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Sample records for macrophage lipid chaperone

  1. Unfolding the relationship between secreted molecular chaperones and macrophage activation states

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, it has emerged that many molecular chaperones and protein-folding catalysts are secreted from cells and function, somewhat in the manner of cytokines, as pleiotropic signals for a variety of cells, with much attention being focused on the macrophage. During the last decade, it has become clear that macrophages respond to bacterial, protozoal, parasitic and host signals to generate phenotypically distinct states of activation. These activation states have been termed ‘classical’ and ‘alternative’ and represent not a simple bifurcation in response to external signals but a range of cellular phenotypes. From an examination of the literature, the hypothesis is propounded that mammalian molecular chaperones are able to induce a wide variety of alternative macrophage activation states, and this may be a system for relating cellular or tissue stress to appropriate macrophage responses to restore homeostatic equilibrium. PMID:18958583

  2. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) as a Chaperone Inhibiting Accumulation of Misfolded SOD1

    PubMed Central

    Israelson, Adrian; Ditsworth, Dara; Sun, Shuying; Song, SungWon; Liang, Jason; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Abu-Hamad, Salah; Zoltsman, Guy; Shani, Tom; Maldonado, Marcus; Bui, Anh; Navarro, Michael; Zhou, Huilin; Marsala, Martin; Kaspar, Brian K.; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons and accompanied by accumulation of misfolded SOD1 onto the cytoplasmic faces of intracellular organelles, including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Using inhibition of misfolded SOD1 deposition onto mitochondria as an assay, a chaperone activity abundant in non-neuronal tissues is now purified and identified to be the multifunctional macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), whose activities include an ATP-independent protein folding chaperone. Purified MIF is shown to directly inhibit mutant SOD1 misfolding. Elevating MIF in neuronal cells suppresses accumulation of misfolded SOD1 and its association with mitochondria and ER and extends survival of mutant SOD1-expressing motor neurons. Accumulated MIF protein is identified to be low in motor neurons, implicating correspondingly low chaperone activity as a component of vulnerability to mutant SOD1 misfolding and supporting therapies to enhance intracellular MIF chaperone activity. PMID:25801706

  3. Lipid storage by adipose tissue macrophages regulates systemic glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aouadi, Myriam; Vangala, Pranitha; Yawe, Joseph C.; Tencerova, Michaela; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Cohen, Jessica L.; Shen, Yuefei

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory pathways in adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) can impair glucose tolerance in obesity, but ATMs may also be beneficial as repositories for excess lipid that adipocytes are unable to store. To test this hypothesis, we selectively targeted visceral ATMs in obese mice with siRNA against lipoprotein lipase (LPL), leaving macrophages within other organs unaffected. Selective silencing of ATM LPL decreased foam cell formation in visceral adipose tissue of obese mice, consistent with a reduced supply of fatty acids from VLDL hydrolysis. Unexpectedly, silencing LPL also decreased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake (CD36) and esterification in ATMs. This deficit in fatty acid uptake capacity was associated with increased circulating serum free fatty acids. Importantly, ATM LPL silencing also caused a marked increase in circulating fatty acid-binding protein-4, an adipocyte-derived lipid chaperone previously reported to induce liver insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Consistent with this concept, obese mice with LPL-depleted ATMs exhibited higher hepatic glucose production from pyruvate and glucose intolerance. Silencing CD36 in ATMs also promoted glucose intolerance. Taken together, the data indicate that LPL secreted by ATMs enhances their ability to sequester excess lipid in obese mice, promoting systemic glucose tolerance. PMID:24986598

  4. The essential functions of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, LiChun; Wang, Hong-Hui

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle for protein and lipid synthesis in hepatocytes. ER homeostasis is vital to maintain normal hepatocyte physiology. Perturbed ER functions causes ER stress associated with accumulation of unfolded protein in the ER that activates a series of adaptive signalling pathways, termed unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR regulates ER chaperone levels to preserve ER protein-folding environment to protect the cell from ER stress. Recent findings reveal an array of ER chaperones that alter the protein-folding environment in the ER of hepatocytes and contribute to dysregulation of hepatocyte lipid metabolism and liver disease. In this review, we will discuss the specific functions of these chaperones in regulation of lipid metabolism, especially de novo lipogenesis and lipid transport and demonstrate their homeostatic role not only for ER-protein synthesis but also for lipid metabolism in hepatocyte. PMID:27133206

  5. Targeted delivery of pharmacological chaperones for Gaucher disease to macrophages by a mannosylated cyclodextrin carrier.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lavado, Julio; de la Mata, Mario; Jiménez-Blanco, José L; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Benito, Juan M; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Ohno, Kousaku; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M

    2014-04-14

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a rare monogenetic disorder leading to dysfunction of acid β-glucosidase (β-glucocerebrosidase; GCase) and accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes, especially in macrophages (Gaucher cells). Many of the mutations at the origin of GD do not impair the catalytic activity of GCase, but cause misfolding and subsequent degradation by the quality control system at the endoplasmic reticulum. Pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the endogenous mutant enzyme represent promising alternatives to the currently available enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapies (ERT and SRT, respectively), but unfavorable biodistribution and potential side-effects remain important issues. We have now designed a strategy to enhance the controlled delivery of PCs to macrophages that exploit the formation of ternary complexes between the PC, a trivalent mannosylated β-cyclodextrin (βCD) conjugate and the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR). First, PC candidates with appropriate relative avidities towards the βCD cavity and the GCase active site were selected to ensure efficient transfer of the PC cargo from the host to the GCase active site. Control experiments confirmed that the βCD carrier was selectively recognized by mannose-specific lectins and that the corresponding PC:mannosylated βCD supramolecular complex retained both the chaperoning activity, as confirmed in human GD fibroblasts, and the MMR binding ability. Finally, fluorescence microscopy techniques proved targeting and cellular uptake of the PC-loaded system in macrophages. Altogether, the results support that combined cyclodextrin encapsulation and glycotargeting may improve the efficacy of PCs for GD. PMID:24589885

  6. Phenotypic modulation of macrophages in response to plaque lipids

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Samantha; Leitinger, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The accumulation of macrophages in the vascular wall is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. The biological properties of atherosclerotic plaque macrophages determine lesion size, composition and stability. In atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages encounter a microenvironment that is comprised of a variety of lipid oxidation products, each of which has diverse biological effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the effects of plaque lipids on macrophage phenotypic polarization. Recent findings Atherosclerotic lesions in mice and in humans contain various macrophage phenotypes, which play different roles in mediating inflammation, the clearance of dead cells, and possibly resolution. Macrophages alter their phenotype and biological function in response to plaque lipids through the upregulation of specific sets of genes. Interaction of oxidized lipids with pattern recognition receptors and activation of the inflammasome by cholesterol crystals drive macrophages towards an inflammatory M1 phenotype. A new phenotype, Mox, develops when oxidized phospholipids activate stress response genes via Nrf2. Other lipid mediators such as nitrosylated-fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acid-derived products polarize plaque macrophages towards anti-inflammatory and proresolving phenotypes. Summary A deeper understanding of how lipids that accumulate in atherosclerotic plaques affect macrophage phenotype and function and thus atherosclerotic lesion development and stability will help to devise novel strategies for intervention. PMID:21841486

  7. Lipid rafts direct macrophage motility in the tissue microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Peterman, Kimberly; Shah, Smit; Luzuriaga, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Infiltrating leukocytes are exposed to a wide range of tissue elasticities. While we know the effects of substrate elasticity on acute inflammation via the study of neutrophil migration, we do not know its effects on leukocytes that direct chronic inflammatory events. Here, we studied morphology and motility of macrophages, the innate immune cells that orchestrate acute and chronic inflammation, on polyacrylamide hydrogels that mimicked a wide range of tissue elasticities. As expected, we found that macrophage spreading area increased as substrate elasticity increased. Unexpectedly, we found that morphology did not inversely correlate with motility. In fact, velocity of steady-state macrophages remained unaffected by substrate elasticity, while velocity of biologically stimulated macrophages was limited on stiff substrates. We also found that the lack of motility on stiff substrates was due to a lack of lipid rafts on the leading edge of the macrophages. This study implicates lipid rafts in the mechanosensory mechanism of innate immune cell infiltration. PMID:25269613

  8. Alteration of macrophage membrane lipids following processing of bacterial peptidoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Polanski, M.; Gray, G.R.

    1986-03-01

    As part of the continuing investigation into the role played by macrophages in antigen presentation and bacterial adjuvant activation, the authors have examined the metabolites produced by macrophages after encounter with peptidoglycan. Peptidoglycan was chosen because it contains N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (muramyl dipeptide), a known adjuvant whose primary target cell is the macrophage. In previous work, the authors established that a series of muramyl dipeptide-like glycopeptides was released into the medium following phagocytosis of peptidoglycan by a macrophage cell line. Here the authors report on the finding that, additionally, a membrane lipid has been covalently altered by the addition of a peptidoglycan fragment. Bacillus subtilis cell walls which had been radiolabeled in their muramic acid, glucosamine and alanine residues, were incubated with the murine macrophage cell line RAW264. Using standard lipid extraction procedures, a lipid was isolated and found to contain equal molar ratios of alanine, glutamic acid and diaminopimelic acid. Since lipidated peptidoglycan peptides have been shown to be immunoactivators, the isolated lipid derivative may serve as a signal for interactions with other lymphocytes.

  9. Regulation of the expression of chaperone gp96 in macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Lutz; Fischbeck, Anne; Frey-Wagner, Isabelle; Wojtal, Kacper A; Lang, Silvia; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Hausmann, Martin; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The chaperone function of the ER-residing heat shock protein gp96 plays an important role in protein physiology and has additionally important immunological functions due to its peptide-binding capacity. Low amounts of gp96 stimulate immunity; high quantities induce tolerance by mechanisms not fully understood. A lack of gp96 protein in intestinal macrophages (IMACs) from Crohn`s disease (CD) patients correlates with loss of tolerance against the host gut flora, leading to chronic inflammation. Since gp96 shows dose-dependent direction of immunological reactions, we studied primary IMACs and developed cell models to understand the regulation of gp96 expression. Induction of gp96-expression was higher in in vitro differentiated dendritic cells (i.v.DCs) than in in vitro differentiated macrophages (i.v.MACs), whereas monocytes (MOs) expressed only low gp96 levels. The highest levels of expression were found in IMACs. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramyl dipeptide (MDP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), and Interleukin (IL)-4 induced gp96-expression, while IL12, IL-17, IL-23 and interferon (IFN)-γ were not effective indicating that Th1 and Th17 cells are probably not involved in the induction of gp96. Furthermore, gp96 was able to induce its own expression. The ER-stress inducer tunicamycin increased gp96-expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both ulcerative colitis (UC) and CD patients showed significantly elevated gp96 mRNA levels in intestinal biopsies which correlated positively with the degree of inflammation of the tissue. Since gp96 is highly expressed on the one hand upon stress induction as during inflammation and on the other hand possibly mediating tolerance, these results will help to understand the whether gp96 plays a role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:24146856

  10. Degradation of lipid droplet-associated proteins by chaperone-mediated autophagy facilitates lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) selectively degrades a subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. A potent physiological activator of CMA is nutrient deprivation, a condition in which intracellular triglyceride stores or lipid droplets (LD) also undergo hydrolysis (lipolysis) to generate free fatty acids for energetic purposes. Here we report that LD-associated proteins perilipin 2 (PLIN2) and perilipin 3 (PLIN3) are CMA substrates and their degradation via CMA precedes lipolysis. In vivo studies revealed that CMA degradation of PLIN2 and PLIN3 was enhanced during starvation, concurrent with elevated levels of cytosolic adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and macroautophagy proteins on LD. CMA blockage both in cultured cells and mouse liver or expression of CMA-resistant PLINs lead to reduced association of ATGL and macrolipophagy-related proteins with LD and the subsequent decrease in lipid oxidation and accumulation of LD. We propose a role of CMA in LD biology and in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. PMID:25961502

  11. Lipase maturation factor 1: a lipase chaperone involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Péterfy, Miklós

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1) are associated with severe hypertriglyceridemia in mice and human subjects. The underlying cause is impaired lipid clearance due to lipase deficiency. LMF1 is a chaperone of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and it is critically required for the post-translational activation of three vascular lipases: lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL). As LMF1 is only required for the maturation of homodimeric, but not monomeric, lipases, it is likely involved in the assembly of inactive lipase subunits into active enzymes and/or the stabilization of active dimers. Herein, we provide an overview of current understanding of LMF1 function and propose that it may play a regulatory role in lipase activation and lipid metabolism. Further studies will be required to test this hypothesis and elucidate the full spectrum of phenotypes in combined lipase deficiency. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Triglyceride Metabolism and Disease. PMID:22063272

  12. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JIAN; PING, LING-YAN; DUONG, DUC M.; GAO, XIAO-YAN; HE, CHUN-YAN; WEI, LEI; WU, JUN-ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native-LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL-stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native-LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native-LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation. PMID:26781977

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 in macrophages is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Anas, Adam A; de Vos, Alex F; Hoogendijk, Arie J; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common Gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia, mice homozygous for the conditional Hsp90b1 allele encoding gp96 were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under control of the LysM promoter to generate LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice showed absence of gp96 protein in macrophages and partial depletion in monocytes and granulocytes. This was accompanied by almost complete absence of TLR2 and TLR4 on macrophages. Likewise, integrin subunits CD11b and CD18 were not detectable on macrophages, while being only slightly reduced on monocytes and granulocytes. Gp96-deficient macrophages did not release pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to Klebsiella and displayed reduced phagocytic capacity independent of CD18. LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice were highly vulnerable to lower airway infection induced by K. pneumoniae, as reflected by enhanced bacterial growth and a higher mortality rate. The early inflammatory response in Hsp90b1-flox mice was characterized by strongly impaired recruitment of granulocytes into the lungs, accompanied by attenuated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the inflammatory response during late-stage pneumonia was not dependent on the presence of gp96. Blocking CD18 did not reproduce the impaired host defence of LysMcre-Hsp90b1-flox mice during Klebsiella pneumonia. These data indicate that macrophage gp96 is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia by regulating TLR expression. PMID:26365983

  14. Heat Shock Protein gp96 Is a Master Chaperone for Toll-like Receptors and Is Important in the Innate Function of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Bei; Dai, Jie; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Zammit, David J.; Lefrançois, Leo; Li, Zihai

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone for cell-surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Little is known about its roles in chaperoning other TLRs or in the biology of macrophage in vivo. We generated a macrophage-specific gp96-deficient mouse. Despite normal development and activation by interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-1β, the mutant macrophages failed to respond to ligands of both cell-surface and intracellular TLRs including TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9. Furthermore, we found that TLR4 and TLR9 preferentially interacted with a super-glycosylated gp96 species. The categorical loss of TLRs in gp96-deficient macrophages operationally created a conditional and cell-specific TLR null mouse. These mice were resistant to endotoxin shock but were highly susceptible to Listeria monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate that gp96 is the master chaperone for TLRs and that macrophages, but not other myeloid cells, are the dominant source of proinflammatory cytokines during endotoxemia and Listeria infections. PMID:17275357

  15. Lipid A binding proteins in macrophages detected by ligand blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, R.Y.; Golenbock, D.T.; Raetz, C.R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Endotoxin (LPS) stimulates a variety of eukaryotic cells. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. The site of action of the LPS toxic moiety, lipid A (LA), is unclear. Their laboratory has previously identified a bioactive LA precursor lipid IV/sub A/, which can be enzymatically labeled with /sup 32/P/sub i/ (10/sup 9/ dpm/nmole) and purified (99%). They now show that this ligand binds to specific proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (NC) from LPS-sensitive RAW 264.7 cultured macrophages. NC blots were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-IV/sub A/ in a buffer containing BSA, NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and azide. Binding was assessed using autoradiography or scintillation counting. Dot blot binding of the radioligand was inhibited by excess cold IV/sub A/, LA, or ReLPS but not by phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidic acid. Binding was trypsin-sensitive and dependent on protein concentration. Particulate macrophage proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE and then electroblotted onto NC. Several discrete binding proteins were observed. Identical treatment of fetal bovine serum or molecular weight standards revealed no detectable binding. By avoiding high nonspecific binding of intact membranes, this ligand blotting assay may be useful in elucidating the molecular actions of LPS.

  16. Changes in macrophage function modulated by the lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Cauvi, David M; Rivera, Isabel; Hawisher, Dennis; De Maio, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages (Mφs) play a critical role in the defense against pathogens, orchestrating the inflammatory response during injury and maintaining tissue homeostasis. During these processes, macrophages encounter a variety of environmental conditions that are likely to change their gene expression pattern, which modulates their function. In this study, we found that murine Mφs displayed two different subpopulations characterized by differences in morphologies, expression of surface markers and phagocytic capacity under non-stimulated conditions. These two subpopulations could be recapitulated by changes in the culture conditions. Thus, Mφs grown in suspension in the presence of serum were highly phagocytic, whereas subtraction of serum resulted in rapid attachment and reduced phagocytic activity. The difference in phagocytosis between these subpopulations was correlated with the expression levels of FcγR. These two cell subpopulations also differed in their responses to LPS and the expression of surface markers, including CD14, CD86, scavenger receptor A1, TLR4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor. Moreover, we found that the lipid/cholesterol content in the culture medium mediated the differences between these two cell subpopulations. Thus, we described a mechanism that modulates Mφ function depending on the exposure to lipids within their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:26951856

  17. Oregonin reduces lipid accumulation and proinflammatory responses in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Annika; Magnusson, Lisa U; Ullström, Christina; Krasilnikova, Jelena; Telysheva, Galina; Dizhbite, Tatjana; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson

    2015-03-13

    Inflammation in the vascular wall is important for the development of atherosclerosis. We have previously shown that inflammatory macrophages are more abundant in human atherosclerotic lesions than in healthy arteries. Activated macrophages produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that promote local inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. Here, we investigated the role of oregonin, a diarylheptanoid, on proinflammatory responses in primary human macrophages and found that oregonin decreased cellular lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. We also found that oregonin decreased ROS production in macrophages. Additionally, we observed that treatment of lipopolysaccharide-exposed macrophages with oregonin significantly induced the expression of antioxidant-related genes, including Heme oxygenase-1 and NADPH dehydrogenase quinone 1. In summary, we have shown that oregonin reduces lipid accumulation, inflammation and ROS production in primary human macrophages, indicating that oregonin has anti-inflammatory bioactivities. PMID:25686497

  18. Apoptosis does not mediate macrophage depletion in rabbit atherosclerotic plaques after dietary lipid lowering.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Wim; Croons, Valerie; Herman, Arnold G; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2009-08-01

    Unstable atherosclerotic plaques are characterized by a thin fibrous cap that contains few smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and numerous foam cells of macrophage origin. Previously we and others demonstrated that macrophages disappear from atherosclerotic plaques after dietary lipid lowering. However, it remains unclear whether loss of macrophages after lipid lowering occurs via increased apoptosis, decreased macrophage replication and/or recruitment, or via a combination of both. Rabbits were fed a diet supplemented with cholesterol (0.3%) for 24 weeks followed by a normal diet for 4, 12, or 24 weeks. After 24 weeks of cholesterol supplement, plaques showed apoptosis in both macrophages and SMCs, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling. Cell replication (Ki-67 immunolabeling) was predominantly present in macrophages. After 24 weeks of cholesterol withdrawal, the thickness and areas of the plaques were unchanged. Nevertheless, plaques showed a considerable loss of macrophages. This event was associated with a reduced immunoreactivity for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in the endothelial cells starting 4 weeks after cholesterol withdrawal. Apoptosis did not increase after lipid lowering but showed a steady decline. Apart from decreased VCAM-1 expression, a strong decrease in Ki-67 immunolabeling was observed after 12 weeks of cholesterol withdrawal. Our findings suggest that loss of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques after dietary lipid lowering is not related to induction of macrophage apoptosis but mainly a consequence of impaired monocyte recruitment followed by decreased macrophage replication. This information is essential for understanding the effects of aggressive lipid lowering on plaque stability. PMID:19723077

  19. Beauveriolides, specific inhibitors of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages, produced by Beauveria sp. FO-6979.

    PubMed

    Namatame, I; Tomoda, H; Si, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Masuma, R; Omura, S

    1999-01-01

    Beauveria sp. FO-6979, a soil isolate, was found to produce inhibitors of lipid droplet formation in mouse peritoneal macrophages. A new compound beauveriolide III was isolated along with a known compound beauveriolide I from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, ODS column chromatography, silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Beauveriolides I and III caused a reduction in the number and size of cytosolic lipid droplets in macrophages at 10 microM without any cytotoxic effect on macrophages. PMID:10092189

  20. miRNA-133a attenuates lipid accumulation via TR4-CD36 pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    lipid metabolism is the major causes of atherosclerosis. There is increasing evidence that miR-133a plays an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a in macrophages is still unclear. Several lines of evidence indicate that loss of TR4 leads to reduce lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissues, etc, and lesional macrophages-derived TR4 can greatly increase the foam cell formation through increasing the CD36-mediated the uptake of ox-LDL. Interestingly, computational analysis suggests that TR4 may be a target gene of miR-133a. Here, we examined whether miR-133a regulates TR4 expression in ox-LDL-induced mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, thereby affecting lipid accumulation. Using ox-LDL-treatment RAW 264.7 macrophages transfected with miR-133a mimics or inhibitors, we have showed that miR-133a can directly regulate the expression of TR4 in RAW 264.7 cells, thereby attenuates CD36-medide lipid accumulation. Furthermore, our studies suggest an additional explanation for the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a regulation to its functional target, TR4 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Thus, our findings suggest that miR-133a may regulate lipid accumulation in ox-LDL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages via TR4-CD36 pathway. PMID:27109382

  1. THP-1 macrophage lipid accumulation unaffected by fatty acid double bond geometric or positional configuration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fatty acid type alters atherosclerotic lesion progression and macrophage lipid accumulation. Incompletely elucidated are the mechanisms by which fatty acids differing in double-bond geometric or positional configuration alter arterial lipid accumulation. The objective of this study was to ev...

  2. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:26122084

  3. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zughaier, Susu M; Kandler, Justin L; Balthazar, Jacqueline T; Shafer, William M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA) addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A) moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen's ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense) peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses. PMID:26641098

  4. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zughaier, Susu M.; Kandler, Justin L.; Balthazar, Jacqueline T.; Shafer, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA) addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A) moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen’s ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense) peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses. PMID:26641098

  5. RORα and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Crosstalk Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tuong, Zewen Kelvin; Lau, Patrick; Du, Ximing; Condon, Nicholas D.; Goode, Joel M.; Oh, Tae Gyu; Yeo, Jeremy C.; Muscat, George E. O.; Stow, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors have important roles in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (Rorα)-deficient staggerer (sg/sg) mice display several phenotypes indicative of aberrant lipid metabolism, including dyslipidemia, and increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study we demonstrate that macrophages from sg/sg mice have increased ability to accumulate lipids and accordingly exhibit larger lipid droplets (LD). We have previously shown that BMMs from sg/sg mice have significantly decreased expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) mRNA, the enzyme that produces the oxysterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), and now confirm this at the protein level. 25HC functions as an inverse agonist for RORα. siRNA knockdown of Ch25h in macrophages up-regulates Vldlr mRNA expression and causes increased accumulation of LDs. Treatment with physiological concentrations of 25HC in sg/sg macrophages restored lipid accumulation back to normal levels. Thus, 25HC and RORα signify a new pathway involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in macrophages, potentially via increased uptake of lipid which is suggested by mRNA expression changes in Vldlr and other related genes. PMID:26812621

  6. RORα and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Crosstalk Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tuong, Zewen Kelvin; Lau, Patrick; Du, Ximing; Condon, Nicholas D; Goode, Joel M; Oh, Tae Gyu; Yeo, Jeremy C; Muscat, George E O; Stow, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors have important roles in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory pathways. The retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (Rorα)-deficient staggerer (sg/sg) mice display several phenotypes indicative of aberrant lipid metabolism, including dyslipidemia, and increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis. In this study we demonstrate that macrophages from sg/sg mice have increased ability to accumulate lipids and accordingly exhibit larger lipid droplets (LD). We have previously shown that BMMs from sg/sg mice have significantly decreased expression of cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h) mRNA, the enzyme that produces the oxysterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), and now confirm this at the protein level. 25HC functions as an inverse agonist for RORα. siRNA knockdown of Ch25h in macrophages up-regulates Vldlr mRNA expression and causes increased accumulation of LDs. Treatment with physiological concentrations of 25HC in sg/sg macrophages restored lipid accumulation back to normal levels. Thus, 25HC and RORα signify a new pathway involved in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in macrophages, potentially via increased uptake of lipid which is suggested by mRNA expression changes in Vldlr and other related genes. PMID:26812621

  7. Macrophage Differentiation from Monocytes Is Influenced by the Lipid Oxidation Degree of Low Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jin-Won; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, In-Hong

    2015-01-01

    LDL plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque formation and macrophage differentiation. However, there is no report regarding the oxidation degree of LDL and macrophage differentiation. Our study has shown that the differentiation into M1 or M2 macrophages is related to the lipid oxidation level of LDL. Based on the level of lipid peroxidation, LDL is classified into high-oxidized LDL (hi-oxLDL) and low-oxidized LDL (low-oxLDL). The differentiation profiles of macrophages were determined by surface receptor expression and cytokine secretion profiles. Low-oxLDL induced CD86 expression and production of TNF-α and IL-12p40 in THP-1 cells, indicating an M1 macrophage phenotype. Hi-oxLDL induced mannose receptor expression and production of IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, which mostly match the phenotype of M2 macrophages. Further supporting evidence for an M2 polarization by hi-oxLDL was the induction of LOX-1 in THP-1 cells treated with hi-oxLDL but not with low-oxLDL. Similar results were obtained in primary human monocytes. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that the oxidation degree of LDL influences the differentiation of monocytes into M1 or M2 macrophages and determines the inflammatory fate in early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:26294848

  8. Monitoring intra-cellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman- and CARS-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthäus, Christian; Bergner, Gero; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in lipid metabolism in vessel wall tissues. Macrophages can take up lipids by various mechanisms. As phagocytes, macrophages are important for the decomposition of lipid plaques within arterial walls that contribute to arteriosclerosis. Of special interest are uptake dynamics and intra-cellular fate of different individual types of lipids as, for example, fatty acids, triglycerides or free and esterified cholesterol. Here we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and follow subsequent storage or degradation patterns. The combination of optical microscopy with Raman spectroscopy allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through the associated spectral information. Relatively long measuring times, due to the weakness of Raman scattering can be overcome by non-linear effects such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). With this contribution we introduce first results to monitor the incorporation of lipid components into individual cells employing Raman and CARS microscopy.

  9. Cellular uptake and metabolism of curcuminoids in monocytes/macrophages: regulatory effects on lipid accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that curcumin (CUR) may increase lipid accumulation in cultured THP-1 monocytes/macrophages, but tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), an in vivo metabolite of CUR, had no such effect. In the present study, we have hypothesized that different cellular uptake and/or metabolism of CUR and THC...

  10. Structure elucidation of fungal beauveriolide III, a novel inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, I; Tomoda, H; Tabata, N; Si, S; Omura, S

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fungal beauveriolide III, an inhibitor of lipid droplet formation in mouse macrophages, was elucidated to be cyclo-[(3S,4S)-3-hydroxy-4-methyloctanoyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanyl- D-allo-isoleucyl] by spectral analyses and chemical degradation. PMID:10092190

  11. In vitro effects of exogenous carbon monoxide on oxidative stress and lipid metabolism in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Aviram, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a major constituent of traffic-related air pollution and is also produced endogenously under conditions of oxygen-mediated stress. It has been shown to affect both oxidative stress and inflammation. However, its role in lipid metabolism has been neglected. Using short exposure times, the effect of CO on J774A.1 macrophage atherogenic functions was investigated up to 16 h after exposure. Exposure of macrophages was found to be pro-atherogenic as it significantly increased triglyceride mass, up to 60%, and decreased high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux, up to 27%. In contrast, paraoxonase 2 lactonase activity was increased, up to 65%, and cellular oxidative stress was attenuated by 29%, compared with the control cells. The above results on lipid metabolism may lead to arterial macrophage foam cell formation, the hallmark of early atherogenesis. PMID:25501254

  12. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  13. Differential lipid metabolism in monocytes and macrophages: influence of cholesterol loading.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Irene; Puchalska, Patrycja; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the hypercholesterolemia associated with atherosclerosis on monocytes is poorly understood. Monocytes are exposed to high concentrations of lipids, particularly cholesterol and lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC). Indeed, in line with recent reports, we found that monocytes accumulate cholesteryl esters (CEs) in hypercholesterolemic mice, demonstrating the need for studies that analyze the effects of lipid accumulation on monocytes. Here we analyze the effects of cholesterol and lyso-PC loading in human monocytes and macrophages. We found that cholesterol acyltransferase and CE hydrolase activities are lower in monocytes. Monocytes also showed a different expression profile of cholesterol influx and efflux genes in response to lipid loading and a different pattern of lyso-PC metabolism. In monocytes, increased levels of CE slowed the conversion of lyso-PC into PC. Interestingly, although macrophages accumulated glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine was the main water-soluble choline metabolite being generated in monocytes, suggesting a role for mono- and diacylglycerol in the chemoattractability of these cells. In summary, monocytes and macrophages show significant differences in lipid metabolism and gene expression profiles in response to lipid loading. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and suggest potentials for targeting monocyte chemotactic properties not only in atherosclerosis but also in other diseases. PMID:26839333

  14. Uptake and incorporation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids into macrophage lipids and their effect upon macrophage adhesion and phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Calder, P C; Bond, J A; Harvey, D J; Gordon, S; Newsholme, E A

    1990-01-01

    Murine thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages were cultured in the presence of a variety of fatty acids added as complexes with bovine serum albumin. All fatty acids tested were taken up readily by the cells and both neutral and phospholipid fractions were enriched with the fatty acid provided in the medium. This generated a range of cells enriched in saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids, including n-3 acids of fish oil origin. Saturated fatty acid enrichment enhanced macrophage adhesion to both tissue culture plastic and bacterial plastic compared with enrichment with polyunsaturated fatty acids. Macrophages enriched with the saturated fatty acids myristate or palmitate showed decreases of 28% and 21% respectively in their ability to phagocytose unopsonized zymosan particles. Those enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids showed 25-55% enhancement of phagocytic capacity. The greatest rate of uptake was with arachidonate-enriched cells. Phagocytic rate was highly correlated with the saturated/unsaturated fatty acid ratio, percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acid and index of unsaturation, except for macrophages enriched with fish-oil-derived fatty acids; they showed lower phagocytic activity than expected on the basis of their degree of unsaturation. These results suggest that membrane fluidity is important in determining macrophage adhesion and phagocytic activity. However, in the case of phagocytosis, this effect may be partially overcome if the cells are enriched with fish-oil-derived fatty acids. Thus it may be possible to modulate the activity of cells of the immune system, and so an immune response, by dietary lipid manipulation. PMID:2117922

  15. Overexpression of Sirt3 inhibits lipid accumulation in macrophages through mitochondrial IDH2 deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Shangchun; Kang, Yi; Guo, Yongchan; Pu, Qinli; Cai, Miao; Tu, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between Sirt3 expression and lipid accumulation in macrophages by inducing mitochondrial IDH2 deacetylation. In this study, Sirt3 interference and overexpression lentiviral vectors were constructed. Macrophages collected from C57BL/6J mice by peritoneal lavage were used to construct Sirt3 gene interference and overexpression models, and cultured in medium containing 1 mg/ml ox-LDL for 72 h to observe the enrichment of ox-LDL. Reverse transcription PCR was used to detect the expression of Sirt3 mRNA, western blot to detect Sirt3 and acetylated IDH2 proteins, and Nile Red staining and flow cytometry to detect intracellular lipids in macrophages. The results indicated that as compared to Sirt3 overexpressed and normal groups, the acetylation of IDH2 and accumulation of ox-LDL were significantly higher in the Sirt3 inhibited group. In conclusion, the expression of Sirt3 can inhibit lipid accumulation in macrophages by inducing mitochondrial IDH2 deacetylation. PMID:26464666

  16. Targeting mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux and lipid phenotype.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janice M W; Allen, Anne-Marie; Graham, Annette

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as a potential therapeutic target, capable of increasing macrophage cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. Expression and activity of TSPO in human (THP-1) macrophages were manipulated genetically and by the use of selective TSPO ligands. Cellular responses were analysed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), immunoblotting and radiolabelling, including [3H]cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and human serum. Induction of macrophage cholesterol deposition by acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL) increased expression of TSPO mRNA and protein, reflecting findings in human carotid atherosclerosis. Transient overexpression of TSPO enhanced efflux (E%) of [3H]cholesterol to apoA-I, HDL and human serum compared with empty vector (EV) controls, whereas gene knockdown of TSPO achieved the converse. Ligation of TSPO (using PK11195, FGIN-1-27 and flunitrazepam) triggered increases in [3H]cholesterol efflux, an effect that was amplified in TSPO-overexpressing macrophages. Overexpression of TSPO induced the expression of genes [PPARA (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α), NR1H3 (nuclear receptor 1H3/liver X receptor α), ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette A1), ABCG4 (ATP-binding cassette G4) and APOE (apolipoprotein E)] and proteins (ABCA1 and PPARα) involved in cholesterol efflux, reduced macrophage neutral lipid mass and lipogenesis and limited cholesterol esterification following exposure to AcLDL. Thus, targeting TSPO reduces macrophage lipid content and prevents macrophage foam cell formation, via enhanced cholesterol efflux to (apo)lipoprotein acceptors. PMID:24814875

  17. Macrophage-derived lipid agonists of PPAR-α as intrinsic controllers of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pontis, Silvia; Ribeiro, Alison; Sasso, Oscar; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are multi-faceted phagocytic effector cells that derive from circulating monocytes and undergo differentiation in target tissues to regulate key aspects of the inflammatory process. Macrophages produce and degrade a variety of lipid mediators that stimulate or suppress pain and inflammation. Among the analgesic and anti-inflammatory lipids released from these cells are the fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), which produce their effects by engaging nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α). Two members of this lipid family, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), have recently emerged as important intrinsic regulators of nociception and inflammation. These substances are released from the membrane precursor, N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE), by the action of a NAPE-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD), and in macrophage are primarily deactivated by the lysosomal cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). NAPE-PLD and NAAA regulate FAE levels, exerting a tight control over the ability of these lipid mediators to recruit PPAR-α and attenuate the inflammatory response. This review summarizes recent findings on the contribution of the FAE-PPAR-α signaling complex in inflammation, and on NAAA inhibition as a novel mechanistic approach to treat chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:26585314

  18. Leptin induces macrophage lipid body formation by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- and mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Almeida, Patricia E; D'Avila, Heloisa; Martins, Aline S; Rezende, Ana Paula; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo; Bozza, Patricia T

    2008-01-25

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Lipid bodies (lipid droplets) are emerging as dynamic organelles with roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here we investigated the roles of leptin in signaling pathways involved in cytoplasmic lipid body biogenesis and leukotriene B(4) synthesis in macrophages. Our results demonstrated that leptin directly activated macrophages and induced the formation of adipose differentiation-related protein-enriched lipid bodies. Newly formed lipid bodies were sites of 5-lipoxygenase localization and correlated with an enhanced capacity of leukotriene B(4) production. We demonstrated that leptin-induced macrophage activation was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, since the lipid body formation was inhibited by LY294002 and was absent in the PI3K knock-out mice. Leptin induces phosphorylation of p70(S6K) and 4EBP1 key downstream signaling intermediates of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism. The mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibited leptin-induced lipid body formation, both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, rapamycin inhibited leptin-induced adipose differentiation-related protein accumulation in macrophages and lipid body-dependent leukotriene synthesis, demonstrating a key role for mTOR in lipid body biogenesis and function. Our results establish PI3K/mTOR as an important signaling pathway for leptin-induced cytoplasmic lipid body biogenesis and adipose differentiation-related protein accumulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized link between intracellular (mTOR) and systemic (leptin) nutrient sensors in macrophage lipid metabolism. Leptin-induced increased formation of cytoplasmic lipid bodies and enhanced inflammatory mediator production in macrophages may have implications for obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18039669

  19. Adipocyte-derived lipids increase angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and modulate macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Trouvain, Caroline; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fleming, Ingrid

    2011-03-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages express the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) but nothing is known about its role under physiological conditions. As adipose tissue contains resident macrophages that have been implicated in the generation of insulin resistance in expanding fat mass, we determined whether adipocytes release factors that affect ACE expression and function in monocytes. Incubation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with conditioned medium from freshly isolated human adipocytes (BMI = 25.4 ± 0.96) resulted in a 4-fold increase in ACE expression. The effect was insensitive to denaturation and different proteases but abolished after lipid extraction. mRNA levels of the major histocompatibility complex class II protein increased in parallel with ACE, whereas the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 decreased. As a consequence of the reduction in MCP-1, monocyte recruitment was also attenuated. Moreover, adipocyte-conditioned medium prevented the interferon (IFN)-γ induced formation of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, all markers of classically-activated (M1 type) macrophages. The decrease in cytokine expression in adipocyte-conditioned medium-treated macrophages was sensitive to ACE silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Accordingly, ACE overexpression in THP-1 cells mimicked the effect of adipocyte-conditioned medium. In both cell types, ACE inhibition failed to affect the changes induced by adipocyte conditioned-medium treatment and ACE overexpression. Thus, the modulation of macrophage polarization by ACE appears to be mediated independently of enzyme activity, probably via intracellular signaling. Interestingly, human macrophage ACE expression was also upregulated by IL-4 and IL-13, which promote the "alternative" activation of macrophages and decreased by LPS and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, adipocyte-conditioned medium stimulated the phosphorylation of

  20. Development of the smooth muscle foam cell: uptake of macrophage lipid inclusions.

    PubMed

    Wolfbauer, G; Glick, J M; Minor, L K; Rothblat, G H

    1986-10-01

    A possible mechanism for the formation of smooth muscle foam cells in the atherosclerotic lesion was explored. Cultured macrophages (J774 cell line) were induced to form cytoplasmic cholesteryl ester inclusions by exposure to acetylated low density lipoprotein in the presence of cholesterol-rich phospholipid dispersions. The macrophages were disrupted by brief sonication, and the inclusions were isolated by flotation. When these inclusions were placed in direct contact with cultured smooth muscle cells, cellular uptake of the inclusions in a time- and dose-dependent manner was observed. Light and electron microscopy indicated the presence of lipid inclusions throughout the cytoplasm of the cells. Uptake of inclusion lipid by the smooth muscle cells was inhibited by several metabolic inhibitors, indicating that the process is dependent on metabolic activity. A modest but significant hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester was observed, showing that the stored cholesteryl esters are metabolically available. PMID:3020555

  1. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC50 values of 0.78 and 0.41 μM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC50 values of 6.0 and 5.5 μM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  2. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Omura, Satoshi

    2004-01-20

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC(50) values of 0.78 and 0.41 microM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC(50) values of 6.0 and 5.5 microM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  3. 25-Hydroxycholesterol-3-sulfate regulates macrophage lipid metabolism via the LXR/SREBP-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Xu, Leyuan; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Li, Xiaobo; Heuman, Douglas M; Hylemon, Phillip B; Pandak, William M; Ren, Shunlin

    2008-12-01

    The oxysterol receptor LXR is a key transcriptional regulator of lipid metabolism. LXR increases expression of SREBP-1, which in turn regulates at least 32 genes involved in lipid synthesis and transport. We recently identified 25-hydroxycholesterol-3-sulfate (25HC3S) as an important regulatory molecule in the liver. We have now studied the effects of 25HC3S and its precursor, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), on lipid metabolism as mediated by the LXR/SREBP-1 signaling in macrophages. Addition of 25HC3S to human THP-1-derived macrophages markedly decreased nuclear LXR protein levels. 25HC3S administration was followed by dose- and time-dependent decreases in SREBP-1 mature protein and mRNA levels. 25HC3S decreased the expression of SREBP-1-responsive genes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) as well as HMGR and LDLR, which are key proteins involved in lipid metabolism. Subsequently, 25HC3S decreased intracellular lipids and increased cell proliferation. In contrast to 25HC3S, 25HC acted as an LXR ligand, increasing ABCA1, ABCG1, SREBP-1, and FAS mRNA levels. In the presence of 25HC3S, 25HC, and LXR agonist T0901317, stimulation of LXR targeting gene expression was repressed. We conclude that 25HC3S acts in macrophages as a cholesterol satiety signal, downregulating cholesterol and fatty acid synthetic pathways via inhibition of LXR/SREBP signaling. A possible role of oxysterol sulfation is proposed. PMID:18854425

  4. Circulating Blood Monocyte Subclasses and Lipid-Laden Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pecht, Tal; Haim, Yulia; Bashan, Nava; Shapiro, Hagit; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Kirshtein, Boris; Clément, Karine; Shai, Iris; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral adipose tissue foam cells are increased in human obesity, and were implicated in adipose dysfunction and increased cardio-metabolic risk. In the circulation, non-classical monocytes (NCM) are elevated in obesity and associate with atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that circulating NCM correlate and/or are functionally linked to visceral adipose tissue foam cells in obesity, potentially providing an approach to estimate visceral adipose tissue status in the non-surgical obese patient. Methods We preformed ex-vivo functional studies utilizing sorted monocyte subclasses from healthy donors. Moreover, we assessed circulating blood monocyte subclasses and visceral fat adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) lipid content by flow-cytometry in paired blood and omental-fat samples collected from patients (n = 65) undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Results Ex-vivo, NCM and NCM-derived macrophages exhibited lower lipid accumulation capacity compared to classical or intermediate monocytes/-derived macrophages. Moreover, of the three subclasses, NCM exhibited the lowest migration towards adipose tissue conditioned-media. In a cohort of n = 65, increased %NCM associated with higher BMI (r = 0.250,p<0.05) and ATM lipid content (r = 0.303,p<0.05). Among patients with BMI≥25Kg/m2, linear regression models adjusted for age, sex or BMI revealed that NCM independently associate with ATM lipid content, particularly in men. Conclusions Collectively, although circulating blood NCM are unlikely direct functional precursor cells for adipose tissue foam cells, their increased percentage in the circulation may clinically reflect higher lipid content in visceral ATMs. PMID:27442250

  5. 25-Hydroxycholesterol-3-sulfate regulates macrophage lipid metabolism via the LXR/SREBP-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Xu, Leyuan; Rodriguez-Agudo, Daniel; Li, Xiaobo; Heuman, Douglas M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Pandak, William M.; Ren, Shunlin

    2008-01-01

    The oxysterol receptor LXR is a key transcriptional regulator of lipid metabolism. LXR increases expression of SREBP-1, which in turn regulates at least 32 genes involved in lipid synthesis and transport. We recently identified 25-hydroxycholesterol-3-sulfate (25HC3S) as an important regulatory molecule in the liver. We have now studied the effects of 25HC3S and its precursor, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), on lipid metabolism as mediated by the LXR/SREBP-1 signaling in macrophages. Addition of 25HC3S to human THP-1-derived macrophages markedly decreased nuclear LXR protein levels. 25HC3S administration was followed by dose- and time-dependent decreases in SREBP-1 mature protein and mRNA levels. 25HC3S decreased the expression of SREBP-1-responsive genes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) as well as HMGR and LDLR, which are key proteins involved in lipid metabolism. Subsequently, 25HC3S decreased intracellular lipids and increased cell proliferation. In contrast to 25HC3S, 25HC acted as an LXR ligand, increasing ABCA1, ABCG1, SREBP-1, and FAS mRNA levels. In the presence of 25HC3S, 25HC, and LXR agonist T0901317, stimulation of LXR targeting gene expression was repressed. We conclude that 25HC3S acts in macrophages as a cholesterol satiety signal, downregulating cholesterol and fatty acid synthetic pathways via inhibition of LXR/SREBP signaling. A possible role of oxysterol sulfation is proposed. PMID:18854425

  6. Bordetella parapertussis Survives inside Human Macrophages in Lipid Raft-Enriched Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Harvill, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella parapertussis is a human pathogen that causes whooping cough. The increasing incidence of B. parapertussis has been attributed to the lack of cross protection induced by pertussis vaccines. It was previously shown that B. parapertussis is able to avoid bacterial killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) if specific opsonic antibodies are not present at the site of interaction. Here, we evaluated the outcome of B. parapertussis innate interaction with human macrophages, a less aggressive type of cell and a known reservoir of many persistent pathogens. The results showed that in the absence of opsonins, O antigen allows B. parapertussis to inhibit phagolysosomal fusion and to remain alive inside macrophages. The O antigen targets B. parapertussis to lipid rafts that are retained in the membrane of phagosomes that do not undergo lysosomal maturation. Forty-eight hours after infection, wild-type B. parapertussis bacteria but not the O antigen-deficient mutants were found colocalizing with lipid rafts and alive in nonacidic compartments. Taken together, our data suggest that in the absence of opsonic antibodies, B. parapertussis survives inside macrophages by preventing phagolysosomal maturation in a lipid raft- and O antigen-dependent manner. Two days after infection, about 15% of macrophages were found loaded with live bacteria inside flotillin-enriched phagosomes that had access to nutrients provided by the host cell recycling pathway, suggesting the development of an intracellular infection. IgG opsonization drastically changed this interaction, inducing efficient bacterial killing. These results highlight the need for B. parapertussis opsonic antibodies to induce bacterial clearance and prevent the eventual establishment of cellular reservoirs of this pathogen. PMID:25267839

  7. Dysregulation of lipid metabolism in Tangier monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, G; Fischer, H; Beuck, M; Hoecker, K P; Robenek, H

    1990-01-01

    The cellular defect in Tangier mononuclear phagocytes (MNP) was shown to be associated with significant abnormalities in cellular phospholipid, triglyceride, and cholesteryl ester metabolism by using various radiolabeled precursors (32Pi, 3H-serine, 3H-choline, 14C-acetate, and 14C-oleic acid). Tangier MNP expressed increased rates of synthesis for phospholipids (twofold), triglycerides (fivefold), and cholesteryl esters (threefold) as compared to normal MNP when incubated in McCoy's medium containing 0.2% human serum albumin. The turnover rate of cellular phospholipids was also enhanced, while the turnover rates for triglycerides and cholesteryl esters were normal, thus leading to the accumulation of a larger pool of labeled triglycerides and cholesteryl esters in Tangier MNP. The individual phospholipid classes, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine were similarly affected. Cholesterol loading led to approximately 30% down-regulation of phospholipid synthesis in normal cells, but Tangier MNP showed a smaller response. When nonloaded normal MNP were exposed to high density lipoprotein3 (HDL3), they diminished cellular cholesterol esterification mediated by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT); in Tangier MNP, ACAT activity increased in the presence of HDL3. When cholesterol-loaded normal and Tangier MNP were treated with HDL3, an up-regulation of phospholipid synthesis was observed in both cell types, but Tangier MNP showed a smaller response. We conclude that the defect in Tangier disease, which we recently described as a "disorder of intracellular traffic" (Schmitz et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1985;82:6305-6309), is associated with a dysregulation of cellular lipid metabolism, leading to an overproduction of triglycerides and esterified cholesterol and to enhanced synthesis and catabolism of phospholipids. PMID:2244850

  8. Evolution of foam cells in subcutaneous rabbit carrageenan granulomas. II. Tissue and macrophage lipid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, J. L.; Suenram, C. A.; Valente, A. J.; Sprague, E. A.; Rozek, M. M.; Schwartz, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the lipid composition of differentiating macrophage-derived foam cells in the inflammatory carrageenan granuloma. In this model, macrophages exposed in vivo to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia progressively accumulate electron-translucent lipid inclusions; and at 14 and 28 days, many assume the morphologic features of arterial plaque foam cells. Subcutaneous carrageenan granulomas were induced in 24 pellet-fed (NC) and 24 cholesterol-fed (HC) rabbits, and tissue was harvested at 4, 14, and 28 days. Total (TC) and free cholesterol (FC), cholesteryl esters (CEs), CE fatty acids, triglycerides (TGs), and phospholipids (PLs) were measured on lipid extracts from tissue. TC, FC, and CEs were also measured on isolated, cultured granuloma macrophages. Tissue TCs and FCs were significantly elevated in HC relative to NC rabbits at both 14 and 28 days (P less than 0.005 and P less than 0.01, respectively). CE accumulation in HC granuloma tissue was 80-fold greater at 14 days and 178-fold greater at 28 days (P less than 0.005), compared with NC granulomas. Oleic acid (18:1), the principal CE fatty acid in both NC and HC granulomas, accounted for significantly more (P less than 0.05) of the total CE fatty acids in HC (48%) relative to NC granulomas (37%). No net accumulation of TG was observed with time in NC or HC animals. Although diet did not influence tissue PL content, significant increases (P less than 0.05) were observed at 14 days in NC rabbits and at 14 and 28 days in HC rabbits relative to 4-day levels. CE accumulation was significantly greater in cultured macrophages isolated from HC granulomas at 14 days (P less than 0.001) and 28 days (P less than 0.01). These findings have demonstrated the significant accumulation of CEs in both HC granuloma tissue and in cultured HC macrophage/foam cells in vivo. The carrageenan granuloma model has, we believe, considerable potential for defining mechanisms responsible for CE accumulation in the

