosuccinate (SUPL) and alkaline pullulan-g-N-(-2-aminoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (AMPL). In CAL-1 cells, pullulan, SUPL and AMPL up-regulated the mRNA expressions of type I interferons (IFN), including IFN-α and IFN-β1, and some other proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-23 (IL-23), and also significantly enhanced the protein expressions of IFN-α and TNF-α. The activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the nuclear translocations of interferon regulation factors (IRFs), including IRF-3 and IRF-5, exhibited pivotal roles in the immune responses induced by pullulan, SUPL and AMPL. By comparison, pullulan and SUPL displayed weak effects on the activation of CAL-1 cells, but AMPL showed remarkably enhanced immunomodulatory activities, which were comparable to that induced by R848, an agonist for Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8. Our results suggested that AMPL, as an alkaline pullulan derivative, could be used as a potent immunomodulatory agent in the food and pharmacological fields. PMID:26854885

  8. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  9. Amphiregulin may be a new biomarker of classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chen; Liu, Guilin; Mu, Honglan; Zhou, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shihai; Xu, Younian

    2015-10-23

    Amphiregulin (Areg) participates in tissue repair and inflammation regulation. As important effector cells in inflammation, macrophages can be polarized to classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated phenotype with diverse functions in immunity. However, the relationship between Areg expression and macrophage activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Areg was significantly expressed in M1 but not in M2 macrophages. This was confirmed by analyses of RT-PCR and ELISA in peritoneal macrophages, and by evaluating protein expression in alveolar macrophages and RAW264.7 cells. Selective inhibitors of TLR4 (CLI-095) and MAP kinase, including Erk1/2 (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580), significantly reduced Areg expression in M1 macrophages, suggesting that M1 macrophages produce Areg mainly through the TLR4-MAPK pathway, which is involved in the mechanism of M1 activation. When compared with productions of classical biomarkers of M1 macrophages, Areg expression was highly consistent in time series. Taken together, Areg may be an effective new biomarker of M1 macrophages. PMID:26365345

  10. Immunomodulatory mechanisms of lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Over the past decade it has become clear that lactobacilli and other probiotic and commensal organisms can interact with mucosal immune cells or epithelial cells lining the mucosa to modulate specific functions of the mucosal immune system. The most well understood signalling mechanisms involve the innate pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors. Binding of microbe-associated molecular patterns with these receptors can activate antigen presenting cells and modulate their function through the expression of surface receptors, secreted cytokines and chemokines. In vitro the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and dendritic cells to lactobacilli can be strikingly different depending on both the bacterial species and the strain. Several factors have been identified in lactobacilli that influence the immune response in vitro and in vivo including cell surface carbohydrates, enzymes modifying the structure of lipoteichoic acids and metabolites. In mice mechanistic studies point to a role for the homeostatic control of inducible T regulatory cells in the mucosal tissues as one possible immunomodulatory mechanism. Increasing evidence also suggests that induction of epithelial signalling by intestinal lactobacilli can modulate barrier functions, defensin production and regulate inflammatory signalling. Other probiotic mechanisms include modulation of the T cell effector subsets, enhancement of humoral immunity and interactions with the epithelial-associated dendritic cells and macrophages. A major challenge for the future will be to gain more knowledge about the interactions occurring between lactobacilli and the host in vivo and to understand the molecular basis of innate signalling in response to whole bacteria which trigger multiple signalling pathways. PMID:21995674

  11. Lactobacillus isolates from healthy volunteers exert immunomodulatory effects on activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keyi; Xie, Chao; Xu, Donghua; Yang, Xiaofan; Tang, James; Ji, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    As probiotics in the gut, Lactobacilli are believed to play important roles in the development and maintenance of both the mucosal and systemic immune system of the host. This study was aimed to investigate the immuno-modulatory function of candiate lactobacilli on T cells. Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy human feces and the microbiological characteristics were identified by API 50 CHL and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assays. Anti-CD3 antibody activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated by viable, heat-killed lactobacilli and genomic DNA of lactobacilli, and cytokine profiles were tested by ELISA. Isolated lactobacilli C44 and C48 were identified as L. acidophilus and L. paracacei, which have properties of acid and bile tolerance and inhibitor effects on pathogens. Viable and heat-killed C44 and C48 induced low levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) and high levels of IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in PBMCs. In anti-CD3 antibody activated PBMCs, viable and heat-killed C44 increased Th2 cytokine levels (IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10), and simultaneously enhanced Th1 responses by inducing IFN-γ and IL-12p70 production. Different from that of lactabacillus strains, their genomic DNA induced low levels of IL-12p70, IFN-γ and proinflammatory cytokines in PBMCs with or without anti-CD3 antibody activation. These results provided in vitro evidence that the genomic DNA of strains of C44 and C48, especially C44, induced weaker inflammation, and may be potentially applied for treating allergic diseases. PMID:23554802

  12. A sensitive technique for measuring specific macrophage aggregation: a comparison with macrophage migration inhibition, for the detection of lymphokine activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rouveix, B; Badenoch-Jones, P; Turk, J L

    1979-01-01

    A new quantitative method for the measurement of macrophage aggregation, induced by lymphokine preparations, is described. This involves the continuous measurement of the light absorbance of stirred macrophage suspensions. The results have been compared with those obtained by measuring macrophage migration inhibition activity for the detection of lymphokine activity. Separation of crude lymphocyte culture supernatants by Sephadex G-200 shows that the material with aggregating activity is heterogeneous. The greater amount of this activity is not separated from macrophage migration inhibition activity, and has a molecular weight of 35,000--70,000. A comparison has been made with other published methods for measuring macrophage aggregation. Images Figure 3 PMID:374256

  13. The intriguing ultrastructure of lipid body organelles within activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dias, Felipe F; Zarantonello, Victor C; Parreira, Gleydes G; Chiarini-Garcia, Hlio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-06-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells with essential functions in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance, and first defense in infections. A distinguishing feature of activated macrophages participating in different situations such as inflammatory and metabolic diseases is the presence of increased numbers of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets, in their cytoplasm. LBs are considered structural markers of activated macrophages and are involved in different functions such as lipid metabolism, intracellular trafficking, and synthesis of inflammatory mediators. In this review, we revisit the distinct morphology of LB organelles actively formed within macrophages in response to infections and cell clearance, taking into account new insights provided by ultrastructural studies. We also discuss the LB interactions within macrophages, revealed by transmission electron microscopy, with a focus on the remarkable LB-phagosome association and discuss potential links between structural aspects and function. PMID:24786359

  14. Cyclic Steroid Glycosides from the Starfish Echinaster luzonicus: Structures and Immunomodulatory Activities.

    PubMed

    Kicha, Alla A; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I; Malyarenko, Timofey V; Ivanchina, Natalia V; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Menchinskaya, Ekaterina S; Yurchenko, Ekaterina A; Pislyagin, Evgeny A; Aminin, Dmitry L; Huong, Trinh T T; Long, Pham Quoc; Stonik, Valentin A

    2015-06-26

    Five new steroid glycosides, luzonicosides B-E (2-5), belonging to a rare structure group of marine glycosides, containing carbohydrate moieties incorporated into a macrocycle, and a related open carbohydrate chain steroid glycoside, luzonicoside F (6), were isolated from the starfish Echinaster luzonicus along with the previously known cyclic steroid glycoside luzonicoside A (1). The structures of compounds 2-6 were established by extensive NMR and ESIMS techniques as well as chemical transformations. Luzonicoside A (1) at concentrations of 0.01-0.1 ?M was shown to be potent in lysosomal activity stimulation, intracellular ROS level elevation, and NO synthesis up-regulation in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Luzonicoside D (4) was less active in these biotests. PMID:26068600

  15. Immunostimulative Activity of Low Molecular Weight Chitosans in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Xiang, Xing-Wei; Huang, Yan-Na; Gao, Yang; Qu, You-Le

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives such as low molecular weight chitosans (LMWCs) have been reported to exert many biological activities, such as antioxidant and antitumor effects. However, complex and molecular weight dependent effects of chitosan remain controversial and the mechanisms that mediate these complex effects are still poorly defined. This study was carried out to investigate the immunostimulative effect of different molecular weight chitosan in RAW264.7 macrophages. Our data suggested that two LMWCs (molecular weight of 3 kDa and 50 kDa) both possessed immunostimulative activity, which was dependent on dose and, at the higher doses, also on the molecular weight. LMWCs could significantly enhance the the pinocytic activity, and induce the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a molecular weight and concentration-dependent manner. LMWCs were further showed to promote the expression of the genes including iNOS, TNF-α. Taken together, our findings suggested that LMWCs elicited significantly immunomodulatory response through up-regulating mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and activated RAW264.7 macrophage in a molecular weight- and concentration-dependent manner. PMID:26437419

  16. Synthetic Mimics of Antimicrobial Peptides with Immunomodulatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Hitesh D.; Som, Abhigyan; Ayaz, Furkan; Scott, Richard W.; Anguita, Juan; Tew, Gregory N.

    2012-01-01

    A new series of aryl-based SMAMPs with antimicrobial activity and selectivity have been developed via systematic tuning of aromatic groups and charge. The addition of a pendant aromatic group improved the antimicrobial activity against gram-negative bacteria, while the addition of charge improved the selectivity. SMAMP 4, with six charges and a naphthalene central ring, demonstrated a selectivity of 200 against both S. aureus and E. coli, compared to a selectivity of 8 for the peptide MSI-78. In addition to the direct antimicrobial activity, SMAMP 4 exhibited specific immunomodulatory activities in macrophages both in the presence and absence of LPS, a TLR agonist. SMAMP 4 also induced the production of the neutrophil chemo-attractant, murine KC, in mouse primary cells. This is the first, non-peptidic SMAMP demonstrating both good antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity. PMID:22697149

  17. Teriflunomide, an immunomodulatory drug, exerts anticancer activity in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ou; Zhang, Weili; Zhi, Qiaoming; Xue, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongchun; Shen, Daoming; Geng, Meiyu; Xie, Zuoquan; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a group of primary breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors, characterized by higher relapse rate and lower survival compared with other subtypes. Due to lack of identified targets and molecular heterogeneity, conventional chemotherapy is the only available option for treatment of TNBC, but non-discordant positive therapeutic efficacy could not be achieved. Here, we demonstrated that these TNBC cells were sensitive to teriflunomide, which was a well-known immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Potent anti-cancer effects in TNBC invitro, including proliferation inhibition, cell cycle delay, cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell motility and invasiveness, could be achieved with this agent. Of note, we showed that multiple signals involved in TNBC proliferation, survival, migratory, and invasive potential were under regulation by teriflunomide. Among them, we identified down-regulation of growth factor receptors to abolish growth maintenance, suppression of c-Myc, and cyclin D1 to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, modulation of components of cell cycle to induce S-phase arrest, degradation of Bcl-xL, and up-regulation of BAX via activation of MAPK pathway to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression, and inactivation of Src/FAK to reduce TNBC migration and invasion. The results identified teriflunomide may be of therapeutic benefit for the more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancer subtype, indicating the use of teriflunomide for clinical trials for treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:25304315

  18. Maternal immune activation leads to activated inflammatory macrophages in offspring.

    PubMed

    Onore, Charity E; Schwartzer, Jared J; Careaga, Milo; Berman, Robert F; Ashwood, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown an association between infection or inflammation during pregnancy and increased risk of autism in the child. In addition, animal models have illustrated that maternal inflammation during gestation can cause autism-relevant behaviors in the offspring; so called maternal immune activation (MIA) models. More recently, permanent changes in T cell cytokine responses were reported in children with autism and in offspring of MIA mice; however, the cytokine responses of other immune cell populations have not been thoroughly investigated in these MIA models. Similar to changes in T cell function, we hypothesized that following MIA, offspring will have long-term changes in macrophage function. To test this theory, we utilized the poly (I:C) MIA mouse model in C57BL/6J mice and examined macrophage cytokine production in adult offspring. Pregnant dams were given either a single injection of 20mg/kg polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, poly (I:C), or saline delivered intraperitoneally on gestational day 12.5. When offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams reached 10weeks of age, femurs were collected and bone marrow-derived macrophages were generated. Cytokine production was measured in bone marrow-derived macrophages incubated for 24h in either growth media alone, LPS, IL-4/LPS, or IFN-?/LPS. Following stimulation with LPS alone, or the combination of IFN-?/LPS, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams produced higher levels of IL-12(p40) (p<0.04) suggesting an increased M1 polarization. In addition, even without the presence of a polarizing cytokine or LPS stimulus, macrophages from offspring of poly (I:C) treated dams exhibited a higher production of CCL3 (p=0.05). Moreover, CCL3 levels were further increased when stimulated with LPS, or polarized with either IL-4/LPS or IFN-?/LPS (p<0.05) suggesting a general increase in production of this chemokine. Collectively, these data suggest that MIA can produce lasting changes in macrophage function that are sustained into adulthood. PMID:24566386

  19. Molecular and epigenetic basis of macrophage polarized activation.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Riboldi, Elena; Ippolito, Alessandro; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are unique cells for origin, heterogeneity and plasticity. At steady state most of macrophages are derived from fetal sources and maintained in adulthood through self-renewing. Despite sharing common progenitors, a remarkable heterogeneity characterized tissue-resident macrophages indicating that local signals educate them to express organ-specific functions. Macrophages are extremely plastic: chromatin landscape and transcriptional programs can be dynamically re-shaped in response to microenvironmental changes. Owing to their ductility, macrophages are crucial orchestrators of both initiation and resolution of immune responses and key supporters of tissue development and functions in homeostatic and pathological conditions. Herein, we describe current understanding of heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages using the M1-M2 dichotomy as operationally useful simplification of polarized activation. We focused on the complex network of signaling cascades, metabolic pathways, transcription factors, and epigenetic changes that control macrophage activation. In particular, this network was addressed in sepsis, as a paradigm of a pathological condition determining dynamic macrophage reprogramming. PMID:26561250

  20. Using macrophage activation to augment immunotherapy of established tumours

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Z G; Jassar, A; Mishalian, I; Wang, L-CS; Kapoor, V; Cheng, G; Sun, J; Singhal, S; Levy, L; Albelda, S M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful immunotherapy will require alteration of the tumour microenvironment and/or decreased immune suppression. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are one major factor affecting tumour microenvironment. We hypothesised that altering TAM phenotype would augment the efficacy of immunotherapy. Methods: We and others have reported that 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic-acid (DMXAA, Vadimezan) has the ability to change TAM phenotypes, inducing a tumour microenvironment conducive to antitumour immune responses. We therefore combined DMXAA with active immunotherapies, and evaluated anti-tumour efficacy, immune cell phenotypes (flow cytometry), and tumour microenvironment (RTPCR). Results: In several different murine models of immunotherapy for lung cancer, DMXAA-induced macrophage activation significantly augmented the therapeutic effects of immunotherapy. By increasing influx of neutrophils and anti-tumour (M1) macrophages to the tumour, DMXAA altered myeloid cell phenotypes, thus changing the intratumoural M2/non-M2 TAM immunoinhibitory ratio. It also altered the tumour microenvironment to be more pro-inflammatory. Modulating macrophages during immunotherapy resulted in increased numbers, activity, and antigen-specificity of intratumoural CD8+ T cells. Macrophage depletion reduced the effect of combining immunotherapy with macrophage activation, supporting the importance of TAMs in the combined effect. Conclusion: Modulating intratumoural macrophages dramatically augmented the effect of immunotherapy. Our observations suggest that addition of agents that activate TAMs to immunotherapy should be considered in future trials. PMID:23481183

  1. Differential inhibition of macrophage microbicidal activity by liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbreath, M J; Swartz, G M; Alving, C R; Nacy, C A; Hoover, D L; Meltzer, M S

    1985-01-01

    In vitro culture of murine resident peritoneal macrophages with lymphokine (LK)-rich leukocyte culture fluids induces enhanced microbicidal activity against amastigotes of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tropica. Macrophages infected with Leishmania and treated with LKs after infection acquire the capacity to kill the intracellular parasite within 72 h. When compared with control macrophage cultures treated with medium lacking LKs, 80 to 90% fewer macrophages treated with LKs contained amastigotes. In experiments designed to test liposome delivery of LKs to infected macrophages, addition of multilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (molar ratio, 7:3) completely abrogated LK-induced microbicidal activity. Liposomes containing only phosphatidylcholine were not inhibitory. Inhibition of LK activity by the liposomes occurred regardless of whether the liposomes contained LKs. Liposomal inhibition of activated macrophage effector activity was limited to intracellular killing; LK-induced macrophage extracellular cytolysis (i.e., tumor cytotoxicity) was not affected by liposome treatment. These data indicate that elucidation of the effects of liposome composition on acquired host defense mechanisms may be useful for the design of drug delivery systems that allow expression or augmentation of immunologically induced mechanisms for the intracellular destruction of infectious agents. PMID:3967927

  2. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Morgan D; Ford, Rebecca J; McGregor, Chelsea P; LeBlond, Nicholas D; Snider, Shayne A; Stypa, Stephanie A; Day, Emily A; Lhotk, rka; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Austin, Richard C; Kemp, Bruce E; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk ?1-deficient (?1(-/-)) mice. Macrophages from Ampk ?1(-/-) mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk ?1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk ?1(-/-) macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk ?1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk ?1(-/-) macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  3. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  4. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  5. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Pessoni, André Moreira; Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Damásio, André Ricardo Lima; Pedersoli, Wellington Ramos; Mineo, José Roberto; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50°C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection. PMID:26659253

  6. Inhibitory effect of deferoxamine or macrophage activation on transformation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia ingested by macrophages: reversal by holotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Gomez, B; Brummer, E; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1994-01-01

    Conidia of P. brasiliensis ingested by murine macrophages at 37 degrees C showed enhanced transformation to yeast cells and further intracellular growth compared with conidia in culture medium alone. Treatment of macrophages with the iron chelator deferoxamine inhibited the intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. Cytokine-activated macrophages could also exert this inhibitory effect. Holotransferrin reversed the inhibitory effect of either deferoxamine or activated macrophages on intracellular conidium-to-yeast transformation. These results indicate that iron restriction is one of the mechanisms by which activated macrophages control the intracellular transformation of ingested conidia and growth of yeast cells. PMID:8132359

  7. Immunomodulatory activities of alpha-mangostin on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kasemwattanaroj, Pimolkan; Moongkarndi, Primchanien; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Mangmool, Supachoke; Rodpai, Ekkarat; Samer, Jutima; Konlata, Julaporn; Sukapirom, Kasama

    2013-09-01

    Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) a tropical fruit, has been used in traditional medicine. A frequently used part of mangosteen is the pericarp, containing a high content of xanthones. alpha-Mangostin, one of the major xanthone derivatives, exhibits a variety of actions, including antimicrobial, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antitumor; however, its function on the immune system is still equivocal. This study aimed to examine the immunomodulatory activities of alpha-mangostin on lymphocyte lineage and cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cytotoxic activity of alpha-mangostin was measured by MTT assay. The concentration of alpha-mangostin at 5.55 microg/mL resulted in a 50% survival of PBMCs, which was as potent a cytotoxic activity as that of paclitaxel. After 24 h of PBMCs culture, the percentages of T cells (CD3+), B cells (CD19+) and NK cells (CD3-CD16+CD56+) were not significantly changed by treatment with 1, 2 and 4 microg/mL of alpha-mangostin compared with untreated-PBMCs; in addition, the percentages of these lymphocytes treated with the combination of alpha-mangostin (1, 2 and 4 microg/mL) and the mitogen concanavalin A (ConA) was not significantly different from that of ConA-treated PBMCs. For cytokine secretion, alpha-mangostin (1, 2 and 4 microg/mL) did not significantly induce either proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) or cytokine of adaptive immunity (i.e., IL-2). The combination of alpha-mangostin (1, 2 and 4 microg/mL) and ConA did not significantly alter the relative difference of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta compared with ConA-treated PBMCs; however, these combinations could significantly decrease the relative difference of IL-2 compared with ConA-treated PBMCs. These data indicated that alpha-mangostin was able to inhibit IL-2 release without interfering with human immune cells; therefore, further studies are necessary to investigate its effect on IL-2 production. PMID:24273861

  8. Molecular control of activation and priming in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Christopher K.; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2016-01-01

    In tissues, macrophages are exposed to metabolic, homeostatic and immune-regulatory signals of local or systemic origin that influence their basal functions and responses to danger signals. Signal transduction pathways regulated by extracellular signals are coupled to distinct sets of broadly expressed stimulus-regulated transcription factors whose ability to elicit gene expression changes is influenced by the accessibility of their DNA binding sites in the macrophage genome. In turn, accessibility of macrophage-specific transcriptional regulatory elements (enhancers and promoters) is specified by transcription factors that determine the macrophage lineage or impose their tissue-specific properties. Here, we review recent findings that advance our understanding of mechanisms underlying priming and signal-dependent activation of macrophages, and discuss the impact of genetic variation on these processes. PMID:26681459

  9. Triacylglycerol Accumulation Activates the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Aflaki, Elma; Radovi?, Branislav; Chandak, Prakash G.; Kolb, Dagmar; Eisenberg, Tobias; Ring, Julia; Fertschai, Ismene; Uellen, Andreas; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp-Dieter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Sattler, Wolfgang; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Malli, Roland; Madeo, Frank; Kratky, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death of lipid-laden macrophages is a prominent feature of atherosclerotic lesions and mostly ascribed to accumulation of excess intracellular cholesterol. The present in vitro study investigated whether intracellular triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation could activate a similar apoptotic response in macrophages. To address this question, we utilized peritoneal macrophages isolated from mice lacking adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the major enzyme responsible for TG hydrolysis in multiple tissues. In Atgl?/? macrophages, we observed elevated levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species, stimulated cytochrome c release, and nuclear localization of apoptosis-inducing factor. Fragmented mitochondria prior to cell death were indicative of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway being triggered as a consequence of defective lipolysis. Other typical markers of apoptosis, such as externalization of phosphatidylserine in the plasma membrane, caspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, were increased in Atgl?/? macrophages. An artificial increase of cellular TG levels by incubating wild-type macrophages with very low density lipoprotein closely mimicked the apoptotic phenotype observed in Atgl?/? macrophages. Results obtained during the present study define a novel pathway linking intracellular TG accumulation to mitochondrial dysfunction and programmed cell death in macrophages. PMID:21196579

  10. Immunomodulatory activity of methanolic leaf extract of Moringa oleifera in Wistar albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Nfambi, Joshua; Bbosa, Godfrey S.; Sembajwe, Lawrence Fred; Gakunga, James; Kasolo, Josephine N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, Moringa oleifera is used by different communities to treat various ailments including modulation of the immune system though with limited scientific evidence. Aim To study the immunomodulatory activity of M. oleifera methanolic leaf extract in Wistar albino rats. Methods An experimental laboratory-based study was done following standard methods and procedures. Nine experimental groups (I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX) each comprising of six animals were used. Group I received normal saline. Groups II to IX received 200 mg/kg bwt cyclophosphamide at the beginning of the study. Group III received 50 mg/kg bwt of an immunostimulatory drug levamisole. Groups IV to IX were dosed daily for 14 days with extract at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg bwt, respectively, using an intragastric tube. Complete blood count (CBC), delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction (DTH), neutrophil adhesion test, and hemagglutination antibody titer were determined using standard methods and procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using GraphPad prism 5.0a Software. Results There was an increment in WBC, lymphocyte, and neutrophil counts at a dose of 1000 mg/kg bwt similar to the levamisole-positive control group. The neutrophil adhesion was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) for treatment groups that received 1000 mg/kg bwt (29.94%) and 500 mg/kg bwt at 17.28%. The mean percentage increment in footpad thickness was highest (26.9%) after 8 h of injection of antigen in the footpad of rats dosed 500 mg/kg bwt and this later reduced to 25.6% after 24 h. There was a dose-dependent increment in the mean hemagglutination antibody titer to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) from 10.73±0.57 HA units/μL for the 250 mg/kg bwt to 26.22±1.70 HA units/μL for the 1000 mg/kg bwt. Conclusions Methanolic leaf extract of M. oleifera caused a significant immunostimulatory effect on both the cell-mediated and humoral immune systems in the Wistar albino rats. PMID:26103628

  11. Ultrastructure of phagocytosed Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in nonactivated or activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Sun, S H; Harrison, J L; Perlman, A M; Philpott, D E; Stevens, D A

    1990-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study ultrastructures in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells after ingestion by nonactivated or cytokine-activated murine peritoneal macrophages. Yeast cells ingested by nonactivated macrophages had typical bi- and trilayered cell walls, plasma membranes, mitochondria, nuclei, vacuoles, etc., which remained intact for 24 h of coculture. In contrast, yeast cells ingested by activated macrophages exhibited abnormal mitochondrial ultrastructures within 4 h of interaction. Subsequent events that occurred were the formation of several clear vacuoles per cell, disintegration of the cytoplasm, and development of empty cells with intact walls. These findings provide, for the first time, insights into stepwise damage to fungal cells by activated macrophages (of particular interest in this instance because of prior evidence that the damage is due to nonoxidative mechanisms) and give possible clues regarding fungicidal mechanisms. Images PMID:2370112

  12. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Amplifies the Differentiation of Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongwei; Headley, Mark B.; Xu, Whitney; Comeau, Michael R.; Zhou, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    The epithelial-derived cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has been associated with the promotion of type 2 inflammation and the induction of allergic disease. In humans TSLP is elevated in the lungs of asthma patients and in the lesional skin of individuals with atopic dermatitis, whereas mice lacking TSLP responses are refractory to models of Th2-driven allergic disease. Although several cell types, including dendritic cells, basophils, and CD4 T cells, have been shown to respond to TSLP, its role in macrophage differentiation has not been studied. Type 2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-13) can drive the differentiation of macrophages into alternatively activated macrophages (aaM?s, also referred to as M2 macrophages). This population of macrophages is associated with allergic inflammation. We therefore reasoned that TSLP/TSLPR signaling may be involved in the differentiation and activation of aaM?s during allergic airway inflammation. In this study, we report that TSLP changes the quiescent phenotype of pulmonary macrophages toward an aaM? phenotype during TSLP-induced airway inflammation. This differentiation of airway macrophages was IL-13, but not IL-4, dependent. Taken together, we demonstrate in this study that TSLP/TSLPR plays a significant role in the amplification of aaM? polarization and chemokine production, thereby contributing to allergic inflammation. PMID:23275605

  13. Activation of spleen cells by ArtinM may account for its immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago Aparecido da; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Cecílio, Nerry Tatiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2014-09-01

    ArtinM is a D-mannose-binding lectin extracted from Artocarpus heterophyllus that promotes interleukin-12 production by macrophages and dendritic cells. This property is considered responsible for T helper 1 immunity induced in vivo after ArtinM administration. In this study, we investigated the effect of native (jArtinM) and recombinant (rArtinM) forms of lectin on murine spleen cells and isolated T lymphocytes. We found that ArtinM binds to the surface of spleen cells. This interaction, which was blocked by D-mannose, induced cell activation, as manifested by increased mitochondrial activity, interleukin-2 production, and cell proliferation. We verified that a 30-times higher concentration of rArtinM was required to trigger optimal activation of spleen cells compared with that needed with jArtinM, although these proteins have identical sugar recognition properties and use the same signaling molecules to trigger cell activation. Because the distinction between native and recombinant is restricted to their tertiary structure (tetrameric and monomeric, respectively), we postulated that the multi-valence of jArtinM accounts for its superiority in promoting clustering of cell surface glycoreceptors and activation. The jArtinM and rArtinM activation effect exerted on spleen cells was reproduced on purified CD4(+) T cells. Our results suggest that ArtinM interaction with T cells leads to responses that may act in concert with the interleukin-12 produced by antigen-presenting cells to modulate immunity toward the T helper 1 axis. Further studies are necessary to dissect ArtinM/T-cell interactions to more fully understand the immunomodulation induced by carbohydrate recognition. PMID:24842046

  14. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4R?, myeloid specific IL-4R?, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  15. Itaconic acid is a mammalian metabolite induced during macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Strelko, Cheryl L; Lu, Wenyun; Dufort, Fay J; Seyfried, Thomas N; Chiles, Thomas C; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Roberts, Mary F

    2011-10-19

    Itaconic acid (ITA), or methylenesuccinic acid, is not generally classified as a mammalian metabolite. Using NMR-based metabolomics and (13)C-labeling, we have detected ITA in both macrophage-like VM-M3 and RAW 264.7 tumor cell lines as well as stimulated and unstimulated primary murine macrophages. Macrophage activation by addition of lipopolysaccharide and IFN-? markedly increased ITA production and secretion. Crude cell extracts synthesize ITA via decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, indicative of a novel mammalian cis-aconitic decarboxylase activity. Our results highlight a previously unidentified biosynthetic pathway related to TCA cycle metabolism in mammalian cells and a novel metabolite that likely plays a role in macrophage-based immune response. PMID:21919507

  16. Itaconic acid is a mammalian metabolite induced during macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Strelko, Cheryl L.; Lu, Wenyun; Dufort, Fay J.; Seyfried, Thomas N.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Roberts, Mary F.

    2011-01-01

    Itaconic acid, or methylenesuccinic acid, is not generally classified as a mammalian metabolite. Using NMR based metabolomics and 13C-labeling, we have detected itaconic acid in both macrophage-like VM-M3 and RAW 264.7 tumor cell lines as well as stimulated and unstimulated primary murine macrophages. Macrophage activation by addition of lipopolysaccharide and IFN-? markedly increased itaconic acid production and secretion. Crude cell extracts synthesize itaconic acid via decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, indicative of a novel mammalian cis-aconitic decarboxylase activity. Our results highlight a previously unidentified biosynthetic pathway related to TCA cycle metabolism in mammalian cells and a novel metabolite that likely plays a role in macrophage-based immune response. PMID:21919507

  17. C/EBP? regulates macrophage activation and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonggi; Qiao, Liping; Lu, Min; Yoo, Hyung Sun; Cheung, Wai; Mak, Robert; Schaack, Jerome; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Chi, Nai-Wen; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Shao, Jianhua

    2014-05-15

    Macrophage infiltration plays an important role in obesity-induced insulin resistance. CCAAT enhancer-binding protein-? (C/EBP?) is a transcription factor that is highly expressed in macrophages. To examine the roles of C/EBP? in regulating macrophage functions and energy homeostasis, macrophage-specific C/EBP? knockout (M?KO) mice were created. Chow-fed M?KO mice exhibited higher body fat mass and decreased energy expenditure despite no change in food intake. However, the obese phenotype disappeared after high-fat (HF) diet feeding. Although there was a transient decrease in insulin sensitivity of chow-fed young M?KO mice, systemic insulin sensitivity was protected during HF-feeding due to preserved insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. We also found that C/EBP?-deficient macrophages exhibited a blunted response of cytokine-induced expression of M1 and M2 macrophage markers, suggesting that C/EBP? controls both M1 and M2 polarization. Consistent with decreased exercise capacity, mitochondrial respiration rates and signal pathways for fatty acid oxidation were remarkably reduced in the skeletal muscle of chow-fed M?KO mice. Furthermore, expression levels of inflammatory cytokines were reduced in skeletal muscle of HF-fed M?KO mice. Together, these results imply that C/EBP? is required for macrophage activation, which plays an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle energy metabolism. PMID:24691027

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of anti-leishmanial and immunomodulatory activity of Neem leaf extract in Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Sundar, Shyam; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2015-06-01

    The toxicity and emergence of resistance to available chemical drugs against visceral leishmaniasis is evoking to explore herbal treatment. One such attempt with the Neem is being reported here. The current study is primarily focused to evaluate the anti-leishmanial effects of Neem leaf extracts. Among which, ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) alone was found to exhibit leishmanicidal effect validated through cytotoxicity assay and estimated its IC?? to be 52.4?g/ml on the promastigote stage. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of dead cells substantiated the aforementioned activity. Carboxy fluorescein-diaceate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining of promastigotes has affirmed its anti-proliferation activity. The characteristic features such as DNA fragmentation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased sub G0/G1 phase parasites and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in EAF treated promastigotes indicate the apoptosis like death. In addition, the reduced parasite burden both in vitro (viz.?~45% in human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and ~50% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells) and in vivo (spleen and liver) provides the evidence for its anti-leishmanial activity on amastigote stage. The increase of ROS levels in THP-1 and nitric oxide (NO) production from J774.1 cell line (mouse macrophages) upon EAF treatment was evidenced for oxidative killing of intracellular amastigotes. Active immunomodulatory activity at m-RNA level (viz. upregulation of Th1 cytokines, and downregulation of Th2 cytokines) both in vitro and in vivo was also shown to be exhibited by EAF. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of EAF revealed the presence of 14 compounds. PMID:25747203

  19. [The activating action of mercaptobenzimidazole derivatives on peritoneal macrophages].

    PubMed

    Ratnikov, V I; Ratnikova, L I

    1991-01-01

    It was established that derivatives of mercaptobenzimidazole (bemitil, methoxybemitil, 5-ethoxy-2-ethylmercaptobenzimidazole hydrochloride) in a dose of 25 mg/kg stimulate the mouse peritoneal macrophages by increasing their phagocytic activity and phagocytosis index. Among the studied agents 5-ethoxy-2-ethylmercaptobenzimidazole hydrochloride possesses the greatest effect. The increase of phagocytosis processes was shown to be accompanied with a growth of the number of macrophages reducing nitroblue tetrazolium in diphormazan and with an enhancement of secretion of lysosomal enzymes. PMID:1884800

  20. Cholesteryl ester hydrolase activity is abolished in HSL macrophages but unchanged in macrophages lacking KIAA1363[S

    PubMed Central

    Buchebner, Marlene; Pfeifer, Thomas; Rathke, Nora; Chandak, Prakash G.; Lass, Achim; Schreiber, Renate; Kratzer, Adelheid; Zimmermann, Robert; Sattler, Wolfgang; Koefeler, Harald; Frhlich, Eleonore; Kostner, Gerhard M.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Chiang, Kyle P.; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Cravatt, Benjamin; Kratky, Dagmar

    2010-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages represents a crucial event during foam cell formation, a hallmark of atherogenesis. Here we investigated the role of two previously described CE hydrolases, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and KIAA1363, in macrophage CE hydrolysis. HSL and KIAA1363 exhibited marked differences in their abilities to hydrolyze CE, triacylglycerol (TG), diacylglycerol (DG), and 2-acetyl monoalkylglycerol ether (AcMAGE), a precursor for biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF). HSL efficiently cleaved all four substrates, whereas KIAA1363 hydrolyzed only AcMAGE. This contradicts previous studies suggesting that KIAA1363 is a neutral CE hydrolase. Macrophages of KIAA1363?/? and wild-type mice exhibited identical neutral CE hydrolase activity, which was almost abolished in tissues and macrophages of HSL?/? mice. Conversely, AcMAGE hydrolase activity was diminished in macrophages and some tissues of KIAA1363?/? but unchanged in HSL?/? mice. CE turnover was unaffected in macrophages lacking KIAA1363 and HSL, whereas cAMP-dependent cholesterol efflux was influenced by HSL but not by KIAA1363. Despite decreased CE hydrolase activities, HSL?/? macrophages exhibited CE accumulation similar to wild-type (WT) macrophages. We conclude that additional enzymes must exist that cooperate with HSL to regulate CE levels in macrophages. KIAA1363 affects AcMAGE hydrolase activity but is of minor importance as a direct CE hydrolase in macrophages. PMID:20625037

  1. Immunomodulatory activity and control of Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in the intestinal tract of chickens by Lactobacillus based probiotic.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Díaz, Silvia Juliana Acelas; Fernando, Filipe Santos; Chang, Yung-Fu; Andreatti Filho, Raphael Lucio; Berchieri Junior, Angelo

    2015-09-15

    Lactobacillus-based probiotics (LBP) are used as competitive exclusion to control pathogenic enterobacterial infections and improve the weight gain in broiler chickens. This study assessed the inhibition of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in one-week-old broiler chicks, using an experimental LBP containing four Lactobacillus strains isolated from chickens (L. acidophilus, L. fermentum, L. reuteri, L. salivarius). The immunomodulatory effects of this treatment were evaluated, through the analysis of cytokines and influx of macrophages, γδ, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the gut. The intestinal colonization by SE was reduced by 1.8 CFU/g (log10) in chicks treated with LBP (p<0.05). The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, LITAF) were significantly reduced in treated chicks (p<0.05), whilst untreated chicks showed elevated inflammatory stimulus and an increased population of CD8(+) T cells in the intestinal mucosa after challenge (p<0.05). Additionally, the LBP stimulated TLR2 expression in caecal tonsils. The adjuvant property of the Lactobacillus cell wall (LCW) was evaluated, demonstrating good capability to stimulate T helper 2 (Th2) cell proliferation. Pretreatment of chicks with LBP decreased the intestinal colonization by SE, minimizing the tissue lesions and inflammation after challenge and showed a potential use as adjuvant with injectable killed vaccines. PMID:26099807

  2. Sequential delivery of immunomodulatory cytokines to facilitate the M1-to-M2 transition of macrophages and enhance vascularization of bone scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Nassiri, Sina; Witherel, Claire E.; Anfang, Rachel R.; Ng, Johnathan; Nakazawa, Kenneth R.; Yu, Tony; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    In normal tissue repair, macrophages exhibit a pro-inflammatory phenotype (M1) at early stages and a pro-healing phenotype (M2) at later stages. We have previously shown that M1 macrophages initiate angiogenesis while M2 macrophages promote vessel maturation. Therefore, we reasoned that scaffolds that promote sequential M1 and M2 polarization of infiltrating macrophages should result in enhanced angiogenesis and healing. To this end, we first analyzed the in vitro kinetics of macrophage phenotype switch using flow cytometry, gene expression, and cytokine secretion analysis. Then, we designed scaffolds for bone regeneration based on modifications of decellularized bone for a short release of interferon-gamma (IFNg) to promote the M1 phenotype, followed by a more sustained release of interleukin-4 (IL4) to promote the M2 phenotype. To achieve this sequential release profile, IFNg was physically adsorbed onto the scaffolds, while IL4 was attached via biotin-streptavidin binding. Interestingly, despite the strong interactions between biotin and streptavidin, release studies showed that biotinylated IL4 was released over 6 days. These scaffolds promoted sequential M1 and M2 polarization of primary human macrophages as measured by gene expression of ten M1 and M2 markers and secretion of four cytokines, although the overlapping phases of IFNg and IL4 release tempered polarization to some extent. Murine subcutaneous implantation model showed increased vascularization in scaffolds releasing IFNg compared to controls. This study demonstrates that scaffolds for tissue engineering can be designed to harness the angiogenic behavior of host macrophages towards scaffold vascularization. PMID:25453950

  3. CDDO-Me Redirects Activation of Breast Tumor Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Michael S.; Shipman, Emilie P.; Kim, Hyunjung; Liby, Karen T.; Pioli, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages can account for up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer patients and high TAM density is associated with poor clinical prognosis. Because TAMs enhance tumor growth, development, and metastatic potential, redirection of TAM activation may have significant therapeutic benefit. Our studies in primary human macrophages and murine breast TAMs suggest that the synthetic oleanane triterpenoid CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) reprograms the activation profile of TAMs from tumor-promoting to tumor-inhibiting. We show that CDDO-Me treatment inhibits expression of IL-10 and VEGF in stimulated human M2 macrophages and TAMs but increases expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Surface expression of CD206 and CD163, which are characteristic of M2 activation, is significantly attenuated by CDDO-Me. In contrast, CDDO-Me up-regulates surface expression of HLA-DR and CD80, which are markers of M1 activation, and importantly potentiates macrophage activation of autologous T cells but inhibits endothelial cell vascularization. These results show for the first time that CDDO-Me redirects activation of M2 macrophages and TAMs from immune-suppressive to immune-stimulatory, and implicate a role for CDDO-Me as an immunotherapeutic in the treatment of breast and potentially other types of cancer. PMID:26918785

  4. Immunomodulatory dendritic cells require autologous serum to circumvent nonspecific immunosuppressive activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Claus; Ejrnaes, Mette; Juedes, Amy E.; Wolfe, Tom; Markholst, Helle; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2005-01-01

    In immunotherapy, dendritic cells (DCs) can be used as powerful antigen-presenting cells to enhance or suppress antigen-specific immunity upon in vivo transfer in mice or humans. However, to generate sufficient numbers of DCs, most protocols include an ex vivo culture step, wherein the cells are exposed to heterologous serum and/or antigenic stimuli. In mouse models of virus infection and virus-induced autoimmunity, we tested how heterologous serum affects the immunomodulatory capacity of immature DCs generated in the presence of IL-10 by comparing fetal bovine serum (FBS)- or normal mouse serum (NMS)-supplemented DC cultures. We show that FBS-exposed DCs induce a systemic immune deviation characterized by reduction of virus-specific T cells, delayed viral clearance, and enhanced systemic production of interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-10 to FBS-derived antigens, including bovine serum albumin (BSA). By contrast, DCs generated in NMS-supplemented cultures modulated immunity and autoimmunity in an antigen-specific fashion. These cells did not induce systemic IL-4, IL-5, or IL-10 production and inhibited generation of virus-specific T cells or autoimmunity only if pulsed with a viral antigen. These data underscore the importance of using autologous serum-derived immature DCs in preclinical animal studies to accurately assess their immunomodulatory potential in future human therapeutic settings, where application of FBS is not feasible. PMID:16118326

  5. Active autophagy but not lipophagy in macrophages with defective lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Chandak, Prakash G.; Korbelius, Melanie; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Leopold, Christina; Obrowsky, Sascha; Rainer, Silvia; Doddapattar, Prakash; Aflaki, Elma; Wegscheider, Martin; Sachdev, Vinay; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    During autophagy, autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes to degrade damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. Breakdown products are released into the cytosol and contribute to energy and metabolic building block supply, especially during starvation. Lipophagy has been defined as the autophagy-mediated degradation of lipid droplets (LDs) by lysosomal acid lipase. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme catalyzing the initial step of lipolysis by hydrolyzing triglycerides (TGs) in cytosolic LDs. Consequently, most organs and cells, including macrophages, lacking ATGL accumulate TGs, resulting in reduced intracellular free fatty acid concentrations. Macrophages deficient in hormone-sensitive lipase (H0) lack TG accumulation albeit reduced in vitro TG hydrolase activity. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated in lipase-deficient macrophages to counteract their energy deficit. We therefore generated mice lacking both ATGL and HSL (A0H0). Macrophages from A0H0 mice showed 73% reduced neutral TG hydrolase activity, resulting in TG-rich LD accumulation. Increased expression of cathepsin B, accumulation of LC3-II, reduced expression of p62 and increased DQ-BSA dequenching suggest intact autophagy and functional lysosomes in A0H0 macrophages. Markedly decreased acid TG hydrolase activity and lipid flux independent of bafilomycin A1 treatment, however, argue against effective lysosomal degradation of LDs in A0H0 macrophages. We conclude that autophagy of proteins and cell organelles but not of LDs is active as a compensatory mechanism to circumvent and balance the reduced availability of energy substrates in A0H0 macrophages. PMID:26143381

  6. Active autophagy but not lipophagy in macrophages with defective lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Goeritzer, Madeleine; Vujic, Nemanja; Schlager, Stefanie; Chandak, Prakash G; Korbelius, Melanie; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Leopold, Christina; Obrowsky, Sascha; Rainer, Silvia; Doddapattar, Prakash; Aflaki, Elma; Wegscheider, Martin; Sachdev, Vinay; Graier, Wolfgang F; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-10-01

    During autophagy, autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes to degrade damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. Breakdown products are released into the cytosol and contribute to energy and metabolic building block supply, especially during starvation. Lipophagy has been defined as the autophagy-mediated degradation of lipid droplets (LDs) by lysosomal acid lipase. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme catalyzing the initial step of lipolysis by hydrolyzing triglycerides (TGs) in cytosolic LDs. Consequently, most organs and cells, including macrophages, lacking ATGL accumulate TGs, resulting in reduced intracellular free fatty acid concentrations. Macrophages deficient in hormone-sensitive lipase (H0) lack TG accumulation albeit reduced in vitro TG hydrolase activity. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated in lipase-deficient macrophages to counteract their energy deficit. We therefore generated mice lacking both ATGL and HSL (A0H0). Macrophages from A0H0 mice showed 73% reduced neutral TG hydrolase activity, resulting in TG-rich LD accumulation. Increased expression of cathepsin B, accumulation of LC3-II, reduced expression of p62 and increased DQ-BSA dequenching suggest intact autophagy and functional lysosomes in A0H0 macrophages. Markedly decreased acid TG hydrolase activity and lipid flux independent of bafilomycin A1 treatment, however, argue against effective lysosomal degradation of LDs in A0H0 macrophages. We conclude that autophagy of proteins and cell organelles but not of LDs is active as a compensatory mechanism to circumvent and balance the reduced availability of energy substrates in A0H0 macrophages. PMID:26143381

  7. The immunomodulatory and anticancer properties of propolis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung; Cheung, Ka-Wai; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen

    2013-06-01

    Propolis, a waxy substance produced by the honeybee, has been adopted as a form of folk medicine since ancient times. It has a wide spectrum of alleged applications including potential anti-infection and anticancer effects. Many of the therapeutic effects can be attributed to its immunomodulatory functions. The composition of propolis can vary according to the geographic locations from where the bees obtained the ingredients. Two main immunopotent chemicals have been identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and artepillin C. Propolis, CAPE, and artepillin C have been shown to exert summative immunosuppressive function on T lymphocyte subsets but paradoxically activate macrophage function. On the other hand, they also have potential antitumor properties by different postulated mechanisms such as suppressing cancer cells proliferation via its anti-inflammatory effects; decreasing the cancer stem cell populations; blocking specific oncogene signaling pathways; exerting antiangiogenic effects; and modulating the tumor microenvironment. The good bioavailability by the oral route and good historical safety profile makes propolis an ideal adjuvant agent for future immunomodulatory or anticancer regimens. However, standardized quality controls and good design clinical trials are essential before either propolis or its active ingredients can be adopted routinely in our future therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:22707327

  8. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khoa D; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y P Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-12-01

    All homeotherms use thermogenesis to maintain their core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiological processes can continue in cold environments. In the prevailing model of thermogenesis, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue. Acting via the ?(3)-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPAR-? coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report in mice an unexpected requirement for the interleukin-4 (IL-4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Exposure to cold temperature rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in brown adipose tissue and lipolysis in white adipose tissue. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL-4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. Thus, we have discovered a role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  9. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  10. Periodontitis-activated monocytes/macrophages cause aortic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miyajima, Shin-ichi; Naruse, Keiko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Nishikawa, Toru; Adachi, Kei; Suzuki, Yuki; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Mizutani, Makoto; Ohno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Toshihide; Matsubara, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis has been suggested by epidemiological studies. Ligature-induced experimental periodontitis is an adequate model for clinical periodontitis, which starts from plaque accumulation, followed by inflammation in the periodontal tissue. Here we have demonstrated using a ligature-induced periodontitis model that periodontitis activates monocytes/macrophages, which subsequently circulate in the blood and adhere to vascular endothelial cells without altering the serum TNF-? concentration. Adherent monocytes/macrophages induced NF-?B activation and VCAM-1 expression in the endothelium and increased the expression of the TNF-? signaling cascade in the aorta. Peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells from rats with experimental periodontitis showed enhanced adhesion and increased NF-?B/VCAM-1 in cultured vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that periodontitis triggers the initial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation of the vasculature, through activating monocytes/macrophages. PMID:24893991

  11. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A; Halo, Tiffany L; Merkel, Timothy J; Rische, Clayton H; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A; Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2015-03-31

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies. PMID:25775582

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus CP23 with weak immunomodulatory activity lacks anchoring structure for surface layer protein.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Sae; Kato, Shinji; Ashida, Nobuhisa; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2015-05-01

    To determine the reason for the low levels of Surface layer protein A (SlpA) on CP23 cells, which might play a crucial role in the immunomodulatory effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus, the DNA sequence of the slpA gene of CP23 and L-92 strains, including the upstream region, were analyzed. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in the predicted amino acid sequence of the C-terminus needed for cell anchoring, and only an additional Ala-Val-Ala sequence inserted in the N-terminal region of the mature CP23 protein. Therefore, anchoring of SlpA on the cell wall of CP23 and L-92 was evaluated by a reconstitution assay, which showed that SlpA released by LiCl treatment from both CP23 and L-92 was successfully anchored on LiCl-treated L-92 cells, but not on LiCl-treated CP23 cells. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SlpA protein in the culture medium of CP23 and L-92 by ELISA revealed higher levels of SlpA secretion in CP23 cells than in L-92 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that the lower levels of SlpA on the surface of CP23 cells might be caused by less cell wall capacity for SlpA anchoring, leading to an accumulation of SlpA in the culture medium of CP23 cells. The present study supports the importance of cell surface structure of L. acidophilus L-92 for SlpA anchoring on the cell surface needed for immunomodulatory effect. PMID:25454604

  13. Toxic effects of methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) on chicken activated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, M.A.; Bloom, S.E.; Hamilton, J.W.; Dietert, R.R.