  9. Induction of DKK1 by ox-LDL negatively regulates intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ge, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Xinxin; Chen, Yifei; Li, Mengmeng; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway antagonist, is closely associated with cardiovascular disease and adipogenesis. We performed an in vitro study to determine whether oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) increased the expression of DKK1 in macrophages and whether β-catenin and liver X receptor α (LXRα) were involved in this regulation. Induction of DKK1 expression by ox-LDL decreased the level of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) via a Wnt/β-catenin pathway and increased ATP-binding cassette transporter A/G1 (ABCA/G1) levels via a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. Lower LOX-1 and higher ABCA/G1 levels inhibited cholesterol loading in macrophages. In conclusion, ox-LDL may induce DKK1 expression in macrophages to inhibit the accumulation of lipids through a mechanism that involves downregulation of LOX-1-mediated lipid uptake and upregulation of ABCA/G1-dependent cholesterol efflux. PMID:25436422

  10. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  11. β Common Receptor Mediates Erythropoietin-Conferred Protection on OxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Yun; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Feng-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), the key factor for erythropoiesis, also protects macrophage foam cells from lipid accumulation, yet the definitive mechanisms are not fully understood. β common receptor (βCR) plays a crucial role in the nonhematopoietic effects of EPO. In the current study, we investigated the role of βCR in EPO-mediated protection in macrophages against oxidized low-density lipoprotein- (oxLDL-) induced deregulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation. Here, we show that βCR expression was mainly in foamy macrophages of atherosclerotic aortas from apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Results of confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that βCR was colocalized and interacted with EPO receptor (EPOR) in macrophages. Inhibition of βCR activation by neutralizing antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the EPO-conferred protection in oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, EPO-promoted cholesterol efflux and upregulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 were prevented by pretreatment with βCR neutralizing antibody or βCR siRNA. Additionally, blockage of βCR abrogated the EPO-conferred anti-inflammatory action on oxLDL-induced production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Collectively, our findings suggest that βCR may play an important role in the beneficial effects of EPO against oxLDL-elicited dysfunction of macrophage foam cells. PMID:26101463

  12. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source. PMID:26871576

  13. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source. PMID:26871576

  14. Specific lipid mediator signatures of human phagocytes: microparticles stimulate macrophage efferocytosis and pro-resolving mediators

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytes orchestrate acute inflammation and host defense. Here we carried out lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics profiling distinct phagocytes: neutrophils (PMN), apoptotic PMN, and macrophages. Efferocytosis increased specialized pro-resolving mediator (SPM) biosynthesis, including Resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, and RvE2, which were further elevated by PMN microparticles. Apoptotic PMN gave elevated prostaglandin E2, lipoxin B4 and RvE2, whereas zymosan-stimulated PMN showed predominantly leukotriene B4 and 20-OH-leukotriene B4, as well as lipoxin marker 5,15-diHETE. Using deuterium-labeled precursors (d8-arachidonic acid, d5-eicosapentaenoic acid, and d5-docosahexaenoic acid), we found that apoptotic PMN and microparticles contributed to SPM biosynthesis during efferocytosis. M2 macrophages produced SPM including maresin-1 (299 ± 8 vs 45 ± 6 pg/2.5 × 105 cells; P < .01) and lower amounts of leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin than M1. Apoptotic PMN uptake by both macrophage subtypes led to modulation of their LM profiles. Leukotriene B4 was down-regulated in M2 (668 ± 81 vs 351 ± 39 pg/2.5 × 105 cells; P < .01), whereas SPM including lipoxin A4 (977 ± 173 vs 675 ± 167 pg/2.5 × 105 cells; P < .05) were increased. Conversely, uptake of apoptotic PMN by M2 macrophages reduced (∼ 25%) overall LM. Together, these results establish LM signature profiles of human phagocytes and related subpopulations. Moreover, they provide evidence for microparticle regulation of specific endogenous LM during defined stages of the acute inflammatory process and their dynamic changes in human primary phagocytes. PMID:22904297

  15. Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins regulate perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 lipid-droplet-associated proteins in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Varela, Lourdes M; López, Sergio; Ortega-Gómez, Almudena; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Buers, Insa; Robenek, Horst; Muriana, Francisco J G; Abia, Rocío

    2015-04-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages contributes to atherosclerosis. Within macrophages, lipids are stored in lipid droplets (LDs); perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 are the main LD-associated proteins. Postprandial triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins induce LD accumulation in macrophages. The role of postprandial lipoproteins in perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 regulation was studied. TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) induced the levels of intracellular TGs, LDs and perilipin-2 protein expression in THP-1 macrophages and in Apoe(-/-) mice bone-marrow-derived macrophages with low and high basal levels of TGs. Perilipin-3 was only synthesized in mice macrophages with low basal levels of TGs. The regulation was dependent on the fatty acid composition of the lipoproteins; monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) more strongly attenuated these effects compared with saturated fatty acids. In THP-1 macrophages, immunofluorescence microscopy and freeze-fracture immunogold labeling indicated that the lipoproteins translocated perilipin-3 from the cytoplasm to the LD surface; only the lipoproteins that were rich in PUFAs suppressed this effect. Chemical inhibition showed that lipoproteins induced perilipin-2 protein expression through the peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor (PPAR) PPARα and PPARγ pathways. Overall, our data indicate that postprandial TRLs may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation through the regulation of perilipin-2 and perilipin-3 proteins in macrophages. Because the fatty acid composition of the lipoproteins is dependent on the type of fat consumed, the ingestion of olive oil, which is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids, and fish oil, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, can be considered a good nutritional strategy to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis by LD-associated proteins decrease. PMID:25595097

  16. Lipid-Laden Alveolar Macrophages and pH Monitoring in Gastroesophageal Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kitz, R.; Boehles, H. J.; Rosewich, M.; Rose, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages and pH monitoring have been used in the diagnosis of chronic aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This study was conducted to prove a correlation between the detection of alimentary pulmonary fat phagocytosis and an increasing amount of proximal gastroesophageal reflux. It was assumed that proximal gastroesophageal reflux better correlates with aspiration than distal GER. Patients from 6 months to 16 years with unexplained recurrent wheezy bronchitis and bronchial hyperreactivity, or recurrent pneumonia with chronic cough underwent 24-hour double-channel pH monitoring and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Aspiration of gastric content was determined by counting lipid laden alveolar macrophages from BAL specimens. There were no correlations between any pH-monitoring parameters and counts of lipid-laden macrophages in the whole study population, even when restricting analysis to those with abnormal reflux index expressing clinically significant GER. Quantifying lipid-laden alveolar macrophages from BAL in children with gastroesophageal-related respiratory disorders does not have an acceptable specificity to prove chronic aspiration as an underlying etiology. Therefore, research for other markers of pulmonary aspiration is needed. PMID:22448325

  17. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  18. Noninvasive imaging of intracellular lipid metabolism in macrophages by Raman microscopy in combination with stable isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Christian; Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Brehm, Bernhard R; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-10-16

    Monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role in atherogenesis because their transformation into foam cells is responsible for deposition of lipids in plaques within arterial walls. The appearance of cytosolic lipid droplets is a hallmark of macrophage foam cell formation, and the molecular basics involved in this process are not well understood. Of particular interest is the intracellular fate of different individual lipid species, such as fatty acids or cholesterol. Here, we utilize Raman microscopy to image the metabolism of such lipids and to trace their subsequent storage patterns. The combination of microscopic information with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful molecular imaging method, which allows visualization at the diffraction limit of the employed laser light and biochemical characterization through associated spectral information. In order to distinguish the molecules of interest from other naturally occurring lipids spectroscopically, deuterium labels were introduced. Intracellular distribution and metabolic changes were observed for serum albumin-complexed palmitic and oleic acid and cholesterol and quantitatively evaluated by monitoring the increase in CD scattering intensities at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 24, 30, and 36 h. This approach may also allow for investigating the cellular trafficking of other molecules, such as nutrients, metabolites, and drugs. PMID:22954250

  19. Activation of Nlrp3 Inflammasomes Enhances Macrophage Lipid-Deposition and Migration: Implication of a Novel Role of Inflammasome in Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Min; Gulbins, Erich; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Although Nlrp3 inflammasome activation in macrophages has been shown to be critical for the development of atherosclerosis upon atherogenic stimuli, it remains unknown whether activated Nlrp3 inflammasomes by other non-atherogenic stimuli induce alterations in macrophages that may contribute in the concert with other factors to atherogenesis. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes by ATP, which is a classical non-lipid danger stimulus, enhances the migration of macrophage and increases lipids deposition in macrophages accelerating foam cell formation. We first demonstrated that extracellular ATP (2.5 mM) markedly increased the formation and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) from wild type (Asc+/+) mice resulting in activation of caspase-1 and IL-1β production. In these Asc+/+ macrophages, such stimulation of inflammasomes by non-lipid ATP was similar to those induced by atherogenic stimuli such as cholesterol crystals or 7-ketocholesterol. Both non-lipid and lipid forms of stimuli induced formation and activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes, which were prevented by Asc gene deletion. Interestingly, Asc+/+ BMMs had dramatic lipids accumulation after stimulation with ATP. Further, we demonstrated that large amount of cholesterol was accumulated in lysosomes of Asc+/+ BMMs when inflammasomes were activated by ATP. Such intracellular and lysosomal lipids deposition was not observed in Asc−/− BMMs and also prevented by caspase-1 inhibitor WEHD. In addition, in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that migration of Asc+/+ BMMs increased due to stimulation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes, which was markedly attenuated in Asc−/− BMMs. Together, these results suggest that activation of Nlrp3 inflammasomes remarkably increases the susceptibility of macrophages to lipid deposition and their migration ability. Such novel action of inflammasomes may facilitate entry or retention of macrophages into the

  20. Mitofusin 2 decreases intracellular lipids in macrophages by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun; Ge, Beihai; He, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Kejian; Qian, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Wenzhong; Guo, Xiaomei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Mfn2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation by activating cholesterol transporters. • PPARγ is involved in the Mfn2-mediated increase of cholesterol transporter expressions. • Inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 is involved in Mfn2-induced PPARγ expression. - Abstract: Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. This study aims to reveal how Mfn2 functions in the atherosclerosis. Mfn2 expression was found to be significantly reduced in arterial atherosclerotic lesions of both mice and human compared with healthy counterparts. Here, we observed that Mfn2 increased cellular cholesterol transporter expression in macrophages by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, an effect achieved at least partially by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These findings provide insights into potential mechanisms of Mfn2-mediated alterations in cholesterol transporter expression, which may have significant implications for the treatment of atherosclerotic heart disease.

  1. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ruairi C; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%-42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%-7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  2. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Algae-Derived Lipid Extracts on Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Stimulated Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Ruairi C.; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Bahar, Bojlul; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Algae contain a number of anti-inflammatory bioactive compounds such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) and chlorophyll a, hence as dietary ingredients, their extracts may be effective in chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of lipid extracts from three red seaweeds (Porphyra dioica, Palmaria palmata and Chondrus crispus) and one microalga (Pavlova lutheri) were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages. Extracts contained 34%–42% total fatty acids as n-3 PUFA and 5%–7% crude extract as pigments, including chlorophyll a, β-carotene and fucoxanthin. Pretreatment of the THP-1 cells with lipid extract from P. palmata inhibited production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (p < 0.05) and IL-8 (p < 0.05) while that of P. lutheri inhibited IL-6 (p < 0.01) production. Quantitative gene expression analysis of a panel of 92 genes linked to inflammatory signaling pathway revealed down-regulation of the expression of 14 pro-inflammatory genes (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR8, TRAF5, TRAF6, TNFSF18, IL6R, IL23, CCR1, CCR4, CCL17, STAT3, MAP3K1) by the lipid extracts. The lipid extracts effectively inhibited the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated via toll-like receptors, chemokines and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling molecules. These results suggest that lipid extracts from P. lutheri, P. palmata, P. dioica and C. crispus can inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory pathways in human macrophages. Therefore, algal lipid extracts should be further explored as anti-inflammatory ingredients for chronic inflammation-linked metabolic diseases. PMID:26308008

  3. Pomegranate peel polyphenols inhibit lipid accumulation and enhance cholesterol efflux in raw264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengjuan; Li, Jianke; Wang, Lifang; Wu, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-13

    Macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmarks of early atherogenesis. Many plant polyphenols have been shown to inhibit macrophage foam cell formation and the development of atherosclerotic lesions. However, the effect of pomegranate peel polyphenols on foam cells remains unclear. In this study, the potential atheroprotective actions of pomegranate peel polyphenols on cholesterol accumulation and outflow in raw264.7 macrophages, and the mechanisms, were investigated. The results showed that the pomegranate peel polyphenols reduced ox-LDL internalization to diminish foam cell formation, as measured by oil-red O staining in raw264.7 macrophages, which may be due to decreasing the macrophage CD36 protein expression and not SR-A. In addition, pomegranate peel polyphenols promoted apoA-1-mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux by up-regulating ABCA1 and LXRα at the mRNA and protein levels, independently of ABCG1 and PPARγ. PMID:27334099

  4. Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) diminishes lipid droplet-coating proteins leading to lipolysis in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamura, Yoshihiro; Mori, Mayumi; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Mikami, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Katsuhisa; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM induces lipolysis in a distinct manner from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM ablates activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor in adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIM reduces mRNA levels of lipid-droplet coating proteins leading to lipolysis. -- Abstract: Under fasting conditions, triacylglycerol in adipose tissue undergoes lipolysis to supply fatty acids as energy substrates. Such lipolysis is regulated by hormones, which activate lipases via stimulation of specific signalling cascades. We previously showed that macrophage-derived soluble protein, AIM induces obesity-associated lipolysis, triggering chronic inflammation in fat tissue which causes insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of how AIM mediates lipolysis remains unknown. Here we show that AIM induces lipolysis in a manner distinct from that of hormone-dependent lipolysis, without activation or augmentation of lipases. In vivo and in vitro, AIM did not enhance phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in adipocytes, a hallmark of hormone-dependent lipolysis activation. Similarly, adipose tissue from obese AIM-deficient and wild-type mice showed comparable HSL phosphorylation. Consistent with the suppressive effect of AIM on fatty acid synthase activity, the amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids was reduced in adipocytes treated with AIM. This response ablated transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR{gamma}), leading to diminished gene expression of lipid-droplet coating proteins including fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) and Perilipin, which are indispensable for triacylglycerol storage in adipocytes. Accordingly, the lipolytic effect of AIM was overcome by a PPAR{gamma}-agonist or forced expression of FSP27, while it was synergized by a PPAR{gamma}-antagonist. Overall, distinct modes of lipolysis appear to take place in different physiological

  5. Balancing the effect of corona on therapeutic efficacy and macrophage uptake of lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, P; Buzón, P; Boulaiz, H; Peula-García, J M; Ortega-Vinuesa, J L; Luque, I; Salvati, A; Marchal, J A

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have shown the potential of biocompatible lipid nanocapsules as hydrophobic drug delivery systems. Understanding the factors that determine the interactions of these oil-in-water nanoemulsions with cells is a necessary step to guide the design of the most effective formulations. The aim of this study was to probe the ability of two surfactants with a markedly different nature, a non-ionic poloxamer, and a charged phospholipid, to prepare formulations with shells of different composition and different surface properties. Thus we determined their effects on the interaction with biological environments. In particular, we investigated how the shell formulation affected the adsorption of biomolecules from the surrounding biological fluids on the nanocapsule surface (corona formation). A complete physicochemical characterization including an isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) study revealed that the use of poloxamer led to nanocapsules with a marked reduction in the number of protein-binding sites. Surface hydrophilicity and changes in corona formation strongly correlated to changes in uptake by cancer cells and by macrophages. Our results indicate that the nature and concentration of surfactants in the nanocapsules can be easily manipulated to effectively modulate their surface architecture with the aim of controlling the environmental interactions, thus optimizing functionality for in vivo applications. In particular, addition of surfactants that reduce protein binding can modulate nanoparticle clearance by the immune system, but also screens the desired interactions with cells, leading to lower uptake, thus lower therapeutic efficacy. The two effects need to be balanced in order to obtain successful formulations. PMID:26005765

  6. The role of lipid-activated nuclear receptors in shaping macrophage and dendritic cell function: From physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Mate; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Nagy, Laszlo

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors linking lipid signaling to the expression of the genome. There is increasing appreciation of the involvement of this receptor network in the metabolic programming of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), essential members of the innate immune system. In this review we focus on the role of retinoid X receptor, retinoic acid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor γ, liver X receptor, and vitamin D receptor in shaping the immune and metabolic functions of macrophages and DCs. We also provide an overview of the contribution of macrophage- and DC-expressed nuclear receptors to various immunopathologic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, asthma, and some others. We suggest that systematic analyses of the roles of these receptors and their activating lipid ligands in immunopathologies combined with complementary and focused translational and clinical research will be crucial for the development of new therapies using the many molecules available to target nuclear receptors. PMID:23905916

  7. Myelin-Derived Lipids Modulate Macrophage Activity by Liver X Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Irrthum, Alexandre; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Mulder, Monique; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which macrophages and microglia play a central role. Foamy macrophages and microglia, containing degenerated myelin, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent studies have described an altered macrophage phenotype after myelin internalization. However, it is unclear by which mechanisms myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype can influence lesion progression. Here we demonstrate, by using genome wide gene expression analysis, that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages have an enhanced expression of genes involved in migration, phagocytosis and inflammation. Interestingly, myelin internalization also induced the expression of genes involved in liver-X-receptor signaling and cholesterol efflux. In vitro validation shows that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages indeed have an increased capacity to dispose intracellular cholesterol. In addition, myelin suppresses the secretion of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6 by macrophages, which was mediated by activation of liver-X-receptor β. Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by nuclear receptor activation, which may subsequently affect lesion progression in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22984598

  8. Myelin-derived lipids modulate macrophage activity by liver X receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Timmermans, Silke; Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh; Irrthum, Alexandre; Smeets, Hubert J M; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R; Mulder, Monique; Stinissen, Piet; Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system in which macrophages and microglia play a central role. Foamy macrophages and microglia, containing degenerated myelin, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis lesions. Recent studies have described an altered macrophage phenotype after myelin internalization. However, it is unclear by which mechanisms myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype can influence lesion progression. Here we demonstrate, by using genome wide gene expression analysis, that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages have an enhanced expression of genes involved in migration, phagocytosis and inflammation. Interestingly, myelin internalization also induced the expression of genes involved in liver-X-receptor signaling and cholesterol efflux. In vitro validation shows that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages indeed have an increased capacity to dispose intracellular cholesterol. In addition, myelin suppresses the secretion of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6 by macrophages, which was mediated by activation of liver-X-receptor β. Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by nuclear receptor activation, which may subsequently affect lesion progression in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22984598

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB3 maintains redox homeostasis by regulating virulence lipid anabolism to modulate macrophage response.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit; Crossman, David K; Mai, Deborah; Guidry, Loni; Voskuil, Martin I; Renfrow, Matthew B; Steyn, Adrie J C

    2009-08-01

    The metabolic events associated with maintaining redox homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) during infection are poorly understood. Here, we discovered a novel redox switching mechanism by which Mtb WhiB3 under defined oxidizing and reducing conditions differentially modulates the assimilation of propionate into the complex virulence polyketides polyacyltrehaloses (PAT), sulfolipids (SL-1), phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIM), and the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) that is under control of the DosR/S/T dormancy system. We developed an in vivo radio-labeling technique and demonstrated for the first time the lipid profile changes of Mtb residing in macrophages, and identified WhiB3 as a physiological regulator of virulence lipid anabolism. Importantly, MtbDeltawhiB3 shows enhanced growth on medium containing toxic levels of propionate, thereby implicating WhiB3 in detoxifying excess propionate. Strikingly, the accumulation of reducing equivalents in MtbDeltawhiB3 isolated from macrophages suggests that WhiB3 maintains intracellular redox homeostasis upon infection, and that intrabacterial lipid anabolism functions as a reductant sink. MtbDeltawhiB3 infected macrophages produce higher levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, indicating that WhiB3-mediated regulation of lipids is required for controlling the innate immune response. Lastly, WhiB3 binds to pks2 and pks3 promoter DNA independent of the presence or redox state of its [4Fe-4S] cluster. Interestingly, reduction of the apo-WhiB3 Cys thiols abolished DNA binding, whereas oxidation stimulated DNA binding. These results confirmed that WhiB3 DNA binding is reversibly regulated by a thiol-disulfide redox switch. These results introduce a new paradigmatic mechanism that describes how WhiB3 facilitates metabolic switching to fatty acids by regulating Mtb lipid anabolism in response to oxido-reductive stress associated with infection, for maintaining redox balance. The link between the WhiB3

  10. miR-223 Inhibits Lipid Deposition and Inflammation by Suppressing Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Bai, Xiaojun; Song, Qiang; Fan, Fenling; Hu, Zhi; Cheng, Gesheng; Zhang, Yushun

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its complications rank as the leading cause of death with the hallmarks of lipid deposition and inflammatory response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently garnered increasing interests in cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the function of miR-223 and the underlying mechanism in atherosclerosis. In the atherosclerotic ApoE−/− mice models, an obvious increase of miR-223 was observed in aortic atherosclerotic lesions. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated macrophages, its expression was decreased. The miR-223 overexpression significantly attenuated macrophage foam cell formation, lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, which were reversed by anti-miR-223 inhibitor transfection. Mechanism assay corroborated that miR-223 negatively regulated the activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Pretreatment with a specific inhibitor of NF-κB (pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, PDTC) strikingly abrogated miR-223 silence-induced lipid deposition and inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, PI3K/AKT was activated by miR-223 up-regulation. Pretreatment with PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 strikingly ameliorated the inhibitory effects of miR-223 on the activation of TLR4 and p65, concomitant with the increase in lipid deposition and inflammatory cytokine production. Together, these data indicate that miR-223 up-regulation might abrogate the development of atherosclerosis by blocking TLR4 signaling through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, and provides a promising therapeutic avenue for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26492242

  11. Dual-wavelength multifrequency photothermal wave imaging combined with optical coherence tomography for macrophage and lipid detection in atherosclerotic plaques using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Jacob Mancuso, J.; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Dwelle, Jordan; Ma, Li L.; Willsey, Brian; Shams Kazmi, S. M.; Qiu, Jinze; Li, Xiankai; Asmis, Reto; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the ability of combined photothermal wave (PTW) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect, and further characterize the distribution of macrophages (having taken up plasmonic gold nanorose as a contrast agent) and lipid deposits in atherosclerotic plaques. Aortas with atherosclerotic plaques were harvested from nine male New Zealand white rabbits divided into nanorose- and saline-injected groups and were imaged by dual-wavelength (800 and 1210 nm) multifrequency (0.1, 1 and 4 Hz) PTW imaging in combination with OCT. Amplitude PTW images suggest that lateral and depth distribution of nanorose-loaded macrophages (confirmed by two-photon luminescence microscopy and RAM-11 macrophage stain) and lipid deposits can be identified at selected modulation frequencies. Radiometric temperature increase and modulation amplitude of superficial nanoroses in response to 4 Hz laser irradiation (800 nm) were significantly higher than native plaque (P<0.001). Amplitude PTW images (4 Hz) were merged into a coregistered OCT image, suggesting that superficial nanorose-loaded macrophages are distributed at shoulders on the upstream side of atherosclerotic plaques (P<0.001) at edges of lipid deposits. Results suggest that combined PTW-OCT imaging can simultaneously reveal plaque structure and composition, permitting characterization of nanorose-loaded macrophages and lipid deposits in atherosclerotic plaques.

  12. Dual-wavelength multifrequency photothermal wave imaging combined with optical coherence tomography for macrophage and lipid detection in atherosclerotic plaques using gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyi; Jacob Mancuso, J.; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Dwelle, Jordan; Ma, Li L.; Willsey, Brian; Shams Kazmi, S. M.; Qiu, Jinze; Li, Xiankai; Asmis, Reto; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of combined photothermal wave (PTW) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect, and further characterize the distribution of macrophages (having taken up plasmonic gold nanorose as a contrast agent) and lipid deposits in atherosclerotic plaques. Aortas with atherosclerotic plaques were harvested from nine male New Zealand white rabbits divided into nanorose- and saline-injected groups and were imaged by dual-wavelength (800 and 1210 nm) multifrequency (0.1, 1 and 4 Hz) PTW imaging in combination with OCT. Amplitude PTW images suggest that lateral and depth distribution of nanorose-loaded macrophages (confirmed by two-photon luminescence microscopy and RAM-11 macrophage stain) and lipid deposits can be identified at selected modulation frequencies. Radiometric temperature increase and modulation amplitude of superficial nanoroses in response to 4 Hz laser irradiation (800 nm) were significantly higher than native plaque (P<0.001). Amplitude PTW images (4 Hz) were merged into a coregistered OCT image, suggesting that superficial nanorose-loaded macrophages are distributed at shoulders on the upstream side of atherosclerotic plaques (P<0.001) at edges of lipid deposits. Results suggest that combined PTW-OCT imaging can simultaneously reveal plaque structure and composition, permitting characterization of nanorose-loaded macrophages and lipid deposits in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:22502567

  13. Reversible Lipid Accumulation and Associated Division Arrest of Mycobacterium avium in Lipoprotein-Induced Foamy Macrophages May Resemble Key Events during Latency and Reactivation of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Caire-Brändli, Irène; Papadopoulos, Alexia; Malaga, Wladimir; Marais, David; Canaan, Stéphane; Thilo, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    During the dormant phase of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists in lung granulomas by residing in foamy macrophages (FM) that contain abundant lipid bodies (LB) in their cytoplasm, allowing bacilli to accumulate lipids as intracytoplasmic lipid inclusions (ILI). An experimental model of FM is presented where bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages are infected with M. avium and exposed to very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) as a lipid source. Quantitative analysis of detailed electron microscope observations showed the following results. (i) Macrophages became foamy, and mycobacteria formed ILI, for which host triacylglycerides, rather than cholesterol, was essential. (ii) Lipid transfer occurred via mycobacterium-induced fusion between LB and phagosomes. (iii) Mycobacteria showed a thinned cell wall and became elongated but did not divide. (iv) Upon removal of VLDL, LB and ILI declined within hours, and simultaneous resumption of mycobacterial division restored the number of mycobacteria to the same level as that found in untreated control macrophages. This showed that the presence of ILI resulted in a reversible block of division without causing a change in the mycobacterial replication rate. Fluctuation between ILI either partially or fully extending throughout the mycobacterial cytoplasm was suggestive of bacterial cell cycle events. We propose that VLDL-driven FM constitute a well-defined cellular system in which to study changed metabolic states of intracellular mycobacteria that may relate to persistence and reactivation of tuberculosis. PMID:24478064

  14. Apolipoprotein A-I glycation by Glucose and Reactive Aldehydes Alters Phospholipid Affinity but Not Cholesterol Export from Lipid-Laden Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bronwyn E.; Nobecourt, Estelle; Zeng, Jingmin; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Davies, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Increased protein glycation in people with diabetes may promote atherosclerosis. This study examined the effects of non-enzymatic glycation on the association of lipid-free apolipoproteinA-I (apoA-I) with phospholipid, and cholesterol efflux from lipid-loaded macrophages to lipid-free and lipid-associated apoA-I. Glycation of lipid-free apoA-I by methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde resulted in Arg, Lys and Trp loss, advanced glycation end-product formation and protein cross-linking. The association of apoA-I glycated by glucose, methylglyoxal or glycolaldehyde with phospholipid multilamellar vesicles was impaired in a glycating agent dose-dependent manner, with exposure of apoA-I to both 30 mM glucose (42% decrease in kslow) and 3 mM glycolaldehyde (50% decrease in kfast, 60% decrease in kslow) resulting is significantly reduced affinity. Cholesterol efflux to control or glycated lipid-free apoA-I, or discoidal reconstituted HDL containing glycated apoA-I (drHDL), was examined using cholesterol-loaded murine (J774A.1) macrophages treated to increase expression of ATP binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1) or G1 (ABCG1). Cholesterol efflux from J774A.1 macrophages to glycated lipid-free apoA-I via ABCA1 or glycated drHDL via an ABCG1-dependent mechanism was unaltered, as was efflux to minimally modified apoA-I from people with Type 1 diabetes, or controls. Changes to protein structure and function were prevented by the reactive carbonyl scavenger aminoguanidine. Overall these studies demonstrate that glycation of lipid-free apoA-I, particularly late glycation, modifies its structure, its capacity to bind phospholipids and but not ABCA1- or ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:23741493

  15. Second-Hand Cigarette Smoke Impairs Bacterial Phagocytosis in Macrophages by Modulating CFTR Dependent Lipid-Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Inzer; Ji, Changhoon; Vij, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction First/Second-hand cigarette-smoke (FHS/SHS) exposure weakens immune defenses inducing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Hence, we evaluated if SHS induced changes in membrane/lipid-raft (m-/r)-CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) expression/activity is a potential mechanism for impaired bacterial phagocytosis in COPD. Methods RAW264.7 murine macrophages were exposed to freshly prepared CS-extract (CSE) containing culture media and/or Pseudomonas-aeruginosa-PA01-GFP for phagocytosis (fluorescence-microscopy), bacterial survival (colony-forming-units-CFU), and immunoblotting assays. The CFTR-expression/activity and lipid-rafts were modulated by transient-transfection or inhibitors/inducers. Next, mice were exposed to acute/sub-chronic-SHS or room-air (5-days/3-weeks) and infected with PA01-GFP, followed by quantification of bacterial survival by CFU-assay. Results We investigated the effect of CSE treatment on RAW264.7 cells infected by PA01-GFP and observed that CSE treatment significantly (p<0.01) inhibits PA01-GFP phagocytosis as compared to the controls. We also verified this in murine model, exposed to acute/sub-chronic-SHS and found significant (p<0.05, p<0.02) increase in bacterial survival in the SHS-exposed lungs as compared to the room-air controls. Next, we examined the effect of impaired CFTR ion-channel-activity on PA01-GFP infection of RAW264.7 cells using CFTR172-inhibitor and found no significant change in phagocytosis. We also similarly evaluated the effect of a CFTR corrector-potentiator compound, VRT-532, and observed no significant rescue of CSE impaired PA01-GFP phagocytosis although it significantly (p<0.05) decreases CSE induced bacterial survival. Moreover, induction of CFTR expression in macrophages significantly (p<0.03) improves CSE impaired PA01-GFP phagocytosis as compared to the control. Next, we verified the link between m

  16. EFFECTS OF OZONE EXPOSURE ON LIPID METABOLISM IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA) which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A2 or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. ollowing release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biological active m...

  17. Paeonol suppresses lipid accumulation in macrophages via upregulation of the ATP‑binding cassette transporter A1 and downregulation of the cluster of differentiation 36.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuying; Zhou, Yuanda; Yu, Chao; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Chengzhi; Ye, Yun; Xiao, Shunlin

    2015-02-01

    Paeonol, a potent antioxidant isolated from cortex moutan, possesses athero‑protective activity, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully investigated. This study was conducted to explore the role of paeonol and its underlying mechanisms in RAW264.7 macrophages and apolipoprotein E‑deficient (ApoE(‑/‑)) mice. Paeonol treatment significantly attenuated intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages, which may be the result of decreased oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (ox‑LDL) uptake and increased cholesterol efflux. Additionally, paeonol markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) by decreasing nuclear translocation of c‑Jun [a subunit of activator protein‑1 (AP‑1)]. Moreover, paeonol upregulated the protein stability of ATP‑binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) by inhibiting calpain activity, while ABCA1 mRNA expression was not altered. Furthermore, small hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting haem oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1) inhibited the paeonol‑mediated beneficial effects on the expression of c‑Jun, CD36, ABCA1, calpain activity and lipid accumulation in macrophages. Accordingly, paeonol retarded the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE(‑/‑) mice and modulated the expression of CD36 and ABCA1 in aortas similarly to that observed in macrophages. These results indicate that paeonol provides protective effects on foam cell formation by a novel HO‑1‑dependent mediation of cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages. PMID:25405950

  18. Isolevuglandin-Type Lipid Aldehydes Induce the Inflammatory Response of Macrophages by Modifying Phosphatidylethanolamines and Activating the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lilu; Chen, Zhongyi; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Yancey, Patricia G.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Savage, Justin R.; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Increased lipid peroxidation occurs in many conditions associated with inflammation. Because lipid peroxidation produces lipid aldehydes that can induce inflammatory responses through unknown mechanisms, elucidating these mechanisms may lead to development of better treatments for inflammatory diseases. We recently demonstrated that exposure of cultured cells to lipid aldehydes such as isolevuglandins (IsoLG) results in the modification of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). We therefore sought to determine (i) whether PE modification by isolevuglandins (IsoLG-PE) occurred in vivo, (ii) whether IsoLG-PE stimulated the inflammatory responses of macrophages, and (iii) the identity of receptors mediating the inflammatory effects of IsoLG-PE. Results: IsoLG-PE levels were elevated in plasma of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and in the livers of mice fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity and hepatosteatosis. IsoLG-PE potently stimulated nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activation and expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. The effects of IsoLG-PE were blocked by the soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE) and by RAGE antagonists. Furthermore, macrophages derived from the bone marrow of Ager null mice failed to express inflammatory cytokines in response to IsoLG-PE to the same extent as macrophages from wild-type mice. Innovation: These studies are the first to identify IsoLG-PE as a mediator of macrophage activation and a specific receptor, RAGE, which mediates its biological effects. Conclusion: PE modification by IsoLG forms RAGE ligands that activate macrophages, so that the increased IsoLG-PE generated by high circulating cholesterol levels or high-fat diet may play a role in the inflammation associated with these conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1633–1645. PMID:25751734

  19. Exposure to fine airborne particulate matter induces macrophage infiltration, unfolded protein response, and lipid deposition in white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Roberto; Zheng, Ze; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Kezhong

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested a link between exposure to ambient air-pollution and susceptibility to metabolic disorders such as Type II diabetes mellitus. Previously, we provided evidence that both short- and long-term exposure to concentrated ambient particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) induces multiple abnormalities associated with the pathogenesis of Type II diabetes mellitus, including insulin resistance, visceral adipose inflammation, brown adipose mitochondrial adipose changes, and hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this report, we show that chronic inhalation exposure to PM2.5 (10 months exposure) induces macrophage infiltration and Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), an intracellular stress signaling that regulates cell metabolism and survival, in mouse white adipose tissue in vivo. Gene expression studies suggested that PM2.5 exposure induces two distinct UPR signaling pathways mediated through the UPR transducer inositol-requiring 1α (IRE1α): 1) ER-associated Degradation (ERAD) of unfolded or misfolded proteins, and 2) Regulated IRE1-dependent Decay (RIDD) of mRNAs. Along with the induction of the UPR pathways and macrophage infiltration, expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, adipocyte differentiation, and lipid droplet formation was increased in the adipose tissue of the mice exposed to PM2.5. In vitro study confirmed that PM2.5 can trigger phosphorylation of the UPR transducer IRE1α and activation of macrophages. These results provide novel insights into PM2.5-triggered cell stress response in adipose tissue and increase our understanding of pathophysiological effects of particulate air pollution on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:23573366

  20. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Entwistle, Lewis J.; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R.; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J.; Pedro S. de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8–/–mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8–/–M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  1. TPL-2 Regulates Macrophage Lipid Metabolism and M2 Differentiation to Control TH2-Mediated Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Yashaswini; Perez-Lloret, Jimena; Li, Yanda; Entwistle, Lewis J; Khoury, Hania; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Mahmood, Radma; Mansour, Nuha R; Ching-Cheng Huang, Stanley; Pearce, Edward J; Pedro S de Carvalho, Luiz; Ley, Steven C; Wilson, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    Persistent TH2 cytokine responses following chronic helminth infections can often lead to the development of tissue pathology and fibrotic scarring. Despite a good understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in fibrogenesis, there are very few therapeutic options available, highlighting a significant medical need and gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of TH2-mediated immunopathology. In this study, we found that the Map3 kinase, TPL-2 (Map3k8; Cot) regulated TH2-mediated intestinal, hepatic and pulmonary immunopathology following Schistosoma mansoni infection or S. mansoni egg injection. Elevated inflammation, TH2 cell responses and exacerbated fibrosis in Map3k8-/-mice was observed in mice with myeloid cell-specific (LysM) deletion of Map3k8, but not CD4 cell-specific deletion of Map3k8, indicating that TPL-2 regulated myeloid cell function to limit TH2-mediated immunopathology. Transcriptional and metabolic assays of Map3k8-/-M2 macrophages identified that TPL-2 was required for lipolysis, M2 macrophage activation and the expression of a variety of genes involved in immuno-regulatory and pro-fibrotic pathways. Taken together this study identified that TPL-2 regulated TH2-mediated inflammation by supporting lipolysis and M2 macrophage activation, preventing TH2 cell expansion and downstream immunopathology and fibrosis. PMID:27487182

  2. Apolipoprotein E receptor-2 deficiency enhances macrophage susceptibility to lipid accumulation and cell death to augment atherosclerotic plaque progression and necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Waltmann, Meaghan D.; Basford, Joshua E.; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Hui, David Y.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked LRP8 polymorphisms to premature coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in humans. However, the mechanisms by which dysfunctions of apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (apoER2), the protein encoded by LRP8 gene, influence atherosclerosis have not been elucidated completely. The current study focused on the role of apoER2 in macrophages, a cell type that plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Results showed that apoER2-deficient mouse macrophages accumulated more lipids and were more susceptible to oxidized LDL (oxLDL)-induced death compared to control cells. Consistent with these findings, apoER2 deficient macrophages also displayed defective serum-induced Akt activation and higher levels of the pro-apoptotic protein phosphorylated p53. Furthermore, the expression and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) was increased in apoER2-deficient macrophages. Deficiency of apoER2 in hypercholesterolemic LDL receptor-null mice (Lrp8−/−Ldlr−/− mice) also resulted in accelerated atherosclerosis with more complex lesions and extensive lesion necrosis compared to Lrp8+/+Ldlr−/− mice. The atherosclerotic plaques of Lrp8−/−Ldlr−/− mice displayed significantly higher levels of p53-positive macrophages, indicating that the apoER2-deficient macrophages contribute to the accelerated atherosclerotic lesion necrosis observed in these animals. Taken together, this study indicates that apoER2 in macrophages limits PPARγ expression and protects against oxLDL-induced cell death. Thus, abnormal apoER2 functions in macrophages may at least in part contribute to the premature coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in humans with LRP8 polymorphisms. Moreover, the elevated PPARγ expression in apoER2-deficient macrophages suggests that LRP8 polymorphism may be a genetic modifier of cardiovascular risk with PPARγ therapy. PMID:24840660

  3. Regulatory effects of curcumin on lipid accumulation in monocytes/macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent evidence suggests potential benefits from phytochemicals and micronutrients in protecting against oxidative and lipid-mediated damage, but the molecular mechanisms of these actions are still unclear. Here we investigated whether the dietary polyphenol curcumin can modulate the accumulation of...

  4. Nocardia brasiliensis cell wall lipids modulate macrophage and dendritic responses that favor development of experimental actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Trevino-Villarreal, J Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C

    2012-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis. PMID:22851755

  5. Nocardia brasiliensis Cell Wall Lipids Modulate Macrophage and Dendritic Responses That Favor Development of Experimental Actinomycetoma in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trevino-Villarreal, J. Humberto; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Valero-Guillén, Pedro L.

    2012-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterium frequently isolated from human actinomycetoma. However, the pathogenesis of this infection remains unknown. Here, we used a model of bacterial delipidation with benzine to investigate the role of N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids in experimental actinomycetoma. Delipidation of N. brasiliensis with benzine resulted in complete abolition of actinomycetoma without affecting bacterial viability. Chemical analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate and an unidentified hydrophobic compound were the principal compounds extracted from N. brasiliensis with benzine. By electron microscopy, the extracted lipids were found to be located in the outermost membrane layer of the N. brasiliensis cell wall. They also appeared to confer acid-fastness. In vitro, the extractable lipids from the N. brasiliensis cell wall induced the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and CCL-2 in macrophages. The N. brasiliensis cell wall extractable lipids inhibited important macrophage microbicidal effects, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) production, phagocytosis, bacterial killing, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression in response to gamma interferon (IFN-γ). In dendritic cells (DCs), N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated extractable lipids suppressed MHC-II, CD80, and CD40 expression while inducing tumor growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Immunization with delipidated N. brasiliensis induced partial protection preventing actinomycetoma. These findings suggest that N. brasiliensis cell wall-associated lipids are important for actinomycetoma development by inducing inflammation and modulating the responses of macrophages and DCs to N. brasiliensis. PMID:22851755

  6. Methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum protects murine peritoneal macrophages from nicotine toxicity by decreasing free radical generation, lipid and protein damage and enhances antioxidant protection

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Das, Subhasis

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum Linn (ME-Og) was tested against nicotine-induced murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro. Phytochemical analysis of ME-Og shown high amount of flavonoid and phenolic compound present in it. The cytotoxic effect of ME-Og was studied in murine peritoneal macrophages at different concentrations (0.1 to 100 µg/ml) using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. To establish the protective role of ME-Og against nicotine toxicity, peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with nicotine (10 mM), nicotine + ME-Og (1 to 25 µg/ml) for 12 h in culture media. The significantly (p < 0.05) increased super oxide anion generation, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels were observed in nicotine-treated group as compared to control group; those were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in ME-Og supplemented groups in concentration dependent manner. More over, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced antioxidant status due to nicotine exposure was effectively ameliorated by ME-Og supplementation in murine peritoneal macrophages. Among the different concentration of ME-Og, maximum protective effect was observed by 25 µg/ml, which does not produce significant cell cytotoxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced free radical generation, lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in important immune cell, peritoneal macrophages. PMID:20716908

  7. Effects of ozone exposure on lipid metabolism in human alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Madden, M.C.; Samet, J.M.; Koren, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) store arachidonic acid (AA) which is esterified in cellular phospholipids until liberated by phospholipase A2 or C after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Following release, there can be subsequent metabolism of AA into various potent, biological active mediators including prostaglandins and platelet activating factor (PAF). To examine the possibility that these mediators may account for some of the pathophysiologic alterations seen in the lung following O3 exposure, human AM were collected by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal subjects, plated into tissue culture dishes, and the adherent cells were incubated with 3H-AA or 3H-lysoPAF. Human AM exposed 1.0 ppm O3 for 2 hr released 65 + or - 12% more tritium, derived from 3H-AA, than paired air-exposed controls into media supernatants. In other studies using a similar O3 exposure protocol, there was also a significant increase in human AM PGE2 production (2.0 + or - 0.5 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.01, n=17). In additional studies, using a similar O3 exposure protocol (1.0 ppm for 1 hr), there was also a significant increase in human AM PAF content (1.7 + or - 0.2 fold-increase above air-exposure values, p<0.02, n=5).

  8. Inhibiting LDL glycation ameliorates increased cholesteryl ester synthesis in macrophages and hypercholesterolemia and aortic lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Margo P.; Shea, Elizabeth A.; Wu, Van-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Increased nonenzymatic glycation of apoB-containing lipoproteins impairs uptake and metabolism by the high affinity low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, and is one of the post-secretory modifications contributory to accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes. The present study evaluated in vitro and in vivo effects of 2,2-chlorophenylaminophenylacetate (CAP22) to probe the influence of glycated lipoprotein on cholesterol homeostasis. This compound prevented the increased formation of glycated products in LDL incubated with 200 mM glucose and the increased cholesteryl ester synthesis in THP-1 macrophages induced by apoB-containing lipoproteins preincubated with high glucose concentration. The elevated circulating concentrations of glycated lipoprotein and cholesterol and higher vascular levels of lipid peroxidation products observed in streptozotocin diabetic rats compared to nondiabetic controls were significantly reduced in diabetic animals treated for six months with test compound. These results are the first to demonstrate that inhibiting nonenzymatic glycation of apoB-containing lipoproteins ameliorates abnormalities contributory to hypercholesterolemia and atherogenic risk in diabetes. PMID:19922964

  9. Gymnastics of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Matthias P

    2010-08-13

    Molecular chaperones assist folding processes and conformational changes in many proteins. In order to do so, they progress through complex conformational cycles themselves. In this review, I discuss the diverse conformational dynamics of the ATP-dependent chaperones of the Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp100 families. PMID:20705236

  10. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  11. Chaperones in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James; Wiseman, R. Luke; Chiti, Fabrizio; Dickey, Chad A.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular protein homeostasis (proteostasis) maintains the integrity of the proteome and includes protein synthesis, folding, oligomerization, and turnover; chaperone proteins assist with all of these processes. Neurons appear to be especially susceptible to failures in proteostasis, and this is now increasingly recognized as a major origin of neurodegenerative disease. This review, based on a mini-symposium presented at the 2015 Society for Neuroscience meeting, describes new work in the area of neuronal proteostasis, with a specific focus on the roles and therapeutic uses of protein chaperones. We first present a brief review of protein misfolding and aggregation in neurodegenerative disease. We then discuss different aspects of chaperone control of neuronal proteostasis on topics ranging from chaperone engineering, to chaperone-mediated blockade of protein oligomerization and cytotoxicity, to the potential rescue of neurodegenerative processes using modified chaperone proteins. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aberrant protein homeostasis within neurons results in protein misfolding and aggregation. In this review, we discuss specific roles for protein chaperones in the oligomerization, assembly, and disaggregation of proteins known to be abnormally folded in neurodegenerative disease. Collectively, our goal is to identify therapeutic mechanisms to reduce the cellular toxicity of abnormal aggregates. PMID:26468185

  12. Agglomerates of ultrafine particles of elemental carbon and TiO2 induce generation of lipid mediators in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Speier, I; Dayal, N; Karg, E; Maier, K L; Roth, C; Ziesenis, A; Heyder, J

    2001-01-01

    Agglomerates of ultrafine particles (AUFPs) may cause adverse health effects because of their large surface area. To evaluate physiologic responses of immune cells, we studied whether agglomerates of 77-nm elemental carbon [(EC); specific surface area 750 m2/g] and 21 nm titanium dioxide (TiO(2) particles (specific surface area 50 m(2)/g) affect the release of lipid mediators by alveolar macrophages (AMs). After 60-min incubation with 1 microg/mL AUFP-EC (corresponding to 7.5 cm(2) particle surface area), canine AMs (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) released arachidonic acid (AA) and the cyclooxygenase (COX) products prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2), thromboxane B(2), and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid but not 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products. AUFP-TiO(2) with a 10-fold higher mass (10 microg/mL) than AUFP-EC, but a similar particle surface area (5 cm(2) also induced AMs to release AA and COX products. Agglomerates of 250 nm TiO(2) particles (specific surface area 6.5 m(2)/g) at 100 microg/mL mass concentration (particle surface area 6.5 cm(2) showed the same response. Interestingly, 75 cm(2)/mL surface area of AUFP-EC and 16 cm(2)/mL surface area of AUFP-TiO(2) additionally induced the release of the 5-LO products leukotriene B(4) and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Respiratory burst activity of stimulated canine neutrophils was partially suppressed by supernatants of AMs treated with various mass concentrations of the three types of particles. Inhibition of neutrophil activity was abolished by supernatants of AMs treated with COX inhibitors prior to AUFP-incubation. This indicates that anti-inflammatory properties of PGE(2) dominate the overall response of lipid mediators released by AUFP-affected AMs. In conclusion, our data indicate that surface area rather than mass concentration determines the effect of AUFPs, and that activation of phospholipase A(subscript)2(/subscript) and COX pathway occurs at a lower particle surface area than that of 5-LO-pathway. We hypothesize a

  13. Soluble Glucan Is Internalized and Trafficked to the Golgi Apparatus in Macrophages via a Clathrin-Mediated, Lipid Raft-Regulated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Matthew P.; Kalbfleisch, John H.; Williams, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Glucans are natural product carbohydrates that stimulate immunity. Glucans are internalized by the pattern recognition receptor, Dectin-1. Glucans were thought to be trafficked to phagolysosomes, but this is unproven. We examined the internalization and trafficking of soluble glucans in macrophages. Incubation of macrophages with glucan resulted in internalization of Dectin-1 and glucan. Inhibition of clathrin blocked internalization of the Dectin-1/glucan complex. Lipid raft depletion resulted in decreased Dectin levels and glucan uptake. Once internalized, glucans colocalized with early endosomes at 0 to 15 min, with the Golgi apparatus at 15 min to 24 h, and with Dectin-1 immediately (0 h) and again later (15 min-24 h). Glucans did not colocalize with lysosomes at any time interval examined. We conclude that the internalization of Dectin-1/glucan complexes in macrophages is mediated by clathrin and negatively regulated by lipid rafts and/or caveolin-1. Upon internalization, soluble glucans are trafficked via endosomes to the Golgi apparatus, not lysosomes. PMID:22700434

  14. p62-enriched inclusion bodies in macrophages protect against atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergin, Ismail; Bhattacharya, Somashubhra; Emanuel, Roy; Esen, Emel; Stokes, Carl J.; Evans, Trent D.; Arif, Batool; Curci, John A.; Razani, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic cellular mechanism that degrades dysfunctional proteins and organelles. Atherosclerotic plaque formation is enhanced in mice with macrophages that cannot undergo autophagy because of a deficiency of an autophagy component such as ATG5. We showed that exposure of macrophages to atherogenic lipids led to an increase in the abundance of the autophagy chaperone p62, which colocalized with polyubiquitinated proteins in cytoplasmic inclusions. p62 accumulation was increased in ATG5-null macrophages, which had large cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive p62 inclusions. Aortas from atherosclerotic mice and plaques from human endarterectomy samples showed increased abundance of p62 and polyubiquitinated proteins that co-localized with plaque macrophages, suggesting that p62-enriched protein aggregates were characteristic of atherosclerosis. The formation of the cytoplasmic inclusions depended on p62 because lipid-loaded p62-null macrophages accumulated polyubiquitinated proteins in a diffuse cytoplasmic pattern. The failure of these aggregates to form was associated with increased secretion of IL-1β and enhanced macrophage apoptosis, which depended on the p62 ubiquitin-binding domain and at least partly involved p62-mediated clearance of NLRP3 inflammasomes. Consistent with our in vitro observations, p62-deficient mice formed greater numbers of more complex atherosclerotic plaques, and p62 deficiency further increased atherosclerotic plaque burden in mice with a macrophage-specific ablation of ATG5. Together, these data suggested that sequestration of cytotoxic ubiquitinated proteins by p62 protects against atherogenesis, a condition in which the clearance of protein aggregates is disrupted. PMID:26732762

  15. Miltefosine-loaded lipid nanoparticles: Improving miltefosine stability and reducing its hemolytic potential toward erythtocytes and its cytotoxic effect on macrophages.