    1986-03-01

    Adherent peritoneal exudate cells rich in macrophages were harvested from Cornell K-strain chickens 42 hours after i.p. stimulation with Sephadex-G-40. Glass adherent monolayers were obtained on coverslips and subjected to in vitro exposure to MMS at various doses for one hour. Solvent (0.17% ethanol final concentration) and sham (RPMI 1640 growth media) exposures were also performed. At selected times after exposure, the macrophages were analyzed for cell density, viability, DNA damage and functional activity. While MMS doses of 5 x 10/sup 3/M and 1 x 10/sup 3/M concentrations resulted in significant cytotoxicity, 2 x 20/sup 4/M MMS had no significant cytotoxic effect. However, this exposure resulted in DNA damage as measured by alkaline elution. Concomitant with the DNA damage was a significant decrease in the phagocytic activity of the macrophages. In contrast, the incidence of Fc receptor-positive cells detected by rosetting increased immediately after MMS exposure. Repair of MMS-induced DNA lesions in macrophages was indicated by a normal DNA alkaline elution profile 10 hours post-treatment. Functional activity of cells also returned to normal levels. These results suggest that the avian macrophage represents a useful target cell for examining the relationship between genotoxic and immunotoxic effects of environmental mutagens.

  14. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi K.; Littke, Matt H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-09

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pre-treatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pre-treatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pre-treatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from a M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNF production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia, and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Nanotoxicology screening strategies should therefore consider how exposure to these materials alters susceptibility to other environmental exposures.

  15. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pre-treatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pre-treatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pre-treatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from a M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNF? production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia, and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Nanotoxicology screening strategies should therefore consider how exposure to these materials alters susceptibility to other environmental exposures. PMID:23808590

  16. Human macrophage activation programs induced by bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Gerard J.; Richmond, Joan F. L.; Schlesinger, Ann; Jennings, Ezra G.; Lander, Eric S.; Young, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the response of innate immune cells to pathogens may provide insights to host defenses and the tactics used by pathogens to circumvent these defenses. We used DNA microarrays to explore the responses of human macrophages to a variety of bacteria. Macrophages responded to a broad range of bacteria with a robust, shared pattern of gene expression. The shared response includes genes encoding receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. This shared activation program transforms the macrophage into a cell primed to interact with its environment and to mount an immune response. Further study revealed that the activation program is induced by bacterial components that are Toll-like receptor agonists, including lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, muramyl dipeptide, and heat shock proteins. Pathogen-specific responses were also apparent in the macrophage expression profiles. Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific responses revealed inhibition of interleukin-12 production, suggesting one means by which this organism survives host defenses. These results improve our understanding of macrophage defenses, provide insights into mechanisms of pathogenesis, and suggest targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:11805289

  17. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed Central

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  18. Study of the activated macrophage transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Novoselov, Vladimir V; Sazonova, Margarita A; Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2015-12-01

    Transcriptome analysis is a powerful modern tool to study possible alterations of gene expression associated with human diseases. It turns out to be especially promising for evaluation of gene expression changes in immunopathology, as immune cells have flexible gene expression patterns that can be switched in response to infection, inflammatory stimuli and exposure to various cytokines. In particular, macrophage polarization towards pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotypes can be successfully studied using the modern transcriptome analysis approaches. The two mostly used techniques for transcriptome analysis are microarray and next generation sequencing. In this review we will provide an overview of known gene expression changes associated with immunopathology and discuss the advantage and limitations of different methods of transcriptome analysis. PMID:26439118

  19. Apoptosis-inducing activity of clofazimine in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fukutomi, Yasuo; Maeda, Yumi; Makino, Masahiko

    2011-09-01

    Clofazimine is a riminophenazine compound which has been used for the treatment of leprosy since the 1960s. Although the drug is effective in the management of leprosy reactions because of its anti-inflammatory activity, the mechanism leading to the cessation of inflammation is not well understood. In the present study, it was shown that clofazimine exhibits apoptosis-inducing activity in macrophages. When human monocyte-derived macrophages were cultured in vitro in the presence of clofazimine, the cells exhibited a marked decrease in metabolic activity and showed shrinkage in cell size, indicating cell death. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation were also observed by Giemsa and Hoechst 33248 stains. The endonuclease inhibitor ZnCl(2) inhibited the clofazimine-induced cell death. Significant enhancement of caspase-3 activity was observed in clofazimine-treated macrophages and THP-1 cells. Collectively, these results suggest the apoptosis-inducing activity of clofazimine in macrophages, which may also be responsible for the antibacterial properties of clofazimine. PMID:21690278

  20. NOTCH reprograms mitochondrial metabolism for proinflammatory macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Chi, Feng; Guo, Tongsheng; Punj, Vasu; Lee, W.N. Paul; French, Samuel W.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is implicated in macrophage activation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the NOTCH1 pathway dictates activation of M1 phenotypes in isolated mouse hepatic macrophages (HMacs) and in a murine macrophage cell line by coupling transcriptional upregulation of M1 genes with metabolic upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ROS (mtROS) to augment induction of M1 genes. Enhanced mitochondrial glucose oxidation was achieved by increased recruitment of the NOTCH1 intracellular domain (NICD1) to nuclear and mitochondrial genes that encode respiratory chain components and by NOTCH-dependent induction of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 (Pdp1) expression, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, and glucose flux to the TCA cycle. As such, inhibition of the NOTCH pathway or Pdp1 knockdown abrogated glucose oxidation, mtROS, and M1 gene expression. Conditional NOTCH1 deficiency in the myeloid lineage attenuated HMac M1 activation and inflammation in a murine model of alcoholic steatohepatitis and markedly reduced lethality following endotoxin-mediated fulminant hepatitis in mice. In vivo monocyte tracking further demonstrated the requirement of NOTCH1 for the migration of blood monocytes into the liver and subsequent M1 differentiation. Together, these results reveal that NOTCH1 promotes reprogramming of mitochondrial metabolism for M1 macrophage activation. PMID:25798621

  1. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  2. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the…

  3. DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF TYPE I INTERFERON ACTIVATION IN MACROPHAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulmonary airways are relatively vulnerable to infection because of continuous exposure to antigen during respiration. The innate immune response must be activated promptly, yet incisively, after pathogen recognition. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play a role in initiating the antiviral response in the ...

  4. Diet Modifies the Neuroimmune System by Influencing Macrophage Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Christina Lynn

    2009-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that adequate nutrition is required for proper immune function and it is now recognized that dietary components contribute to modulation of immune cells, subsequently impacting the whole body's response during an immune challenge. Macrophage activation plays a critical role in the immune system and directs the

  5. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Microtubule-associated Proteins during Macrophage Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prerna C.; Fisher, Katherine H.; Yang, Eric C. C.; Deane, Charlotte M.; Harrison, Rene E.

    2009-01-01

    Classical activation of macrophages induces a wide range of signaling and vesicle trafficking events to produce a more aggressive cellular phenotype. The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is crucial for the regulation of immune responses. In the current study, we used a large scale proteomics approach to analyze the change in protein composition of the MT-associated protein (MAP) network by macrophage stimulation with the inflammatory cytokine interferon-? and the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide. Overall the analysis identified 409 proteins that bound directly or indirectly to MTs. Of these, 52 were up-regulated 2-fold or greater and 42 were down-regulated 2-fold or greater after interferon-?/lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Bioinformatics analysis based on publicly available binary protein interaction data produced a putative interaction network of MAPs in activated macrophages. We confirmed the up-regulation of several MAPs by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analysis. More detailed analysis of one up-regulated protein revealed a role for HSP90? in stabilization of the MT cytoskeleton during macrophage activation. PMID:19651621

  7. Extracts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, suppress macrophage activation in vitro and alleviate chemically induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M J G; Wang, A; Catarino, M E D; Ball, L; Phan, V C; MacDonald, J A; McKay, D M

    2010-03-01

    Analysis of parasite-host interactions can reveal the intricacies of immunity and identify ways to modulate immunopathological reactions. We assessed the ability of a phosphate-buffered saline-soluble extract of adult Hymenolepis diminuta to suppress macrophage (human THP-1 cell line, murine peritoneal macrophages) activity in vitro and the impact of treating mice with this extract on colitis induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS). A high-molecular-mass fraction of adult H. diminuta (HdHMW) or excretory/secretory products reduced macrophage activation: lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and poly(I:C)-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 were suppressed by HdHMW. The active component in the HdHMW extract was minimally sensitive to boiling and trypsin digestion, whereas the use of sodium metaperiodate, as a general deglycosylation strategy, indicated that the immunosuppressive effect of HdHMW was at least partially dependent on a glycan: treating the HdHMW with neuraminidase and alpha-mannosidase failed to inhibit its blockade of LPS-induced TNF-alpha production by THP-1 macrophages. Mice treated with DNBS developed colitis, as typified by wasting, shortening of the colon, macroscopic and microscopic tissue damage, and an inflammatory infiltrate. Mice cotreated with HdHMW (three intraperitoneal injections) displayed significantly less inflammatory disease, and this was accompanied by reduced TNF-alpha production and increased IL-10 and IL-4 production by mitogen-stimulated spleen cells. However, cotreatment of mice with neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibodies had only a minor impact on the anticolitic effect of the HdHMW. We speculate that purification of the immunosuppressive factor(s) from H. diminuta has the potential to lead to the development of novel immunomodulatory drugs to treat inflammatory disease. PMID:20028812

  8. Biological activity of bacterial surface components. Immunogenicity and immunomodulatory properties of a bacterial extract from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bessler, W G; Beck, P; Konetznick, U; Loleit, M; Sedelmeier, E; Hoffmann, P; Strecker, M; Stcklin, S

    1991-03-01

    The immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties of a lysed fraction from selected E. coli strains (OM-89, Uro-Vaxom) were determined in vivo and in vitro. It could be demonstrated that OM-89 constitutes an active immunogen in mice. Maximum OM-89-specific antibody titers were obtained after 4-5 i.p. immunizations; the titers could be further enhanced by the simultaneous injection of lipopeptide adjuvants. It was shown by ELISA that the antibodies obtained bound to the bacterial strains used for the preparation of the OM-89 extract. Immunogenicity was observed both after intraperitoneal and oral application of the extract. Besides being active as an immunogen. OM-89 was able to act in vitro as a polyclonal lymphocyte activator, as determined in splenocyte cultures of different inbred murine strains, and in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Our results show that the B lymphocyte stimulating activity of the bacterial extract OM-89 was comparable to that of lipopeptide adjuvants. In conclusion, the bacterial extract both an active immunogen in vivo, and a polyclonal B cell activator in vitro. These findings may be of importance for the understanding of the therapeutic effect of OM-89. PMID:1867666

  9. Wnt5A exerts immunomodulatory activity in the human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, Somayeh; Hossein, Ghamartaj; Zarnani, Amir Hassan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was three fold: (1) to reveal the implications of Wnt5A for cytokine and chemokine production by human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3 cells, (2) to determine the influence of Wnt5A on chemotactic SKOV-3 cell migration, and (3) to assess the effect of inflammatory mediators on Wnt5A expression levels and to describe its underlying molecular mechanisms. A cytokine array was performed using a conditioned medium harvested from SKOV-3 cells transfected with specific siRNAs against Wnt5A or with scrambled siRNA and a transfection reagent alone as negative controls for 48?h. Chemotactic cell migration was performed using transwells. Inflammation-induced Wnt5A expression was determined by treating cells with recombinant human (rh) IL-1?, IFN?, or TNF? alone or in combination with STAT3 and NF-?B inhibitors for different time durations. The cytokine array showed the suppression of GCSF, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-2, IL-13, and MCP-3 production, whereas cell RANTES and IL-7 showed increased levels in Wnt5A knock-down cells compared with those in controls. Chemotactic migration decreased significantly when the conditioned medium from Wnt5A knock-down cells was applied to the upper chamber of the transwell. Compared with the control, there were 30-fold and five-fold increases in Wnt5A mRNA levels in cells treated, with rhIL-1? and rhIFN?, respectively after 8?h (P?immunomodulatory role of endogenous Wnt5A in ovarian cancer cells, which could further influence chemotactic cell migration. PMID:26462870

  10. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  11. Synergistic anti-myeloma activity of the proteasome inhibitor marizomib and the IMiD() immunomodulatory drug pomalidomide.

    PubMed

    Das, Deepika S; Ray, Arghya; Song, Yan; Richardson, Paul; Trikha, Mohit; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2015-12-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is an effective therapy for the treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM); however, prolonged treatment can be associated with toxicity, peripheral neuropathy and drug resistance. Our earlier studies showed that the novel proteasome inhibitor marizomib is distinct from bortezomib in its chemical structure, mechanisms of action and effects on proteasomal activities, and that it can overcome bortezomib resistance. Pomalidomide, like lenalidomide, has potent immunomodulatory activity and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of RRMM. Here, we demonstrate that combining low concentrations of marizomib with pomalidomide induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Marizomib plus pomalidomide-induced apoptosis is associated with: (i) activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP cleavage, (ii) downregulation of cereblon (CRBN), IRF4, MYC and MCL1, and (iii) suppression of chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like proteasome activities. CRBN-siRNA attenuates marizomib plus pomalidomide-induced MM cells death. Furthermore, marizomib plus pomalidomide inhibits the migration of MM cells and tumour-associated angiogenesis, as well as overcomes cytoprotective effects of bone marrow microenvironment. In human MM xenograft model studies, the combination of marizomib and pomalidomide is well tolerated, inhibits tumour growth and prolongs survival. These preclinical studies provide the rationale for on-going clinical trials of combined marizomib and pomalidomide to improve outcome in patients with RRMM. PMID:26456076

  12. Characteristics of Suppressor Macrophages Induced by Mycobacterial and Protozoal Infections in relation to Alternatively Activated M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Haruaki; Tatano, Yutaka; Maw, Win Win; Sano, Chiaki; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    In the advanced stages of mycobacterial infections, host immune systems tend to change from a Th1-type to Th2-type immune response, resulting in the abrogation of Th1 cell- and macrophage-mediated antimicrobial host protective immunity. Notably, this type of immune conversion is occasionally associated with the generation of certain types of suppressor macrophage populations. During the course of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) infections, the generation of macrophages which possess strong suppressor activity against host T- and B-cell functions is frequently encountered. This paper describes the immunological properties of M1- and M2-type macrophages generated in tumor-bearing animals and those generated in hosts with certain microbial infections. In addition, this paper highlights the immunological and molecular biological characteristics of suppressor macrophages generated in hosts with mycobacterial infections, especially MAC infection. PMID:22666284

  13. Alternatively activated macrophages derived from monocytes and tissue macrophages are phenotypically and functionally distinct

    PubMed Central

    Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Girgis, Natasha M.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Jenkins, Stephen; Ward, Lauren N.; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Wiens, Kirsten E.; Tang, Mei San; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Allen, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages adopt an alternatively activated phenotype (AAMs) when activated by the interleukin-4receptor(R)?. AAMs can be derived either from proliferation of tissue resident macrophages or recruited inflammatory monocytes, but it is not known whether these different sources generate AAMs that are phenotypically and functionally distinct. By transcriptional profiling analysis, we show here that, although both monocyte and tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of Arg1, Chi3l3, and Retnla, only monocyte-derived AAMs up-regulated Raldh2 and PD-L2. Monocyte-derived AAMs were also CX3CR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)high and expressed CD206, whereas tissue-derived AAMs were CX3CR1-GFP and CD206 negative. Monocyte-derived AAMs had high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and promoted the differentiation of FoxP3+ cells from nave CD4+ cells via production of retinoic acid. In contrast, tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of uncoupling protein 1. Hence monocyte-derived AAM have properties associated with immune regulation, and the different physiological properties associated with AAM function may depend on the distinct lineage of these cells. PMID:24695852

  14. Immunomodulatory effects of curcumin: in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Varalakshmi, Ch; Ali, A Mubarak; Pardhasaradhi, B V V; Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Singh, Sarvjeet; Khar, Ashok

    2008-05-01

    Curcumin specifically exhibits cytostatic and cytotoxic effects against tumors of multiple origin. Previously we have demonstrated apoptotic activity of curcumin against tumor cells with no effect on normal cells in-vitro. Many anti-cancer drugs exhibit deleterious effects on immune cells, which restrict their wide use in-vivo. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of curcumin on the major functions of T cells, natural killer cells, macrophages and on total splenocytes in-vivo, which insight the role of curcumin on their broad effector functions. This study demonstrates that prolonged curcumin-injections (i.p.) do not impair the cytotoxic function of natural killer cells, the generation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide from macrophages and the levels of Th1 regulatory cytokines remained unaltered. Interestingly, curcumin-injections enhanced the mitogen and antigen induced proliferation potential of T cells. We have also evaluated immunomodulatory effects of curcumin in ascites-bearing animals. This study strengthens our belief that curcumin is a safe and useful immunomodulator for the immune system. PMID:18387511

  15. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Lucy; Breidenstein, Elena B.M.; Elliott, Melissa; Reffuveille, Fany; Speert, David P.; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L.; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive) resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients. PMID:26221537

  16. Aloe-emodin exerts a potent anticancer and immunomodulatory activity on BRAF-mutated human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tabolacci, Claudio; Cordella, Martina; Turcano, Lorenzo; Rossi, Stefania; Lentini, Alessandro; Mariotti, Sabrina; Nisini, Roberto; Sette, Giovanni; Eramo, Adriana; Piredda, Lucia; De Maria, Ruggero; Facchiano, Francesco; Beninati, Simone

    2015-09-01

    Aim of this study was to extend the knowledge on the antineoplastic effect of aloe-emodin (AE), a natural hydroxyanthraquinone compound, both in metastatic human melanoma cell lines and in primary stem-like cells (melanospheres). Treatment with AE caused reduction of cell proliferation and induction of SK-MEL-28 and A375 cells differentiation, characterized by a marked increase of transamidating activity of transglutaminase whose expression remained unmodified. In vitro antimetastatic property of AE was evaluated by adhesion and Boyden chamber invasion assays. The effect of AE on melanoma cytokines/chemokines production was determined by a multiplex assay: interestingly AE showed an immunomodulatory activity through GM-CSF and IFN-? production. We report also that AE significantly reduced the proliferation, stemness and invasive potential of melanospheres. Moreover, AE treatment significantly enhanced dabrafenib (a BRAF inhibitor) antiproliferative activity in BRAF mutant cell lines. Our results confirm that AE possesses remarkable antineoplastic properties against melanoma cells, indicating this anthraquinone as a promising agent for differentiation therapy of cancer, or as adjuvant in chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Further, its mechanisms of action support a potential efficacy of AE treatment to counteract resistance of BRAF-mutated melanoma cells to target therapy. PMID:26048310

  17. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-?1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25953850

  18. Role of Chemokines in Shaping Macrophage Activity in AMD.

    PubMed

    Rutar, Matt; Provis, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. While the advent of anti-VEGF therapy has allowed for effective treatment of neovascular 'wet' AMD, no treatments are available to mitigate the more prevalent 'dry' forms of the disease. A role for inflammatory processes in the progression of AMD has emerged over a period of many years, particularly the characterisation of leukocyte infiltrates in AMD-affected eyes, as well as in animal models. This review focuses on the burgeoning understanding of chemokines in the retina, and their potential role in shaping the recruitment and activation of macrophages in AMD. Understanding the mechanisms which promote macrophage activity in the degenerating retina may be key to controlling the potentially devastating consequences of inflammation in diseases such as AMD. PMID:26427387

  19. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of selenium (Se)-polysaccharide from Se-enriched Grifola frondosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guang-Hua; Ren, Yi; Li, Qian; Wu, Hui-Yu; Jin, Dun; Zhao, Ting; Xu, Cai-Quan; Zhang, Deng-Hong; Jia, Qing-Dong; Bai, Yan-Peng; Yang, Liu-Qing; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    A polysaccharide termed Se-GP11 was extracted and purified from Se-enriched Grifola frondosa in our previous study. This study investigated the characterization, anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of Se-GP11. The results showed that Se-GP11 was composed of mannose, glucose and galactose with a molar ratio of 1:4.91:2.41. The weight-average molecular weight (Mw) and weight-average mean square radius (Rw) of Se-GP11 in 0.1M sodium chloride solution were 3.310(4)Da and 32.8nm. Se-GP11 existed as a globular conformation with random coil structure. Se-GP11 had no anti-tumor activity against HepG-2 cells in vitro, and it significantly inhibited the growth of Heps tumor in vivo. Se-GP11 increased the relatively thymus and spleen weights as well as serum necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. In addition, Se-GP11 promoted the phagocytosis and NO production of RAW264.7 as compared with that of the normal control group. The results revealed that the Se-GP11 may exhibit the anti-tumor through improving immunologic function of the tumor bearing mice. PMID:26522247

  20. Activation of RAW264.7 macrophages by the polysaccharide from the roots of Actinidia eriantha and its molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongxiang; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Fengyang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polysaccharide from the roots of Actinidia eriantha (AEPS), a potent antitumor agent and immunological adjuvant, was investigated for the immunomodulatory effects on RAW264.7 macrophages and its molecular mechanisms. AEPS could significantly enhance the pinocytic and phagocytic activity, induce the production of NO, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-1β and IL-6, and promote the expression of accessory and costimulatory molecules in RAW264.7 cells. PCR array assay revealed that AEPS up-regulated 28 genes including TLRs (TLR2, TLR8, TLR9), proinflammatory factors (IL-1β, G-CSF, IL-1α, GM-CSF, IL-6, COX-2, TNF-α, IFN-β, CXCL10, CCL2, TNF-β, IL-10), and the genes involved in NF-κB signaling pathway, and down-regulated 6 genes such as TLR3, TLR4, PGLYRP1, EIF2αK2, MAP3K1 and IRF1. AEPS was further showed to promote cytoplasmic IκB-α degradation and increase nuclear NF-κB p65 levels in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggested that AEPS activated RAW264.7 macrophages and elicited a M1 and M2 response through TLRs/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25659714

  1. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barber-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrn, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis. PMID:26382298

  2. Recombinant Expression of a Novel Fungal Immunomodulatory Protein with Human Tumor Cell Antiproliferative Activity from Nectria haematococca

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuying; Nie, Ying; Ding, Yang; Shi, Lijun; Tang, Xuanming

    2014-01-01

    To our best knowledge, all of the fungal immunomodulatory proteins (FIPs) have been successfully extracted and identified in Basidomycetes, with only the exception of FIP from ascomycete Nectria haematococca (FIP-nha) discovered through homology alignment most recently. In this work, a gene encoding FIP-nha was synthesized and recombinantly expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-MS analyses of recombinant FIP-nha (rFIP-nha) indicated that the gene was successfully expressed. The yield of the bioactive FIP-nha protein was 42.7 mg/L. In vitro assays of biological activity indicated that the rFIP-nha caused hemagglutination of human and rabbit red blood cells, significantly stimulated mouse spleen lymphocyte proliferation, and enhanced expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) released from mouse splenocytes, revealing a strong antitumor effect against HL60, HepG2 and MGC823. Through this work, we constructed a rapid and efficient method of FIP production, and suggested that FIP-nha is a valuable candidate for use in future medical care and pharmaceutical products. PMID:25272229

  3. A Systematic Approach to Identify Markers of Distinctly Activated Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sudan, Bayan; Wacker, Mark A.; Wilson, Mary E.; Graff, Joel W.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been a useful concept for describing activated macrophage phenotypes and gene expression profiles. However, macrophage activation status within tumors and other settings are often inferred based on only a few markers. Complicating matters for relevance to human biology, many macrophage activation markers have been best characterized in mice and sometimes are not similarly regulated in human macrophages. To identify novel markers of activated human macrophages, gene expression profiles for human macrophages of a single donor subjected to 33 distinct activating conditions were obtained and a set of putative activation markers were subsequently evaluated in macrophages from multiple donors using integrated fluidic circuit (IFC)-based RT-PCR. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the microarray screen, highly altered transcripts (>4-fold change in expression) sorted the macrophage transcription profiles into two major and 13 minor clusters. Among the 1874 highly altered transcripts, over 100 were uniquely altered in one major or two related minor clusters. IFC PCR-derived data confirmed the microarray results and determined the kinetics of expression of potential macrophage activation markers. Transcripts encoding chemokines, cytokines, and cell surface were prominent in our analyses. The activation markers identified by this study could be used to better characterize tumor-associated macrophages from biopsies as well as other macrophage populations collected from human clinical samples. PMID:26074920

  4. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and cytokines and identifies the relationships between macrophage activation states induced by these stimuli. By comparing macrophage activation programs to pathogens and cytokines under identical experimental conditions, we provide new insights into how macrophage responses to kinetoplastids correlate with the overall range of macrophage activation states. PMID:20361029

  5. Purification and identification of a polysaccharide from medicinal mushroom Amauroderma rude with immunomodulatory activity and inhibitory effect on tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Honghui; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiguo; Yu, Xiongtao; Jiao, Chunwei; Yang, Xiaobing; Dhaliwal, Preet; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms in recent years have been the subject of many experiments searching for anticancer properties. We previously screened thirteen mushrooms for their potential in inhibiting tumor growth, and found that the water extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest activity. Previous studies have shown that the polysaccharides contained in the water extract were responsible for the anticancer properties. This study was designed to explore the potential effects of the polysaccharides on immune regulation and tumor growth. Using the crude Amauroderma rude extract, in vitro experiments showed that the capacities of spleen lymphocytes, macrophages, and natural killer cells were all increased. In vivo experiments showed that the extract increased macrophage metabolism, lymphocyte proliferation, and antibody production. In addition, the partially purified product stimulated the secretion of cytokines in vitro, and in vivo. Overall, the extract decreased tumor growth rates. Lastly, the active compound was purified and identified as polysaccharide F212. Most importantly, the purified polysaccharide had the highest activity in increasing lymphocyte proliferation. In summary, this molecule may serve as a lead compound for drug development. PMID:26219260

  6. Purification and identification of a polysaccharide from medicinal mushroom Amauroderma rude with immunomodulatory activity and inhibitory effect on tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Pan, Honghui; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiguo; Yu, Xiongtao; Jiao, Chunwei; Yang, Xiaobing; Dhaliwal, Preet; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B

    2015-07-10

    Medicinal mushrooms in recent years have been the subject of many experiments searching for anticancer properties. We previously screened thirteen mushrooms for their potential in inhibiting tumor growth, and found that the water extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest activity. Previous studies have shown that the polysaccharides contained in the water extract were responsible for the anticancer properties. This study was designed to explore the potential effects of the polysaccharides on immune regulation and tumor growth. Using the crude Amauroderma rude extract, in vitro experiments showed that the capacities of spleen lymphocytes, macrophages, and natural killer cells were all increased. In vivo experiments showed that the extract increased macrophage metabolism, lymphocyte proliferation, and antibody production. In addition, the partially purified product stimulated the secretion of cytokines in vitro, and in vivo. Overall, the extract decreased tumor growth rates. Lastly, the active compound was purified and identified as polysaccharide F212. Most importantly, the purified polysaccharide had the highest activity in increasing lymphocyte proliferation. In summary, this molecule may serve as a lead compound for drug development. PMID:26219260

  7. A novel immunomodulatory hemocyanin from the limpet Fissurella latimarginata promotes potent anti-tumor activity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Arancibia, Sergio; Espinoza, Cecilia; Salazar, Fabin; Del Campo, Miguel; Tampe, Ricardo; Zhong, Ta-Ying; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno; Ferreira, Jorge; Lavelle, Ed C; Manubens, Augusto; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; Becker, Mara Ins

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH). This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-? production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-?) by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24466345

  8. A Novel Immunomodulatory Hemocyanin from the Limpet Fissurella latimarginata Promotes Potent Anti-Tumor Activity in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Arancibia, Sergio; Espinoza, Cecilia; Salazar, Fabin; Del Campo, Miguel; Tampe, Ricardo; Zhong, Ta-Ying; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno; Ferreira, Jorge; Lavelle, Ed C.; Manubens, Augusto; De Ioannes, Alfredo E.; Becker, Mara Ins

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH). This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-? production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-?) by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24466345

  9. Review on medicinal uses, pharmacological, phytochemistry and immunomodulatory activity of plants.

    PubMed

    Akram, M; Hamid, A; Khalil, A; Ghaffar, A; Tayyaba, N; Saeed, A; Ali, M; Naveed, A

    2014-01-01

    Since ancient times, plants have been an exemplary source of medicine. Researchers have discovered some important compounds from plants. The present work constitutes a review of the medicinal plants whose immunomodulant activity has been proven. We performed PUBMED, EMBASE, Google scholar searches for research papers of medicinal plants having immunomodulant activity. Medicinal plants used by traditional physicians or reported as having immunomodulant activity include Acacia concocinna, Camellia sinensis, Lawsonia inermis Linn, Piper longum Linn, Gelidium amansii, Petroselinum crispum, Plantago major and Allium sativum. Immunomodulant activities of some of these medicinal plants have been investigated. The medicinal plants documented have immunomodulant activity and should be further investigated via clinical trial. PMID:25280022

  10. Immunomodulatory activities of fractions from hot aqueous extract of wood from Clausena excavata.

    PubMed

    Manosroi, A; Saraphanchotiwitthaya, A; Manosroi, J

    2004-06-01

    The effects of fractions from hot aqueous extract, acetone extract and the folklore preparation of Clausena excavata were studied on mouse splenocyte proliferation. The fractions of hot aqueous and acetone extracts were found to be the most active. On the contrary, the fractions from the crude folklore preparation resulted less active. This result could partly explain the popularity of this plant in folk medicine as a remedy for cancer and HIV patients in the eastern part of Thailand. PMID:15158986

  11. Immunomodulatory drugs in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Andhavarapu, Swati; Roy, Vivek

    2013-02-01

    The introduction of new agents immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) and proteasome inhibitors has brought a major shift in therapeutic paradigm in the treatment of newly diagnosed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Thalidomide was the first immunomodulatory agent approved for use in myeloma. Although highly active, it is associated with considerable toxicity, particularly in older patients. Lenalidomide, an analog of thalidomide, was developed because of its more potent anti-MM activity and better toxicity profile than the parent compound. Since its introduction in 2004, lenalidomide has established a role in all phases of treatment in MM. The pleiotropic antitumor effects of lenalidomide have translated into clinical efficacy in diseases other than MM. Pomalidomide is a highly potent third-generation IMiD that shares similar pharmacologic properties as thalidomide, with very promising activity in MM and myelofibrosis. This review summarizes the mechanisms of action and clinical activity of IMiDs in MM. PMID:23373782

  12. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani Frana; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  13. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems. PMID:26378047

  14. Activation of human mast cells by retrocyclin and protegrin highlight their immunomodulatory and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kshitij; Kotian, Akhil; Subramanian, Hariharan; Daniell, Henry; Ali, Hydar

    2015-10-01

    Preclinical evaluation of Retrocyclins (RC-100, RC-101) and Protegrin-1 (PG-1) antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is important because of their therapeutic potential against bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Human mast cells (HMCs) play important roles in host defense and wound healing but the abilities of retrocyclins and protegrin-1 to harness these functions have not been investigated. Here, we report that chemically synthesized RC-100 and PG-1 caused calcium mobilization and degranulation in HMCs but these responses were not blocked by an inhibitor of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), a known receptor for AMPs. However, RC-100 and PG-1 induced degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells stably expressing Mas related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MrgX2). Chemical synthesis of these AMPs is prohibitively expensive and post-synthesis modifications (cyclization, disulfide bonds, folding) are inadequate for optimal antimicrobial activity. Indeed, we found that synthetic RC-100, which caused mast cell degranulation via MrgX2, did not display any antimicrobial activity. Green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RC-101 (analog of RC-100) and GFP-tagged PG-1 purified from transgenic plant chloroplasts killed bacteria and induced mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, GFP-PG1 bound specifically to RBL-2H3 cells expressing MrgX2. These findings suggest that retrocyclins and protegrins activate HMCs independently of FPRL1 but via MrgX2. Harnessing this novel feature of AMPs to activate mast cell's host defense/wound healing properties in addition to their antimicrobial activities expands their clinical potential. Low cost production of AMPs in plants should facilitate their advancement to the clinic overcoming major hurdles in current production systems. PMID:26378047

  15. Macrophage Activation Redirects Yersinia-Infected Host Cell Death from Apoptosis to Caspase-1-Dependent Pyroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Cookson, Brad T

    2007-01-01

    Infection of macrophages by Yersinia species results in YopJ-dependent apoptosis, and naïve macrophages are highly susceptible to this form of cell death. Previous studies have demonstrated that macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior to infection are resistant to YopJ-dependent cell death; we found this simultaneously renders macrophages susceptible to killing by YopJ− Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb). YopJ− Yptb-induced macrophage death was dependent on caspase-1 activation, resulting in rapid permeability to small molecules, followed by membrane breakdown and DNA damage, and accompanied by cleavage and release of proinflammatory interleukin-18. Induction of caspase-1-dependent death, or pyroptosis, required the bacterial type III translocon but none of its known translocated proteins. Wild-type Yptb infection also triggered pyroptosis: YopJ-dependent activation of proapoptotic caspase-3 was significantly delayed in activated macrophages and resulted in caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis. The transition to susceptibility was not limited to LPS activation; it was also seen in macrophages activated with other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and intact nonviable bacteria. Yptb infection triggered macrophage activation and activation of caspase-1 in vivo. Y. pestis infection of activated macrophages also stimulated caspase-1 activation. These results indicate that host signaling triggered by TLR and other activating ligands during the course of Yersinia infection redirects both the mechanism of host cell death and the downstream consequences of death by shifting from noninflammatory apoptosis to inflammatory pyroptosis. PMID:17983266

  16. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  17. Immunomodulatory Activities of the Benzoxathiole Derivative BOT-4-One Ameliorate Pathogenic Skin Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Cho, Nam-Chul; Jeong, Ae Jin; Li, Yu-Chen; Rhie, Sung-Ja; Choi, Jung Sook; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Pae, Ae Nim; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Byung-Hak

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated immune responses play an important role in body protection. However, aberrantly activated immune responses are responsible for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The regulation of pathologic immune responses may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these diseases. Despite that multiple pharmacologic properties of benzoxathiole derivatives have been defined, the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties remain to be clarified. Here, we demonstrated the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) regulated immune responses and ameliorated experimentally induced inflammatory skin diseases both invitro and invivo. BOT-4-one inhibited the differentiation of CD4(+) T-cell subsets by regulating the expression and production of T-cell lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines and activating the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited TCR-mediated Akt and NF-?B signaling. Topical application of BOT-4-one ameliorated experimentally induced inflammatory skin diseases in mice models such as 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene-induced contact and atopic dermatitis and IL-23-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation. Our study demonstrated that BOT-4-one ameliorates inflammatory skin diseases by suppressing the pathogenic CD4(+) T cell differentiation and overall immune responses. PMID:26763430

  18. IFN-? Prevents Adenosine Receptor (A2bR) Upregulation To Sustain the Macrophage Activation Response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Heather B; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M

    2015-10-15

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-? prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we demonstrate that, following TLR stimulation, macrophages upregulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This upregulation of A2bR leads to the induction of macrophages with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the downregulation of inflammation. IFN-? priming of macrophages selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and to prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-?-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNF-? and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacologic inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyperinflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-? treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-? effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-? contributes to host defense by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the antimicrobial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  19. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  20. Antitumor and immunomodulatory activity of genkwanin on colorectal cancer in the APC(Min/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Song, Zi-Jing; He, Xin; Zhang, Run-Qi; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Li, Fei; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common malignant tumor with high morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the antitumor effect of genkwanin on colorectal cancer enhanced by western high-fat diet, we investigated the activity of genkwanin on HT-29 and SW-480 human colorectal cancer lines in vitro and on the APC(Min/+) mice in vivo. In a cell culture system, six different inflammatory cytokines obviously stimulated two cancer cells growth in a concentration-dependent manner, while genkwanin significantly inhibited HT-29 and SW-480 human colorectal cancer cells proliferation and inflammatory cytokine IL-8 secretion. In the APC(Min/+) mice, the body weights, spleen and thymus indexes and immunity cytokine secretions were significantly improved after oral administration 12.5 and 25mg/kg/day of genkwanin. Besides, the tumor multiplicity changes and inflammatory cytokine levels were markedly reduced in two genkwanin-treated groups. The dysplastic adenomatous changes were also obviously ameliorated in gut histopathology. Taken together, our results indicated that genkwanin had a better antitumor activity partly via enhancing host immunity and decreasing the inflammatory cytokine levels. Genkwanin may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26388189

  1. Spherical Lactic Acid Bacteria Activate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Immunomodulatory Function via TLR9-Dependent Crosstalk with Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jounai, Kenta; Ikado, Kumiko; Sugimura, Tetsu; Ano, Yasuhisa; Braun, Jonathan; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) are a specialized sensor of viral and bacterial nucleic acids and a major producer of IFN-α that promotes host defense by priming both innate and acquired immune responses. Although synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, pathogenic bacteria and viruses activate pDC, there is limited investigation of non-pathogenic microbiota that are in wide industrial dietary use, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we screened for LAB strains, which induce pDC activation and IFN-α production using murine bone marrow (BM)-derived Flt-3L induced dendritic cell culture. Microbial strains with such activity on pDC were absent in a diversity of bacillary strains, but were observed in certain spherical species (Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Pediococcus), which was correlated with their capacity for uptake by pDC. Detailed study of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis JCM5805 and JCM20101 revealed that the major type I and type III interferons were induced (IFN-α, -β, and λ). IFN-α induction was TLR9 and MyD88-dependent; a slight impairment was also observed in TLR4-/- cells. While these responses occurred with purified pDC, IFN-α production was synergistic upon co-culture with myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), an interaction that required direct mDC-pDC contact. L. lactis strains also stimulated expression of immunoregulatory receptors on pDC (ICOS-L and PD-L1), and accordingly augmented pDC induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg compared to the Lactobacillus strain. Oral administration of L. lactis JCM5805 induced significant activation of pDC resident in the intestinal draining mesenteric lymph nodes, but not in a remote lymphoid site (spleen). Taken together, certain non-pathogenic spherical LAB in wide dietary use has potent and diverse immunomodulatory effects on pDC potentially relevant to anti-viral immunity and chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:22505996

  2. Comparison of Immunomodulatory and Anticancer Activities in Different Strains of Tremella fuciformis Berk.

    PubMed

    Han, Chien-Kuo; Chiang, Hsin-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yin; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Lee, Hsinyu; Huang, Ding-Ding; Zeng, Yu-Ru; Chuang, Tsai-Ni; Huang, Yuan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Tremella fuciformis Berk (TF) is a common edible and medicinal mushroom, and has long been used in food and in Chinese medicine. It possesses anticancer, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative, and neuroprotective abilities. Since their cultivation is a problem, TFs in Taiwan are primarily imported from China, which has a problem with pesticide residues. Thus, the question of whether the Taiwan cultivated TFs, T1, and T6 showed similar or even better results than TFs from China (CH) was assessed in the present study. The results of the physicochemical tests of these TFs showed that T1 extracted by hot water (T1H) has the highest concentration of polysaccharide; meanwhile, T6 extracted by cold water (T6C) showed the highest amount of protein. Regarding the immune modulatory effects of these TFs, hot water extracts of these TFs augmented significantly the inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text] mRNA expression than those of cold water extracts. On the other hand, the cold water extracts of TFs, especially of T1C, obviously suppressed cancer cell survival better than those of hot water extracts. Interestingly, we found that hot water extracts of TFs may augment necrotic cell death, whereas, cold water extracts of TFs induce apoptosis. Furthermore, we also showed that these TFs activate caspase-3 cleavage, up regulate the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and decrease MMP-9 expressions in PC-3 cells. Taken together, our results indicated that T1 and T6 strains of TFs showed the similar immune modulatory and anticancer abilities were better than the CH strain of TFs. PMID:26621447

  3. Macrophage activation syndrome in the course of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Emmi, Giacomo; Fastiggi, Michele; Silvestri, Elena; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-08-01

    An overwhelming activation of cytotoxic T cells and well-differentiated macrophages leading to systemic overload of inflammatory mediators characterizes the so-called macrophage activation syndrome (MAS); this potentially life-threatening clinical entity may derive from several genetic defects involved in granule-mediated cytotoxicity but has been largely observed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, many rheumatologic diseases, infections, and malignancies. The occurrence of MAS in the natural history or as the revealing clue of monogenic autoinflammatory disorders (AIDs), rare conditions caused by disrupted innate immunity pathways with overblown release of proinflammatory cytokines, has been only reported in few isolated patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome since 2001. All these patients displayed various clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of MAS and have often required intensive care support. Only one patient has died due to MAS. Defective cytotoxic cell function was documented in a minority of patients. Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment, but anakinra was clinically effective in three refractory cases. Even if MAS and AIDs share multiple clinical features as well as heterogeneous pathogenetic scenes and a potential response to anti-interleukin-1 targeted therapies, MAS requires a prompt specific recognition in the course of AIDs due to its profound severity and high mortality rate. PMID:25846831

  4. [Macrophage activation syndrome and autoimmunity due to visceral leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Higel, L; Froehlich, C; Pages, M-P; Dupont, D; Collardeau-Frachon, S; Dijoud, F; Cochat, P; Belot, A

    2015-04-01

    Hemophagocytic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by an excessive immune response, mediated by activated cytotoxic T cells and macrophages. Among hemophagocytic syndromes, genetic and secondary forms can be distinguished. We report on the case of a male newborn who presented with macrophage activation syndrome associated with lymphoproliferation with favorable outcome under prednisone and cyclosporin. Hemopathy, infection, or genetic lymphohistiocytosis were initially ruled out. Severe autoimmunity was suspected because of positive antinuclear antibodies and Farr test associated with anemia and a positive Coombs test as well as cytolytic hepatitis with anti-liver, kidney microsome (LKM) antibodies. Treatment was therefore intensified by adding mycophenolate mofetil. This led to an unexpected deterioration of general health and lab exam results with recurrence of fever and inflammation. The initial investigations were revisited and completed by a liver biopsy, which revealed the presence of numerous leishmania parasites at the amastigote stage, enabling the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The patient's condition dramatically improved under liposomal amphotericin B treatment. Our observation shows that visceral leishmaniasis can present as lupus-like syndrome with lymphoproliferation. Moreover, the lack of leishmania on marrow aspiration cannot rule out the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Detection of leishmania by serological or molecular tests is mandatory in case of hepatosplenomegaly with hemophagocytic syndrome together with autoantibodies, in order to avoid useless and life-threatening exposure to immunosuppressive treatments. PMID:25617995

  5. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  6. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue.

    PubMed

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  7. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  8. STAT1 signaling within macrophages is required for antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Mueller, Mathias; Wormley, Floyd L

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily affects AIDS patients and patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. In immunocompromised individuals, C. neoformans can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Studies using a virulent strain of C. neoformans engineered to produce gamma interferon (IFN-?), denoted H99?, demonstrated that protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection is associated with the generation of a T helper 1 (Th1)-type immune response and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-mediated classical (M1) macrophage activation. However, the critical mechanism by which M1 macrophages mediate their anti-C. neoformans activity remains unknown. The current studies demonstrate that infection with C. neoformans strain H99? in mice with macrophage-specific STAT1 ablation resulted in severely increased inflammation of the pulmonary tissue, a dysregulated Th1/Th2-type immune response, increased fungal burden, deficient M1 macrophage activation, and loss of protection. STAT1-deficient macrophages produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) than STAT1-sufficient macrophages, correlating with an inability to control intracellular cryptococcal proliferation, even in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, macrophages from inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, which had intact ROS production, were deficient in anticryptococcal activity. These data indicate that STAT1 activation within macrophages is required for M1 macrophage activation and anti-C. neoformans activity via the production of NO. PMID:26351277

  9. A defect in the inflammation-primed macrophage-activation cascade in osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Lindsay, D D; Naraparaju, V R; Ireland, R A; Popoff, S N

    1994-05-15

    Macrophages were activated by administration of lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-Pc) or dodecylglycerol (DDG) to wild-type rats but not in osteopetrotic (op) mutant rats. In vitro treatment of wild-type rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG efficiently activated macrophages whereas treatment of op mutant rat peritoneal cells with lyso-Pc or DDG did not activate macrophages. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation cascade in rats requires participation of B lymphocytes and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase of wild-type rat B lymphocytes can convert DBP to the macrophage-activating factor (MAF), whereas B lymphocytes of the op mutant rats were shown to be deficient in lyso-Pc-inducible beta-galactosidase. DBP is conserved among mammalian species. Treatment of human DBP (Gc1 protein) with commercial glycosidases yields an extremely high titrated MAF as assayed on mouse and rat macrophages. Because the enzymatically generated MAF (GcMAF) bypasses the role of lymphocytes in macrophage activation, the op mutant rat macrophages were efficiently activated by administration of a small quantity (100 pg/rat) of GcMAF. Likewise, in vitro treatment of op rat peritoneal cells with as little as 40 pg GcMAF/ml activated macrophages. PMID:8176226

  10. Activation of peritoneal macrophages to cytoxicity against B16 melanoma cells by Serratia marcescens polyribosome fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Serratia marcescens polyribosomes (SMPR) have been shown to elicit an anti-tumor response in vivo. The in-vitro effects of SMPR on macrophages as the nonspecific mediators of the anti-tumor response have not previously been examined. The first objective of this research project is to corroborate and analyze the in-vivo results by the development and application of an in-vitro cytotoxicity assay. The second objective is to examine the effect of SMPR upon previously unstimulated peritoneal macrophages as representing the mechanism of cytotoxicity. The third objective is to identify the minimal effective component of SMPR responsible for an effect on macrophages. Results revealed that SMPR preparations exert a number of effects upon macrophages. Morphologic changes included increased spreading and increased perinuclear vacuolization. Macrophages were shown to be metabolically activate by two lines of evidence. SMPR-treated macrophages exhibited increased cellular metabolism by the increased uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine and by the increased levels of secreted leucine aminopeptidase as compared to control macrophages. Results also showed that SMPR activates macrophages to cytotoxicity against syngeneic tumor target cells. Buoyant-density fractions were isolated and assayed for macrophage activating ability. Results showed 50S ribosomal subunits to be the smallest fraction effective for macrophage activation. Both the RNA and protein were necessary for complete effectiveness.

  11. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-?B activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.03.3 ?m and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.45.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-?B more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-?, IL-1?, and TGF-?, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1?. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects. PMID:26143263

  12. Transcriptome-Based Network Analysis Reveals a Spectrum Model of Human Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jia; Schmidt, Susanne V.; Sander, Jil; Draffehn, Astrid; Krebs, Wolfgang; Quester, Inga; De Nardo, Dominic; Gohel, Trupti D.; Emde, Martina; Schmidleithner, Lisa; Ganesan, Hariharasudan; Nino-Castro, Andrea; Mallmann, Michael R.; Labzin, Larisa; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Latz, Eicke; Freeman, Tom C.; Ulas, Thomas; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophage activation is associated with profound transcriptional reprogramming. Although much progress has been made in the understanding of macrophage activation, polarization, and function, the transcriptional programs regulating these processes remain poorly characterized. We stimulated human macrophages with diverse activation signals, acquiring a data set of 299 macrophage transcriptomes. Analysis of this data set revealed a spectrum of macrophage activation states extending the current M1 versus M2-polarization model. Network analyses identified central transcriptional regulators associated with all macrophage activation complemented by regulators related to stimulus-specific programs. Applying these transcriptional programs to human alveolar macrophages from smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) revealed an unexpected loss of inflammatory signatures in COPD patients. Finally, by integrating murine data from the ImmGen project we propose a refined, activation-independent core signature for human and murine macrophages. This resource serves as a framework for future research into regulation of macrophage activation in health and disease. PMID:24530056

  13. cAMP Modulates Macrophage Development by Suppressing M-CSF-Induced MAPKs Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ning; Cui, Jian; Qiao, Chunxia; Li, Yan; Ma, Yuanfang; Zhang, Jiyan; Shen, Beifen

    2008-01-01

    M-CSF is a key cytokine in macrophage development by inducing MAPKs activation, and cAMP can inhibit MAPKs activation induced by inflammatory stimuli. To explore the effects of cAMP on M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation and on macrophage development, the model of bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (BMMs) was used. The effects of cAMP on M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation were analyzed by Western blotting assay, and the effects of cAMP on CD14 and F4/80 expression during macrophage development were examined by FACS analysis. Macrophage morphology showed the successful establishment of the model of macrophage development. Western blotting assay revealed that M-CSF activated ERK, JNK and p38 in both mature and immature macrophages, and cAMP inhibited M-CSF-induced ERK, JNK and p38 activation in a time-dependent manner. FACS analysis revealed that macrophage development was impaired with cAMP pretreatment. In conclusion, cAMP modulates macrophage development by suppressing M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation. PMID:18445346

  14. Biological activities of lipid A from Vibrio parahaemolyticus: stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bandekar, J R; Nerkar, D P

    1988-01-01

    The toxicity and macrophage stimulating property of Vibrio parahaemolyticus lipid A was studied. The LD50 dose of lipid A in galactosamine-sensitized mice was found to be 0.6 micrograms when injected intraperitoneally. Administration of lipid A resulted in stimulation of peritoneal macrophages as evident by increase in their cellular RNA contents and lysosomal enzyme activities. The treatment also caused enhancement in the phagocytic activity of macrophages. PMID:3393096

  15. Phenotypic Diversity and Emerging New Tools to Study Macrophage Activation in Bacterial Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Mignane B.; Daumas, Aurélie; Textoris, Julien; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage polarization is a concept that has been useful to describe the different features of macrophage activation related to specific functions. Macrophage polarization is responsible for a dichotomic approach (killing vs. repair) of the host response to bacteria; M1-type conditions are protective, whereas M2-type conditions are associated with bacterial persistence. The use of the polarization concept to classify the features of macrophage activation in infected patients using transcriptional and/or molecular data and to provide biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis has most often been unsuccessful. The confrontation of polarization with different clinical situations in which monocytes/macrophages encounter bacteria obliged us to reappraise this concept. With the exception of M2-type infectious diseases, such as leprosy and Whipple’s disease, most acute (sepsis) or chronic (Q fever, tuberculosis) infectious diseases do not exhibit polarized monocytes/macrophages. This is also the case for commensals that shape the immune response and for probiotics that alter the immune response independent of macrophage polarization. We propose that the type of myeloid cells (monocytes vs. macrophages) and the kinetics of the immune response (early vs. late responses) are critical variables for understanding macrophage activation in human infectious diseases. Explorating the role of these new markers will provide important tools to better understand complex macrophage physiology. PMID:25346736

  16. The generation of macrophages with anti-inflammatory activity in the absence of STAT6 signaling.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Bryan D; Chandrasekaran, Prabha; Dillon, Laura A L; Dalby, Elizabeth; Suresh, Rahul; Sarkar, Arup; El-Sayed, Najib M; Mosser, David M

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages readily change their phenotype in response to exogenous stimuli. In this work, macrophages were stimulated under a variety of experimental conditions, and phenotypic alterations were correlated with changes in gene expression. We identified 3 transcriptionally related populations of macrophages with immunoregulatory activity. They were generated by stimulating cells with TLR ligands in the presence of 3 different "reprogramming" signals: high-density ICs, PGE2, or Ado. All 3 of these cell populations produced high levels of transcripts for IL-10 and growth and angiogenic factors. They also secreted reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1?, IL-6, and IL-12. All 3 macrophage phenotypes could partially rescue mice from lethal endotoxemia, and therefore, we consider each to have anti-inflammatory activity. This ability to regulate innate-immune responses occurred equally well in macrophages from STAT6-deficient mice. The lack of STAT6 did not affect the ability of macrophages to change cytokine production reciprocally or to rescue mice from lethal endotoxemia. Furthermore, treatment of macrophages with IL-4 failed to induce similar phenotypic or transcriptional alterations. This work demonstrates that there are multiple ways to generate macrophages with immunoregulatory activity. These anti-inflammatory macrophages are transcriptionally and functionally related to each other and are quite distinct from macrophages treated with IL-4. PMID:26048978

  17. Induction of heat shock proteins and their possible roles in macrophages during activation by macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, S; Rokutan, K; Takahashi, M; Nikawa, T; Kishi, K

    1996-01-01

    (1) Treatment of resident peritoneal macrophages for 8 h with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) increased release of superoxide anion (O2-) stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Gel electrophoresis of pulse-labelled proteins with L-[35S]methionine showed that a number of proteins were induced during activation by M-CSF. Immunoblot analysis with antibody against heat shock protein (HSP) 90, HSP70, or HSP60 demonstrated that M-CSF induced these stress-inducible HSPs; the timing of induction and level of each HSP correlated with the increase in O2- production. The activated macrophages acquired resistance to H2O2-induced damage. M-CSF also stimulated the synthesis of a heat shock cognate protein (HSC70); however, the induction occurred at 1 h, when O2- production was not yet augmented, but at which time L-[35S]methionine incorporation into cell proteins was already enhanced. (2) Gel mobility shift assay with oligonucleotide coding for the heat shock element showed that M-CSF activated the heat shock factor within 15 min, and the activation continued for at least 8 h. Northern-blot analysis with a cDNA probe for human HSP70 or HSC70 showed that accumulations of HSP70 and HSC70 mRNAs coincided with the inductions of the respective proteins. (3) These results suggest that M-CSF may induce the transcriptional activation of heat shock genes, and that the stress-inducible HSPs as well as HSC70 may play an important role in the activation of macrophages by functioning as molecular chaperones and by protecting the macrophage against the auto-oxidative damage associated with the respiratory burst. PMID:8615820

  18. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Khn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. Images PMID:7504626

  19. Regulation of murine macrophage function by IL-4: IL-4 and IFN-gamma differentially regulate macrophage tumoricidal activation.

    PubMed Central

    Suk, K; Somers, S D; Erickson, K L

    1993-01-01

    To understand the differential role of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in the process of macrophage tumoricidal activation, we investigated the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide in activated murine macrophages and the effects of those lymphokines on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-mediated down-regulation. IFN-gamma and IL-4 increased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNF-alpha production by different mechanisms because IL-4, unlike IFN-gamma, failed to overcome the LPS-hyporesponsiveness in C3H/HeJ mice. Moreover, only IFN-gamma synergized with LPS to induce nitric oxide production and blocked eicosanoid-mediated down-regulation. These differential effects of IFN-gamma and IL-4 on the select efferent cytolytic activities may be the result of an altered or different signal transduction pathway. Because potentiation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by IFN-gamma has been previously documented, we next studied the role of IFN-gamma and IL-4 in alteration of enzymatic activity of PKC. Two lymphokines caused translocation of PKC from cytosol to membrane with different levels, providing a biochemical basis for explaining how two lymphokines lead to different phenotypic responses. Although treatment of macrophages with IFN-gamma and IL-4 gave rise to a similar enhancing effect on macrophage TNF-alpha production, these two lymphokines appeared to differentially regulate the overall functional state of macrophages for tumour cell killing capability. Additionally, this differential regulation seems to be accomplished in part by different biochemical events. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8307612

  20. Carbon monoxide negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Soo; Moon, Jong-Seok; Xu, Jin-Fu; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K; Nakahira, Kiichi

    2015-05-15

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes that promote the cleavage of caspase-1, which leads to the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and IL-18. Among the known inflammasomes, the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich-containing family, pyrin domain-containing-3 (NLRP3)-dependent inflammasome is critically involved in the pathogenesis of various acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule physiologically produced in cells and tissues during heme catabolism, can act as an anti-inflammatory molecule and a potent negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. To date, the role of CO in inflammasome-mediated immune responses has not been fully investigated. Here, we demonstrated that CO inhibited caspase-1 activation and the secretion of IL-1? and IL-18 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP treatment in bone marrow-derived macrophages. CO also inhibited IL-18 secretion in response to LPS and nigericin treatment, another NLRP3 inflammasome activation model. In contrast, CO did not suppress IL-18 secretion in response to LPS and poly(dA:dT), an absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-mediated inflammasome model. LPS and ATP stimulation induced the formation of complexes between NLRP3 and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, or NLRP3 and caspase-1. CO treatment inhibited these molecular interactions that were induced by LPS and ATP. Furthermore, CO inhibited mitochondrial ROS generation and the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by LPS and ATP in macrophages. We also observed that the inhibitory effect of CO on the translocation of mitochondrial DNA into the cytosol was associated with suppression of cytokine secretion. Our results suggest that CO negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25770182

  1. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXR? and LXR?), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  2. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille; UDSL, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille ; Pattou, Francois; Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital, Lille; U859 Biotherapies for Diabetes, INSERM, Lille ; Staels, Bart; INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille; UDSL, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille ; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; INSERM UR1011, F-59000 Lille; UDSL, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  3. Mechanisms by which activated normal macrophages destroy syngeneic rat tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro interaction between nonimmune activated macrophages and syngeneic tumour cells (induced in inbred DA rats by polyoma virus, dimethylbenzanthracene or methylcholanthrene) has shown that a distinctive series of events can be clearly separated. The earliest consequence of interaction detectable by objective means is a marked decrease in tumour cell proliferation as reflected in the reduction of the capacity of tumour cells to incorporate DNA precursors such as [3H]thymidine. By 34 hours, the cytostatic effect is strongly marked, and is essentially established after 12 hours of interaction. Shrinkage, agglutination and decrease in the number of tumour cells as examples of the morphological consequences of cytostatic target cell damage accomplished by activated macrophages are rarely perceptible before 1012 hours although the tumour cells have completely disappeared after 2448 hours. Under the experimental conditions employed, occasional tumour cells escaped interaction with activated macrophages. The fact that such recovery of targets was fully reversed by adding further activated macrophages indicates that tumour cell revival reflects a decrease in macrophage effector functions during prolonged incubation. The possibility that some tumour cells might be resistant to macrophage effects thus seems excluded. Activated macrophages from normal and from congenitally athymic nude mice are equally effective in reducing tumour cell proliferation. Thus T lymphocytes and/or their soluble mediators are not essential for the macrophage function under investigation. Pretreatment of activated macrophages with an extensive array of metabolic inhibitors and agents known to affect distinct cellular functions yields much data but does not yet permit a simple comprehensive interpretation. However, the findings are compatible with the thesis that macrophage activation is accompanied by the de novo or enhanced synthesis of the cytostatic principle. Once possessed of this mechanism, other basic functional capacities of macrophages, such as membrane activity, movement or endocytosis are no longer essential for the mediation of the cytostatic effects. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4370655

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist rosiglitazone attenuates postincisional pain by regulating macrophage polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; Ohnou, Tetsuya; Godai, Kohei; Kurimoto, Tae; Nakama, Mayo; Kanmura, Yuichi

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone attenuated postincisional pain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rosiglitazone alters macrophage polarization to F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages at the incisional sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated macrophages produced analgesic effects. -- Abstract: Acute inflammation triggered by macrophage infiltration to injured tissue promotes wound repair and may induce pain hypersensitivity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR){gamma} signaling is known to regulate heterogeneity of macrophages, which are often referred to as classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages have considerable antimicrobial activity and produce a wide variety of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, M2 macrophages are involved in anti-inflammatory and homeostatic functions linked to wound healing and tissue repair. Although it has been suggested that PPAR{gamma} agonists attenuate pain hypersensitivity, the molecular mechanism of macrophage-mediated effects of PPAR{gamma} signaling on pain development has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the link between the phenotype switching of macrophage polarization induced by PPAR{gamma} signaling and the development of acute pain hypersensitivity. Local administration of rosiglitazone significantly ameliorated hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical stimuli, and paw swelling. Consistent with the down-regulation of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) phosphorylation by rosiglitazone at the incisional sites, the number of F4/80{sup +}iNOS{sup +} M1 macrophages was decreased whereas numbers of F4/80{sup +}CD206{sup +} M2 macrophages were increased in rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites 24 h after the procedure. In addition, gene induction of anti-inflammatory M2-macrophage-associated markers such as arginase1, FIZZ1 and interleukin (IL)-10 were significantly increased, whereas M1-macrophage-related molecules such as integrin {alpha}X, IL-1{beta}, MIP2{alpha} and leptin were decreased at rosiglitazone-treated incisional sites. Moreover, transplantation of rosiglitazone-treated peritoneal macrophages into the incisional sites significantly attenuated hyperalgesia. We speculate that local administration of rosiglitazone significantly alleviated the development of postincisional pain, possibly through regulating macrophage polarity at the inflamed site. PPAR{gamma} signaling in macrophages may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of acute pain development.

  5. Th1 CD4+ lymphocytes delete activated macrophages through the Fas/APO-1 antigen pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ashany, D; Song, X; Lacy, E; Nikolic-Zugic, J; Friedman, S M; Elkon, K B

    1995-01-01

    The Fas/APO-1 cytotoxic pathway plays an important role in the regulation of peripheral immunity. Recent evidence indicates that this regulatory function operates through deletion of activated T and B lymphocytes by CD4+ T cells expressing the Fas ligand. Because macrophages play a key role in peripheral immunity, we asked whether Fas was involved in T-cell-macrophage interactions. Two-color flow cytometry revealed that Fas receptor (FasR) was expressed on resting murine peritoneal macrophages. FasR expression was upregulated after activation of macrophages with cytokines or lipopolysaccharide, although only tumor necrosis factor-alpha rendered macrophages sensitive to anti-FasR antibody-mediated death. To determine the consequence of antigen presentation by macrophages to CD4+ T cells, macrophages were pulsed with antigen and then incubated with either Th1 or Th2 cell lines or clones. Th1, but not Th2, T cells induced lysis of 60-80% of normal macrophages, whereas macrophages obtained from mice with mutations in the FasR were totally resistant to Th1-mediated cytotoxicity. Macrophage cytotoxicity depended upon specific antigen recognition by T cells and was major histocompatibility complex restricted. These findings indicate that, in addition to deletion of activated lymphocytes, Fas plays an important role in deletion of activated macrophages after antigen presentation to Th1 CD4+ T cells. Failure to delete macrophages that constitutively present self-antigens may contribute to the expression of autoimmunity in mice deficient in FasR (lpr) or Fas ligand (gld). PMID:7479970

  6. Stimulation of macrophages and antitumor activity of radiodetoxified endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Nerkar, D P; Bandekar, J R

    1986-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella typhimurium was irradiated with gamma radiation at 10, 15, and 30 kGy doses. A dose of 30 kGy significantly detoxified the LPS (180 times). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with the radiodetoxified LPS, and it was found that it stimulated peritoneal macrophages as was evident from the enhancement of their acid hydrolases and cellular RNA content. Both LPS and radiodetoxified LPS exhibited antitumor activity against S180 cells in Swiss mice. Treatment with 20 micrograms/mouse of either LPS or 30 kGy LPS gave maximum survival of the mice (90%). These mice were found to resist the challenge of S180 cells (1 X 10(6)). PMID:2432383

  7. Antiviral, Immunomodulatory, and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of a Protein-Enriched Fraction from the Larvae of the Housefly, Musca domestica

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Hui; Wang, Furong; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Lingyao; Lei, Chaoliang

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study, protein-enriched fraction (PEF) that was isolated from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), showed excellent hepatoprotective activity as well as the potential for clinical application in therapy for liver diseases. In this study, antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of PEF were evaluated. The antiviral results demonstrated that PEF inhibited the infection of avian influenza virus H9N2 and had a virucidal effect against the multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica Speyer (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in vitro. The mortality of silkworm larve in a PEF treatment group decreased significantly compared with a negative control. PEF showed excellent scavenging activity for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide anion radicals, which were similar to those of ascorbic acid. The imunomodulatory results suggested that PEF could effectively improve immune function in experimental mice. Our results indicated that PEF could possibly be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by avian influenza virus infection. In addition, PEF with virucidal activity against insect viruses might provide useful for the development of antimicrobial breeding technology for economically important insects. As a natural product from insects, PEF could be a potential source for the discovery of potent antioxidant and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24735244

  8. Macrophage Activation in Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Jonas Christian; Binder, Harald; Jger, Benedikt; Cillis, Giuseppe; Zissel, Gernot; Mller-Quernheim, Joachim; Prasse, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a common cause of disease acceleration in IPF and has a major impact on mortality. The role of macrophage activation in AE of IPF has never been addressed before. Methods We evaluated BAL cell cytokine profiles and BAL differential cell counts in 71 IPF patients w/wo AE and in 20 healthy volunteers. Twelve patients suffered from AE at initial diagnosis while sixteen patients developed AE in the 24 months of follow-up. The levels of IL-1ra, CCL2, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, TNF-?, IL-1?, CXCL1 and IL-8 spontaneously produced by BAL-cells were analysed by ELISA. Results In patients with AE, the percentage of BAL neutrophils was significantly increased compared to stable patients. We found an increase in the production rate of the pro-inflammatory cytokines CXCL1 and IL-8 combined with an increase in all tested M2 cytokines by BAL-cells. An increase in CCL18 levels and neutrophil counts during AE was observed in BAL cells from patients from whom serial lavages were obtained. Furthermore, high baseline levels of CCL18 production by BAL cells were significantly predictive for the development of future AE. Conclusions BAL cell cytokine production levels at acute exacerbation show up-regulation of pro-inflammatory as well as anti-inflammatory/ M2 cytokines. Our data suggest that AE in IPF is not an incidental event but rather driven by cellular mechanisms including M2 macrophage activation. PMID:25590613

  9. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Gran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-06-10

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the "pro-tumourigenic" effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation.Macrophages promote "pro-tumourigenic" cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the "pro-tumourigenic" characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  10. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H.; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the “pro-tumourigenic” effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation. Macrophages promote “pro-tumourigenic” cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the “pro-tumourigenic” characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  11. Macrophage Infiltration and Alternative Activation during Wound Healing Promote MEK1-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christine; Telerman, Stephanie B; Reimer, Andreas S; Sequeira, Ines; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Arwert, Esther N; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-02-15

    Macrophages are essential for the progression and maintenance of many cancers, but their role during the earliest stages of tumor formation is unclear. To test this, we used a previously described transgenic mouse model of wound-induced skin tumorigenesis, in which expression of constitutively active MEK1 in differentiating epidermal cells results in chronic inflammation (InvEE mice). Upon wounding, the number of epidermal and dermal monocytes and macrophages increased in wild-type and InvEE skin, but the increase was greater, more rapid, and more sustained in InvEE skin. Macrophage ablation reduced tumor incidence. Furthermore, bioluminescent imaging in live mice to monitor macrophage flux at wound sites revealed that macrophage accumulation was predictive of tumor formation; wounds with the greatest number of macrophages at day 5 went on to develop tumors. Gene expression profiling of flow-sorted monocytes, macrophages, and T cells from InvEE and wild-type skin showed that as wound healing progressed, InvEE macrophages altered their phenotype. Throughout wound healing and after wound closure, InvEE macrophages demonstrated sustained upregulation of several markers implicated in alternative macrophage activation including arginase-1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor (CD206). Notably, inhibition of ARG1 activity significantly reduced tumor formation and epidermal proliferation in vivo, whereas addition of L-arginase to cultured keratinocytes stimulated proliferation. We conclude that macrophages play a key role in early, inflammation-mediated skin tumorigenesis, with mechanistic evidence suggesting that ARG1 secretion drives tumor development by stimulating epidermal cell proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of cancer immunotherapies aiming to polarize tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype. Cancer Res; 76(4); 805-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26754935

  12. Regulation of macrophage cholesterol efflux and liver X receptor ? activation by nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongming; Li, Xiaoyan; Qian, Zongjie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the characteristics of liver X receptor ? (LXR?) and its target gene expression, as well as cholesterol efflux in human macrophages treated by nicotine. Methods: Human monocyte-derived macrophages were collected. Before apoA-I-mediated human monocyte-derived macrophage cholesterol efflux, and mRNA expression of LXR?, and some of its target genes being detected, the macrophages were induced with or without nicotine. Results: Pre-incubation of Human monocyte-derived macrophages with nicotine, cholesterol efflux was suppressed to apolipoprotein AI. Nicotine also inhibited LXR? and some of its target genes mRNA expression involved cholesterol metabolism, and facilitated some inflammatory genes expression. Conclusion: The changed function of cholesterol efflux and some genes expression may be the pathogenetic cause, and LXR activity of macrophage may offer potential therapeutic benefit in the treatment of atherosclerosis. Thus nicotine can regulate foam cell formation by inhibiting LXR pathway. PMID:26629160

  13. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  14. Cell motility is decreased in macrophages activated by cancer cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of feruloylated oligosaccharides from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Chen, Hua-Han; Lin, Su-Yi; Fang, Yi-Ting

    2012-09-15

    Feruloylated oligosaccharides (FOs), the ferulic acid ester of oligosaccharides, can be released either by the enzymatic or mild acid hydrolysis of arabinoxylans present in cereal bran, and are usually considered as natural antioxidants. However, no related research is available to explain their immunomodulatory effects. This report elucidated their immunomodulatory effects through the variations of pro-inflammatory mediators in vitro. FOs were obtained from the mild acid hydrolysis of rice bran. We found that FOs (0.1-100 ?g/ml) induced tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), IL-1?, IL-6, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE(2) production in unstimulated macrophages, RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, pre- and post-treated FOs (0.1-100 ?g/ml) dose-dependently suppressed TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-6 and NO production, and induced IL-10 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells without exerting cytotoxicity. As a result anti-inflammatory and therapeutic activities were revealed. It is noteworthy that prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production was significantly suppressed at an FO level of 100 ?g/ml. The in vitro assessment of inflammatory mediators should be useful in further characterising the effects of FOs on immunomodulation. Moreover, it will create the economical value of rice bran, which has long been considered as conventional agricultural wastes. PMID:23107698

  16. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Enzymatic Activity and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mawhinney, Leona; Armstrong, Michelle E; O’ Reilly, Ciaran; Bucala, Richard; Leng, Lin; Fingerle-Rowson, Gunter; Fayne, Darren; Keane, Michael P; Tynan, Aisling; Maher, Lewena; Cooke, Gordon; Lloyd, David; Conroy, Helen; Donnelly, Seamas C

    2014-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) possesses unique tautomerase enzymatic activity, which contributes to the biological functional activity of MIF. In this study, we investigated the effects of blocking the hydrophobic active site of the tautomerase activity of MIF in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. To address this, we initially established a Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) murine model in Mif-KO and wild-type (WT) mice and compared tumor growth in a knock-in mouse model expressing a mutant MIF lacking enzymatic activity (Mif P1G). Primary tumor growth was significantly attenuated in both Mif-KO and Mif P1G mice compared with WT mice. We subsequently undertook a structure-based, virtual screen to identify putative small molecular weight inhibitors specific for the tautomerase enzymatic active site of MIF. From primary and secondary screens, the inhibitor SCD-19 was identified, which significantly attenuated the tautomerase enzymatic activity of MIF in vitro and in biological functional screens. In the LLC murine model, SCD-19, given intraperitoneally at the time of tumor inoculation, was found to significantly reduce primary tumor volume by 90% (p < 0.001) compared with the control treatment. To better replicate the human disease scenario, SCD-19 was given when the tumor was palpable (at d 7 after tumor inoculation) and, again, treatment was found to significantly reduce tumor volume by 81% (p < 0.001) compared with the control treatment. In this report, we identify a novel inhibitor that blocks the hydrophobic pocket of MIF, which houses its specific tautomerase enzymatic activity, and demonstrate that targeting this unique active site significantly attenuates lung cancer growth in in vitro and in vivo systems. PMID:25826675

  17. Oral administration of aqueous extract of Carthami Flos induces macrophage activation and preferentially potentiates type 1 helper T-cell response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn-Hwa; Do, Jeong-Su; Seo, Hyo-Jung; Hwang, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jun-Hee; Song, Eun-Jung; Nam, Sang-Yun

    2007-01-01

    In vivo immunomodulatory activity of aqueous extract of Carthami Flos (AECF) was investigated using a mouse model immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Serum level of Ag-specific IgG2a was significantly elevated by oral administration of AECF but not IgG1. However, no selective B-cell proliferation by AECF was observed in vivo. Ag-specific proliferation and IFN-gamma and IL-5 production of draining lymph node T cells also was higher in AECF-treated mice when compared with water-treated control mice. However, AECF failed to enhance nonspecific T-cell response under CD3 stimulation. These results led us to hypothesize that AECF potentiates Ag-specific T-cell response, possibly through activation of antigen presenting cells (APC) other than B cells. Functional assessment of splenic macrophages showed that AECF administration significantly enhances IL-12 production as well as APC activity for IFN-gamma production and STAT-4 activation by T cells. Collectively, these data strongly support that AECF preferentially potentiates immune response polarized toward TH1 and for which increased activation of macrophages is most likely to be responsible. The present data implicate a possible application of AECF to potentiate cellular immunity and, we hope, prevent intracellular infections. PMID:17849267

  18. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in ?-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a ?3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPAR? ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis. PMID:26538237

  19. The homeobox transcription factor VentX controls human macrophage terminal differentiation and proinflammatory activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoming; Gao, Hong; Ke, Weixiong; Giese, Roger W.; Zhu, Zhenglun

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are critical players in both innate and adaptive immunity. While the exogenous signaling events leading to the terminal differentiation of macrophages from monocytes have been studied extensively, the underlying intracellular transcriptional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report that the homeobox transcription factor VentX plays a pivotal role in human macrophage terminal differentiation and proinflammatory function. Our study showed that VentX expression was upregulated upon human primary monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation induced by cytokines such as M-CSF, GM-CSF, and IL-3. Moreover, ablation of VentX expression in primary monocytes profoundly impaired their differentiation to macrophages, and ectopic expression of VentX in a myeloid progenitor cell line triggered its differentiation with prominent macrophage features. Further analysis revealed that VentX was pivotal for the proinflammatory response of terminally differentiated macrophages. Mechanistically, VentX was found to control expression of proteins key to macrophage differentiation and activation, including M-CSF receptor. Importantly, preliminary analysis of gene expression in leukocytes from patients with autoimmune diseases revealed a strong correlation between levels of VentX and those of proinflammatory cytokines. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the crucial roles of VentX in macrophage differentiation and proinflammatory activation and suggest that dysregulation of VentX may play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21670496

  20. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1? (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-I?B?/I?B? in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-I?B?/I?B?. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NF?B pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  1. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  2. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-? and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  3. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-01

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25578260

  4. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Mller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  5. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell-derived TGF-? Promotes Maturation of Activated, Neointima Lesion-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ostriker, Allison; Horita, Henrick N.; Poczobutt, Joanna; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.M.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To define the contribution of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-derived factors to macrophage phenotypic modulation in the setting of vascular injury. Approach and Results By flow cytometry, macrophages were the predominant myeloid cell type recruited to wire-injured femoral arteries, in mouse, compared to neutrophils or eosinophils. Recruited macrophages from injured vessels exhibited a distinct expression profile relative to circulating mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (Increased: Il-6, Il-10, Il-12b, CCR3, CCR7, TNF-?, iNOS, Arg I; decreased: Il-12a, MMP9). This phenotype was recapitulated in vitro by maturing rat bone marrow cells in the presence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 20% conditioned media from cultured rat SMC (sM?), compared to maturation in M-CSF alone (M0). Recombinant TGF-?1 recapitulated the effect of SMC conditioned media. Macrophage maturation studies performed in the presence of a pan-TGF-? neutralizing antibody, a TGF-? receptor inhibitor, or conditioned media from TGF-?-depleted SMCs confirmed the SMC-derived factor responsible for macrophage activation was TGF-?. Finally, the effect of SMC-mediated macrophage activation on SMC biology was assessed. SMCs co-cultured with sM? exhibited increased rates of proliferation relative to SMCs cultured alone or with M0 macrophages. Conclusions SMC-derived TGF-? modulates the phenotype of maturing macrophages in vitro, recapitulating the phenotype found in vascular lesions in vivo. SMC-modulated macrophages induce SMC activation to a greater extent than control macrophages. PMID:24526697

  6. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce macrophage ROS production and expression of COX-2, chemokines, and RAGE. > Hepatocyte-mediated macrophage activation involves p44/42 MAP kinase signaling. > HMGB1 is released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes and contributes to macrophage activation.

  7. Opposing Effects of NGF and proNGF on HIV Induced Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kimberly S; Killebrew, Deirdre A; Clary, Gillian P; Meeker, Rick B

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage and microglial activation by HIV in the central nervous system (CNS) triggers the secretion of soluble factors which damage neurons. Therapeutic approaches designed to restore cognitive function by suppressing this inflammatory activity have not yet been successful. Recent studies have indicated that the phenotype of macrophages is differentially controlled by the mature and pro form of nerve growth factor. These cells therefore may be highly responsive to the imbalance in pro versus mature neurotrophins often associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we evaluated the interactions between neurotrophins and HIV induced macrophage activation. HIV stimulation of macrophages induced a neurotoxic phenotype characterized by the expression of podosomes, suppression of calcium spiking and increased neurotoxin production. The secretome of the activated macrophages revealed a bias toward anti-angiogenic like activity and increased secretion of MMP-9. Co-stimulation with NGF and HIV suppressed neurotoxin secretion, increased calcium spiking, suppressed podosome expression and reversed 86% of the proteins secreted in response to HIV, including MMP-9 and many growth factors. In contrast, co-stimulation of macrophages with proNGF not only failed to reverse the effects of HIV but increased the neurotoxic phenotype. These differential effects of proNGF and NGF on HIV activation provide a potential novel therapeutic avenue for controlling macrophage activation in response to HIV. PMID:26420421

  8. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26078009

  9. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the G? subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens. PMID:26667172

  10. β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor protect mice against S. typhimurium challenge by activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Huang, Ke-Yan; Jiang, Yan-Long; Yang, Gui-Lian; Wang, Chun-Feng; Li, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The effects of β-glucans from Coriolus versicolor (CVP), which are extracted from a well-known immune stimulator C. versicolor, have been demonstrated extensively in vitro and in vivo. However, until now, the phagocytic activity has not been elucidated. Hence, the objective of the present study was to identify the antibacterial activity of CVP or CVP-treated macrophages by an analysis of cell cytotoxicity, phagocytic activity, intracellular bacterial survival, macrophage activation, production of nitric oxide (NO) and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in CVP-treated macrophages using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, a gentamicin protection assay, a Nitric oxide assay and an iNOS enzymatic activity assay. The results indicate that CVP-treated macrophages can phagocytize and kill bacteria, probably due to the production of NO and iNOS. More importantly, CVP-treated macrophages are effective at protecting mice against the challenge of Salmonella typhimurium. The results of this study suggest that the antibacterial effects of CVP are probably caused by the activation of innate immune cells, especially macrophages, because the activated macrophage produces NO, which kills bacteria. These phenomena indicate the possibility of CVP as a potential alternative for antibiotics against resistant bacteria. PMID:26802244

  11. Morphine Modulates Interleukin-4- or Breast Cancer Cell-induced Pro-metastatic Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khabbazi, Samira; Goumon, Yannick; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment play a key role in the control of invasiveness, metastasis and angiogenesis. Macrophages display a range of activation states in specific pathological contexts and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages can promote tumour aggressiveness. Opioids are able to modulate tumour growth and metastasis. We tested whether morphine modulates the activation of macrophages induced by (i) interleukin-4 (IL-4), the prototypical M2 polarization-inducing cytokine, or (ii) coculture with breast cancer cells. We showed that IL-4 causes increased MMP-9 production and expression of the alternative activation markers arginase-1 and MRC-1. Morphine prevented IL-4-induced increase in MMP-9 in a naloxone- and methylnaltrexone-reversible fashion. Morphine also prevented IL-4-elicited alternative activation of RAW264.7 macrophages. Expression of MMP-9 and arginase-1 were increased when RAW264.7 were subjected to paracrine activation by 4T1 cells, and this effect was prevented by morphine via an opioid receptor-mediated mechanism. Morphine further decreased 4T1 breast cancer cell invasion elicited by co-culture with RAW264.7. Reduction of MMP-9 expression and alternative activation of macrophages by morphine was confirmed using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that morphine may modulate tumour aggressiveness by regulating macrophage protease production and M2 polarization within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26078009

  12. PPAR? activation promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport through an LXR-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Tohyama, Junichiro; Naik, Snehal U; Tanigawa, Hiroyuki; Jaye, Michael; MacPhee, Colin; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Objective Peroxisome proliferator-activate receptor? (PPAR?) activation has been shown in vitro to increase macrophage cholesterol efflux, the initial step in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). However, it remains unclear whether PPAR? activation promotes macrophage RCT in vivo. Methods and Results We demonstrated that a specific potent PPAR? agonist GW7647 inhibited atherosclerosis and promoted macrophage RCT in hypercholesterolemic mice expressing the human apoA-I gene. We compared the effect of GW7647 on RCT in human apoA-I transgenic (hA-ITg) mice with wild-type (WT) mice and showed that the PPAR? agonist promoted RCT in hA-ITg mice to a much greater extent than in WT mice, indicating that human apoA-I expression is important for PPAR?-induced RCT. We further investigated the dependence of the macrophage PPAR?-LXR pathway on the promotion of RCT by GW7647. Primary murine macrophages lacking PPAR? or LXR abolished the ability of GW7647 to promote RCT in hA-ITg mice. In concert, the PPAR? agonist promoted cholesterol efflux and ABCA1/ABCG1 expression in primary macrophages and this was also by the PPAR?-LXR pathway. Conclusion Our observations demonstrate that a potent PPAR? agonist promotes macrophage RCT in vivo in a manner that is enhanced by human apoA-I expression and dependent on both macrophage PPAR? and LXR expression. PMID:21441141

  13. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type ? interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-?, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-?, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV.-Dai, M., Wang, X., Li, J.-L., Zhou, Y., Sang, M., Liu, J.-B., Wu, J.-G., Ho, W.-Z. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages. PMID:26296370

  14. Macrophage Infiltration Induces Gastric Cancer Invasiveness by Activating the ?-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Kuo, Min-Liang; Lin, Ming-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that activated macrophages act in an inflammatory microenvironment to promote gastric tumorigenesis via ?-catenin signaling, the effects of ?-catenin signaling on gastric cancer cell metastasis and the relationship of these cells with surrounding tumor associated macrophages have not been directly studied. Methods Immunohistochemical staining was employed to analyze 103 patients. An invasion assay was used to evaluate the relationship between macrophages and gastric cancer cells. ?-catenin gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were performed. To assess the ?-catenin regulation mechanism in gastric cancer cells, Western blotting and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were used. Results Increased density of macrophages was associated with advanced stage and poor survival. Gastric cancer cell lines co-cultured with macrophages conditioned medium showed increased nuclear accumulation of ?-catenin and increased invading ability. AKT but not ERK regulated ?-catenin translocation. MMP7 and CD44, both ?-catenin downstream genes, were involved in macrophage-activated gastric cancer cell invasion. Conclusion(s) Collectively, the clinical data suggest that macrophage infiltration is correlated with increased grade and poor prognosis for gastric cancer patients who underwent radical resection. Macrophages may induce invasiveness by activating the ?-catenin pathway. PMID:26226629