    PubMed

    da Gama Bitencourt, José Jardes; Pazin, Wallance Moreira; Ito, Amando Siuiti; Barioni, Marina Berardi; de Paula Pinto, Carolline; Santos, Maria Aparecida Dos; Guimarães, Thales Henrique Santos; Santos, Márcia Regina Machado Dos; Valduga, Claudete Justina

    2016-10-01

    The toxic effects of miltefosine on the epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract and its hemolytic action on erythrocytes have limited its use as an antileishmanial agent. As part of our search for new strategies to overcome the side effects of miltefosine during the treatment of leishmaniasis, we have developed stable miltefosine-loaded lipid nanoparticles in an attempt to reduce the toxic effects of the drug. We have evaluated lipid nanoparticles containing varying amounts of miltefosine and cholesterol, prepared by sonication, in terms of their physicochemical properties, preliminary stability, hemolytic potential toward erythrocytes, and cytotoxicity to macrophages and to promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania (L.) chagasi. Miltefosine loading into lipid nanoparticles was 100% for low drug concentrations (7.0 to 20.0mg/mL). Particle size decreased from 143nm (control) to between 43 and 69nm. From fluorescence studies, it was observed that the presence of miltefosine and cholesterol (below 103μM) promoted ordering effects in the phospholipid region of the nanoparticles. The formulation containing 15mg/mL miltefosine was stable for at least six months at 4°C and in simulated gastrointestinal fluids, and did not promote epithelial gastrointestinal irritability in Balb/C mice. When loaded into lipid nanoparticles, the hemolytic potential of miltefosine and its cytotoxicity to macrophages diminished, while its antiparasitic activity remained unaltered. The results suggested that miltefosine-loaded lipid nanoparticles may be promising for the treatment of leishmaniasis and might be suitable for oral and parenteral use. PMID:27497059

  16. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype. PMID:25319333

  17. Effects of Toxicologically Relevant Xenobiotics and the Lipid-Derived Electrophile 4-Hydroxynonenal on Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux: Silencing Carboxylesterase 1 Has Paradoxical Effects on Cholesterol Uptake and Efflux

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol cycles between free cholesterol (unesterified) found predominantly in membranes and cholesteryl esters (CEs) stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Only free cholesterol is effluxed from macrophages via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters to extracellular acceptors. Carboxylesterase 1 (CES1), proposed to hydrolyze CEs, is inactivated by oxon metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides and by the lipid electrophile 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). We assessed the ability of these compounds to reduce cholesterol efflux from foam cells. Human THP-1 macrophages were loaded with [3H]-cholesterol/acetylated LDL and then allowed to equilibrate to enable [3H]-cholesterol to distribute into its various cellular pools. The cholesterol-engorged cells were then treated with toxicants in the absence of cholesterol acceptors for 24 h, followed by a 24 h efflux period in the presence of toxicant. A concentration-dependent reduction in [3H]-cholesterol efflux via ABCA1 (up to 50%) was found for paraoxon (0.1–10 μM), whereas treatment with HNE had no effect. A modest reduction in [3H]-cholesterol efflux via ABCG1 (25%) was found after treatment with either paraoxon or chlorpyrifos oxon (10 μM each) but not HNE. No difference in efflux rates was found after treatments with either paraoxon or HNE when the universal cholesterol acceptor 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum was used. When the re-esterification arm of the CE cycle was disabled in foam cells, paraoxon treatment increased CE levels, suggesting the neutral CE hydrolysis arm of the cycle had been inhibited by the toxicant. However, paraoxon also partially inhibited lysosomal acid lipase, which generates cholesterol for efflux, and reduced the expression of ABCA1 protein. Paradoxically, silencing CES1 expression in macrophages did not affect the percent of [3H]-cholesterol efflux. However, CES1 mRNA knockdown markedly reduced cholesterol uptake by macrophages, with SR-A and CD36 mRNA reduced 3- and 4-fold, respectively

  18. Calcium binding chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Coe, Helen; Michalak, Marek

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a major Ca(2+) store of the cell that impacts many cellular processes within the cell. The endoplasmic reticulum has roles in lipid and sterol synthesis, protein folding, post-translational modification and secretion and these functions are affected by intraluminal endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+). In the endoplasmic reticulum there are several Ca(2+) buffering chaperones including calreticulin, Grp94, BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Calreticulin is one of the major Ca(2+) binding/buffering chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum. It has a critical role in Ca(2+) signalling in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and this has significant impacts on many Ca(2+)-dependent pathways including control of transcription during embryonic development. In addition to Ca(2+) buffering, calreticulin plays important role in the correct folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins. PMID:20093733

  19. Catabolism of 4-Hydroxy-2-trans-Nonenal by THP1 Monocytes/Macrophages and Inactivation of Carboxylesterases by this Lipid Electrophile

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Edelmann, Mariola J.; Hardin, Katelyn L.; Herring, Katye L.; Crow, J. Allen; Ross, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress in cells and tissues leads to the formation of an assortment of lipid electrophiles, such as the quantitatively important 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (HNE). Although this cytotoxic aldehyde is atherogenic the mechanisms involved are unclear. We hypothesize that elevated HNE levels can directly inactivate esterase and lipase activities in macrophages via protein adduction, thus generating a biochemical lesion that accelerates foam cell formation and subsequent atherosclerosis. In the present study we examined the effects of HNE treatment on esterase and lipase activities in human THP1 monocytes/macrophages at various physiological scales (i.e., pure recombinant enzymes, cell lysate, and intact living cells). The hydrolytic activities of bacterial and human carboxylesterase enzymes (pnbCE and CES1, respectively) were inactivated by HNE in vitro in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In addition, so were the hydrolytic activities of THP1 cell lysates and intact THP1 monocytes and macrophages. A single lysine residue (Lys105) in recombinant CES1 was modified by HNE via a Michael addition reaction, whereas the lone reduced cysteine residue (Cys389) was found unmodified. The lipolytic activity of cell lysates and intact cells was more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of HNE than the esterolytic activity. Moreover, immunoblotting analysis using HNE antibodies confirmed that several cellular proteins were adducted by HNE following treatment of intact THP1 monocytes, albeit at relatively high HNE concentrations (>50 µM). Unexpectedly, in contrast to CES1, the treatment of a recombinant human CES2 with HNE enhanced its enzymatic activity ~3-fold compared to untreated enzyme. In addition, THP1 monocytes/macrophages can efficiently metabolize HNE, and glutathione conjugation of HNE is responsible for ~43% of its catabolism. The functional importance of HNE-mediated inactivation of cellular hydrolytic enzymes with respect to atherogenesis remains

  20. CR3 and Dectin-1 Collaborate in Macrophage Cytokine Response through Association on Lipid Rafts and Activation of Syk-JNK-AP-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juin-Hua; Lin, Ching-Yu; Wu, Sheng-Yang; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chu, Ching-Liang; Brown, Gordon D; Chuu, Chih-Pin; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2015-07-01

    Collaboration between heterogeneous pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) leading to synergistic coordination of immune response is important for the host to fight against invading pathogens. Although complement receptor 3 (CR3) and Dectin-1 are major PRRs to detect fungi, crosstalk between these two receptors in antifungal immunity is largely undefined. Here we took advantage of Histoplasma capsulatum which is known to interact with both CR3 and Dectin-1 and specific particulate ligands to study the collaboration of CR3 and Dectin-1 in macrophage cytokine response. By employing Micro-Western Array (MWA), genetic approach, and pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrated that CR3 and Dectin-1 act collaboratively to trigger macrophage TNF and IL-6 response through signaling integration at Syk kinase, allowing subsequent enhanced activation of Syk-JNK-AP-1 pathway. Upon engagement, CR3 and Dectin-1 colocalize and form clusters on lipid raft microdomains which serve as a platform facilitating their cooperation in signaling activation and cytokine production. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that CR3 and Dectin-1 cooperatively participate in host defense against disseminated histoplasmosis and instruct adaptive immune response. Taken together, our findings define the mechanism of receptor crosstalk between CR3 and Dectin-1 and demonstrate the importance of their collaboration in host defense against fungal infection. PMID:26132276

  1. Implication of the anti-inflammatory bioactive lipid prostaglandin D2-glycerol ester in the control of macrophage activation and inflammation by ABHD6.

    PubMed

    Alhouayek, Mireille; Masquelier, Julien; Cani, Patrice D; Lambert, Didier M; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2013-10-22

    Proinflammatory macrophages are key mediators in several pathologies; thus, controlling their activation is necessary. The endocannabinoid system is implicated in various inflammatory processes. Here we show that in macrophages, the newly characterized enzyme α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) controls 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels and thus its pharmacological effects. Furthermore, we characterize a unique pathway mediating the effects of 2-AG through its oxygenation by cyclooxygenase-2 to give rise to the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin D2-glycerol ester (PGD2-G). Pharmacological blockade of cyclooxygenase-2 or of prostaglandin D synthase prevented the effects of increasing 2-AG levels by ABHD6 inhibition in vitro, as well as the 2-AG-induced increase in PGD2-G levels. Together, our data demonstrate the physiological relevance of the interaction between the endocannabinoid and prostanoid systems. Moreover, we show that ABHD6 inhibition in vivo allows for fine-tuning of 2-AG levels in mice, therefore reducing lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, without the characteristic central side effects of strong increases in 2-AG levels obtained following monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition. In addition, administration of PGD2-G reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in mice, thus confirming the biological relevance of this 2-AG metabolite. This points to ABHD6 as an interesting therapeutic target that should be relevant in treating inflammation-related conditions, and proposes PGD2-G as a bioactive lipid with potential anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. PMID:24101490

  2. MicroRNA-155 silencing enhances inflammatory response and lipid uptake in oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ri-sheng; Hu, Guan-qiong; Lin, Bin; Lin, Zhi-yi; Sun, Cheng-chao

    2010-12-01

    It has been proposed that the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is an important regulator of the immune system and has been shown to be involved in acute inflammatory response. However, the function of miR-155 in oxLDL-stimulated inflammation and atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here, we show that the exposure of human THP-1 macrophages to oxLDL led to a marked up-regulation of miR-155 in a dose-dependent manner. Silencing of endogenous miR-155 in THP-1 cells using locked nucleic acid-modified antisense oligonucleotides significantly enhanced oxLDL-induced lipid uptake, up-regulated the expression of scavenger receptors (lectinlike oxidized LDL receptor-1, cluster of differentiation 36 [CD36], and CD68), and promoted the release of several cytokines including interleukin (IL)-6, -8, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Luciferase reporter assay showed that targeting miR-155 promoted nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and potentiated the NF-κB-driven transcription activity. Moreover, miR-155 knockdown resulted in a marked increase in the protein amount of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), an important adapter protein used by Toll-like receptors to activate the NF-κB pathway. Our data demonstrate that miR-155 serves as a negative feedback regulator in oxLDL-stimulated THP-1 inflammatory responses and lipid uptake and thus might have potential therapeutic implications in atherosclerosis. PMID:21030878

  3. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L.; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. PMID:25770416

  4. Adsorption of Surfactant Lipids by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Mouse Lung upon Pharyngeal Aspiration: Role in Uptake by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Alexander A.; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E.; Kisin, Elena R.; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J.; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids – phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (~108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted “coating” whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  5. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  6. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  7. Activation of GPR55 Receptors Exacerbates oxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Responses, while Reducing Cholesterol Efflux from Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lanuti, Mirko; Talamonti, Emanuela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Chiurchiù, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been proposed as a new cannabinoid receptor associated with bone remodelling, nervous system excitability, vascular homeostasis as well as in several pathophysiological conditions including obesity and cancer. However, its physiological role and underlying mechanism remain unclear. In the present work, we demonstrate for the first time its presence in human macrophages and its increased expression in ox-LDL-induced foam cells. In addition, pharmacological activation of GPR55 by its selective agonist O-1602 increased CD36- and SRB-I-mediated lipid accumulation and blocked cholesterol efflux by downregulating ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as enhanced cytokine- and pro-metalloprotease-9 (pro-MMP-9)-induced proinflammatory responses in foam cells. Treatment with cannabidiol, a selective antagonist of GPR55, counteracted these pro-atherogenic and proinflammatory O-1602-mediated effects. Our data suggest that GPR55 could play deleterious role in ox-LDL-induced foam cells and could be a novel pharmacological target to manage atherosclerosis and other related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25970609

  8. Polyphosphate is a primordial chaperone.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Wagner, Nico O; Cremers, Claudia M; Mueller-Schickert, Antje; Hock, Nathaniel T; Krieger, Adam G; Smith, Erica M; Bender, Robert A; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Composed of up to 1,000 phospho-anhydride bond-linked phosphate monomers, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is one of the most ancient, conserved, and enigmatic molecules in biology. Here we demonstrate that polyP functions as a hitherto unrecognized chaperone. We show that polyP stabilizes proteins in vivo, diminishes the need for other chaperone systems to survive proteotoxic stress conditions, and protects a wide variety of proteins against stress-induced unfolding and aggregation. In vitro studies reveal that polyP has protein-like chaperone qualities, binds to unfolding proteins with high affinity in an ATP-independent manner, and supports their productive refolding once nonstress conditions are restored. Our results uncover a universally important function for polyP and suggest that these long chains of inorganic phosphate may have served as one of nature's first chaperones, a role that continues to the present day. PMID:24560923

  9. Gaucher iPSC-derived macrophages produce elevated levels of inflammatory mediators and serve as a new platform for therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Leelamma M.; Miller, Diana; Awad, Ola; Bose, Vivek; Lun, Yu; Park, Tea Soon; Zambidis, Elias T.; Sgambato, Judi A.; Feldman, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene. The hallmark of GD is the presence of lipid-laden Gaucher macrophages, which infiltrate bone marrow and other organs. These pathological macrophages are believed to be the source of elevated levels of inflammatory mediators present in the serum of GD patients. The alteration in the immune environment caused by GD is believed to play a role in the increased risk of developing multiple myeloma and other malignancies in GD patients. To determine directly whether Gaucher macrophages are abnormally activated and if their functional defects can be reversed by pharmacological intervention, we generated GD macrophages by directed differentiation of human iPS cells (hiPSC) derived from patients with types 1, 2, and 3 GD. GD hiPSC-derived macrophages expressed higher levels of TNF alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta than control cells, and this phenotype was exacerbated by treatment with LPS. In addition, GD hiPSC macrophages exhibited a striking delay in clearance of phagocytosed red blood cells, recapitulating the presence of RBC remnants in Gaucher macrophages from bone marrow aspirates. Incubation of GD hiPSC macrophages with recombinant glucocerebrosidase, or with the chaperones isofagomine and ambroxol, corrected the abnormal phenotypes of GD macrophages to an extent that reflected their known clinical efficacies. We conclude that Gaucher macrophages are the likely source of the elevated levels of inflammatory mediators in the serum of GD patients, and that GD hiPSC are valuable new tools for studying disease mechanisms and drug discovery. PMID:24801745

  10. Involvement of TLR6 in the induction of COX-2, PGE2 and IL-10 in macrophages by lipids from virulent S2P and attenuated R1A Babesia bovis strains.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, G; Belaunzarán, M L; Magalhães, K G; Poncini, C V; Lammel, E M; González Cappa, S M; Bozza, P T; Isola, E L D

    2016-06-15

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the modulation of diverse host genes expression through a complex network of signalling events that allow for an appropriate response to a microbial pathogen. In the present work we used TLR6KO mice in order to study the role of TLR6 in the immune discrimination of lipids from two Babesia bovis strains, attenuated R1A (LA) and virulent S2P (LV), and the consequent macrophage activation. We demonstrated that TLR6 is required for lipid body induction in murine peritoneal macrophages by both LA and LV. Interestingly, as regards IL-10 and COX-2/PGE2 pathway induction by LA and LV, we observed differences in the biological effects produced by these lipid extracts. Our results indicate a role of TLR6 in the down-modulation of these immunoregulators only in the case of LA, whereas this receptor was not implicated in pro-inflammatory TNFα, IL-6 and KC release induced by LA. Remarkably, LV did not exert the down-modulatory effect observed for LA, supporting the notion that LA and LV possess different lipid composition that could correlate with the polar pathogenic effect of both B. bovis strains. PMID:27198789

  11. Interobserver and intraobserver variability in the calculation of the lipid-laden macrophage index: implications for its use in the evaluation of aspiration in children.

    PubMed

    Reid-Nicholson, Michelle; Kulkarni, Renuka; Adeagbo, Bamidele; Looney, Stephen; Crosby, John

    2010-12-01

    The lipid-laden macrophage index (LLMI) is a semiquantitative test used to evaluate aspiration in children. We assessed the reliability and reproducibility of LLMI by calculating interobserver and intraobserver variability among pathologists, with and without expertise in cytopathology. Forty-nine bronchoalveolar washes/lavages were blindly reviewed by four reviewers and assigned an LLMI. Three pathologists (two cytopathologists, one pathology fellow) reviewed slides twice and one cytotechnologist reviewed them once. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with 95% confidence interval (C.I.) was used to measure overall intraobserver and interobserver agreement. Interobserver agreement was also calculated separately for each pair of reviewers. ICC values did not indicate an acceptable level of interobserver agreement among pathologists, with (ICC = 0.67, 95% C.I.: 0.56-0.77) and without (ICC = 0.77, 95% C.I.: 0.61-0.84) the cytotechnologist included in the analysis. An ICC of 0.84 (95% C.I.: 0.78-0.89) indicated an acceptable level of intraobserver agreement among pathologists. When calculated separately for each pair of reviewers, all but two ICC values for interobserver agreement were less than 0.75 (the minimally acceptable value for a reliable clinical measurement), and the lower confidence limit of each of the 95% C.I. was far below the 0.75 cutoff. Using Lin's coefficient, intraobserver variability was only acceptable for two pathologists. Our study highlights the lack of precision and subjectivity of the LLMI, as well as the significant inter and intraobserver bias that may occur among experienced and inexperienced pathologists, and cytotechnologists. Clinicians and cytopathologists alike should be mindful of this potential pitfall and interpret LLMI scores with caution. PMID:20049966

  12. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed Central

    Docter, Brianne E.; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro. Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  13. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed

    Docter, Brianne E; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-06-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  14. A Lys49 phospholipase A2, isolated from Bothrops asper snake venom, induces lipid droplet formation in macrophages which depends on distinct signaling pathways and the C-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Leiguez, Elbio; Moreira, Vanessa; Nascimento, Neide Galvão; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Lopes de Melo, Robson; Teixeira, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    MT-II, a Lys49PLA2 homologue devoid of catalytic activity from B. asper venom, stimulates inflammatory events in macrophages. We investigated the ability of MT-II to induce formation of lipid droplets (LDs), key elements of inflammatory responses, in isolated macrophages and participation of protein kinases and intracellular PLA2s in this effect. Influence of MT-II on PLIN2 recruitment and expression was assessed, and the effects of some synthetic peptides on LD formation were further evaluated. At noncytotoxic concentrations, MT-II directly activated macrophages to form LDs. This effect was reproduced by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence 115-129 of MT-II, evidencing the critical role of C-terminus for MT-II-induced effect. Moreover, MT-II induced expression and recruitment of PLIN2. Pharmacological interventions with specific inhibitors showed that PKC, PI3K, ERK1/2, and iPLA2, but not P38(MAPK) or cPLA2, signaling pathways are involved in LD formation induced by MT-II. This sPLA2 homologue also induced synthesis of PGE2 that colocalized to LDs. In conclusion, MT-II is able to induce formation of LDs committed to PGE2 formation in a process dependent on C-terminal loop engagement and regulated by distinct protein kinases and iPLA2. LDs may constitute an important inflammatory mechanism triggered by MT-II in macrophages. PMID:23509782

  15. Pro-oxidant activity of indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus indica modulates arachidonate metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis through lipid peroxide production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Allegra, M; D'Acquisto, F; Tesoriere, L; Attanzio, A; Livrea, M A

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages come across active prostaglandin (PG) metabolism during inflammation, shunting early production of pro-inflammatory towards anti-inflammatory mediators terminating the process. This work for the first time provides evidence that a phytochemical may modulate the arachidonate (AA) metabolism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages, promoting the ultimate formation of anti-inflammatory cyclopentenone 15deoxy-PGJ2. Added 1 h before LPS, indicaxanthin from Opuntia Ficus Indica prevented activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and over-expression of PGE2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1), but up-regulated cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and PGD2 synthase (H-PGDS), with final production of the anti-inflammatory cyclopentenone. The effects were positively related with concentration between 50 and 100 µM. Indicaxanthin did not have any effect in the absence of LPS. A kinetic study investigating the redox status of LPS-stimulated macrophages between 0.5 and 12 h, either in the absence or in the presence of 50-100 µM indicaxanthin, revealed a differential control of ROS production, with early (0.5-3 h) modest inhibition, followed by a progressive (3-12 h) concentration-dependent enhancement over the level induced by LPS alone. In addition, indicaxanthin caused early (0.5-3 h) concentration-dependent elevation of conjugated diene lipid hydroperoxides, and production of hydroxynonenal-protein adducts, over the amount induced by LPS. In LPS-stimulated macrophages indicaxanthin did not affect PG metabolism when co-incubated with either an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase or vitamin E. It is concluded that LPS-induced pro-oxidant activity of indicaxanthin at the membrane level allows formation of signaling intermediates whose accumulation modulates PG biosynthetic pathway in inflamed macrophages. PMID:25180166

  16. RUBISCO ACTIVASE --- RUBISCO'S CATALYTIC CHAPERONE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current status of research on the structure, regulation, mechanism and importance of Rubisco activase is reviewed. The activase is now recognized to be a member of the AAA+ family, whose members participate in macromolecular complexes that perform diverse chaperone-line functions. The conversed ...

  17. Macrophage immunoregulatory pathways in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Murugesan V.S.; Ni, Bin; Dodd, Claire E.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, the major host cells harboring Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), are a heterogeneous cell type depending on their tissue of origin and host they are derived from. Significant discord in macrophage responses to M.tb exists due to differences in M.tb strains and the various types of macrophages used to study tuberculosis (TB). This review will summarize current concepts regarding macrophage responses to M.tb infection, while pointing out relevant differences in experimental outcomes due to the use of divergent model systems. A brief description of the lung environment is included since there is increasing evidence that the alveolar macrophage (AM) has immunoregulatory properties that can delay optimal protective host immune responses. In this context, this review focuses on selected macrophage immunoregulatory pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), cytokines, negative regulators of inflammation, lipid mediators and microRNAs (miRNAs). PMID:25453226

  18. Balance between fatty acid degradation and lipid accumulation in cultured smooth muscle cells and IC-21 macrophages exposed to oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Moinat, M; Kossovsky, M; Chevey, J M; Giacobino, J P

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of changes in fatty acid beta-oxidation activity on triglyceride and cholesteryl ester synthesis were studied in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC) and in a macrophage cell line IC-21 in the presence of oleic acid (100 microM). 2. Etomoxir, an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, stimulated the incorporation of [2-3H]glycerol into triglycerides in SMC and in macrophages 6.2- and 8.2-fold, respectively, and the incorporation of [4-14C]cholesterol into cholesteryl esters in macrophages 3.5-fold. 3. L-Carnitine, a cofactor of fatty acid beta-oxidation, decreased the incorporation of [2-3H]glycerol into triglycerides in smooth muscle cells by 69% and the incorporation of [4-14C]cholesterol into cholesteryl esters by 52%. L-Carnitine had no effect on the macrophages. PMID:2060277

  19. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  20. A group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 from snake venom induces lipid body formation in macrophages: the roles of intracellular phospholipases A2 and distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Leiguez, Elbio; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Cianciarullo, Aurora Marques; Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Teixeira, Catarina

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the ability of the sPLA(2), known as MT-III, isolated from the viperid snake Bothrops asper, to induce LB formation in macrophages and the major cellular signaling pathways involved in this process. The effects of MT-III on ADRP localization and expression and macrophage ultrastructure were assessed. Our results showed that this sPLA(2) induced a marked increase in LB numbers in macrophages, induced the recruitment of ADRP in macrophages, and up-regulated ADRP expression. Ultrastructural analysis showed the presence of weakly and strongly osmiophilic LBs in sPLA(2)-stimulated cells. Enlargement of the ER and Golgi cisterns was also observed. Pretreatment of cells with H7 or staurosporine (PKC inhibitors), LY294002 or wortmannin (PI3K inhibitors), SB202190 or PD98059 (p38(MAPK) and ERK1/2 inhibitors, respectively), or Pyr-2 or Bel (cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) inhibitors, respectively) significantly reduced sPLA(2)-induced LB formation. Herbimycin (a PTK inhibitor) and indomethacin or etoricoxib (COX inhibitors) failed to alter sPLA(2)-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show for the first time the ability of a venom sPLA(2) to induce the formation of LBs and the expression of ADRP in macrophages. Venom PLA(2)-induced LB formation is dependent on PKC, PI3K, p38(MAPK), ERK1/2, cPLA(2), and iPLA(2) signaling pathways but not on PTK, COX-1, or COX-2 pathways. Activation of the ER and Golgi complex may play an important role in the formation of LBs induced by this sPLA(2) in macrophages. PMID:21478270

  1. Pharmacological Targeting of the Hsp70 Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Patury, Srikanth; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), acts at multiple steps in a protein’s life cycle, including during the processes of folding, trafficking, remodeling and degradation. To accomplish these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by a host of co-chaperones, which bind to the core chaperone and influence its functions. Genetic studies have strongly linked Hsp70 and its co-chaperones to numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration and microbial pathogenesis, yet the potential of this chaperone as a therapeutic target remains largely underexplored. Here, we review the current state of Hsp70 as a drug target, with a special emphasis on the important challenges and opportunities imposed by its co-chaperones, protein-protein interactions and allostery. PMID:19860737

  2. HtrA chaperone activity contributes to host cell binding in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis caused by the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is associated with attachment of bacteria to the intestinal epithelium and subsequent invasion of epithelial cells. In C. jejuni, the periplasmic protein HtrA is required for efficient binding to epithelial cells. HtrA has both protease and chaperone activity, and is important for virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Results The aim of this study was to determine the role of the dual activities of HtrA in host cell interaction of C. jejuni by comparing an htrA mutant lacking protease activity, but retaining chaperone activity, with a ΔhtrA mutant and the wild type strain. Binding of C. jejuni to both epithelial cells and macrophages was facilitated mainly by HtrA chaperone activity that may be involved in folding of outer membrane adhesins. In contrast, HtrA protease activity played only a minor role in interaction with host cells. Conclusion We show that HtrA protease and chaperone activities contribute differently to C. jejuni's interaction with mammalian host cells, with the chaperone activity playing the major role in host cell binding. PMID:21939552

  3. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Jensen, Henrik H.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-03-23

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe amore » new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease.« less

  4. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Jensen, Henrik H.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-03-23

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe a new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease.

  5. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone-substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  6. Localization of the chaperone binding site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis derived from models of the multi-oligomeric chaperone complex suggests that partially denatured proteins bind in a central cavity in the aggregate. To test this hypothesis, the molecular chaperone, alpha crystallin, was bound to partially denatured forms of gamma crystallin, and the binding site was visualized by immunogold localization. In an alternative approach, gold particles were directly complexed with gamma crystallin, followed by binding to the alpha crystallin aggregate. In both cases, binding was localized to the central region of the aggregate, confirming for the first time that partially denatured proteins do indeed bind to a central region of the molecular chaperone aggregate.

  7. Threonine 22 phosphorylation attenuates Hsp90 interaction with co-chaperones and affects its chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Mollapour, Mehdi; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Truman, Andrew W.; Xu, Wanping; Vaughan, Cara K.; Beebe, Kristin; Konstantinova, Anna; Vourganti, Srinivas; Panaretou, Barry; Piper, Peter W.; Trepel, Jane B.; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H.; Neckers, Len

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone whose activity is regulated not only by co-chaperones but also by distinct post-translational modifications. We report here that casein kinase 2 phosphorylates a conserved threonine residue (T22) in α-helix 1 of the yeast Hsp90 N-domain both in vitro and in vivo. This α-helix participates in a hydrophobic interaction with the catalytic loop in Hsp90's middle domain, helping to stabilize the chaperone's ATPase competent state. Phospho-mimetic mutation of this residue alters Hsp90 ATPase activity and chaperone function, and impacts interaction with the co-chaperones Aha1 and Cdc37. Over-expression of Aha1 stimulates the ATPase activity, restores co-chaperone interactions, and compensates for the functional defects of these Hsp90 mutants. PMID:21419342

  8. Using pharmacological chaperones to restore proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Di, Xiao-Jing; Mu, Ting-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Normal organismal physiology depends on the maintenance of proteostasis in each cellular compartment to achieve a delicate balance between protein synthesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation while minimizing misfolding and aggregation. Defective proteostasis leads to numerous protein misfolding diseases. Pharmacological chaperones are cell-permeant small molecules that promote the proper folding and trafficking of a protein via direct binding to that protein. They stabilize their target protein in a protein-pharmacological chaperone state, increasing the natively-folded protein population that can effectively engage trafficking machinery for transport to the final destination for function. Here, as regards the application of pharmacological chaperones, we focus on their capability to promote the folding and trafficking of lysosomal enzymes, G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and ion channels, each of which is presently an important drug target. Pharmacological chaperones hold great promise as potential therapeutics to ameliorate a variety of protein misfolding diseases. PMID:24747662

  9. Molecular chaperones: functional mechanisms and nanotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario Fernández-Fernández, M.; Sot, Begoña; María Valpuesta, José

    2016-08-01

    Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in protein homeostasis. They not only prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, but also target misfolded proteins for degradation. Despite differences in structure, all types of chaperones share a common general feature, a surface that recognizes and interacts with the misfolded protein. This and other, more specialized properties can be adapted for various nanotechnological purposes, by modification of the original biomolecules or by de novo design based on artificial structures.

  10. Structural mechanisms of chaperone mediated protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ClpB/Hsp104 and Hsp70 classes of molecular chaperones use ATP hydrolysis to dissociate protein aggregates and complexes, and to move proteins through membranes. ClpB/Hsp104 are members of the AAA+ family of proteins which form ring-shaped hexamers. Loops lining the pore in the ring engage substrate proteins as extended polypeptides. Interdomain rotations and conformational changes in these loops coupled to ATP hydrolysis unfold and pull proteins through the pore. This provides a mechanism that progressively disrupts local secondary and tertiary structure in substrates, allowing these chaperones to dissociate stable aggregates such as β-sheet rich prions or coiled coil SNARE complexes. While the ClpB/Hsp104 mechanism appears to embody a true power-stroke in which an ATP powered conformational change in one protein is directly coupled to movement or structural change in another, the mechanism of force generation by Hsp70s is distinct and less well understood. Both active power-stroke and purely passive mechanisms in which Hsp70 captures spontaneous fluctuations in a substrate have been proposed, while a third proposed mechanism—entropic pulling—may be able to generate forces larger than seen in ATP-driven molecular motors without the conformational coupling required for a power-stroke. The disaggregase activity of these chaperones is required for thermotolerance, but unrestrained protein complex/aggregate dissociation is potentially detrimental. Disaggregating chaperones are strongly auto-repressed, and are regulated by co-chaperones which recruit them to protein substrates and activate the disaggregases via mechanisms involving either sequential transfer of substrate from one chaperone to another and/or simultaneous interaction of substrate with multiple chaperones. By effectively subjecting substrates to multiple levels of selection by multiple chaperones, this may insure that these potent disaggregases are only activated in the appropriate context. PMID

  11. Molecular chaperones: functional mechanisms and nanotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Sot, Begoña; Valpuesta, José María

    2016-08-12

    Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in protein homeostasis. They not only prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, but also target misfolded proteins for degradation. Despite differences in structure, all types of chaperones share a common general feature, a surface that recognizes and interacts with the misfolded protein. This and other, more specialized properties can be adapted for various nanotechnological purposes, by modification of the original biomolecules or by de novo design based on artificial structures. PMID:27363314

  12. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Ambre; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the trigger factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin–antitoxin system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria. PMID:25538690

  13. Molecular chaperones: multiple functions, pathologies, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2007-01-01

    Cell stressors are ubiquitous and frequent, challenging cells often, which leads to the stress response with activation of anti-stress mechanisms. These mechanisms involve a variety of molecules, including molecular chaperones also known as heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The chaperones treated in this article are proteins that assist other proteins to fold, refold, travel to their place of residence (cytosol, organelle, membrane, extracellular space), and translocate across membranes. Molecular chaperones participate in a variety of physiological processes and are widespread in organisms, tissues, and cells. It follows that chaperone failure will have an impact, possibly serious, on one or more cellular function, which may lead to disease. Chaperones must recognize and interact with proteins in need of assistance or client polypeptides (e.g., nascent at the ribosome, or partially denatured by stressors), and have to interact with other chaperones because the chaperoning mechanism involves teams of chaperone molecules, i.e., multimolecular assemblies or chaperone machines. Consequently, chaperone molecules have structural domains with distinctive functions: bind the client polypeptide, interact with other chaperone molecules to build a machine, and interact with other complexes that integrate the chaperoning network. Also, various chaperones have ATP-binding and ATPase sites because the chaperoning process requires as, a rule, energy from ATP hydrolysis. Alterations in any one of these domains due to a mutation or an aberrant post-translational modification can disrupt the chaperoning process and cause diseases termed chaperonopathies. This article presents the pathologic concept of chaperonopathy with examples, and discusses the potential of using chaperones (genes or proteins) in treatment (chaperonotherapy). In addition, emerging topics within the field of study of chaperones (chaperonology) are highlighted, e.g., genomics (chaperonomics), systems biology

  14. Supercharging Chaperones: A Meeting Toolkit for Maximizing Learning for Youth and Chaperones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Trip and conference chaperones are a wonderful resource in youth development programs. These well-intended volunteers, many parents of youth participating in the event, want the best experience for the youth but are not necessarily trained in positive youth development. A consequence of this circumstance is that not all chaperones provide the best…

  15. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants.

    PubMed

    Soti, C; Csermely, P

    2007-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which sequester and repair damaged proteins. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of the low affinity, transient interactions (weak links) in cellular networks leading to increased noise, destabilization and diversity. These processes may be further amplified by age-specific network remodelling and by the sequestration of weakly linked cellular proteins to protein aggregates of aging cells. Chaperones are weakly linked hubs (i.e., network elements with a large number of connections) and inter-modular bridge elements of protein-protein interaction, signalling and mitochondrial networks. As aging proceeds, the increased overload of damaged proteins is an especially important element contributing to cellular disintegration and destabilization. Additionally, chaperone overload may contribute to the increase of "noise" in aging cells, which leads to an increased stochastic resonance resulting in a deficient discrimination between signals and noise. Chaperone- and other multi-target therapies, which restore the missing weak links in aging cellular networks, may emerge as important anti-aging interventions. PMID:16814508

  16. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; French, Samuel W

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population or more than 185 million people worldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000 deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is the most common indication for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the Flaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cell can be divided into six phases: (1) binding and internalization; (2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3) viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNA genome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) and assembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation) and secretion. Many host factors are involved in the HCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group of host cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerous cellular processes including protein folding, multimeric protein assembly, protein trafficking, and protein degradation. All phases of the viral life cycle require chaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteins with chaperones. This review will present our current knowledge and understanding of the role of chaperones in the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCV infection will provide further insights into viral/host interactions and potential therapeutic targets for both HCV and other viruses. PMID:26783419

  17. Chaperones in control of protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Liberek, Krzysztof; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ziętkiewicz, Szymon

    2008-01-01

    The chaperone protein network controls both initial protein folding and subsequent maintenance of proteins in the cell. Although the native structure of a protein is principally encoded in its amino-acid sequence, the process of folding in vivo very often requires the assistance of molecular chaperones. Chaperones also play a role in a post-translational quality control system and thus are required to maintain the proper conformation of proteins under changing environmental conditions. Many factors leading to unfolding and misfolding of proteins eventually result in protein aggregation. Stress imposed by high temperature was one of the first aggregation-inducing factors studied and remains one of the main models in this field. With massive protein aggregation occurring in response to heat exposure, the cell needs chaperones to control and counteract the aggregation process. Elimination of aggregates can be achieved by solubilization of aggregates and either refolding of the liberated polypeptides or their proteolysis. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms by which heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), Hsp100 and small Hsp chaperones liberate and refold polypeptides trapped in protein aggregates. PMID:18216875

  18. Interleukin-10 overexpression in macrophages suppresses atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xinbing; Kitamoto, Shiro; Wang, Hongwei; Boisvert, William A.

    2010-01-01

    In atherogenesis, macrophage foam cell formation is modulated by pathways involving both the uptake and efflux of cholesterol. We recently showed that interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates lipid metabolism by enhancing both uptake and efflux of cholesterol in macrophages. However, the mechanistic details of these properties in vivo have been unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether expression of IL-10 in macrophages would alter susceptibility to atherosclerosis and whether IL-10 exerts its antiatherosclerotic properties by modulating lipid metabolism in macrophages. We utilized a macrophage-specific retroviral vector that allows long-term in vivo expression of IL-10 in macrophages through transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow cells (BMCs). IL-10 expressed by macrophages derived from transduced BMCs inhibited atherosclerosis in LDLR−/− mice by reducing cholesteryl ester accumulation in atherosclerotic sites. Experiments with primary macrophages indicated that macrophage source of IL-10 stimulated both the uptake (by up-regulating scavenger receptors) and efflux of cholesterol (by activating the PPARγ-LXR-ABCA1/ABCG1 pathway), thereby reducing inflammation and apoptosis in atherosclerosis. These findings indicate that BMC-transduced macrophage IL-10 production can act as a strong antiatherogenic agent, and they highlight a novel antiatherosclerotic therapy using a simple, yet effective, stem cell transduction system that facilitates long-term expression of IL-10 in macrophages.—Han, X., Kitamoto, S., Wang, H., Boisvert, W. A. Interleukin-10 overexpression in macrophages suppresses atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:20354139

  19. Changes in transcriptome of macrophages in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages display significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Two growth factors, macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 4, drive terminal differentiation of monocytes to M0 and M4 macrophages respectively. Compared to M0 macrophages, M4 cells have a unique transcriptome, with expression of surface markers such as S100A8, mannose receptor CD206 and matrix metalloproteinase 7. M4 macrophages did not express CD163, a scavenger receptor for haemoglobin/haptoglobin complex. Depending on the stimuli, M0 macrophages could polarize towards the proinflammatory M1 subset by treatment with lipopolysaccharide or interferon-γ. These macrophages produce a range of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and exhibit high chemotactic and phagocytic activity. The alternative M2 type could be induced from M0 macrophage by stimulation with interleukin (IL)-4. M2 macrophages express high levels of CD206 and produce anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β. M1, M2 and M4 macrophages could be found in atherosclerotic plaques. In the plaque, macrophages are subjected to the intensive influence not only by cytokines and chemokines but also with bioactive lipids such as cholesterol and oxidized phospholipids. Oxidized phospholipids induce a distinct Mox phenotype in murine macrophages that express a unique panel of antioxidant enzymes under control of the redox-regulated transcription factor Klf2, resistant to lipid accumulation. In unstable human lesions, atheroprotective M(Hb) and HA-mac macrophage subsets could be found. These two subsets are induced by the haemoglobin/haptoglobin complex, highly express haeme oxygenase 1 and CD163, and are implicated in clearance of haemoglobin and erythrocyte remnants. In atherogenesis, the macrophage phenotype is plastic and could therefore be switched to proinflammatory (i.e. proatherogenic) and anti-inflammatory (i.e. atheroprotective). The aim of this review was to

  20. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  1. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding.

    PubMed

    Woodford, Mark R; Dunn, Diana M; Blanden, Adam R; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A; Loh, Stewart N; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S; Marston Linehan, W; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  2. Allostery in the Hsp70 chaperone proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zuiderweg, Erik R.P.; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Rousaki, Aikaterini; Mayer, Matthias P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Ahmad, Atta

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperones are essential to in-vivo protein folding, protein transport and protein re-folding. They carry out these activities using repeated cycles of binding and release of client proteins. This process is under allosteric control of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques have contributed much to the understanding of the allosteric mechanism linking these activities and the effect of co-chaperones on this mechanism. In this chapter, these findings are critically reviewed. Studies on the allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 have gained enhanced urgency, as recent studies have implicated this chaperone as a potential drug target in diseases such as Alzheimer's and cancer. Recent approaches to combat these diseases through interference with the Hsp70 allosteric mechanism are discussed. PMID:22576356

  3. Accelerated Vascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Role of Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Al Gadban, Mohammed M.; Alwan, Mohamed M.; Smith, Kent J.; Hammad, Samar M.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition that is considered a major cause of death worldwide. Striking phenomena of atherosclerosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is its high incidence in young patients. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that differentiate from hematopoietic progenitors and reside in different tissues to preserve tissue integrity. Macrophages scavenge modified lipids and play a major role in the development of atherosclerosis. When activated, macrophages secret inflammatory cytokines. This activation triggers apoptosis of cells in the vicinity of macrophages. As such, macrophages play a significant role in tissue remodeling including atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture. In spite of studies carried on identifying the role of macrophages in atherosclerosis, this role has not been studied thoroughly in SLE-associated atherosclerosis. In this review, we address factors released by macrophages as well as extrinsic factors that may control macrophage behavior and their effect on accelerated development of atherosclerosis in SLE. PMID:25638414

  4. Regulation of molecular chaperones through post-translational modifications: Decrypting the chaperone code

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Philippe; Coulombe, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated cofactors form a group of highly specialized proteins that orchestrate the folding and unfolding of other proteins and the assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. Chaperones are found in all cell types and organisms, and their activity must be tightly regulated to maintain normal cell function. Indeed, deregulation of protein folding and protein complex assembly is the cause of various human diseases. Here, we present the results of an extensive review of the literature revealing that the post-translational modification (PTM) of chaperones has been selected during evolution as an efficient mean to regulate the activity and specificity of these key proteins. Because the addition and reciprocal removal of chemical groups can be triggered very rapidly, this mechanism provides an efficient switch to precisely regulate the activity of chaperones on specific substrates. The large number of PTMs detected in chaperones suggests that a combinatory code is at play to regulate function, activity, localization, and substrate specificity for this group of biologically important proteins. This review surveys the core information currently available as a starting point toward the more ambitious endeavor of deciphering the “chaperone code”. PMID:23459247

  5. CHIP: a co-chaperone for degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Edkins, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein folding and protein degradation. Molecular chaperones like Hsp70 and Hsp90 fulfil well-defined roles in protein folding and conformational stability via ATP dependent reaction cycles. These folding cycles are controlled by associations with a cohort of non-client protein co-chaperones, such as Hop, p23 and Aha1. Pro-folding co-chaperones facilitate the transit of the client protein through the chaperone mediated folding process. However, chaperones are also involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of client proteins. Similar to folding complexes, the ability of chaperones to mediate protein degradation is regulated by co-chaperones, such as the C terminal Hsp70 binding protein (CHIP). CHIP binds to Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones through its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase using a modified RING finger domain (U-box). This unique combination of domains effectively allows CHIP to network chaperone complexes to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of CHIP as a co-chaperone that switches Hsp70/Hsp90 chaperone complexes from protein folding to protein degradation. PMID:25487024

  6. The histone chaperone CAF-1 safeguards somatic cell identity.

    PubMed

    Cheloufi, Sihem; Elling, Ulrich; Hopfgartner, Barbara; Jung, Youngsook L; Murn, Jernej; Ninova, Maria; Hubmann, Maria; Badeaux, Aimee I; Euong Ang, Cheen; Tenen, Danielle; Wesche, Daniel J; Abazova, Nadezhda; Hogue, Max; Tasdemir, Nilgun; Brumbaugh, Justin; Rathert, Philipp; Jude, Julian; Ferrari, Francesco; Blanco, Andres; Fellner, Michaela; Wenzel, Daniel; Zinner, Marietta; Vidal, Simon E; Bell, Oliver; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Chang, Howard Y; Almouzni, Genevieve; Lowe, Scott W; Rinn, John; Wernig, Marius; Aravin, Alexei; Shi, Yang; Park, Peter J; Penninger, Josef M; Zuber, Johannes; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2015-12-10

    Cellular differentiation involves profound remodelling of chromatic landscapes, yet the mechanisms by which somatic cell identity is subsequently maintained remain incompletely understood. To further elucidate regulatory pathways that safeguard the somatic state, we performed two comprehensive RNA interference (RNAi) screens targeting chromatin factors during transcription-factor-mediated reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). Subunits of the chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) complex, including Chaf1a and Chaf1b, emerged as the most prominent hits from both screens, followed by modulators of lysine sumoylation and heterochromatin maintenance. Optimal modulation of both CAF-1 and transcription factor levels increased reprogramming efficiency by several orders of magnitude and facilitated iPS cell formation in as little as 4 days. Mechanistically, CAF-1 suppression led to a more accessible chromatin structure at enhancer elements early during reprogramming. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in somatic heterochromatin domains, increased binding of Sox2 to pluripotency-specific targets and activation of associated genes. Notably, suppression of CAF-1 also enhanced the direct conversion of B cells into macrophages and fibroblasts into neurons. Together, our findings reveal the histone chaperone CAF-1 to be a novel regulator of somatic cell identity during transcription-factor-induced cell-fate transitions and provide a potential strategy to modulate cellular plasticity in a regenerative setting. PMID:26659182

  7. The histone chaperone CAF-1 safeguards somatic cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Cheloufi, Sihem; Elling, Ulrich; Hopfgartner, Barbara; Jung, Youngsook L; Murn, Jernej; Ninova, Maria; Hubmann, Maria; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ang, Cheen Euong; Tenen, Danielle; Wesche, Daniel J; Abazova, Nadezhda; Hogue, Max; Tasdemir, Nilgun; Brumbaugh, Justin; Rathert, Philipp; Jude, Julian; Ferrari, Francesco; Blanco, Andres; Fellner, Michaela; Wenzel, Daniel; Zinner, Marietta; Vidal, Simon E; Bell, Oliver; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Chang, Howard Y.; Almouzni, Genevieve; Lowe, Scott W; Rinn, John; Wernig, Marius; Aravin, Alexei; Shi, Yang; Park, Peter; Penninger, Josef M; Zuber, Johannes; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Cellular differentiation involves profound remodeling of chromatic landscapes, yet the mechanisms by which somatic cell identity is subsequently maintained remain incompletely understood. To further elucidate regulatory pathways that safeguard the somatic state, we performed two comprehensive RNAi screens targeting chromatin factors during transcription factor-mediated reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Remarkably, subunits of the chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) complex emerged as the most prominent hits from both screens, followed by modulators of lysine sumoylation and heterochromatin maintenance. Optimal modulation of both CAF-1 and transcription factor levels increased reprogramming efficiency by several orders of magnitude and facilitated iPSC formation in as little as 4 days. Mechanistically, CAF-1 suppression led to a more accessible chromatin structure at enhancer elements early during reprogramming. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in somatic heterochromatin domains, increased binding of Sox2 to pluripotency-specific targets and activation of associated genes. Notably, suppression of CAF-1 also enhanced the direct conversion of B cells into macrophages and fibroblasts into neurons. Together, our findings reveal the histone chaperone CAF-1 as a novel regulator of somatic cell identity during transcription factor-induced cell fate transitions and provide a potential strategy to modulate cellular plasticity in a regenerative setting. PMID:26659182

  8. Emerging novel concept of chaperone therapies for protein misfolding diseases

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach to protein misfolding diseases. Among them we found unstable mutant enzyme proteins in a few lysosomal diseases, resulting in rapid intracellular degradation and loss of function. Active-site binding low molecular competitive inhibitors (chemical chaperones) paradoxically stabilized and enhanced the enzyme activity in somatic cells by correction of the misfolding of enzyme protein. They reached the brain through the blood-brain barrier after oral administration, and corrected pathophysiology of the disease. In addition to these inhibitory chaperones, non-competitive chaperones without inhibitory bioactivity are being developed. Furthermore molecular chaperone therapy utilizing the heat shock protein and other chaperone proteins induced by small molecules has been experimentally tried to handle abnormally accumulated proteins as a new approach particularly to neurodegenerative diseases. These three types of chaperones are promising candidates for various types of diseases, genetic or non-genetic, and neurological or non-neurological, in addition to lysosomal diseases. PMID:24814990

  9. Combined effects of the signal sequence and the major chaperone proteins on the export of human cytokines in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bergès, H; Joseph-Liauzun, E; Fayet, O

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the export of two human proteins in the course of their production in Escherichia coli. The coding sequences of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and of interleukin 13 were fused to those of two synthetic signal sequences to direct the human proteins to the bacterial periplasm. We found that the total amount of protein varies with the signal peptide-cytokine combination, as does the fraction of it that is soluble in a periplasmic extract. The possibility that the major chaperone proteins such as SecB and the GroEL-GroES and DnaK-DnaJ pairs are limiting factors for the export was tested by overexpressing one or the other of these chaperones concomitantly with the heterologous protein. The GroEL-GroES chaperone pair had no effect on protein production. Overproduction of SecB or DnaK plus DnaJ resulted in a marked increase of the quantity of human proteins in the periplasmic fraction, but this increase depends on the signal peptide-heterologous protein-chaperone association involved. PMID:8572712

  10. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-02-19

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for >50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and proresolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge. PMID:26892964

  11. A Mouse Macrophage Lipidome*♦

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Edward A.; Deems, Raymond A.; Harkewicz, Richard; Quehenberger, Oswald; Brown, H. Alex; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Glass, Christopher K.; Hardiman, Gary; Reichart, Donna; Merrill, Alfred H.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Wang, Elaine; Murphy, Robert C.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Garrett, Teresa A.; Guan, Ziqiang; Ryan, Andrea C.; Russell, David W.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Thompson, Bonne M.; Shaw, Walter A.; Sud, Manish; Zhao, Yihua; Gupta, Shakti; Maurya, Mano R.; Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2010-01-01

    We report the lipidomic response of the murine macrophage RAW cell line to Kdo2-lipid A, the active component of an inflammatory lipopolysaccharide functioning as a selective TLR4 agonist and compactin, a statin inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis. Analyses of lipid molecular species by dynamic quantitative mass spectrometry and concomitant transcriptomic measurements define the lipidome and demonstrate immediate responses in fatty acid metabolism represented by increases in eicosanoid synthesis and delayed responses characterized by sphingolipid and sterol biosynthesis. Lipid remodeling of glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, and prenols also take place, indicating that activation of the innate immune system by inflammatory mediators leads to alterations in a majority of mammalian lipid categories, including unanticipated effects of a statin drug. Our studies provide a systems-level view of lipid metabolism and reveal significant connections between lipid and cell signaling and biochemical pathways that contribute to innate immune responses and to pharmacological perturbations. PMID:20923771

  12. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells. PMID:26493158

  13. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  14. Liposomal prednisolone promotes macrophage lipotoxicity in experimental atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, Fleur M; Schulte, Dominik M; Meiler, Svenja; Tang, Jun; Zheng, Kang He; Van den Bossche, Jan; Seijkens, Tom; Laudes, Matthias; de Winther, Menno; Lutgens, Esther; Alaarg, Amr; Metselaar, Josbert M; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Mulder, Willem J M; Stroes, Erik S G; Hamers, Anouk A J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven inflammatory disease, for which nanomedicinal interventions are under evaluation. Previously, we showed that liposomal nanoparticles loaded with prednisolone (LN-PLP) accumulated in plaque macrophages, however, induced proatherogenic effects in patients. Here, we confirmed in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) mice that LN-PLP accumulates in plaque macrophages. Next, we found that LN-PLP infusions at 10mg/kg for 2weeks enhanced monocyte recruitment to plaques. In follow up, after 6weeks of LN-PLP exposure we observed (i) increased macrophage content, (ii) more advanced plaque stages, and (iii) larger necrotic core sizes. Finally, in vitro studies showed that macrophages become lipotoxic after LN-PLP exposure, exemplified by enhanced lipid loading, ER stress and apoptosis. These findings indicate that liposomal prednisolone may paradoxically accelerate atherosclerosis by promoting macrophage lipotoxicity. Hence, future (nanomedicinal) drug development studies are challenged by the multifactorial nature of atherosclerotic inflammation. PMID:27015770

  15. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  16. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  17. Extracellular HSP110 skews macrophage polarization in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Berthenet, Kevin; Boudesco, Christophe; Collura, Ada; Svrcek, Magali; Richaud, Sarah; Hammann, Arlette; Causse, Sebastien; Yousfi, Nadhir; Wanherdrick, Kristell; Duplomb, Laurence; Duval, Alex; Garrido, Carmen; Jego, Gaetan

    2016-07-01

    HSP110 is induced by different stresses and, through its anti-apoptotic and chaperoning properties, helps the cells to survive these adverse situations. In colon cancers, HSP110 is abnormally abundant. We have recently showed that colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with microsatellite instability (MSI) had an improved response to chemotherapy because they harbor an HSP110 inactivating mutation (HSP110DE9). In this work, we have used patients' biopsies and human CRC cells grown in vitro and in vivo (xenografts) to demonstrate that (1) HSP110 is secreted by CRC cells and that the amount of this extracellular HSP110 is strongly decreased by the expression of the mutant HSP110DE9, (2) Supernatants from CRC cells overexpressing HSP110 or purified recombinant human HSP110 (LPS-free) affect macrophage differentiation/polarization by favoring a pro-tumor, anti-inflammatory profile, (3) Conversely, inhibition of HSP110 (expression of siRNA, HSP110DE9 or immunodepletion) induced the formation of macrophages with a cytotoxic, pro-inflammatory profile. (4) Finally, this effect of extracellular HSP110 on macrophages seems to implicate TLR4. These results together with the fact that colorectal tumor biopsies with HSP110 high were infiltrated with macrophages with a pro-tumoral profile while those with HSP110 low were infiltrated with macrophages with a cytotoxic profile, suggest that the effect of extracellular HSP110 function on macrophages may also contribute to the poor outcomes associated with HSP110 expression. PMID:27622020

  18. Salicylate improves macrophage cholesterol homeostasis via activation of Ampk.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Morgan D; Ford, Rebecca J; McGregor, Chelsea P; LeBlond, Nicholas D; Snider, Shayne A; Stypa, Stephanie A; Day, Emily A; Lhoták, Šárka; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Austin, Richard C; Kemp, Bruce E; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis stems from imbalances in lipid metabolism and leads to maladaptive inflammatory responses. The AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates many aspects of lipid and energy metabolism, although its specific role in controlling macrophage cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We sought to address this question by testing the effects of direct Ampk activators in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from Ampk β1-deficient (β1(-/-)) mice. Macrophages from Ampk β1(-/-) mice had enhanced lipogenic capacity and diminished cholesterol efflux, although cholesterol uptake was unaffected. Direct activation of Ampk β1 via salicylate (the unacetylated form of aspirin) or A-769662 (a small molecule activator), decreased the synthesis of FAs and sterols in WT but not Ampk β1(-/-) macrophages. In lipid-laden macrophages, Ampk activation decreased cholesterol content (foam cell formation) and increased cholesterol efflux to HDL and apoA-I, effects that occurred in an Ampk β1-dependent manner. Increased cholesterol efflux was also associated with increased gene expression of the ATP binding cassette transporters, Abcg1 and Abca1. Moreover, in vivo reverse cholesterol transport was suppressed in mice that received Ampk β1(-/-) macrophages compared with the WT control. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting macrophage Ampk with new or existing drugs for the possible reduction in foam cell formation during the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:25773887

  19. Capturing the misfolds : chaperone-peptide-binding motifs.

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1997-06-01

    Recently, the crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of human Hsp90-alpha chaperone and its complex with geldanamycin and the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of yeast Hsp90 have been determined at high resolution. These structures reveal features that shed new light on the Hsp90 chaperone-protein interactions.

  20. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  1. Modulation of human IAPP fibrillation: cosolutes, crowders and chaperones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mimi; Estel, Kathrin; Seeliger, Janine; Friedrich, Ralf P; Dogan, Susanne; Wanker, Erich E; Winter, Roland; Ebbinghaus, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The cellular environment determines the structure and function of proteins. Marginal changes of the environment can severely affect the energy landscape of protein folding. However, despite the important role of chaperones on protein folding, less is known about chaperonal modulation of protein aggregation and fibrillation considering different classes of chaperones. We find that the pharmacological chaperone O4, the chemical chaperone proline as well as the protein chaperone serum amyloid P component (SAP) are inhibitors of the type 2 diabetes mellitus-related aggregation process of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). By applying biophysical methods such as thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy, total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy we analyse and compare their inhibition mechanism. We demonstrate that the fibrillation reaction of human IAPP is strongly inhibited by formation of globular, amorphous assemblies by both, the pharmacological and the protein chaperones. We studied the inhibition mechanism under cell-like conditions by using the artificial crowding agents Ficoll 70 and sucrose. Under such conditions the suppressive effect of proline was decreased, whereas the pharmacological chaperone remains active. PMID:25406896

  2. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  3. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin functions as crucial chaperone reservoir in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Filipa; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Tânia; Tse, Eric; Koldewey, Philipp; Southworth, Daniel R.; Tomás, Ana M.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic eukaryotic 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins have been widely reported to act as dual-function proteins, either detoxifying reactive oxygen species or acting as chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. Several stimuli, including peroxide-mediated sulfinic acid formation at the active site cysteine, have been proposed to trigger the chaperone activity. However, the mechanism underlying this activation and the extent to which the chaperone function is crucial under physiological conditions in vivo remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that in the vector-borne protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx) exerts intrinsic ATP-independent chaperone activity, protecting a wide variety of different proteins against heat stress-mediated unfolding in vitro and in vivo. Activation of the chaperone function appears to be induced by temperature-mediated restructuring of the reduced decamers, promoting binding of unfolding client proteins in the center of Prx’s ringlike structure. Client proteins are maintained in a folding-competent conformation until restoration of nonstress conditions, upon which they are released and transferred to ATP-dependent chaperones for refolding. Interference with client binding impairs parasite infectivity, providing compelling evidence for the in vivo importance of Prx’s chaperone function. Our results suggest that reduced Prx provides a mitochondrial chaperone reservoir, which allows L. infantum to deal successfully with protein unfolding conditions during the transition from insect to the mammalian hosts and to generate viable parasites capable of perpetuating infection. PMID:25646478

  4. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  5. CSPα—chaperoning presynaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission relies on precisely regulated and exceedingly fast protein-protein interactions that involve voltage-gated channels, the exocytosis/endocytosis machinery as well as signaling pathways. Although we have gained an ever more detailed picture of synaptic architecture much remains to be learned about how synapses are maintained. Synaptic chaperones are “folding catalysts” that preserve proteostasis by regulating protein conformation (and therefore protein function) and prevent unwanted protein-protein interactions. Failure to maintain synapses is an early hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic vesicle protein and molecular chaperone that has a central role in preventing synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Over the past few years, a number of different “client proteins” have been implicated as CSPα substrates including voltage-dependent ion channels, signaling proteins and proteins critical to the synaptic vesicle cycle. Here we review the ion channels and synaptic protein complexes under the influence of CSPα and discuss gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:24808827

  6. Monocyte and Macrophage Dynamics during Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus; Miller, Yury I.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is associated with and in large part driven by changes in the leukocyte compartment of the vessel wall. Here, we focus on monocyte influx during atherosclerosis, the most common form of vascular inflammation. Although the arterial wall contains a large number of resident macrophages and some resident dendritic cells, atherosclerosis drives a rapid influx of inflammatory monocytes (Ly-6C+ in mice) and other monocytes (Ly-6C− in mice, also known as patrolling monocytes). Once in the vessel wall, Ly-6C+ monocytes differentiate to a phenotype consistent with inflammatory macrophages and inflammatory dendritic cells. The phenotype of these cells is modulated by lipid uptake, Toll-like receptor ligands, hematopoietic growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. In addition to newly recruited macrophages, it is likely that resident macrophages also change their phenotype. Monocyte-derived inflammatory macrophages have a short half-life. After undergoing apoptosis, they may be taken up by surrounding macrophages or, if the phagocytic capacity is overwhelmed, can undergo secondary necrosis, a key event in forming the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions. In this review, we discuss these and other processes associated with monocytic cell dynamics in the vascular wall and their role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:21677293

  7. Macrophage Models of Gaucher Disease for Evaluating Disease Pathogenesis and Candidate Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K.; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)–derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development. PMID:24920659

  8. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  9. Specificity of Intramembrane Protein–Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Ernst, Andreas Max; Wieland, Felix; Brügger, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Our concept of biological membranes has markedly changed, from the fluid mosaic model to the current model that lipids and proteins have the ability to separate into microdomains, differing in their protein and lipid compositions. Since the breakthrough in crystallizing membrane proteins, the most powerful method to define lipid-binding sites on proteins has been X-ray and electron crystallography. More recently, chemical biology approaches have been developed to analyze protein–lipid interactions. Such methods have the advantage of providing highly specific cellular probes. With the advent of novel tools to study functions of individual lipid species in membranes together with structural analysis and simulations at the atomistic resolution, a growing number of specific protein–lipid complexes are defined and their functions explored. In the present article, we discuss the various modes of intramembrane protein–lipid interactions in cellular membranes, including examples for both annular and nonannular bound lipids. Furthermore, we will discuss possible functional roles of such specific protein–lipid interactions as well as roles of lipids as chaperones in protein folding and transport. PMID:21536707

  10. Expression and variability of molecular chaperones in the sugarcane expressome.

    PubMed

    Borges, Júlio C; Cagliari, Thiago C; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2007-04-01

    Molecular chaperones perform folding assistance in newly synthesized polypeptides preventing aggregation processes, recovering proteins from aggregates, among other important cellular functions. Thus their study presents great biotechnological importance. The present work discusses the mining for chaperone-related sequences within the sugarcane EST genome project database, which resulted in approximately 300 different sequences. Since molecular chaperones are highly conserved in most organisms studied so far, the number of sequences related to these proteins in sugarcane was very similar to the number found in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The Hsp70 family was the main molecular chaperone system present in the sugarcane expressome. However, many other relevant molecular chaperones systems were also present. A digital RNA blot analysis showed that 5'ESTs from all molecular chaperones were found in every sugarcane library, despite their heterogeneous expression profiles. The results presented here suggest the importance of molecular chaperones to polypeptide metabolism in sugarcane cells, based on their abundance and variability. Finally, these data have being used to guide more in deep analysis, permitting the choice of specific targets to study. PMID:16687190

  11. Maintenance of structure and function of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperones requires the chaperone Hep1

    PubMed Central

    Sichting, Martin; Mokranjac, Dejana; Azem, Abdussalam; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2005-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones mediate folding of proteins and prevent their misfolding and aggregation. We report here on a new kind of Hsp70 interacting protein in mitochondria, Hep1. Hep1 is a highly conserved protein present in virtually all eukaryotes. Deletion of HEP1 results in a severe growth defect. Cells lacking Hep1 are deficient in processes that need the function of mitochondrial Hsp70s, such as preprotein import and biogenesis of proteins containing FeS clusters. In the mitochondria of these cells, Hsp70s, Ssc1 and Ssq1 accumulate as insoluble aggregates. We show that it is the nucleotide-free form of mtHsp70 that has a high tendency to self-aggregate. This process is efficiently counteracted by Hep1. We conclude that Hep1 acts as a chaperone that is necessary and sufficient to prevent self-aggregation and to thereby maintain the function of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperones. PMID:15719019

  12. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  13. Stress chaperone mortalin regulates human melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Renu; Priyandoko, Didik; Gao, Ran; Widodo, Nashi; Nigam, Nupur; Li, Ling; Ahn, Hyo Min; Yun, Chae-Ok; Ando, Nobuhiro; Mahe, Christian; Kaul, Sunil C

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify the cellular factors involved in human melanogenesis, we carried out shRNA-mediated loss-of-function screening in conjunction with induction of melanogenesis by 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol (OAG) in human melanoma cells using biochemical and visual assays. Gene targets of the shRNAs (that caused loss of OAG-induced melanogenesis) and their pathways, as determined by bioinformatics, revealed involvement of proteins that regulate cell stress response, mitochondrial functions, proliferation, and apoptosis. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the mitochondrial stress chaperone mortalin is crucial for melanogenesis. Upregulation of mortalin was closely associated with melanogenesis in in vitro cell-based assays and clinical samples of keloids with hyperpigmentation. Furthermore, its knockdown resulted in compromised melanogenesis. The data proposed mortalin as an important protein that may be targeted to manipulate pigmentation for cosmetic and related disease therapeutics. PMID:27056733

  14. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitric oxide production by macrophages through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ). Furthermore, uptake of PS by macrophages, after intravenous injection of PS-containing liposomes (PSLs), suppresses the production of inflammatory mediators and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. The protective effect of PSLs in EAE animals is associated with a reduced immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system and decreased splenic cognate antigen specific proliferation. Interestingly, PPARβ/δ is activated in foamy macrophages in active MS lesions, indicating that myelin also activates PPARβ/δ in macrophages in the human brain. Conclusion Our data show that myelin modulates the phenotype of macrophages by PPAR activation, which may subsequently dampen MS lesion progression. Moreover, our results suggest that myelin-derived PS mediates PPARβ/δ activation in macrophages after myelin uptake. The immunoregulatory impact of naturally-occurring myelin lipids may hold promise for future MS therapeutics. PMID:24252308

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-01

    1. The effect of liposome phospholipid composition has been assumed to be relatively unimportant because of the presumed inert nature of phospholipids. 2. We have previously shown that cationic liposome formulations used for gene therapy inhibit, through their cationic component, the synthesis by activated macrophages of the pro-inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). 3. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of different cationic lipids to reduce footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan and by sheep red blood cell challenge. 4. Parenteral (i.p. or s.c) or local injection of the positively charged lipids dimethyldioctadecylammomium bromide (DDAB), dioleyoltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP) or dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl cholesterol (DC-Chol) significantly reduced the inflammation observed in both models in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition: 70-95%). 5. Cationic lipids associated with dioleyol- or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine retained their anti-inflammatory activity while cationic lipids associated with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) showed no anti-inflammatory activity, indicating that the release of cationic lipids into the macrophage cytoplasm is a necessary step for anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids was abrogated by the addition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene)glycol-2000 (DPPE-PEG2000) which blocks the interaction of cationic lipids with macrophages. 6. Because of the significant role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the inflammatory process we have determined whether the cationic lipids used in this study inhibit PKC activity. The cationic lipids significantly inhibited the activity of PKC but not the activity of a non-related protein kinase, PKA. The synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is not dependent on PKC activity for its

  16. Lipoxygenase products mediate the attachment of rat macrophages to glomeruli in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Baud, L.; Sraer, J.; Delarue, F.; Bens, M.; Balavoine, F.; Schlondorff, D.; Ardaillou, R.; Sraer, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Because there is an accumulation of macrophages in the Bowman's space during human and experimental glomerulonephritis, the authors have studied the binding of (/sup 3/H)-uridine labeled macrophages to isolated glomeruli. Binding was related to the glomerular protein and macrophage concentrations, temperature, time of incubation, and was a saturable process. Macrophage adherence depended on glomerular lipoxygenase activity but not on glomerular cyclooxygenase activity since preincubation of glomeruli with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited this phenomenon whereas preincubation with indomethacin was ineffective. Glomeruli interacted with macrophages in converting arachidonic acid (C20:4) to prostaglandins (PG) since productions of 6 keto-PGF1 alpha, TXB2, and PGD2 by glomeruli and macrophages incubated in combination were much greater than the sums of their respective productions by glomeruli and macrophages incubated separately. Macrophages were the source of the supplementary synthesis of PG which was abolished when these cells were pretreated with aspirin. Stimulation of macrophages by glomeruli was blunted by pretreatment of glomeruli with NDGA. Production of PG and of 12-HETE by macrophages was stimulated by a lipid extract of glomeruli containing the oxygenated metabolites of C20:4. Direct addition of 12-HPETE also stimulated macrophage functions. These data suggest that macrophage attachment to glomeruli and macrophage stimulation in the presence of glomeruli depend on glomerular lipoxygenase activity.

  17. Paraoxonases 1, 2, and 3, oxidative stress, and macrophage foam cell formation during atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Michael; Rosenblat, Mira

    2004-11-01

    Paraoxonases PON1 and PON3, which are both associated in serum with HDL, protect the serum lipids from oxidation, probably as a result of their ability to hydrolyze specific oxidized lipids. The activity of HDL-associated PON1 seems to involve an activity (phospholipase A2-like activity, peroxidase-like activity, lactonase activity) which produces LPC. To study the possible role of PON1 in macrophage foam cell formation and atherogenesis we used macrophages from control mice, from PON1 knockout mice, and from PON1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we analyzed PON1-treated macrophages and PON1-transfected cells to demonstrate the contribution of PON1 to the attenuation of macrophage cholesterol and oxidized lipid accumulation and foam cell formation. PON1 was shown to inhibit cholesterol influx [by reducing the formation of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), increasing the breakdown of specific oxidized lipids in Ox-LDL, and decreasing macrophage uptake of Ox-LDL]. PON1 also inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis and stimulates HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PON2 and PON3 protect against oxidative stress, with PON2 acting mainly at the cellular level. Whereas serum PON1 and PON3 were inactivated under oxidative stress, macrophage PON2 expression and activity were increased under oxidative stress, probably as a compensatory mechanism against oxidative stress. Intervention to increase the paraoxonases (cellular and humoral) by dietary or pharmacological means can reduce macrophage foam cell formation and attenuate atherosclerosis development. PMID:15454271

  18. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:27331813

  19. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  20. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking. We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  1. Heterogeneous expression of apolipoprotein-E by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tedla, Nicodemus; Glaros, Elias N; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Apolipoprotein-E (apoE) is expressed at high levels by macrophages. In addition to its role in lipid transport, macrophage-derived apoE plays an important role in immunoregulation. Previous studies have identified macrophage subpopulations that differ substantially in their ability to synthesize specific cytokines and enzymes, however, potential heterogeneous macrophage apoE expression has not been studied. Here we examined apoE expression in human THP-1 macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry methods we reveal a striking heterogeneity in macrophage apoE expression in both cell types. In phorbol-ester-differentiated THP-1 macrophages, 5% of the cells over-expressed apoE at levels more than 50-fold higher than the rest of the population. ApoE over-expressing THP-1 macrophages contained condensed/fragmented nuclei and increased levels of activated caspase-3 indicating induction of apoptosis. In MDM, 3–5% of the cells also highly over-expressed apoE, up to 50-fold higher than the rest of the population; however, this was not associated with obvious nuclear alterations. The apoE over-expressing MDM were larger, more granular, and more autofluorescent than the majority of cells and they contained numerous vesicle-like structures that appeared to be coated by apoE. Flow cytometry experiments indicated that the apoE over-expressing subpopulation of MDM were positive for CD14, CD11b/Mac-1 and CD68. These observations suggest that specific macrophage subpopulations may be important for apoE-mediated immunoregulation and clearly indicate that subpopulation heterogeneity should be taken into account when investigating macrophage apoE expression. PMID:15500620

  2. Macrophage Pro-Resolving Mediators—the When and Where

    PubMed Central

    DALLI, JESMOND; SERHAN, CHARLES

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils orchestrate acute inflammation and host defense as well as the resolution phase and return to homeostasis. In this article, we review the contribution of macrophages to local lipid mediator (LM) levels and the regulation of macrophage LM profiles by neutrophils and neutrophil-derived microparticles. We carried out LM metabololipidomics profiling distinct phagocytes: neutrophils (PMN), apoptotic PMN, and macrophages. Efferocytosis increased specialized proresolving mediator (SPM) biosynthesis, including Resolvin D1 (RvD1), RvD2, and RvE2, which were further elevated by PMN microparticles. Using deuterium-labeled precursors (d8-arachidonic acid, d5-eicosapentaenoic acid, and d5-docosahexaenoic acid), apoptotic PMN and microparticles contributed to SPM biosynthesis during efferocytosis. Assessment of macrophage LM profiles in M2 macrophages demonstrated higher SPM levels in this macrophage subset, including maresin 1 (MaR1), and lower amounts of leukotriene B4 and prostaglandins than M1. Apoptotic PMN uptake by both macrophage subtypes led to modulation of their LM profiles. Leukotriene B4 was down-regulated in M2 whereas SPM including lipoxin A4 were increased. Conversely, uptake of apoptotic PMN by M2 macrophages reduced (~ 25%) overall LM. MaR1 displays potent tissue regenerative and anti-nociceptive actions in addition to its pro-resolving and anti-inflammatory actions. In addition the MaR1 biosynthetic intermediate 13S,14S-epoxy-Maresin is also bioactive, inhibiting LTB4 biosynthesis and switching macrophage phenotypes from M1 to M2. Together, these results establish LM signature profiles of human phagocytes and related subpopulations. They demonstrate microparticle regulation of specific macrophage endogenous LM during defined stages of acute inflammation and their dynamic changes in human primary phagocytes. PMID:27337457

  3. Deficient chaperone-mediated autophagy in liver leads to metabolic dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jaime L.; Suh, Yousin; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Summary The activity of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), a catabolic pathway for selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes, decreases with age, but the consequences of this functional decline in vivo remain unknown. In this work, we have generated a conditional knockout mouse to selectively block CMA in liver. We have found that blockage of CMA causes hepatic glycogen depletion and hepatosteatosis. The liver phenotype is accompanied by reduced peripheral adiposity, increased energy expenditure, and altered glucose homeostasis. Comparative lysosomal proteomics revealed that key enzymes in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are normally degraded by CMA and that impairment of their regulated degradation contributes to the metabolic abnormalities observed in CMA-defective animals. These findings highlight the involvement of CMA in regulating hepatic metabolism and suggest that the age-related decline in CMA may have a negative impact on the energetic balance in old organisms. PMID:25043815

  4. The archaeal molecular chaperone machine: peculiarities and paradoxes.

    PubMed Central

    Macario, A J; de Macario, E C

    1999-01-01

    A major finding within the field of archaea and molecular chaperones has been the demonstration that, while some species have the stress (heat-shock) gene hsp70(dnaK), others do not. This gene encodes Hsp70(DnaK), an essential molecular chaperone in bacteria and eukaryotes. Due to the physiological importance and the high degree of conservation of this protein, its absence in archaeal organisms has raised intriguing questions pertaining to the evolution of the chaperone machine as a whole and that of its components in particular, namely, Hsp70(DnaK), Hsp40(DnaJ), and GrpE. Another archaeal paradox is that the proteins coded by these genes are very similar to bacterial homologs, as if the genes had been received via lateral transfer from bacteria, whereas the upstream flanking regions have no bacterial markers, but instead have typical archaeal promoters, which are like those of eukaryotes. Furthermore, the chaperonin system in all archaea studied to the present, including those that possess a bacterial-like chaperone machine, is similar to that of the eukaryotic-cell cytosol. Thus, two chaperoning systems that are designed to interact with a compatible partner, e.g., the bacterial chaperone machine physiologically interacts with the bacterial but not with the eucaryal chaperonins, coexist in archaeal cells in spite of their apparent functional incompatibility. It is difficult to understand how these hybrid characteristics of the archaeal chaperoning system became established and work, if one bears in mind the classical ideas learned from studying bacteria and eukaryotes. No doubt, archaea are intriguing organisms that offer an opportunity to find novel molecules and mechanisms that will, most likely, enhance our understanding of the stress response and the protein folding and refolding processes in the three phylogenetic domains. PMID:10430558

  5. Mobilization of stored triglycerides from macrophages as free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    von Hodenberg, E; Khoo, J C; Jensen, D; Witztum, J L; Steinberg, D

    1984-01-01

    Because many or most lipid-laden foam cells in atheromas and in xanthomas derive from macrophages, it is important to understand how they accumulate lipids and how they can divest themselves of lipids. The mobilization of stored triglycerides from macrophages was studied in cell cultures. Mouse resident peritoneal macrophages and J774 macrophages increased their triglyceride content six- to tenfold during a 24-hour incubation with free fatty acids complexed to albumin. Subsequent incubation in fresh medium containing free fatty acid-poor albumin was accompanied by a fall in cell triglyceride content (50% in 20 hours) and a corresponding increase in medium-free fatty acid. Release of free fatty acid was linear as a function of time, provided fresh medium was added hourly. When medium was not changed, release rates fell off rapidly, probably due to re-uptake of released free fatty acid. Chloroquine did not affect the rate of free fatty acid release. The results suggest that macrophages-foam cells can reduce their triglyceride stores via the action of a nonlysosomal (presumably cytoplasmic) neutral triglyceride lipase. PMID:6508637

  6. Macrophage Autophagy in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Grassia, Gianluca; Platt, Andrew M.; Carnuccio, Rosa; Ialenti, Armando; Maffia, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in atherosclerotic immune responses. Recent investigation into macrophage autophagy (AP) in atherosclerosis has demonstrated a novel pathway through which these cells contribute to vascular inflammation. AP is a cellular catabolic process involving the delivery of cytoplasmic contents to the lysosomal machinery for ultimate degradation and recycling. Basal levels of macrophage AP play an essential role in atheroprotection during early atherosclerosis. However, AP becomes dysfunctional in the more advanced stages of the pathology and its deficiency promotes vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and plaque necrosis. In this paper, we will discuss the role of macrophages and AP in atherosclerosis and the emerging evidence demonstrating the contribution of macrophage AP to vascular pathology. Finally, we will discuss how AP could be targeted for therapeutic utility. PMID:23401644

  7. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  8. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families-molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases-chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  9. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families–molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases–chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  10. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L; Champion, Matthew M; Clark, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress. PMID:27626276

  11. Chaperone-assisted selective autophagy is essential for muscle maintenance.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Verena; Dick, Nikolaus; Tawo, Riga; Dreiseidler, Michael; Wenzel, Daniela; Hesse, Michael; Fürst, Dieter O; Saftig, Paul; Saint, Robert; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Hoch, Michael; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2010-01-26

    How are biological structures maintained in a cellular environment that constantly threatens protein integrity? Here we elucidate proteostasis mechanisms affecting the Z disk, a protein assembly essential for actin anchoring in striated muscles, which is subjected to mechanical, thermal, and oxidative stress during contraction [1]. Based on the characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster cochaperone Starvin (Stv), we define a conserved chaperone machinery required for Z disk maintenance. Instead of keeping Z disk proteins in a folded conformation, this machinery facilitates the degradation of damaged components, such as filamin, through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA). Stv and its mammalian ortholog BAG-3 coordinate the activity of Hsc70 and the small heat shock protein HspB8 during disposal that is initiated by the chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase CHIP and the autophagic ubiquitin adaptor p62. CASA is thus distinct from chaperone-mediated autophagy, previously shown to facilitate the ubiquitin-independent, direct translocation of a client across the lysosomal membrane [2]. Impaired CASA results in Z disk disintegration and progressive muscle weakness in flies, mice, and men. Our findings reveal the importance of chaperone-assisted degradation for the preservation of cellular structures and identify muscle as a tissue that highly relies on an intact proteostasis network, thereby shedding light on diverse myopathies and aging. PMID:20060297

  12. Dissecting the Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone network using differential proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vertommen, Didier; Silhavy, Thomas J.; Collet, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    β-barrel proteins, or outer membrane proteins (OMPs), perform many essential functions in Gram-negative bacteria, but questions remain about the mechanism by which they are assembled into the outer membrane (OM). In Escherichia coli, β-barrels are escorted across the periplasm by chaperones, most notably SurA and Skp. However, the contributions of these two chaperones to the assembly of the OM proteome remained unclear. We used differential proteomics to determine how the elimination of Skp and SurA affects the assembly of many OMPs. We have shown that removal of Skp has no impact on the levels of the 63 identified OM proteins. However, depletion of SurA in the skp strain has a marked impact on the OM proteome, diminishing the levels of almost all β-barrel proteins. Our results are consistent with a model in which SurA plays a primary chaperone role in E. coli. Furthermore, they suggest that while no OMPs prefer the Skp chaperone pathway in wild-type cells, most can use Skp efficiently when SurA is absent. Our data, which provide a unique glimpse into the protein content of the non-viable surA skp mutant, clarify the roles of the periplasmic chaperones in E. coli. PMID:22589188

  13. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid. PMID:22869926

  14. Treatment with sulphated galactan inhibits macrophage chemotaxis and reduces intraplaque macrophage content in atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Gomes Quinderé, Ana Luíza; Barros Benevides, Norma Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Burger, Fabienne; Carbone, Federico; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Pagano, Sabrina; Bertolotto, Maria; Dallegri, Franco; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Experimental data from animal models and clinical studies support connections between the haemostasis and inflammation in atherogenesis. These interfaces among inflammation and thrombogenesis have been suggested as targets for pharmacological intervention to reduce disease progression. We hypothesize that the recently discovered antithrombotic drug Sulphated Galactan (SG) (isolated from the red marine alga Acanthophora muscoides) might reduce atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability and inflammatory gene expression in 10-week aged apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice under high-cholesterol diet for additional 11weeks. Then, the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated in vitro. SG (10mg/kg) or Vehicle was subcutaneously injected from week 6 until week 11 of the diet. Treatment with SG reduced intraplaque macrophage and Tissue Factor (TF) content as compared to Vehicle-treated animals. Intraplaque TF co-localized and positively correlated with macrophage rich-areas. No changes on atherosclerotic plaque size, and other intraplaque features of vulnerability (such as lipid, neutrophil, MMP-9 and collagen contents) were observed. Moreover, mRNA expression of MMPs, chemokines and genetic markers of Th1/2/reg/17 lymphocyte polarization within mouse aortic arches and spleens was not affected by SG treatment. In vitro, treatment with SG dose-dependently reduced macrophage chemotaxis without affecting TF production. Overall, the chronic SG treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, our results indicate that SG treatment reduced intraplaque macrophage content (by impacting on cell recruitment) and, concomitantly, intraplaque TF content of potential macrophage origin in atherosclerotic mice. PMID:25869506

  15. Dietary ellagic acid attenuates oxidized LDL uptake and stimulates cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Sook; Han, Seon-Young; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2011-11-01

    Foam cell formation is the hallmark of early atherosclerosis. Lipid uptake by scavenger receptors (SR) in macrophages initiates chronic proinflammatory cascades linked to atherosclerosis. It has been reported that the upregulation of cholesterol efflux may be protective in the development of atherosclerosis. Ellagic acid, a polyphenolic compound mostly found in berries, walnuts, and pomegranates, possesses antioxidative, growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-promoting activities in cancer cells. However, the antiatherogenic actions of ellagic acid are not well defined. The current study elucidated oxidized LDL handling of ellagic acid in J774A1 murine macrophages. Noncytotoxic ellagic acid suppressed SR-B1 induction and foam cell formation within 6 h after the stimulation of macrophages with oxidized LDL, confirmed by Oil red O staining of macrophages. Ellagic acid at ≤5 μmol/L upregulated PPARγ and ATP binding cassette transporter-1 in lipid-laden macrophages, all responsible for cholesterol efflux. In addition, 5 μmol/L ellagic acid accelerated expression and transcription of the nuclear receptor of liver X receptor-α highly implicated in the PPAR signaling. Furthermore, ellagic acid promoted cholesterol efflux in oxidized LDL-induced foam cells. These results provide new information that ellagic acid downregulated macrophage lipid uptake to block foam cell formation of macrophages and boosted cholesterol efflux in lipid-laden foam cells. Therefore, dietary and pharmacological interventions with berries rich in ellagic acid may be promising treatment strategies to interrupt the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:21940512

  16. Plasmodium falciparum-encoded exported hsp70/hsp40 chaperone/co-chaperone complexes within the host erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Charnaud, Sarah; Dagan, Tal; Riedel, Jan; Mandal, Pradipta; Pesce, Eva R; Blatch, Gregory L; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R; Przyborski, Jude M

    2012-11-01

    Malaria parasites modify their host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. We are interested in the molecules mediating these processes, and have recently described a family of parasite-encoded heat shock proteins (PfHsp40s) that are targeted to the host cell, and implicated in host cell modification. Hsp40s generally function as co-chaperones of members of the Hsp70 family, and until now it was thought that human Hsp70 acts as the PfHsp40 interaction partner within the host cell. Here we revise this hypothesis, and identify and characterize an exported parasite-encoded Hsp70, referred to as PfHsp70-x. PfHsp70-x is exported to the host erythrocyte where it forms a complex with PfHsp40s in structures known as J-dots, and is closely associated with PfEMP1. Interestingly, Hsp70-x is encoded only by parasite species that export the major virulence factor EMP1, implying a possible role for Hsp70-x in EMP1 presentation at the surface of the infected erythrocyte. Our data strongly support the presence of parasite-encoded chaperone/co-chaperone complexes within the host erythrocyte, which are involved in protein traffic through the host cell. The host-pathogen interaction within the infected erythrocyte is more complex than previously thought, and is driven notonly by parasite co-chaperones, but also by the parasite-encoded chaperone Hsp70-x itself. PMID:22925632

  17. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  18. Molecular chaperones and the epigenetics of longevity and cancer resistance.

    PubMed

    Krøll, Jens

    2007-04-01

    The inherent immortality of embryonic stem cells demonstrates that replicative senescence as possibly the aging of species are epigenetic phenomena. The cellular level of expression of the housekeeping molecular chaperones correlates with longevity and cancer resistance of species. The chaperones are cancer antagonists by acting as genetic buffers, stabilizing the normal phenotype. Probably the progressive age-related silencing of the housekeeping genes contributes to the phenotype of aging, with the associated increase in cancer incidence. The present review concerns epigenetic chemical, immunological, and hormonal mechanisms, activating chaperone- and immune-response genes, which have proved effective in increasing longevity and cancer resistance. The relation of steroid hormone levels to species longevity, the anticarcinogenic activity of pregnancy hormones, and the influence of hormones on the longevity of social insects, illustrates the importance of hormonal mechanisms for the activation of longevity genes. PMID:17460166

  19. Review: The HSP90 molecular chaperone-an enigmatic ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Laurence H

    2016-08-01

    The HSP90 molecular chaperone is involved in the activation and cellular stabilization of a range of 'client' proteins, of which oncogenic protein kinases and nuclear steroid hormone receptors are of particular biomedical significance. Work over the last two decades has revealed a conformational cycle critical to the biological function of HSP90, coupled to an inherent ATPase activity that is regulated and manipulated by many of the co-chaperones proteins with which it collaborates. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 ATPase activity results in degradation of client proteins in vivo, and is a promising target for development of new cancer therapeutics. Despite this, the actual function that HSP90s conformationally-coupled ATPase activity provides in its biological role as a molecular chaperone remains obscure. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 594-607, 2016. PMID:26991466

  20. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly conserved hydrogen bond network, and define the signal transduction pathway that allows bound substrates to trigger ATP hydrolysis. We identify variants deficient in only one direction of allosteric control and demonstrate that ATP-induced substrate release is more important for chaperone activity than substrate-stimulated ATP hydrolysis. These findings provide evidence of an unexpected dichotomic allostery mechanism in Hsp70 chaperones and provide the basis for a comprehensive mechanical model of allostery in Hsp70s. PMID:26383706

  1. Immunomodulatory Impact of Leishmania-Induced Macrophage Exosomes: A Comparative Proteomic and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Kasra; Olivier, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Released by many eukaryotic cells, the exosomes are 40–100 nm vesicles shown to operate over the complex processes of cell-cell communication. Among the metazoan cell lineages known to generate exosomes is the mononuclear phagocyte lineage, a lineage that parasites such as Leishmania are known to subvert as host cells. We previously reported that mouse macrophage signaling and functions are modified once co-incubated with exoproteome of Leishmania promastigotes. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we were curious to further compare the content of purified exosomes released by the J774 mouse macrophage cell line exposed or not to either LPS or to stationary phase Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Collectively, our analyses resulted in detection of 248 proteins, ∼50–80% of which were shared among the three sources studied. Using exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) and network analyses, we found that the macrophage exosomes display unique signatures with respect to composition and abundance of many functional groups of proteins, such as plasma membrane-associated proteins, chaperones and metabolic enzymes. Moreover, for the first time, L. mexicana surface protease GP63 is shown to be present in exosomes released from J774 macrophages exposed to stationary phase promastigotes. We observed that macrophage exosomes are able to induce signaling molecules and transcription factors in naive macrophages. Finally, using qRT-PCR, we monitored modulation of expression of multiple immune-related genes within macrophages exposed to exosomes. We found all three groups of exosomes to induce expression of immune-related genes, the ones collected from macrophages exposed to L. mexicana sharing properties with exosomes collected from macrophage left unexposed to any agonist. Overall, our results allowed depicting that protein sorting into macrophage-derived exosomes depends upon the cell status and how such distinct protein sorting can in turn impact the

  2. Pdcd4 deficiency enhances macrophage lipoautophagy and attenuates foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Song, X; Guo, C; Zhu, F; Wang, X; Wang, Q; Shi, Y; Wang, J; Gao, F; Zhao, W; Chen, Y H; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage foam cells, a major component of the atherosclerotic lesion, have vital roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Lipoautophagy, a type of autophagy characterized by selective delivery of lipid droplet for lysosomal degradation, may impact atherosclerosis by regulating macrophage foam cell formation. Previously, we reported that programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), a tumor suppressor, negatively regulated autophagy in tumor cells. However, its roles in macrophage lipoautophagy, foam cell formation and atherosclerosis remain to be established. Here we found that Pdcd4 deficiency clearly improved oxidized low-density lipoproteins-impaired autophagy efflux, promoted autophagy-mediated lipid breakdown in murine macrophages and thus prevented macrophage conversion into foam cells. Importantly, Pdcd4 deficiency in mice significantly upregulated macrophage autophagy in local plaques along with attenuated lipid accumulation and atherosclerotic lesions in high-fat-fed Apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiment demonstrated that PDCD4-mediated autophagy in hematopoietic cells contributed to the development of atherosclerosis. These results indicate that endogenous PDCD4 promotes for macrophage foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development via inhibiting autophagy and provides new insights into atherogenesis, suggesting that promoting macrophage autophagy through downregulating PDCD4 expression may be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:26775706

  3. Pdcd4 deficiency enhances macrophage lipoautophagy and attenuates foam cell formation and atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Song, X; Guo, C; Zhu, F; Wang, X; Wang, Q; Shi, Y; Wang, J; Gao, F; Zhao, W; Chen, Y H; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage foam cells, a major component of the atherosclerotic lesion, have vital roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Lipoautophagy, a type of autophagy characterized by selective delivery of lipid droplet for lysosomal degradation, may impact atherosclerosis by regulating macrophage foam cell formation. Previously, we reported that programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), a tumor suppressor, negatively regulated autophagy in tumor cells. However, its roles in macrophage lipoautophagy, foam cell formation and atherosclerosis remain to be established. Here we found that Pdcd4 deficiency clearly improved oxidized low-density lipoproteins-impaired autophagy efflux, promoted autophagy-mediated lipid breakdown in murine macrophages and thus prevented macrophage conversion into foam cells. Importantly, Pdcd4 deficiency in mice significantly upregulated macrophage autophagy in local plaques along with attenuated lipid accumulation and atherosclerotic lesions in high-fat-fed Apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiment demonstrated that PDCD4-mediated autophagy in hematopoietic cells contributed to the development of atherosclerosis. These results indicate that endogenous PDCD4 promotes for macrophage foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development via inhibiting autophagy and provides new insights into atherogenesis, suggesting that promoting macrophage autophagy through downregulating PDCD4 expression may be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:26775706

  4. Specific chaperones and regulatory domains in control of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-10-30

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  5. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Suhua

    2016-08-01

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. PMID:27216461

  6. Cyanogenic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Selmar, Dirk; Grocholewski, Sabine; Seigler, David S.

    1990-01-01

    Large amounts of cyanogenic lipids (esters of 1 cyano-2-methylprop-2-ene-1-ol with C:20 fatty acids) are stored in the seeds of Ungnadia speciosa. During seedling development, these lipids are completely consumed without liberation of free HCN to the atmosphere. At the same time, cyanogenic glycosides are synthesized, but the total amount is much lower (about 26%) than the quantity of cyanogenic lipids formerly present in the seeds. This large decrease in the total content of cyanogens (HCN-potential) demonstrates that at least 74% of cyanogenic lipids are converted to noncyanogenic compounds. Whether the newly synthesized cyanogenic glycosides are derived directly from cyanogenic lipids or produced by de novo synthesis is still unknown. Based on the utilization of cyanogenic lipids for the synthesis of noncyanogenic compounds, it is concluded that these cyanogens serve as storage for reduced nitrogen. The ecophysiological significance of cyanolipids based on multifunctional aspects is discussed. PMID:16667514

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases Also Exhibit Chaperone like Activity In-Vitro and In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashish; Tripathi, Deeksha; Kumar, Ashutosh; Khubaib, Mohd; Bhuwan, Manish; Chaudhuri, Tapan Kumar; Hasnain, Seyed Ehtesham; Ehtesham, Nasreen Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (Ppiases), also known as cyclophilins, are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that assist in protein folding by isomerization of peptide bonds preceding prolyl residues. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is known to possess two Ppiases, PpiA and PpiB. However, our understanding about the biological significance of mycobacterial Ppiases with respect to their pleiotropic roles in responding to stress conditions inside the macrophages is restricted. This study describes chaperone-like activity of mycobacterial Ppiases. We show that recombinant rPpiA and rPpiB can bind to non-native proteins in vitro and can prevent their aggregation. Purified rPpiA and rPpiB exist in oligomeric form as evident from gel filtration chromatography.E. coli cells overexpressing PpiA and PpiB of M.tb could survive thermal stress as compared to plasmid vector control. HEK293T cells transiently expressing M.tb PpiA and PpiB proteins show increased survival as compared to control cells in response to oxidative stress and hypoxic conditions generated after treatment with H2O2 and CoCl2 thereby pointing to their likely role in adaption under host generated oxidative stress and conditions of hypoxia. The chaperone-like function of these M.tuberculosis cyclophilins may possibly function as a stress responder and consequently contribute to virulence. PMID:26981873

  8. The Leishmania donovani chaperone cyclophilin 40 is essential for intracellular infection independent of its stage-specific phosphorylation status.