  15. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Proinflammatory Mediator Production through TLR4 Activity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Previtera, Michelle L.; Sengupta, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data show that disease adversely affects tissue elasticity or stiffness. While macrophage activity plays a critical role in driving disease pathology, there are limited data available on the effects of tissue stiffness on macrophage activity. In this study, the effects of substrate stiffness on inflammatory mediator production by macrophages were investigated. Bone marrowderived macrophages were grown on polyacrylamide gels that mimicked the stiffness of a variety of soft biological tissues. Overall, macrophages grown on soft substrates produced less proinflammatory mediators than macrophages grown on stiff substrates when the endotoxin LPS was added to media. In addition, the pathways involved in stiffnessregulated proinflammation were investigated. The TLR4 signaling pathway was examined by evaluating TLR4, pNF?B p65, MyD88, and pI?B? expression as well as pNF?B p65 translocation. Expression and translocation of the various signaling molecules were higher in macrophages grown on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Furthermore, TLR4 knockout experiments showed that TLR4 activity enhanced proinflammation on stiff substrates. In conclusion, these results suggest that proinflammatory mediator production initiated by TLR4 is mechanically regulated in macrophages. PMID:26710072

  16. Pterins inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; van Overveld, F. J.; Bult, H.; Vermeire, P. A.; Herman, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. The synthesis of nitrite and citrulline from L-arginine by immune-stimulated rat alveolar macrophages and the modulation of this synthesis were studied. 2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP), 6R-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) and L-sepiapterin were potent inhibitors of the recombinant interferon-gamma induced production of nitrogen oxides in intact cultured cells with I50 values for BH4 and L-sepiapterin of approximately 10 microM. They were equally effective in inhibiting the induced production of citrulline. This inhibitory effect was concentration-dependent for all three modulators investigated. 2. The inhibitory effects were not dependent on incubation times of either 24 or 48 h, on the immune-stimulus used (lipopolysaccharide, interferon-gamma), or whether these stimuli were added during or after the induction period. 3. Pterin-6-carboxylic acid (PCA), which cannot be converted into BH4, and methotrexate (MTX), which inhibits dihydrofolatereductase but not de novo biosynthesis of BH4, did not change the production of nitrite. 4. The data indicate that DAHP, an inhibitor of the de novo biosynthesis of the co-factor BH4, blocks the nitric oxide synthase activity in intact cells. Since the pterins BH4 and L-sepiapterin blocked the L-arginine dependent production of nitrite and citrulline, the activity of nitric oxide synthase in phagocytic cells may be regulated by metabolic endproducts of the de novo biosynthesis of BH4. PMID:1281717

  17. Antitumor and Immunomodulatory Effects of Polysaccharides from Broken-Spore of Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-Yun; Zhu, Xiao-Ling; Lin, Zhi-Bin

    2012-01-01

    The antitumor and immunomodulatory activity of broken-spore of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-BSP) were investigated in vivo and in vitro. It was showed that Gl-BSP (50, 100, and 200?mg?kg?1) exhibited antitumor effect against Sarcoma 180 (S180) in BALB/c mice. The Gl-BSP was not cytotoxicity in S180 cells and PG cells (human lung carcinoma cell) in vitro. However, serum from Gl-BSP-treated S180-bearing mice significantly inhibited S180 and PG cells proliferation in vitro. Moreover, Gl-BSP promoted the splenic lymphocyte proliferation induced by Con A or LPS, enhanced nature killer cell (NK cell) cytotoxic activity, augmented the percentage of neutral red phagocytosis by macrophages, and increased the percentage of the CD4+ or CD8+ subset in S180-bearing mice. The serum level of IFN-?, TNF-?, and nitric oxide was increased by Gl-BSP. Gl-BSP also showed immunomodulatory activities in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, neutralization with anti-TNF-? and/or anti-IFN-? significantly diminished growth inhibition induced by Gl-BSP-treated serum of S180-bearing mice in S180 or PG cells. These observations suggest that the antitumor activity of Gl-BSP may be mainly related to the activation of the immune response of the host organism by the stimulation of NK cells, T cells, and macrophages. PMID:22811667

  18. The active enhancer network operated by liganded RXR supports angiogenic activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Bence; Nagy, Gergely; Hah, Nasun; Horvath, Attila; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Poliska, Szilard; Gyuris, Tibor; Keirsse, Jiri; Gysemans, Conny; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Balint, Balint L; Evans, Ronald M; Barta, Endre; Nagy, Laszlo

    2014-07-15

    RXR signaling is predicted to have a major impact in macrophages, but neither the biological consequence nor the genomic basis of its ligand activation is known. Comprehensive genome-wide studies were carried out to map liganded RXR-mediated transcriptional changes, active binding sites, and cistromic interactions in the context of the macrophage genome architecture. The macrophage RXR cistrome has 5200 genomic binding sites, which are not impacted by ligand. Active enhancers are characterized by PU.1 binding, an increase of enhancer RNA, and P300 recruitment. Using these features, 387 liganded RXR-bound enhancers were linked to 226 genes, which predominantly reside in CTCF/cohesin-limited functional domains. These findings were molecularly validated using chromosome conformation capture (3C) and 3C combined with sequencing (3C-seq), and we show that selected long-range enhancers communicate with promoters via stable or RXR-induced loops and that some of the enhancers interact with each other, forming an interchromosomal network. A set of angiogenic genes, including Vegfa, has liganded RXR-controlled enhancers and provides the macrophage with a novel inducible program. PMID:25030696

  19. Interferon-? regulates cellular metabolism and mRNA translation to potentiate macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yi; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G.; Hu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hui; Cross, Justin R.; Rtsch, Gunnar; Rice, Charles M.; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-? (IFN-?) primes macrophages for enhanced inflammatory activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and microbial killing, but little is known about the regulation of cell metabolism or mRNA translation during priming. We found that IFN-? regulates human macrophage metabolism and translation by targeting the kinases mTORC1 and MNK that both converge on the selective regulator of translation initiation eIF4E. Physiological downregulation of mTORC1 by IFN-? was associated with autophagy and translational suppression of repressors of inflammation such as HES1. Genome-wide ribosome profiling in TLR2-stimulated macrophages revealed that IFN-? selectively modulates the macrophage translatome to promote inflammation, further reprogram metabolic pathways, and modulate protein synthesis. These results add IFN-?-mediated metabolic reprogramming and translational regulation as key components of classical inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:26147685

  20. Dysfunctional CFTR Alters the Bactericidal Activity of Human Macrophages against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Paola Del; Cifani, Noemi; Guarnieri, Simone; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Mariggiò, Maria A.; Spadaro, Francesca; Guglietta, Silvia; Anile, Marco; Venuta, Federico; Quattrucci, Serena; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the lung, as a consequence of persistent bacterial infections by several opportunistic pathogens represents the main cause of mortality and morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Mechanisms leading to increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in CF are not completely known, although the involvement of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in microbicidal functions of macrophages is emerging. Tissue macrophages differentiate in situ from infiltrating monocytes, additionally, mature macrophages from different tissues, although having a number of common activities, exhibit variation in some molecular and cellular functions. In order to highlight possible intrinsic macrophage defects due to CFTR dysfunction, we have focused our attention on in vitro differentiated macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes. Here we report on the contribution of CFTR in the bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa of monocyte derived human macrophages. At first, by real time PCR, immunofluorescence and patch clamp recordings we demonstrated that CFTR is expressed and is mainly localized to surface plasma membranes of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) where it acts as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel. Next, we evaluated the bactericidal activity of P. aeruginosa infected macrophages from healthy donors and CF patients by antibiotic protection assays. Our results demonstrate that control and CF macrophages do not differ in the phagocytic activity when infected with P. aeruginosa. Rather, although a reduction of intracellular live bacteria was detected in both non-CF and CF cells, the percentage of surviving bacteria was significantly higher in CF cells. These findings further support the role of CFTR in the fundamental functions of innate immune cells including eradication of bacterial infections by macrophages. PMID:21625641

  1. Quantitative proteomics analyses of activation states of human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Kees; Weening, Desiree; de Vries, Marcel P; Priebe, Marion G; Vonk, Roel J; Roelofsen, Han

    2015-10-14

    Macrophages display large functional and phenotypical plasticity. They can adopt a broad range of activation states depending on their microenvironment. Various surface markers are used to characterize these differentially polarized macrophages. However, this is not informative for the functions of the macrophage. In order to have a better understanding of the functional changes of macrophages upon differential polarization, we studied differences in LPS- and IL4-stimulated macrophages. The THP-1 human monocytic cell line, was used as a model system. Cells were labeled, differentiated and stimulated with either LPS or IL-4 in a quantitative SILAC proteomics set-up. The resulting sets of proteins were functionally clustered. LPS-stimulated macrophages show increased secretion of proinflammatory peptides, leading to increased pressure on protein biosynthesis and processing. IL4-stimulated macrophages show upregulation of cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodeling. Our approach provides an integrated view of polarization-induced functional changes and proves useful for studying functional differences between subsets of macrophages. Moreover, the identified polarization specific proteins may contribute to a better characterization of different activation states in situ and their role in various inflammatory processes. PMID:26200757

  2. Activation of murine dendritic cells and macrophages induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kalupahana, Ruwani Sagarika; Mastroeni, Pietro; Maskell, Duncan; Blacklaws, Barbara Ann

    2005-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and the direct involvement of both cell types in the immune response to Salmonella has been identified. In this study we analysed the phenotypic and functional changes that take place in murine macrophages and DCs in response to live and heat-killed Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both types of cell secreted proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in response to live and heat-killed salmonellae. Bacterial stimulation also resulted in up-regulation of costimulatory molecules on macrophages and DCs. The expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by macrophages and DCs was differentially regulated by interferon (IFN)-? and salmonellae. Live and heat-killed salmonellae as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibited the up-regulation of MHC class II expression induced by IFN-? on macrophages but not on DCs. Macrophages as well as DCs presented Salmonella-derived antigen to CD4 T cells, although DCs were much more efficient than macrophages at stimulating CD4 T-cell cytokine release. Macrophages are effective in the uptake and killing of bacteria whilst DCs specialize in antigen presentation. This study showed that the viability of salmonellae was not essential for activation of APCs but, unlike live bacteria, prolonged contact with heat-killed bacteria was necessary to obtain maximal expression of the activation markers studied. PMID:16011515

  3. Activation of murine dendritic cells and macrophages induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kalupahana, Ruwani Sagarika; Mastroeni, Pietro; Maskell, Duncan; Blacklaws, Barbara Ann

    2005-08-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and the direct involvement of both cell types in the immune response to Salmonella has been identified. In this study we analysed the phenotypic and functional changes that take place in murine macrophages and DCs in response to live and heat-killed Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both types of cell secreted proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in response to live and heat-killed salmonellae. Bacterial stimulation also resulted in up-regulation of costimulatory molecules on macrophages and DCs. The expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by macrophages and DCs was differentially regulated by interferon (IFN)-gamma and salmonellae. Live and heat-killed salmonellae as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibited the up-regulation of MHC class II expression induced by IFN-gamma on macrophages but not on DCs. Macrophages as well as DCs presented Salmonella-derived antigen to CD4 T cells, although DCs were much more efficient than macrophages at stimulating CD4 T-cell cytokine release. Macrophages are effective in the uptake and killing of bacteria whilst DCs specialize in antigen presentation. This study showed that the viability of salmonellae was not essential for activation of APCs but, unlike live bacteria, prolonged contact with heat-killed bacteria was necessary to obtain maximal expression of the activation markers studied. PMID:16011515

  4. Isolation and immunomodulatory activity of bursal peptide, a novel bursal peptide from the chicken bursa of Fabricius

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Yingjuan

    2015-01-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF), which is unique to birds, serves as the central humoral immune organ and plays a significant role in B lymphocyte differentiation. In this study, a new bursal peptide (BP-IV) was isolated from BF, which promoted colony-forming unit pre-B formation and regulated B cell differentiation. BP-IV also exerted immunomodulatory effects on antigen-specific immune responses via both humoral and cellular immunity in chicken and mice that had been immunized with inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV; H9N2 subtype), including enhancing AIV-specific antibody and cytokine production. The results of this study provided novel insights into the use of a potential candidate reagent for B cell development and future immuno-pharmacological use. PMID:26119163

  5. Isolation and immunomodulatory activity of bursal peptide, a novel bursal peptide from the chicken bursa of Fabricius.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Yingjuan; Jung, Yong-Sam; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2015-12-30

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF), which is unique to birds, serves as the central humoral immune organ and plays a significant role in B lymphocyte differentiation. In this study, a new bursal peptide (BP-IV) was isolated from BF, which promoted colony-forming unit pre-B formation and regulated B cell differentiation. BP-IV also exerted immunomodulatory effects on antigen-specific immune responses via both humoral and cellular immunity in chicken and mice that had been immunized with inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV; H9N2 subtype), including enhancing AIV-specific antibody and cytokine production. The results of this study provided novel insights into the use of a potential candidate reagent for B cell development and future immuno-pharmacological use. PMID:26119163

  6. In vitro differentiation of human macrophages with enhanced antimycobacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Guillaume; Nathan, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes widespread, persistent infection, often residing in macrophages that neither sterilize the bacilli nor allow them to cause disease. How macrophages restrict growth of pathogens is one of many aspects of human phagocyte biology whose study relies largely on macrophages differentiated from monocytes in vitro. However, such cells fail to recapitulate the phenotype of tissue macrophages in key respects, including that they support early, extensive replication of M. tuberculosis and die in several days. Here we found that human macrophages could survive infection, kill Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and severely limit the replication of M. tuberculosis for several weeks if differentiated in 40% human plasma under 5%10% (physiologic) oxygen in the presence of GM-CSF and/or TNF-? followed by IFN-?. Control was lost with fetal bovine serum, 20% oxygen, M-CSF, higher concentrations of cytokines, or premature exposure to IFN-?. We believe that the new culture method will enable inquiries into the antimicrobial mechanisms of human macrophages. PMID:21911939

  7. Macrophage CGI-58 deficiency activates ROS-inflammasome pathway to promote insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongming; Ou, Juanjuan; Ma, Yinyan; Guo, Feng; Yang, Zhenggang; Wiggins, Melvin; Liu, Chaohong; Song, Wenxia; Han, Xianlin; Wang, Miao; Cao, Qiang; Chung, Bik-Ho Florence; Yang, Dan; Liang, Houjie; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Gan, Lixia; Yu, Liqing

    2014-04-10

    Overnutrition activates a proinflammatory program in macrophages to induce insulin resistance (IR), but its molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that saturated fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide, two factors implicated in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced IR, suppress macrophage CGI-58 expression. Macrophage-specific CGI-58 knockout (MaKO) in mice aggravates HFD-induced glucose intolerance and IR, which is associated with augmented systemic/tissue inflammation and proinflammatory activation of adipose tissue macrophages. CGI-58-deficient macrophages exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction due to defective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)? signaling. Consequently, they overproduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to potentiate secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by activating NLRP3 inflammasome. Anti-ROS treatment or NLRP3 silencing prevents CGI-58-deficient macrophages from oversecreting proinflammatory cytokines and from inducing proinflammatory signaling and IR in the cocultured fat slices. Anti-ROS treatment also prevents exacerbation of inflammation and IR in HFD-fed MaKO mice. Our data thus establish CGI-58 as a suppressor of overnutrition-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:24703845

  8. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk[S

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Morgan D.; Ford, Rebecca J.; McGregor, Chelsea P.; LeBlond, Nicholas D.; Snider, Shayne A.; Stypa, Stephanie A.; Day, Emily A.; Lhoták, Šárka; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Austin, Richard C.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk β1-deficient (β1−/−) mice. Macrophages from Ampk β1−/− mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk β1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk β1−/− macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk β1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk β1−/− macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  9. Macrophage CGI-58 Deficiency Activates ROS-Inflammasome Pathway to Promote Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongming; Ou, Juanjuan; Ma, Yinyan; Guo, Feng; Yang, Zhenggang; Wiggins, Melvin D.; Liu, Chaohong; Song, Wenxia; Han, Xianlin; Wang, Miao; Cao, Qiang; Chung, Bik-Ho Florence; Yang, Dan; Liang, Houjie; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Gan, Lixia; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Overnutrition activates proinflammatory program in macrophages to induce insulin resistance (IR), but its molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that saturated fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide, two factors implicated in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced IR, suppress macrophage CGI-58 expression. Macrophage-specific CGI-58 knockout (MaKO) in mice aggravates HFD-induced glucose intolerance and IR, which is associated with augmented systemic/tissue inflammation and proinflammatory activation of adipose tissue macrophages. CGI-58-deficient macrophages exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction due to defective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-? signaling. Consequently they overproduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to potentiate secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by activating NLRP3 inflammasome. Anti-ROS treatment or NLRP3 silencing prevents CGI-58-deficient macrophages from over-secreting proinflammatory cytokines and from inducing proinflammatory signaling and IR in the co-cultured fat slices. Anti-ROS treatment also prevents exacerbation of inflammation and IR in HFD-fed MaKO mice. Our data thus establish CGI-58 as a suppressor of overnutrition-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:24703845

  10. [Activation and regulation of macrophages induced by inoculation of cryodestroyed tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Tsujino, M

    1990-06-01

    Cryosurgery provides two prominent features, that is in situ destruction of malignant tumor and potential immunotherapy against tumor. In order to investigate the immunological response after cryosurgery, immunological system of macrophage activation were studied in an experimental tumor system using BALB/c mice and syngeneic Meth-A fibrosarcoma. The mice inoculated the cryodestroyed Meth-A (Cryo-Meth-A mice) acquired antitumor potency in Meth-A challenge test, and the mice inoculated the Mitomycin C treated Meth-A (MMC-Meth-A mice) also acquired antitumor potency. Spleen cells of Cryo-Meth-A mice showed antitumor activity in Winn assay, and spleen cells of MMC-Meth-A mice also showed antitumor activity. The effector cells in Cryo-Meth-A mice were mainly macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. On the other hand, they were mainly macrophages and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in MMC-Meth-A mice. The maximum macrophage cytostatic activity of Cryo-Meth-A mice was noted on 14 days after inoculation (Day 14), whereas it appeared on Day 7 and continued until Day 14 in MMC-Meth-A mice. Macrophages of Cryo-Meth-A mice enhanced the production activity of interleukin 1 (IL-1), interferon (IFN) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). On the other hand, macrophages of MMC-Meth-A mice enhanced production activity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and increased Ia antigen positive ratio. These findings suggest that macrophages of both groups are activated by different immunological mechanisms. It was found that Cryo-Meth-A played a role as an alpha-IFN inducer, and the macrophages stimulated with Cryo-Meth-A produced alpha-IFN in vitro. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the anti-alpha-IFN antibody carried down-regulation of macrophage cytostatic activity and NK activity of Cryo-Meth-A mice, whereas MMC-Meth-A mice were not. In addition to these findings, CTL activity enhanced some extent by i.p. administration of the anti-alpha-IFN antibody. These facts suggest that the alpha-IFN have two ways of immunological regulation, the first one is the activation of macrophage cytostatic activity and NK activity, and the other is down-regulation of CTL activity by suppression of Ia antigen expression of macrophages. These results suggest that cryodestruction changes the tumor antigen of Meth-A cells, thereby Cryo-Meth-A induces peculiar immunological response. PMID:2135404

  11. Inhibition of macrophage activity by mitogen-induced goldfish leukocyte deactivating factor.

    PubMed

    Stafford, J; Neumann, N F; Belosevic, M

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage activating and deactivating cytokines have been characterized in mammalian systems but little is known about these immunoregulatory molecules in fish. Using gel permeation and chromatofocusing fast performance liquid chromatography (GP-FPLC and C-FPLC) we partially purified a macrophage deactivating factor (MDF) from mitogen-induced goldfish kidney leukocytes. Inhibition of the macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO) response induced by this MDF was time-, dose- and temperature-dependent. Macrophages pre-treated for 6 or 24 h with MDF before activation with macrophage activating factors (MAF) and/or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exhibited a down-regulation in their NO response, while those treated with MDF 24 h after activation with MAF and LPS did not. MDF treatment also impaired the NO response of goldfish macrophages infected with the mammalian protozoan parasite Leishmania major. These results suggest that MDF exhibits its inhibitory effect downstream of the converging intracellular pathways induced by LPS and/or L. major. The novel teleost MDF has an approximate Mr of 15 kD and a pI < 4, and is the first endogenous molecule of teleosts known to down regulate macrophage antimicrobial responses. PMID:10579387

  12. Interferon gamma activated macrophages kill mycobacteria by nitric oxide induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Susanne; Schaible, Ulrich E; Schneider, Bianca E

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen of macrophages and escapes the macrophages' bactericidal effectors by interfering with phagosome-lysosome fusion. IFN-γ activation renders the macrophages capable of killing intracellular mycobacteria by overcoming the phagosome maturation block, nutrient deprivation and exposure to microbicidal effectors including nitric oxide (NO). While the importance about NO for the control of mycobacterial infection in murine macrophages is well documented, the underlying mechanism has not been revealed yet. In this study we show that IFN-γ induced apoptosis in mycobacteria-infected macrophages, which was strictly dependent on NO. Subsequently, NO-mediated apoptosis resulted in the killing of intracellular mycobacteria independent of autophagy. In fact, killing of mycobacteria was susceptible to the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). However, 3-MA also suppressed NO production, which is an important off-target effect to be considered in autophagy studies using 3-MA. Inhibition of caspase 3/7 activation, as well as NO production, abolished apoptosis and elimination of mycobacteria by IFN-γ activated macrophages. In line with the finding that drug-induced apoptosis kills intracellular mycobacteria in the absence of NO, we identified NO-mediated apoptosis as a new defense mechanism of activated macrophages against M. tuberculosis. PMID:21559306

  13. MicroRNA-223 is a crucial mediator of PPAR?-regulated alternative macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Tseng, Alexander; Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Morin, Andrew; Brehm, Tyler; Triff, Karen; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Zhuang, Guoqing; Song, Hui; Kanameni, Srikanth; Wang, Haiqing; Golding, Michael C; Bazer, Fuller W; Chapkin, Robert S; Safe, Stephen; Zhou, Beiyan

    2015-11-01

    Polarized activation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) is crucial for maintaining adipose tissue function and mediating obesity-associated cardiovascular risk and metabolic abnormalities; however, the regulatory network of this key process is not well defined. Here, we identified a PPAR?/microRNA-223 (miR-223) regulatory axis that controls macrophage polarization by targeting distinct downstream genes to shift the cellular response to various stimuli. In BM-derived macrophages, PPAR? directly enhanced miR-223 expression upon exposure to Th2 stimuli. ChIP analysis, followed by enhancer reporter assays, revealed that this effect was mediated by PPAR? binding 3 PPAR? regulatory elements (PPREs) upstream of the pre-miR-223 coding region. Moreover, deletion of miR-223 impaired PPAR?-dependent macrophage alternative activation in cells cultured ex vivo and in mice fed a high-fat diet. We identified Rasa1 and Nfat5 as genuine miR-223 targets that are critical for PPAR?-dependent macrophage alternative activation, whereas the proinflammatory regulator Pknox1, which we reported previously, mediated miR-223-regulated macrophage classical activation. In summary, this study provides evidence to support the crucial role of a PPAR?/miR-223 regulatory axis in controlling macrophage polarization via distinct downstream target genes. PMID:26436647

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors impair antibacterial defenses of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, Matteo; Lugrin, Jrme; Rubino, Ivana; Chanson, Anne-Laure; Giddey, Marlyse; Calandra, Thierry; Roger, Thierry

    2011-11-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) control gene expression by deacetylating histones and nonhistone proteins. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are powerful anticancer drugs that exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. We recently reported a proof-of-concept study demonstrating that HDACi increase susceptibility to bacterial infections in vivo. Yet, still little is known about the effects of HDACi on antimicrobial innate immune defenses. Here we show that HDACi belonging to different chemical classes inhibit at multiple levels the response of macrophages to bacterial infection. HDACi reduce the phagocytosis and the killing of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by macrophages. In line with these findings, HDACi decrease the expression of phagocytic receptors and inhibit bacteria-induced production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by macrophages. Consistently, HDACi impair the expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits and inducible nitric oxide synthase. These data indicate that HDACi have a strong impact on critical antimicrobial defense mechanisms in macrophages. PMID:21921209

  15. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  16. Alternatively activated macrophages and collagen remodeling characterize the postpartum involuting mammary gland across species.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jenean; Lyons, Traci; Monks, Jenifer; Lucia, M Scott; Wilson, R Storey; Hines, Lisa; Man, Yan-gao; Borges, Virginia; Schedin, Pepper

    2010-03-01

    Recent pregnancy correlates with decreased survival for breast cancer patients compared with non-pregnancy-associated breast cancer. We hypothesize that postpartum mammary involution induces metastasis through wound-healing programs known to promote cancer. It is unknown whether alternatively activated M2 macrophages, immune cells important in wound-healing and experimental tumorigenesis that also predict poor prognosis for breast cancer patients, are recruited to the normal involuting gland. Macrophage markers CD68, CSF-1R, and F4/80 were examined across the pregnancy and involution cycle in rodent and human mammary tissues. Quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed up to an eightfold increase in macrophage number during involution, which returned to nulliparous levels with full regression. The involution macrophages exhibit an M2 phenotype as determined by high arginase-1 and low inducible nitric oxide synthase staining in rodent tissue, and by mannose receptor expression in human breast tissue. M2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 also peaked during involution. Extracellular matrix (ECM) isolated from involuting rat mammary glands was chemotactic for macrophages compared with nulliparous mammary ECM. Fibrillar collagen levels and proteolysis increased dramatically during involution, and denatured collagen I acted as a strong chemoattractant for macrophages in cell culture, suggesting proteolyzed fibrillar collagen as a candidate ECM mediator of macrophage recruitment. M2 macrophages, IL-4, IL-13, fibrillar collagen accumulation, and proteolysis of collagen are all components of tumor promotional microenvironments, and thus may mediate promotion of breast cancers arising in the postpartum setting. PMID:20110414

  17. Cot/tpl2 participates in the activation of macrophages by adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Garcia, Carlos; Nagy, Laura E.; Lasuncin, Miguel A.; Fernandez, Margarita; Alemany, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the main function of APN is to enhance insulin activity, it is also involved in modulating the macrophage phenotype. Here, we demonstrate that at physiological concentrations, APN activates Erk1/2 via the IKK?-p105/NF-??1-Cot/tpl2 intracellular signal transduction cassette in macrophages. In peritoneal macrophages stimulated with APN, Cot/tpl2 influences the ability to phagocytose beads. However, Cot/tpl2 did not modulate the known capacity of APN to decrease lipid content in peritoneal macrophages in response to treatment with oxLDL or acLDL. A microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in BMDMs exposed to APN revealed that APN modulated the expression of ?3300 genes; the most significantly affected biological functions were the inflammatory and the infectious disease responses. qRT-PCR analysis of WT and Cot/tpl2 KO macrophages stimulated with APN for 0, 3, and 18 h revealed that Cot/tpl2 participated in the up-regulation of APN target inflammatory mediators included in the cytokinecytokine receptor interaction pathway (KEGG ID 4060). In accordance with these data, macrophages stimulated with APN increased secretion of cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1?, IL-1?, TNF-?, IL-10, IL-12, IL-6, and CCL2. Moreover, Cot/tpl2 also played an important role in the production of these inflammatory mediators upon stimulation of macrophages with APN. It has been reported that different types of signals that stimulate TLRs, IL-1R, TNFR, Fc?R, and proteinase-activated receptor-1 activate Cot/tpl2. Here, we demonstrate that APN is a new signal that activates the IKK?-p105/NF-??1-Cot/tpl2-MKK1/2-Erk1/2 axis in macrophages. Furthermore, this signaling cassette modulates the biological functions triggered by APN in macrophages. PMID:24532642

  18. Macrophages in resistance to rickettsial infections: protection against lethal Rickettsia tsutsugamushi infections by treatment of mice with macrophage-activating agents.

    PubMed

    Nacy, C A; Meltzer, M S

    1984-04-01

    Peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice activated in vivo by intraperitoneal inoculation of viable Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG or the nonliving macrophage-activating agent Propionibacterium acnes (Corynebacterium parvum), were resistant to infection with Rickettsia tsutsugamushi, and they killed bacteria that did gain entry into the intracellular environment of these cells. This macrophage resistance to infection and intracellular destruction of rickettsiae was dependent upon development of an immune response to the activating agents, since macrophages elicited by sterile inflammatory agents failed to display either microbicidal activity unless cells were exposed to factors present in lymphokine-rich culture fluids from antigen or mitogen stimulated spleen cells (LK) in vitro. C3H/HeN mice that had been treated with activating agents, but not sterile inflammatory irritants, also survived intraperitoneal inoculation of up to 10(4) R. tsutsugamushi. This nonspecific protection required the chronic presence of activated macrophages: acute immune response induced by intraperitoneal injection of PPD into mice inoculated intradermally with BCG, or intraperitoneal inoculation of conconavalin A, were not sufficient to induce survival of rickettsial disease, although macrophages from these animals were activated to kill rickettsiae at the time of challenge. The critical nature of activated macrophages in nonspecific protection against rickettsial infection was demonstrated with the macrophage-defective C3H/HeJ mice. These mice are equally as susceptible as C3H/HeN mice to intraperitoneal inoculation of R. tsutsugamushi, but do not develop activated macrophages in response to BCG infection, and are not protected against lethal rickettsial challenge following BCG treatment. PMID:6584528

  19. Integrin signaling in neutrophils and macrophages uses adaptors containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mcsai, Attila; Abram, Clare L; Jakus, Zoltn; Hu, Yongmei; Lanier, Lewis L; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-01-01

    At sites of inflammation, ligation of leukocyte integrins is critical for the activation of cellular effector functions required for host defense. However, the signaling pathways linking integrin ligation to cellular responses are poorly understood. Here we show that integrin signaling in neutrophils and macrophages requires adaptors containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). Neutrophils and macrophages lacking two ITAM-containing adaptor proteins, DAP12 and FcR?, were defective in integrin-mediated responses. Activation of the tyrosine kinase Syk by integrins required that DAP12 and FcR? were first phosphorylated by Src family kinases. Retroviral transduction of neutrophils and macrophages with wild-type and mutant Syk or DAP12 demonstrated that the Src homology 2 domains of Syk and the ITAM of DAP12 were required for integrin signaling. Our data show that integrin signaling for the activation of cellular responses in neutrophils and macrophages proceeds by an immunoreceptor-like mechanism. PMID:17086186

  20. Impairing autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium leads to inflammasome activation and enhanced macrophage-mediated angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Copland, David A; Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Chiu, Hsi An Amy; Barba, Miriam Durazo; Mak, Ka Wang; Mack, Matthias; Nicholson, Lindsay B; Dick, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in autophagy contribute to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have now studied the interaction between autophagy impaired in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the responses of macrophages. We find that dying RPE cells can activate the macrophage inflammasome and promote angiogenesis. In vitro, inhibiting rotenone-induced autophagy in RPE cells elicits caspase-3 mediated cell death. Co-culture of damaged RPE with macrophages leads to the secretion of IL-1?, IL-6 and nitrite oxide. Exogenous IL-6 protects the dysfunctional RPE but IL-1? causes enhanced cell death. Furthermore, IL-1? toxicity is more pronounced in dysfunctional RPE cells showing reduced IRAK3 gene expression. Co-culture of macrophages with damaged RPE also elicits elevated levels of pro-angiogenic proteins that promote ex vivo choroidal vessel sprouting. In vivo, impaired autophagy in the eye promotes photoreceptor and RPE degeneration and recruitment of inflammasome-activated macrophages. The degenerative tissue environment drives an enhanced pro-angiogenic response, demonstrated by increased size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions. The contribution of macrophages was confirmed by depletion of CCR2(+) monocytes, which attenuates CNV in the presence of RPE degeneration. Our results suggest that the interplay between perturbed RPE homeostasis and activated macrophages influences key features of AMD development. PMID:26847702

  1. NBS1 is required for macrophage homeostasis and functional activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Lopes, Selma; Tur, Juan; Calatayud-Subias, Juan A; Lloberas, Jorge; Stracker, Travis H; Celada, Antonio

    2015-11-26

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1) is a component of the MRE11 complex, which is a sensor of DNA double-strand breaks and plays a crucial role in the DNA damage response. Because activated macrophages produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can cause DNA lesions, we examined the role of NBS1 in macrophage functional activity. Proliferative and proinflammatory (interferon gamma [IFN-?] and lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) stimuli led to increased NBS1 levels in macrophages. In mice expressing a hypomorphic allele of Nbs1, Nbs1(?B/?B), macrophage activation-induced ROS caused increased levels of DNA damage that were associated with defects in proliferation, delayed differentiation, and increased senescence. Furthermore, upon stimulation, Nbs1(?B/?B) macrophages exhibited increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In the in vivo 2,4-dinitrofluorobenezene model of inflammation, Nbs1(?B/?B) animals showed increased weight and ear thickness. By using the sterile inflammation by zymosan injection, we found that macrophage proliferation was drastically decreased in the peritoneal cavity of Nbs1(?B/?B) mice. Our findings show that NBS1 is crucial for macrophage function during normal aging. These results have implications for understanding the immune defects observed in patients with NBS and related disorders. PMID:26324700

  2. Impairing autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium leads to inflammasome activation and enhanced macrophage-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Chiu, Hsi An Amy; Barba, Miriam Durazo; Mak, Ka Wang; Mack, Matthias; Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decreases in autophagy contribute to the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have now studied the interaction between autophagy impaired in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the responses of macrophages. We find that dying RPE cells can activate the macrophage inflammasome and promote angiogenesis. In vitro, inhibiting rotenone-induced autophagy in RPE cells elicits caspase-3 mediated cell death. Co-culture of damaged RPE with macrophages leads to the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and nitrite oxide. Exogenous IL-6 protects the dysfunctional RPE but IL-1β causes enhanced cell death. Furthermore, IL-1β toxicity is more pronounced in dysfunctional RPE cells showing reduced IRAK3 gene expression. Co-culture of macrophages with damaged RPE also elicits elevated levels of pro-angiogenic proteins that promote ex vivo choroidal vessel sprouting. In vivo, impaired autophagy in the eye promotes photoreceptor and RPE degeneration and recruitment of inflammasome-activated macrophages. The degenerative tissue environment drives an enhanced pro-angiogenic response, demonstrated by increased size of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesions. The contribution of macrophages was confirmed by depletion of CCR2+ monocytes, which attenuates CNV in the presence of RPE degeneration. Our results suggest that the interplay between perturbed RPE homeostasis and activated macrophages influences key features of AMD development. PMID:26847702

  3. Re-evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of mastic using activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Satoh, Kazue; Takahashi, Keiso; Watanabe, Shuji; Nakamura, Wataru; Maki, Jun; Hatano, Hajime; Takekawa, Fumihiro; Shimada, Chiyako; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Mastic is a resinous exudate obtained from the stem and the main leaves of Pistacia lentiscus. Mastic has shown several beneficial pharmaceutical properties such as antibacterial and apoptosis-modulating activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mastic affects the function of activated macrophages. Both solid and liquid types of mastic inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory substances such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG)E(2) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. This was accompanied by the decline of viable cell number. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that mastic inhibited the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 at both protein and mRNA levels. ESR spectroscopy revealed that mastic scavenged NO and superoxide radicals very poorly, in contrast to its potent hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. These data demonstrate that mastic inhibits the production of both NO and PGE(2) by activated macrophages mostly via its cytotoxic action. The narrow range of effective concentration of mastic due to its cytotoxicity may limit its potential application as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:19567394

  4. Macrophage activation and nitric oxide production by water soluble components of Hericium erinaceum.

    PubMed

    Son, Chang Gue; Shin, Jang Woo; Cho, Jung Hyo; Cho, Chong Kwan; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chung, Wantae; Han, Seung Hyun

    2006-08-01

    Hericium erinaceum is a medicinal and edible mushroom with anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. To evaluate the immunoregulatory functions of H. erinaceum, we prepared water extract from H. erinaceum (WEHE) and investigated its ability to activate macrophages and to induce nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. Rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with 1 to 100 mug/ml of WEHE for 24, 48, or 72 h produced NO in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that WEHE augmented the steady-state level of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA in both the peritoneal macrophages and a murine macrophage cell-line, RAW 264.7. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that WEHE increased DNA binding activity of the transcription factor NF-kappaB, which is responsible for iNOS gene expression. Furthermore, its trans-acting activity was confirmative as determined by in vitro transfection assay using a reporter gene construct, p(NF-kappaB)(3)-CAT, whose expression is solely regulated by the activity of NF-kappaB. Concomitantly with the activation of NF-kappaB, WEHE markedly decreased intracellular IkappaBalpha level as demonstrated by Western blot assay. These results suggested that WEHE induces iNOS gene expression followed by NO production in macrophages via enhancing the activation of transcription factor, NF-kappaB. PMID:16782550

  5. [Immunomodulatory therapy in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Cspny, Tnde; Bereczki, Dniel

    2004-11-20

    During the past decade, several disease-modifying agents have been established and have become available for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The disease-modifying agents could be grouped into immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapies altering the long-term course of multiple sclerosis. Therapy is now available for relapsing-remitting, secondary progressive and progressive-relapsing multiple sclerosis. Different disease-modifying agents became also available for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in Hungary which makes the therapeutic decision difficult. This overview might help to give an answer for different questions in the management of multiple sclerosis: Which agent to choose? When to initiate the therapy? Which dose to apply? Are the drugs safe? How long to treat the patients with immunomodulatory drugs? We give a review from the literature to assess the efficacy of disease-modifying therapies and to compare the data from phase three trials of interferon beta1b, two preparations of interferon beta1a or glatiramer acetate for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. We analyzed the efficacy and safety of these agents on physical, inflammatory and cognitive measures of disease activity. Comparison of study results indicated similar effects of immunomodulatory agents on relapse-related and inflammatory measures in relapsing multiple sclerosis. Interferon beta1a slowed the progression of disability in relapsing multiple sclerosis. One interferon beta1a preparation (intramuscularly injected) demonstrated efficacy in slowing progression of cognitive dysfunction. The interferons reduced relapses at early phase of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, but their efficacy have not yet been proven in the later phase of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis without relapses. Mitoxantrone demonstrated efficacy in slowing the progression of disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. All of the disease modifying agents are safe and tolerable, if the indication is correct and the patients are strictly controlled. PMID:15662768

  6. Translational Regulation of Specific mRNAs Controls Feedback Inhibition and Survival during Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Johanna; Reitter, Sonja; Philipp, Janine; Haneke, Katharina; Schäfer, Heiner; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    For a rapid induction and efficient resolution of the inflammatory response, gene expression in cells of the immune system is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The control of mRNA translation has emerged as an important determinant of protein levels, yet its role in macrophage activation is not well understood. We systematically analyzed the contribution of translational regulation to the early phase of the macrophage response by polysome fractionation from mouse macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Individual mRNAs whose translation is specifically regulated during macrophage activation were identified by microarray analysis. Stimulation with LPS for 1 h caused translational activation of many feedback inhibitors of the inflammatory response including NF-κB inhibitors (Nfkbid, Nfkbiz, Nr4a1, Ier3), a p38 MAPK antagonist (Dusp1) and post-transcriptional suppressors of cytokine expression (Zfp36 and Zc3h12a). Our analysis showed that their translation is repressed in resting and de-repressed in activated macrophages. Quantification of mRNA levels at a high temporal resolution by RNASeq allowed us to define groups with different expression patterns. Thereby, we were able to distinguish mRNAs whose translation is actively regulated from mRNAs whose polysomal shifts are due to changes in mRNA levels. Active up-regulation of translation was associated with a higher content in AU-rich elements (AREs). For one example, Ier3 mRNA, we show that repression in resting cells as well as de-repression after stimulation depends on the ARE. Bone-marrow derived macrophages from Ier3 knockout mice showed reduced survival upon activation, indicating that IER3 induction protects macrophages from LPS-induced cell death. Taken together, our analysis reveals that translational control during macrophage activation is important for cellular survival as well as the expression of anti-inflammatory feedback inhibitors that promote the resolution of inflammation. PMID:24945926

  7. Batf2/Irf1 induces inflammatory responses in classically activated macrophages, lipopolysaccharides, and mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sugata; Guler, Reto; Parihar, Suraj P; Schmeier, Sebastian; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Nishimura, Hajime; Shin, Jay W; Negishi, Yutaka; Ozturk, Mumin; Hurdayal, Ramona; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kimura, Yasumasa; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Brombacher, Frank; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2015-06-15

    Basic leucine zipper transcription factor Batf2 is poorly described, whereas Batf and Batf3 have been shown to play essential roles in dendritic cell, T cell, and B cell development and regulation. Batf2 was drastically induced in IFN-?-activated classical macrophages (M1) compared with unstimulated or IL-4-activated alternative macrophages (M2). Batf2 knockdown experiments from IFN-?-activated macrophages and subsequent expression profiling demonstrated important roles for regulation of immune responses, inducing inflammatory and host-protective genes Tnf, Ccl5, and Nos2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Beijing strain HN878)-infected macrophages further induced Batf2 and augmented host-protective Batf2-dependent genes, particularly in M1, whose mechanism was suggested to be mediated through both TLR2 and TLR4 by LPS and heat-killed HN878 (HKTB) stimulation experiments. Irf1 binding motif was enriched in the promoters of Batf2-regulated genes. Coimmunoprecipitation study demonstrated Batf2 association with Irf1. Furthermore, Irf1 knockdown showed downregulation of IFN-?- or LPS/HKTB-activated host-protective genes Tnf, Ccl5, Il12b, and Nos2. Conclusively, Batf2 is an activation marker gene for M1 involved in gene regulation of IFN-?-activated classical macrophages, as well as LPS/HKTB-induced macrophage stimulation, possibly by Batf2/Irf1 gene induction. Taken together, these results underline the role of Batf2/Irf1 in inducing inflammatory responses in M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:25957166

  8. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  9. Molecular imaging of macrophage protease activity in cardiovascular inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quillard, Thibaut; Croce, Kevin; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Macrophages contribute pivotally to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), notably to atherosclerosis. Imaging of macrophages in vivo could furnish new tools to advance evaluation of disease and therapies. Proteolytic enzymes serve as key effectors of many macrophage contributions to CVD. Therefore, intravital imaging of protease activity could aid evaluation of the progress and outcome of atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysm formation, or rejection of cardiac allografts. Among the large families of proteases, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cysteinyl cathepsins have garnered the most interest because of their participation in extracellular matrix remodeling. These considerations have spurred the development of dedicated imaging agents for protease activity detection. Activatable fluorescent probes, radiolabeled inhibitors, and nanoparticles are currently under exploration for this purpose. While some agents and technologies may soon see clinical use, others will require further refinement. Imaging of macrophages and protease activity should provide an important adjunct to understanding pathophysiology in vivo, evaluating the effects of interventions, and ultimately aiding clinical care. PMID:21225096

  10. Pioglitazone Suppresses CXCR7 Expression To Inhibit Human Macrophage Chemotaxis through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor ?.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Duo; Zhu, Zhicheng; Li, Dan; Xu, Rihao; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-11-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pioglitazone, the widely used thiazolidinedione, is shown to be efficient in the prevention of cardiovascular complications of T2DM. In this study, we report that pioglitazone inhibits CXCR7 expression and thus blocks chemotaxis in differentiated macrophage without perturbing cell viability or macrophage differentiation. In addition, pioglitazone-mediated CXCR7 suppression and chemotaxis inhibition occur via activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) but not PPAR? in differentiated macrophage. More importantly, pioglitazone therapy-induced PPAR? activation suppresses CXCR7 expression in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pioglitazone suppresses CXCR7 expression to inhibit human macrophage chemotaxis through PPAR?. PMID:26507929

  11. Chitohexaose Activates Macrophages by Alternate Pathway through TLR4 and Blocks Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Santosh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Tupperwar, Nitin C.; Vaidya, Tushar; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Ravindran, Balachandran