    PubMed

    Yau, Wai-Lok; Pescher, Pascale; MacDonald, Andrea; Hem, Sonia; Zander, Dorothea; Retzlaff, Silke; Blisnick, Thierry; Rotureau, Brice; Rosenqvist, Heidi; Wiese, Martin; Bastin, Philippe; Clos, Joachim; Späth, Gerald F

    2014-07-01

    During its life cycle, the protozoan pathogen Leishmania donovani is exposed to contrasting environments inside insect vector and vertebrate host, to which the parasite must adapt for extra- and intracellular survival. Combining null mutant analysis with phosphorylation site-specific mutagenesis and functional complementation we genetically tested the requirement of the L. donovani chaperone cyclophilin 40 (LdCyP40) for infection. Targeted replacement of LdCyP40 had no effect on parasite viability, axenic amastigote differentiation, and resistance to various forms of environmental stress in culture, suggesting important functional redundancy to other parasite chaperones. However, ultrastructural analyses and video microscopy of cyp40-/- promastigotes uncovered important defects in cell shape, organization of the subpellicular tubulin network and motility at stationary growth phase. More importantly, cyp40-/- parasites were unable to establish intracellular infection in murine macrophages and were eliminated during the first 24 h post infection. Surprisingly, cyp40-/- infectivity was restored in complemented parasites expressing a CyP40 mutant of the unique S274 phosphorylation site. Together our data reveal non-redundant CyP40 functions in parasite cytoskeletal remodelling relevant for the development of infectious parasites in vitro independent of its phosphorylation status, and provide a framework for the genetic analysis of Leishmania-specific phosphorylation sites and their role in regulating parasite protein function. PMID:24811325

  9. Adipogenic role of alternatively activated macrophages in β-adrenergic remodeling of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    De novo brown adipogenesis involves the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors, yet the mechanisms that guide these events in vivo are poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) agonist triggers brown/beige adipogenesis in gonadal white adipose tissue following adipocyte death and clearance by tissue macrophages. The close physical relationship between adipocyte progenitors and tissue macrophages suggested that the macrophages that clear dying adipocytes might generate proadipogenic factors. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages from mice treated with CL 316,243 identified a subpopulation that contained elevated lipid and expressed CD44. Lipidomic analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting-isolated macrophages demonstrated that CD44+ macrophages contained four- to five-fold higher levels of the endogenous peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and 13-HODE compared with CD44- macrophages. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ADRB3 agonist treatment upregulated expression of ALOX15, the lipoxygenase responsible for generating 9-HODE and 13-HODE. Using an in vitro model of adipocyte efferocytosis, we found that IL-4-primed tissue macrophages accumulated lipid from dying fat cells and upregulated expression of Alox15. Furthermore, treatment of differentiating adipocytes with 9-HODE and 13-HODE potentiated brown/beige adipogenesis. Collectively, these data indicate that noninflammatory removal of adipocyte remnants and coordinated generation of PPARγ ligands by M2 macrophages provides localized adipogenic signals to support de novo brown/beige adipogenesis. PMID:26538237

  10. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  11. Pulmonary Macrophage Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Arumugam, Paritha; Sakagami, Takuro; Lachmann, Nico; Chalk, Claudia; Sallese, Anthony; Abe, Shuichi; Trapnell, Cole; Carey, Brenna; Moritz, Thomas; Malik, Punam; Lutzko, Carolyn; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection-risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independent of hematologic progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using GM-CSF receptor-β deficient (Csf2rb−/−) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA/CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe, well-tolerated, and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations, normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Results identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP. PMID:25274301

  12. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  13. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S S; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  14. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies. PMID:26210152

  15. Modification of the structure and activity of lipid A in Yersinia pestis lipopolysaccharide by growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tsukano, Hiroko; Watanabe, Haruo; Lindner, Buko; Matsuura, Motohiro

    2002-08-01

    Yersinia pestis strain Yreka was grown at 27 or 37 degrees C, and the lipid A structures (lipid A-27 degrees C and lipid A-37 degrees C) of the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Lipid A-27 degrees C consisted of a mixture of tri-acyl, tetra-acyl, penta-acyl, and hexa-acyl lipid A's, of which tetra-acyl lipid A was most abundant. Lipid A-37 degrees C consisted predominantly of tri- and tetra-acylated molecules, with only small amounts of penta-acyl lipid A; no hexa-acyl lipid A was detected. Furthermore, the amount of 4-amino-arabinose was substantially higher in lipid A-27 degrees C than in lipid A-37 degrees C. By use of mouse and human macrophage cell lines, the biological activities of the LPS and lipid A preparations were measured via their abilities to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In both cell lines the LPS and the lipid A from bacteria grown at 27 degrees C were stronger inducers of TNF-alpha than those from bacteria grown at 37 degrees C. However, the difference in activity was more prominent in human macrophage cells. These results suggest that in order to reduce the activation of human macrophages, it may be more advantageous for Y. pestis to produce less-acylated lipid A at 37 degrees C. PMID:12117916

  16. Molecular chaperones and proteostasis regulation during redox imbalance☆

    PubMed Central

    Niforou, Katerina; Cheimonidou, Christina; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals originate from both exogenous environmental sources and as by-products of the respiratory chain and cellular oxygen metabolism. Sustained accumulation of free radicals, beyond a physiological level, induces oxidative stress that is harmful for the cellular homeodynamics as it promotes the oxidative damage and stochastic modification of all cellular biomolecules including proteins. In relation to proteome stability and maintenance, the increased concentration of oxidants disrupts the functionality of cellular protein machines resulting eventually in proteotoxic stress and the deregulation of the proteostasis (homeostasis of the proteome) network (PN). PN curates the proteome in the various cellular compartments and the extracellular milieu by modulating protein synthesis and protein machines assembly, protein recycling and stress responses, as well as refolding or degradation of damaged proteins. Molecular chaperones are key players of the PN since they facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, as well as holding, folding, and/or degradation of unfolded, misfolded, or non-native proteins. Therefore, the expression and the activity of the molecular chaperones are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level at organismal states of increased oxidative and, consequently, proteotoxic stress, including ageing and various age-related diseases (e.g. degenerative diseases and cancer). In the current review we present a synopsis of the various classes of intra- and extracellular chaperones, the effects of oxidants on cellular homeodynamics and diseases and the redox regulation of chaperones. PMID:24563850

  17. Pharmacological chaperones for human α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nathaniel E; Metcalf, Matthew C; Best, Daniel; Fleet, George W J; Garman, Scott C

    2012-10-23

    Schindler/Kanzaki disease is an inherited metabolic disease with no current treatment options. This neurologic disease results from a defect in the lysosomal α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL) enzyme. In this report, we show evidence that the iminosugar DGJNAc can inhibit, stabilize, and chaperone human α-NAGAL both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that a related iminosugar DGJ (currently in phase III clinical trials for another metabolic disorder, Fabry disease) can also chaperone human α-NAGAL in Schindler/Kanzaki disease. The 1.4- and 1.5-Å crystal structures of human α-NAGAL complexes reveal the different binding modes of iminosugars compared with glycosides. We show how differences in two functional groups result in >9 kcal/mol of additional binding energy and explain the molecular interactions responsible for the unexpectedly high affinity of the pharmacological chaperones. These results open two avenues for treatment of Schindler/Kanzaki disease and elucidate the atomic basis for pharmacological chaperoning in the entire family of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23045655

  18. Pharmacological chaperones for human α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Nathaniel E.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Best, Daniel; Fleet, George W. J.; Garman, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Schindler/Kanzaki disease is an inherited metabolic disease with no current treatment options. This neurologic disease results from a defect in the lysosomal α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL) enzyme. In this report, we show evidence that the iminosugar DGJNAc can inhibit, stabilize, and chaperone human α-NAGAL both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that a related iminosugar DGJ (currently in phase III clinical trials for another metabolic disorder, Fabry disease) can also chaperone human α-NAGAL in Schindler/Kanzaki disease. The 1.4- and 1.5-Å crystal structures of human α-NAGAL complexes reveal the different binding modes of iminosugars compared with glycosides. We show how differences in two functional groups result in >9 kcal/mol of additional binding energy and explain the molecular interactions responsible for the unexpectedly high affinity of the pharmacological chaperones. These results open two avenues for treatment of Schindler/Kanzaki disease and elucidate the atomic basis for pharmacological chaperoning in the entire family of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23045655

  19. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl AT; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James CA

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These “Super Spy” variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001 PMID:24497545

  20. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  1. RNA chaperones buffer deleterious mutations in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Marina; Schneider, Dominique; Warnecke, Tobias; Krisko, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Both proteins and RNAs can misfold into non-functional conformations. Protein chaperones promote native folding of nascent polypeptides and refolding of misfolded species, thereby buffering mutations that compromise protein structure and function. Here, we show that RNA chaperones can also act as mutation buffers that enhance organismal fitness. Using competition assays, we demonstrate that overexpression of select RNA chaperones, including three DEAD box RNA helicases (DBRHs) (CsdA, SrmB, RhlB) and the cold shock protein CspA, improves fitness of two independently evolved Escherichia coli mutator strains that have accumulated deleterious mutations during short- and long-term laboratory evolution. We identify strain-specific mutations that are deleterious and subject to buffering when introduced individually into the ancestral genotype. For DBRHs, we show that buffering requires helicase activity, implicating RNA structural remodelling in the buffering process. Our results suggest that RNA chaperones might play a fundamental role in RNA evolution and evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04745.001 PMID:25806682

  2. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  3. Milk lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  4. Macrophage Polarization in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24910531

  5. A macrophage-specific synthetic promoter for therapeutic application of adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Kang, W S; Kwon, J S; Kim, H B; Jeong, H-y; Kang, H J; Jeong, M H; Cho, J G; Park, J C; Kim, Y S; Ahn, Y

    2014-01-01

    Foam cell formation from macrophage is a major cause of atherosclerosis. An efficient macrophage-specific promoter is required for the targeting to macrophages. In this study, we develop a macrophage-specific synthetic promoter for the therapeutic application of adiponectin (APN), an antiatherogenic gene. Synthetic promoter-146 (SP146), registered on the NCBI website (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/DQ107383), was tested for promoter activities in two non-macrophage cell lines (293 T, HeLa) and a macrophage cell line (RAW264.7, bone marrow-derived macrophages). To enforce macrophage specificity, partial elements of p47phox including the PU.1 site with various lengths (-C1, -C2 and -C3) were inserted next to the synthetic promoters. SP146-C1 showed the highest specificity and efficacy in RAW264.7 cells and was selected for development of an APN-carrying macrophage-specific promoter. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)- or APN-expressing lentivirus under SP146-C1 (Lenti-SP-GFP or Lenti-SP-APN, respectively) showed the highest expression efficacy in RAW264.7 cells compared with the non-macrophage cell lines. APN overexpression in RAW264.7 cells successfully inhibited intracellular lipid accumulation, and atherosclerotic lesions and lipid accumulation were significantly reduced by Lenti-SP-APN in ApoE−/− atherosclerosis mice. In conclusion, the synthetic promoter SP146-C1, combined with a p47phox promoter element, was successfully developed to target macrophage, and macrophage-specific introduction of APN under SP146-C1 was shown to ameliorate the atherosclerotic pathology. PMID:24500526

  6. A macrophage-specific synthetic promoter for therapeutic application of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Kang, W S; Kwon, J S; Kim, H B; Jeong, H-Y; Kang, H J; Jeong, M H; Cho, J G; Park, J C; Kim, Y S; Ahn, Y

    2014-04-01

    Foam cell formation from macrophage is a major cause of atherosclerosis. An efficient macrophage-specific promoter is required for the targeting to macrophages. In this study, we develop a macrophage-specific synthetic promoter for the therapeutic application of adiponectin (APN), an antiatherogenic gene. Synthetic promoter-146 (SP146), registered on the NCBI website (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/DQ107383), was tested for promoter activities in two non-macrophage cell lines (293 T, HeLa) and a macrophage cell line (RAW264.7, bone marrow-derived macrophages). To enforce macrophage specificity, partial elements of p47(phox) including the PU.1 site with various lengths (-C1, -C2 and -C3) were inserted next to the synthetic promoters. SP146-C1 showed the highest specificity and efficacy in RAW264.7 cells and was selected for development of an APN-carrying macrophage-specific promoter. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)- or APN-expressing lentivirus under SP146-C1 (Lenti-SP-GFP or Lenti-SP-APN, respectively) showed the highest expression efficacy in RAW264.7 cells compared with the non-macrophage cell lines. APN overexpression in RAW264.7 cells successfully inhibited intracellular lipid accumulation, and atherosclerotic lesions and lipid accumulation were significantly reduced by Lenti-SP-APN in ApoE-/- atherosclerosis mice. In conclusion, the synthetic promoter SP146-C1, combined with a p47(phox) promoter element, was successfully developed to target macrophage, and macrophage-specific introduction of APN under SP146-C1 was shown to ameliorate the atherosclerotic pathology. PMID:24500526

  7. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains, the multifunctional HIV-1 Gag polyprotein orchestrates the highly coordinated process of virion assembly, but the contribution of these domains to tRNA3Lys annealing is unclear. Here, we show that NC is absolutely essential for annealing and that the MA domain inhibits Gag's tRNA annealing capability. During assembly, MA specifically interacts with inositol phosphate (IP)-containing lipids in the plasma membrane (PM). Surprisingly, we find that IPs stimulate Gag-facilitated tRNA annealing but do not stimulate annealing in Gag variants lacking the MA domain or containing point mutations involved in PM binding. Moreover, we find that IPs prevent MA from binding to nucleic acids but have little effect on NC or Gag. We propose that Gag binds to RNA either with both NC and MA domains or with NC alone and that MA-IP interactions alter Gag's binding mode. We propose that MA's interactions with the PM trigger the switch between these two binding modes and stimulate Gag's chaperone function, which may be important for the regulation of events such as tRNA primer annealing. PMID:21123373

  8. The RNA chaperone Hfq is essential for the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Sittka, Alexandra; Pfeiffer, Verena; Tedin, Karsten; Vogel, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The RNA chaperone, Hfq, plays a diverse role in bacterial physiology beyond its original role as a host factor required for replication of Qβ RNA bacteriophage. In this study, we show that Hfq is involved in the expression and secretion of virulence factors in the facultative intracellular pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium. A Salmonella hfq deletion strain is highly attenuated in mice after both oral and intraperitoneal infection, and shows a severe defect in invasion of epithelial cells and a growth defect in both epithelial cells and macrophages in vitro. Surprisingly, we find that these phenotypes are largely independent of the previously reported requirement of Hfq for expression of the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS. Our results implicate Hfq as a key regulator of multiple aspects of virulence including regulation of motility and outer membrane protein (OmpD) expression in addition to invasion and intracellular growth. These pleiotropic effects are suggested to involve a network of regulatory small non-coding RNAs, placing Hfq at the centre of post-transcriptional regulation of virulence gene expression in Salmonella. In addition, the hfq mutation appears to cause a chronic activation of the RpoE-mediated envelope stress response which is likely due to a misregulation of membrane protein expression. PMID:17163975

  9. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Required for Virulence of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Bibova, Ilona; Skopova, Karolina; Masin, Jiri; Cerny, Ondrej; Hot, David; Sebo, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a Gram-negative pathogen causing the human respiratory disease called pertussis or whooping cough. Here we examined the role of the RNA chaperone Hfq in B. pertussis virulence. Hfq mediates interactions between small regulatory RNAs and their mRNA targets and thus plays an important role in posttranscriptional regulation of many cellular processes in bacteria, including production of virulence factors. We characterized an hfq deletion mutant (Δhfq) of B. pertussis 18323 and show that the Δhfq strain produces decreased amounts of the adenylate cyclase toxin that plays a central role in B. pertussis virulence. Production of pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin was affected to a lesser extent. In vitro, the ability of the Δhfq strain to survive within macrophages was significantly reduced compared to that of the wild-type (wt) strain. The virulence of the Δhfq strain in the mouse respiratory model of infection was attenuated, with its capacity to colonize mouse lungs being strongly reduced and its 50% lethal dose value being increased by one order of magnitude over that of the wt strain. In mixed-infection experiments, the Δhfq strain was then clearly outcompeted by the wt strain. This requirement for Hfq suggests involvement of small noncoding RNA regulation in B. pertussis virulence. PMID:23980112

  10. Invariant chain is a new chaperone for TLR7 in B cells.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2015-12-01

    The innate immune system provides the first barrier against pathogens. Intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLR3, 7 and 9) localise in endosomes and sense nucleotides from viruses and bacteria. This recognition induces their conformational changes resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and MHC class II (MHCII) antigenic presentation. In the absence of stimulation, TLRs are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Upon stimulation, they relocate to the endo-lysosomal compartment, allowing the recruitment of the adaptor molecules, MyD88 or TRIF. Increasing evidences describe a cross talk between proteins that regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. For example, proteolytic enzymes which are required for breaking down exogenous antigen to generate suitable peptides for MHCII molecules are also essential to activate endosomal TLRs and MHCII molecules were recently described to regulate TLR signalling. But other proteins are possibly involved and regulated differentially between cell types. We have observed that intracellular TLR trafficking and signalling in B cells are different from dendritic cells and macrophages and involved the MHCII chaperone molecule, the invariant chain (Ii). PMID:26198699

  11. The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins interact with cellular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum and MV infection upregulates chaperone expression.

    PubMed

    Bolt, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study examines the coprecipitation of measles virus (MV) glycoproteins with host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone proteins. Both the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins interacted with calnexin and GRP78, whereas interaction with calreticulin was only demonstrated for the H glycoprotein. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor castanospermine reduced and delayed the association of F proteins with calnexin. We have previously shown that alpha-glucosidase activity is important for the functionality and antigenicity of the MV F glycoprotein and for release of MV particles from infected cells. Thus, interaction with calnexin appears vital for processing of nascent MV F protein into its functional conformation. In contrast to many other viral glycoproteins, a substantial proportion of the pulsed MV glycoproteins remained associated with ER chaperones for more than 2(1/2) h. Thus, the slow and incomplete migration of MV glycoproteins to the cell surface may result from their retention by ER chaperones, probably due to malfolding. MV infection upregulated the cellular expression of calreticulin and GRP78 and also increased their presence at the cell surface. The chaperone proteins are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, and their induction by MV may play a role for the pathogenesis of measles and its sequelae. PMID:11765911

  12. Macrophages interaction with pulmonary surfactant using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Minette; Telesford, Dana Marie; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Alveolar pulmonary surfactant, composed mostly of phospholipids, is essential for maintenance of normal lung function. However, increased production of lung surfactant can lead to many pulmonary inflammatory disorders. Alveolar macrophages are responsible for the degradation of the surfactant and exhibit increased lipid uptake in inflamated lungs. Owing to their limited clearance capability, excessive accumulation of surfactant may impair their phagocytic function. In this study, the interaction of the macrophages with different lipid components was studied using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy, a nonlinear vibrational technique which combines spectroscopy and microscopy, allows noninvasive characterization and imaging of chemical species without preparation or labeling. A monolayer of THP-1 macrophages and palmitic acid-d31 on phosphate buffer solution was transferred to a coverslip using the Langmuir-Blodgett method and then imaged using CARS by mapping the CH2 stretch signal of the lipid membrane of the macrophage and C-D stretch signal from palmitic acid-d31. Preliminary results showed CARS images of the macrophage on the solid substrate and thermal degradation of the sample due to long exposure to high laser power. A contrast image is expected to be observed by mapping the CH2 and C-D signals, which can show the lipid interaction and phagocytosis of the macrophage.

  13. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation – From Atherosclerosis to Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Hilhorst, Marc; Harrison, David G.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of vascular inflammatory disease ranges from atherosclerosis and hypertension, widespread conditions affecting large proportions of the population, to the vasculitides, rare syndromes leading to fast and irreversible organ failure. Atherosclerosis progresses over decades, inevitably proceeding through multiple phases of disease and causes its major complications when the vessel wall lesion ruptures, giving rise to lumen-occlusive atherothrombosis. Vasculitides of medium and large arteries progress rapidly, causing tissue ischemia through lumen-occlusive intimal hyperplasia. In both disease entities, macrophages play a decisive role in pathogenesis, but function in the context of other immune cells that direct their differentiation and their functional commitments. In atherosclerosis, macrophages are involved in the removal of lipids and tissue debris and make a critical contribution to tissue damage and wall remodeling. In several of the vasculitides, macrophages contribute to granuloma formation, a microstructural platform optimizing macrophage-T cell interactions, antigen containment and inflammatory amplification. By virtue of their versatility and plasticity, macrophages are able to promote a series of pathogenic functions, ranging from the release of cytokines and enzymes, the production of reactive oxygen species, presentation of antigen and secretion of tissue remodeling factors. However, as short-lived cells that lack memory, macrophages are also amendable to reprogramming, making them promising targets for anti-inflammatory interventions. PMID:25811915

  14. Acute heart inflammation: ultrastructural and functional aspects of macrophages elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The heart is the main target organ of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. During the acute disease, tissue damage in the heart is related to the intense myocardium parasitism. To control parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. In response to inflammatory and immune stimulation, an intense migration and extravasation of monocytes occurs from the bloodstream into heart. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of tissue phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defence. Newly elicited monocyte-derived macrophages both undergo profound physiological changes and display morphological heterogeneity that greatly differs from originally non-inflammatory macrophages, and underlie their functional activities as potent inflammatory cells. Thus, activated macrophages play a critical role in the outcome of parasite infection. This review covers functional and ultrastructural aspects of heart inflammatory macrophages triggered by the acute Chagas' disease, including recent discoveries on morphologically distinct, inflammation-related organelles, termed lipid bodies, which are actively formed in vivo within macrophages in response to T. cruzi infection. These findings are defining a broader role for lipid bodies as key markers of macrophage activation during innate immune responses to infectious diseases and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. Modulation of macrophage activation may be central in providing therapeutic benefits for Chagas' disease control. PMID:18624767

  15. Foam Cell Formation In Vivo Converts Macrophages to a Pro-Fibrotic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anita C.; Eijgelaar, Wouter J.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Newby, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of foam cell macrophages, which sequester extracellular modified lipids, is a key event in atherosclerosis. How lipid loading affects macrophage phenotype is controversial, with evidence suggesting either pro- or anti-inflammatory consequences. To investigate this further, we compared the transcriptomes of foamy and non-foamy macrophages that accumulate in the subcutaneous granulomas of fed-fat ApoE null mice and normal chow fed wild-type mice in vivo. Consistent with previous studies, LXR/RXR pathway genes were significantly over-represented among the genes up-regulated in foam cell macrophages. Unexpectedly, the hepatic fibrosis pathway, associated with platelet derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-β action, was also over-represented. Several collagen polypeptides and proteoglycan core proteins as well as connective tissue growth factor and fibrosis-related FOS and JUN transcription factors were up-regulated in foam cell macrophages. Increased expression of several of these genes was confirmed at the protein level in foam cell macrophages from subcutaneous granulomas and in atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD2, which is downstream of several transforming growth factor-β family members, was also detected in foam cell macrophages. We conclude that foam cell formation in vivo leads to a pro-fibrotic macrophage phenotype, which could contribute to plaque stability, especially in early lesions that have few vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:26197235

  16. ABCA1 promotes the efflux of bacterial LPS from macrophages and accelerates recovery from LPS-induced tolerance[S

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A.; Gauthier, Karine C.; Varley, Alan W.; Kitchens, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in both lipid metabolism and innate immunity. We show here that macrophage ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a transporter known for its ability to promote apolipoprotein-dependent cholesterol efflux, also participates in the removal of an immunostimulatory bacterial lipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas monocytes require an exogenous lipoprotein acceptor to remove cell-associated LPS, macrophages released LPS in the absence of an exogenous acceptor by a mechanism that was driven, in part, by endogenous apolipoprotein E (apoE). Agents that increased ABCA1 expression increased LPS efflux from wild-type but not ABCA1-deficient macrophages. Preexposure of peritoneal macrophages to LPS for 24 h increased the expression of ABCA1 and increased LPS efflux with a requirement for exogenous apolipoproteins due to suppression of endogenous apoE production. In contrast, LPS preconditioning of ABCA1-deficient macrophages significantly decreased LPS efflux and led to prolonged retention of cell-surface LPS. Although the initial response to LPS was similar in wild-type and ABCA1-deficient macrophages, LPS-induced tolerance was greater and more prolonged in macrophages that lacked ABCA1. Our results define a new role for macrophage ABCA1 in removing cell-associated LPS and restoring normal macrophage responsiveness. PMID:20472936

  17. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  18. MicroRNA 21 Is a Homeostatic Regulator of Macrophage Polarization and Prevents Prostaglandin E2-Mediated M2 Generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Brandt, Stephanie; Medeiros, Alexandra; Wang, Soujuan; Wu, Hao; Dent, Alexander; Serezani, C. Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages dictate both initiation and resolution of inflammation. During acute inflammation classically activated macrophages (M1) predominate, and during the resolution phase alternative macrophages (M2) are dominant. The molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage polarization are understudied. MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in M1 and M2 macrophages that influence macrophage polarization. We identified a role of miR-21 in macrophage polarization, and found that cross-talk between miR-21 and the lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a determining factor in macrophage polarization. miR-21 inhibition impairs expression of M2 signature genes but not M1 genes. PGE2 and its downstream effectors PKA and Epac inhibit miR-21 expression and enhance expression of M2 genes, and this effect is more pronounced in miR-21-/- cells. Among potential targets involved in macrophage polarization, we found that STAT3 and SOCS1 were enhanced in miR-21-/- cells and further enhanced by PGE2. We found that STAT3 was a direct target of miR-21 in macrophages. Silencing the STAT3 gene abolished PGE2-mediated expression of M2 genes in miR-21-/- macrophages. These data shed light on the molecular brakes involved in homeostatic macrophage polarization and suggest new therapeutic strategies to prevent inflammatory responses. PMID:25706647

  19. Membrane Chaperone SecDF Plays a Role in the Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Major Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Burg-Golani, Tamar; Pozniak, Yair; Rabinovich, Lev; Sigal, Nadejda; Nir Paz, Ran

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive human intracellular pathogen that infects diverse mammalian cells. Upon invasion, L. monocytogenes secretes multiple virulence factors that target host cellular processes and promote infection. It has been presumed, but was not empirically established, that the Sec translocation system is the primary mediator of this secretion. Here, we validate an important role for SecDF, a component of the Sec system, in the secretion of several critical L. monocytogenes virulence factors. A ΔsecDF mutant is demonstrated to exhibit impaired membrane translocation of listeriolysin O (LLO), PlcA, PlcB, and ActA, factors that mediate L. monocytogenes phagosomal escape and spread from cell to cell. This impaired translocation was monitored by accumulation of the factors on the bacterial membrane and by reduced activity upon secretion. This defect in secretion is shown to be associated with a severe intracellular growth defect of the ΔsecDF mutant in macrophages and a less virulent phenotype in mice, despite normal growth in laboratory medium. We further show that SecDF is upregulated when the bacteria reside in macrophage phagosomes and that it is necessary for efficient phagosomal escape. Taken together, these data support the premise that SecDF plays a role as a chaperone that facilitates the translocation of L. monocytogenes virulence factors during infection. PMID:24056100

  20. Pathogenesis of experimental lipid keratopathy. An ultrastructural study of an animal model system.

    PubMed

    Roth, S I; Stock, E L; Siel, J M; Mendelsohn, A; Reddy, C; Preskill, D G; Ghosh, S

    1988-10-01

    The histology and ultrastructure of experimental lipid keratopathy were studied in hypercholesterolemic rabbits in which the insertion of corneal sutures induced vascularization and subsequent lipid deposition in the anterior stroma. Lipid accumulated in the keratocytes, the pericytes and occasionally in the endothelial cells of the capillaries. The lipid-laden keratocytes were concentrated in the region of the capillaries. No lipid was seen in the control rabbits. In the hypercholesterolemic rabbit with sutures, intracellular lipid in the keratocytes was present largely in nonmembrane-limited droplets with smaller amounts of membrane-limited cholesterol crystals and rare numbers of myelin figures. In addition, large, lipid-engorged spherical cells were present. The numerous phagolysosomes seen ultrastructurally suggest that some of these cells probably represent macrophages. Keratocytes and the large, spherical lipid-engorged cells show focal degenerative changes, including pyknotic nuclei, cytoplasmic coagulation and membrane loss, leaving extracellular mixed accumulations of lipid and cytoplasmic organelles. Small numbers of lymphocytes and plasmacytoid cells were present. No corneal lipid was seen in animals with normocholesterolemia, with or without sutures. In hypercholesterolemic animals, a few lipid-laden keratocytes without macrophages were identified even in the absence of vessels. These morphologic studies support the hypothesis that the accumulation of the corneal lipid in this animal model of lipid keratopathy is the result of increased lysosomal uptake of lipid, probably as low density lipoprotein, from the extracellular space by the keratocytes. The rate of metabolism of this lipid is insufficient to clear the cells of the lipid and the subsequent lipid inspissation results in keratocyte death, leading to macrophage accumulation of lipid and free lipid in the stroma. PMID:3170126

  1. Nanoencapsulation Enhances Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Stability and Its Anti-atherogenic Bioactivities in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    We have successfully synthesized (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) encapsulated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCE) and chitosan coated NLCE (CSNLCE) using natural lipids, surfactant, chitosan and EGCG. Nanoencapsulation dramatically improved EGCG stability. CSNLCE significantly increased EGCG content in THP-1 derived macrophages compared with nonencapsulated EGCG. As compared to 10 μM of nonencapsulated EGCG, both NLCE and CSNLCE at the same concentration significantly decreased macrophage cholesteryl ester content. NLCE and CSNLCE significantly decreased mRNA levels and protein secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in macrophages, respectively. These data suggest that nanoencapsulated EGCG may have a potential to inhibit atherosclerotic lesion development through decreasing macrophage cholesterol content and MCP-1 expression. PMID:24020822

  2. Clinical utility of the liposteroid therapy: Potential effects on the macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

      Liposteroid, a lipid emulsion containing dexamethasone, was developed in Japan. This drug is effective against rheumatoid arthritis, and has fewer side effects than dexamethasone. Moreover, at high dosage, liposteroid has been effectively used for the treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, because the lipid emulsions are easily taken up by phagocytes, and are retained in macrophages. Its anti-inflammatory effect was found to be 2-5 times higher than that of dexamethasone in arthritis and granuloma rat models. Japanese researchers have reported the clinical efficacy and utility of liposteroid in the treatment of diseases with macrophage activation. These include hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, graft-versus-host disease, and pulmonary hemosiderosis. Here, we describe the clinical effects of liposteroid on macrophage activation syndrome and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in patients. PMID:27320934

  3. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  4. Generalized iterative annealing model for the action of RNA chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of the rugged landscape of RNA molecules their folding is described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism according to which only a small fraction (ϕF) reaches the folded state while the remaining fraction of molecules is kinetically trapped in misfolded intermediates. The transition from the misfolded states to the native state can far exceed biologically relevant time. Thus, RNA folding in vivo is often aided by protein cofactors, called RNA chaperones, that can rescue RNAs from a multitude of misfolded structures. We consider two models, based on chemical kinetics and chemical master equation, for describing assisted folding. In the passive model, applicable for class I substrates, transient interactions of misfolded structures with RNA chaperones alone are sufficient to destabilize the misfolded structures, thus entropically lowering the barrier to folding. For this mechanism to be efficient the intermediate ribonucleoprotein complex between collapsed RNA and protein cofactor should have optimal stability. We also introduce an active model (suitable for stringent substrates with small ϕF), which accounts for the recent experimental findings on the action of CYT-19 on the group I intron ribozyme, showing that RNA chaperones do not discriminate between the misfolded and the native states. In the active model, the RNA chaperone system utilizes chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to repeatedly bind and release misfolded and folded RNAs, resulting in substantial increase of yield of the native state. The theory outlined here shows, in accord with experiments, that in the steady state the native state does not form with unit probability.

  5. Pharmacological Chaperoning: A Primer on Mechanism and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Katelyn G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately forty percent of diseases are attributable to protein misfolding, including those for which genetic mutation produces misfolding mutants. Intriguingly, many of these mutants are not terminally misfolded since native-like folding, and subsequent trafficking to functional locations, can be induced by target-specific, small molecules variably termed pharmacological chaperones, pharmacoperones, or pharmacochaperones (PCs). PC targets include enzymes, receptors, transporters, and ion channels, revealing the breadth of proteins that can be engaged by ligand-assisted folding. The purpose of this review is to provide an integrated primer of the diverse mechanisms and pharmacology of PCs. In this regard, we examine the structural mechanisms that underlie PC rescue of misfolding mutants, including the ability of PCs to act as surrogates for defective intramolecular interactions and, at the intermolecular level, overcome oligomerization deficiencies and dominant negative effects, as well as influence the subunit stoichiometry of heteropentameric receptors. Not surprisingly, PC-mediated structural correction of misfolding mutants normalizes interactions with molecular chaperones that participate in protein quality control and forward-trafficking. A variety of small molecules have proven to be efficacious PCs and the advantages and disadvantages of employing orthostatic antagonists, active-site inhibitors, orthostatic agonists, and allosteric modulator PCs is considered. Also examined is the possibility that several therapeutic agents may have unrecognized activity as PCs, and this chaperoning activity may mediate/contribute to therapeutic action and/or account for adverse effects. Lastly, we explore evidence that pharmacological chaperoning exploits intrinsic ligand-assisted folding mechanisms. Given the widespread applicability of PC rescue of mutants associated with protein folding disorders, both in vitro and in vivo, the therapeutic potential of PCs is vast

  6. Complexity of fatty acid distribution inside human macrophages on single cell level using Raman micro-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiebing, Clara; Matthäus, Christian; Krafft, Christoph; Keller, Andrea-Anneliese; Weber, Karina; Lorkowski, Stefan; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells which are involved in the non-specific immune defense. Lipid uptake and storage behavior of macrophages also play a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions within walls of blood vessels. The allocation of exogenous lipids such as fatty acids in the blood stream dictates the accumulation and quantity of lipids within macrophages. In case of an overexposure, macrophages transform into foam cells because of the large amount of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Raman micro-spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying single cells due to the combination of microscopic imaging with spectral information. With a spatial resolution restricted by the diffraction limit, it is possible to visualize lipid droplets within macrophages. With stable isotopic labeling of fatty acids with deuterium, the uptake and storage of exogenously provided fatty acids can be investigated. In this study, we present the results of time-dependent Raman spectroscopic imaging of single THP-1 macrophages incubated with deuterated arachidonic acid. The polyunsaturated fatty acid plays an important role in the cellular signaling pathway as being the precursor of icosanoids. We show that arachidonic acid is stored in lipid droplets but foam cell formation is less pronounced as with other fatty acids. The storage efficiency in lipid droplets is lower than in cells incubated with deuterated palmitic acid. We validate our results with gas chromatography and gain information on the relative content of arachidonic acid and its metabolites in treated macrophages. These analyses also provide evidence that significant amounts of the intracellular arachidonic acid is elongated to adrenic acid but is not metabolized any further. The co-supplementation of deuterated arachidonic acid and deuterated palmitic acid leads to a non-homogenous storage pattern in lipid droplets within single cells. PMID:24939132

  7. Polydatin Inhibits Formation of Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Liu, Meixia; Guo, Gang; Zhang, Wengao; Liu, Longtao

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, a Chinese herbal medicine, has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for a long time. Polydatin, one of the major active ingredients in Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, has been recently shown to possess extensive cardiovascular pharmacological activities. In present study, we examined the effects of Polydatin on the formation of peritoneal macrophage-derived foam cells in Apolipoprotein E gene knockout mice (ApoE−/−) and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Peritoneal macrophages were collected from ApoE−/− mice and cultured in vitro. These cells sequentially were divided into four groups: Control group, Model group, Lovastatin group, and Polydatin group. Our results demonstrated that Polydatin significantly inhibits the formation of foam cells derived from peritoneal macrophages. Further studies indicated that Polydatin regulates the metabolism of intracellular lipid and possesses anti-inflammatory effects, which may be regulated through the PPAR-γ signaling pathways. PMID:26557864

  8. Lysophosphatidylcholine perpetuates macrophage polarization toward classically activated phenotype in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofei; Qiu, Chunguang; Zhao, Luosha

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory macrophages are involved in vascular inflammation and serve as the major effector cells in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major phospholipid moiety affixed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and thought to play important roles in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study we described that a bioactive lipid derivative, lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), generated from hydrolysis of the PC moiety of oxidized LDL, promoted and stabilized a strong M1 phenotype in macrophage polarization. Another derivative, 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE), did not show the similar biological function. Blockade of G protein coupled receptor, G2A, which mediates the signal transduction of lysoPC, diminished the effects of lysoPC on the macrophage polarization toward M1 phenotype. The results provide insights into the new mechanism on how oxidized LDL participates in tissue inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:24841857

  9. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Costello, Shawn M; Plummer, Ashlee M; Fleming, Patrick J; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-08-16

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed "Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model" (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  10. Chaperone properties of Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Renée; Malki, Abderrahim; Holmgren, Arne; Richarme, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and NADPH form the thioredoxin system and are the major cellular protein disulphide reductase. We report here that Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase interact with unfolded and denatured proteins, in a manner similar to that of molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and protein renaturation after stress. Thioredoxin and/or thioredoxin reductase promote the functional folding of citrate synthase and alpha-glucosidase after urea denaturation. They also promote the functional folding of the bacterial galactose receptor, a protein without any cysteines. Furthermore, redox cycling of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase in the presence of NADPH and cystine stimulates the renaturation of the galactose receptor, suggesting that the thioredoxin system functions like a redox-powered chaperone machine. Thioredoxin reductase prevents the aggregation of citrate synthase under heat-shock conditions. It forms complexes that are more stable than those formed by thioredoxin with several unfolded proteins such as reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin and unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These results suggest that the thioredoxin system, in addition to its protein disulphide isomerase activity possesses chaperone-like properties, and that its thioredoxin reductase component plays a major role in this function. PMID:12549977

  11. Nucleolar protein B23 has molecular chaperone activities.

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, A.; Olson, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    Protein B23 is an abundant, multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein whose activities are proposed to play a role in ribosome assembly. Szebeni et al. (1997) showed stimulation of nuclear import in vitro by protein B23 and suggested that this effect was due to a molecular chaperone-like activity. Protein B23 was tested for chaperone activities using several protein substrates. The temperature-dependent and -independent aggregation of the HIV-1 Rev protein was measured using a zero angle light scattering (turbidity) assay. Protein B23 inhibited the aggregation of the Rev protein, with the amount of inhibition proportional to the concentration of B23 added. This activity was saturable with nearly complete inhibition when the molar ratio of B23:Rev was slightly above one. Protein B23 also protected liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH), carboxypeptidase A, citrate synthase, and rhodanese from aggregation during thermal denaturation and preserved the enzyme activity of LADH under these conditions. In addition, protein B23 was able to promote the restoration of activity of LADH previously denatured with guanidine-HCl. Protein B23 preferentially bound denatured substrates and exposed hydrophobic regions when complexed with denatured proteins. Thus, by several criteria, protein B23 behaves like a molecular chaperone; these activities may be related to its role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:10211837

  12. Potential synergy between tau aggregation inhibitors and tau chaperone modulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a soluble, microtubule-associated protein known to aberrantly form amyloid-positive aggregates. This pathology is characteristic for more than 15 neuropathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Finding therapeutics to reverse or remove this non-native tau state is of great interest; however, at this time only one drug is entering phase III clinical trials for treating tauopathies. Generally, tau manipulation by therapeutics can either directly or indirectly alter tau aggregation and stability. Drugs that bind and change the conformation of tau itself are largely classified as aggregation inhibitors, while drugs that alter the activity of a tau-effector protein fall into several categories, such as kinase inhibitors, microtubule stabilizers, or chaperone modulators. Chaperone inhibitors that have proven effective in tau models include heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, heat shock protein 70 inhibitors and activators, as well as inducers of heat shock proteins. While many of these compounds can alter tau levels and/or aggregation states, it is possible that combining these approaches may produce the most optimal outcome. However, because many of these compounds have multiple off-target effects or poor blood–brain barrier permeability, the development of this synergistic therapeutic strategy presents significant challenges. This review will summarize many of the drugs that have been identified to alter tau biology, with special focus on therapeutics that prevent tau aggregation and regulate chaperone-mediated clearance of tau. PMID:24041111

  13. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  14. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. PMID:27104973

  15. Lipid Bodies in Inflammatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; D’Avila, Heloisa; Wan, Hsiao-Ching; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, have increasingly been recognized as functionally active organelles linked to diverse biological functions and human diseases. These organelles are actively formed in vivo within cells from the immune system, such as macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils, in response to different inflammatory conditions and are sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators. In this review, the authors discuss structural and functional aspects of LBs and current imaging techniques to visualize these organelles in cells engaged in inflammatory processes, including infectious diseases. The dynamic morphological aspects of LBs in leukocytes as inducible, newly formable organelles, elicitable in response to stimuli that lead to cellular activation, contribute to the evolving understanding of LBs as organelles that are critical regulators of different inflammatory diseases, key markers of leukocyte activation, and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:21430261

  16. Lipidic nanovesicles stabilize suspensions of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Lete, Marta G; Rojas, Elena; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Alonso, Alicia; Moya, Sergio E; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the effect of adding lipid nanovesicles (liposomes) on the aggregation of commercial titanium oxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), or cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (NPs) suspensions in Hepes buffer. Liposomes were prepared with pure phospholipids or mixtures of phospholipids and/or cholesterol. Changes in turbidity were recorded as a function of time, either of metal nanoparticles alone, or for a mixture of nanoparticles and lipidic nanovesicles. Lipid nanovesicles markedly decrease the NPs tendency to sediment irrespective of size or lipid compositions, thus keeping the metal oxide NPs in suspension. Cryo-electron microscopy, fluorescence anisotropy of TMA-DPH and general polarization of laurdan failed to reveal any major effect of the NPs on the lipid bilayer structure or phase state of the lipids. The above data may help in developing studies of the interaction of inhaled particles with lung surfactant lipids and alveolar macrophages. PMID:26301898

  17. Efficient Production of Active Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase in Escherichia coli by Coexpression of Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Nicholas M.; Saika, Azusa; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Sangiambut, Smith; Tsuge, Takeharu; Summers, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The type I polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Cupriavidus necator was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli with simultaneous overexpression of chaperone proteins. Compared to expression of synthase alone (14.55 mg liter−1), coexpression with chaperones resulted in the production of larger total quantities of enzyme, including a larger proportion in the soluble fraction. The largest increase was seen when the GroEL/GroES system was coexpressed, resulting in approximately 6-fold-greater enzyme yields (82.37 mg liter−1) than in the absence of coexpressed chaperones. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was unaffected by coexpression with chaperones. Therefore, the increase in yield was attributed to an enhanced soluble fraction of synthase. Chaperones were also coexpressed with a polyhydroxyalkanoate production operon, resulting in the production of polymers with generally reduced molecular weights. This suggests a potential use for chaperones to control the physical properties of the polymer. PMID:23335776

  18. Decidual Macrophages and Their Roles at the Maternal-Fetal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Brandy L.