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is a consequence of systemic bacterial infections leading to hyper activation of immune cells by bacterial products resulting in enhanced release of mediators of inflammation. Endotoxin (LPS) is a major component of the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and a critical factor in pathogenesis of sepsis. Development of antagonists that inhibit the storm of inflammatory molecules by blocking Toll like receptors (TLR) has been the main stay of research efforts. We report here that a filarial glycoprotein binds to murine macrophages and human monocytes through TLR4 and activates them through alternate pathway and in the process inhibits LPS mediated classical activation which leads to inflammation associated with endotoxemia. The active component of the nematode glycoprotein mediating alternate activation of macrophages was found to be a carbohydrate residue, Chitohexaose. Murine macrophages and human monocytes up regulated Arginase-1 and released high levels of IL-10 when incubated with chitohexaose. Macrophages of C3H/HeJ mice (non-responsive to LPS) failed to get activated by chitohexaose suggesting that a functional TLR4 is critical for alternate activation of macrophages also. Chitohexaose inhibited LPS induced production of inflammatory molecules TNF-?, IL-1? and IL-6 by macropahges in vitro and in vivo in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of chitohexaose completely protected mice against endotoxemia when challenged with a lethal dose of LPS. Furthermore, Chitohexaose was found to reverse LPS induced endotoxemia in mice even 6/24/48 hrs after its onset. Monocytes of subjects with active filarial infection displayed characteristic alternate activation markers and were refractory to LPS mediated inflammatory activation suggesting an interesting possibility of subjects with filarial infections being less prone to develop of endotoxemia. These observations that innate activation of alternate pathway of macrophages by chtx through TLR4 has offered novel opportunities to cell biologists to study two mutually exclusive activation pathways of macrophages being mediated through a single receptor. PMID:22654663

  12. Human intestinal macrophages display profound inflammatory anergy despite avid phagocytic and bacteriocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smythies, Lesley E; Sellers, Marty; Clements, Ronald H; Mosteller-Barnum, Meg; Meng, Gang; Benjamin, William H; Orenstein, Jan M; Smith, Phillip D

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages, which are thought to orchestrate mucosal inflammatory responses, have received little investigative attention compared with macrophages from other tissues. Here we show that human intestinal macrophages do not express innate response receptors, including the receptors for LPS (CD14), Fcalpha (CD89), Fcgamma (CD64, CD32, CD16), CR3 (CD11b/CD18), and CR4 (CD11c/CD18); the growth factor receptors IL-2 (CD25) and IL-3 (CD123); and the integrin LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18). Moreover, resident intestinal macrophages also do not produce proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, RANTES, TGF-beta, and TNF-alpha, in response to an array of inflammatory stimuli but retain avid phagocytic and bacteriocidal activity. Thus, intestinal macrophages are markedly distinct in phenotype and function from blood monocytes, although intestinal macrophages are derived from blood monocytes. To explain this paradox, we show that intestinal stromal cell-derived products downregulate both monocyte receptor expression and, via TGF-beta, cytokine production but not phagocytic or bacteriocidal activity, eliciting the phenotype and functional profile of intestinal macrophages. These findings indicate a mechanism in which blood monocytes recruited to the intestinal mucosa retain avid scavenger and host defense functions but acquire profound "inflammatory anergy," thereby promoting the absence of inflammation characteristic of normal intestinal mucosa despite the close proximity of immunostimulatory bacteria. PMID:15630445

  13. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-08-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9(-/-)) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9-B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  14. Tumor cell-activated CARD9 signaling contributes to metastasis-associated macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, M; Shao, J-H; Miao, Y-J; Cui, W; Qi, Y-F; Han, J-H; Lin, X; Du, J

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are critical immune effector cells of the tumor microenvironment that promote seeding, extravasation and persistent growth of tumor cells in primary tumors and metastatic sites. Tumor progression and metastasis are affected by dynamic changes in the specific phenotypes of macrophage subpopulations; however, the mechanisms by which tumor cells modulate macrophage polarization remain incompletely understood. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is a central adaptor protein of innate immune responses to extracellular pathogens. We report that increased CARD9 expression is primarily localized in infiltrated macrophages and significantly associated with advanced histopathologic stage and the presence of metastasis. Using CARD9-deficient (CARD9−/−) mice, we show that bone marrow-derived CARD9 promotes liver metastasis of colon carcinoma cells. Mechanistic studies reveal that CARD9 contributes to tumor metastasis by promoting metastasis-associated macrophage polarization through activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that tumor cell-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor facilitates spleen tyrosine kinase activation in macrophages, which is necessary for formation of the CARD9–B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10–mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 complex. Taken together, our results indicating that CARD9 is a regulator of metastasis-associated macrophages will lead to new insights into evolution of the microenvironments supporting tumor metastasis, thereby providing targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:24722209

  15. Expression of Immunomodulatory Neutrophil-activating Protein of Helicobacter pylori Enhances the Antitumor Activity of Oncolytic Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Iankov, Ianko D; Allen, Cory; Federspiel, Mark J; Myers, Rae M; Peng, Kah Whye; Ingle, James N; Russell, Stephen J; Galanis, Evanthia

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (NAP) is a major virulence factor and powerful inducer of inflammatory reaction and Th1-polarized immune response. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of measles virus (MV) strains engineered to express secretory NAP forms against metastatic breast cancer. Recombinant viruses encoding secretory NAP forms (MV-lambda-NAP and MV-s-NAP) efficiently infect and destroy breast cancer cells by cell-to-cell viral spread and large syncytia formation independently of hormone receptor status. Intrapleural administration of MV-s-NAP doubled the median survival in a pleural effusion xenograft model: 65 days as compared to 29 days in the control group (P < 0.0001). This therapeutic effect correlated with a brisk Th1 type cytokine response in vivo. Secretory NAP was expressed at high levels by infected tumor cells and increased tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12/23 cytokine concentrations were detected in the pleural effusion. In an aggressive model of lung metastatic breast cancer, MV-lambda-NAP and MV-s-NAP also significantly improved survival of the treated animals (P < 0.05) as compared to the control MV strain. These data suggest that potent immunomodulators of bacterial origin, such as H. pylori NAP, can enhance the antitumor effect of oncolytic viruses and support the feasibility and potential of a combined viroimmunotherapy approach. PMID:22334023

  16. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in macrophages regulates cytokine production and experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ning; Wang, Lihong; Cao, Hailong; Liu, Liping; Van Kaer, Luc; Washington, Mary K.; Rosen, Michael J.; Dub, Philip E.; Wilson, Keith T.; Ren, Xiubao; Hao, Xishan; Polk, D. Brent; Yan, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate innate immunity to maintain intestinal homeostasis and play pathological roles in intestinal inflammation. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, survival and wound closure in several cell types. However, the impact of EGFR in macrophages remains unclear. This study was to investigate whether EGFR activation in macrophages regulates cytokine production and intestinal inflammation. We found that EGFR was activated in colonic macrophages in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and in patients with ulcerative colitis. DSS-induced acute colitis was ameliorated and recovery from colitis was promoted in Egfrfl/flLysM-Cre mice with myeloid cell-specific deletion of EGFR, compared with LysM-Cre mice. DSS treatment increased IL-10 and TNF levels during the acute phase of colitis, and increased IL-10 but reduced TNF levels during the recovery phase in Egfrfl/flLysM-Cre mice. An anti-IL-10 neutralizing antibody abolished these effects of macrophage-specific EGFR deletion on DSS-induced colitis in Egfrfl/flLysM-Cre mice. LPS stimulated EGFR activation and inhibition of EGFR kinase activity enhanced LPS-stimulated NF-?B activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, induction of IL-10 production by EGFR kinase-blocked RAW 264.7 cells, in response to LPS plus IFN-?, correlated with decreased TNF production. Thus, although selective deletion of EGFR in macrophages leads to increases in both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to inflammatory stimuli, the increase in the IL-10 level plays a role in suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production, resulting in protection of mice from intestinal inflammation. These results reveal an integrated response of macrophages regulated by EGFR in intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:24391216

  17. Immunomodulatory activity of diethylcarbamazine on humoral, cellular cytokine response and respiratory burst in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Medina-De la Garza, Carlos E; Guerrero-Ramírez, Graciela; García-Hernández, Marisela; Castro-Corona, M Angeles; Torres-López, Ernesto; Brattig, Norbert W; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-06-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) is an anthelmintic piperazine derivative drug with putative immunomodulating properties, including increased platelet and granulocyte adhesion to parasites and enhanced production of cytokines. To further analyse these properties in a well-established animal model, we evaluated the effect of DEC on antibody, cellular cytokine response and respiratory burst in BALB/c mice. Animals were challenged with a thymus-dependent (tetanus toxoid, (TT)) and with a thymus-independent (lipopolysaccharide, (LPS)) antigen and treated with DEC for seven days with two different doses (50 mg/day and 500 mg/day). Serum was assessed for antibody production at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after stimulation and at 0, 24 and 48 h for IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-12 release. Respiratory burst of neutrophils and monocytes from peripheral blood was measured by flow cytometry. We found low-dose treatment with DEC enhanced cytokine production vs. TT and antibody production vs. LPS, whereas a higher dose enhanced significantly the respiratory burst of both polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, with a significant higher effect on the former. Our results suggest a stimulating, dose-dependent immunomodulatory effect of DEC with a higher effect on the phagocytic cells. PMID:22564175

  18. Hyper-inflammation and skin destruction mediated by rosiglitazone activation of macrophages in IL-6 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Das, Lopa M; Rosenjack, Julie; Au, Liemin; Galle, Pia S; Hansen, Morten B; Cathcart, Martha K; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Silverstein, Roy L; Lu, Kurt Q

    2015-02-01

    Injury initiates recruitment of macrophages to support tissue repair; however, excessive macrophage activity may exacerbate tissue damage causing further destruction and subsequent delay in wound repair. Here we show that the peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor-? agonist, rosiglitazone (Rosi), a medication recently reintroduced as a drug to treat diabetes and with known anti-inflammatory properties, paradoxically generates pro-inflammatory macrophages. This is observed in both IL-6-deficient mice and control wild-type mice experimentally induced to produce high titers of auto-antibodies against IL-6, mimicking IL-6 deficiency in human diseases. IL-6 deficiency when combined with Rosi-mediated upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 leads to an altered ratio of nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/NF-?B that allows hyper-induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Macrophages activated in this manner cause de novo tissue destruction, recapitulating human chronic wounds, and can be reversed in vivo by recombinant IL-6, blocking macrophage infiltration, or neutralizing iNOS. This study provides insight into an unanticipated paradoxical role of Rosi in mediating hyper-inflammatory macrophage activation significant for diseases associated with IL-6 deficiency. PMID:25184961

  19. Hyper-Inflammation and Skin Destruction Mediated by Rosiglitazone Activation of Macrophages in IL-6 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Das, Lopa M; Rosenjack, Julie; Au, Liemin; Galle, Pia S; Hansen, Morten B; Cathcart, Martha K; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Silverstein, Roy L; Lu, Kurt Q

    2015-01-01

    Injury initiates recruitment of macrophages to support tissue repair; however, excessive macrophage activity may exacerbate tissue damage causing further destruction and subsequent delay in wound repair. Here we show that the peroxisome proliferationactivated receptor-? agonist, rosiglitazone (Rosi), a medication recently reintroduced as a drug to treat diabetes and with known anti-inflammatory properties, paradoxically generates pro-inflammatory macrophages. This is observed in both IL-6-deficient mice and control wild-type mice experimentally induced to produce high titers of auto-antibodies against IL-6, mimicking IL-6 deficiency in human diseases. IL-6 deficiency when combined with Rosi-mediated upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 leads to an altered ratio of nuclear signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/NF-?B that allows hyper-induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Macrophages activated in this manner cause de novo tissue destruction, recapitulating human chronic wounds, and can be reversed in vivo by recombinant IL-6, blocking macrophage infiltration, or neutralizing iNOS. This study provides insight into an unanticipated paradoxical role of Rosi in mediating hyper-inflammatory macrophage activation significant for diseases associated with IL-6 deficiency. PMID:25184961

  20. A patatin-like protein protects Toxoplasma gondii from degradation in activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mordue, Dana G.; Scott-Weathers, Casey F.; Tobin, Crystal M.; Knoll, Laura J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is able to suppress nitric oxide production in activated macrophages. A screen of over 6000 T. gondii insertional mutants identified two clones, which were consistently unable to suppress nitric oxide production from activated macrophages. One strain, called 89B7, grew at the same rate as wild-type parasites in nave macrophages, but unlike wild type, the mutant was degraded in activated macrophages. This degradation was marked by a reduction in the number of parasites within vacuoles over time, the loss of GRA4 and SAG1 protein staining by immunofluorescence assay, and the vesiculation and breakdown of the internal parasite ultrastructure by electron microscopy. The mutagenesis plasmid in the 89B7 clone disrupts the promoter of a 3.4 kb mRNA that encodes a predicted 68 kDa protein with a cleavable signal peptide and a patatin-like phospholipase domain. Genetic complementation with the genomic locus of this patatin-like protein restores the parasites ability to suppress nitric oxide and replicate in activated macrophages. A haemagglutinin-tagged version of this patatin-like protein shows punctate localization into atypical T. gondii structures within the parasite. This is the first study that defines a specific gene product that is needed for parasite survival in activated but not nave macrophages. PMID:17166175

  1. An activating NLRC4 inflammasome mutation causes autoinflammation with recurrent macrophage activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Canna, Scott W; de Jesus, Adriana A; Gouni, Sushanth; Brooks, Stephen R; Marrero, Bernadette; Liu, Yin; DiMattia, Michael A; Zaal, Kristien J M; Sanchez, Gina A Montealegre; Kim, Hanna; Chapelle, Dawn; Plass, Nicole; Huang, Yan; Villarino, Alejandro V; Biancotto, Angelique; Fleisher, Thomas A; Duncan, Joseph A; O'Shea, John J; Benseler, Susanne; Grom, Alexei; Deng, Zuoming; Laxer, Ronald M; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-10-01

    Inflammasomes are innate immune sensors that respond to pathogen- and damage-associated signals with caspase-1 activation, interleukin (IL)-1? and IL-18 secretion, and macrophage pyroptosis. The discovery that dominant gain-of-function mutations in NLRP3 cause the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and trigger spontaneous inflammasome activation and IL-1? oversecretion led to successful treatment with IL-1-blocking agents. Herein we report a de novo missense mutation (c.1009A > T, encoding p.Thr337Ser) affecting the nucleotide-binding domain of the inflammasome component NLRC4 that causes early-onset recurrent fever flares and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). Functional analyses demonstrated spontaneous inflammasome formation and production of the inflammasome-dependent cytokines IL-1? and IL-18, with the latter exceeding the levels seen in CAPS. The NLRC4 mutation caused constitutive caspase-1 cleavage in cells transduced with mutant NLRC4 and increased production of IL-18 in both patient-derived and mutant NLRC4-transduced macrophages. Thus, we describe a new monoallelic inflammasome defect that expands the monogenic autoinflammatory disease spectrum to include MAS and suggests new targets for therapy. PMID:25217959

  2. An activating NLRC4 inflammasome mutation causes autoinflammation with recurrent macrophage activation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canna, Scott W.; de Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Gouni, Sushanth; Brooks, Stephen R.; Marrero, Bernadette; Liu, Yin; DiMattia, Michael A.; Zaal, Kristien J.M.; Montealegre Sanchez, Gina A.; Kim, Hanna; Chapelle, Dawn; Plass, Nicole; Huang, Yan; Villarino, Alejandro V.; Biancotto, Angelique; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Duncan, Joseph A.; O’Shea, John J; Benseler, Susanne; Grom, Alexei; Deng, Zuoming; Laxer, Ronald M; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes are innate immune sensors that respond to pathogen and damage-associated signals with caspase-1 activation, IL-1β and IL-18 secretion, and macrophage pyroptosis. The discovery that dominant gain-of-function mutations in NLRP3 cause the Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) and trigger spontaneous inflammasome activation and IL-1β oversecretion, led to successful treatment with IL-1 blocking agents1. Herein, we report a de novo missense mutation, c.1009A>T, p.Thr337Ser, in the nucleotide-binding domain of inflammasome component NLRC4 (IPAF/CARD12) that causes early-onset recurrent fever flares and Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS). Functional analyses demonstrated spontaneous inflammasome formation and production of the inflammasome-dependent cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, the latter exceeding levels in CAPS. The NLRC4 mutation caused constitutive caspase-1 cleavage in transduced cells and increased production of IL-18 by both patient and NLRC4 mutant macrophages. Thus, we describe a novel monoallelic inflammasome defect that expands the monogenic autoinflammatory disease spectrum to include MAS and suggests novel targets for therapy. PMID:25217959

  3. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  4. PGC-1? suppresses saturated fatty acid-induced macrophage inflammation by inhibiting TAK1 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongen; Liu, Yan; Li, Di; Song, Jiayi; Xia, Min

    2016-02-01

    Inflammation of infiltrated macrophages in adipose tissue is a key contributor to the initiation of adipose insulin resistance. These macrophages are exposed to high local concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) and can be proinflammatory activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs). However, the regulatory mechanisms on SFA-induced macrophage inflammation are still elusive. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? coactivator-1? (PGC-1?) is a member of the PGC-1 family of transcriptional coactivators and has been reported to play a key role in SFAs metabolism and in the regulation of inflammatory signaling. However, it remains unclear whether PGC-1? is involved in SFA-induced macrophage inflammation. In this study, we found that PGC-1? expression was significantly decreased in response to palmitic acid (PA) in macrophages in a dose dependent manner. PGC-1? inhibited PA induced TNF?, MCP-1, and IL-1? mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, PGC-1? significantly antagonized PA induced macrophage nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) p65 and JUN N-terminal kinase activation. Mechanistically, we revealed that TGF-?-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its adaptor protein TAK1 binding protein 1 (TAB1) played a dominant role in the regulatory effects of PGC-1?. We confirmed that PGC-1? inhibited downstream inflammatory signals via binding with TAB1 and thus preventing TAB1/TAK1 binding and TAK1 activation. Finally, we showed that PGC-1? overexpression in PA treated macrophages improved adipocytes PI3K-Akt insulin signaling in a paracrine fashion. Collectively, our results uncovered a novel mechanism on how macrophage inflammation induced by SFAs was regulated and suggest a potential target in the treatment of obesity induced insulin resistance. 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(2):145-155, 2016. PMID:26748475

  5. Differential macrophage activation alters the expression profile of NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Rafael Fernandes; Braganhol, Elizandra; Bergamin, Letcia Scussel; Campesato, Lus Felipe Ingrassia; Filho, Alfeu Zanotto; Moreira, Jos Cludio Fonseca; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Svigny, Jean; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina; de Souza Wyse, Angela Terezinha; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are key elements in the inflammatory process, whereas depending on the micro-environmental stimulation they exhibit a pro-inflammatory (classical/M1) or an anti-inflammatory/reparatory (alternative/M2) phenotype. Extracellular ATP can act as a danger signal whereas adenosine generally serves as a negative feedback mechanism to limit inflammation. The local increase in nucleotides communication is controlled by ectonucleotidases, such as members of the ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) family and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5'-NT). In the present work we evaluated the presence of these enzymes in resident mice M1 (macrophages stimulated with LPS), and M2 (macrophages stimulated with IL-4) macrophages. Macrophages were collected by a lavage of the mice (6-8 weeks) peritoneal cavity and treated for 24 h with IL-4 (10 ng/mL) or LPS (10 ng/mL). Nitrite concentrations were measured using the Greiss reaction. Supernatants were harvested to determine cytokines and the ATPase, ADPase and AMPase activities were determined by the malachite green method and HPLC analysis. The expression of selected surface proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry. The results reveal that M1 macrophages presented a decreased ATP and AMP hydrolysis in agreement with a decrease in NTPDase1, -3 and ecto-5'-nucleotidase expression compared to M2. In contrast, M2 macrophages showed a higher ATP and AMP hydrolysis and increased NTPDase1, -3 and ecto-5'-nucleotidase expression compared to M1 macrophages. Therefore, macrophages of the M1 phenotype lead to an accumulation of ATP while macrophages of the M2 phenotype may rapidly convert ATP to adenosine. The results also showed that P1 and P2 purinoreceptors present the same mRNA profile in both phenotypes. In addition, M2 macrophages, which have a higher ATPase activity, were less sensitive to cell death. In conclusion, these changes in ectoenzyme activities might allow macrophages to adjust the outcome of the extracellular purinergic cascade in order to fine-tune their functions during the inflammatory set. PMID:22348056

  6. Functional Activity of Monocytes and Macrophages in HTLV-1 Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Camila F.; Souza, Anselmo S.; Diniz, Angela G.; Carvalho, Natlia B.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2014-01-01

    The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC), 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS) not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-? and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the increasing inflammatory activity of macrophages was similar in HAM/TSP patients and HC and it was related to HTLV-1 proviral load rather than the high IFN-? production observed in these subjects. PMID:25521499

  7. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  8. The M1 and M2 paradigm of macrophage activation: time for reassessment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are endowed with a variety of receptors for lineage-determining growth factors, T helper (Th) cell cytokines, and B cell, host, and microbial products. In tissues, macrophages mature and are activated in a dynamic response to combinations of these stimuli to acquire specialized functional phenotypes. As for the lymphocyte system, a dichotomy has been proposed for macrophage activation: classic vs. alternative, also M1 and M2, respectively. In view of recent research about macrophage functions and the increasing number of immune-relevant ligands, a revision of the model is needed. Here, we assess how cytokines and pathogen signals influence their functional phenotypes and the evidence for M1 and M2 functions and revisit a paradigm initially based on the role of a restricted set of selected ligands in the immune response. PMID:24669294

  9. Hydroxysafflor yellow A attenuates ischemia/reperfusion-induced liver injury by suppressing macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shujun; Shi, Zhen; Li, Changyong; Ma, Chunlei; Bai, Xianyong; Wang, Chaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a major constituent in the hydrophilic fraction of the safflower plant, can retard the progress of hepatic fibrosis. However, the anti-inflammatory properties and the underlying mechanisms of HSYA on I/R-induced acute liver injury are unknown. Inhibiting macrophage activation is a potential strategy to treat liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of HSYA on liver I/R injury and the direct effect of HSYA on macrophage activation following inflammatory conditions. The therapeutic effects of HSYA on I/R injury were tested in vivo using a mouse model of segmental (70%) hepatic ischemia. The mechanisms of HSYA were examined in vitro by evaluating migration and the cytokine expression profile of the macrophage cell line RAW264.7 exposed to acute hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R). Results showed that mice pretreated with HSYA had reduced serum transaminase levels, attenuated inflammation and necrosis, reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, and less macrophage recruitment following segmental hepatic ischemia. In vitro HSYA pretreated RAW264.7 macrophages displayed reduced migratory response and produced less inflammatory cytokines. In addition, HSYA pretreatment down-regulated the expression of matrix matalloproteinase-9 and reactive oxygen species, and inhibited NF-?B activation and P38 phosphorylation in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, these data suggest that HSYA can reduce I/R-induced acute liver injury by directly attenuating macrophage activation under inflammatory conditions. PMID:24966974

  10. Significant Correlation between TLR2 Agonist Activity and TNF-? Induction in J774.A1 Macrophage Cells by Different Medicinal Mushroom Products.

    PubMed

    Coy, Catherine; Standish, Leanna J; Bender, Geoff; Lu, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    In the US market, there is a variety of mushroom preparations available, even within the same species of mushroom. Nonetheless, little is known about whether species or the various extraction methods affect biological activity and potency of the immune modulatory activity of mushroom extracts. After discovering that protein-bound polysaccharide-K, a hot water extract from Trametes versicolor, was a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 agonist that stimulates both innate and adaptive immunity, this study was initiated to evaluate whether other medicinal mushroom products also have TLR2 agonist activity and immune-enhancing potential as measured by the induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? in J774.A1 murine macrophage cells. Furthermore, the products were divided by extraction method and species to determine whether these factors affect their immunomodulatory activity. The results showed that the majority (75%) of mushroom products tested had TLR2 agonist activity and that there was a significant correlation between TLR2 agonist activity and TNF-? induction potential in the mushroom products analyzed. In addition, the data demonstrated that hot water mushroom extracts are more potent than ground mushroom products in activating TLR2 and inducing TNF-?. These data provide evidence that extraction methods may affect the biological activity of mushroom products; thus, further studies are warranted to investigate the structural differences between various mushroom products. PMID:26559858

  11. Macrophages activation and nitric oxide alterations in mice treated with Pleurotus florida.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Tooba; Yaraee, Roya; Farahnejad, Zohre; Rahmati, Batool; Hakimzadeh, Hoda

    2010-03-01

    Macrophages play an essential role against invading pathogen and malignancies. The present study addresses the in vivo effect of P.florida extract on nitric oxide (NO) production and cell viability of macrophages. Forty Balb/c mice were divided to 8 groups and were treated with different doses of P. florida aqueous extract. MTT test has been performed in order to evaluate viability of intraperitoneal macrophages and Griess method to measure NO production of macrophages. The results indicated that cell viability of macrophages significantly increased by oral administration of P. florida with 200, 500 and 1000mg/kg/day. Also, NO production significantly increased by oral administration of doses of 500 and 1000mg/kg/day of P. florida. but i.p. injection of P. florida with 10,20,50,100mg/kg/day significantly decreased NO production by macrophages. This study showed a macrophage activator function for P. florida and also may confirms its anti inflammatory role. Further studies are needed to address effective phytochemicals of this edible mushroom and their mechanisms. PMID:19697991

  12. Hypoxia Potentiates Palmitate-induced Pro-inflammatory Activation of Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Ryan G; Bo, Marcel; Zezina, Ekaterina; Weigert, Andreas; Dehne, Nathalie; Fleming, Ingrid; Brne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation and obesity-induced insulin resistance. Recent studies have shown that adipose tissue hypoxia promotes an inflammatory phenotype in ATMs. However, our understanding of how hypoxia modulates the response of ATMs to free fatty acids within obese adipose tissue is limited. We examined the effects of hypoxia (1% O2) on the pro-inflammatory responses of human monocyte-derived macrophages to the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Compared with normoxia, hypoxia significantly increased palmitate-induced mRNA expression and protein secretion of IL-6 and IL-1?. Although palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and nuclear factor ?B pathway activation were not enhanced by hypoxia, hypoxia increased the activation of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in palmitate-treated cells. Inhibition of JNK blocked the hypoxic induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, whereas knockdown of hypoxia-induced transcription factors HIF-1? and HIF-2? alone or in combination failed to reduce IL-6 and only modestly reduced IL-1? gene expression in palmitate-treated hypoxic macrophages. Enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and JNK activity under hypoxia were prevented by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, silencing of dual-specificity phosphatase 16 increased normoxic levels of IL-6 and IL-1? and reduced the hypoxic potentiation in palmitate-treated macrophages. The secretome of hypoxic palmitate-treated macrophages promoted IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 expression in primary human adipocytes, which was sensitive to macrophage JNK inhibition. Our results reveal that the coexistence of hypoxia along with free fatty acids exacerbates macrophage-mediated inflammation. PMID:26578520

  13. Pulmonary Infection with an Interferon-?-Producing Cryptococcus neoformans Strain Results in Classical Macrophage Activation and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, Sarah E.; Ravi, Sailatha; Wozniak, Karen L.; Young, Mattie L.; Olszewski, Michal A.; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2010-01-01

    Alternative macrophage activation is associated with exacerbated disease in murine models of pulmonary cryptococcosis. The present study evaluated the efficacy of interferon-? transgene expression by Cryptococcus neoformans strain H99? in abrogating alternative macrophage activation in infected mice. Macrophage recruitment into the lungs of mice after infection with C. neoformans strain H99? was comparable with that observed in mice challenged with wild-type C. neoformans. However, pulmonary infection in mice with C. neoformans strain H99? was associated with reduced pulmonary fungal burden, increased pulmonary Th1-type and interleukin-17 cytokine production, and classical macrophage activation as evidenced by increased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, histological evidence of enhanced macrophage fungicidal activity, and resolution of inflammation. In contrast, progressive pulmonary infection, enhanced Th2-type cytokine production, and the induction of alternatively activated macrophages expressing arginase-1, found in inflammatory zone 1, Ym1, and macrophage mannose receptor were observed in the lungs of mice infected with wild-type C. neoformans. These alternatively activated macrophages were also shown to harbor highly encapsulated, replicating cryptococci. Our results demonstrate that pulmonary infection with C. neoformans strain H99? results in the induction of classically activated macrophages and promotes fungal clearance. These studies indicate that phenotype, as opposed to quantity, of infiltrating macrophages correlates with protection against pulmonary C. neoformans infection. PMID:20056835

  14. Short communication: Activating stimuli enhance immunotoxin-mediated killing of HIV-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Xu, Jie; Hamer, Dean; Zack, Jerome A

    2008-11-01

    Abstract Strategies for purging persistent reservoirs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals may be enhanced by including agents that specifically kill virus-expressing cells. Anti-HIV envelope immunotoxins (ITs) represent one class of candidate molecules that could fulfill this function. We have previously utilized an anti-gp120 IT in conjunction with various stimulants to kill latently infected T cells ex vivo. Here we show that primary macrophages expressing HIV Env are relatively refractory to killing by IT when used alone. However, including stimulants such as prostratin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to increase HIV gene expression in infected macrophages enhanced IT-mediated killing. Therefore, "activation-elimination" strategies similar to those proposed for purging the latent HIV reservoir may prove useful in clearing chronically infected macrophages in vivo. PMID:19000022

  15. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. ?-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p?activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p?macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal biocompatibility, specifically through the quantification of cell-surface markers of leukocyte activation. PMID:25281645

  16. Guinea pig neutrophils infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis produce cytokines which activate alveolar macrophages in noncontact cultures.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Kirti V; McMurray, David N

    2007-04-01

    The early influx of neutrophils to the site of infection may be an important step in host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of M. tuberculosis infection on the ability of guinea pig neutrophils to produce interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and to activate alveolar macrophages. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were isolated from naïve guinea pigs, cultured together or alone, and infected with virulent M. tuberculosis for 3, 12, and 24 h. IL-8 protein production in cocultures, as measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was found to be additive at 24 h and significantly greater in M. tuberculosis-infected cocultures than in uninfected cocultures and in cultures of the infected neutrophils or macrophages alone. The IL-8 mRNA levels, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, were elevated at 24 h in infected cocultures and infected cells cultured alone. In order to elucidate the contributions of neutrophils and their soluble mediators to the activation of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were cultured in a contact-independent manner by using a Transwell insert system. Neutrophils were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis in the upper wells, and alveolar macrophages were cultured in the lower wells. The release of hydrogen peroxide from alveolar macrophages exposed to soluble products from infected neutrophils was significantly increased compared to that from unexposed alveolar macrophages. Significant up-regulation of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA levels in alveolar macrophages was observed at 24 and 30 h, respectively, compared to those in cells not exposed to soluble neutrophil products. Treatment with anti-guinea pig TNF-alpha polyclonal antibody completely abolished the response of alveolar macrophages to neutrophil products. This finding suggests that TNF-alpha produced by infected neutrophils may be involved in the activation of alveolar macrophages and hence may contribute to the containment of M. tuberculosis infection during the early period of infection. PMID:17283104

  17. Macrophage polarization in response to oral commensals and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chifu B; Alimova, Yelena; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages have been identified in the periodontium. Data have phenotypically described these cells, demonstrated changes with progressing periodontal disease, and identified their ability to function in antigen-presentation critical for adaptive immune responses to individual oral bacterium. Recent evidence has emphasized an important role for the plasticity of macrophage phenotypes, not only in the resulting function of these cells in various tissues, but also clear differences in the stimulatory signals that result in M1 (classical activation, inflammatory) and M2 (alternative activation/deactivated, immunomodulatory) cells. This investigation hypothesized that the oral pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induce M1-type cells, while oral commensal bacteria primarily elicit macrophage functions consistent with an M2 phenotype. However, we observed that the M1 output from P. gingivalis challenge, showed exaggerated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, with a much lower production of chemokines related to T-cell recruitment. This contrasted with A. actinomycetemcomitans infection that increased both the pro-inflammatory cytokines and T-cell chemokines. Thus, it appears that P. gingivalis, as an oral pathogen, may have a unique capacity to alter the programming of the M1 macrophage resulting in a hyperinflammatory environment and minimizing the ability for T-cell immunomodulatory influx into the lesions. PMID:26884502

  18. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates IL-10-mediated antiinflammatory signaling pathways in macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanfang Peipei; Brown, Jonathan R.; Sag, Duygu; Zhang, Lihua; Suttles, Jill

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK, is a conserved serine/threonine kinase with a critical function in the regulation of metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells. Recently, AMPK has been shown to play an additional role as a regulator of inflammatory activity in leukocytes. Treatment of macrophages with chemical AMPK activators, or forced expression of a constitutively active form of AMPK, results in polarization to an antiinflammatory phenotype. Additionally, we reported previously that stimulation of macrophages with antiinflammatory cytokines such as IL-10, IL-4 and TGF-? results in rapid activation of AMPK, suggesting that AMPK contributes to the suppressive function of these cytokines. In the current study we investigated the role of AMPK in IL-10-induced gene expression and antiinflammatory function. IL-10-stimulated wild-type macrophages displayed rapid activation of PI3K and its downstream targets Akt and mTORC1, an effect that was not seen in macrophages generated from AMPK?1-deficient mice. AMPK activation was not impacted by treatment with either the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or the JAK inhibitor CP-690550, suggesting that IL-10-mediated activation of AMPK is independent of PI3K and JAK activity. IL-10 induced phosphorylation of both Tyr705 and Ser727 residues of STAT3 in an AMPK?1-dependent manner, and these phosphorylation events were blocked by inhibition of CaMKK?, an upstream activator of AMPK, and by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, respectively. The impaired STAT3 phosphorylation in response to IL-10 observed in AMPK?1-deficient macrophages was accompanied by reduced SOCS3 expression and an inadequacy of IL-10 to suppress LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Overall, our data demonstrate that AMPK?1 is required for IL-10 activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and STAT3-mediated antiinflammatory pathways regulating macrophage functional polarization. PMID:25512602

  20. Signal transduction activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) dysfunction in autoimmune monocytes and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Litherland, S.A.; Xie, T.X.; Grebe, K.M.; Davoodi-Semiromi, A.; Elf, J.; Belkin, N.S.; Moldawer, L.L.; Clare-Salzler, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Autocrine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) sequentially activates intracellular components in monocyte/macrophage production of the pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory prostanoid, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). GM-CSF first induces STAT5 signaling protein phosphorylation, then prostaglandin synthase 2 (COX2/PGS2) gene expression, and finally IL-10 production, to downregulate the cascade. Without activation, monocytes of at-risk, type 1 diabetic (T1D), and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) humans, and macrophages of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have aberrantly high GM-CSF, PGS2, and PGE2 expression, but normal levels of IL-10. After GM-CSF stimulation, repressor STAT5A and B isoforms (80–77 kDa) in autoimmune human and NOD monocytes and activator STAT5A (96–94 kDa) and B (94–92 kDa) isoforms in NOD macrophages stay persistently tyrosine phosphorylated. This STAT5 phosphorylation persisted despite treatment in vitro with IL-10, anti-GM-CSF antibody, or the JAK2/3 inhibitor, AG490. Phosphorylated STAT5 repressor isoforms in autoimmune monocytes had diminished DNA binding capacity on GAS sequences found in the PGS2 gene enhancer. In contrast, STAT5 activator isoforms in NOD macrophages retained their DNA binding capacity on these sites much longer than in healthy control strain macrophages. These findings suggest that STAT5 dysfunction may contribute to dysregulation of GM-CSF signaling and gene activation, including PGS2, in autoimmune monocytes and macrophages. PMID:15927792

  1. Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Inflammatory Signaling Cascade in LPS-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Alencar, Severino M.; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies suggested an anti-inflammatory property of Brazilian red propolis (BRP), the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of BRP and its activity on macrophages were still not elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether BRP attenuates the inflammatory effect of LPS on macrophages and to investigate its underlying mechanisms. BRP was added to RAW 264.7 murine macrophages after activation with LPS. NO production, cell viability, cytokines profile were evaluated. Activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and macrophage polarization were determined by RT-qPCR and Western blot. BRP at 50 μg/ml inhibited NO production by 78% without affecting cell viability. Cd80 and Cd86 were upregulated whereas mrc1 was down regulated by BRP indicating macrophage polarization at M1. BRP attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-12, GM-CSF, IFN-Ɣ, IL-1β in cell supernatants although levels of TNF- α and IL-6 were slightly increased after BRP treatment. Levels of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β were also reduced by BRP. BRP significantly reduced the up-regulation promoted by LPS of transcription of genes in inflammatory signaling (Pdk1, Pak1, Nfkb1, Mtcp1, Gsk3b, Fos and Elk1) and of Il1β and Il1f9 (fold-change rate > 5), which were further confirmed by the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the upstream adaptor MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal), also known as TIRAP, involved in TLR2 and TLR4 signaling, was down- regulated in BRP treated LPS-activated macrophages. Given that BRP inhibited multiple signaling pathways in macrophages involved in the inflammatory process activated by LPS, our data indicated that BRP is a noteworthy food-source for the discovery of new bioactive compounds and a potential candidate to attenuate exhacerbated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26660901

  2. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation of Nrf2 independently of Keap1 and NF-κB, suggesting a unique therapeutic potential of dh404 for specific targeting a Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflammation.

  3. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-?B

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-?, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-?B activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization. PMID:26664149

  4. Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-?B.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yulong; Wang, Baikui; Xu, Xin; Du, Wei; Li, Weifen; Wang, Youming

    2015-01-01

    The roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza species (licorice) have been widely used as natural sweeteners and herbal medicines. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice on macrophage polarization. Both phenotypic and functional activities of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) treated by GA were assessed. Our results showed that GA obviously increased the cell surface expression of CD80, CD86, and MHCII molecules. Meanwhile, GA upregulated the expression of CCR7 and the production of TNF-?, IL-12, IL-6, and NO (the markers of classically activated (M1) macrophages), whereas it downregulated the expression of MR, Ym1, and Arg1 (the markers of alternatively activated (M2) macrophage). The functional tests showed that GA dramatically enhanced the uptake of FITC-dextran and E. coli K88 by BMDMs and decreased the intracellular survival of E. coli K88 and S. typhimurium. Moreover, we demonstrated that JNK and NF-?B activation are required for GA-induced NO and M1-related cytokines production, while ERK1/2 pathway exhibits a regulatory effect via induction of IL-10. Together, these findings indicated that GA promoted polarization of M1 macrophages and enhanced its phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity. The results expanded our knowledge about the role of GA in macrophage polarization. PMID:26664149

  5. Nitroarachidonic acid prevents NADPH oxidase assembly and superoxide radical production in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Perilli, Luca; lvarez, Mara Noel; Prolo, Carolina; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andrs

    2013-05-01

    Nitration of arachidonic acid (AA) to nitroarachidonic acid (AANO2) leads to anti-inflammatory intracellular activities during macrophage activation. However, less is known about the capacity of AANO2 to regulate the production of reactive oxygen species under proinflammatory conditions. One of the immediate responses upon macrophage activation involves the production of superoxide radical (O2(-)) due to the NADPH-dependent univalent reduction of oxygen to O2(-) by the phagocytic NADPH oxidase isoform (NOX2), the activity of NOX2 being the main source of O2(-) in monocytes/macrophages. Because the NOX2 and AA pathways are connected, we propose that AANO2 can modulate macrophage activation by inhibiting O2(-) formation by NOX2. When macrophages were activated in the presence of AANO2, a significant inhibition of NOX2 activity was observed as evaluated by cytochrome c reduction, luminol chemiluminescence, Amplex red fluorescence, and flow cytometry; this process also occurs under physiological mimic conditions within the phagosomes. AANO2 decreased O2(-) production in a dose- (IC50=4.11.8 ?M AANO2) and time-dependent manner. The observed inhibition was not due to a decreased phosphorylation of the cytosolic subunits (e.g., p40(phox) and p47(phox)), as analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blot. However, a reduction in the migration to the membrane of p47(phox) was obtained, suggesting that the protective actions involve the prevention of the correct assembly of the active enzyme in the membrane. Finally, the observed in vitro effects were confirmed in an in vivo inflammatory model, in which subcutaneous injection of AANO2 was able to decrease NOX2 activity in macrophages from thioglycolate-treated mice. PMID:23318789

  6. Nitroarachidonic acid prevents NADPH oxidase assembly and superoxide radical production in activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González-Perilli, Lucía; Álvarez, María Noel; Prolo, Carolina; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Nitration of arachidonic acid (AA) to nitroarachidonic acid (AANO2) leads to anti-inflammatory intracellular activities during macrophage activation. However, less is known about the capacity of AANO2 to regulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under pro-inflammatory conditions. One of the immediate responses upon macrophage activation involves the production of superoxide radical (O2·−), due to the NADPH dependent univalent reduction of oxygen to O2·− by the phagocytic NADPH-oxidase isoform (NOX2), being the activity of NOX2 the main source of O2·− in monocytes/macrophages. Since NOX2 and AA pathways are connected, we propose that AANO2can modulate macrophage activation by inhibiting O2·− formation by NOX2. When macrophages were activated in the presence of AANO2, a significant inhibition of NOX2 activity was observed as evaluated by cytochrome c reduction, luminol chemiluminescence, Amplex Red fluorescence and flow cytometry; this process also occurs in physiological mimic conditions within the phagosomes. AANO2 decreased O2·− production in a dose-(IC50= 4.1 ± 1.8 μM AANO2) and time-dependent manner. The observed inhibition was not due to a decreased phosphorylation of the cytosolic subunits (e.g. p40phox and p47phox), as analyzed by immunoprecipitation and western blot. However, a reduction of the migration to the membrane of p47phox was obtained suggesting that the protective actions involve the prevention of the correct assembly of the active enzyme in the membrane. Finally, the observed in vitro effects were confirmed in an in vivo inflammatory model, where subcutaneous injection of AANO2 was able to decrease NOX2 activity in macrophages from thioglycolate treated mice. PMID:23318789

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of latent transforming growth factor-beta1 activation by stimulated macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, H.; Vodovotz, Y.; Cox, G. W.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta) is secreted in a latent form consisting of mature TGF-beta noncovalently associated with its amino-terminal propeptide, which is called latency associated peptide (LAP). Biological activity depends upon the release of TGF-beta from the latent complex following extracellular activation, which appears to be the key regulatory mechanism controlling TGF-beta action. We have identified two events associated with latent TGF-beta (LTGF-beta) activation in vivo: increased immunoreactivity of certain antibodies that specifically detect TGF-beta concomitant with decreased immunoreactivity of antibodies to LAP. Macrophages stimulated in vitro with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide reportedly activate LTGF-beta via cell membrane-bound protease activity. We show through dual immunostaining of paraformaldehyde-fixed macrophages that such physiological TGF-beta activation is accompanied by a loss of LAP immunoreactivity with concomitant revelation of TGF-beta epitopes. The induction of TGF-beta immunoreactivity colocalized with immunoreactive betaglycan/RIII in activated macrophages, suggesting that LTGF-beta activation occurs on the cell surface. Confocal microscopy of metabolically active macrophages incubated with antibodies to TGF-beta and betaglycan/RIII prior to fixation supported the localization of activation to the cell surface. The ability to specifically detect and localize LTGF-beta activation provides an important tool for studies of its regulation.