    2012-01-01

    The semi-allogeneic fetus, whose genome consists of maternally and paternally inherited alleles, must coexist with an active maternal immune system during its 9 months in utero. Macrophages are the second most abundant immune cell at the maternal-fetal interface, although populations and functions for these populations remain ill defined. We have previously reported two distinct subsets of CD14+ decidual macrophages found to be present in first trimester decidual tissue, 20 percent CD11cHI and 68 percent CD11cLO. Interestingly, CD11cHI decidual macrophages express genes associated with lipid metabolism, inflammation, and antigen presentation function and specifically upregulate CD1 molecules. Conversely, CD11cLO decidual macrophages express genes associated with extracellular matrix formation, muscle regulation, and tissue growth. The large abundance of CD11cHI decidual macrophages and their ability to process antigens more efficiently than CD11cLO macrophages suggests that CD11cHI macrophages may be important antigen processing and presenting cells at the maternal-fetal interface, while CD11cLO macrophages may perform necessary homeostatic functions during placental construction. Thus, macrophage heterogeneity may be an important and necessary division of labor that leads to both an induction of maternal immune cell tolerance to fetal antigens as well as basic homeostatic functions in human pregnancy. PMID:22461749

  19. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    PubMed Central

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  20. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Haka, Abigail S; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2016-06-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  1. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  2. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity. PMID:27337479

  3. Novel interaction between the major bacterial heat shock chaperone (GroESL) and an RNA chaperone (CspC).

    PubMed

    Lenz, Gal; Ron, Eliora Z

    2014-01-23

    The heat shock response is one of the main global regulatory networks in all organisms and involves an increased cellular level of chaperones and proteases to enable correct protein folding and balanced growth. One of the major heat shock chaperones in Escherichia coli is GroESL, composed of GroES and GroEL (the bacterial Hsp10 and Hsp60 homologues), which is essential for refolding of misfolded proteins. GroESL was previously shown to play a role in the regulation of the heat shock response by promoting the proteolysis of the regulatory protein--sigma32 (RpoH), the heat shock transcription activator. Here we show the involvement of GroESL in another proteolytic process, this of the major RNA chaperone--CspC--that specifically stabilizes the transcripts of several stress-related genes. Evidence is provided for an interaction between GroESL and CspC that results in enhanced, temperature-dependent proteolysis of the latter. This interaction is of regulatory importance, as reduction in the cellular levels of CspC leads to a decrease in stability of the major heat shock gene transcripts. PMID:24148697

  4. Zinc-L-carnosine binds to molecular chaperone HSP70 and inhibits the chaperone activity of the protein.

    PubMed

    Haga, Asami; Okamoto, Tomoya; Yamada, Shintaroh; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sanpei, Ann; Takahashi, Shota; Nakayama, Masahiro; Nagai, Miki; Otaka, Michiro; Miyazaki, Toshio; Nunomura, Wataru; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the specific binding proteins of Zinc-L-carnosine (Polaprezinc) using Polaprezinc-affinity column chromatography in vitro. A protein having a 70-kDa molecular mass was eluted by the linear gradient of 0-1.0 mM Polaprezinc from the affinity column and the protein was identified as the molecular chaperone HSP70 by immunoblotting. The chaperone activity of HSP70 was completely suppressed by Polaprezinc. The ATPase activity of HSP70 was affected to some extent by the reagent. In the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum, the secondary structure of HSP70 was changed in the presence of Polaprezinc, i.e. it decreased in the α-helix. We have determined the Polaprezinc-binding domain of HSP70 by using recombinant HSP70N- and C-domains. Although Polaprezinc could bind to both the N-terminal and the C-terminal of HSP70, the HSP70N-domain has a high affinity to the drug. Regarding the peptide cleavage of the HSP70N- and C-domains with proteinase K, the intact HSP70N still remained in the presence of Polaprezinc. On the other hand, the quantity of the intact C-domain slightly decreased under the same conditions along with the newly digested small peptides appeared. It has been suggested that Polaprezinc binds to HSP70 especially in the N-domains, suppresses the chaperone activity and delays an ATPase activities of HSP70. PMID:23687308

  5. Chaperone-assisted excisive recombination, a solitary role for DnaJ (Hsp40) chaperone in lysogeny escape.

    PubMed

    Champ, Stéphanie; Puvirajesinghe, Tania M; Perrody, Elsa; Menouni, Rachid; Genevaux, Pierre; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2011-11-11

    Temperate bacteriophage lytic development is intrinsically related to the stress response in particular at the DNA replication and virion maturation steps. Alternatively, temperate phages become lysogenic and integrate their genome into the host chromosome. Under stressful conditions, the prophage resumes a lytic development program, and the phage DNA is excised before being replicated. The KplE1 defective prophage of Escherichia coli K12 constitutes a model system because it is fully competent for integrative as well as excisive recombination and presents an atypical recombination module, which is conserved in various phage genomes. In this work, we identified the host-encoded stress-responsive molecular chaperone DnaJ (Hsp40) as an active participant in KplE1 prophage excision. We first show that the recombination directionality factor TorI of KplE1 specifically interacts with DnaJ. In addition, we found that DnaJ dramatically enhances both TorI binding to its DNA target and excisive recombination in vitro. Remarkably, such stimulatory effect by DnaJ was performed independently of its DnaK chaperone partner and did not require a functional DnaJ J-domain. Taken together, our results underline a novel and unsuspected functional interaction between the generic host stress-regulated chaperone and temperate bacteriophage lysogenic development. PMID:21908845

  6. Lipid Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  7. Regulation of Macrophage Motility by the Water Channel Aquaporin-1: Crucial Role of M0/M2 Phenotype Switch

    PubMed Central

    Tyteca, Donatienne; Nishino, Tomoya; Debaix, Huguette; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'Kuli, Francisca; Hoffmann, Delia; Cnops, Yvette; Rabolli, Virginie; van Loo, Geert; Beyaert, Rudi; Huaux, François; Devuyst, Olivier; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) promotes migration of many cell types. Although AQP1 is expressed in macrophages, its potential role in macrophage motility, particularly in relation with phenotype polarization, remains unknown. We here addressed these issues in peritoneal macrophages isolated from AQP1-deficient mice, either undifferentiated (M0) or stimulated with LPS to orientate towards pro-inflammatory phenotype (classical macrophage activation; M1). In non-stimulated macrophages, ablation of AQP1 (like inhibition by HgCl2) increased by 2–3 fold spontaneous migration in a Src/PI3K/Rac-dependent manner. This correlated with cell elongation and formation of lamellipodia/ruffles, resulting in membrane lipid and F4/80 recruitment to the leading edge. This indicated that AQP1 normally suppresses migration of resting macrophages, as opposed to other cell types. Resting Aqp1-/- macrophages exhibited CD206 redistribution into ruffles and increased arginase activity like IL4/IL13 (alternative macrophage activation; M2), indicating a M0-M2 shift. In contrast, upon M1 orientation by LPS in vitro or peritoneal inflammation in vivo, migration of Aqp1-/- macrophages was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that AQP1 oppositely regulates macrophage migration, depending on stimulation or not by LPS, and that macrophage phenotypic and migratory changes may be regulated independently of external cues. PMID:25719758

  8. Regulation of macrophage motility by the water channel aquaporin-1: crucial role of M0/M2 phenotype switch.

    PubMed

    Tyteca, Donatienne; Nishino, Tomoya; Debaix, Huguette; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'Kuli, Francisca; Hoffmann, Delia; Cnops, Yvette; Rabolli, Virginie; van Loo, Geert; Beyaert, Rudi; Huaux, François; Devuyst, Olivier; Courtoy, Pierre J

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) promotes migration of many cell types. Although AQP1 is expressed in macrophages, its potential role in macrophage motility, particularly in relation with phenotype polarization, remains unknown. We here addressed these issues in peritoneal macrophages isolated from AQP1-deficient mice, either undifferentiated (M0) or stimulated with LPS to orientate towards pro-inflammatory phenotype (classical macrophage activation; M1). In non-stimulated macrophages, ablation of AQP1 (like inhibition by HgCl2) increased by 2-3 fold spontaneous migration in a Src/PI3K/Rac-dependent manner. This correlated with cell elongation and formation of lamellipodia/ruffles, resulting in membrane lipid and F4/80 recruitment to the leading edge. This indicated that AQP1 normally suppresses migration of resting macrophages, as opposed to other cell types. Resting Aqp1-/- macrophages exhibited CD206 redistribution into ruffles and increased arginase activity like IL4/IL13 (alternative macrophage activation; M2), indicating a M0-M2 shift. In contrast, upon M1 orientation by LPS in vitro or peritoneal inflammation in vivo, migration of Aqp1-/- macrophages was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that AQP1 oppositely regulates macrophage migration, depending on stimulation or not by LPS, and that macrophage phenotypic and migratory changes may be regulated independently of external cues. PMID:25719758

  9. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging. PMID:25779326

  10. Polyunsaturated fatty acid relatively decreases cholesterol content in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cell: partly correlates with expression profile of CIDE and PAT members

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have positive effect on the regulation of plasma lipids. But the mechanism for them to modulate lipid homeostasis in macrophage is still unclear. In this study, we employed PUFA to pretreat macrophages and evaluated the variations of lipid droplet (LD) content, lipid composition, and expressions of LD-associated genes in macrophage-derived foam cells. Method THP-1-derived macrophages or human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were pre-treated with four non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) separately: saturated fatty acid (SFA)-palmitic acid (PA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)-oleic acid (OA), PUFAs-linoleic acid (LA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Intracellular lipid content and cholesterol efflux were analyzed in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells. Related gene expressions were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Results PUFA pre-treatment reduced cholesterol content in foam cells and increased cholesterol efflux to lipid-free apoAI in conditioned medium compared with PA or OA group. Cell death-inducing DFF45 like effector (CIDE) and Perilipin-Adipophilin-TIP47 (PAT) family members, as LD-associated proteins, showed specific gene expression profiles after PUFA pre-treatment. These results may help to explain the process of lipid metabolism within foam cells. Conclusion PUFA (LA or EPA) had a potential protective effect against cholesterol accumulation. The specific expressions of CIDE and PAT genes may provide clues to explore the protective mechanism of PUFA in foam cells. PMID:23879935

  11. Puerarin Inhibits oxLDL-Induced Macrophage Activation and Foam Cell Formation in Human THP1 Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhai, Zhenhua; Zhou, Hongyu; Li, Yao; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Yuhan; Li, Weihong; Shi, Yueping; Zhou, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone derived from Kudzu roots, has been widely used for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular diseases in China and other Asian countries. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study investigated whether puerarin inhibited atherogenic lipid oxLDL-mediated macrophage activation and foam cell formation in human THP1 macrophage. Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 160%) and interleukin (IL) 1β (13 fold) accompanied by upregulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, 165%) and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα in THP1 macrophage. Puerarin dose-dependently prevented an increase in oxLDL-induced proinflammatory gene expression with downregulation of TLR4 and the ratio of phospho-IκBα/IκBα. Furthermore, puerarin prevented oxLDL-mediated lipid deposition and foam cell formation associated with downregulation of scavenger receptor CD36. Flow cytometry analysis showed that puerarin reduced the number of early apoptotic cells of macrophages induced by oxLDL. Our results show that puerarin has anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects in vitro; the underlying mechanisms may involve the inhibition of TLR4/NFκB pathway and downregulation of CD36 expression. The results from the present study provide scientific evidence and may expand our armamentarium to use puerarin for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26576421

  12. The role of HSP70 and its co-chaperones in protein misfolding, aggregation and disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Emma J; Cheetham, Michael E; Chapple, J Paul; van der Spuy, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones are essential in health and disease as they are key facilitators of protein folding, quality control and function. In particular, the HSP70 molecular chaperone networks have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases caused by aberrant protein folding. The pathogenesis of these disorders usually includes the formation of deposits of misfolded, aggregated protein. HSP70 and its co-chaperones have been recognised as potent modulators of inclusion formation and cell survival in cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. In has become evident that the HSP70 chaperone machine functions not only in folding, but also in proteasome mediated degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins. Thus, there has been a great deal of interest in the potential manipulation of molecular chaperones as a therapeutic approach for many neurodegenerations. Furthermore, mutations in several HSP70 co-chaperones and putative co-chaperones have been identified as causing inherited neurodegenerative and cardiac disorders, directly linking the HSP70 chaperone system to human disease. PMID:25487025

  13. Expression of lipoprotein lipase mRNA and secretion in macrophages isolated from human atherosclerotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, L; Johansson, H; Ottosson, M; Bondjers, G; Wiklund, O

    1993-10-01

    The expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA and the LPL activity were studied in macrophages (CD14 positive) from human atherosclerotic tissue. Macrophages were isolated after collagenase digestion by immunomagnetic isolation. About 90% of the cells were foam cells with oil red O positive lipid droplets. To analyze the mRNA expression, PCR with specific primers for LPL was used. Arterial macrophages were analyzed directly after isolation and the data showed low expression of LPL mRNA when compared with monocyte-derived macrophages. To induce the expression of LPL mRNA in macrophages, PMA was used. When incubating arterial macrophages with PMA for 24 h we could not detect any increase in LPL mRNA levels. Similarly, the cells secreted very small amounts of LPL even after PMA stimulation. In conclusion, these studies show a very low expression of LPL mRNA in the CD14-positive macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from human atherosclerotic tissue. These data suggest that the CD14-positive cells are a subpopulation of foam cells that express low levels of lipoprotein lipase, and the lipid content could be a major factor for downregulation of LPL. However, the cells were isolated from advanced atherosclerotic lesions, and these findings may not reflect the situation in early fatty streaks. PMID:8408628

  14. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Nathan; Blacklock, Kristin; Berrigan, Elizabeth; Verkhivker, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock) kinase from the system during client loading (release) stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery. PMID:24287464

  15. Lipid signaling in adipose tissue: Connecting inflammation & metabolism.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Mojgan; Kuda, Ondrej; Rossmeisl, Martin; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Obesity-associated low-grade inflammation of white adipose tissue (WAT) contributes to development of insulin resistance and other disorders. Accumulation of immune cells, especially macrophages, and macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 state, affect intrinsic WAT signaling, namely anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines, fatty acids (FA), and lipid mediators derived from both n-6 and n-3 long-chain PUFA such as (i) arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and endocannabinoids, and (ii) specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators including resolvins derived from both eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), lipoxins (AA metabolites), protectins and maresins (DHA metabolites). In this respect, potential differences in modulating adipocyte metabolism by various lipid mediators formed by inflammatory M1 macrophages typical of obese state, and non-inflammatory M2 macrophages typical of lean state remain to be established. Studies in mice suggest that (i) transient accumulation of M2 macrophages could be essential for the control of tissue FA levels during activation of lipolysis, (ii) currently unidentified M2 macrophage-borne signaling molecule(s) could inhibit lipolysis and re-esterification of lipolyzed FA back to triacylglycerols (TAG/FA cycle), and (iii) the egress of M2 macrophages from rebuilt WAT and removal of the negative feedback regulation could allow for a full unmasking of metabolic activities of adipocytes. Thus, M2 macrophages could support remodeling of WAT to a tissue containing metabolically flexible adipocytes endowed with a high capacity of both TAG/FA cycling and oxidative phosphorylation. This situation could be exemplified by a combined intervention using mild calorie restriction and dietary supplementation with EPA/DHA, which enhances the formation of "healthy" adipocytes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance." PMID:25311170

  16. Early hematopoiesis and macrophage development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Palis, James

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm that all blood cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been challenged by two findings. First, there are tissue-resident hematopoietic cells, including subsets of macrophages that are not replenished by adult HSCs, but instead are maintained by self-renewal of fetal-derived cells. Second, during embryogenesis, there is a conserved program of HSC-independent hematopoiesis that precedes HSC function and is required for embryonic survival. The presence of waves of HSC-independent hematopoiesis as well as fetal HSCs raises questions about the origin of fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages. In the murine embryo, historical examination of embryonic macrophage and monocyte populations combined with recent reports utilizing genetic lineage-tracing approaches has led to a model of macrophage ontogeny that can be integrated with existing models of hematopoietic ontogeny. The first wave of hematopoiesis contains primitive erythroid, megakaryocyte and macrophage progenitors that arise in the yolk sac, and these macrophage progenitors are the source of early macrophages throughout the embryo, including the liver. A second wave of multipotential erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) also arises in the yolk sac. EMPs colonize the fetal liver, initiating myelopoiesis and forming macrophages. Lineage tracing indicates that this second wave of macrophages are distributed in most fetal tissues, although not appreciably in the brain. Thus, fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages, other than microglia, appear to predominately derive from EMPs. While HSCs emerge at midgestation and colonize the fetal liver, the relative contribution of fetal HSCs to tissue macrophages at later stages of development is unclear. The inclusion of macrophage potential in multiple waves of hematopoiesis is consistent with reports of their functional roles throughout development in innate immunity, phagocytosis, and tissue morphogenesis and remodeling

  17. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  18. Prolonged Endoplasmic Reticulum-Stressed Hepatocytes Drive an Alternative Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fangming; Catapano, Michael; Diao, Li; Stanojcic, Mile; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-07-01

    Relatively little is known about the effects of hepatocytes on hepatic macrophages, particularly under the situation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We examined the effects of hepatocytes conditioned media (CM) from HepG2 treated with ER stress inducers, tunicamycin or thapsigargin, on the secretion of cytokines, expression of ER stress markers, and polarization of phorbol myristate acetate-activated THP-1 cells (pTHP-1). We found that CM decreased the production of the proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-1β as well as other cytokines and chemokines from pTHP-1 cells. These effects are mediated by the inhibition of TLR4 expression and nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. In addition, hepatocytes CM increased the expression of binding immunoglobulin protein and the transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in pTHP-1 cells. Preconditioning with ER stress inhibitor, small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate before addition of ER stressors, attenuated the ER stress in macrophages, the property of hepatocytes CM to alter tumor necrosis factor α production and nuclear factor κB expression by macrophages. Remarkably, treatment of macrophage with these CM leads to an alternative activation of macrophages mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ signaling pathway, which might be resulted from the secretion of IL-10 and IL-4 as well as releasing apoptotic bodies from hepatocytes under ER stress. Our results highlight a mechanism of ER stress transmission from hepatocytes to macrophage that drives an alternative activation of macrophages, which depends on the exposure of hepatocytes to severe and prolonged ER stress. PMID:25944791

  19. Macrophage-targeted photodynamic detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Castano, Ana P.; Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Ahmadi, Atosa; Stern, Jeremy; Ortel, Bernhard; Chirico, Stephanie; Shirazi, Azadeh; Syed, Sakeena; Muller, James E.

    2003-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque (VP) leading to coronary thrombosis is the chief cause of sudden cardiac death. VPs are angiographically insignificant lesions, which are excessively inflamed and characterized by dense macrophage infiltration, large necrotic lipid cores, thin fibrous caps, and paucity of smooth muscle cells. We have recently shown that chlorin(e6) conjugated with maleylated albumin can target macrophages with high selectivity via the scavenger receptor. We report the potential of this macrophage-targeted fluorescent probe to localize in VPs in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis, and allow detection and/or diagnosis by fluorescence spectroscopy or imaging. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand White rabbit aortas by balloon injury followed by administration of a high-fat diet. 24-hours after IV injection of the conjugate into atherosclerotic or normal rabbits, the animals were sacrificed, and aortas were removed, dissected and examined for fluorescence localization in plaques by fiber-based spectrofluorimetry and confocal microscopy. Dye uptake within the aortas was also quantified by fluorescence extraction of samples from aorta segments. Biodistribution of the dye was studied in many organs of the rabbits. Surface spectrofluorimetry after conjugate injection was able to distinguish between plaque and adjacent aorta, between atherosclerotic and normal aorta, and balloon-injured and normal iliac arteries with high significance. Discrete areas of high fluorescence (up to 20 times control were detected in the balloon-injured segments, presumably corresponding to macrophage-rich plaques. Confocal microscopy showed red ce6 fluorescence localized in plaques that showed abundant foam cells and macrophages by histology. Extraction data on aortic tissue corroborated the selectivity of the conjugate for plaques. These data support the strategy of employing macrophage-targeted fluorescent dyes to detect VP by intravascular

  20. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  1. Hybrid nanoparticles improve targeting to inflammatory macrophages through phagocytic signals.

    PubMed

    Bagalkot, Vaishali; Badgeley, Marcus A; Kampfrath, Thomas; Deiuliis, Jeffrey A; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Maiseyeu, Andrei

    2015-11-10

    Macrophages are innate immune cells with great phenotypic plasticity, which allows them to regulate an array of physiological processes such as host defense, tissue repair, and lipid/lipoprotein metabolism. In this proof-of-principle study, we report that macrophages of the M1 inflammatory phenotype can be selectively targeted by model hybrid lipid-latex (LiLa) nanoparticles bearing phagocytic signals. We demonstrate a simple and robust route to fabricate nanoparticles and then show their efficacy through imaging and drug delivery in inflammatory disease models of atherosclerosis and obesity. Self-assembled LiLa nanoparticles can be modified with a variety of hydrophobic entities such as drug cargos, signaling lipids, and imaging reporters resulting in sub-100nm nanoparticles with low polydispersities. The optimized theranostic LiLa formulation with gadolinium, fluorescein and "eat-me" phagocytic signals (Gd-FITC-LiLa) a) demonstrates high relaxivity that improves magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity, b) encapsulates hydrophobic drugs at up to 60% by weight, and c) selectively targets inflammatory M1 macrophages concomitant with controlled release of the payload of anti-inflammatory drug. The mechanism and kinetics of the payload discharge appeared to be phospholipase A2 activity-dependent, as determined by means of intracellular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In vivo, LiLa targets M1 macrophages in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, allowing noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaque by MRI. In the context of obesity, LiLa particles were selectively deposited to M1 macrophages within inflamed adipose tissue, as demonstrated by single-photon intravital imaging in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that phagocytic signals can preferentially target inflammatory macrophages in experimental models of atherosclerosis and obesity, thus opening the possibility of future clinical applications that diagnose/treat these conditions. Tunable Li

  2. p58IPK suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β production via inhibition of PKR in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Boriushkin, Evgenii; Wang, Joshua J.; Li, Junhua; Bhatta, Maulasri; Zhang, Sarah X.

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome activation is a key signaling event for activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β from macrophages. p58IPK is a molecular chaperone that regulates protein homeostasis through inhibiting eIF-2α kinases including double-stranded RNA–dependent protein kinase (PKR), which has been recently implicated in inflammasome activation. Herein we investigate the role of p58IPK in TLR4 signaling and inflammasome activation in macrophages. Primary bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was isolated from p58IPK knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP to activate TLR4 signaling and stimulate inflammasome activation. Compared to WT macrophages, p58IPK deficient cells demonstrated significantly stronger activation of PKR, NF-κB, and JNK and higher expression of pro-inflammatory genes TNF-α and IL-1β. Coincidently, p58IPK deletion intensified NLRP3-inflammasome activation indicated by enhanced caspase 1 cleavage and increased IL-1β maturation and secretion. Pretreatment with specific PKR inhibitor or overexpression of p58IPK largely abolished the changes in inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in p58IPK null macrophages. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the binding of p58IPK with PKR, but not other TLR4 downstream signaling molecules. Collectively, these results suggest a novel and crucial role of p58IPK in regulation of inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in macrophages. PMID:27113095

  3. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  4. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Condensed from Lipid Storage ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Lipid Storage Diseases? Lipid storage diseases are a group ...

  5. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Involved in Stress Tolerance and Virulence in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Cheng; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a bacterial RNA chaperone involved in the riboregulation of diverse genes via small noncoding RNAs. Here, we show that Hfq is critical for the uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis to effectively colonize the bladder and kidneys in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model and to establish burned wound infection of the rats. In this regard, we found the hfq mutant induced higher IL-8 and MIF levels of uroepithelial cells and displayed reduced intra-macrophage survival. The loss of hfq affected bacterial abilities to handle H2O2 and osmotic pressures and to grow at 50°C. Relative to wild-type, the hfq mutant had reduced motility, fewer flagella and less hemolysin expression and was less prone to form biofilm and to adhere to and invade uroepithelial cells. The MR/P fimbrial operon was almost switched to the off phase in the hfq mutant. In addition, we found the hfq mutant exhibited an altered outer membrane profile and had higher RpoE expression, which indicates the hfq mutant may encounter increased envelope stress. With the notion of envelope disturbance in the hfq mutant, we found increased membrane permeability and antibiotic susceptibilities in the hfq mutant. Finally, we showed that Hfq positively regulated the RpoS level and tolerance to H2O2 in the stationary phase seemed largely mediated through the Hfq-dependent RpoS expression. Together, our data indicate that Hfq plays a critical role in P. mirabilis to establish UTIs by modulating stress responses, surface structures and virulence factors. This study suggests Hfq may serve as a scaffold molecule for development of novel anti-P. mirabilis drugs and P. mirabilis hfq mutant is a vaccine candidate for preventing UTIs. PMID:24454905

  6. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  7. Genomic organization of ATOX1, a human copper chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Po-Ching; Koeller, David M; Kaler, Stephen G

    2003-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential trace element that plays a critical role in the survival of all living organisms. Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS) are allelic disorders of copper transport caused by defects in a X-linked gene (ATP7A) that encodes a P-type ATPase that transports copper across cellular membranes, including the trans-Golgi network. Genetic studies in yeast recently revealed a new family of cytoplasmic proteins called copper chaperones which bind copper ions and deliver them to specific cellular pathways. Biochemical studies of the human homolog of one copper chaperone, ATOX1, indicate direct interaction with the Menkes/OHS protein. Although no disease-associated mutations have been reported in ATOX1, mice with disruption of the ATOX1 locus demonstrate perinatal mortality similar to that observed in the brindled mice (Mobr), a mouse model of Menkes disease. The cDNA sequence for ATOX1 is known, and the genomic organization has not been reported. Results We determined the genomic structure of ATOX1. The gene contains 4 exons spanning a genomic distance of approximately 16 kb. The translation start codon is located in the 3' end of exon 1 and the termination codon in exon 3. We developed a PCR-based assay to amplify the coding regions and splice junctions from genomic DNA. We screened for ATOX1 mutations in two patients with classical Menkes disease phenotypes and one individual with occipital horn syndrome who had no alterations detected in ATP7A, as well as an adult female with chronic anemia, low serum copper and evidence of mild dopamine-beta-hydroxylase deficiency and no alterations in the ATOX1 coding or splice junction sequences were found. Conclusions In this study, we characterized the genomic structure of the human copper chaperone ATOX1 to facilitate screening of this gene from genomic DNA in patients whose clinical or biochemical phenotypes suggest impaired copper transport. PMID:12594858

  8. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  9. The small heat shock proteins family: the long forgotten chaperones.

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Paul, C; Seigneuric, R; Kampinga, H H

    2012-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their implication in physio-pathological processes and human diseases is now well evidenced, as it will be discussed in the different reviews of this special issue. In this mini-review we will just present a general introduction about the small heat shock proteins family. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. PMID:22449631

  10. IRAK regulates macrophage foam cell formation by modulating genes involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux.

    PubMed

    Rana, Minakshi; Kumar, Amit; Tiwari, Rajiv Lochan; Singh, Vishal; Chandra, Tulika; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK1) is linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; however, its role in macrophage foam cell formation is not known. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of IRAK1 in lipid uptake, biosynthesis, and efflux in THP-1 derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Ox-LDL (40 μg/mL, 15 minutes-48 hours) treatment induced time-dependent increase in IRAK1, IRAK4, and Stat1 activation in THP-1 derived macrophages. IRAK1/4 inhibitor (INH) or IRAK1 siRNA significantly attenuated cholesterol accumulation, DiI-Ox-LDL binding, and uptake while cholesterol efflux to apoAI and HDL was enhanced in THP-1 derived macrophages and HMDMs. Ox-LDL treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of CD36, LOX-1, SR-A, ABCA1, ABCG1, Caveolin-1, CYP27A1 while that of SR-BI was decreased. IRAK1/4 inhibition or IRAK1 knockdown, however, attenuated Ox-LDL-induced CD36 expression; augmented ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression while expression of others was unaffected in THP-1 derived macrophages and HMDMs. Moreover, IRAK1/4 inhibition had no significant effect on genes involved in lipid biosynthesis. In IRAK1/4 INH pre-treated THP-1 derived macrophages Ox-LDL-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and its binding to CD36 promoter was significantly attenuated while LXRα expression and its binding to the ABCA1/ABCG1 locus, NFATc2 activation and its binding to ABCA1 locus was enhanced. The present study thus demonstrates that IRAK regulates lipid accumulation by modulating CD36-mediated uptake and ABCA1-, ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux. Therefore, IRAK1 can be a potential target for preventing macrophage foam cell formation. PMID:27270491

  11. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J; Müller, Dominik N; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  12. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  13. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  14. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine. PMID:26869018

  15. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells' resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine. PMID:26869018

  16. [CHAPERONES FUNCTION HSP60 AND HSP90 AND THEIR ROLE IN CARDIAC PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Kazimirko, V K; Kutovoy, V V; Bobyk, V I; Kozak, I O; Ivanitskaya, L M; Dubkova, A G; Silanteva, T S

    2014-01-01

    In review provides information about the function oft the body of chaperones and their role in the development of pathological processes, including--atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Marked comminications systems chaperones to the immune and endocrine systems, and inflammation. PMID:26492771

  17. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN), an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27491084

  18. Targeting Molecular Chaperones for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis: Is It a Viable Approach?

    PubMed

    Heard, Ashley; Thompson, Jake; Carver, Jessica; Bakey, Michelle; Wang, X Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is largely caused by protein misfolding and the loss of function of a plasma membrane anion channel known as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The most common CF-causing mutation, F508del, leads to severe conformational defect in CFTR. The cellular chaperone machinery plays an important role in CFTR biogenesis and quality control. Multiple attempts have been made to improve the cell surface functional expression of the mutant CFTR by modulating the expression of components of the cellular chaperone machinery. The efficacy of such an approach has been low largely due to the severe intrinsic folding defects of the F508del CFTR. Moreover, the impact of chaperone perturbation on the chaperone machinery itself and on other physiologically important proteins might lead to potentially severe side effects. Approaches aimed at disrupting chaperone-CFTR interactions show greater efficacy, and are compatible with small-molecule drug discovery and gene therapy. Combination between chaperone modulators and F508del correctors might further enhance potency and specificity. As molecular chaperones play important roles in regulating inflammation and immunity, they can be potential targets for controlling airway infection and inflammation in patients. If such effects can be synergized with chaperone-mediated regulation of CFTR biogenesis and quality control, more efficacious therapeutics will be developed to combat CF lung disease. PMID:25981601

  19. Macrophage-secreted factors impair human adipogenesis: involvement of proinflammatory state in preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Danièle; Taleb, Soraya; Keophiphath, Mayoura; Miranville, Alexandra; Clement, Karine

    2007-02-01

    Obesity is considered a chronic low-grade inflammatory state. The white adipose tissue produces a variety of inflammation-related proteins whose expression is increased in obese subjects. The nonadipose cell fraction, which includes infiltrated macrophages, is a determinant source of inflammation-related molecules within the adipose tissue. Our working hypothesis is that macrophage infiltration affects fat expansion through a paracrine action on adipocyte differentiation. Human primary preadipocytes were then differentiated in the presence of conditioned media obtained from macrophages differentiated from blood monocytes. Preadipocytes treated by macrophage-conditioned medium displayed marked reduction of adipogenesis as assessed by decreased cellular lipid accumulation and reduced gene expression of adipogenic and lipogenic markers. In addition to this effect, the activation of macrophages by lipopolysaccharides stimulated nuclear factor kappaB signaling, increased gene expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and induced preadipocyte proliferation. This phenomenon was associated with increased cyclin D1 gene expression and maintenance of the fibronectin-rich matrix. Anti-TNFalpha neutralizing antibody inhibits the inflammatory state of preadipocytes positioning TNFalpha as an important mediator of inflammation in preadipocytes. Strikingly, conditioned media produced by macrophages isolated from human adipose tissue exerted comparable effects with activated macrophages, i.e. decreased adipogenesis and increased inflammatory state in the preadipocytes. These data show that macrophage-secreted factors inhibit the formation of mature adipocytes, suggesting possible role in limiting adipose tissue expansion in humans. PMID:17082259

  20. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  1. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Bharathi Devi, S R; Dhivya M, Aloysius; Sulochana, K N

    2016-09-01

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studies have reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate copper trafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in relation to angiogenesis has to be further explored. The intracellular copper levels when in excess are deleterious and certain mutations of copper chaperones have been shown to induce cell death and influence various cellular metabolisms. The study of these chaperones will be helpful in understanding the players in the cascade of events in angiogenesis and their role in cellular metabolic pathways. In this review we have briefly listed the copper chaperones associated with angiogenic and metabolic signalling and their function. PMID:27581939

  2. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation. PMID:27009901

  3. Study of receptor-chaperone interactions using the optical technique of spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P; Abell, Benjamin M; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-07-20

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. PMID:21767504

  4. Rapid reconstitution of a transmembrane protein into supported planar lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, M

    1984-10-29

    A procedure for reconstituting a transmembrane protein by the freeze-thaw method into supported planar lipid layers has been developed. A solution containing human glycophorin A was introduced between an alkylated cover glass with lipid layers from soybean phospholipids and a bare glass slide, and was then put in a glass dish which was frozen outside by liquid nitrogen. The lipid layer membranes prepared in this manner have been examined by the binding of both macrophages and wheat germ agglutinin agarose. Macrophages bound more efficiently to the membranes bearing glycophorin A and spread more rapidly than those of the control membranes. PMID:6548452

  5. Two Unique Human Decidual Macrophage Populations

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Brandy L.; Tilburgs, Tamara; Hill, Jonathan; Nicotra, Matthew L.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2013-01-01

    Several important events occur at the maternal–fetal interface, including generation of maternal–fetal tolerance, remodeling of the uterine smooth muscle and its spiral arteries and glands, and placental construction. Fetal-derived extravillous trophoblasts come in direct contact with maternal decidual leukocytes. Macrophages represent ~20% of the leukocytes at this interface. In this study, two distinct subsets of CD14+ decidual macrophages (dMϕs) are found to be present in first-trimester decidual tissue, CD11cHI and CD11cLO. Gene expression analysis by RNA microarray revealed that 379 probes were differentially expressed between these two populations. Analysis of the two subsets revealed several clusters of coregulated genes that suggest distinct functions for these subsets in tissue remodeling, growth, and development. CD11cHI dMϕs express genes associated with lipid metabolism and inflammation, whereas CD11cLO dMϕs express genes associated with extracellular matrix formation, muscle regulation, and tissue growth. The CD11cHI dMϕs also differ from CD11cLO dMϕs in their ability to process protein Ag and are likely to be the major APCs in the decidua. Moreover, these populations each secrete both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines that may contribute to the balance that establishes fetal–maternal tolerance. Thus, they do not fit the conventional M1/M2 categorization. PMID:21257965

  6. Macrophages in spinal cord injury: phenotypic and functional change from exposure to myelin debris

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Cao, Kai; Sun, Xin; Chen, Yongxiong; Duan, Zhaoxia; Sun, Li; Guo, Lei; Bai, Paul; Sun, Dongming; Fan, Jianqing; He, Xijing; Young, Wise; Ren, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation and persistent inflammation contribute to the pathological process of spinal cord injury (SCI). It was reported that M2 macrophages were induced at 3–7 days after SCI but M2 markers were reduced or eliminated after 1 week. By contrast, M1 macrophage response is rapidly induced and then maintained at injured spinal cord. However, factors that modulate macrophage phenotype and function are poorly understood. We developed a model to distinguished bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) from residential microglia and explored how BMDMs change their phenotype and functions in response to the lesion-related factors in injured spinal cord. Infiltrating BMDMs expressing higher Mac-2 and lower CX3CR1 migrate to the epicenter of injury, while microglia expressing lower Mac-2 but higher CX3CR1 distribute to the edges of lesion. Myelin debris at the lesion site switches BMDMs from M2 phenotype towards M1-like phenotype. Myelin debris activate ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) for cholesterol efflux in response to myelin debris loading in vitro. However, this homeostatic mechanism in injured site is overwhelmed, leading to the development of foamy macrophages and lipid plaque in the lesion site. The persistence of these cells indicates a pro-inflammatory environment, associated with enhanced neurotoxicity and impaired wound healing. These foamy macrophages have poor capacity to phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils resulting in uningested neutrophils releasing their toxic contents and further tissue damage. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time that myelin debris generated in injured spinal cord modulates macrophage activation. Lipid accumulation following macrophage phenotype switch contributes to SCI pathology. PMID:25452166

  7. Structural basis underlying viral hijacking of a histone chaperone complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Deng, Zhong; Vladimirova, Olga; Wiedmer, Andreas; Lu, Fang; Lieberman, Paul M; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-01-01

    The histone H3.3 chaperone DAXX is implicated in formation of heterochromatin and transcription silencing, especially for newly infecting DNA virus genomes entering the nucleus. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can efficiently establish stable latent infection as a chromatinized episome in the nucleus of infected cells. The EBV tegument BNRF1 is a DAXX-interacting protein required for the establishment of selective viral gene expression during latency. Here we report the structure of BNRF1 DAXX-interaction domain (DID) in complex with DAXX histone-binding domain (HBD) and histones H3.3-H4. BNRF1 DID contacts DAXX HBD and histones through non-conserved loops. The BNRF1-DAXX interface is responsible for BNRF1 localization to PML-nuclear bodies typically associated with host-antiviral resistance and transcriptional repression. Paradoxically, the interface is also required for selective transcription activation of viral latent cycle genes required for driving B-cell proliferation. These findings reveal molecular details of virus reprogramming of an antiviral histone chaperone to promote viral latency and cellular immortalization. PMID:27581705

  8. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. PMID:23158495

  9. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  10. [Unfolding chaperone as a prion protein relating molecule].

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Naomi S; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi

    2003-11-01

    Prion protein exists in two different isoforms, a normal cellular isoform (PrPc) and an abnormal infectious isoform (PrPSc), the latter is a causative agent of prion disease such as mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Amino acid sequences of PrPc and PrPSc are identical, but their conformations are rather different; PrPc rich in non beta-sheet vs. PrPSc rich in beta-sheet isoform. Since the two isoforms have quite different conformation, this host factor might be a molecular chaperone, which enables to override an energy barrier between PrPc and PrPSc. To examine the protein unfolding activities against collectively folded structure exist or not, we constructed an assay system and purified a novel molecular chaperone. Unfolding, from S. cerevisiae. Unfolding consists of oligomeric ring-like structure with the central cavity and has an ATP-dependent protein Unfoldingg activity with broad specificity in vitro, of which targets included PrP in beta-sheet form, alpha-synuclein, and A beta protein. We have also found that mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells contained the activity. Treatment of this factor with an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, caused the decrease in its protein Unfoldingg activity. It was suggested that the purified protein probably formed homo-oligomer consisting of 4-5 subunits and its activity was ATP-dependent. PMID:15152473

  11. Tau triage decisions mediated by the chaperone network.

    PubMed

    Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The pathological accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is linked to an increasing number of neurodegenerative conditions associated with aging, though the mechanisms by which tau accumulates in disease are unclear. In this review, we will summarize our previous research assessing the mechanism of action, as well as the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 inhibition for the treatment of tauopathies. Specifically, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening approach to identify and rank compounds, and demonstrate the selective elimination of aberrant p-tau species in the brain following treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor. Additionally, we identify CHIP as an essential component of the Hsp90 chaperone complex that mediates tau degradation, and present evidence to suggest that CHIP functions to identify and sequester neurotoxic tau species. Finally, we discuss recent data identifying an additional mechanism by which CHIP modulates protein triage decisions involving Hsp90. Specifically, CHIP indirectly regulates Hsp90 chaperone activity by modulating steady-state levels of the Hsp90 deacetylase, HDAC6, thus influencing both the acetylation state and function of Hsp90. Thus future research directions will focus on the manipulation of this network to promote degradation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:22596270

  12. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand. PMID:26663758

  13. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. PMID:23158495

  14. Co-chaperone CHIP promotes aggregation of ataxin-1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Young; Ryu, Jeong Hee; Kim, Hyo-Sun; Park, Sung Goo; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Myung, Pyung Keun; Cho, Sayeon; Park, Byoung Chul; Lee, Do Hee

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that co-chaperone/E3 ligase CHIP (C-terminus of hsp70-interacting protein) mediates the ubiquitylation and suppresses the aggregation of polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins, such as huntingtin or ataxin-3. In this study, we investigated the effects of CHIP on the degradation of another polyQ protein ataxin-1. Interestingly CHIP associates not only with the polyQ-expanded ataxin-1 but also with the normal ataxin-1. Moreover, by enhancing ataxin-1 ubiquitylation, CHIP over-expression leads to a reduction in the solubility of ataxin-1 and thus increases the aggregate formation, especially that of polyQ-expanded ataxin-1. Domain analysis revealed that the TPR domain is required for the promotion of aggregation. By contrast, other co-chaperones or E3 ligases, such as BAG-1 or parkin, did not show similar effects on the aggregation of ataxin-1. Importantly, the effect of CHIP is impaired by the mutation of Ser776 of ataxin-1 whose phosphorylation is crucial for ataxin-1 aggregation. Our findings suggest that the role of CHIP in aggregation of polyQ proteins greatly varies depending on the context of full-length polyQ proteins. PMID:17127076

  15. Macrophages in Collateral Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Erik; Helisch, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic vascular disease is the most common cause of death and a major cause of disability in the developed world. Adverse outcomes of arteriosclerotic vascular disease are related to consequences of tissue ischemia and necrosis affecting the heart, brain, limbs, and other organs. Collateral artery growth or arteriogenesis occurs naturally and can help restore perfusion to ischemic tissues. Understanding the mechanisms of collateral artery growth may provide therapeutic options for patients with ischemic vascular disease. In this review, we examine the evidence for a role of monocytes and macrophages in collateral arteriogenesis. PMID:23055975

  16. Classification of chemical chaperones based on their effect on protein folding landscapes.

    PubMed

    Dandage, Rohan; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Saxena, Kanika; Dalal, Vijit; Das, Aritri; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2015-03-20

    Various small molecules present in biological systems can assist protein folding in vitro and are known as chemical chaperones. De novo design of chemical chaperones with higher activity than currently known examples is desirable to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation in multiple contexts. However, this development has been hindered by limited knowledge of their activities. It is thought that chemical chaperones are typically poor solvents for a protein backbone and hence facilitate native structure formation. However, it is unknown if different chemical chaperones can act differently to modulate folding energy landscapes. Using a model slow folding protein, double-mutant Maltose-binding protein (DM-MBP), we show that a canonical chemical chaperone, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), accelerates refolding by decreasing the flexibility of the refolding intermediate (RI). Among a number of small molecules that chaperone DM-MBP folding, proline and serine stabilize the transition state (TS) enthalpically, while trehalose behaves like TMAO and increases the rate of barrier crossing through nonenthalpic processes. We propose a two-group classification of chemical chaperones based upon their thermodynamic effect on RI and TS, which is also supported by single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies. Interestingly, for a different test protein, the molecular mechanisms of the two groups of chaperones are not conserved. This provides a glimpse into the complexity of chemical chaperoning activity of osmolytes. Future work would allow us to engineer synergism between the two classes to design more efficient chemical chaperones to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation problems. PMID:25493352

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones and Their Roles in the Immunogenicity of Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major site of passage for proteins en route to other organelles, to the cell surface, and to the extracellular space. It is also the transport route for peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome into the ER for loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules for eventual antigen presentation at the cell surface. Chaperones within the ER are critical for many of these processes; however, outside the ER certain of those chaperones may play important and direct roles in immune responses. In some cases, particular ER chaperones have been utilized as vaccines against tumors or infectious disease pathogens when purified from tumor tissue or recombinantly generated and loaded with antigen. In other cases, the cell surface location of ER chaperones has implications for immune responses as well as possible tumor resistance. We have produced heat-shock protein/chaperone protein-based cancer vaccines called “chaperone-rich cell lysate” (CRCL) that are conglomerates of chaperones enriched from solid tumors by an isoelectric focusing technique. These preparations have been effective against numerous murine tumors, as well as in a canine with an advanced lung carcinoma treated with autologous CRCL. We also published extensive proteomic analyses of CRCL prepared from human surgically resected tumor samples. Of note, these preparations contained at least 10 ER chaperones and a number of other residents, along with many other chaperones/heat-shock proteins. Gene ontology and network analyses utilizing these proteins essentially recapitulate the antigen presentation pathways and interconnections. In conjunction with our current knowledge of cell surface/extracellular ER chaperones, these data collectively suggest that a systems-level view may provide insight into the potent immune stimulatory activities of CRCL with an emphasis on the roles of ER components in those processes. PMID:25610811

  18. Hematopoietic Cell–Restricted Deletion of CD36 Reduces High-Fat Diet–Induced Macrophage Infiltration and Improves Insulin Signaling in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Hayley T.; Kowalski, Greg; Kennedy, David J.; Risis, Steve; Zaffino, Lee A.; Watson, Nadine; Kanellakis, Peter; Watt, Matthew J.; Bobik, Alex; Bonen, Arend; Febbraio, Maria; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Febbraio, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fatty acid translocase and scavenger receptor CD36 is important in the recognition and uptake of lipids. Accordingly, we hypothesized that it plays a role in saturated fatty acid–induced macrophage lipid accumulation and proinflammatory activation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In vitro, the effect of CD36 inhibition and deletion in lipid-induced macrophage inflammation was assessed using the putative CD36 inhibitor, sulfosuccinimidyl oleate (SSO), and bone marrow–derived macrophages from mice with (CD36KO) or without (wild-type) global deletion of CD36. To investigate whether deletion of macrophage CD36 would improve insulin sensitivity in vivo, wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from CD36KO or wild-type mice and then fed a standard or high-fat diet (HFD) for 20 weeks. RESULTS SSO treatment markedly reduced saturated fatty acid–induced lipid accumulation and inflammation in RAW264.7 macrophages. Mice harboring CD36-specific deletion in hematopoietic-derived cells (HSC CD36KO) fed an HFD displayed improved insulin signaling and reduced macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue compared with wild-type mice, but this did not translate into protection against HFD-induced whole-body insulin resistance. Contrary to our hypothesis and our results using SSO in RAW264.7 macrophages, neither saturated fatty acid–induced lipid accumulation nor inflammation was reduced when comparing CD36KO with wild-type bone marrow–derived macrophages. CONCLUSIONS Although CD36 does not appear important in saturated fatty acid–induced macrophage lipid accumulation, our study uncovers a novel role for CD36 in the migration of proinflammatory phagocytes to adipose tissue in obesity, with a concomitant improvement in insulin action. PMID:21378177

  19. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  20. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

  1. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins in lipid bilayers - Unassisted and assisted folding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Jörg H

    2015-09-01

    In cells, β-barrel membrane proteins are transported in unfolded form to an outer membrane into which they fold and insert. Model systems have been established to investigate the mechanisms of insertion and folding of these versatile proteins into detergent micelles, lipid bilayers and even synthetic amphipathic polymers. In these experiments, insertion into lipid membranes is initiated from unfolded forms that do not display residual β-sheet secondary structure. These studies therefore have allowed the investigation of membrane protein folding and insertion in great detail. Folding of β-barrel membrane proteins into lipid bilayers has been monitored from unfolded forms by dilution of chaotropic denaturants that keep the protein unfolded as well as from unfolded forms present in complexes with molecular chaperones from cells. This review is aimed to provide an overview of the principles and mechanisms observed for the folding of β-barrel transmembrane proteins into lipid bilayers, the importance of lipid-protein interactions and the function of molecular chaperones and folding assistants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25983306

  2. Hybrid nanoparticles improve targeting to inflammatory macrophages through phagocytic signals

    PubMed Central

    Bagalkot, Vaishali; Badgeley, Marcus A.; Kampfrath, Thomas; Deiuliis, Jeffrey A.; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Maiseyeu, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells with great phenotypic plasticity, which allows them to regulate an array of physiological processes such as host defense, tissue repair, and lipid/lipoprotein metabolism. In this proof-of-principle study, we report that macrophages of the M1 inflammatory phenotype can be selectively targeted by model hybrid lipid–latex (LiLa) nanoparticles bearing phagocytic signals. We demonstrate a simple and robust route to fabricate nanoparticles and then show their efficacy through imaging and drug delivery in inflammatory disease models of atherosclerosis and obesity. Self-assembled LiLa nanoparticles can be modified with a variety of hydrophobic entities such as drug cargos, signaling lipids, and imaging reporters resulting in sub-100 nm nano-particles with low polydispersities. The optimized theranostic LiLa formulation with gadolinium, fluorescein and “eat-me” phagocytic signals (Gd-FITC-LiLa) a) demonstrates high relaxivity that improves magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity, b) encapsulates hydrophobic drugs at up to 60% by weight, and c) selectively targets inflammatory M1 macrophages concomitant with controlled release of the payload of anti-inflammatory drug. The mechanism and kinetics of the payload discharge appeared to be phospholipase A2 activity-dependent, as determined by means of intracellular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In vivo, LiLa targets M1 macrophages in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, allowing noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaque by MRI. In the context of obesity, LiLa particles were selectively deposited to M1 macrophages within inflamed adipose tissue, as demonstrated by single-photon intravital imaging in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that phagocytic signals can preferentially target inflammatory macrophages in experimental models of atherosclerosis and obesity, thus opening the possibility of future clinical applications that diagnose/treat these conditions. Tunable

  3. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Ramazan; Chandra, Partha K.; Aboulnasr, Fatma; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Ferraris, Pauline; Aydin, Yucel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Wu, Tong; Balart, Luis A.; Dash, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α)-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA)-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1), which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired. Aim To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment. Method HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate) and unsaturated (oleate) long-chain free fatty acids (FFA). Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α) and Type III IFN (IFN-λ) was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated. Results FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ), which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA

  4. Monocyte to Macrophage Differentiation Goes along with Modulation of the Plasmalogen Pattern through Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stefan; Grandl, Margot; Konovalova, Tatiana; Sigrüner, Alexander; Kopf, Thomas; Peer, Markus; Orsó, Evelyn; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulation of monocyte-macrophage differentiation is a hallmark of vascular and metabolic diseases and associated with persistent low grade inflammation. Plasmalogens represent ether lipids that play a role in diabesity and previous data show diminished plasmalogen levels in obese subjects. We therefore analyzed transcriptomic and lipidomic changes during monocyte-macrophage differentiation in vitro using a bioinformatic approach. Methods Elutriated monocytes from 13 healthy donors were differentiated in vitro to macrophages using rhM-CSF under serum-free conditions. Samples were taken on days 0, 1, 4 and 5 and analyzed for their lipidomic and transcriptomic profiles. Results Gene expression analysis showed strong regulation of lipidome-related transcripts. Enzymes involved in fatty acid desaturation and elongation were increasingly expressed, peroxisomal and ER stress related genes were induced. Total plasmalogen levels remained unchanged, while the PE plasmalogen species pattern became more similar to circulating granulocytes, showing decreases in PUFA and increases in MUFA. A partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS/DA) revealed that PE plasmalogens discriminate the stage of monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation. Partial correlation analysis could predict novel potential key nodes including DOCK1, PDK4, GNPTAB and FAM126A that might be involved in regulating lipid and especially plasmalogen homeostasis during differentiation. An in silico transcription analysis of lipid related regulation revealed known motifs such as PPAR-gamma and KLF4 as well as novel candidates such as NFY, RNF96 and Zinc-finger proteins. Conclusion Monocyte to macrophage differentiation goes along with profound changes in the lipid-related transcriptome. This leads to an induction of fatty-acid desaturation and elongation. In their PE-plasmalogen profile macrophages become more similar to granulocytes than monocytes, indicating terminal phagocytic differentiation

  5. Effects of sodium fluoride on immune response in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Beatriz; Vázquez, Marta; Rocha, René Antonio; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2016-08-01

    Excessive fluoride intake may be harmful for health, producing dental and skeletal fluorosis, and effects upon neurobehavioral development. Studies in animals have revealed effects upon the gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems. Some of the disorders may be a consequence of immune system alterations. In this study, an in vitro evaluation is made of fluoride immunotoxicity using the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line over a broad range of concentrations (2.5-75mg/L). The results show that the highest fluoride concentrations used (50-75mg/L) reduce the macrophage population in part as a consequence of the generation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species and consequent redox imbalance, which in turn is accompanied by lipid peroxidation. A decrease in the expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine Il10 is observed from the lowest concentrations (5mg/L). High concentrations (50mg/L) in turn produce a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokines Il6 and Mip2 from 4h of exposure. In addition, cell phagocytic capacity is seen to decrease at concentrations of ≥20mg/L. These data indicate that fluoride, at high concentrations, may affect macrophages and thus immune system function - particularly with regard to the inflammation autoregulatory processes, in which macrophages play a key role. PMID:26965474

  6. Regulation of macrophage IL-12 synthesis by Leishmania phosphoglycans.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, D; Proudfoot, L; Nikolaev, A V; Xu, D; Sands, W; Feng, G J; Thomas, E; Brewer, J; Ferguson, M A; Alexander, J; Liew, F Y

    1999-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that IFN-gamma, secreted by Th1 cells, is the most potent cytokine leading to macrophage activation and host resistance against infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania. It is also established that IL-12 is a critical cytokine involved in the differentiation and expansion of Th1 cells. Therefore, the ability of Leishmania parasites to actively suppress IL-12 production by host macrophages may be an important strategy for parasite survival. Here we report that a major parasite cell surface molecule, phosphoglycan (PG), of Leishmania could selectively inhibit the synthesis of IL-12(p40, p70) by activated murine macrophages. Furthermore, synthetic PG (sPG) was able to inhibit IL-12 release in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was dependent on the galactose(beta1-4)mannose(alpha1)-PO4 repeating units and not the glycophosphoinositol lipid anchor of lipophosphoglycan. At the concentration used, sPG had no effect on the release of TNF-alpha or IL-6 in activated macrophages. The inhibition of IL-12(p40) production was at the transcriptional level, but was not mediated through NF kappaB inhibition. These data demonstrate that PG may be an important molecule for the establishment and survival of the parasite in permissive hosts. PMID:9933105

  7. Modeling and analysis of prion dynamics in the presence of a chaperone.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Murali, Padma

    2008-05-01

    Prions are infectious agents and are polymers called PrP(Sc)-Prion protein scrapies, of a normal protein, a monomer called PrP(c)-Prion protein cellular. These PrP(Sc)s cause TSEs-transmissible spongiform encephalopathies such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapies in sheep, Kuru and Creutzfeld-Jacob diseases in humans. Cellular molecular chaperones, which are ubiquitous, stress-induced proteins, and newly found chemical and pharmacological chaperones have been found to be effective in preventing misfolding of different disease-causing proteins, essentially reducing the severity of several neurodegenerative disorders and many other protein-misfolding diseases. In this work, we propose a model for the replication of prions by nucleated polymerization in the presence of a chaperone. According to this model, the biological processes of coagulation, splitting and the inhibitory effects of the chaperone can be described by a coupled system consisting of ordinary differential equations and a partial differential equation. The model is converted into a system of ordinary differential equations and the equilibrium points are computed and their stability is studied. We give a numerical simulation of the model and we find that a disease free state can be achieved in the presence of a chaperone. The duration of the disease free state is found to increase with the amount of chaperone and this amount of chaperone can be computed from the model. PMID:18362035

  8. Molecular chaperones: guardians of the proteome in normal and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Wilson; Lee, Sukyeong; Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Tsai, Francis T.F.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins must adopt a defined three-dimensional structure in order to gain functional activity, or must they? An ever-increasing number of intrinsically disordered proteins and amyloid-forming polypeptides challenge this dogma. While molecular chaperones and proteases are traditionally associated with protein quality control inside the cell, it is now apparent that molecular chaperones not only promote protein folding in the “forward” direction by facilitating folding and preventing misfolding and aggregation, but also facilitate protein unfolding and even disaggregation resulting in the recovery of functional protein from aggregates. Here, we review our current understanding of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones that harness the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to fuel their chaperone functions. An emerging theme is that most of these chaperones do not work alone, but instead function together with other chaperone systems to maintain the proteome. Hence, molecular chaperones are the major component of the proteostasis network that guards and protects the proteome from damage. Furthermore, while a decline of this network is detrimental to cell and organismal health, a controlled perturbation of the proteostasis network may offer new therapeutic avenues against human diseases. PMID:26918154

  9. M1 of Murine Gamma-Herpesvirus 68 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Production

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiaying; Gong, Danyang; Fu, Xudong; Wu, Ting-ting; Wang, Jane; Chang, Jennifer; Zhou, Jingting; Lu, Gang; Wang, Yibin; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely on host chaperone network to support their infection. In particular, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperones play key roles in synthesizing and processing viral proteins. Influx of a large amount of foreign proteins exhausts the folding capacity in ER and triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). A fully-executed UPR comprises signaling pathways that induce ER folding chaperones, increase protein degradation, block new protein synthesis and may eventually activate apoptosis, presenting both opportunities and threats to the virus. Here, we define a role of the MHV-68M1 gene in differential modulation of UPR pathways to enhance ER chaperone production. Ectopic expression of M1 markedly induces ER chaperone genes and expansion of ER. The M1 protein accumulates in ER during infection and this localization is indispensable for its function, suggesting M1 acts from the ER. We found that M1 protein selectively induces the chaperon-producing pathways (IRE1, ATF6) while, interestingly, sparing the translation-blocking arm (PERK). We identified, for the first time, a viral factor capable of selectively intervening the initiation of ER stress signaling to induce chaperon production. This finding provides a unique opportunity of using viral protein as a tool to define the activation mechanisms of individual UPR pathways. PMID:26615759

  10. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    PubMed

    Cetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics. PMID:24244114

  11. Modification of the Structure and Activity of Lipid A in Yersinia pestis Lipopolysaccharide by Growth Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Tsukano, Hiroko; Watanabe, Haruo; Lindner, Buko; Matsuura, Motohiro

    2002-01-01

    Yersinia pestis strain Yreka was grown at 27 or 37°C, and the lipid A structures (lipid A-27°C and lipid A-37°C) of the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Lipid A-27°C consisted of a mixture of tri-acyl, tetra-acyl, penta-acyl, and hexa-acyl lipid A's, of which tetra-acyl lipid A was most abundant. Lipid A-37°C consisted predominantly of tri- and tetra-acylated molecules, with only small amounts of penta-acyl lipid A; no hexa-acyl lipid A was detected. Furthermore, the amount of 4-amino-arabinose was substantially higher in lipid A-27°C than in lipid A-37°C. By use of mouse and human macrophage cell lines, the biological activities of the LPS and lipid A preparations were measured via their abilities to induce production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In both cell lines the LPS and the lipid A from bacteria grown at 27°C were stronger inducers of TNF-α than those from bacteria grown at 37°C. However, the difference in activity was more prominent in human macrophage cells. These results suggest that in order to reduce the activation of human macrophages, it may be more advantageous for Y. pestis to produce less-acylated lipid A at 37°C. PMID:12117916

  12. Some Biochemical Effects of Asbestos on Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Klara; Harington, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The in vitro effects of chrysotile, crocidolite and amosite asbestos, and silica and rutile dust, on hamster peritoneal macrophages were assessed by estimating the release of acid phosphatase into the culture medium and by changes in the composition of phospholipids in the cells. Chrysotile was as toxic as silica, while crocidolite, amosite and the control dust, rutile were inert. The toxicity of chrysotile and silica is evidently due to the surface interaction of the dusts with phagosomal membranes, leading to the release of lytic enzymes from the damaged phagosomes into the cytoplasm. Considerable amounts of acid phosphatase were released into the medium 28 hours after the phagocytosis of both dusts, whereas very little was found when crocidolite, amosite and rutile were used. Further evidence of cytopathic effects was seen by changes in lipid components of cells which had ingested silica and chrysotile. A decrease in total lipid content and an increase in lysolecithin apparently indicate specific, secondary and toxic effects following the release of lysosomal enzymes. ImagesFigs. 1-2 PMID:4341797

  13. Role of Subunit Exchange and Electrostatic Interactions on the Chaperone Activity of Mycobacterium leprae HSP18

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Panda, Alok Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae HSP18, a major immunodominant antigen of M. leprae pathogen, is a small heat shock protein. Previously, we reported that HSP18 is a molecular chaperone that prevents aggregation of different chemically and thermally stressed client proteins and assists refolding of denatured enzyme at normal temperature. We also demonstrated that it can efficiently prevent the thermal killing of E. coli at higher temperature. However, molecular mechanism behind the chaperone function of HSP18 is still unclear. Therefore, we studied the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 at normal temperature (25°C) as well as at higher temperatures (31–43°C). Our study revealed that the chaperone function of HSP18 is enhanced significantly with increasing temperature. Far- and near-UV CD experiments suggested that its secondary and tertiary structure remain intact in this temperature range (25–43°C). Besides, temperature has no effect on the static oligomeric size of this protein. Subunit exchange study demonstrated that subunits of HSP18 exchange at 25°C with a rate constant of 0.018 min-1. Both rate of subunit exchange and chaperone activity of HSP18 is found to increase with rise in temperature. However, the surface hydrophobicity of HSP18 decreases markedly upon heating and has no correlation with its chaperone function in this temperature range. Furthermore, we observed that HSP18 exhibits diminished chaperone function in the presence of NaCl at 25°C. At elevated temperatures, weakening of interactions between HSP18 and stressed client proteins in the presence of NaCl results in greater reduction of its chaperone function. The oligomeric size, rate of subunit exchange and structural stability of HSP18 were also found to decrease when electrostatic interactions were weakened. These results clearly indicated that subunit exchange and electrostatic interactions play a major role in the chaperone function of HSP18. PMID:26098662

  14. Molecular Chaperones as Rational Drug Targets for Parkinson’s Disease Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, S.K.; Kalia, L.V.; McLean, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that is caused, in part, by the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia. The presence of intracellular protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, within the surviving nigral neurons is the defining neuropathological feature of the disease. Accordingly, the identification of specific genes mutated in families with Parkinson’s disease and of genetic susceptibility variants for idiopathic Parkinson’s disease has implicated abnormalities in proteostasis, or the handling and elimination of misfolded proteins, in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Protein folding and the refolding of misfolded proteins are regulated by a network of interactive molecules, known as the chaperone system, which is composed of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. The chaperone system is intimately associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway which are responsible for elimination of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition to their role in proteostasis, some chaperone molecules are involved in the regulation of cell death pathways. Here we review the role of the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90, and the co-chaperones Hsp40, BAG family members such as BAG5, CHIP and Hip in modulating neuronal death with a focus on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. We also review current progress in preclinical studies aimed at targetting the chaperone system to prevent neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss potential future chaperone-based therapeutics for the symptomatic treatment and possible disease modification of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:20942788

  15. Morphometry of in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from control and ozone-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, H.; Tyler, W.S.; Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.

    1983-07-01

    Effects of ambient levels of ozone on cell size and compartments were determined morphometrically for both in situ and lavaged pulmonary alveolar macrophages from rats exposed to filtered air or to filtered air with 0.60 ppm ozone. The ozone exposure was 8 hr/day for 3 days. Significant exposure-related compartmental volume density changes of in situ centriacinar macrophages were: decreased endoplasm (p less than 0.01); increased lysosome-like structures (p less than 0.01); decreased primary lysosomes (p less than 0.01); increased small and large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.001); and decreased phagosomes/autophagosomes (p less than 0.05). In lavaged macrophages, the only significant exposure-related change was an increase in the density of large secondary lysosomes (p less than 0.01). Mean profile areas of in situ centriacinar macrophages from control and exposed rats were 86.94 micrometers/sup 2/ and 112.04 micrometers/sup 2/, respectively. The average mean cell volume V and mean caliper diameter D of macrophages lavaged from control rats were 1128.45 micrometers/sup 3/ and 12.92 micrometers, respectively, whereas those from exposed rats were 1583.08 micrometers/sup 3/ and 14.46 micrometers, respectively. Exposure-related increases in cell size were seen in both in situ and lavaged macrophages, but more significant differences in cell compartments were seen in the in situ centriacinar macrophages. Morphometry of pulmonary alveolar macrophages after ambient levels of ozone indicated increased uptake, storage, or both rather than cell damage. Comparison of in situ centriacinar and lavaged macrophages from both control and exposed rats revealed significant differences in their volume fractions of nucleus, cytoplasm, ectoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome-like structures, lipid droplets, vacuoles, and phagosome/autophagosomes. These differences between centriacinar and lavaged macrophages indicate different cell populations are sampled by these two methods.

  16. Replication of Crohn's disease-associated AIEC within macrophages is dependent on TNF-α secretion.

    PubMed

    Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Billard, Elisabeth; Glasser, Anne-Lise; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2012-03-01

    Adherent and invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) associated with Crohn's disease are able to survive and to replicate extensively in active phagolysosomes within macrophages. AIEC-infected macrophages release large amounts of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and do not undergo cell death. The aim of the present study was to determine what benefit AIEC bacteria could gain from inducing the release of large amounts of TNF-α by infected macrophages and to what extent the neutralization of TNF-α could affect AIEC intramacrophagic replication. Our results showed that the amount of TNF-α released by infected macrophages is correlated with the load of intramacrophagic AIEC bacteria and their intracellular replication. TNF-α secretion was not related to the number of bacteria entering host cells because when the number of bacteria internalized in macrophage was decreased by blocking lipid raft-dependent and clathrin-coated pits-dependent endocytosis, the amount of TNF-α secreted by infected macrophages was not modified. Interestingly, dose-dependent increases in the number of intracellular AIEC LF82 bacteria were observed when infected macrophages were stimulated with exogenous TNF-α, and neutralization of TNF-α secreted by AIEC-infected macrophages using anti-TNF-α antibodies induced a significant decrease in the number of intramacrophagic bacteria. These results indicate that AIEC bacteria use TNF-α as a Trojan horse to ensure their intracellular replication because replication of AIEC bacteria within macrophages induces the release of TNF-α, which in turn increases the intramacrophagic replication of AIEC. Neutralizing TNF-α secreted by infected macrophages may represent an effective strategy to control AIEC intracellular replication. PMID:22042084

  17. Ubiquilins Chaperone and Triage Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins for Degradation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Zavodszky, Eszter; Shao, Sichen; Wohlever, Matthew L; Keenan, Robert J; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how mitochondrial membrane proteins remain soluble in the cytosol until their delivery to mitochondria or degradation at the proteasome. We show that Ubiquilin family proteins bind transmembrane domains in the cytosol to prevent aggregation and temporarily allow opportunities for membrane targeting. Over time, Ubiquilins recruit an E3 ligase to ubiquitinate bound clients. The attached ubiquitin engages Ubiquilin's UBA domain, normally bound to an intramolecular UBL domain, and stabilizes the Ubiquilin-client complex. This conformational change precludes additional chances at membrane targeting for the client, while simultaneously freeing Ubiquilin's UBL domain for targeting to the proteasome. Loss of Ubiquilins by genetic ablation or sequestration in polyglutamine aggregates leads to accumulation of non-inserted mitochondrial membrane protein precursors. These findings define Ubiquilins as a family of chaperones for cytosolically exposed transmembrane domains and explain how they use ubiquitin to triage clients for degradation via coordinated intra- and intermolecular interactions. PMID:27345149

  18. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  19. The Spliceosome: The Ultimate RNA Chaperone and Sculptor.

    PubMed

    Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome, one of the most complex machineries of eukaryotic cells, removes intronic sequences from primary transcripts to generate functional messenger and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Genetic, biochemical, and structural data reveal that the spliceosome is an RNA-based enzyme. Striking mechanistic and structural similarities strongly argue that pre-mRNA introns originated from self-catalytic group II ribozymes. However, in the spliceosome, protein components organize and activate the catalytic-site RNAs, and recognize and pair together splice sites at intron boundaries. The spliceosome is a dynamic, reversible, and flexible machine that chaperones small nuclear (sn) RNAs and a variety of pre-mRNA sequences into conformations that enable intron removal. This malleability likely contributes to the regulation of alternative splicing, a prevalent process contributing to cell differentiation, homeostasis, and disease. PMID:26682498

  20. pH-Responsive Pharmacological Chaperones for Rescuing Mutant Glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Mena-Barragán, Teresa; Narita, Aya; Matias, Dino; Tiscornia, Gustavo; Nanba, Eiji; Ohno, Kousaku; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Higaki, Katsumi; Garcia Fernández, José Manuel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen

    2015-09-28

    A general approach is reported for the design of small-molecule competitive inhibitors of lysosomal glycosidases programmed to 1) promote correct folding of mutant enzymes at the endoplasmic reticulum, 2) facilitate trafficking, and 3) undergo dissociation and self-inactivation at the lysosome. The strategy is based on the incorporation of an orthoester segment into iminosugar conjugates to switch the nature of the aglycone moiety from hydrophobic to hydrophilic in the pH 7 to pH 5 window, which has a dramatic effect on the enzyme binding affinity. As a proof of concept, new highly pH-responsive glycomimetics targeting human glucocerebrosidase or α-galactosidase with strong potential as pharmacological chaperones for Gaucher or Fabry disease, respectively, were developed. PMID:26386364

  1. Chemical chaperones assist intracellular folding to buffer mutational variations

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Saxena, Kanika; Kasturia, Neha; Dalal, Vijit; Bhatt, Niraj; Rajkumar, Asher; Maity, Shuvadeep; Sengupta, Shantanu; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    Hidden genetic variations harbor potential for the evolution of new traits. Molecular chaperones, that assist protein folding, may conceal genetic variations in protein coding regions. Here, we investigate if the chemical milieu of cells has the potential to alleviate intracellular protein folding; potentially implicating a role of osmolytes in concealing genetic variations. Using the model osmolyte TMAO, we uncover that it can buffer mutations that impose kinetic traps in the folding pathways of two model proteins. Using this information, we rationally designed TMAO-dependent mutants in vivo, starting from a TMAO-independent protein. Strikingly, we delineate different osmolytes to have a unique spectrum of buffered-mutations. Consequently, the chemical milieu of cells may alter the folding pathways of unique mutant variants in polymorphic populations and lead to unanticipated spectra of genetic buffering. PMID:22246401

  2. The nucleotide exchange factors of Hsp70 molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bracher, Andreas; Verghese, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family form an important hub in the cellular protein folding networks in bacteria and eukaryotes, connecting translation with the downstream machineries of protein folding and degradation. The Hsp70 folding cycle is driven by two types of cochaperones: J-domain proteins stimulate ATP hydrolysis by Hsp70, while nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) promote replacement of Hsp70-bound ADP with ATP. Bacteria and organelles of bacterial origin have only one known NEF type for Hsp70, GrpE. In contrast, a large diversity of Hsp70 NEFs has been discovered in the eukaryotic cell. These NEFs belong to the Hsp110/Grp170, HspBP1/Sil1, and BAG domain protein families. In this short review we compare the structures and molecular mechanisms of nucleotide exchange factors for Hsp70 and discuss how these cochaperones contribute to protein folding and quality control in the cell. PMID:26913285

  3. A photoconvertible fluorescent reporter to track chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroshi; Martinez-Vicente, Marta; Macian, Fernando; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective mechanism for the degradation of soluble proteins in lysosomes. CMA contributes to cellular quality control and is activated as part of the cellular response to different stressors. Defective CMA has been identified in aging and different age-related diseases. Until now, CMA activity could only be measured in vitro upon isolation of lysosomes. Here we report the development of a photoconvertible fluorescent reporter that allows monitoring of CMA activity in living cells. Activation of CMA increases the association of the reporter with lysosomes which are visualized as a change in the intracellular fluorescence. The CMA reporter can be utilized in a broad variety of cells and is suitable for high-content microscopy. Using this reporter, we find that levels of basal and inducible CMA activity are cell-type dependent and we have identified an upregulation of this pathway in response to the catalytic inhibition of the proteasome. PMID:21750540

  4. Multiple functions of the histone chaperone Jun dimerization protein 2.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ho; Wuputra, Kenly; Lin, Yin-Chu; Lin, Chang-Shen; Yokoyama, Kazunari K

    2016-09-30

    The Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) is part of the family of stress-responsible transcription factors such as the activation protein-1, and binds the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetateresponse element and the cAMP response element. It also plays a role as a histone chaperone and participates in diverse processes, such as cell-cycle arrest, cell differentiation, apoptosis, senescence, and metastatic spread, and functions as an oncogene and anti-oncogene, and as a cellular reprogramming factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these multiple functions of JDP2 have not been clarified. This review summarizes the structure and function of JDP2, highlighting the specific role of JDP2 in cellular-stress regulation and prevention. PMID:27041241

  5. Cardiomyocyte ryanodine receptor degradation by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pedrozo, Zully; Torrealba, Natalia; Fernández, Carolina; Gatica, Damian; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Sanchez, Gina; Gillette, Thomas G.; Hill, Joseph A.; Donoso, Paulina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Time for primary review: 15 days Aims Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a selective mechanism for the degradation of soluble cytosolic proteins bearing the sequence KFERQ. These proteins are targeted by chaperones and delivered to lysosomes where they are translocated into the lysosomal lumen and degraded via the lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP-2A). Mutations in LAMP2 that inhibit autophagy result in Danon disease characterized by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) plays a key role in cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction and its dysfunction can lead to cardiac failure. Whether RyR2 is degraded by CMA is unknown. Methods and results To induce CMA, cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with geldanamycin (GA) to promote protein degradation through this pathway. GA increased LAMP-2A levels together with its redistribution and colocalization with Hsc70 in the perinuclear region, changes indicative of CMA activation. The inhibition of lysosomes but not proteasomes prevented the loss of RyR2. The recovery of RyR2 content after incubation with GA by siRNA targeting LAMP-2A suggests that RyR2 is degraded via CMA. In silico analysis also revealed that the RyR2 sequence harbours six KFERQ motifs which are required for the recognition Hsc70 and its degradation via CMA. Our data suggest that presenilins are involved in RyR2 degradation by CMA. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a model in which oxidative damage of the RyR2 targets it for turnover by presenilins and CMA, which could lead to removal of damaged or leaky RyR2 channels. PMID:23404999

  6. Antarctic Krill 454 Pyrosequencing Reveals Chaperone and Stress Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Melody S.; Thorne, Michael A. S.; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Meng, Yan; Guan, Le Luo; Peck, Lloyd S.; Moore, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. Methodology/Principal Findings The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp). In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS), providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. Conclusions This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical “stress proteins”, such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of “stress” genes for studies understanding marine

  7. Modulation of deregulated chaperone-mediated autophagy by a phosphopeptide

    PubMed Central

    Macri, Christophe; Wang, Fengjuan; Tasset, Inmaculada; Schall, Nicolas; Page, Nicolas; Briand, Jean-Paul; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muller, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    The P140 peptide, a 21-mer linear peptide (sequence 131–151) generated from the spliceosomal SNRNP70/U1–70K protein, contains a phosphoserine residue at position 140. It significantly ameliorates clinical manifestations in autoimmune patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and enhances survival in MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. Previous studies showed that after P140 treatment, there is an accumulation of autophagy markers sequestosome 1/p62 and MAP1LC3-II in MRL/lpr B cells, consistent with a downregulation of autophagic flux. We now identify chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) as a target of P140 and demonstrate that its inhibitory effect on CMA is likely tied to its ability to alter the composition of HSPA8/HSC70 heterocomplexes. As in the case of HSPA8, expression of the limiting CMA component LAMP2A, which is increased in MRL/lpr B cells, is downregulated after P140 treatment. We also show that P140, but not the unphosphorylated peptide, uses the clathrin-dependent endo-lysosomal pathway to enter into MRL/lpr B lymphocytes and accumulates in the lysosomal lumen where it may directly hamper lysosomal HSPA8 chaperoning functions, and also destabilize LAMP2A in lysosomes as a result of its effect on HSP90AA1. This dual effect may interfere with the endogenous autoantigen processing and loading to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and as a consequence, lead to lower activation of autoreactive T cells. These results shed light on mechanisms by which P140 can modulate lupus disease and exert its tolerogenic activity in patients. The unique selective inhibitory effect of the P140 peptide on CMA may be harnessed in other pathological conditions in which reduction of CMA activity would be desired. PMID:25719862

  8. Oxidative switches in functioning of mammalian copper chaperone Cox17

    PubMed Central

    Voronova, Anastassia; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Thomas; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt; Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sillard, Rannar; Palumaa, Peep

    2007-01-01

    Cox17, a copper chaperone for cytochrome-c oxidase, is an essential and highly conserved protein in eukaryotic organisms. Yeast and mammalian Cox17 share six conserved cysteine residues, which are involved in complex redox reactions as well as in metal binding and transfer. Mammalian Cox17 exists in three oxidative states, each characterized by distinct metal-binding properties: fully reduced mammalian Cox170S–S binds co-operatively to four Cu+; Cox172S–S, with two disulfide bridges, binds to one of either Cu+ or Zn2+; and Cox173S–S, with three disulfide bridges, does not bind to any metal ions. The Em (midpoint redox potential) values for two redox couples of Cox17, Cox173S–S↔Cox172S–S (Em1) and Cox172S–S↔Cox170S–S (Em2), were determined to be −197 mV and −340 mV respectively. The data indicate that an equilibrium exists in the cytosol between Cox170S-S and Cox172S–S, which is slightly shifted towards Cox170S-S. In the IMS (mitochondrial intermembrane space), the equilibrium is shifted towards Cox172S–S, enabling retention of Cox172S–S in the IMS and leading to the formation of a biologically competent form of the Cox17 protein, Cox172S–S, capable of copper transfer to the copper chaperone Sco1. XAS (X-ray absorption spectroscopy) determined that Cu4Cox17 contains a Cu4S6-type copper–thiolate cluster, which may provide safe storage of an excess of copper ions. PMID:17672825

  9. Combined Two-Photon Luminescence Microscopy and OCT for Macrophage Detection in the Hypercholesterolemic Rabbit Aorta Using Plasmonic Gold Nanorose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyi; Mancuso, J. Jacob; Kazmi, S.M. Shams; Dwelle, Jordan; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Willsey, Brian; Ma, Li L.; Qiu, Jinze; Li, Xiankai; Dunn, Andrew K.; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The macrophage is an important early cellular marker related to risk of future rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Two-channel two-photon luminescence (TPL) microscopy combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to detect, and further characterize the distribution of aorta-based macrophages using plasmonic gold nanorose as an imaging contrast agent. Study Design/Materials and Methods Nanorose uptake by macrophages was identified by TPL microscopy in macrophage cell culture. Ex vivo aorta segments (8 × 8 × 2 mm3) rich in macrophages from a rabbit model of aorta inflammation were imaged by TPL microscopy in combination with OCT. Aorta histological sections (5 µm in thickness) were also imaged by TPL microscopy. Results Merged two-channel TPL images showed the lateral and depth distribution of nanorose-loaded macrophages (confirmed by RAM-11 stain) and other aorta components (e.g., elastin fiber and lipid droplet), suggesting that nanorose-loaded macrophages are diffusively distributed and mostly detected superficially within 20 µm from the luminal surface of the aorta. Moreover, OCT images depicted detailed surface structure of the diseased aorta. Conclusions Results suggest that TPL microscopy combined with OCT can simultaneously reveal macrophage distribution with respect to aorta surface structure, which has the potential to detect vulnerable plaques and monitor plaque-based macrophages overtime during cardiovascular interventions. PMID:22246984

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ɣ activation induces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Copin, Corinne; Duhem, Christian; Derudas, Bruno; Neve, Bernardette; Noel, Benoit; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyses the intracellular reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, the natural ligand activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor controlling inflammation, lipid metabolism and the macrophage polarization state. In this study, we investigated the impact of macrophage polarization on the expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 and the role of PPAR therein. Methods and Results 11β-HSD1 gene expression is higher in pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages than in resting macrophages (RM), whereas its activity is highest in M2 macrophages. Interestingly, PPARγ activation induces 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in M2 macrophages, but not in RM or M1 macrophages. Consequently, human M2 macrophages displayed enhanced responsiveness to the 11β-HSD1 substrate cortisone, an effect amplified by PPAR -induction of 11β-HSD1 activity, as illustrated by an increased expression of GR target genes. Conclusions Our data identify a positive cross-talk between PPARγ and GR in human M2 macrophages via the induction of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity. PMID:22207732

  11. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  12. The RNA chaperone Hfq impacts growth, metabolism and production of virulence factors in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Kakoschke, Tamara; Kakoschke, Sara; Magistro, Giuseppe; Schubert, Sören; Borath, Marc; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rossier, Ombeline

    2014-01-01

    To adapt to changes in environmental conditions, bacteria regulate their gene expression at the transcriptional but also at the post-transcriptional level, e.g. by small RNAs (sRNAs) which modulate mRNA stability and translation. The conserved RNA chaperone Hfq mediates the interaction of many sRNAs with their target mRNAs, thereby playing a global role in fine-tuning protein production. In this study, we investigated the significance of Hfq for the enteropathogen Yersina enterocolitica serotype O:8. Hfq facilitated optimal growth in complex and minimal media. Our comparative protein analysis of parental and hfq-negative strains suggested that Hfq promotes lipid metabolism and transport, cell redox homeostasis, mRNA translation and ATP synthesis, and negatively affects carbon and nitrogen metabolism, transport of siderophore and peptides and tRNA synthesis. Accordingly, biochemical tests indicated that Hfq represses ornithine decarboxylase activity, indole production and utilization of glucose, mannitol, inositol and 1,2-propanediol. Moreover, Hfq repressed production of the siderophore yersiniabactin and its outer membrane receptor FyuA. In contrast, hfq mutants exhibited reduced urease production. Finally, strains lacking hfq were more susceptible to acidic pH and oxidative stress. Unlike previous reports in other Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq was dispensable for type III secretion encoded by the virulence plasmid. Using a chromosomally encoded FLAG-tagged Hfq, we observed increased production of Hfq-FLAG in late exponential and stationary phases. Overall, Hfq has a profound effect on metabolism, resistance to stress and modulates the production of two virulence factors in Y. enterocolitica, namely urease and yersiniabactin. PMID:24454955

  13. Celery Seed Extract Blocks Peroxide Injury in Macrophages via Notch1/NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Si, Yanhong; Guo, Shoudong; Fang, Yongqi; Qin, Shucun; Li, Furong; Zhang, Ying; Jiao, Peng; Zhang, Chunduo; Gao, Linlin

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced macrophage foam cell formation and injury is one of the major atherogenic factors. This study is aimed to investigate the protective effect of celery seed extract (CSE) on ox-LDL-induced injury of macrophages and the underlying signaling pathway. RAW264.7 macrophages were pre-incubated with CSE for 24 h, followed by stimulation with ox-LDL. Oil red O staining and enzymatic colorimetry indicated CSE significantly lessened lipid droplets and total cholesterol (TC) content in ox-LDL-injured macrophages. ELISA revealed that CSE decreased the secretion of inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-6 by 12-27% and 5-15% respectively. MTT assay showed CSE promoted cell viability by 16-40%. Cell apoptosis was also analyzed by flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscope and the data indicated CSE inhibited ox-LDL-induced apoptosis of macrophages. Meanwhile, western blot analysis showed CSE suppressed NF-κBp65 and notch1 protein expressions stimulated by ox-LDL in macrophages. These results suggest that CSE inhibits ox-LDL-induced macrophages injury via notch1/NF-κB pathway. PMID:25916469

  14. Identification of Neutral Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase, a Key Enzyme Removing Cholesterol from Macrophages*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Masaki; Nishi, Makiko; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tajima, Makiko; Takase, Satoru; Takanashi, Mikio; Ohta, Keisuke; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Yahagi, Naoya; Ohashi, Ken; Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Ishibashi, Shun

    2008-01-01

    Unstable lipid-rich plaques in atherosclerosis are characterized by the accumulation of macrophage foam cells loaded with cholesterol ester (CE). Although hormone-sensitive lipase and cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) have been proposed to mediate the hydrolysis of CE in macrophages, circumstantial evidence suggests the presence of other enzymes with neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (nCEH) activity. Here we show that the murine orthologue of KIAA1363, designated as neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), is a microsomal nCEH with high expression in murine and human macrophages. The effect of various concentrations of NaCl on its nCEH activity resembles that on endogenous nCEH activity of macrophages. RNA silencing of NCEH decreases nCEH activity at least by 50%; conversely, its overexpression inhibits the CE formation in macrophages. Immunohistochemistry reveals that NCEH is expressed in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions. These data indicate that NCEH is responsible for a major part of nCEH activity in macrophages and may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:18782767

  15. Deletion of CGI-58 or adipose triglyceride lipase differently affects macrophage function and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Goeritzer, Madeleine; Schlager, Stefanie; Radovic, Branislav; Madreiter, Corina T.; Rainer, Silvia; Thomas, Gwynneth; Lord, Caleb C.; Sacks, Jessica; Brown, Amanda L.; Vujic, Nemanja; Obrowsky, Sascha; Sachdev, Vinay; Kolb, Dagmar; Chandak, Prakash G.; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Sattler, Wolfgang; Brown, J. Mark; Kratky, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Cellular TG stores are efficiently hydrolyzed by adipose TG lipase (ATGL). Its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) strongly increases ATGL-mediated TG catabolism in cell culture experiments. To investigate the consequences of CGI-58 deficiency in murine macrophages, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of CGI-58 in myeloid cells (macCGI-58−/− mice). CGI-58−/− macrophages accumulate intracellular TG-rich lipid droplets and have decreased phagocytic capacity, comparable to ATGL−/− macrophages. In contrast to ATGL−/− macrophages, however, CGI-58−/− macrophages have intact mitochondria and show no indications of mitochondrial apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that TG accumulation per se lacks a significant role in processes leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Another notable difference is the fact that CGI-58−/− macrophages adopt an M1-like phenotype in vitro. Finally, we investigated atherosclerosis susceptibility in macCGI-58/ApoE-double KO (DKO) animals. In response to high-fat/high-cholesterol diet feeding, DKO animals showed comparable plaque formation as observed in ApoE−/− mice. In agreement, antisense oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of CGI-58 in LDL receptor−/− mice did not alter atherosclerosis burden in the aortic root. These results suggest that macrophage function and atherosclerosis susceptibility differ fundamentally in these two animal models with disturbed TG catabolism, showing a more severe phenotype by ATGL deficiency. PMID:25316883

  16. Cell-mediated Transfer of Catalase Nanoparticles from Macrophages to Brain Endothelial and Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Matthew J.; Zhao, Yuling; Li, Shu; Higginbotham, Sheila M.; Booth, Stephanie L.; Han, Huai-Yun; Vetro, Joseph A.; Mosley, R. Lee; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Batrakova, Elena V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our laboratories forged the concept of macrophage delivery of protein antioxidants to attenuate neuroinflammation and nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Notably, the delivery of the redox enzyme, catalase, incorporated into a polyion complex micelle (“nanozyme”) by bone marrow-derived macrophages protected the nigrostriatal against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication. Nonetheless, how macrophage delivery of nanozyme increases the efficacy of catalase remains unknown. Methods Herein, we examined the transfer of nanozyme from macrophages to brain microvessel endothelial cells, neurons and astrocytes. Results Facilitated transport of the nanozyme from macrophages to endothelial and neural target cells occurred through endocytosis-independent mechanisms that involved fusion of cellular membranes; macrophage bridging conduits; and nanozyme lipid coatings. Nanozyme transfer was operative across an artificial blood brain barrier and showed efficient reactive oxygen species decomposition. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that drug-loaded macrophages discharge particles to contiguous target cells for potential therapeutic brain enzyme delivery. The pathways for drug delivery shown may be used for the treatment of degenerative disorders of the nervous system. PMID:21449849

  17. Major role of adipocyte prostaglandin E2 in lipolysis-induced macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqian; Cifarelli, Vincenza; Sun, Shishuo; Kuda, Ondrej; Abumrad, Nada A; Su, Xiong

    2016-04-01

    Obesity induces accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which contribute to both local and systemic inflammation and modulate insulin sensitivity. Adipocyte lipolysis during fasting and weight loss also leads to ATM accumulation, but without proinflammatory activation suggesting distinct mechanisms of ATM recruitment. We examined the possibility that specific lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory properties are released from adipocytes undergoing lipolysis to induce macrophage migration. In the present study, we showed that conditioned medium (CM) from adipocytes treated with forskolin to stimulate lipolysis can induce migration of RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition to FFAs, lipolytic stimulation increased release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2) and prostaglandin D2(PGD2), reflecting cytosolic phospholipase A2α activation and enhanced cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 expression. Reconstituted medium with the anti-inflammatory PGE2potently induced macrophage migration while different FFAs and PGD2had modest effects. The ability of CM to induce macrophage migration was abolished by treating adipocytes with the COX2 inhibitor sc236 or by treating macrophages with the prostaglandin E receptor 4 antagonist AH23848. In fasted mice, macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue coincided with increases of PGE2levels and COX1 expression. Collectively, our data show that adipocyte-originated PGE2with inflammation suppressive properties plays a significant role in mediating ATM accumulation during lipolysis. PMID:26912395

  18. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  19. Leishmania promastigotes: building a safe niche within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moradin, Neda; Descoteaux, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Upon their internalization by macrophages, Leishmania promastigotes inhibit phagolysosome biogenesis. The main factor responsible for this inhibition is the promastigote surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan (LPG). This glycolipid has a profound impact on the phagosome, causing periphagosomal accumulation of F-actin and disruption of phagosomal lipid microdomains. Functionally, this LPG-mediated inhibition of phagosome maturation is characterized by an impaired assembly of the NADPH oxidase and the exclusion of the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge concerning the nature of the intra-macrophage compartment in which Leishmania donovani promastigotes establish infection. We also describe how LPG enables this parasite to remodel the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:23050244

  20. Leishmania promastigotes: building a safe niche within macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moradin, Neda; Descoteaux, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Upon their internalization by macrophages, Leishmania promastigotes inhibit phagolysosome biogenesis. The main factor responsible for this inhibition is the promastigote surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan (LPG). This glycolipid has a profound impact on the phagosome, causing periphagosomal accumulation of F-actin and disruption of phagosomal lipid microdomains. Functionally, this LPG-mediated inhibition of phagosome maturation is characterized by an impaired assembly of the NADPH oxidase and the exclusion of the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes. In this chapter, we review the current knowledge concerning the nature of the intra-macrophage compartment in which Leishmania donovani promastigotes establish infection. We also describe how LPG enables this parasite to remodel the parasitophorous vacuole. PMID:23050244

  1. Pulmonary surfactant and macrophages studied at the air/liquid interface revealed by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesford, Dana-Marie; Allen, Heather; Carlson, Tracy; Schlesinger, Larry

    2012-04-01

    The alveolus is lined with a complex mixture of lipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant (PS) that lower surface tension at the alveolar air/liquid interface. The surface area of the lung for a 70 kg adult human at total lung capacity is ˜70 m^2. The large surface area and the direct exposure to the environment with every inhalation make this organ more susceptible to invasion by viruses, bacteria, and small particles. The most abundant cell recovered in human lung lavage is the alveolar macrophage which accounts for 85% of the total. The primary function of the alveolar macrophage is to defend the lung against invasion, but also in the clearance of surfactant components in the lung. Quintero and Wright,^1 in an in vitro study observing alveolar macrophage metabolism of two lipid components dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), noted that DPPG was removed at a faster rate. The mechanism by which this process takes place is not fully understood and our aim is to investigate the interactions of macrophages with different lipids using Brewster angle microscopy. Preliminary studies suggest that THP-1 differentiated macrophages do not significantly perturb DPPC and DPPG monolayers and research utilizing alveolar macrophages is underway. The effect of PS SP-A and SP-D is also discussed.

  2. Uptake of exogenous free cholesterol induces upregulation of tissue factor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lesnik, P; Rouis, M; Skarlatos, S; Kruth, H S; Chapman, M J

    1992-01-01

    Lipid-laden macrophages present as foam cells may contribute to the hyperthrombotic state of human atherosclerotic lesions by the production of tissue factor (TF). We investigated the effect of exogenous nonlipoprotein cholesterol on the expression of TF by human monocyte-derived macrophages in culture. Nonlipoprotein cholesterol at 50 micrograms/ml increased TF activity 4-fold; TF induction was dose- and time-dependent. Expression of TF activity was positively correlated with the free cholesterol content of monocyte-derived macrophages, was increased upon inhibition of cholesterol esterification, and reflected de novo synthesis of TF protein. TF expression in cholesterol-loaded macrophages remained sensitive to stimulation (approximately 12-fold) by bacterial lipopolysaccharide, indicating that intracellular free cholesterol and lipopolysaccharide act by distinct mechanisms in inducing TF procoagulant activity. Our results suggest that loading human monocyte-derived macrophages with free cholesterol induces upregulation of TF expression, thereby contributing to thrombus formation at sites of plaque rupture. Images PMID:1438222

  3. Binding of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and alveolar macrophages: relationship between binding affinity and antifibrogenic potential of these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ma, J K; Mo, C G; Malanga, C J; Ma, J Y; Castranova, V

    1991-01-01

    A group of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been shown to exhibit various degrees of effectiveness in preventing silica-induced fibrosis in animal models. The objective of the present study was to characterize the binding of several of these alkaloids to phosphatidylcholine vesicles and rat alveolar macrophages using fluorometric and equilibrium dialysis methods, respectively. The lipid binding affinity of these alkaloids was found to depend upon several structural factors including hydrophobic substitutions, chiral configurations, and double oxygen bridge-restricted confirmation of the benzylisoquinoline moieties. Tetrandrine, which is a highly effective agent in preventing fibrosis, showed strong binding to both lipid vesicles and alveolar macrophages. In contrast, certain analogues of tetrandrine such as curine and tubocurine, which have little or no effect on silicosis, exhibited only weak binding to lipid vesicles and almost no binding to cells. The moderate binding affinity of fangchinoline to vesicles and cells corresponded to a moderate effectiveness of the compound as an antifibrogenic agent. Methoxyadiantifoline, an alkaloid of unknown antifibrogenic potential, also exhibited high binding affinities for lipid and cells. In conclusion, the results of these studies indicate that alveolar macrophages exhibit large binding capacities for certain members of this class of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids. A positive correlation was observed between binding affinity to alveolar macrophages and the reported antifibrotic potency of these compounds. These data also suggest that the ability of these drugs to interact with alveolar macrophages may be a key step in inhibition of the progression of silica-induced pulmonary disease. PMID:1663032

  4. Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) expression is a determinant factor in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interaction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew; Tao, Huan; Metrione, Michael; Hajri, Tahar

    2014-01-17

    Obesity is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, characterized by adipocyte hypertrophy and macrophage infiltration. Previously, we have shown that very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is virtually absent in preadipocytes but is strongly induced during adipogenesis and actively participates in adipocyte hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the role of VLDLR in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interactions in wild type and VLDLR-deficient mice fed a high fat diet. The results show that VLDLR deficiency reduced high fat diet-induced inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in adipose tissue in conjunction with reduced macrophage infiltration, especially those expressing pro-inflammatory markers. In adipocyte culture, VLDLR deficiency prevented adipocyte hypertrophy and strongly reduced VLDL-induced ER stress and inflammation. Likewise, cultures of primary peritoneal macrophages show that VLDLR deficiency reduced lipid accumulation and inflammation but did not alter chemotactic response of macrophages to adipocyte signals. Moreover, VLDLR deficiency tempered the synergistic inflammatory interactions between adipocytes and macrophages in a co-culture system. Collectively, these results show that VLDLR contributes to adipose tissue inflammation and mediates VLDL-induced lipid accumulation and induction of inflammation and ER stress in adipocytes and macrophages. PMID:24293365

  5. microRNA-155 deficiency results in decreased macrophage inflammation and attenuated atherogenesis in apoE−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fen; Yu, Fang; Wang, Yuzhen; Hui, Yvonne; Carnevale, Kevin; Fu, Mingui; Lu, Hong; Fan, Daping

    2014-01-01

    Objective microRNA-155 (miR155) plays a critical role in immunity and macrophage inflammation. We aim to investigate the role of miR155 in atherogenesis. Approach and Results Quantitative real-time PCR showed that miR155 was expressed in mouse and human atherosclerotic lesions. miR155 expression in macrophages was positively correlated with proinflammatory cytokine expression. Lentivirus-mediated overexpression of miR155 in macrophages enhanced their inflammatory response to LPS through targeting SOCS-1, and impaired cholesterol efflux from acetylated LDL-loaded macrophages, whereas deficiency of miR155 blunted macrophage inflammatory responses, and enhanced cholesterol efflux possibly via enhancing lipid loading-induced macrophage autophagy. We next examined the atherogenesis in apoE−/− and miR155−/−/apoE−/− (DKO) mice fed a western diet. Compared with apoE−/− mice, the DKO mice developed less atherosclerosis lesion in aortic root, with reduced neutral lipid content and macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed that there were increased number of regulatory T cells, and reduced numbers of Th17 cells and CD11b+/Ly6Chigh cells in the spleen of DKO mice. Peritoneal macrophages from the DKO mice had significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and secretion both in the absence and presence of LPS stimulation. To determine whether miR155 in leukocytes contributes to atherosclerosis, we performed bone marrow transplantation study. Deficiency of miR155 in bone marrow-derived cells suppressed atherogenesis in apoE−/− mice, demonstrating that hematopoietic cell-derived miR155 plays a critical role. Conclusion miR155 deficiency attenuates atherogenesis in apoE−/− mice by reducing inflammatory responses of macrophages, enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux and resulting in an anti-atherogenic leukocyte profile. Targeting miR155 may be a promising strategy to halt atherogenesis. PMID:24504735

  6. PPARs in alveolar macrophage biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Monica R; Standiford, Theodore J; Reddy, Raju C

    2007-01-01

    PPARs, most notably PPAR-gamma, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-gamma and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages-thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus-while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-gamma responses play in specific lung diseases. PMID:18000531

  7. Molecular Etiology of Atherogenesis – In Vitro Induction of Lipidosis in Macrophages with a New LDL Model

    PubMed Central

    Estronca, Luis M. B. B.; Silva, Joao C. P.; Sampaio, Julio L.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Verkade, Paul; Vaz, Alfin D. N.; Vaz, Winchil L. C.; Vieira, Otilia V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis starts by lipid accumulation in the arterial intima and progresses into a chronic vascular inflammatory disease. A major atherogenic process is the formation of lipid-loaded macrophages in which a breakdown of the endolysomal pathway results in irreversible accumulation of cargo in the late endocytic compartments with a phenotype similar to several forms of lipidosis. Macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL exihibit this phenomenon in vitro and manifest an impaired degradation of internalized lipids and enhanced inflammatory stimulation. Identification of the specific chemical component(s) causing this phenotype has been elusive because of the chemical complexity of oxidized LDL. Methodology/Principal Findings Lipid “core aldehydes" are formed in oxidized LDL and exist in atherosclerotic plaques. These aldehydes are slowly oxidized in situ and (much faster) by intracellular aldehyde oxidizing systems to cholesteryl hemiesters. We show that a single cholesteryl hemiester incorporated into native, non-oxidized LDL induces a lipidosis phenotype with subsequent cell death in macrophages. Internalization of the cholesteryl hemiester via the native LDL vehicle induced lipid accumulation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in “frozen" endolysosomes. Quantitative shotgun lipidomics analysis showed that internalized lipid in cholesteryl hemiester-intoxicated cells remained largely unprocessed in those lipid-rich organelles. Conclusions/Significance The principle elucidated with the present cholesteryl hemiester-containing native-LDL model, extended to other molecular components of oxidized LDL, will help in defining the molecular etiology and etiological hierarchy of atherogenic agents. PMID:22514671

  8. Micronuclei in human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, F; Bonatti, S; Oddera, S; De Flora, S

    1992-01-01

    Occurrence of micronuclei was monitored in pulmonary alveolar macrophages collected from 31 individuals undergoing diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage. The overall frequency of micronucleated cells was 3.88 +/- 1.84/1000, without any significant difference attributable to sex, age, pathology, occupation, or smoking habits. The lack of influence of cigarette smoke on this clastogenicity index presumably reflects the very low rate of mitoses of macrophages in the alveolar lumen. PMID:1579732

  9. Evolution of the Chaperone/Usher Assembly Pathway: Fimbrial Classification Goes Greek†

    PubMed Central

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Many Proteobacteria use the chaperone/usher pathway to assemble proteinaceous filaments on the bacterial surface. These filaments can curl into fimbrial or nonfimbrial surface structures (e.g., a capsule or spore coat). This article reviews the phylogeny of operons belonging to the chaperone/usher assembly class to explore the utility of establishing a scheme for subdividing them into clades of phylogenetically related gene clusters. Based on usher amino acid sequence comparisons, our analysis shows that the chaperone/usher assembly class is subdivided into six major phylogenetic clades, which we have termed α-, β-, γ-, κ-, π-, and σ-fimbriae. Members of each clade share related operon structures and encode fimbrial subunits with similar protein domains. The proposed classification system offers a simple and convenient method for assigning newly discovered chaperone/usher systems to one of the six major phylogenetic groups. PMID:18063717