  8. Transgenic expression of salmon delta-5 and delta-6 desaturase in zebrafish muscle inhibits the growth of Vibrio alginolyticus and affects fish immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Da; Peng, Kuan-Chieh; Wu, Jen-Leih; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2014-08-01

    Marine fish are an important nutritional source for highly polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). PUFA biosynthesis requires the following key enzymes: delta-4 (?-4) desaturase, delta-5 (?-5) desaturase, delta-6 (?-6) desaturase, delta-5 (?-5) elongase, and delta-6 (?-6) elongase. The effect of overexpressing delta-5 desaturase and/or delta-6 desaturase in zebrafish muscle has not previously been reported. Herein, we investigated the effects of these proteins on antibacterial and immunomodulatory activity in transgenic zebrafish infected with Vibrio alginolyticus. Overexpression of delta-5 and delta-6 desaturase enhanced antibacterial activity at 4 and 12 h after injection of bacteria into muscle, as compared to controls. Furthermore, expression of immune-related genes (IL-1?, IL-22, and TNF-?) was observed to be altered in transgenic fish after 4 h of bacterial infection, resulting in a significant decrease in the inflammatory response, as compared to control fish. These results demonstrate that muscle-specific expression of transgenic desaturases in zebrafish not only enhance PUFA production, but also enhance antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity. Overall, these results identify delta-5 and delta-6 desaturase as novel candidate genes for use in aquaculture, to enhance both disease resistance and fish oil production. PMID:24811009

  9. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  10. IRAK-M promotes alternative macrophage activation and fibroproliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, Megan N.; Newstead, Michael W.; Zeng, Xianying; Bhan, Urvashi; Mo, Xiaokui M.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Moore, Bethany B.; Flavell, Richard; Christman, John W.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disease characterized by inflammation and the development of excessive extracellular matrix deposition. Currently, there are only limited therapeutic intervenes to offer patients diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis. While previous studies focused on structural cells in promoting fibrosis, our study assessed the contribution of macrophages. Recently, toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling has been identified as a regulator of pulmonary fibrosis. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a MyD88-dependent inhibitor of TLR signaling, suppresses deleterious inflammation, but may paradoxically promote fibrogenesis. Mice deficient in IRAK-M (IRAK-M?/?) were protected against bleomycin-induced fibrosis and displayed diminished collagen deposition in association with reduced production of interleukin (IL)-13 compared to wild type (WT) control mice. Bone marrow (BM) chimera experiments indicated that IRAK-M expression by BM derived cells, rather than structural cells, promoted fibrosis. After bleomycin, WT macrophages displayed an alternatively activated phenotype, whereas IRAK-M?/? macrophages displayed higher expression of classically activated macrophage markers. Using an in vitro co-culture system, macrophages isolated from in vivo bleomycin-challenged WT, but not IRAK-M?/?, mice promoted increased collagen and ?-smooth muscle actin expression from lung fibroblasts in an IL-13-dependent fashion. Finally, IRAK-M expression is upregulated in peripheral blood cells from IPF patients and correlated with markers of alternative macrophage activation. These data indicate expression of IRAK-M skews lung macrophages towards an alternatively activated profibrotic phenotype, which promotes collagen production leading to the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25595781

  11. Enhancement of carrier-mediated transport after immunologic activation of peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bonventre, P F; Straus, D; Baughn, R E; Imhoff, J

    1977-05-01

    Immunologically activated peritoneal macrophages from inbred mice and Hartley strain guinea pigs demonstrate a markedly greater than normal transport of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and L-leucine. The degree of nutrilite transport enhancement was greatest when animals were injected with the appropriate eliciting antigens before harvesting and also, if antigen was included in the tissue culture medium during the initial hours of in vitro culture. Enhanced hexose and amino acid uptake could also be achieved by exposure of macrophages from nonimmunized animals for 48 hr to supernatants of sensitized splenic lymphocyte cultures incubated with specific antigens. The animal systems in which this phenomenon was observed included CBA/J and C57BL/6J mice immunized with Staphylococcus aureus or sub-lethal doses of Listeria monocytogens, and the Hartley strain, albino guinea pig immunized with S. aureus or BCG. In all cases, immunization resulted in a state of delayed hypersensitivity as measured by skin testing or footpad swelling. Splenic cell supernatants contained lymphokines as detected by the presence of macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), and by the supernatants' capacity to stimulate incorporation of 14C-glucosamine by macrophages in vitro. No increase of glucose or leucine transport by macrophages was observed in the absence of appropriate antigen stimulation in vivo or in vitro. We previously showed that a phagocytic stimulus results in a significant increase in hexose transport by normal macrophages; leucine transport by these same cells was unaltered after phagocytosis. In contrast, immunologically activated macrophages do not transport measurably more 2-deoxy-C-glucose after particle ingestion; activation or the phagocytic stimulus enhance 2-deoxy-C-glucose uptake to approximately the same extent. Analysis of nutrilite transport kinetics revealed that immunologic activation of macrophages increases the initial velocity (V1) and Vmax but does not change the Km values of hexose or amino acid transport. The kinetics of transport by the immunologically activated macrophages do not change measurably after phagocytosis. We conclude that either immunological activation or phagocytosis results in augmented 2-deoxy-D-glucose transport via identical or related mechanisms and that transport of the sugar can't be increased above that level induced by either event. The reasons why immunologic activation increases both glucose and leucine transport but phagocytosis increases only the former are not yet understood. PMID:404359

  12. Monoclonal antibodies detect monocyte/macrophage activation and differentiation antigens and identify functionally distinct subpopulations of human rheumatoid synovial tissue macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Burrows, J. C.; Skoutelis, A.; Marder, R.; Domer, P. H.; Anderson, B.; Leibovich, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to functionally heterogeneous populations of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissue macrophages and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated U937 cells were generated. These MAbs were used to characterize macrophages in situ in the synovial pannus and to study relative antigen expression on the surface of cells isolated from the synovium and from normal peripheral blood. Monoclonal antibody 3D8, an anti-CD13 MAb, reacts with an antigen expressed on the surface of blood monocytes and is a monocyte activation-related antigen that is upregulated by exposure of monocytes to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and LPS. The expression of the 3D8 antigen increases in parallel with MHC class II antigen expression and also is upregulated in culture as monocytes mature to macrophages. 3D8 antigen is expressed strongly on RA synovial tissue lining cells, which are thought to be composed of macrophages. 8D7 antigen expression, detected by MAb 8D7, increases on blood monocytes on cellular activation with LPS and interferon-gamma, but in contrast to the 3D8 antigen, does not increase with monocyte maturation in vitro. The 8D7 antigen is expressed differentially on density-defined macrophage subpopulations isolated from RA synovial tissue and is expressed more strongly on macrophages that are nonangiogenic than those that are angiogenic. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1987761

  13. Forced Activation of Notch in Macrophages Represses Tumor Growth by Upregulating miR-125a and Disabling Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Huang, Fei; He, Fei; Gao, Chun-Chen; Liang, Shi-Qian; Ma, Peng-Fei; Dong, Guang-Ying; Han, Hua; Qin, Hong-Yan

    2016-03-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) contribute greatly to hallmarks of cancer. Notch blockade was shown to arrest TAM differentiation, but the precise role and underlying mechanisms require elucidation. In this study, we employed a transgenic mouse model in which the Notch1 intracellular domain (NIC) is activated conditionally to define the effects of active Notch1 signaling in macrophages. NIC overexpression had no effect on TAM differentiation, but it abrogated TAM function, leading to repressed growth of transplanted tumors. Macrophage miRNA profiling identified a novel downstream mediator of Notch signaling, miR-125a, which was upregulated through an RBP-J-binding site at the first intronic enhancer of the host gene Spaca6A. miR-125a functioned downstream of Notch signaling to reciprocally influence polarization of M1 and M2 macrophages by regulating factor inhibiting hypoxia inducible factor-1α and IRF4, respectively. Notably, macrophages transfected with miR-125a mimetics increased phagocytic activity and repressed tumor growth by remodeling the immune microenvironment. We also identified a positive feedback loop for miR-125a expression mediated by RYBP and YY1. Taken together, our results showed that Notch signaling not only supported the differentiation of TAM but also antagonized their protumorigenic function through miR-125a. Targeting this miRNA may reprogram macrophages in the tumor microenvironment and restore their antitumor potential. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1403-15. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26759236

  14. Binding and activation of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient macrophages by staphylococcal exotoxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Macrophages from C2D transgenic mice deficient in the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II proteins were used to identify binding sites for superantigens distinct from the MHC class II molecule. Iodinated staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB) and exfoliative toxins A and B (ETA and ETB) bound to C2D macrophages in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner. All four toxins increased F-actin concentration within 30 s of their addition to C2D macrophages, indicating that signal transduction occurred in response to toxin in the absence of class II MHC. Furthermore, ETA, ETB, SEA, and, to a lesser extent, SEB induced C2D macrophages to produce interleukin 6. Several molecular species on C2D macrophages with molecular masses of 140, 97, 61, 52, 43, and 37 kDa bound SEA in immunoprecipitation experiments. These data indicate the presence of novel, functionally active toxin binding sites on murine macrophages distinct from MHC class II molecules.

  15. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages suppress PPAR? activity in Adipocytes via S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ruiying; Fang, Li; Li, Yingjia; Xue, Peng; Li, Yazi; Guan, Youfei; Chang, Yongsheng; Chen, Chang; Wang, Nanping

    2015-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor and plays an essential role in insulin signaling. Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue is a character of metabolic inflammation and closely related to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. The mechanism by which pro-inflammatory macrophages cause insulin resistance remains to be elucidated. Here we showed that co-culture with macrophages significantly suppressed the transcriptional activity of PPAR? on its target genes in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and diabetic primary adipocytes, depending on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We further showed that PPAR? underwent S-nitrosylation in response to nitrosative stress. Mass-spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that S-nitrosylation at cysteine 168 was responsible for the impairment of PPAR? function. Extended exposure to NO instigated the proteasome-dependent degradation of PPAR?. Consistently, in vivo evidence revealed an association of the decreased PPAR? protein level with increased macrophage infiltration in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of obese diabetic db/db mice. Together, our results demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages suppressed PPAR? activity in adipocytes via S-nitrosylation, suggesting a novel mechanism linking metabolic inflammation with insulin resistance. PMID:26475041

  16. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Shape Transition towards an Atypical Elongated Phenotype by Histone Deacetylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cabanel, Mariana; Brand, Camila; Oliveira-Nunes, Maria Cecilia; Cabral-Piccin, Mariela Pires; Lopes, Marcela Freitas; Brito, Jose Marques; de Oliveira, Felipe Leite

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory chronic pathologies are complex processes characterized by an imbalance between the resolution of the inflammatory phase and the establishment of tissue repair. The main players in these inflammatory pathologies are bone marrow derived monocytes (BMDMs). However, how monocyte differentiation is modulated to give rise to specific macrophage subpopulations (M1 or M2) that may either maintain the chronic inflammatory process or lead to wound healing is still unclear. Considering that inhibitors of Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) have an anti-inflammatory activity, we asked whether this enzyme would play a role on monocyte differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotype and in the cell shape transition that follows. We then induced murine bone marrow progenitors into monocyte/macrophage differentiation pathway using media containing GM-CSF and the HDAC blocker, Trichostatin A (TSA). We found that the pharmacological inhibition of HDAC activity led to a shape transition from the typical macrophage pancake-like shape into an elongated morphology, which was correlated to a mixed M1/M2 profile of cytokine and chemokine secretion. Our results present, for the first time, that HDAC activity acts as a regulator of macrophage differentiation in the absence of lymphocyte stimuli. We propose that HDAC activity down regulates macrophage plasticity favoring the pro-inflammatory phenotype. PMID:26196676

  17. Macrophage activation, phagocytosis and intracellular calcium oscillations induced by scorpion toxins from Tityus serrulatus

    PubMed Central

    Petricevich, V L; Reynaud, E; Cruz, A H; Possani, L D

    2008-01-01

    The research described here is focused upon studying the activation of mice peritoneal macrophages when submitted to in vitro effects of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom and its major toxic peptides. Several functional events were analysed, such as: cytotoxicity, spreading, extent of phagocytosis, vacuole formation and changes of internal calcium concentration. Among the main results observed, when macrophages are subjected to the effects of soluble venom of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom, a partially purified fraction (FII) or a pure toxin (Ts1), are an increment in the percentage of phagocytosis and vacuole formation, a decrement of the spreading ability, accompanied by oscillations of internal calcium concentration. The net results demonstrate that scorpion venom or its major toxins are effective stimulators of macrophage activity; the effect of whole soluble venom or partially purified fractions is due to the toxic peptides, seen here clearly with Ts1. The possible involvement of Na+-channels in these events is discussed. A basic understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for macrophage activation should serve as a foundation for novel drug development aimed at modulating macrophage activity. PMID:19037924

  18. The immunostimulating activity of quercetin 3-O-xyloside in murine macrophages via activation of the ASK1/MAPK/NF-?B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisun; Choi, Ji Won; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Park, Yong Il

    2016-02-01

    Quercetin is a natural plant flavonoid that has been reported to possess a wide range of beneficial health effects, including anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Glycosylation of natural flavonoids with various sugar moieties can affect their physical, chemical, and biological properties. In this study, quercetin 3-O-xyloside (Quer-xyl) was enzymatically synthesized, and the immunomodulatory activities of quercetin and Quer-xyl were evaluated and compared. The results showed that Quer-xyl more effectively induced the secretion of TNF-? and IL-6 than quercetin by 2.5 and 1.5-fold, respectively. Quer-xyl dose-dependently induced the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and increased the production of nitric oxide (NO) 1.3-fold more than quercetin. Quer-xyl also increased the phosphorylation of ASK1 and MAPKs (JNK and p38). Treatment with NQDI-1 (an inhibitor of ASK1) significantly attenuated the Quer-xyl-induced up-regulation of TNF-? secretion. The activation and subsequent nuclear translocation of NF-?B were substantially enhanced upon treatment with Quer-xyl (2.5-20?M), while NQDI-1 treatment blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-?B. These results demonstrated that Quer-xyl can enhance the early innate immunity more effectively than quercetin by activating macrophages to secrete TNF-? and IL-6 through up-regulation of the redox-dependent ASK1/MAPK/NF-?B signaling pathway, suggesting for the first time that Quer-xyl may represent a new immunostimulator. PMID:26709074

  19. Critical Role of Regulator G-Protein Signaling 10 (RGS10) in Modulating Macrophage M1/M2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Kyung; Chung, Jaegwon; Kannarkat, George T.; Tansey, Malú G.

    2013-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 10 (RGS10), a GTPase accelerating protein (GAP) for G alpha subunits, is a negative regulator of NF-κB in microglia. Here, we investigated the role of RGS10 in macrophages, a closely related myeloid-derived cell type. Features of classical versus alternative activation were assessed in Rgs10-/- peritoneal and bone marrow-derived macrophages upon LPS or IL-4 treatments, respectively. Our results showed that Rgs10-/- macrophages produced higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF, IL-1β and IL-12p70 in response to LPS treatment and exerted higher cytotoxicity on dopaminergic MN9D neuroblastoma cells. We also found that Rgs10-/- macrophages displayed a blunted M2 phenotype upon IL-4 priming. Specifically, Rgs10-/- macrophages displayed lower YM1 and Fizz1 mRNA levels as measured by QPCR compared to wild type macrophages upon IL-4 treatment and this response was not attributable to differences in IL-4 receptor expression. Importantly, phagocytic activities of Rgs10-/- macrophages were blunted in response to IL-4 priming and/or LPS treatments. However, there was no difference in chemotaxis between Rgs10-/- and WT macrophages. Our data indicate that Rgs10-/- macrophages displayed dysregulated M1 responses along with blunted M2 alternative activation responses, suggesting that RGS10 plays an important role in determining macrophage activation responses. PMID:24278459

  20. Alternatively activated RAW264.7 macrophages enhance tumor lymphangiogenesis in mouse lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bicheng; Wang, Jun; Gao, Juan; Guo, Yan; Chen, Xi; Wang, Baocheng; Gao, Jianfei; Rao, Zhiguo; Chen, Zhengtang

    2009-05-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in promoting tumor progression and invasion. The onset and maintenance of tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis also seem to be partly driven by a group of polarized alternatively activated macrophages (aaMphi) in lung adenocarcinoma. Here, the aaMphi and classically activated macrophages (caMphi) were obtained using RAW264.7 cells via IL-4 and IFN-gamma + LPS treatment, respectively. Co-inoculation of aaMphi with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells promoted tumor growth, increased lymph node metastasis, and reduced the survival in C57BL/6 mice bearing LLC. Furthermore, the effects of the activated macrophages on the lymphangiogenesis-related properties of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) were investigated in vitro. When LECs were cultured in macrophages conditioned medium or in a co-culture system of macrophages and LECs, aaMphi significantly promoted proliferation, migration, and tube-like formation of LECs. We identified high VEGF-C expression in aaMphi and low expression in caMphi as well as unactivated macrophages by ELISA and Western blotting. In LECs, co-culture with aaMphi resulted in a significant increase of mRNA levels of specific lymphatic marker VEGF receptor-3 and the homeobox gene Prox-1, as well as lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C rather than VEGF-D by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, enhanced LECs migration and capillary formation by co-culture with aaMphi were significantly inhibited by rVEGF receptor-3/Fc chimera. In conclusion, these data show that aaMphi play a critical role in tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis through up-regulating VEGF-C and increasing lymphangiogenesis-related behavior of LECs, which may contribute to lymphatic invasion in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:19241443

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Induced Pulmonary Granulomatous Disease: Twist1 and Alveolar Macrophage M1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Barna, Barbara P.; Huizar, Isham; Malur, Anagha; McPeek, Matthew; Marshall, Irene; Jacob, Mark; Dobbs, Larry; Kavuru, Mani S.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown cause, has been linked to several environmental risk factors, among which are some that may favor carbon nanotube formation. Using gene array data, we initially observed that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from sarcoidosis patients displayed elevated mRNA of the transcription factor, Twist1, among many M1-associated genes compared to healthy controls. Based on this observation we hypothesized that Twist1 mRNA and protein expression might become elevated in alveolar macrophages from animals bearing granulomas induced by carbon nanotube instillation. To address this hypothesis, wild-type and macrophage-specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) knock out mice were given oropharyngeal instillation of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). BAL cells obtained 60 days later exhibited significantly elevated Twist1 mRNA expression in granuloma-bearing wild-type or PPAR? knock out alveolar macrophages compared to sham controls. Overall, Twist1 expression levels in PPAR? knock out mice were higher than those of wild-type. Concurrently, BAL cells obtained from sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls validated gene array data: qPCR and protein analysis showed significantly elevated Twist1 in sarcoidosis compared to healthy controls. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophages from healthy controls indicated that Twist1 was inducible by classical (M1) macrophage activation stimuli (LPS, TNF?) but not by IL-4, an inducer of alternative (M2) macrophage activation. Findings suggest that Twist1 represents a PPAR?-sensitive alveolar macrophage M1 biomarker which is induced by inflammatory granulomatous disease in the MWCNT model and in human sarcoidosis. PMID:24322444

  2. Monocyte/macrophage cytokine activity regulates vascular smooth muscle cell function within a degradable polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Battiston, K G; Ouyang, B; Labow, R S; Simmons, C A; Santerre, J P

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies rely on the ability to promote cell proliferation and migration into porous biomaterial constructs, as well as to support specific phenotypic states of the cells in vitro. The present study investigated the use of released factors from monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDM) and the mechanism by which they regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) response in a VSMC-monocyte co-culture system within a porous degradable polyurethane (D-PHI) scaffold. VSMCs cultured in monocyte/MDM-conditioned medium (MCM), generated from the culture of monocytes/MDM on D-PHI scaffolds for up to 28 days, similarly affected VSMC contractile marker expression, growth and three-dimensional migration when compared to direct VSMC-monocyte co-culture. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were identified as two cytokines present in MCM, at concentrations that have previously been shown to influence VSMC phenotype. VSMCs cultured alone on D-PHI scaffolds and exposed to MCP-1 (5 ng ml(-1)) or IL-6 (1 ng ml(-1)) for 7 days experienced a suppression in contractile marker expression (with MCP-1 or IL-6) and increased growth (with MCP-1) compared to no cytokine medium supplementation. These effects were also observed in VSMC-monocyte co-culture on D-PHI. Neutralization of IL-6, but not MCP-1, was subsequently shown to decrease VSMC growth and enhance calponin expression for VSMC-monocyte co-cultures on D-PHI scaffolds for 7 days, implying that IL-6 mediates VSMC response in monocyte-VSMC co-cultures. This study highlights the use of monocytes and their derived macrophages in conjunction with immunomodulatory biomaterials, such as D-PHI, as agents for regulating VSMC response, and demonstrates the importance of monocyte/MDM-released factors, such as IL-6 in particular, in this process. PMID:24361424

  3. Immunomodulatory activity of the water extract of Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis, and Zataria multiflora on dendritic cells and T cells responses.

    PubMed

    Amirghofran, Zahra; Ahmadi, Hossein; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Thymus daenensis, and Zataria multiflora are medicinal plants being used widely for infections and inflammatory diseases in folk medicine. In this study, the effects of the water extract of these plants on the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells was investigated. Both T. vulgaris and Z. multiflora decreased the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes, whereas T. daenensis induced cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001). All the three plants increased the CD40 expression on DCs (p < 0.04). The extent of allogenic T cell proliferation in the presence of T. vulgaris and Z. multiflora extracts was significantly decreased (p < 0.02). The effect of the extracts on secretion of IFN-? and IL-4 cytokines showed that none of the extracts influenced the pattern of cytokine production by T helper (Th) cells toward a Thl or Th2 profile. In conclusion, all the extracts had the ability to activate DCs. Whereas Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris extracts showed immunoihibitory effects on allogenic T cell proliferation, the main effect of T. daenensis was on mitogenic T cell response. These data may partly explain the mechanisms underlying the beneficial immunomodulatory effects of these extracts in infections and immune-related diseases. PMID:22963488

  4. INTERLEUKIN-4- AND INTERLEUKIN-13-MEDIATED ALTERNATIVELY ACTIVATED MACROPHAGES: ROLES IN HOMEOSTASIS AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyken, Steven J.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    The macrophage, a versatile cell type prominently involved in host defense and immunity, assumes a distinct state of alternative activation in the context of polarized type 2 immune responses such as allergic inflammation and helminth infection. This alternatively activated phenotype is induced by the canonical type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, which mediate expression of several characteristic markers along with a dramatic shift in macrophage metabolic pathways that influence surrounding cells and tissues. We discuss recent advances in the understanding of IL-4- and IL-13-mediated alternatively activated macrophages and type 2 immune responses; such advances have led to an expanded appreciation for functions of these cells beyond immunity, including maintenance of physiologic homeostasis and tissue repair. PMID:23298208

  5. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, Heather S.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    Maintenance of macrophages in their basal state and their rapid activation in response to pathogen detection are central to the innate immune system, acting to limit nonspecific oxidative damage and promote pathogen killing following infection. To identify possible age-related alterations in macrophage function, we have assayed the function of peritoneal macrophages from young (3−4 months) and aged (14−15 months) Balb/c mice. In agreement with prior suggestions, we observe age-dependent increases in the extent of recruitment of macrophages into the peritoneum, as well as ex vivo functional changes involving enhanced nitric oxide production under resting conditions that contribute to a reduction in the time needed for full activation of senescent macrophages following exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Further, we observe enhanced bactericidal activity following Salmonella uptake by macrophages isolated from aged Balb/c mice in comparison with those isolated from young animals. Pathways responsible for observed phenotypic changes were interrogated using tandem mass spectrometry, which identified age-dependent increases in levels of proteins linked to immune cell pathways under basal conditions and following LPS activation. Immune pathways upregulated in macrophages isolated from aged mice include proteins critical to the formation of the immunoproteasome. Detection of these latter proteins is dramatically enhanced following LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from aged animals; in comparison, the identification of immunoproteasome subunits is insensitive to LPS exposure for macrophages isolated from young animals. Consistent with observed global changes in the proteome, quantitative proteomic measurements indicate that there are age-dependent abundance changes involving specific proteins linked to immune cell function under basal conditions. LPS exposure selectively increases the levels of many proteins involved in immune cell function in aged Balb/c mice. Collectively, these results indicate that macrophages isolated from old mice are in a preactivated state that enhances their sensitivities to LPS exposure. The hyper-responsive activation of macrophages in aged animals may act to minimize infection by general bacterial threats that arise due to age-dependent declines in adaptive immunity. However, this hypersensitivity and the associated increase in the level of formation of reactive oxygen species are likely to contribute to observed age-dependent increases in the level of oxidative damage that underlie many diseases of the elderly.

  6. Immunomodulatory Effect of Mangiferin in Experimental Animals with Benzo(a)Pyrene-induced Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Jayakumar, Thangavel; Nishigaki, Ikuo; Ekambaram, Ganapathy; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Vetriselvi, Jayabal; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of mangiferin was studied in various groups of animals. For this study, adult Swiss albino male mice were treated with benzo(a)pyrene, abbreviated as B(a)P, at 50 mg/kg body weight orally twice a week for 4 weeks; and mangiferin was also given orally (pre- and post-initiation of carcinoma) at 100 mg/kg body weight. Immunocompetence and immune complexes as measured by phagocyte index, avidity index, and soluble immune complex (SIC) levels (p<0.001), as well as NBT reduction, were decreased in the B(a)P-treated animals;whereas increased levels of immunocompetence were noted in the mangiferin-treated animals given B(a)P (p<0.001, p<0.05). The levels of immunoglobulins such as IgG and IgM were decreased considerably (p<0.001) in the B(a)P-treated animals compared with their levels in the control animals; whereas the IgA level was increased (p<0.001). In the mangiferin-treated experimental animals given B(a)P, the levels of IgG and IgM were significantly (p<0.001, p<0.05) increased whereas the IgA level was decreased compared with those for the B(a)P-treated mice. Oxidative changes in lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages were also measured. The enhanced lipid peroxidation and decreased catalase and superoxide dismutase activities found in the lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and macrophages from B(a)P-treated mice were significantly reduced and increased, respectively, by the mangiferin treatment. This study confirms the immunomodulatory effect of mangiferin and shows an immunoprotective role arbitrated through a reduction in the reactive intermediate-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. PMID:23847456

  7. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-? gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15?kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  8. Activation of Cannabinoid Type Two Receptors (CB2) Diminish Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages and Brain Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Persidsky, Yuri; Fan, Shongshan; Dykstra, Holly; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Rom, Slava; Ramirez, Servio H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuroinflammatory disorders (such as HIV associated neurodegeneration) require treatment that decreases production of inflammatory factors by activated microglia and macrophages and protection of blood brain barrier (BBB) injury secondary to activation of brain endothelium. Cannabioid type 2 receptor (CB2) is highly expressed on macrophages and brain microvasular enndothelial cells (BMVEC) and is upregulated in inflammation and HIV infection. It has been shown that CB2 activation dampened inflammatory responses in macrophages and BMVEC. In this study, we assessed by PCR array the expression of a wide range of genes increased in macrophages and BMVEC in inflammation. TNFα treatment upregulated 33 genes in primary human BMVEC, and two highly selective CB2 agonists diminished expression of 31 and 32 genes. These results were confirmed by functional assays (BBB protection after inflammatory insult and decreased migration of monocytes across BMVEC monolayers after CB2 stimulation). Similarly, CB2 stimulation in primary human macrophages led to the suppression of 35 genes out of the 50 genes upregulated by LPS. Such changes in gene expression paralleled diminished secretion of proinflammatory factors. These results indicate the potential utility of CB2 agonists for the treatment of neuroinflammation. PMID:25666933

  9. Influence of macrophage activation on their capacity to bind bacterial antigens studied with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Targosz, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Czuba, Pawel; Biedroń, Rafal; Strus, Magdalena; Gamian, Andrzej; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Szymoński, Marek

    2006-06-01

    In this work we studied interactions between bacterial antigens and receptors on the surface of macrophages using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We used two bacterial cell wall components: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative Escherichia coli and exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from gram-positive Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Interactions between these bacterial antigens and immune cell receptors were studied in peritoneal macrophages derived from two strains of mice, CBA and C3H/J, in which the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is genetically disabled. We collected 500 force-distance curves for LPS-activated cells using an EPS-covered AFM tip, and for EPS-activated cells using an LPS-covered AFM tip. Nonactivated cells were tested as reference cells. The results show that LPS-primed macrophages decrease their ability to bind EPS. Surprisingly, EPS-activated macrophages maintain or even increase their ability to bind LPS. This may suggest that in vivo commensal enteric bacteria, such as lactobacilli, will enhance the defense potential of local macrophages against pathogens expressing LPS. PMID:17292119

  10. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  11. TRIM33 switches off Ifnb1 gene transcription during the late phase of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Federica; Parcelier, Aude; Petit, Vanessa; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Lewandowski, Daniel; Dalloz, Marion; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Soler, Eric; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; De Palma, Michele; Davidson, Irwin; Rousselet, Germain; Romeo, Paul-Henri

    2015-01-01

    Despite its importance during viral or bacterial infections, transcriptional regulation of the interferon-? gene (Ifnb1) in activated macrophages is only partially understood. Here we report that TRIM33 deficiency results in high, sustained expression of Ifnb1 at late stages of toll-like receptor-mediated activation in macrophages but not in fibroblasts. In macrophages, TRIM33 is recruited by PU.1 to a conserved region, the Ifnb1 Control Element (ICE), located 15?kb upstream of the Ifnb1 transcription start site. ICE constitutively interacts with Ifnb1 through a TRIM33-independent chromatin loop. At late phases of lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages, TRIM33 is bound to ICE, regulates Ifnb1 enhanceosome loading, controls Ifnb1 chromatin structure and represses Ifnb1 gene transcription by preventing recruitment of CBP/p300. These results characterize a previously unknown mechanism of macrophage-specific regulation of Ifnb1 transcription whereby TRIM33 is critical for Ifnb1 gene transcription shutdown. PMID:26592194

  12. Extensive macrophage accumulation in young and old Niemann-Pick C1 model mice involves the alternative, M2, activation pathway and inhibition of macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Gail; Muralidhar, Akshay; Le, Ellen; Borbon, Ivan A; Erickson, Robert P

    2016-03-10

    We have studied the pathophysiology of lung disease which occurs in two mouse models of Niemann-Pick C1 disease. We utilized Npc1(-/-) mice transgenic for normal gene expression in glia or neurons and glia at ages several fold the usual and a mouse model of the juvenile form of NPC1, a point mutation, at one age to confirm some findings. Lung weights, as per cent of body weight, increase much more than liver and spleen weights. Although pulmonary function parameters only vary for hysteresis between young and older Npc1(-/-) mice, they are markedly different than those found in normal control mice. Cholesterol accumulation continued in the older mice but sphingosine-1-phosphate was not increased. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed a massive increase (26×) in the number of macrophages. Histologic examination from the older, transgenic Npc1(-/-) mice showed small foci of alveolar proteinosis and evidence of hemorrhage, as well as dense macrophage accumulation. A large subset of macrophages was immunopositive for Fizz1 or arginase-1, markers of the alternative activation pathway, while no Fizz1 or arginase-1 positive macrophages were found in wild-type mice. The percentage of marker positive macrophages was relatively stable at 5-10% at various ages and within the 2 transgenic models. Phosphohistone H3 and Ki67 showed low levels of proliferation of these macrophages. Apoptosis was prominent within lung capillary endothelial cells, but limited within macrophages. Thus, activation of the alternative pathway is involved in Niemann-Pick C1 associated pulmonary macrophage accumulation, with low proliferation of these cells balanced by low levels of apoptosis. PMID:26707209

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity and mechanism of surfactin in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chuan; Dong, Bin; Ma, Xiaolei; Hou, Lihua; Cao, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunling

    2015-04-01

    Surfactin is primarily produced by Bacillus natto TK-1 and is one of the most powerful biosurfactants. It consists of a heptapeptide interlinked with a ?-hydroxy fatty acid. Because of its special structure, surfactin shows broad biological effects, including anti-tumour, anti-microbial and anti-mycoplasma activities. It also has potential anti-inflammatory activity; however, the anti-inflammatory mechanism of surfactin has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of surfactin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Surfactin exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect without cytotoxicity at certain concentrations, and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells appeared normal after surfactin treatment. Surfactin significantly inhibited the increased expression of IFN-?, IL-6, iNOS and nitric oxide (NO). TLR4 is the critical receptor for LPS; therefore, the TLR4 signal transduction pathway is the primary pathway that mediates LPS-induced inflammation. The results show that surfactin downregulated the LPS-induced TLR4 protein expression of macrophages and indicated that the surfactin-mediated signal pathway was involved in with TLR4. The subsequent studies demonstrated that surfactin exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by attenuating the activation of nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), which is involved in the nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) cell signalling pathways. These results suggest that surfactin may be a new therapeutic agent for inflammation. PMID:25331175

  14. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated early after ozone. ► Oxidative stress may contribute to regulating macrophage phenotype and function.

  15. Tissue factor activity. A marker of alveolar macrophage maturation in rabbits. Effects of granulomatous pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberger, H; McGee, M P; Lee, T K

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to examine relationships between alveolar macrophage maturity and amounts of tissue factor (Clotting Factor III) in these cells under physiologic conditions and during immunologically induced pneumonitis. Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, alveolar macrophages from healthy rabbits were rapidly isolated into five subpopulations at different stages of maturation, as demonstrated by morphologic and morphometric evaluation. Very large amounts of tissue factor activity were found in fully mature cells that were purified in the lowest density subpopulation and assayed without preliminary in vitro stimulation or culture. In the remaining four subpopulations of increasing density, amounts of tissue factor were found to progressively diminish in direct correlation with declines of cell maturity. These differences at mean levels were as great as 35-fold. In addition, blood monocytes had less than 1/219 and less than 1/6 of the activity of the fully mature and the least mature subpopulations, respectively. After 16 h culture of the five isolated subpopulations in the absence of lymphokines or of significant numbers of lymphocytes, tissue factor activity increased in inverse correlation with the preincubation stage of cell maturity (2,387 and 109% in the least mature and most mature subpopulations, respectively). These increases required protein synthesis and were accompanied by morphologic and morphometric changes which indicated cellular maturation during the period of tissue factor activity generation in vitro, thus further demonstrating relationships between macrophage maturity and tissue factor content. In additional experiments, direct correlations between cell maturity and tissue factor activity content were also found in activated alveolar macrophage populations from rabbits with Bacillus Calmette Guering (BCG)-induced granulomatous pneumonitis. However, as compared with controls, the BCG populations had increased total amounts of tissue factor activity due to the presence of large numbers of mature alveolar macrophage forms that had high levels of the procoagulant. Thus, tissue factor activity in alveolar macrophages is a marker of cellular maturation in vivo and in vitro. Increased amounts of this initiator of the extrinsic clotting pathway, as found in alveolar macrophage populations from animals with granulomatous pneumonitis induced by BCG hypersensitivity, suggest that alveolar macrophage tissue factor may contribute to the pathology of immune lung diseases. PMID:6373826

  16. Immunomodulatory Effects of Triphala and its Individual Constituents: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Belapurkar, Pranoti; Goyal, Pragya; Tiwari-Barua, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The role of plant extracts and Ayurvedic polyherbal preparations in treating various ailments has been acknowledged since time immemorial. Studies based on the effect of these extracts in treatment of different diseases have also been well documented. Indian medicinal literature also emphasizes the synergistic effect of polyherbal drugs in restoring and rejuvenating immune system. This review focuses on the immunomodulatory potential of the polyherbal preparation, Triphala and its three constituents, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis. The role of Triphala and its extract has been emphasized in stimulating neutrophil function. Under stress condition such as noise, Triphala significantly prevents elevation of IL-4 levels as well as corrects decreased IL-2 and IFN-? levels. Under the condition of inflammatory stress its immunosuppressive activity is attributed to its inhibitory action on complement system, humoral immunity, cell mediated immunity and mitogen-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation. The aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the individual constituents reportedly enhance especially the macrophage activation due to their free radical scavenging activity and the ability to neutralize reactive oxygen species. This study thus concludes the use of Triphala and its three individual constituents as potential immunostimulants and/or immunosuppressants further suggests them to be a better alternative for allopathic immunomodulators. PMID:25593379

  17. [Mechanisms of hyperpolarization of plasma membrane of macrophages and astrocytes during activation].

    PubMed

    Gamale?, I A; Kirpichnikova, K M; Ishchenko, A M; Zhakhov, A V; Kliubin, I V

    1998-01-01

    The hyperpolarization response of macrophages and glial cells (astrocytes, U118 cell line) to the action of inducers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been studied. Macrophages were stimulated with chemotactic peptide fMLP and platelet activation factor (PAF). Astrocytes were affected by complement component--anaphylatoxin C5a. The hyperpolarization response of both cell types depends on intracellular Ca2+ concentration and extracellular K+ concentration. Depletion of K+ concentration in the medium (1 mM KCl) or chelation of intracellular Ca2+ with Quin-2 (50 microM) significantly decreased the hyperpolarization response or caused depolarization of plasma membrane. Moreover, inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channels with quinidine (50 microM) induced only a prolonged depolarization of both cell types. The data obtained permit a suggestion that macrophage and astrocyte hyperpolarization response to stimulation with ROS inducers involves O2.- mediated activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channels. PMID:9821248

  18. Treponemal infection specifically enhances node T-cell regulation of macrophage activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, D R; Bagasra, O; Jacobs, R F

    1986-01-01

    Hamsters experimentally inoculated in the inguinal region with Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum develop considerable pathology at that site. We examined the cell populations from these inguinal lymph nodes to determine their intercellular responses to infection. In vitro, syphilitic-node T cells markedly suppressed C3b receptor-mediated ingestion (C3bMI) in syphilitic macrophages derived from sites both proximal and distal to the inoculation. This activity was more pronounced when node T cells rather than peritoneal T cells were used. When treponemal preparations or live treponemes were added to the coculture system, the suppression was specifically enhanced, whereas the addition of heterologous agents did not promote this effect. Syphilitic macrophages from either compartment cultured alone showed no significant inhibition of C3bMI. In parallel studies on syphilitic macrophages, we observed that the expression of Ia quickly became elevated and was sustained throughout the infection. Moreover, in vitro culturing of the syphilitic-node T cells with these macrophages did not alter this function. These observations suggest that the syphilitic node contains a subpopulation of T cells that can selectively suppress macrophage C3bMI activity and concurrently regulate their cellular response to treponemal infection. PMID:3531014

  19. Activation of Toll-like receptor 2 increases macrophage resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Victoria, Sabina; Temerozo, Jairo R; Gobbo, Livia; Pimenta-Inada, Haynna K; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer

    2013-12-01

    Patients infected with HIV-1, the etiological agent of AIDS, have increased intestinal permeability, which allows for the passage of microbial products, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, into circulation. The exposure of HIV-1-infected cells to certain TLR agonists affects viral replication, but studies associating viral production with the activation of TLR2 in HIV-1-infected cells are rare and controversial. Here, we report that the TLR2 ligands Zymosan and Pam3CSK4 potently inhibit HIV-1 replication in acutely infected monocyte-derived macrophages and the exposure to TLR2 ligands prior to infection renders macrophages refractory to HIV-1 production. Macrophage treatment with Pam3CSK4 did not change the cellular expression of the HIV-1 entry receptors CD4 and CCR5. Both TLR2 ligands increased the macrophage production of ?-chemokines and IL-10, and the blockage of these soluble factors prevented the inhibitory effect of TLR2 activation on HIV-1 replication. Our findings show that the direct engagement of TLR2 in HIV-1-infected macrophages increase cellular resistance to HIV-1 infection, and that controlling HIV-1 replication with agonists for TLR2 might have implications for the development of antiretroviral therapies. PMID:23891328

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of multivalent M2pep peptides for targeting alternatively activated M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Schellinger, Joan G; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-02-28

    The tumor microenvironment in the majority of cancers is known to favor polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to alternatively activated M2 phenotype, promoting disease progression and reducing patient survival. Effective therapy targeting this M2 macrophage population is thus a promising adjuvant to approved cancer therapies. One of the challenges in targeting M2-like TAMs is a lack of high affinity targeting ligand with good selectivity over anti-tumor M1-like TAMs. We have previously identified an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) that binds preferentially to murine M2 macrophages and M2-like TAMs. A fusion peptide of M2pep with pro-apoptotic peptide KLA (M2pepKLA) was further used to reduce TAM population in vivo but high concentrations and frequent dosing were required due to low binding affinity of M2pep for M2 macrophage. The goal of this study was to develop more potent TAM depletion constructs by increasing the valency of both the M2pep targeting and KLA drug domains. Divalent and tetravalent displays of M2pep ([M2pep]2-Biotin and [M2pep]4-Biotin) were synthesized and evaluated for improvement in binding avidity to the murine macrophages. High avidity and selective binding of [M2pep]2-Biotin to M2 macrophages were achieved with at least 10-fold lower concentration than required for monovalent M2pep activity. Increasing M2pep valency to four, however, resulted in a reduction in both binding activity and selectivity. Surprisingly, both divalent and tetravalent M2pep, without conjugation of any cytotoxic drug cargo, exhibited M2 macrophage-selective toxicity not observed in monovalent M2pep treatment. We next synthesized divalent M2pep with monovalent and divalent KLA ([M2pep]2-[KLA] and [M2pep]2-[KLA]2) to evaluate its enhanced potency compared to M2pepKLA. While both constructs were significantly more toxic than M2pepKLA to primary, bone marrow-derived M2 macrophage, desired selectivity was retained only with [M2pep]2-[KLA]. Finally, we evaluated all multivalent M2pep and M2pepKLA analogs using a syngeneic CT-26 tumor cell suspension. In this setting, [M2pep]4-Biotin and [M2pep]2-[KLA]2 exhibited selective toxicity to both M2-like TAMs and malignant cells but not to M1-like TAMs. Therefore, these constructs are promising anti-cancer constructs with dual-modality mechanisms: malignant cell killing and TAM-based immunomodulation. PMID:26772876

  1. Mouse macrophage polarity and ROCK1 activity depend on RhoA and non-apoptotic Caspase 3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yianzhu; Minze, Laurie J; Mumma, Lindsay; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2016-02-15

    The macrophages have different subtypes with different functions in immune response and disease. It has been generally accepted that M1 macrophages are responsible for stimulation of immune system and inflammation while M2 macrophages play a role in tissue repair. Irrespective of the type, macrophage functions depend on actin cytoskeleton, which is under the control of small GTPase RhoA pathway and its downstream effector ROCK1. We generated RhoA-deleted macrophages and compared the effect of RhoA deletion on M0, M1 and M2 macrophage phenotype. Our studies showed that, unexpectedly, the RhoA deletion did not eliminate macrophage ROCK1 expression and increased ROCK1 activity. The RhoA deletion effect on macrophage phenotype, structure and polarity was different for each subtype. Moreover, our study indicates that the up-regulation of ROCK1 activity in RhoA-deleted macrophages and macrophage phenotype/polarity are dependent on non-apoptotic Caspase-3 and are sensitive to Caspase-3 inhibition. These novel findings will revise/complement our understanding of RhoA pathway regulation of cell structure and polarity. PMID:26875770

  2. Macrophage activation induces formation of the anti-inflammatory lipid cholesteryl-nitrolinoleate

    PubMed Central

    FERREIRA, Ana M.; FERRARI, Mariana I.; TROSTCHANSKY, Andrs; BATTHYANY, Carlos; SOUZA, Jos M.; ALVAREZ, Mara N.; LPEZ, Gloria V.; BAKER, Paul R. S.; SCHOPFER, Francisco J.; ODONNELL, Valerie; FREEMAN, Bruce A.; RUBBO, Homero

    2012-01-01

    Nitroalkene derivatives of fatty acids act as adaptive, anti-inflammatory signalling mediators, based on their high-affinity PPAR? (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor ? ) ligand activity and electrophilic reactivity with proteins, including transcription factors. Although free or esterified lipid nitroalkene derivatives have been detected in human plasma and urine, their generation by inflammatory stimuli has not been reported. In the present study, we show increased nitration of cholesteryl-linoleate by activated murine J774.1 macrophages, yielding the mononitrated nitroalkene CLNO2 (cholesteryl-nitrolinoleate). CLNO2 levels were found to increase ~20-fold 24 h after macrophage activation with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-? ; this response was concurrent with an increase in the expression of NOS2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase) and was inhibited by the NO (nitric oxide) inhibitor L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). Macrophage (J774.1 and bone-marrow-derived cells) inflammatory responses were suppressed when activated in the presence of CLNO2 or LNO2 (nitrolinoleate). This included: (i) inhibition of NOS2 expression and cytokine secretion through PPAR? and NO-independent mechanisms; (ii) induction of haem oxygenase-1 expression; and (iii) inhibition of NF-?B (nuclear factor ?B) activation. Overall, these results suggest that lipid nitration occurs as part of the response of macrophages to inflammatory stimuli involving NOS2 induction and that these by-products of nitro-oxidative reactions may act as novel adaptive down-regulators of inflammatory responses. PMID:18671672

  3. Dimethyl sulfoxide modulates NF-kappa B and cytokine activation in lipopolysaccharide-treated murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K A; Hill, M R; Youkhana, K; Wanker, F; Gimble, J M

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants are protective against septic shock in animal models. Recently, free radical scavengers have been found to inhibit the activation of the NF-kappa B protein in a number of cell lines. This transcriptional regulatory protein binds to the promoters of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, and the macrophage inflammatory proteins. The current work examined lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation in the J774 macrophage-like cell line and primary peritoneal macrophages from lipopolysaccharide-responsive (C3HeB/Fej) and -nonresponsive (C3H/HeJ) murine strains. The DNA-binding activity of the NF-kappa B protein directly correlated with mRNA expression for the genes encoding the proinflammatory cytokines and the free radical scavenging enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Both the p50 and p65 NF-kappa B subunits were detected on gel supershift assays. Minimal NF-kappa B activity was observed following exposure of C3H/HeJ macrophages to lipopolysaccharide. The antioxidant dimethyl sulfoxide decreased the level of NF-kappa B activation in the J774 cells. This correlated with decreased expression of cytokine mRNAs and tumor necrosis factor bioactivity. These results suggest that modulation of NF-kappa B activation may provide a mechanism through which antioxidants protect against endotoxemia in murine models. Images PMID:8039880

  4. Effects of drying methods on physicochemical and immunomodulatory properties of polysaccharide-protein complexes from litchi pulp.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Guo, Yajuan; Zhang, Ruifen; Yi, Yang; Deng, Yuanyuan; Su, Dongxiao; Zhang, Mingwei

    2014-01-01

    Dried litchi pulp has been used in traditional remedies in China for many years to treat various diseases, and the therapeutic activity has been, at least partly, attributed to the presence of bioactive polysaccharides. Polysaccharide-protein complexes from vacuum freeze-(VF), vacuum microwave-(VM) and heat pump (HP) dried litchi pulp, which were coded as LP-VF, LP-VM and LP-HP, were comparatively studied on the physicochemical and immunomodulatory properties. LP-HP had a predominance of galactose, while glucose was the major sugar component in LP-VF and LP-VM. Compared with LP-VF and LP-VM, LP-HP contained more aspartate and glutamic in binding protein. LP-HP also exhibited a stronger stimulatory effect on splenocyte proliferation at 200 ?g/mL and triggered higher NO, TNF-? and IL-6 secretion from RAW264.7 macrophages. Different drying methods caused the difference in physicochemical properties of polysaccharide-protein complexes from dried litchi pulp, which resulted in significantly different immunomodulatory activity. HP drying appears to be the best method for preparing litchi pulp to improve its immunomodulatory properties. PMID:25140451

  5. Legumain expression, activity and secretion are increased during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and inhibited by atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Rigmor; Smith, Robert; Almlf, Maria; Tewolde, Eyassu; Nilsen, Hilde; Johansen, Harald Thidemann

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages express several lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins and legumain. In this study, we assessed the expression, activity and secretion of legumain in cellular models of monocytes/macrophages. Macrophages were derived from M-CSF- or GM-CSF/IFN?-stimulated human primary monocytes (M2 and M1, respectively), PMA-treated human THP-1 cells, or murine RAW264.7 macrophages. In both primary monocytes and THP-1 cells, monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation caused highly increased cellular expression and activity of legumain. Also, secretion of legumain from macrophages, but not from monocytes, was observed. Notably, M2 macrophages expressed significantly higher levels of active legumain than M1 macrophages, which are not previously reported. Legumain mRNA has been shown to be down-regulated in monocytes isolated from patients treated with the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor atorvastatin. Interestingly, in our study, the active legumain produced by M2 macrophages was found to be inhibited by atorvastatin, which was reflected in aberrant cellular expression and processing. PMID:25205715

  6. Successful treatment of macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with dermatomyositis by combination with immunosuppressive therapy and plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Kaieda, Shinjiro; Yoshida, Naomi; Yamashita, Fumiya; Okamoto, Masaki; Ida, Hiroaki; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Fukuda, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), also known as secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, is mediated by cytokine overproduction from excessive activation of T lymphocytes and macrophages. We present a dermatomyositis patient with MAS, caused by hypercytokinemia. The combination of tacrolimus and plasma exchange therapy was effective in this case for treating MAS. This combination therapy is especially useful for MAS refractory to steroids. PMID:24252010

  7. Complement activation by the alternative pathway and macrophage enzyme secretion in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Schorlemmer, H U; Bitter-Suermann, D; Allison, A C

    1977-01-01

    A number of stimuli known to induce acid hydrolase secretion from cultured macrophages were examined for their ability to activate C3 via the alternative pathway of the complement system. Loss of haemolytically active C3 was checked in normal and C4-deficient guinea-pig serum. For comparison the interactions of cultured macrophages with other agents well known as potent activators of the alternative pathway of the complement system have been investigated. As judged by their activity in these assays, group A streptococcal cell walls, different carrageenan preparations, dental plaque and Actinomyces viscosus were all capable of initiating the alternative pathway but differed with respect to their potency and their ability to inhibit C3 turnover at high concentrations. Zymosan, some carrageenans, polyanethol sulphonate, and Corynebacterium parvum all induce the release of hydrolytic enzymes from macrophages in culture, even in the absence of serum in the medium. The release is time- and dose-dependent and is not associated with loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase or any other sign of cell death. The parallelism between the capacity of several agents to activate the complement system via the alternative pathway and to induce inflammatory responses in vivo and selective lysosoma enzyme secretion from cultures of macrophages is discussed. PMID:328387

  8. Comparison of the antimicrobial activity of deactivated human macrophages challenged with Aspergillus fumigatus and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Meier-Osusky, I; Schoedon, G; Bluer, F; Schneemann, M; Schaffner, A

    1996-09-01

    The anticonidial activity of human monocytes deactivated by cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 and the hormone dexamethasone was studied and compared with antilisterial activity. Dexamethasone had the largest effect on the anticonidial activity and suppressed germination-inhibiting activity and elimination of ingested spores by macrophages more than the cytokines did. Maximally active concentrations of IL-10 had a similar but significantly smaller deactivating effect. IL-4, in contrast to IL-10 and dexamethasone, did not reduce anticonidial activity. However, IL-4 and IL- 10 were equally potent in deactivating human macrophages against Listeria monocytogenes, whereas dexamethasone was significantly less potent in the Listeria model. These observations indicate that all three mediators lessen antimicrobial activity but that this effect depends on the test organism studied and is apparently mediated through regulation of different antimicrobial systems operating against a particular microorganism. PMID:8769631

  9. Activated macrophages for treating skin ulceration: gene expression in human monocytes after hypo-osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    FRENKEL, O; SHANI, E; BEN-BASSAT, I; BROK-SIMONI, F; ROZENFELD-GRANOT, G; KAJAKARO, G; RECHAVI, G; AMARIGLIO, N; SHINAR, E; DANON, D

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in almost all stages of the complex process of wound healing. It has been previously shown that the incorporation of a hypo-osmotic shock step, in the process of monocyte-concentrate preparation from a blood unit, induces monocyte/macrophage activation. As the macrophages are produced using a unique, closed and sterile system, they are suitable for local application on ulcers in elderly and paraplegic patients. Enhanced phagocytosis by the activated cells, as well as increased secretion of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, were detected in a recent study which are in accord with the very encouraging clinical results. In the present study, we used DNA microarrays to analyse the differential gene expressions of the hypo-osmotic shock-activated monocytes/macrophages and compare them to non-treated cells. Of the genes that exhibited differences of expression in the activated cell population, 94% (68/72) displayed increased activity. The mRNA levels of 43/68 of these genes (63%) were found to be 15-fold or higher (15798) in the activated macrophages cell population as compared to the non-treated cells. Only four genes were found to have lower mRNA levels in the activated cells, with ratios of expression of 06208, which may suggest that the changes are insignificant. A significant number of the genes that showed increased levels of expression is known to be directly involved in macrophage function and wound healing. This may correlate with the increased secretion of different cytokines by the activated macrophages depicted previously. Other groups of genes expressed are known to be involved in important pathways such as neuronal growth and function, developmental defects and cancer. The hypo-osmotic shock induces a gene expression profile of cytokines and receptors in the activated cells. These may evoke potential abilities to produce a variety of protein products needed in the wound healing process and may bring to light possibilities for other therapeutic applications of these cells. PMID:11982591

  10. Activated macrophages for treating skin ulceration: gene expression in human monocytes after hypo-osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, O; Shani, E; Ben-Bassat, I; Brok-Simoni, F; Rozenfeld-Granot, G; Kajakaro, G; Rechavi, G; Amariglio, N; Shinar, E; Danon, D

    2002-04-01

    Macrophages play a major role in almost all stages of the complex process of wound healing. It has been previously shown that the incorporation of a hypo-osmotic shock step, in the process of monocyte-concentrate preparation from a blood unit, induces monocyte/macrophage activation. As the macrophages are produced using a unique, closed and sterile system, they are suitable for local application on ulcers in elderly and paraplegic patients. Enhanced phagocytosis by the activated cells, as well as increased secretion of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, were detected in a recent study which are in accord with the very encouraging clinical results. In the present study, we used DNA microarrays to analyse the differential gene expressions of the hypo-osmotic shock-activated monocytes/macrophages and compare them to non-treated cells. Of the genes that exhibited differences of expression in the activated cell population, 94% (68/72) displayed increased activity. The mRNA levels of 43/68 of these genes (63%) were found to be 1.5-fold or higher (1.5-7.98) in the activated macrophages cell population as compared to the non-treated cells. Only four genes were found to have lower mRNA levels in the activated cells, with ratios of expression of 0.62-0.8, which may suggest that the changes are insignificant. A significant number of the genes that showed increased levels of expression is known to be directly involved in macrophage function and wound healing. This may correlate with the increased secretion of different cytokines by the activated macrophages depicted previously. Other groups of genes expressed are known to be involved in important pathways such as neuronal growth and function, developmental defects and cancer. The hypo-osmotic shock induces a gene expression profile of cytokines and receptors in the activated cells. These may evoke potential abilities to produce a variety of protein products needed in the wound healing process and may bring to light possibilities for other therapeutic applications of these cells. PMID:11982591

  11. Antitumor and Antimetastatic Activity of Synthetic Hydroxystilbenes Through Inhibition of Lymphangiogenesis and M2 Macrophage Differentiation of Tumor-associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Baba, Kimiye

    2016-01-01

    An increase in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) around the tumor microenvironment has been closely associated with a poor prognosis in patients with cancer, and M2 TAMs promote tumor growth and tumor metastasis by stimulating angiogenesis or lymphangiogenesis in tumors. We herein examined the effects of nine synthetic hydroxystilbenes on M2 macrophage activation and differentiation, and three selected dihydroxystilbenes on vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF)-C-induced tube formation in human lymphatic endothelial cells (HLECs) (in vitro). We also investigated the antitumor and antimetastatic effects of three synthetic dihydroxystilbenes in LM8-bearing mice in vivo. The three selected synthetic stilbenes (at concentrations of 5, 10, 25, and 50 ?M) inhibited the production of interleukin-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in M2 macrophages, but promoted that of transforming growth factor-?1. The three dihydroxystilbenes (at concentrations of 10-50 ?M) inhibited the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcript 3 without affecting its expression in the differentiation of M2 macrophages. Furthermore, the 2,3- and 4,4'-dihydroxystilbene inhibited VEGF-C-induced lymphangiogenesis in HLECs. Both 2,3- and 4,4'-dihydroxystilbene (at 10 and 25 mg/kg, twice daily) inhibited tumor growth and metastasis to the lung in mice. These results suggested that the antitumor and antimetastatic effects of 2,3- and 4,4'-dihydroxystilbene were partly due to anti-lymphangiogenesis, and the regulation of M2 macrophage activation and differentiation. PMID:26722037

  12. The synergistic interaction between the calcineurin B subunit and IFN-γ enhances macrophage antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Z; Yang, R; Zhang, W; Xu, L; Zhong, Y; Yin, Y; Cen, J; DeWitt, J P; Wei, Q

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in tumor growth and progression. They infiltrate into tumors and cause inflammation, which creates a microenvironment favoring tumor growth and metastasis. However, certain stimuli may induce macrophages to act as tumor terminators. Here we report that the calcineurin B subunit (CnB) synergizes with IFN-γ to make macrophages highly cytotoxic to cancer cells. Furthermore, CnB and IFN-γ act synergistically to polarize mouse tumor-associated macrophages, as well as human monocyte-derived macrophages to an M1-like phenotype. This synergy is mediated by the crosstalk between CnB-engaged integrin αM-p38 MAPK signaling and IFN-γ-initiated p38/PKC-δ/Jak2 signaling. Interestingly, the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) is a key factor that orchestrates the synergy of CnB and IFN-γ, and the phosphorylation status at Ser727 and Tyr701 of STAT1 is directly regulated by CnB and IFN-γ. PMID:25950470

  13. Cutting Edge: Inflammasome Activation in Primary Human Macrophages Is Dependent on Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Kortmann, Jens; Brubaker, Sky W.

    2015-01-01

    Murine NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory protein (Naip)1, Naip2, and Naip5/6 are host sensors that detect the cytosolic presence of needle and rod proteins from bacterial type III secretion systems and flagellin, respectively. Previous studies using human-derived macrophage-like cell lines indicate that human macrophages sense the cytosolic needle protein, but not bacterial flagellin. In this study, we show that primary human macrophages readily sense cytosolic flagellin. Infection of primary human macrophages with Salmonella elicits robust cell death and IL-1β secretion that is dependent on flagellin. We show that flagellin detection requires a full-length isoform of human Naip. This full-length Naip isoform is robustly expressed in primary macrophages from healthy human donors, but it is drastically reduced in monocytic tumor cells, THP-1, and U937, rendering them insensitive to cytosolic flagellin. However, ectopic expression of full-length Naip rescues the ability of U937 cells to sense flagellin. In conclusion, human Naip functions to activate the inflammasome in response to flagellin, similar to murine Naip5/6. PMID:26109648

  14. Escherichia coli and Candida albicans Induced Macrophage Extracellular Trap-Like Structures with Limited Microbicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chengshui; Liu, Xiaolei; Du, Jing; Shi, Haining; Wang, Xuelin; Bai, Xue; Peng, Peng; Yu, Lu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Mingyuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) has recently been recognized as a novel defense mechanism in several types of innate immune cells. It has been suggested that these structures are toxic to microbes and contribute significantly to killing several pathogens. However, the role of ETs formed by macrophages (METs) in defense against microbes remains little known. In this study, we demonstrated that a subset of murine J774A.1 macrophage cell line (8% to 17%) and peritoneal macrophages (8.5% to 15%) form METs-like structures (METs-LS) in response to Escherichia coli and Candida albicans challenge. We found only a portion of murine METs-LS, which are released by dying macrophages, showed detectable killing effects on trapped E. coli but not C. albicans. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that, in vitro, both microorganisms were entrapped in J774A.1 METs-LS composed of DNA and microbicidal proteins such as histone, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. DNA components of both nucleus and mitochondrion origins were detectable in these structures. Additionally, METs-LS formation occurred independently of ROS produced by NADPH oxidase, and this process did not result in cell lysis. In summary, our results emphasized that microbes induced METs-LS in murine macrophage cells and that the microbicidal activity of these METs-LS differs greatly. We propose the function of METs-LS is to contain invading microbes at the infection site, thereby preventing the systemic diffusion of them, rather than significantly killing them. PMID:24587206

  15. The primary culture of carp (Cyprinus carpio) macrophages and the verification of its phagocytosis activity.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenhui; Liu, Shuai; Chen, Jingsi; Hu, Lei; Wu, Minghong; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study establishes the primary culture method for red carp (Cyprinus carpio) macrophages in vitro and lays the foundation for further research in the fish immune system. The healthy adult red carp was chosen, and mechanical separation and cell adherent culture methods were used to isolate the primary macrophages. Compared to the traditional method of Percoll discontinuous density gradient isolation, the protocol we reported here makes cell isolation steps more concise and obtains more healthy cells with high macrophage purity. The cells were uniform in size with a clearly visible nucleus. Trypan blue staining and non-radioactive cell proliferation assay were used to detect the cell survival rate. Further, we provide optimum culture conditions which include cell density (1 × 10(7) cells/mL), culture medium (Leibovitz's L-15), pH (7.2-7.4), temperature (26°C), and adherent time (24 h). Macrophages have been identified by nonspecific esterase and Wright-Giemsa staining and have shown to grow very well. In addition, the macrophages have a very strong bactericidal activity against three kinds of bacteria, further verifying good growth conditions and proper function. PMID:26427708

  16. Class A scavenger receptor activation inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy in macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hanpeng; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhuang, Yan; Li, Nan; Zhu, Xudong; Hu, Jin; Ben, Jingjing; Yang, Qing; Bai, Hui; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Macrophage death in advanced atherosclerosis promotes plaque necrosis and destabilization. Involvement of autophagy in bulk degradation of cellular components has been recognized recently as an important mechanism for cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We previously found that the engagement of class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) triggered JNK-dependent apoptosis in ER-stressed macrophages. However, pro-apoptotic mechanisms mediated by SR-A are not fully understood. Therefore, we sought to see if SR-A mediated apoptosis was associated with autophagy in macrophages. Here, we showed that fucoidan inhibited microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-phospholipid conjugates (LC3-II) formation as well as the number of autophagosomes under ER stress. The inhibition of LC3-II formation was paralleled by the activation of the mTOR pathway, and the inhibition of mTOR allowed LC3-II induction in macrophages treated with thapsigargin plus fucoidan. Furthermore, apoptosis induced by fucoidan was prevented under ER stress by the mTOR inhibitor. We propose that fucoidan, a SR-A agonist, may contribute to macrophage apoptosis during ER stress by inhibiting autophagy. PMID:25013404

  17. Immunoregulation by macrophages II. Separation of mouse peritoneal macrophages having tumoricidal and bactericidal activities and those secreting PGE and interleukin I

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, K.E.; Cahill, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    Macrophage subpopulations having bactericidal or tumoricidal activities and secreting interleukin I (IL1) or prostaglandin E (PGE) were identified through primary or secondary infection with Salmonella enteritidis and separated by sedimentation velocity. Bactericidal activity was measured by (3H)-thymidine release from Listeria monocytogenes and tumoricidal activity by 51Cr-release from C-4 fibrosarcoma or P815 mastocytoma cells. Macrophages with bactericidal activity were distinguished from those with tumoricidal activity a) during secondary infection when cytolytic activity occurred only at days 1-4 post injection and bactericidal activity remained high throughout and b) after sedimentation velocity separation. Cytolysis was consistently greatest among adherent cells of low sedimentation velocity, whereas cells with bactericidal activity increased in size during the infection. Tumour cytostasis (inhibition and promotion of (3H)-thymidine uptake) differed from cytolysis in that the former was more prolonged during infection and was also detected among large cells. Secretion of immunoregulatory molecules PGE and IL1 occurred maximally among different macrophage subpopulations separated by sedimentation velocity and depending on the type of stimulus used in vitro. There was an inverse correlation between IL1 production and PGE production after stimulation with C3-zymosan or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The development of immunity during infection may therefore be dependent upon the relative proportions of effector and regulatory macrophage subpopulations and the selective effects of environmental stimuli on these functions.

  18. Functional Roles of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanyan; Yu, Tao; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a natural host defensive process that is largely regulated by macrophages during the innate immune response. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are proline-directed serine and threonine protein kinases that regulate many physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. p38 MAPKs are key MAPKs involved in the production of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). p38 MAPK signaling plays an essential role in regulating cellular processes, especially inflammation. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of p38 signaling in macrophage-mediated inflammation. In addition, we discuss the potential of using inhibitors targeting p38 expression in macrophages to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:24771982

  19. HDAC9 represses cholesterol efflux and generation of alternatively activated macrophages in atherosclerosis development

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qiang; Rong, Shunxing; Repa, Joyce J; Clair, Richard St.; Parks, John S.; Mishra, Nilamadhab

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent genome-wide association studies revealed that a genetic variant in the loci corresponding to histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is associated with large vessel stroke. HDAC9 expression was upregulated in human atherosclerotic plaques in different arteries. The molecular mechanisms how HDAC9 might increase atherosclerosis is not clear. Approach and Results In this study, we show that systemic and bone marrow cell deletion of HDAC9 decreased atherosclerosis in LDLr?/? mice with minimal effect on plasma lipid concentrations. HDAC9 deletion resulted upregulation of lipid homeostatic genes, downregulation of inflammatory genes, and polarization towards an M2 phenotype via increased accumulation of total acetylated H3 and H3K9 at the promoters of ABCA1, ABCG1, and PPAR-? in macrophages. Conclusions We conclude that macrophage HDAC9 upregulation is atherogenic via suppression of cholesterol efflux and generation of alternatively activated macrophages in atherosclerosis. PMID:25035344

  20. Interleukin-7 enhances antimicrobial activity against Leishmania major in murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, A; Vieth, M; Will, A; Schrppel, K; Rllinghoff, M

    1993-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that interleukin-7 (IL-7) is able to induce secretion of cytokines and tumoricidal activity by human monocytes. This study shows that treatment of murine macrophages infected with Leishmania major with IL-7 without any other stimulus reduced the percentage of infected cells, as well as the parasite burden per cell, in a dose-dependent manner to a limited degree (45% reduction of the number of amastigotes per 100 macrophages). Simultaneous treatment of macrophages with gamma interferon and IL-7 led to nearly complete (> 99%) elimination of amastigotes. Addition of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha or N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine acetate reversed the leishmanicidal effects of IL-7, and production of nitric oxide was induced in the presence of IL-7. PMID:8359927

  1. Antiinflammatory effects of Epimedium brevicornum water extract on lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Sang-Suk; Lim, Eun-Mee; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Young-Jong; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Tae Hee; Park, Seong Kyu; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Hyung Min; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Wansu

    2010-12-01

    Epimedium brevicornum Maxim (Berberidaceae) possesses estrogenic properties. It is one of the most widespread herbal remedies used in Oriental medicine. The present study investigated the effects of Epimedium brevicornum water extract (EB) on proinflammatory mediators secreted from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW264.7 macrophages. EB significantly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-10, IL-12p40, interferon-inducible protein-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, vascular endothelial growth factor, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells at concentrations of 25, 50, 100 and 200??g/mL (p < 0.05). These results suggest that EB has antiinflammatory activity related to its inhibition of NO, cytokine, chemokine and growth factor production in macrophages. PMID:20564498

  2. Extraintestinal Helminth Infection Limits Pathology and Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression during DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis: A Role for Alternatively Activated Macrophages and Prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Callejas, Blanca E.; Terrazas, Csar A.; Reyes, Jose L.; Espinoza-Jimnez, Arlett; Gonzlez, Marisol I.; Len-Cabrera, Sonia; Morales, Rosario; Olgun, Jonadab E.; Saavedra, Rafael; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa is characteristic of inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Helminth parasites have developed immunomodulatory strategies that may impact the outcome of several inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether Taenia crassiceps infection is able to decrease the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Preinfection significantly reduced the manifestations of DSS-induced colitis, as weight loss and shortened colon length, and decreased the disease activity index independently of the genetic background of the mice. Taenia infection decreased systemic levels of proinflammatory cytokines while increasing levels of IL-4 and IL-10, and the inflammatory infiltrate into the colon was also markedly reduced. RT-PCR assays from colon showed that T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed increased expression of Arginase-1 but decreased expression of iNOS compared to DSS-treated uninfected mice. The percentages of T regulatory cells were not increased. The adoptive transfer of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM?s) from infected mice into mice with DSS-induced colitis reduced the severity of colon inflammation. Administration of indomethacin abrogated the anticolitic effect of Taenia. Thus, T. crassiceps infection limits the pathology of ulcerative colitis by suppressing inflammatory responses mechanistically associated with AAM?s and prostaglandins. PMID:26090422

  3. Immunomodulatory Agents with Antivascular Activity in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Focus on TLR9 Agonists, IMiDs and NGR-TNF

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Angelo; Giovannini, Monica; Belli, Carmen; Villa, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    Standard treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, often lead to disappointing results. Unfortunately, also the various immunotherapeutic approaches so far tested have not produced satisfactory results to be widely applied in the clinical practice. However, the recent development of new immunomodulatory agents may open promising therapeutic options. This paper focuses on PF3512676, lenalidomide, and NGR-TNF, that is, drugs belonging to three different classes of immunomodulatory agents, that are also capable to affect tumor blood vessels with different mechanisms, and discusses the potential role of such agents in NSCLC treatment strategy. PMID:20613952

  4. ARE MACROPHAGES ACTIVATED AND INDUCE PULMONARY INJURY BY INTRACELLULARLY BIOAVAILABLE IRON?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARE MACROPHAGES ACTIVATED AND INDUCE PULMONARY INJURY BY INTRACELLULARLY BIOAVAILABLE IRON? UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, S Becker2, DL Costa1, P Mayer3, A Ziesenis3, WG Kreyling3, 1ETD, 2HSDivision, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, and 3GSF, Inhalation Biology...

  5. Secreted Thrombospondin-1 Regulates Macrophage Interleukin-1? Production and Activation through CD47.

    PubMed

    Stein, Erica V; Miller, Thomas W; Ivins-O'Keefe, Kelly; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 regulates inflammation by engaging several cell surface receptors and by modulating activities of other secreted factors. We have uncovered a novel role of thrombospondin-1 in modulating production and activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1? by human and murine macrophages. Physiological concentrations of thrombospondin-1 limit the induction by lipopolysaccharide of IL-1? mRNA and total protein production by human macrophages. This inhibition can be explained by the ability of thrombospondin-1 to disrupt the interaction between CD47 and CD14, thereby limiting activation of NF?B/AP-1 by lipopolysaccharide. Only the CD47-binding domain of thrombospondin-1 exhibits this activity. In contrast, CD47, CD36, and integrin-binding domains of thrombospondin-1 independently enhance the inflammasome-dependent maturation of IL-1? in human THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Correspondingly, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages that lack either thrombospondin-1 or CD47 exhibit diminished induction of mature IL-1? in response to lipopolysaccharide. Lack of CD47 also limits lipopolysaccharide induction of IL-1?, NLRP3, and caspase-1 mRNAs. These data demonstrate that thrombospondin-1 exerts CD47-dependent and -independent pro-and anti-inflammatory effects on the IL-1? pathway. Therefore, thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 may be useful targets for limiting the pro-inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide and for treating endotoxemia. PMID:26813769

  6. Model-driven multi-omic data analysis elucidates metabolic immunomodulators of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bordbar, Aarash; Mo, Monica L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Jones, Marcus B.; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-06-26

    Macrophages are central players in the immune response, manifesting divergent phenotypes to control inflammation and innate immunity through the release of cytokines and other regulatory factor-dependent signaling pathways. In recent years, the focus on metabolism has been reemphasized as critical signaling and regulatory pathways of human pathophysiology, ranging from cancer to aging, often converge on metabolic responses. Here, we used genome-scale modeling and multi-omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) analysis to assess metabolic features critical for macrophage functions. We constructed a genome-scale metabolic network for the RAW 264.7 cell line to determine metabolic modulators of macrophage activation. Metabolites well-known to be associated with immunoactivation (e.g., glucose and arginine) and immunosuppression (e.g., tryptophan and vitamin D3) were amongst the most critical effectors. Intracellular metabolic mechanisms linked to critical suppressive effectors were then assessed, identifying a suppressive role for de novo nucleotide synthesis. Finally, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of macrophage activation are identified by analyzing multi-omic data obtained from LPS-stimulated RAW cells in the context of our flux-based predictions. Our study demonstrates metabolism's role in regulating activation may be greater than previously anticipated and elucidates underlying metabolic connections between activation and metabolic effectors.

  7. Secreted Thrombospondin-1 Regulates Macrophage Interleukin-1β Production and Activation through CD47

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Erica V.; Miller, Thomas W.; Ivins-O’Keefe, Kelly; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 regulates inflammation by engaging several cell surface receptors and by modulating activities of other secreted factors. We have uncovered a novel role of thrombospondin-1 in modulating production and activation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β by human and murine macrophages. Physiological concentrations of thrombospondin-1 limit the induction by lipopolysaccharide of IL-1β mRNA and total protein production by human macrophages. This inhibition can be explained by the ability of thrombospondin-1 to disrupt the interaction between CD47 and CD14, thereby limiting activation of NFκB/AP-1 by lipopolysaccharide. Only the CD47-binding domain of thrombospondin-1 exhibits this activity. In contrast, CD47, CD36, and integrin-binding domains of thrombospondin-1 independently enhance the inflammasome-dependent maturation of IL-1β in human THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Correspondingly, mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages that lack either thrombospondin-1 or CD47 exhibit diminished induction of mature IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide. Lack of CD47 also limits lipopolysaccharide induction of IL-1β, NLRP3, and caspase-1 mRNAs. These data demonstrate that thrombospondin-1 exerts CD47-dependent and -independent pro-and anti-inflammatory effects on the IL-1β pathway. Therefore, thrombospondin-1 and its receptor CD47 may be useful targets for limiting the pro-inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide and for treating endotoxemia. PMID:26813769

  8. Modular analysis of bioinformatics demonstrates a critical role for NF-?B in macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Yingmei; Lu, Ming; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2014-08-01

    To achieve the goal of identifying the gene groups that regulated macrophage activation, a total of 925 differentially expressed genes of activated macrophages were found at the intersection of the three series (GSE5099-1, GSE5099-2, and GSE18686) from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, and a sub-network was constructed based on the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Four communities (K?=?3) were identified from the sub-network using the CFinder software. Community 1 was considered as the gene group of interest base on the heat map. GO-BP and KEGG enrichment analysis with the DAVID software showed that the functions of the 14 genes in community 1 were mainly related to the NF-?B pathway. A network was constructed using the Cytoscape software. The diagram showed that STAT1, NFKBIA, NFKAIB, JUN, and RELA were the key genes in the regulation of macrophage activation. Among these genes, RELA (NF-?B P65) was an important member of the NF-?B family, while NFKBIA (I?B?) and NFKAIB (I?B?) were the inhibitory factors of NF-?B. Small molecules capable of regulating these five genes were identified via the CMap software, and a network diagram was generated using the Cytoscape software to provide a reference for the development of new drugs that regulate macrophage activation. PMID:24577727

  9. Macrophages mediate flagellin induced inflammasome activation and host defense in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Vincent, William J B; Freisinger, Christina M; Lam, Pui-Ying; Huttenlocher, Anna; Sauer, John-Demian

    2016-04-01

    The inflammasome is an innate immune complex whose rapid inflammatory outputs play a critical role in controlling infection; however, the host cells that mediate inflammasome responses in vivo are not well defined. Using zebrafish larvae, we examined the cellular immune responses to inflammasome activation during infection. We compared the host responses with two Listeria monocytogenes strains: wild type and Lm-pyro, a strain engineered to activate the inflammasome via ectopic expression of flagellin. Infection with Lm-pyro led to activation of the inflammasome, macrophage pyroptosis and ultimately attenuation of virulence. Depletion of caspase A, the zebrafish caspase-1 homolog, restored Lm-pyro virulence. Inflammasome activation specifically recruited macrophages to infection sites, whereas neutrophils were equally recruited to wild type and Lm-pyro infections. Similar to caspase A depletion, macrophage deficiency rescued Lm-pyro virulence to wild-type levels, while defective neutrophils had no specific effect. Neutrophils were, however, important for general clearance of L. monocytogenes, as both wild type and Lm-pyro were more virulent in larvae with defective neutrophils. This study characterizes a novel model for inflammasome studies in an intact host, establishes the importance of macrophages during inflammasome responses and adds importance to the role of neutrophils in controlling L. monocytogenes infections. PMID:26468080

  10. Differential activation of inflammatory pathways in testicular macrophages provides a rationale for their subdued inflammatory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Lu, Yongning; Frhlich, Suada; Fijak, Monika; Vijayan, Vijith; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Spermatogenic cells express cell-specific molecules with the potential to be seen as "foreign" by the immune system. Owing to the time difference between their appearance in puberty and the editing of the lymphocyte repertoire around birth, local adaptations of the immune system coined immune privilege are required to confer protection from autoattack. Testicular macrophages (TM) play an important role in maintaining testicular immune privilege and display reduced proinflammatory capacity compared with other macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this macrophage phenotype remained elusive. We demonstrate that TM have a lower constitutive expression of TLR pathway-specific genes compared with peritoneal macrophages. Moreover, in TM stimulated with LPS, the NF-?B signaling pathway is blocked due to lack of I?B? ubiquitination and, hence, degradation. Instead, challenge of TM with LPS or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid induces MAPK, AP-1, and CREB signaling pathways, which leads to production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-?, although at much lower levels than in peritoneal macrophages. Pretreatment of TM with inhibitors for MAPKs p38 and ERK1/2 suppresses activation of AP-1 and CREB signaling pathways and attenuates LPS-induced TNF-? and IL-10 secretion. High levels of IL-10 production and activation of STAT3 by LPS stimulation in TM indicate a regulatory macrophage phenotype. Our results suggest that TM maintain testicular immune privilege by inhibiting NF-?B signaling through impairment of I?B? ubiquitination and a general reduction of TLR cascade gene expression. However, TM do maintain some capacity for innate immune responses through AP-1 and CREB signaling pathways. PMID:25917085

  11. Macrophage Activation Associated with Chronic Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Results in More Severe Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Miller, Daniel M.; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P.; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-?, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  12. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Meningococcal Lipoprotein Ag473 Depends on the Conformation Made up of the Lipid and Protein Moieties

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ching-Liang; Yu, Yen-Ling; Kung, Yueh-Chen; Liao, Pei-Yu; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Tseng, Yen-Tzu; Lin, Yuan-Chuen; Hsieh, Steve Shih-Yang; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing; Yang, Chiou-Ying

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the meningococcal antigen Ag473 in the presence of Freunds adjuvant can elicit protective immune responses in mouse challenge model. In this study, we evaluated the structural requirement for the immunological activity and the possible signaling pathway of recombinant Ag473 antigen produced in E. coli. We found that lipidated Ag473 (L-Ag473) possesses an intrinsic adjuvant activity that could be attributed to its ability to activate dendritic cells and promote their maturation. In addition, we found that L-Ag473 can activate human monocytes and promote maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. These results provide an indirect support that L-Ag473 may also be immunogenic in human. Interestingly, the observed activity is dependent on the overall conformation of L-Ag473 because heating and proteinase K treatment can diminish and abolish the activity. Furthermore, our data suggest a species-differential TLR recognition of L-Ag473. Overall, these data suggest a new paradigm for the ligand-TLR interaction in addition to demonstrating the self-adjuvanting activity of the vaccine candidate L-Ag473. PMID:22844415

  13. In vitro immunomodulatory effects of 5-amino-3-methyl-4-isoxazolecarboxylic acid hydrazide on the cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Drynda, Angelika; M?czy?ski, Marcin; Ryng, Stanis?aw; Obmi?ska-Mrukowicz, Bo?ena

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the immunomodulatory activity of 5-amino-3-methyl-4-isoxazolecarboxylic acid hydrazide in vitro. This compound was used for the synthesis of a series of 5-amino-3-methyl-4-isoxazolecarboxylic acid semicarbazides and thiosemicarbazides with documented immunotropic activity. The performed measurements assessed the cytotoxic effect of 5-amino-3-methyl-4-isoxazolecarboxylic acid hydrazide on the murine macrophages (cell line J774E.1) and lymphoblasts (cell line D10.G4.1), the influence of this compound on the proliferation of murine lymphocytes isolated from peripheral lymphatic organs and murine peritoneal macrophages stimulated with mitogens (concanavalin A(ConA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phytohemagglutinin A (PHA)). Moreover, the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-1? by the murine peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LPS from Escherichia coli was assessed. It was found that 5-amino-3-methyl-4-isoxazolecarboxylic acid hydrazide displayed no cytotoxic effects in the murine J774E.1 and D10.G4.1 cell lines in a wide range of concentrations (0.5-200??g/ml). Furthermore, the compound stimulated proliferation of lymphocytes isolated from the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes when used alone and in combination with mitogens (ConA and PHA). This effect was stronger in the nonstimulated cells, and it followed a dose-response relationship. The same phenomenon was observed for the proliferation of the murine peritoneal macrophages. The investigated hydrazide, at the highest used concentration of 150??g/ml, increased the LPS-induced production of IL-1? and did not affect the level of TNF-?. These results confirmed the immunomodulatory properties of 5-amino-3-methyl-4-isoxazolecarboxylic acid hydrazide and indicated that this compound could be useful in further research aimed at finding novel functional drugs. PMID:24588616

  14. [Protective effect of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor on fungal infection (2). In vitro effect of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor on systemic aspergillosis and in vitro effect on the activities of macrophage].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Masuda, H; Nakajima, T; Yada, K; Watanabe, M; Kagitani, Y

    1995-05-01

    We studied the protective effect of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) of fungal infection due to systemic aspergillosis in normal mice. We also examined the effect of M-CSF against the activities of mouse peritoneal macrophage which were relating to the phagocytosis, the killing, the production of superoxide after contacting with phorbol myristate acetate and the production of nitric oxide after contacting with interferon-gamma in vitro. M-CSF improved the median survival time and the survival rate of systemic aspergillosis. Combination therapy with M-CSF and amphotericin-B (AMPH-B) showed the therapy with either M-CSF or AMPH-B alone. M-CSF enhanced the activities of phagocytosis and the killing of ingested Candida albicans H and spores of Aspergillus fumigatus K by macrophage. Furthermore, M-CSF promoted the production of superoxide and nitric oxide in macrophage. These results indicate that M-CSF can enhance the fungicidal activity of macrophages by activation in vivo, thereby preventing the dissemination of fungal infection. PMID:7602192

  15. Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells Prevent Macrophage-Mediated Axonal Dieback and Promote Regrowth after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Sarah A.; Hamilton, Jason A.; Horn, Kevin P.; Cuascut, Fernando X.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Lehman, Nicholas; Deans, Robert J.; Ting, Anthony E.; Mays, Robert W.; Silver, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated axonal dieback presents an additional challenge to regenerating axons after spinal cord injury. Adult adherent stem cells are known to have immunomodulatory capabilities, but their potential to ameliorate this detrimental inflammation-related process has not been investigated. Using an in vitro model of axonal dieback as well as an adult rat dorsal column crush model of spinal cord injury, we found that multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) can affect both macrophages and dystrophic neurons simultaneously. MAPCs significantly decrease MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) release from macrophages, effectively preventing induction of axonal dieback. MAPCs also induce a shift in macrophages from an M1, or classically activated proinflammatory state, to an M2, or alternatively activated antiinflammatory state. In addition to these effects on macrophages, MAPCs promote sensory neurite outgrowth, induce sprouting, and further enable axons to overcome the negative effects of macrophages as well as inhibitory proteoglycans in their environment by increasing their intrinsic growth capacity. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs have therapeutic benefits after spinal cord injury and provide specific evidence that adult stem cells exert positive immunomodulatory and neurotrophic influences. PMID:21248119

  16. Reactive oxygen species in the tumor niche triggers altered activation of macrophages and immunosuppression: Role of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sayan; Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Choudhury, Sreetama; Gupta, Payal; Adhikary, Arghya; Baral, Rathindranath; Chattopadhyay, Sreya

    2015-07-01

    Macrophages are projected as one of the key players responsible for the progression of cancer. Classically activated (M1) macrophages are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense, while alternatively activated (M2) macrophages are associated with immunosuppression. Macrophages residing at the site of neoplastic growth are alternately activated and are referred to as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). These "cooperate" with tumor tissue, promoting increased proliferation and immune escape. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors like fluoxetine have recently been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. We used fluoxetine to target tumor-associated inflammation and consequent alternate polarization of macrophages. We established that murine peritoneal macrophages progressed towards an altered activation state when exposed to cell-free tumor fluid, as evidenced by increased IL-6, IL-4 and IL-10 levels. These polarized macrophages showed significant pro-oxidant bias and increased p65 nuclear localization. It was further observed that these altered macrophages could induce oxidative insult and apoptosis in cultured mouse CD3(+) T cells. To validate these findings, we replicated key experiments in vivo, and observed that there was increased serum IL-6, IL-4 and IL-10 in tumor-bearing animals, with increased % CD206(+) cells within the tumor niche. TAMs showed increased nuclear localization of p65 with decreased Nrf2 expression in the nucleus. These results were associated with increase in apoptosis of CD3(+) T cells co-cultured with TAM-spent media. We could establish that fluoxetine treatment could specifically re-educate the macrophages both in vitro and in vivo by skewing their phenotype such that immune suppression mediated by tumor-dictated macrophages was successfully mitigated. PMID:25819340

  17. miR-155 targets Caspase-3 mRNA in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Rebecca; Liepelt, Anke; Mossanen, Jana C; Dueck, Anne; Simons, Nadine; Mohs, Antje; Trautwein, Christian; Meister, Gunter; Marx, Gernot; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H

    2016-01-01

    To secure the functionality of activated macrophages in the innate immune response, efficient life span control is required. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces downstream signaling pathways, which merge to induce the expression of cytokine genes and anti-apoptotic genes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important inflammatory response modulators, but information about their functional impact on apoptosis is scarce. To identify miRNAs differentially expressed in response to LPS, cDNA libraries from untreated and LPS-activated murine macrophages were analyzed by deep sequencing and regulated miRNA expression was verified by Northern blotting and qPCR. Employing TargetScan(TM) we identified CASPASE-3 (CASP-3) mRNA that encodes a key player in apoptosis as potential target of LPS-induced miR-155. LPS-dependent primary macrophage activation revealed TLR4-mediated enhancement of miR-155 expression and CASP-3 mRNA reduction. Endogenous CASP-3 and cleaved CASP-3 protein declined in LPS-activated macrophages. Accumulation of miR-155 and CASP-3 mRNA in miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISC) was demonstrated by ARGONAUTE 2 (AGO2) immunoprecipitation. Importantly, specific antagomir transfection effectively reduced mature miR-155 and resulted in significantly elevated CASP-3 mRNA levels in activated macrophages. In vitro translation assays demonstrated that the target site in the CASP-3 mRNA 3'UTR mediates miR-155-dependent Luciferase reporter mRNA destabilization. Strikingly, Annexin V staining of macrophages transfected with antagomir-155 and stimulated with LPS prior to staurosporine (SSP) treatment implied that LPS-induced miR-155 prevents apoptosis through CASP-3 mRNA down-regulation. In conclusion, we report that miR-155-mediated CASP-3 mRNA destabilization in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages suppresses apoptosis, as a prerequisite to maintain their crucial function in inflammation. PMID:26574931

  18. Effective macrophage redox defense against Chlamydia pneumoniae depends on L-type Ca2+ channel activation.

    PubMed

    Azenabor, Anthony A; Chaudhry, Aziz U

    2003-05-01

    Macrophage immune capability depends on their efficient redox potential expressed in the effective release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. In this study the effect of the activation of a specialized Ca(2+) channel on macrophage redox function during Chlamydia pneumoniae infection was explored. C. pneumoniae exhibited a profound and sustained Ca(2+) influx capacity, with evidence of activity attributable to their lipopolysaccharide (cLPS) content. Also the organism showed an additional Ca(2+) influx signal in macrophages exposed to thapsigargin, and there was evidence for the operation of a single ion channel of the L type as demonstrated by the effect of L-type channel antagonists (methoxyverapamil and nimodipine) despite exposure to Ca(2+)-rich medium. C. pneumoniae or cLPS induced intracellular ROS and NO generation in a manner consistent with dependence on intracellular calcium. L-type Ca(2+) channel blocking significantly prompted C. pneumoniae inclusion formation. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) influx signal and redox function in C. pneumoniae-infected macrophages depend on L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. PMID:12736823

  19. Modulation of Macrophage Activities in Proliferation, Lysosome, and Phagosome by the Nonspecific Immunostimulator, Mica

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Jung, Yeon-Kwon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that the aluminosilicate material mica activated macrophages and showed its immunostimulating effects. However, the mechanisms by which it exerts these effects are unclear. To address this, we evaluated the effects of mica fine particles (MFP, 804.1 0.02 nm) on the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Specifically, RAW 264.7 cells were treated with 100 and 500 ?g/mL MFP and their proliferative response was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Changes in global gene expression upon MFP treatment for 12 and 48 h were also determined using microarrays. Following the MFP treatment, RAW 264.7 cells showed a low level of proliferation compared to nontreated cells (p < 0.01). There was a change in an expression level of 1,128 genes after 48 h treatment. Specifically, genes associated with the cell cycle, DNA replication, and pyrimidine and purine metabolisms, were down-regulated in cells treated with MFP, which resulted in reduction of cell proliferation. MFP treatment also up-regulated genes associated with lysosome and phagosome function, which are both required for macrophage activities. We speculate that activation of macrophages by mica is in part derived from up-regulation of these pathways. PMID:25668030

  20. Resistance of LPS-activated bone marrow derived macrophages to apoptosis mediated by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Haim, Yasmin Ohana; Unger, Naamit Deshet; Souroujon, Miriam C; Mittelman, Moshe; Neumann, Drorit

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) display pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Macrophages are a major target for GC action. Here we show that dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic GC, decreased viability of nave bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), involving an apoptotic mechanism. Administration of DEX together with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) protected BMDM against DEX-mediated cell death, suggesting that activated BMDM respond to DEX differently than nave BMDM. An insight to the molecular basis of LPS actions was provided by a 7 fold increase in mRNA levels of glucocorticoid receptor beta (GR?), a GR dominant-negative splice variant which inhibits GR?'s transcriptional activity. LPS did not inhibit all DEX-mediated effects on BMDM; DEX significantly reduced the percentage of BMDM expressing high levels of the cell surface markers F4/80 and CD11b and led to a decrease in macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP1-?) mRNA and protein levels. These two DEX-mediated effects were not prevented by LPS. Our finding that LPS did not reduce the DEX-induced elevation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a mediator of GCs anti-inflammatory actions, may provide an underlying mechanism. These findings enable a better understanding of clinical states, such as sepsis, in which macrophages are activated by endotoxins and treatment by GCs is considered. PMID:24608810

  1. Mechanism of macrophage activation induced by polysaccharide from Cordyceps militaris culture broth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Duck Soo; Lee, Ki Rim; Park, Jun Myoung; Ha, Suk-Jin; Hong, Eock Kee

    2015-04-20

    Mushroom-derived polysaccharides have been shown to stimulate immune responses. Our previous report showed that the novel polysaccharide PLCM isolated from the culture broth of Cordyceps militaris could induce nitric oxide production in the murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7. In this study, we show that PLCM enhances immunostimulatory activities such as the release of toxic molecules (nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species), secretion of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, and phagocytic uptake in RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, all the specific inhibitors against the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) (SN50, BAY11-7082, PD98059, SP600125 and SB203580) markedly suppressed the nitric oxide production and phagocytic uptake induced by PLCM. Moreover, antibodies specific to the extracellular domain of Toll-like receptor-2, Toll-like receptor-4 or the macrophage receptor Dectin-1 significantly attenuated PLCM-induced secretion of TNF-?. Our results indicate that the C. militaris polysaccharide activates macrophages through the MAPKs and NF-?B signaling pathways via Toll-like receptor 2, Toll-like receptor 4, and Dectin-1. PMID:25662684

  2. Modulation of macrophage activities in proliferation, lysosome, and phagosome by the nonspecific immunostimulator, mica.

    PubMed

    Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Jung, Yeon-Kwon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that the aluminosilicate material mica activated macrophages and showed its immunostimulating effects. However, the mechanisms by which it exerts these effects are unclear. To address this, we evaluated the effects of mica fine particles (MFP, 804.1 0.02 nm) on the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Specifically, RAW 264.7 cells were treated with 100 and 500 ?g/mL MFP and their proliferative response was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Changes in global gene expression upon MFP treatment for 12 and 48 h were also determined using microarrays. Following the MFP treatment, RAW 264.7 cells showed a low level of proliferation compared to nontreated cells (p < 0.01). There was a change in an expression level of 1,128 genes after 48 h treatment. Specifically, genes associated with the cell cycle, DNA replication, and pyrimidine and purine metabolisms, were down-regulated in cells treated with MFP, which resulted in reduction of cell proliferation. MFP treatment also up-regulated genes associated with lysosome and phagosome function, which are both required for macrophage activities. We speculate that activation of macrophages by mica is in part derived from up-regulation of these pathways. PMID:25668030

  3. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sugata; Schmeier, Sebastian; Arner, Erik; Alam, Tanvir; Parihar, Suraj P.; Ozturk, Mumin; Tamgue, Ousman; Kawaji, Hideya; deHoon, MichielJ.L.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, AlistairR. R.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Guler, Reto; Consortium, FANTOM; Brombacher, Frank; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2015-01-01

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation. PMID:26117544

  4. Histone deacetylases in monocyte/macrophage development, activation and metabolism: refining HDAC targets for inflammatory and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Das Gupta, Kaustav; Shakespear, Melanie R; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have central roles in danger detection, inflammation and host defense, and consequently, these cells are intimately linked to most disease processes. Major advances in our understanding of the development and function of macrophages have recently come to light. For example, it is now clear that tissue-resident macrophages can be derived from either blood monocytes or through local proliferation of phagocytes that are originally seeded during embryonic development. Metabolic state has also emerged as a major control point for macrophage activation phenotypes. Herein, we review recent literature linking the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes to macrophage development and activation, particularly in relation to these recent developments. There has been considerable interest in potential therapeutic applications for small molecule inhibitors of HDACs (HDACi), not only for cancer, but also for inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, the enormous range of molecular and cellular processes that are controlled by different HDAC enzymes presents a potential stumbling block to clinical development. We therefore present examples of how classical HDACs control macrophage functions, roles of specific HDACs in these processes and approaches for selective targeting of drugs, such as HDACi, to macrophages. Development of selective inhibitors of macrophage-expressed HDACs and/or selective delivery of pan HDACi to macrophages may provide avenues for enhancing efficacy of HDACi in therapeutic applications, while limiting unwanted side effects. PMID:26900475

  5. Activation of the Macrophage ?7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor and Control of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bez-Pagn, Carlos A; Delgado-Vlez, Manuel; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jos A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses to stimuli are essential body defenses against foreign threats. However, uncontrolled inflammation may result in serious health problems, which can be life-threatening. The ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in the nervous and immune systems, has an essential role in the control of inflammation. Activation of the macrophage ?7 receptor by acetylcholine, nicotine, or other agonists, selectively inhibits production of pro-inflammatory cytokines while leaving anti-inflammatory cytokines undisturbed. The neural control of this regulation pathway was discovered recently and it was named the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP). When afferent vagus nerve terminals are activated by cytokines or other pro-inflammatory stimuli, the message travels through the afferent vagus nerve, resulting in action potentials traveling down efferent vagus nerve fibers in a process that eventually leads to macrophage ?7 activation by acetylcholine and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The mechanism by which activation of ?7 in macrophages regulates pro-inflammatory responses is subject of intense research, and important insights have thus been made. The results suggest that activation of the macrophage ?7 controls inflammation by inhibiting NF-?B nuclear translocation, and activating the JAK2/STAT3 pathway among other suggested pathways. While the ?7 is well characterized as a ligand-gated ion channel in neurons, whole-cell patch clamp experiments suggest that ?7's ion channel activity, defined as the translocation of ions across the membrane in response to ligands, is absent in leukocytes, and therefore, ion channel activity is generally assumed not to be required for the operation of the CAP. In this perspective, we briefly review macrophage ?7 activation as it relates to the control of inflammation, and broaden the current view by providing single-channel currents as evidence that the ?7 expressed in macrophages retains its ion translocation activity despite the absence of whole-cell currents. Whether this ion-translocating activity is relevant for the proper operation of the CAP or other important physiological processes remains obscure. PMID:25870122

  6. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages. PMID:26934296

  7. Antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens and immunomodulatory effects and toxicity of geopropolis produced by the stingless bee Melipona fasciculata Smith

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Native bees of the tribe Meliponini produce a distinct kind of propolis called geopropolis. Although many pharmacological activities of propolis have already been demonstrated, little is known about geopropolis, particularly regarding its antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens. The present study aimed at investigating the antimicrobial activity of M. fasciculata geopropolis against oral pathogens, its effects on S. mutans biofilms, and the chemical contents of the extracts. A gel prepared with a geopropolis extract was also analyzed for its activity on S. mutans and its immunotoxicological potential. Methods Antimicrobial activities of three hydroalcoholic extracts (HAEs) of geopropolis, and hexane and chloroform fractions of one extract, were evaluated using the agar diffusion method and the broth dilution technique. Ethanol (70%, v/v) and chlorhexidine (0.12%, w/w) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Total phenol and flavonoid concentrations were assayed by spectrophotometry. Immunotoxicity was evaluated in mice by topical application in the oral cavity followed by quantification of biochemical and immunological parameters, and macro-microscopic analysis of animal organs. Results Two extracts, HAE-2 and HAE-3, showed inhibition zones ranging from 9 to 13 mm in diameter for S. mutans and C. albicans, but presented no activity against L. acidophilus. The MBCs for HAE-2 and HAE-3 against S. mutans were 6.25 mg/mL and 12.5 mg/mL, respectively. HAE-2 was fractionated, and its chloroform fraction had an MBC of 14.57 mg/mL. HAE-2 also exhibited bactericidal effects on S. mutans biofilms after 3 h of treatment. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in total phenol and flavonoid concentrations were observed among the samples. Signs toxic effects were not observed after application of the geopropolis-based gel, but an increase in the production of IL-4 and IL-10, anti-inflammatory cytokines, was detected. Conclusions In summary, geopropolis produced by M. fasciculata can exert antimicrobial action against S. mutans and C. albicans, with significant inhibitory activity against S. mutans biofilms. The extract with the highest flavonoid concentration, HAE-2, presented the highest antimicrobial activity. In addition, a geopropolis-based gel is not toxic in an animal model and displays anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:22053900

  8. Screening for immunomodulators: Effects of xenobiotics on macrophage chemiluminescence in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P.E.; Hinsdill, R.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Macrophage chemiluminescence (CL) was evaluated as a primary screening assay by assessing the modulatory activity of 17 different chemicals. The chemicals were either known immunomodulatory drugs or environmental toxicants with reported immunomodulatory activity. Elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were exposed to the chemicals in vitro, and CL was measured in response to an opsonized yeast stimulus. Ten chemicals (hydrocortisone, dextran sulfate, di-n-octyltin dichloride, dimethyltin dichloride, azathioprine, lambda carrageenan (l-carrageenan), lead, N-propyl gallate, gallic acid, and indomethacin) were identified as effective modulators of CL. The polyanions dextran sulfate and l-carrageenan either suppressed or enhanced CL, depending on the experimental conditions, while the remaining modulators were inhibitory. A series of secondary assays was used to verify this modulatory activity and to explore different mechanisms of action. Each effective modulator altered only a few specific components of the more complex CL response, and the following general mechanisms were apparent. At least 2 chemicals showed distinct antioxidant activity and thus probably did not alter functional aspects of macrophage CL. Chemicals which blocked Fc receptor function delayed the peak CL of macrophages stimulated by opsonized yeast. Nine of the 10 modulators inhibited hydrogen peroxide release, but only 3 inhibited the release of superoxide. Finally, some effective modulators were chemicals known to interact with cell membranes or specific membrane receptors, and these were able to directly induce a CL response without the addition of opsonized yeast as a stimulus. Thus, macrophage CL was a simple, quantitative, yet sensitive immunotoxicologic screening assay capable of identifying many known immunomodulatory drugs.

  9. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  10. Activity of purine analogs against Leishmania tropica within human macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J D; Lee, L S; Robins, R K; Revankar, G R

    1983-01-01

    The activity of purine analogs against Leishmania tropica in human monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro was determined. Formycin B, formycin A, formycin B and A monophosphate, and formycin A triphosphate all had 50% effective doses of 0.02 to 0.04 microM and eliminated 90% of organisms at less than or equal to 0.5 microM. Allopurinol ribonucleoside was much less active: the 50% effective dose was 76 to 190 microM, and 90% of organisms were not eliminated at the highest dose tested (190 microM). 7-Deazainosine had a low 50% effective dose (0.2 microM), but only 80% of organisms were eliminated at 4 microM. Thio derivatives were as active as or less active than the parent compounds. These data suggest that certain inosine analogs are much more active than others against macrophage-contained Leishmania spp. such as are found in human lesions. However, because toxicity to the human macrophage hosts generally paralleled antileishmanial activity, the more active compounds might also be more toxic to human cells. The activity of 3-deazaguanosine (50% effective dose, 3.6 microM) in this model suggests that guanosine derivatives may have potential as antileishmanial agents. PMID:6638989

  11. Cigarette smoke stimulates cathepsin B activity in alveolar macrophages of rats.

    PubMed

    Gairola, C G; Galicki, N I; Cardozo, C; Lai, Y L; Lesser, M

    1989-10-01

    Cathepsin B activity was determined in alveolar macrophages and cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Sprague-Dawley rats exposed only through the nose to fresh mainstream smoke from University of Kentucky high-tar, high-nicotine reference cigarettes, and in cells and fluid from room control and sham control animals. Increased levels of blood carboxyhemoglobin and pulmonary aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in smoke-exposed animals indicated effective exposure of animals to cigarette smoke. Cathepsin B activity was quantitated with alpha-N-benzyloxycarbonyl-leucine-leucine-arginine-2-naphthylamide as substrate. Specific activity (nanomoles of substrate cleaved per milligram of protein per hour) in alveolar macrophages was increased by 43% at both 4- and 10-week exposure points in animals exposed twice daily to 10 puffs of cigarette smoke. These data indicate that maximal stimulation of the enzyme occurs within 4 weeks of the initiation of smoke exposure. When the activity was expressed on a per-cell basis, cathepsin B activity was also increased in the smoke-exposed group at both exposure points. Activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of smoke-exposed animals was increased by approximately 50% at 4 and 10 weeks, but the differences were not statistically significant. These findings demonstrate that cigarette smoke is a potent inducer of cathepsin B activity in alveolar macrophages of rats. PMID:2794755

  12. High Fc Density Particles Result in Binary Complement Activation but Tunable Macrophage Phagocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulchek, Todd; Pacheco, Patricia; White, David

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis and complement system activation represent two key components of the immune system and both can be activated through the presentation of multiple Fc domains of IgG antibodies. We have created functionalized micro- and nanoparticles with various densities of Fc domains to understand the modulation of the immune system for eventual use as a novel immunomodulation platform. Phagocytosis assays were carried out by adding functionalized particles to macrophage cells and quantitatively determined using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Complement system activation by the functionalized particles in human serum was quantified with an enzyme immunoassay. Our phagocytosis assay revealed a strong dependence on particle size and Fc density. For small particles, as the Fc density increased, the number of particles phagocytosed also increased. Large particles were phagocytosed at significantly lower levels and showed no dependency on Fc density. Complement was successfully activated at levels comparable to positive controls for small particles at high Fc densities. However at low Fc densities, there is a significant decrease in complement activation. This result suggests a binary response for complement system activation with a threshold density for successful activation. Therefore, varying the Fc density on micro/nanoparticles resulted in a tunable response in macrophage phagocytosis while a more binary response for complement activation.

  13. Administration of DHA Reduces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Inflammation and Alters Microglial or Macrophage Activation in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Lloyd D; Yin, Yan; Attarwala, Insiya Y; Begum, Gulnaz; Deng, Julia; Yan, Hong Q; Dixon, C Edward; Sun, Dandan

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effects of the administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) on reducing neuroinflammation. TBI was induced by cortical contusion injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Either DHA (16?mg/kg in dimethyl sulfoxide) or vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (1?ml/kg) was administered intraperitonially at 5?min after TBI, followed by a daily dose for 3 to 21 days. TBI triggered activation of microglia or macrophages, detected by an increase of Iba1 positively stained microglia or macrophages in peri-lesion cortical tissues at 3, 7, and 21 days post-TBI. The inflammatory response was further characterized by expression of the proinflammatory marker CD16/32 and the anti-inflammatory marker CD206 in Iba1(+) microglia or macrophages. DHA-treated brains showed significantly fewer CD16/32(+) microglia or macrophages, but an increased CD206(+) phagocytic microglial or macrophage population. Additionally, DHA treatment revealed a shift in microglial or macrophage morphology from the activated, amoeboid-like state into the more permissive, surveillant state. Furthermore, activated Iba1(+) microglial or macrophages were associated with neurons expressing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker CHOP at 3 days post-TBI, and the administration of DHA post-TBI concurrently reduced ER stress and the associated activation of Iba1(+) microglial or macrophages. There was a decrease in nuclear translocation of activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein at 3 days in DHA-treated tissue and reduced neuronal degeneration in DHA-treated brains at 3, 7, and 21 days after TBI. In summary, our study demonstrated that TBI mediated inflammatory responses are associated with increased neuronal ER stress and subsequent activation of microglia or macrophages. DHA administration reduced neuronal ER stress and subsequent association with microglial or macrophage polarization after TBI, demonstrating its therapeutic potential to ameliorate TBI-induced cellular pathology. PMID:26685193

  14. Administration of DHA Reduces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Inflammation and Alters Microglial or Macrophage Activation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Lloyd D.; Yin, Yan; Attarwala, Insiya Y.; Begum, Gulnaz; Deng, Julia; Yan, Hong Q.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) on reducing neuroinflammation. TBI was induced by cortical contusion injury in Sprague Dawley rats. Either DHA (16 mg/kg in dimethyl sulfoxide) or vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (1 ml/kg) was administered intraperitonially at 5 min after TBI, followed by a daily dose for 3 to 21 days. TBI triggered activation of microglia or macrophages, detected by an increase of Iba1 positively stained microglia or macrophages in peri-lesion cortical tissues at 3, 7, and 21 days post-TBI. The inflammatory response was further characterized by expression of the proinflammatory marker CD16/32 and the anti-inflammatory marker CD206 in Iba1+ microglia or macrophages. DHA-treated brains showed significantly fewer CD16/32+ microglia or macrophages, but an increased CD206+ phagocytic microglial or macrophage population. Additionally, DHA treatment revealed a shift in microglial or macrophage morphology from the activated, amoeboid-like state into the more permissive, surveillant state. Furthermore, activated Iba1+ microglial or macrophages were associated with neurons expressing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker CHOP at 3 days post-TBI, and the administration of DHA post-TBI concurrently reduced ER stress and the associated activation of Iba1+ microglial or macrophages. There was a decrease in nuclear translocation of activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein at 3 days in DHA-treated tissue and reduced neuronal degeneration in DHA-treated brains at 3, 7, and 21 days after TBI. In summary, our study demonstrated that TBI mediated inflammatory responses are associated with increased neuronal ER stress and subsequent activation of microglia or macrophages. DHA administration reduced neuronal ER stress and subsequent association with microglial or macrophage polarization after TBI, demonstrating its therapeutic potential to ameliorate TBI-induced cellular pathology. PMID:26685193

  15. Obesity activates a program of lysosomal-dependent lipid metabolism in adipose tissue macrophages independently of classic activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyuan; Grijalva, Ambar; Skowronski, Alicja; van Eijk, Marco; Serlie, Mireille J; Ferrante, Anthony W

    2013-12-01

    Obesity activates a complex systemic immune response that includes the recruitment of macrophages and other immune cells to key metabolic tissues. Current models postulate that obesity and excess lipids classically activate macrophages, polarizing them toward an M1 (inflammatory) state. Little is known about noninflammatory functions ofadipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). Here, we show that the expansion of adipose tissue (AT) across models of obesity induces a program of lysosome biogenesis in ATMs and is associated with lipid catabolism but not a classic inflammatory phenotype. This program is induced by factors produced by AT and is tightly coupled to lipid accumulation by ATMs. Inhibition of ATM lysosome function impairs lipid metabolism and increases lipid content in ATMs and reduces whole AT lipolysis. These data argue that ATMs contribute quantitatively to the development of obesity-induced inflammation but also serve an important role in lipid trafficking independent of their inflammatory phenotype. PMID:24315368

  16. Obesity Activates a Program of Lysosomal-Dependent Lipid Metabolism in Adipose Tissue Macrophages Independently of Classic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyuan; Grijalva, Ambar; Skowronski, Alicja; van Eijk, Marco; Serlie, Mireille J.; Ferrante, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity activates a complex systemic immune response that includes the recruitment of macrophages and other immune cells to key metabolic tissues. Current models postulate that obesity and excess lipids classically activate macrophages, polarizing them toward an M1 (inflammatory) state. Little is known about noninflammatory functions of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). Here, we show that the expansion of adipose tissue (AT) across models of obesity induces a program of lysosome biogenesis in ATMs and is associated with lipid catabolism but not a classic inflammatory phenotype. This program is induced by factors produced by AT and is tightly coupled to lipid accumulation by ATMs. Inhibition of ATM lysosome function impairs lipid metabolism and increases lipid content in ATMs and reduces whole AT lipolysis. These data argue that ATMs contribute quantitatively to the development of obesity-induced inflammation but also serve an important role in lipid trafficking independent of their inflammatory phenotype. PMID:24315368

  17. Identification of a thrombin sequence with growth factor activity on macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Shavit, R.; Kahn, A.J.; Mann, K.G.; Wilner, G.D.

    1986-02-01

    In contrast to fibroblasts, the exposure of G0/G1-arrested J774 cells, a murine macrophage-like tumor cell line, with either active or esterolytically inactive diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate-conjugated -thrombin results in a mitogenic response as measured by increased (TH)thymidine incorporation. This response to thrombin is optimal at 10 nM and is specifically blocked by hirudin, a high-affinity thrombin inhibitor. When prethrombin 1 is cleaved with cyanogen bromide, a fragment (peptide CB67-129) is produced that, like the parent thrombin molecule, is mitogenic for J774 cells but not for fibroblasts. Limited tryptic digests of this fragment retain the ability to stimulate macrophages - a function that can be mimicked by a synthetic tetradecapeptide homologue of CB67-129 but not by any of a series of well-known growth promoters. The mitogenic effects of this peptide are not limited to J774 cells but can be expressed in other macrophage-like tumor cells lines. In addition to increased (TH)thymidine incorporation, the synthetic B chain peptide stimulates cell proliferation as evidenced by a dose-dependent increase in total protein per culture well and cell number. The authors conclude that the thrombin molecule contains a macrophage growth factor domain that is separate and distinct from its active center. Thus, thrombin, in addition to its major role in hemostasis and thrombosis, may also have important functions in such basic processes as the inflammatory response and monocytopoiesis.

  18. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Wakabayashi, Hideyuki; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Aruto

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

  19. The ?-hydroxybutyrate receptor HCA2 activates a neuroprotective subset of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Muhammad, Sajjad; Khan, Mahtab A; Chen, Hui; Ridder, Dirk A; Mller-Fielitz, Helge; Pokorn, Barbora; Vollbrandt, Tillman; Stlting, Ines; Nadrowitz, Roger; Okun, Jrgen G; Offermanns, Stefan; Schwaninger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The ketone body ?-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is an endogenous factor protecting against stroke and neurodegenerative diseases, but its mode of action is unclear. Here we show in a stroke model that the hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor 2 (HCA2, GPR109A) is required for the neuroprotective effect of BHB and a ketogenic diet, as this effect is lost in Hca2(-/-) mice. We further demonstrate that nicotinic acid, a clinically used HCA2 agonist, reduces infarct size via a HCA2-mediated mechanism, and that noninflammatory Ly-6C(Lo) monocytes and/or macrophages infiltrating the ischemic brain also express HCA2. Using cell ablation and chimeric mice, we demonstrate that HCA2 on monocytes and/or macrophages is required for the protective effect of nicotinic acid. The activation of HCA2 induces a neuroprotective phenotype of monocytes and/or macrophages that depends on PGD2 production by COX1 and the haematopoietic PGD2 synthase. Our data suggest that HCA2 activation by dietary or pharmacological means instructs Ly-6C(Lo) monocytes and/or macrophages to deliver a neuroprotective signal to the brain. PMID:24845831

  20. Macrophage activation and polarization modify P2X7 receptor secretome influencing the inflammatory process

    PubMed Central

    de Torre-Minguela, Carlos; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Gómez, Ana I.; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) on M1 polarized macrophages induces the assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the establishment of the inflammatory response. However, P2X7R signaling to the NLRP3 inflammasome is uncoupled on M2 macrophages without changes on receptor activation. In this study, we analyzed P2X7R secretome in wild-type and P2X7R-deficient macrophages polarized either to M1 or M2 and proved that proteins released after P2X7R stimulation goes beyond caspase-1 secretome. The characterization of P2X7R-secretome reveals a new function of this receptor through a fine-tuning of protein release. We found that P2X7R stimulation in macrophages is able to release potent anti-inflammatory proteins, such as Annexin A1, independently of their polarization state suggesting for first time a potential role for P2X7R during resolution of the inflammation and not linked to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results are of prime importance for the development of therapeutics targeting P2X7R. PMID:26935289

  1. Kv1.3 potassium channel mediates macrophage migration in atherosclerosis by regulating ERK activity.

    PubMed

    Kan, Xiao-Hong; Gao, Hai-Qing; Ma, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Lin; Ling, Ming-Ying; Wang, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Ion channels expressed in macrophages have been tightly related to atherosclerosis by coupling cellular function. How the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) affect macrophage migration remain unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether Kv1.3-ERK signaling pathway plays an important role in the process. We explored the expression of Kv1.3 in coronary atherosclerotic heart disease and found Kv1.3 channel was increased in acute coronary syndrome patients. Treatment of RAW264.7cells with Kv1.3 small interfering RNA, suppressed cell migration. The expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 also decreased after knockdown of Kv1.3. On the other hand, overexpression of Kv1.3 channel promoted cell migration and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. U-0126, the mitogen-activated protein kinaseinhibitors, could reverse macrophage migration induced by Kv1.3 channel overexpression. Downregulation of Kv1.3 channel by siRNA could not further inhibit cell migration when cells were treated with U-0126. It means that ERK is downstream signal of Kv1.3 channel. We concluded that Kv1.3 may stimulate macrophage migration through the activation of ERK. PMID:26748289

  2. IL-33 attenuates EAE by suppressing IL-17 and IFN-? production and inducing alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui-Rong; Milovanovi?, Marija; Allan, Debbie; Niedbala, Wanda; Besnard, Anne-Galle; Fukada, Sandra Y; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Togbe, Dieudonne; Goodyear, Carl S; Linington, Christopher; Xu, Damo; Lukic, Miodrag L; Liew, Foo Y

    2012-07-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, is an important modulator of the immune system associated with several immune-mediated disorders. High levels of IL-33 are expressed by the central nervous system (CNS) suggesting a potential role of IL-33 in autoimmune CNS diseases. We have investigated the expression and function of IL-33 in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice. We report here that IL-33 and its receptor ST2 (IL-33R?) are highly expressed in spinal cord tissue, and ST2 expression is markedly increased in the spinal cords of mice with EAE. Furthermore, ST2-deficient (ST2(-/-) ) mice developed exacerbated EAE compared with wild-type (WT) mice while WT, but not ST2(-/-) EAE mice treated with IL-33 developed significantly attenuated disease. IL-33-treated mice had reduced levels of IL-17 and IFN-? but produced increased amounts of IL-5 and IL-13. Lymph node and splenic macrophages of IL-33-treated mice showed polarization toward an alternatively activated macrophage (M2) phenotype with significantly increased frequency of MR(+) PD-L2(+) cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of these IL-33-treated macrophages attenuated EAE development. Our data therefore demonstrate that IL-33 plays a therapeutic role in autoimmune CNS disease by switching a predominantly pathogenic Th17/Th1 response to Th2 activity, and by polarization of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. PMID:22585447

  3. Macrophage activation and polarization modify P2X7 receptor secretome influencing the inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    de Torre-Minguela, Carlos; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Gómez, Ana I; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) on M1 polarized macrophages induces the assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the establishment of the inflammatory response. However, P2X7R signaling to the NLRP3 inflammasome is uncoupled on M2 macrophages without changes on receptor activation. In this study, we analyzed P2X7R secretome in wild-type and P2X7R-deficient macrophages polarized either to M1 or M2 and proved that proteins released after P2X7R stimulation goes beyond caspase-1 secretome. The characterization of P2X7R-secretome reveals a new function of this receptor through a fine-tuning of protein release. We found that P2X7R stimulation in macrophages is able to release potent anti-inflammatory proteins, such as Annexin A1, independently of their polarization state suggesting for first time a potential role for P2X7R during resolution of the inflammation and not linked to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results are of prime importance for the development of therapeutics targeting P2X7R. PMID:26935289

  4. Antimicrobial, Antiviral and Immunomodulatory Activity Studies of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs 7630) in the Context of Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Pelargonium species contribute significantly to the health care of a large population in the Southern African region, as part of a long-standing medical system intimately linked to traditional healing practices. Most notably, extracts of the roots of P. sidoides have commonly been applied for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea but only occasionally for respiratory complaints. Clinical trials have shown that a modern aqueous-ethanolic formulation of P. sidoides extracts (EPs 7630) is an efficacious treatment for disorders of the respiratory tract, for example bronchitis and sinusitis. It should be noted that EPs 7630 is the most widely investigated extract and therefore is the focus of this review. In order to provide a rationale for its therapeutic activity extracts have been evaluated for antibacterial activity and for their effects on non-specific immune functions. Only moderate direct antibacterial capabilities against a spectrum of bacteria, including Mycobacteria strains, have been noted. In contrast, a large body of in vitro studies has provided convincing evidence for an anti-infective principle associated with activation of the non-specific immune system. Interestingly, significant inhibition of interaction between bacteria and host cells, a key to the pathogenesis of respiratory tract infections, has emerged from recent studies. In addition, antiviral effects have been demonstrated, including inhibition of the replication of respiratory viruses and the enzymes haemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Besides, an increase of cilliary beat frequency of respiratory cells may contribute to the beneficial effects of P. sidoides extracts. This example provides a compelling argument for continuing the exploration of Nature and traditional medical systems as a source of therapeutically useful herbal medicines.

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages in the cutaneous SCC microenvironment are heterogeneously activated.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Julia S; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Surez-Farias, Mayte; Pierson, Katherine C; Pitts-Kiefer, Alexander; Fan, Linda; Belkin, Daniel A; Wang, Claire Q F; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Johnson-Huang, Leanne M; Bluth, Mark J; Krueger, James G; Lowes, Michelle A; Carucci, John A

    2011-06-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) may have an important role in tumor immunity. We studied the activation state of TAMs in cutaneous SCC, the second most common human cancer. CD163 was identified as a more abundant, sensitive, and accurate marker of TAMs when compared with CD68. CD163(+) TAMs produced protumoral factors, matrix metalloproteinases 9 and 11 (MMP9 and MMP11), at the gene and protein levels. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used to evaluate M1 and M2 macrophage gene sets in the SCC genes and to identify candidate genes in order to phenotypically characterize TAMs. There was coexpression of CD163 and alternatively activated "M2" markers, CD209 and CCL18 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 18). There was enrichment for classically activated "M1" genes in SCC, which was confirmed in situ by colocalization of CD163 and phosphorylated STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1), IL-23p19, IL-12/IL-23p40, and CD127. Also, a subset of TAMs in SCC was bi-activated as CD163(+) cells expressed markers for both M1 and M2, shown by triple-label immunofluorescence. These data support heterogeneous activation states of TAMs in SCC, and suggest that a dynamic model of macrophage activation would be more useful to characterize TAMs. PMID:21307877

  6. Activation of macrophages stimulated by the bengkoang fiber extract through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Kumalasari, Ika Dyah; Nishi, Kosuke; Putra, Agus Budiawan Naro; Sugahara, Takuya

    2014-07-25

    Bengkoang (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) is an edible root tuber containing fairly large amounts of carbohydrates and crude fibers. Our previous studies showed that the bengkoang fiber extract (BFE) stimulates activation of macrophages, leading to induction of phagocytotic activity and cytokine production. In the present study we investigated the mechanism underlying activation of murine macrophages by BFE. BFE increased production of TNF-?, IL-6, and nitric oxide by J774.1 cells. In addition BFE also facilitated the gene expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase. We examined the effect of a TLR4 inhibitor on cytokine production to investigate the membrane receptor of macrophage activation by BFE. Treatment of J774.1 cells with the TLR4 inhibitor significantly inhibited production of IL-6 and TNF-?, suggesting that TLR4 is the target membrane receptor for BFE. The main signal molecules located downstream of TLR4 such as JNK, p38, ERK, and NF-?B were activated by BFE treatment. The immunostimulatory effect of BFE was cancelled by the pectinase treatment, suggesting that the active ingredient in BFE is pectin-like molecules. Overall results suggested that BFE activates J774.1 cells via the MAPK and NF-?B signaling pathways. PMID:24770453

  7. Myeloid-Derived Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Promotes Macrophage Motility through FAK, Rac1, and NF-?B Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ling; Jin, Yang; Mars, Wendy M.; Reeves, W. Brian; Hu, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage accumulation is one of the hallmarks of progressive kidney disease. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is known to promote macrophage infiltration and renal inflammation during chronic kidney injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. We examined the role of tPA in macrophage motility invivo by tracking fluorescence-labeled bone marrowderived macrophages, and found that tPA-deficient mice had markedly fewer infiltrating fluorescence-labeled macrophages than the wild-type (WT) mice. Experiments in bone marrow chimeric mice further demonstrated that myeloid cells are the main source of endogenous tPA that promotes macrophage migration. Invitro studies showed that tPA promoted macrophage motility through its CD11b-mediated protease-independent function; and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Rac-1, and NF-?B were indispensable to tPA-induced macrophage migration as either infection of FAK dominant-negative adenovirus or treatment with a Rac-1specific inhibitor or NF-?B inhibitor abolished the effect of tPA. Moreover, ectopic FAK mimicked tPA and induced macrophage motility. tPA also activated migratory signaling invivo. The accumulation of phospho-FAKpositive CD11b macrophages in the obstructed kidneys from WT mice was clearly attenuated in tPA knockout mice, which also displayed lower Rac-1 activity than their WT counterparts. Therefore, our results indicate that myeloid-derived tPA promotes macrophage migration through a novel signaling cascade involving FAK, Rac-1, and NF-?B. PMID:25131752

  8. The GAP activity of type III effector YopE triggers killing of Yersinia in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Parashar, Kaustubh; Sitaram, Ananya; Bliska, James B

    2014-08-01

    The mammalian immune system has the ability to discriminate between pathogens and innocuous microbes by detecting conserved molecular patterns. In addition to conserved microbial patterns, the mammalian immune system may recognize distinct pathogen-induced processes through a mechanism which is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that a type III secretion system (T3SS) in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis leads to decreased survival of this bacterium in primary murine macrophages by unknown mechanisms. Here, we use colony forming unit assays and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the T3SS triggers killing of Yersinia in macrophages. We present evidence that Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) delivered by the T3SS triggers intracellular killing response against Yersinia. YopE mimics eukaryotic GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and inactivates Rho GTPases in host cells. Unlike wild-type YopE, catalytically dead YopER144A is impaired in restricting Yersinia intracellular survival, highlighting that the GAP activity of YopE is detected as a danger signal. Additionally, a second translocated effector, YopT, counteracts the YopE triggered killing effect by decreasing the translocation level of YopE and possibly by competing for the same pool of Rho GTPase targets. Moreover, inactivation of Rho GTPases by Clostridium difficile Toxin B mimics the effect of YopE and promotes increased killing of Yersinia in macrophages. Using a Rac inhibitor NSC23766 and a Rho inhibitor TAT-C3, we show that macrophages restrict Yersinia intracellular survival in response to Rac1 inhibition, but not Rho inhibition. In summary, our findings reveal that primary macrophages sense manipulation of Rho GTPases by Yersinia YopE and actively counteract pathogenic infection by restricting intracellular bacterial survival. Our results uncover a new mode of innate immune recognition in response to pathogenic infection. PMID:25165815

  9. Nf1+/- monocytes/macrophages induce neointima formation via CCR2 activation.

    PubMed

    Bessler, Waylan K; Kim, Grace; Hudson, Farlyn Z; Mund, Julie A; Mali, Raghuveer; Menon, Keshav; Kapur, Reuben; Clapp, D Wade; Ingram, David A; Stansfield, Brian K

    2016-03-15

    Persons with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a predisposition for premature and severe arterial stenosis. Mutations in the NF1 gene result in decreased expression of neurofibromin, a negative regulator of p21(Ras), and increases Ras signaling. Heterozygous Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) mice develop a marked arterial stenosis characterized by proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and a predominance of infiltrating macrophages, which closely resembles arterial lesions from NF1 patients. Interestingly, lineage-restricted inactivation of a single Nf1 allele in monocytes/macrophages is sufficient to recapitulate the phenotype observed in Nf1(+/-) mice and to mobilize proinflammatory CCR2+ monocytes into the peripheral blood. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCR2 receptor activation by its primary ligand monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is critical for monocyte infiltration into the arterial wall and neointima formation in Nf1(+/-) mice. MCP-1 induces a dose-responsive increase in Nf1(+/-) macrophage migration and proliferation that corresponds with activation of multiple Ras kinases. In addition, Nf1(+/-) SMCs, which express CCR2, demonstrate an enhanced proliferative response to MCP-1 when compared with WT SMCs. To interrogate the role of CCR2 activation on Nf1(+/-) neointima formation, we induced neointima formation by carotid artery ligation in Nf1(+/-) and WT mice with genetic deletion of either MCP1 or CCR2. Loss of MCP-1 or CCR2 expression effectively inhibited Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and reduced macrophage content in the arterial wall. Finally, administration of a CCR2 antagonist significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation. These studies identify MCP-1 as a potent chemokine for Nf1(+/-) monocytes/macrophages and CCR2 as a viable therapeutic target for NF1 arterial stenosis. PMID:26740548

  10. The GAP Activity of Type III Effector YopE Triggers Killing of Yersinia in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoying; Parashar, Kaustubh; Sitaram, Ananya; Bliska, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian immune system has the ability to discriminate between pathogens and innocuous microbes by detecting conserved molecular patterns. In addition to conserved microbial patterns, the mammalian immune system may recognize distinct pathogen-induced processes through a mechanism which is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that a type III secretion system (T3SS) in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis leads to decreased survival of this bacterium in primary murine macrophages by unknown mechanisms. Here, we use colony forming unit assays and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the T3SS triggers killing of Yersinia in macrophages. We present evidence that Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) delivered by the T3SS triggers intracellular killing response against Yersinia. YopE mimics eukaryotic GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and inactivates Rho GTPases in host cells. Unlike wild-type YopE, catalytically dead YopER144A is impaired in restricting Yersinia intracellular survival, highlighting that the GAP activity of YopE is detected as a danger signal. Additionally, a second translocated effector, YopT, counteracts the YopE triggered killing effect by decreasing the translocation level of YopE and possibly by competing for the same pool of Rho GTPase targets. Moreover, inactivation of Rho GTPases by Clostridium difficile Toxin B mimics the effect of YopE and promotes increased killing of Yersinia in macrophages. Using a Rac inhibitor NSC23766 and a Rho inhibitor TAT-C3, we show that macrophages restrict Yersinia intracellular survival in response to Rac1 inhibition, but not Rho inhibition. In summary, our findings reveal that primary macrophages sense manipulation of Rho GTPases by Yersinia YopE and actively counteract pathogenic infection by restricting intracellular bacterial survival. Our results uncover a new mode of innate immune recognition in response to pathogenic infection. PMID:25165815

  11. Progesterone-induced activation of membrane-bound progesterone receptors in murine macrophage cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Reese, Joshua; Zhou, Ying; Hirsch, Emmet

    2014-01-01

    Parturition is an inflammatory process mediated to a significant extent by macrophages. Progesterone maintains uterine quiescence in pregnancy, and a proposed functional withdrawal of progesterone classically regulated by nuclear progesterone receptors (nPRs) leads to labor. Progesterone can impact the functions of macrophages despite the reported lack of expression of nPRs in these immune cells. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effects of the activation of the putative membrane-associated progesterone receptor on the function of macrophages (a key cell for parturition) and discuss the implications of these findings for pregnancy and parturition. In murine macrophage cells (RAW264.7), activation of mPRs by progesterone modified to be active only extracellularly by conjugation to BSA (P4BSA, 1.010?7 mol/l) caused a pro-inflammatory shift in mRNA expression profile, with significant up-regulation of the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (Ptgs2), Il1B, and Tnf and down-regulation of membrane progesterone receptor alpha (Paqr7) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr). Pretreatment with PD98059, a MEK 1/2 inhibitor, significantly reduced P4BSA-induced Il1B, Tnf and Ptgs2 mRNA. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by H89 blocked P4BSA-induced Il1B and Tnf mRNA levels. P4BSA induced rapid phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB, a downstream target of PKA). This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with PD98059 and H89, respectively, revealing that MEK1/2 and PKA are two of the components involved in mPR signaling. Taken together, these data demonstrate that changes in membrane progesterone receptor alpha expression and signaling in macrophages are associated with the inflammatory responses; and that these changes might contribute to the functional withdrawal of progesterone related to labor. PMID:25472814

  12. Modulation of Macrophage Activity During Fracture Repair has Differential Effects in Young Adult and Elderly Mice

    PubMed Central

    Slade Shantz, Jesse Alan; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Andres, Wells; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Advanced age is a factor associated with altered fracture healing. Delays in healing may increase the incidence of complications in the elderly, who are less able to tolerate long periods of immobilization and activity restrictions. The following study sought to determine if fracture repair could be enhanced in elderly animals by inhibiting macrophage activation, blocking the M-CSF receptor c-fms, and inhibiting monocyte trafficking using CC chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2) knockout mice. Methods Closed, unstable tibial shaft fractures were produced in mice aged four, 12 and 78 weeks. Mice were then fed a diet containing PLX3397 or a control diet from days 110 post-injury. Fractures were similarly made in CCR2?/? mice aged 78 weeks. The fracture callus was collected during fracture healing and was assessed for its size and the presence of macrophages, both of which were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results PLX3397 treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of macrophages in the fracture callus at Day 5. Calluses in juvenile mice trended towards being smaller compared to elderly mice (p=0.08). There was also a trend toward larger callus size and increased bone formation in PLX3397-treated elderly animals compared to those of the control animals (p=0.12). Similar increases in bone formation (p=0.013) and decreases in cartilage within the callus (p=0.03) were seen at Day 10 in CCR2?/? mice. Conclusions The inhibition of macrophages in elderly mice may lead to an acceleration of fracture healing. Altering macrophage activation after fracture may represent a therapeutic strategy for preventing delayed healing and nonunion in the elderly. PMID:24378434

  13. A Novel in vitro Human Macrophage Model to Study the Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Vitamin D3 and Retinoic Acid Activated THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Jaymie L.; Kan-Sutton, Celestine; Gong, Xing; Rajagopalan, Malini; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Hunter, Robert L.; Eissa, N. Tony; Jagannath, Chinnaswamy

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) replicates within the human macrophages and we investigated the activating effects of retinoic acid (RA) and vitamin D3 (VD) on macrophages in relation to the viability of intracellular Mtb. A combination of these vitamins (RAVD) enhanced the levels of DC-SIGN and mannose receptors on THP-1 macrophages that increased mycobacterial uptake but inhibited the subsequent intracellular growth of Mtb by inducing reactive oxygen species and autophagy. RAVD also enhanced antigen presenting and chemotactic receptors on THPs suggesting an activated phenotype for RAVD activated THPs. RAVD mediated activation was also associated with a marked phenotypic change in Mtb infected THPs that fused with adjacent THPs to form multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). Typically, MNGCs occurred over 30?days of in vitro culture and contained non-replicating persisting Mtb for more than 60?days in culture. Latent tuberculosis occurs in over a third of mankind and we propose that RAVD mediated induction of persistent Mtb within human macrophages provides a novel model to develop therapeutic approaches and investigate pathogenesis of latency. PMID:21747789

  14. Macrophage activation syndrome with acute hepatitis E during tocilizumab treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.