  10. Genetic selection designed to stabilize proteins uncovers a chaperone called Spy

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Koldewey, Philipp; Tapley, Tim; Kirsch, Nadine; Ruane, Karen M.; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Shi, Rong; Hofmann, Stephan; Foit, Linda; Ren, Guoping; Jakob, Ursula; Xu, Zhaohui; Cygler, Miroslaw; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the in vivo folding of proteins, we linked protein stability to antibiotic resistance, thereby forcing bacteria to effectively fold and stabilize proteins. When we challenged Escherichia coli to stabilize a very unstable periplasmic protein, it massively overproduced a periplasmic protein called Spy, which increases the steady-state levels of a set of unstable protein mutants up to 700-fold. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Spy protein is an effective ATP-independent chaperone that suppresses protein aggregation and aids protein refolding. Our strategy opens up new routes for chaperone discovery and the custom tailoring of the in vivo folding environment. Spy forms thin, apparently flexible cradle-shaped dimers. Spy is unlike the structure of any previously solved chaperone, making it the prototypical member of a new class of small chaperones that facilitate protein refolding in the absence of energy cofactors. PMID:21317898

  11. The histone chaperones Vps75 and Nap1 form ring-like, tetrameric structures in solution

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew; Hammond, Colin M.; Stirling, Andrew; Ward, Richard; Shang, Weifeng; El-Mkami, Hassane; Robinson, David A.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Norman, David G.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2014-01-01

    NAP-1 fold histone chaperones play an important role in escorting histones to and from sites of nucleosome assembly and disassembly. The two NAP-1 fold histone chaperones in budding yeast, Vps75 and Nap1, have previously been crystalized in a characteristic homodimeric conformation. In this study, a combination of small angle X-ray scattering, multi angle light scattering and pulsed electron–electron double resonance approaches were used to show that both Vps75 and Nap1 adopt ring-shaped tetrameric conformations in solution. This suggests that the formation of homotetramers is a common feature of NAP-1 fold histone chaperones. The tetramerisation of NAP-1 fold histone chaperones may act to shield acidic surfaces in the absence of histone cargo thus providing a ‘self-chaperoning’ type mechanism. PMID:24688059

  12. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  13. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  14. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  15. Survey of molecular chaperone requirement for the biosynthesis of hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valaviciute, Monika; Norkiene, Milda; Goda, Karolis; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2016-07-01

    A number of viruses utilize molecular chaperones during various stages of their life cycle. It has been shown that members of the heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperone family assist polyomavirus capsids during infection. However, the molecular chaperones that assist the formation of recombinant capsid viral protein 1 (VP1)-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) in yeast remain unclear. A panel of yeast strains with single chaperone gene deletions were used to evaluate the chaperones required for biosynthesis of recombinant hamster polyomavirus capsid protein VP1. The impact of deletion or mild overexpression of chaperone genes was determined in live cells by flow cytometry using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused with VP1. Targeted genetic analysis demonstrated that VP1-EGFP fusion protein levels were significantly higher in yeast strains in which the SSZ1 or ZUO1 genes encoding ribosome-associated complex components were deleted. The results confirmed the participation of cytosolic Hsp70 chaperones and suggested the potential involvement of the Ydj1 and Caj1 co-chaperones and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in the biosynthesis of VP1 VLPs in yeast. Likewise, the markedly reduced levels of VP1-EGFP in Δhsc82 and Δhsp82 yeast strains indicated that both Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones might assist VP1 VLPs during protein biosynthesis. PMID:27038828

  16. Molecular Chaperones in Parkinson’s Disease – Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Wahlster, Lara; McLean, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease, like many other neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by the progressive accumulation of pathogenic protein species and the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies. The cascade by which the small synaptic protein α-synuclein misfolds to form distinctive protein aggregates, termed Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, has been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade. Genetic and pathological studies in Parkinson’s disease patients as well as experimental studies in disease models have clearly established altered protein metabolism as a key element in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Alterations in protein metabolism include misfolding and aggregation, post-translational modification and dysfunctional degradation of cytotoxic protein species. Protein folding and re-folding are both mediated by a highly conserved network of molecules, called molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. In addition to the regulatory role in protein folding, molecular chaperone function is intimately associated with pathways of protein degradation, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, to effectively remove irreversibly misfolded proteins. Because of the central role of molecular chaperones in maintaining protein homeostasis, we herein review our current knowledge on the involvement of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones in Parkinson’s disease. We further discuss the capacity of molecular chaperones to prevent or modulate neurodegeneration, an important concept for future neuroprotective strategies and summarize the current progress in preclinical studies in models of Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Finally we include a discussion on the future potential of using molecular chaperones as a disease modifying therapy. PMID:22279517

  17. Investigation of original multivalent iminosugars as pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Laigre, Eugénie; Hazelard, Damien; Casas, Josefina; Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Delgado, Antonio; Compain, Philippe

    2016-06-24

    Multivalent iminosugars conjugated with a morpholine moiety and/or designed as prodrugs have been prepared and evaluated as new classes of pharmacological chaperones for the treatment of Gaucher disease. This study further confirms the interest of the prodrug concept and shows that the addition of a lysosome-targeting morpholine unit into iminosugar cluster structures has no significant impact on the chaperone activity on Gaucher cells. PMID:27063390

  18. Capturing a Dynamic Chaperone-Substrate Interaction Using NMR-Informed Molecular Modeling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Horowitz, Scott; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-08-10

    Chaperones maintain a healthy proteome by preventing aggregation and by aiding in protein folding. Precisely how chaperones influence the conformational properties of their substrates, however, remains unclear. To achieve a detailed description of dynamic chaperone-substrate interactions, we fused site-specific NMR information with coarse-grained simulations. Our model system is the binding and folding of a chaperone substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), with the chaperone Spy. We first used an automated procedure in which NMR chemical shifts inform the construction of system-specific force fields that describe each partner individually. The models of the two binding partners are then combined to perform simulations on the chaperone-substrate complex. The binding simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data from multiple biophysical measurements. Upon binding, Im7 interacts with a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on Spy's surface, causing conformational exchange within Im7 to slow down as Im7 folds. Meanwhile, the motion of Spy's flexible loop region increases, allowing for better interaction with different substrate conformations, and helping offset losses in Im7 conformational dynamics that occur upon binding and folding. Spy then preferentially releases Im7 into a well-folded state. Our strategy has enabled a residue-level description of a dynamic chaperone-substrate interaction, improving our understanding of how chaperones facilitate substrate folding. More broadly, we validate our approach using two other binding partners, showing that this approach provides a general platform from which to investigate other flexible biomolecular complexes through the integration of NMR data with efficient computational models. PMID:27415450

  19. Sortilin: A novel regulator in lipid metabolism and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Tang, Chao-Ke; Zheng, Xi-Long; Peng, Tian-Hong; Lv, Yun-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that SORT1 gene within 1p13.3 locus is an important modulator of the low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) level and atherosclerosis risk. Here, we summarize the effects of SORT1, which codes for sortilin, on lipid metabolism and development of atherosclerosis and explore the mechanisms underlying sortilin effects on lipid metabolism especially in hepatocytes and macrophages. Recent epidemiological evidence demonstrated that sortilin has been implicated as the causative factor and regulates lipid metabolism in vivo. Hepatic sortilin overexpression leads to both increased and decreased LDL-C levels by several different mechanisms, suggesting the complex roles of sortilin in hepatic lipid metabolism. Macrophage sortilin causes internalization of LDL and probably a reduction in cholesterol efflux, resulting in the intracellular accumulation of excessive lipids. In addition, sortilin deficiency in an atherosclerotic mouse model results in decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesion. Sortilin involves in lipid metabolism, promotes the development of atherosclerosis, and possibly becomes a potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:27312323

  20. Lipid Peroxidation by Human Blood Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stossel, Thomas P.; Mason, Robert J.; Smith, Arnold L.

    1974-01-01

    Cell suspensions enriched in human blood monocytes, obtained from normal peripheral blood by sedimentation on sodium diatrizoate-Ficoll gradients or from the blood of patients with neutropenia and monocytosis, accumulated malonyldialdehyde, a labile catabolite of lipid peroxidation, during incubations with polystyrene beads or heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed blood leukocytes principally composed of granulocytes or granulocytes purified by density gradient sedimentation did not accumulate malonyldialdehyde during incubations with these particles, but did when ingesting particles containing linolenate. The phospholipid fatty acid composition of monocyte-enriched and purified granulocyte preparations from the same donors were compared. The molar fraction of arachidonate (20:4) in phospholipids from monocyte-rich preparations was 62% greater than that of purified granulocytes. The findings indicate that human monocytes, possibly because of a greater content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in their membranes, peroxidize a greater quantity of endogenous lipids than granulocytes during endocytosis. Normal human granulocytes have the capacity to peroxidize ingested lipids. However, mixed leukocytes from two patients with chronic granulomatous disease produced little malonyldialdehyde when engulfing linolenate-containing particles. Therefore the capacity to peroxidize lipid is related to cellular oxygen metabolism, a function in which chronic granulomatous disease granulocytes are dificient. Malonyldialdehyde chemically prepared by hydrolysis of tetramethoxypropane, by extraction from peroxidized linolenic acid, or purified from extracts of phagocytizing rabbit alveolar macrophages had bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and S. epidermidis. Therefore, toxic catabolites of lipid hydroperoxides may potentiate the bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide in mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:4853010

  1. Amyloid-β oligomers are sequestered by both intracellular and extracellular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Priyanka; Meehan, Sarah; Carver, John A.; Wilson, Mark R.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide into β-sheet rich, fibrillar structures proceeds via a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomeric intermediates that have been associated with neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Of particular interest in this context are the mechanisms by which molecular chaperones, part of the primary biological defenses against protein misfolding, influence Aβ aggregation. We have used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to compare the interactions between distinct aggregation states (monomers, oligomers, amyloid fibrils) of the AD-associated amyloid-β(1-40) peptide, and two molecular chaperones, both of which are upregulated in the brains of patients with AD and have been found colocalized with Aβ in senile plaques. One of the chaperones, αB-crystallin, is primarily found inside cells while the other, clusterin, is predominantly located in the extracellular environment. We find that both chaperones bind to misfolded oligomeric species and form long-lived complexes thereby preventing both their further growth into fibrils and their dissociation. From these studies, we conclude that these chaperones have a common mechanism of action based on sequestering Aβ oligomers. This conclusion suggests that these chaperones, both of which are ATP-independent, are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic Aβ oligomer-associated processes whether they occur in the extracellular or intracellular environment. PMID:23106396

  2. Organismal proteostasis: role of cell-nonautonomous regulation and transcellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Protein quality control is essential in all organisms and regulated by the proteostasis network (PN) and cell stress response pathways that maintain a functional proteome to promote cellular health. In this review, we describe how metazoans employ multiple modes of cell-nonautonomous signaling across tissues to integrate and transmit the heat-shock response (HSR) for balanced expression of molecular chaperones. The HSR and other cell stress responses such as the unfolded protein response (UPR) can function autonomously in single-cell eukaryotes and tissue culture cells; however, within the context of a multicellular animal, the PN is regulated by cell-nonautonomous signaling through specific sensory neurons and by the process of transcellular chaperone signaling. These newly identified forms of stress signaling control the PN between neurons and nonneuronal somatic tissues to achieve balanced tissue expression of chaperones in response to environmental stress and to ensure that metastable aggregation-prone proteins expressed within any single tissue do not generate local proteotoxic risk. Transcellular chaperone signaling leads to the compensatory expression of chaperones in other somatic tissues of the animal, perhaps preventing the spread of proteotoxic damage. Thus, communication between subcellular compartments and across different cells and tissues maintains proteostasis when challenged by acute stress and upon chronic expression of metastable proteins. We propose that transcellular chaperone signaling provides a critical control step for the PN to maintain cellular and organismal health span. PMID:25030693

  3. NAP1 family histone chaperones are required for somatic homologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juan; Zhu, Yan; Zhou, Wangbin; Molinier, Jean; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for maintaining genome integrity and variability. To orchestrate HR in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of DNA accessibility and restoration of chromatin organization after DNA repair. Histone chaperones function in nucleosome assembly/disassembly and could play a role in HR. Here, we show that the NUCLEOSOME ASSEMBLY PROTEIN1 (NAP1) family histone chaperones are required for somatic HR in Arabidopsis thaliana. Depletion of either the NAP1 group or NAP1-RELATED PROTEIN (NRP) group proteins caused a reduction in HR in plants under normal growth conditions as well as under a wide range of genotoxic or abiotic stresses. This contrasts with the hyperrecombinogenic phenotype caused by the depletion of the CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR-1 (CAF-1) histone chaperone. Furthermore, we show that the hyperrecombinogenic phenotype caused by CAF-1 depletion relies on NRP1 and NRP2, but the telomere shortening phenotype does not. Our analysis of DNA lesions, H3K56 acetylation, and expression of DNA repair genes argues for a role of NAP1 family histone chaperones in nucleosome disassembly/reassembly during HR. Our study highlights distinct functions for different families of histone chaperones in the maintenance of genome stability and establishes a crucial function for NAP1 family histone chaperones in somatic HR. PMID:22534127

  4. CrAgDb--a database of annotated chaperone repertoire in archaeal genomes.

    PubMed

    Rani, Shikha; Srivastava, Abhishikha; Kumar, Manish; Goel, Manisha

    2016-03-01

    Chaperones are a diverse class of ubiquitous proteins that assist other cellular proteins in folding correctly and maintaining their native structure. Many different chaperones cooperate to constitute the 'proteostasis' machinery in the cells. It has been proposed earlier that archaeal organisms could be ideal model systems for deciphering the basic functioning of the 'protein folding machinery' in higher eukaryotes. Several chaperone families have been characterized in archaea over the years but mostly one protein at a time, making it difficult to decipher the composition and mechanistics of the protein folding system as a whole. In order to deal with these lacunae, we have developed a database of all archaeal chaperone proteins, CrAgDb (Chaperone repertoire in Archaeal genomes). The data have been presented in a systematic way with intuitive browse and search facilities for easy retrieval of information. Access to these curated datasets should expedite large-scale analysis of archaeal chaperone networks and significantly advance our understanding of operation and regulation of the protein folding machinery in archaea. Researchers could then translate this knowledge to comprehend the more complex protein folding pathways in eukaryotic systems. The database is freely available at http://14.139.227.92/mkumar/cragdb/. PMID:26862144

  5. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-07-17

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of cofactors (cochaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these cochaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone-cochaperone-client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific cochaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein-protein interactions for cochaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family cochaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network and its regulation in development and disease and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug-target engagement. PMID:25036637

  6. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Amit K; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  7. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  8. Enhancement of Chaperone Activity of Plant-Specific Thioredoxin through γ-Ray Mediated Conformational Change

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Sik; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Soo-Kwon; Lee, Eun Mi; Singh, Sudhir; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Sang Yeol; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    AtTDX, a thioredoxin-like plant-specific protein present in Arabidospis is a thermo-stable and multi-functional enzyme. This enzyme is known to act as a thioredoxin and as a molecular chaperone depending upon its oligomeric status. The present study examines the effects of γ-irradiation on the structural and functional changes of AtTDX. Holdase chaperone activity of AtTDX was increased and reached a maximum at 10 kGy of γ-irradiation and declined subsequently in a dose-dependent manner, together with no effect on foldase chaperone activity. However, thioredoxin activity decreased gradually with increasing irradiation. Electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that AtTDX had a tendency to form high molecular weight (HMW) complexes after γ-irradiation and γ-ray-induced HMW complexes were tightly associated with a holdase chaperone activity. The hydrophobicity of AtTDX increased with an increase in irradiation dose till 20 kGy and thereafter decreased further. Analysis of the secondary structures of AtTDX using far UV-circular dichroism spectra revealed that the irradiation remarkably increased the exposure of β-sheets and random coils with a dramatic decrease in α-helices and turn elements in a dose-dependent manner. The data of the present study suggest that γ-irradiation may be a useful tool for increasing holdase chaperone activity without adversely affecting foldase chaperone activity of thioredoxin-like proteins. PMID:26580605

  9. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40. PMID:20955165

  10. The effects of clofibrate ingestion on alveolar macrophage peroxisome content and oxygen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Shorrey, J M; Simpson, P

    1982-07-01

    Respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages in response to particulate and soluble challenges, such as zymosan particles and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), is not nearly as dependent upon membrane stimulation as in neutrophils. Microperoxisomes are subcellular organelles containing catalase and are present in lung macrophages and cells of other organs. Evidence from liver cells indicates that peroxisomes are intimately involved with hydrogen peroxide and lipid metabolism. Clofibrate (2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid ethyl, Atromid-S-), a hypolipidemic drug known to cause peroxisomal proliferation in liver cells, was studied with respect to its ability to cause increases in the microperoxisome content and to alter the cellular metabolism of alveolar macrophages. Liver weight increased over a 2-week drug treatment period while lung weight remained unchanged. Plasma triglyceride levels were decreased by the treatment, indicating the effectiveness of the drug. Unlike the effect on liver cells, however, clofibrate did not cause a proliferation of microperoxisomes, as determined by morphometric analysis. Oxygen consumption and hydrogen peroxide generation by alveolar macrophages in response to either stimulant (zymosan or PMA) was no greater in clofibrate-treated rats than in controls. Superoxide release, when expressed as the change in response to PMA, appeared elevated in the drug group; statistical significance, however, was not demonstrated. The hexose monophosphate shunt (HMP), which produces reducing equivalents for lipid biosynthesis, was elevated in macrophages from clofibrate-treated rats when expressed similarly. The significance of these results in relation to the known effects of the drug on liver cells. PMID:6291347

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Nephrotoxicity and Management by Macrophages of Intravenous Pharmaceutical Iron Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Connor, James R.; Zhang, Xuesheng; Nixon, Anne M.; Webb, Becky; Perno, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a significant clinical need for effective treatment of iron deficiency. A number of compounds that can be administered intravenously have been developed. This study examines how the compounds are handled by macrophages and their relative potential to provoke oxidative stress. Methods Human kidney (HK-2) cells, rat peritoneal macrophages and renal cortical homogenates were exposed to pharmaceutical iron preparations. Analyses were performed for indices of oxidative stress and cell integrity. In addition, in macrophages, iron uptake and release and cytokine secretion was monitored. Results HK-2 cell viability was decreased by iron isomaltoside and ferumoxytol and all compounds induced lipid peroxidation. In the renal cortical homogenates, lipid peroxidation occurred at lowest concentrations with ferric carboxymaltose, iron dextran, iron sucrose and sodium ferric gluconate. In the macrophages, iron sucrose caused loss of cell viability. Iron uptake was highest for ferumoxytol and iron isomaltoside and lowest for iron sucrose and sodium ferric gluconate. Iron was released as secretion of ferritin or as ferrous iron via ferroportin. The latter was blocked by hepcidin. Exposure to ferric carboxymaltose and iron dextran resulted in release of tumor necrosis factor α. Conclusions Exposure to iron compounds increased cell stress but was tissue and dose dependent. There was a clear difference in the handling of iron from the different compounds by macrophages that suggests in vivo responses may differ. PMID:25973894

  12. Metabolic dysfunction drives a mechanistically distinct pro-inflammatory phenotype in adipose tissue macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Mario; Coats, Brittney R.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Hagman, Derek; Mutskov, Vesco; Peris, Eduard; Schoenfelt, Kelly Q.; Kuzma, Jessica N.; Larson, Ilona; Billing, Peter S.; Landerholm, Robert W.; Crouthamel, Matthew; Gozal, David; Hwang, Seungmin; Singh, Pradeep; Becker, Lev

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophage (ATM)-driven inflammation plays a key role in insulin resistance; however, factors activating ATMs are poorly understood. Using a proteomics approach, we show that markers of classical activation are absent on ATMs from obese humans, but readily detectable on airway macrophages of patients with cystic fibrosis, a disease of chronic bacterial infection. Moreover, treating macrophages with glucose, insulin, and palmitate – conditions characteristic of the metabolic syndrome – produces a ‘metabolically-activated’ phenotype distinct from classical activation. Markers of metabolic activation are expressed by pro-inflammatory ATMs in obese humans/mice and are positively correlated with adiposity. Metabolic activation is driven by independent pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, which regulate balance between cytokine production and lipid metabolism. We identify PPARγ and p62/SQSTM1 as two key proteins that promote lipid metabolism and limit inflammation in metabolically-activated macrophages. Collectively, our data provide important mechanistic insights into pathways that drive the metabolic disease-specific phenotype of macrophages. PMID:25242226

  13. Metabolic dysfunction drives a mechanistically distinct proinflammatory phenotype in adipose tissue macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Mario; Coats, Brittney R; Hisert, Katherine B; Hagman, Derek; Mutskov, Vesco; Peris, Eduard; Schoenfelt, Kelly Q; Kuzma, Jessica N; Larson, Ilona; Billing, Peter S; Landerholm, Robert W; Crouthamel, Matthew; Gozal, David; Hwang, Seungmin; Singh, Pradeep K; Becker, Lev

    2014-10-01

    Adipose tissue macrophage (ATM)-driven inflammation plays a key role in insulin resistance; however, factors activating ATMs are poorly understood. Using a proteomics approach, we show that markers of classical activation are absent on ATMs from obese humans but are readily detectable on airway macrophages of patients with cystic fibrosis, a disease associated with chronic bacterial infection. Moreover, treating macrophages with glucose, insulin, and palmitate-conditions characteristic of the metabolic syndrome-produces a "metabolically activated" phenotype distinct from classical activation. Markers of metabolic activation are expressed by proinflammatory ATMs in obese humans/mice and are positively correlated with adiposity. Metabolic activation is driven by independent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways, which regulate balance between cytokine production and lipid metabolism. We identify PPARγ and p62/SQSTM1 as two key proteins that promote lipid metabolism and limit inflammation in metabolically activated macrophages. Collectively, our data provide important mechanistic insights into pathways that drive the metabolic-disease-specific phenotype of macrophages. PMID:25242226

  14. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  15. Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor-dependent Dendritic Cells Restrain Lean Adipose Tissue Expansion.

    PubMed

    Pamir, Nathalie; Liu, Ning-Chun; Irwin, Angela; Becker, Lev; Peng, YuFeng; Ronsein, Graziella E; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Duffield, Jeremy S; Heinecke, Jay W

    2015-06-01

    The physiological roles of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in lean white adipose tissue homeostasis have received little attention. Because DCs are generated from bone marrow progenitors in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), we used GM-CSF-deficient (Csf2(-/-)) mice fed a low fat diet to test the hypothesis that adipose tissue DCs regulate the development of adipose tissue. At 4 weeks of age, Csf2(-/-) mice had 75% fewer CD45(+)Cd11b(+)Cd11c(+)MHCII(+) F4/80(-) DCs in white adipose tissue than did wild-type controls. Furthermore, the Csf2(-/-) mice showed a 30% increase in whole body adiposity, which persisted to adulthood. Adipocytes from Csf2(-/-) mice were 50% larger by volume and contained higher levels of adipogenesis gene transcripts, indicating enhanced adipocyte differentiation. In contrast, adipogenesis/adipocyte lipid accumulation was inhibited when preadipocytes were co-cultured with CD45(+)Cd11b(+)Cd11c(+)MHCII(+)F4/80(-) DCs. Medium conditioned by DCs, but not by macrophages, also inhibited adipocyte lipid accumulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that matrix metalloproteinase 12 and fibronectin 1 were greatly enriched in the medium conditioned by DCs compared with that conditioned by macrophages. Silencing fibronectin or genetic deletion of matrix metalloproteinase 12 in DCs partially reversed the inhibition of adipocyte lipid accumulation. Our observations indicate that DCs residing in adipose tissue play a critical role in suppressing normal adipose tissue expansion. PMID:25931125

  16. New therapy via targeting androgen receptor in monocytes/macrophages to battle atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Pang, Haiyan; Wang, Lin; Niu, Yuanjie; Luo, Jie; Chang, Eugene; Sparks, Janet D; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    The male sex has a higher risk to develop coronary artery diseases, including atherosclerosis. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in several atherosclerosis-associated cell types, including monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), but its pathophysiological role in each cell type during the development of atherosclerotic lesions remains unclear. Using the Cre-loxP system, we selectively knocked out AR in these 3 cell types and the resultant AR knockout (ARKO) mice, monocyte/macrophage ARKO, EC-ARKO, and SMC-ARKO, were then crossed with the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice to develop monocyte/macrophage ARKO-LDLR(-/-), EC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-), and SMC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice for the study of atherosclerosis. The results showed that the monocyte/macrophage ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice had reduced atherosclerosis compared with the wild-type-LDLR(-/-) control mice. However, no significant difference was detected in EC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-) and SMC-ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice compared with wild-type-LDLR(-/-) mice, suggesting that the AR in monocytes/macrophages, and not in ECs and SMCs, plays a major role to promote atherosclerosis. Molecular mechanism dissection suggested that AR in monocytes/macrophages upregulated the tumor necrosis factor-α, integrin β2, and lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor 1 molecules that are involved in 3 major inflammation-related processes in atherosclerosis, including monocytes/macrophages migration and adhesion to human umbilical vein ECs, and subsequent foam cell formation. Targeting AR via the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, in wild-type-LDLR(-/-) mice showed similar effects as seen in monocyte/macrophage ARKO-LDLR(-/-) mice with little influence on lipid profile. In conclusion, the AR in monocytes/macrophages plays key roles in atherosclerosis and targeting AR with ASC-J9 may represent a new potential therapeutic approach to battle atherosclerosis. PMID:24688120

  17. Cot/tpl2 participates in the activation of macrophages by adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Garcia, Carlos; Nagy, Laura E.; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Fernandez, Margarita; Alemany, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the main function of APN is to enhance insulin activity, it is also involved in modulating the macrophage phenotype. Here, we demonstrate that at physiological concentrations, APN activates Erk1/2 via the IKKβ-p105/NF-κΒ1-Cot/tpl2 intracellular signal transduction cassette in macrophages. In peritoneal macrophages stimulated with APN, Cot/tpl2 influences the ability to phagocytose beads. However, Cot/tpl2 did not modulate the known capacity of APN to decrease lipid content in peritoneal macrophages in response to treatment with oxLDL or acLDL. A microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in BMDMs exposed to APN revealed that APN modulated the expression of ∼3300 genes; the most significantly affected biological functions were the inflammatory and the infectious disease responses. qRT-PCR analysis of WT and Cot/tpl2 KO macrophages stimulated with APN for 0, 3, and 18 h revealed that Cot/tpl2 participated in the up-regulation of APN target inflammatory mediators included in the cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction pathway (KEGG ID 4060). In accordance with these data, macrophages stimulated with APN increased secretion of cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1β, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-12, IL-6, and CCL2. Moreover, Cot/tpl2 also played an important role in the production of these inflammatory mediators upon stimulation of macrophages with APN. It has been reported that different types of signals that stimulate TLRs, IL-1R, TNFR, FcγR, and proteinase-activated receptor-1 activate Cot/tpl2. Here, we demonstrate that APN is a new signal that activates the IKKβ-p105/NF-κΒ1-Cot/tpl2-MKK1/2-Erk1/2 axis in macrophages. Furthermore, this signaling cassette modulates the biological functions triggered by APN in macrophages. PMID:24532642

  18. Developmental derivation of embryonic and adult macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shepard, J L; Zon, L I

    2000-01-01

    The macrophage cell lineage continually arises from hematopoietic stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and adult life. Previous theories proposed that macrophages are the recent progeny of bone marrow-derived monocytes and that they function primarily in phagocytosis. More recently, however, observations have shown that the ontogeny of macrophages in early mouse and human embryos is different from that occurring during adult development, and that the embryonic macrophages do not follow the monocyte pathway. Fetal macrophages are thought to differentiate from yolk sac-derived primitive macrophages before the development of adult monocytes. Further support for a separate lineage of fetal macrophages has come from studies of several species, including chicken, zebrafish, Xenopus, Drosophila, and C. elegans. The presence of fetal macrophages in PU.1-null mice indicates their independence from monocyte precursors and their existence as an alternative macrophage lineage. PMID:10608497

  19. Purple perilla extracts with α-asarone enhance cholesterol efflux from oxidized LDL-exposed macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Daekeun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-04-01

    The cellular accumulation of cholesterol is critical in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating the efflux of excess cholesterol. In the current study, we investigated whether purple Perilla frutescens extracts (PPE) at a non-toxic concentration of 1-10 µg/ml stimulate the induction of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux from lipid-laden J774A.1 murine macrophages exposed to 50 ng/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Purple perilla, an annual herb in the mint family and its constituents, have been reported to exhibit antioxidant and cytostatic activity, as well as to exert anti-allergic effects. Our results revealed that treatment with oxidized LDL for 24 h led to the accumulation of lipid droplets in the macrophages. PPE suppressed the oxidized LDL-induced foam cell formation by blocking the induction of scavenger receptor B1. However, PPE promoted the induction of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1, and subsequently accelerated cholesterol efflux from the lipid-loaded macrophages. The liver X receptor (LXR) agonist, TO-091317, and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonist, pioglitazone, increased ABCA1 expression and treatment with 10 µg/ml PPE further enhanced this effect. PPE did not induce LXRα and PPARγ expression per se, but enhanced their expression in the macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL. α-asarone was isolated from PPE and characterized as a major component enhancing the induction of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in macrophages exposed to oxidized LDL. α-asarone, but not β-asarone was effective in attenuating foam cell formation and enhancing cholesterol efflux, revealing an isomeric difference in their activity. The results from the present study demonstrate that PPE promotes cholesterol efflux from macrophages by activating the interaction of PPARγ-LXRα-ABC transporters. PMID:25673178

  20. Entrance and survival of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anett K; Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72-96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  1. Entrance and Survival of Brucella pinnipedialis Hooded Seal Strain in Human Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Briquemont, Benjamin; Sørensen, Karen K.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Marine mammal Brucella spp. have been isolated from pinnipeds (B. pinnipedialis) and cetaceans (B. ceti) from around the world. Although the zoonotic potential of marine mammal brucellae is largely unknown, reports of human disease exist. There are few studies of the mechanisms of bacterial intracellular invasion and multiplication involving the marine mammal Brucella spp. We examined the infective capacity of two genetically different B. pinnipedialis strains (reference strain; NTCT 12890 and a hooded seal isolate; B17) by measuring the ability of the bacteria to enter and replicate in cultured phagocytes and epithelial cells. Human macrophage-like cells (THP-1), two murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1), and a human malignant epithelial cell line (HeLa S3) were challenged with bacteria in a gentamicin protection assay. Our results show that B. pinnipedialis is internalized, but is then gradually eliminated during the next 72 – 96 hours. Confocal microscopy revealed that intracellular B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain colocalized with lysosomal compartments at 1.5 and 24 hours after infection. Intracellular presence of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain was verified by transmission electron microscopy. By using a cholesterol-scavenging lipid inhibitor, entrance of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in human macrophages was significantly reduced by 65.8 % (± 17.3), suggesting involvement of lipid-rafts in intracellular entry. Murine macrophages invaded by B. pinnipedialis do not release nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular bacterial presence does not induce cell death. In summary, B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain can enter human and murine macrophages, as well as human epithelial cells. Intracellular entry of B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain involves, but seems not to be limited to, lipid-rafts in human macrophages. Brucella pinnipedialis does not multiply or survive for prolonged periods intracellulary. PMID:24376851

  2. Lipid signaling in pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Shea, John M; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of lipid signaling molecules in the development and pathogenicity of clinically important fungi. In Cryptococcus neoformans, sphingolipid-derived diacylglycerol has been shown to induce the transcription of the putative virulence factor App1, which inhibits the phagocytosis of fungal cells by alveolar macrophages, as well as to activate the protein kinase C Pkc1, which promotes cell-wall stability and increased melanin production. In Candida albicans, exposure to the oxylipin farnesol causes the regulation of specific genes involved in hyphal development, drug resistance and iron acquisition. Farnesol increases resistance to oxidative stress in C. albicans but, interestingly, induces apoptotic-like cell death in Aspergillus nidulans, suggesting that this molecule has multiple and opposing functions. Finally, fungal cells secrete eicosanoids, which are lipid molecules with putative signaling functions in fungi, and the recent characterization of the first fungal enzymes associated with the production of eicosanoids in A. nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus provides new insights into the understanding of the role of eicosanoid production in the biology of fungal pathogenesis. PMID:16798065

  3. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  4. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in macrophages leading to coronary atherosclerosis in CD38(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Yuan, Xinxu; Li, Ningjun; Dewey, William L; Li, Pin-Lan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    The disruption in transportation of oxLDL-derived cholesterol and the subsequent lipid accumulation in macrophages are the hallmark events in atherogenesis. Our recent studies demonstrated that lysosomal Ca(2+) messenger of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), an enzymatic product of CD38 ADP-ribosylcyclase (CD38), promoted lipid endocytic trafficking in human fibroblast cells. The current studies are designed to examine the functional role of CD38/NAADP pathway in the regulation of lysosomal cholesterol efflux in atherosclerosis. Oil red O staining showed that oxLDL concentration-dependently increased lipid buildup in bone marrow-derived macrophages from both wild type and CD38(-/-) , but to a significant higher extent with CD38 gene deletion. Bodipy 493/503 fluorescence staining found that the deposited lipid in macrophages was mainly enclosed in lysosomal organelles and largely enhanced with the blockade of CD38/NAADP pathway. Filipin staining and direct measurement of lysosome fraction further revealed that the free cholesterol constituted a major portion of the total cholesterol segregated in lysosomes. Moreover, in situ assay disclosed that both lysosomal lumen acidity and the acid lipase activity were reduced upon cholesterol buildup in lysosomes. In CD38(-/-) mice, treatment with Western diet (12 weeks) produced atherosclerotic damage in coronary artery with striking lysosomal cholesterol sequestration in macrophages. These data provide the first experimental evidence that the proper function of CD38/NAADP pathway plays an essential role in promoting free cholesterol efflux from lysosomes and that a defection of this signalling leads to lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and results in coronary atherosclerosis in CD38(-/-) mice. PMID:26818887

  5. Hypertriglyceridemic very low density lipoproteins induce triglyceride synthesis and accumulation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gianturco, S H; Bradley, W A; Gotto, A M; Morrisett, J D; Peavy, D L

    1982-07-01

    Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may be responsible for the lipid accumulation in macrophages that can occur in hypertriglyceridemia. Chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, total and with flotation constant [S(f)] 100-400) from fasting hypertriglyceridemic subjects induced a massive accumulation of oil red O-positive inclusions in unstimulated peritoneal macrophages. Cell viability was not affected. The predominant lipid that accumulated in cells exposed to hypertriglyceridemic VLDL was triglyceride. Hypertriglyceridemic VLDL stimulated the incorporation of [(14)C]oleate into cellular triglyceride up to ninefold in 16 h, but not into cholesteryl esters. Mass increase in cellular triglyceride was 38-fold. The stimulation of cellular triglyceride formation was dependent on time, temperature, and concentration of hypertriglyceridemic VLDL. By contrast, VLDL, low density, and high density lipoproteins from fasting normolipemic subjects had no significant effect on oleate incorporation into neutral lipids or on visible lipid accumulation.(125)I-Hypertriglyceridemic VLDL (S(f) 100-400) were degraded by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, with 50 and 100% saturation observed at 3 and 24 mug protein/ml (2.5 and 20 nM), respectively. Hypertriglyceridemic VLDL inhibited the internalization and degradation of (125)I-hypertriglyceridemic VLDL (4 nM) by 50% at 3 nM. Cholesteryl ester-rich VLDL from cholesterol-fed rabbits gave 50% inhibition at 5 nM. Low density lipoproteins (LDL) inhibited by 10% at 5 nM and 40% at 47 nM. Acetyl LDL at 130 nM had no effect. We conclude that the massive triglyceride accumulation produced in macrophages by hypertriglyceridemic VLDL is a direct consequence of uptake via specific receptors that also recognize cholesteryl ester-rich VLDL and LDL but are distinct from the acetyl LDL receptor. Uptake of these triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by monocyte-macrophages in vivo may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of

  6. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  7. Genetic deletion of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs sterol-induced mouse macrophage ABCA1 expression. A new SREBP1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoye; He, Wei; Huang, Zhiping; Gotto, Antonio M; Hajjar, David P; Han, Jihong

    2008-01-25

    Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mutations cause familial hypercholesterolemia and early atherosclerosis. ABCA1 facilitates free cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues. We investigated the effects of LDLR deletion (LDLR(-/-)) on ABCA1 expression. LDLR(-/-) macrophages had reduced basal levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux. A high fat diet increased cholesterol in LDLR(-/-) macrophages but not wild type cells. A liver X receptor (LXR) agonist induced expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux in both LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages, whereas expression of LXRalpha or LXRbeta was similar. Interestingly, oxidized LDL induced more ABCA1 in wild type macrophages than LDLR(-/-) cells. LDL induced ABCA1 expression in wild type cells but inhibited it in LDLR(-/-) macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. However, lipoproteins regulated ABCG1 expression similarly in LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages. Cholesterol or oxysterols induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but had little or inhibitory effects on ABCA1 expression in LDLR(-/-) macrophages. Active sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a (SREBP1a) inhibited ABCA1 promoter activity in an LXRE-dependent manner and decreased both macrophage ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Expression of ABCA1 in animal tissues was inversely correlated to active SREBP1. Oxysterols inactivated SREBP1 in wild type macrophages but not in LDLR(-/-) cells. Oxysterol synergized with nonsteroid LXR ligand induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but blocked induction in LDLR(-/-) cells. Taken together, our studies suggest that LDLR is critical in the regulation of cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 expression in macrophage. Lack of the LDLR impairs sterol-induced macrophage ABCA1 expression by a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1-dependent mechanism that can result in reduced cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages under hypercholesterolemic conditions

  8. Inhibiting DNA Methylation by 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine Ameliorates Atherosclerosis Through Suppressing Macrophage Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qiang; Wang, Xianfeng; Jia, Lin; Mondal, Ashis K.; Diallo, Abdoulaye; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Das, Swapan K.; Parks, John S.; Yu, Liqing; Shi, Huidong

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation marks all stages of atherogenesis. DNA hypermethylation in the whole genome or specific genes is associated with inflammation and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study whether inhibiting DNA methylation by DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) ameliorates atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr−/−) mice. Ldlr−/− mice were fed an atherogenic diet and adminisered saline or 5-aza-dC (0.25 mg/kg) for up to 30 weeks. 5-aza-dC treatment markedly decreased atherosclerosis development in Ldlr−/− mice without changes in body weight, plasma lipid profile, macrophage cholesterol levels and plaque lipid content. Instead, this effect was associated with decreased macrophage inflammation. Macrophages with 5-aza-dC treatment had downregulated expression of genes involved in inflammation (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and inducible nitric oxidase) and chemotaxis (CD62/L-selectin, chemokine [C-C motif] ligand 2/MCP-1 [CCL2/MCP-1], CCL5, CCL9, and CCL2 receptor CCR2). This resulted in attenuated macrophage migration and adhesion to endothelial cells and reduced macrophage infiltration into atherosclerotic plaques. 5-aza-dC also suppressed macrophage endoplasmic reticulum stress, a key upstream signal that activates macrophage inflammation and apoptotic pathways. Finally, 5-aza-dC demethylated liver X receptor α (LXRα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ1 (PPARγ1) promoters, which are both enriched with CpG sites. This led to overexpression of LXRα and PPARγ, which may be responsible for 5-aza-dC's anti-inflammatory and atheroprotective effect. Our findings provide strong evidence that DNA methylation may play a significant role in cardiovascular diseases and serve as a therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25251587

  9. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  10. Macrophage-epithelial interactions in pulmonary alveoli.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jahar; Westphalen, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages have been investigated for years by approaches involving macrophage extraction from the lung by bronchoalveolar lavage, or by cell removal from lung tissue. Since extracted macrophages are studied outside their natural milieu, there is little understanding of the extent to which alveolar macrophages interact with the epithelium, or with one another to generate the lung's innate immune response to pathogen challenge. Here, we review new evidence of macrophage-epithelial interactions in the lung, and we address the emerging understanding that the alveolar epithelium plays an important role in orchestrating the macrophage-driven immune response. PMID:27170185

  11. Proteins with RNA Chaperone Activity: A World of Diverse Proteins with a Common Task—Impediment of RNA Misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Semrad, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Proteins with RNA chaperone activity are ubiquitous proteins that play important roles in cellular mechanisms. They prevent RNA from misfolding by loosening misfolded structures without ATP consumption. RNA chaperone activity is studied in vitro and in vivo using oligonucleotide- or ribozyme-based assays. Due to their functional as well as structural diversity, a common chaperoning mechanism or universal motif has not yet been identified. A growing database of proteins with RNA chaperone activity has been established based on evaluation of chaperone activity via the described assays. Although the exact mechanism is not yet understood, it is more and more believed that disordered regions within proteins play an important role. This possible mechanism and which proteins were found to possess RNA chaperone activity are discussed here. PMID:21234377

  12. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Madej, Benjamin D; Skjevik, Age A; Betz, Robin M; Teigen, Knut; Gould, Ian R; Walker, Ross C

    2014-02-11

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 μs each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields. PMID:24803855

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  15. An integrated signal transduction network of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Variar, Prathyaksha; Advani, Jayshree; Nair, Bipin; Shankar, Subramanian; Gowda, Harsha; Saussez, Sven; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a glycosylated multi-functional protein that acts as an enzyme as well as a cytokine. MIF mediates its actions through a cell surface class II major histocompatibility chaperone, CD74 and co-receptors such as CD44, CXCR2, CXCR4 or CXCR7. MIF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Although MIF is a molecule of biomedical importance, a public resource of MIF signaling pathway is currently lacking. In view of this, we carried out detailed data mining and documentation of the signaling events pertaining to MIF from published literature and developed an integrated reaction map of MIF signaling. This resulted in the cataloguing of 68 molecules belonging to MIF signaling pathway, which includes 24 protein-protein interactions, 44 post-translational modifications, 11 protein translocation events and 8 activation/inhibition events. In addition, 65 gene regulation events at the mRNA levels induced by MIF signaling have also been catalogued. This signaling pathway has been integrated into NetPath ( http://www.netpath.org ), a freely available human signaling pathway resource developed previously by our group. The MIF pathway data is freely available online in various community standard data exchange formats. We expect that data on signaling events and a detailed signaling map of MIF will provide the scientific community with an improved platform to facilitate further molecular as well as biomedical investigations on MIF. PMID:27139435

  16. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I.; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R.; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP—used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor’s nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  17. Protein chaperones: a composition of matter review (2008 – 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Taldone, Tony; Patel, Hardik J; Bolaender, Alexander; Patel, Maulik R; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are proteins with important functions in regulating disease phenotypes. Historically, Hsp90 has first received recognition as a target in cancer, with consequent efforts extending its potential role to other diseases. Hsp70 has also attracted interest as a therapeutic target for its role as a co-chaperone to Hsp90 as well as its own anti-apoptotic roles. Areas covered Herein, patents from 2008 to 2013 are reviewed to identify those that disclose composition of matter claimed to inhibit Hsp90 or Hsp70. Expert opinion For Hsp90, there has been considerable creativity in the discovery of novel pharmacophores that fall outside the three initially discovered scaffolds (i.e., ansamycins, resorcinols and purines). Nonetheless, much of the patent literature appears to build on previously reported structure activity relationship through slight modifications of Hsp90 inhibitor space by finding weaknesses in existing patents. The major goal of future development of Hsp90 inhibitors is not necessarily identifying better molecules but rather understanding how to rationally use these agents in the clinic. The development of Hsp70 inhibitors has lagged behind. It will require a more concerted effort from the drug discovery community in order to begin to realize the potential of this target. PMID:24742089

  18. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy and Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guodong; Mao, Zixu; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a complex neurodegenerative disorder, is pathologically characterized by the formation of Lewy bodies and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be one of the most important causative mechanisms. In addition, dysfunction of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), one of the lysosomal proteolytic pathways, has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. An exciting and important development is recent finding that CMA and mitochondrial quality control may be linked. This review summarizes the studies revealing the link between autophagy and mitochondrial function. Discussions are focused on the connections between CMA and mitochondrial failure and on the role of MEF2D, a neuronal survival factor, in mediating the regulation of mitochondria in the context of CMA. These new findings highlight the need to further explore the possibility of targeting the MEF2D-mitochondria-CMA network in both understanding the PD pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27413575

  19. Prion-impairing mutations in Hsp70 chaperone Ssa1

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Patrick G.; Masison, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    We previously described many Hsp70 Ssa1p mutants that impair [PSI+] prion propagation in yeast without affecting cell growth. To determine how the mutations alter Hsp70 we analyzed biochemically the substrate-binding domain (SBD) mutant L483W and the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) mutants A17V and R34K. Ssa1L483W ATPase activity was elevated 10-fold and was least stimulated by substrates or Hsp40 co-chaperones. Ssa1A17V and Ssa1R34K ATPase activities were nearly wild type but both showed increased stimulation by substrates. Peptide binding and reactivation of denatured luciferase were enhanced in Ssa1A17V and Ssa1R34K but compromised in Ssa1L483W. The nucleotide exchange factor Fes1 influenced ATPase of wild type Ssa1 and each mutant differently. Partial protease digestion uncovered similar and distinct conformational changes of the substrate-binding domain among the three mutants. Our data suggest that prion-impairing mutations of Ssa1 can increase or decrease substrate interactions, alter the Hsp70 reaction cycle at different points and impair normal NBD-SBD cooperation. PMID:18706386

  20. Mechanism of Amyloidogenesis of a Bacterial AAA+ Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sze Wah Samuel; Yau, Jason; Ing, Christopher; Liu, Kaiyin; Farber, Patrick; Won, Amy; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Kara-Yacoubian, Nareg; Seraphim, Thiago V; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Kay, Lewis E; Yip, Christopher M; Pomès, Régis; Sharpe, Simon; Houry, Walid A

    2016-07-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein superstructures that are commonly associated with diseases in humans and with physiological functions in various organisms. The precise mechanisms of amyloid formation remain to be elucidated. Surprisingly, we discovered that a bacterial Escherichia coli chaperone-like ATPase, regulatory ATPase variant A (RavA), and specifically the LARA domain in RavA, forms amyloids under acidic conditions at elevated temperatures. RavA is involved in modulating the proper assembly of membrane respiratory complexes. LARA contains an N-terminal loop region followed by a β-sandwich-like folded core. Several approaches, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, were used to determine the mechanism by which LARA switches to an amyloid state. These studies revealed that the folded core of LARA is amyloidogenic and is protected by its N-terminal loop. At low pH and high temperatures, the interaction of the N-terminal loop with the folded core is disrupted, leading to amyloid formation. PMID:27265850

  1. Withaferin A Analogs That Target the AAA+ Chaperone p97.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shasha; Tillotson, Joseph; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Xu, Ya-ming; Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Eric C; Mesa, Celestina; Mason, Damian J; Brown, Robert V; La Clair, James J; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Zhang, Donna D; Chapman, Eli

    2015-08-21

    Understanding the mode of action (MOA) of many natural products can be puzzling with mechanistic clues that seem to lack a common thread. One such puzzle lies in the evaluation of the antitumor properties of the natural product withaferin A (WFA). A variety of seemingly unrelated pathways have been identified to explain its activity, suggesting a lack of selectivity. We now show that WFA acts as an inhibitor of the chaperone, p97, both in vitro and in cell models in addition to inhibiting the proteasome in vitro. Through medicinal chemistry, we have refined the activity of WFA toward p97 and away from the proteasome. Subsequent studies indicated that these WFA analogs retained p97 activity and cytostatic activity in cell models, suggesting that the modes of action reported for WFA could be connected by proteostasis modulation. Through this endeavor, we highlight how the parallel integration of medicinal chemistry with chemical biology offers a potent solution to one of natures' intriguing molecular puzzles. PMID:26006219

  2. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Should a Chaperone Accompany Our Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Kevin L.; Li, Chengyuan

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes that is associated with axonal atrophy, demyelination, blunted regenerative potential, and loss of peripheral nerve fibers. The development and progression of DPN is due in large part to hyperglycemia but is also affected by insulin deficiency and dyslipidemia. Although numerous biochemical mechanisms contribute to DPN, increased oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction seem intimately associated with nerve dysfunction and diminished regenerative capacity. Despite advances in understanding the etiology of DPN, few approved therapies exist for the pharmacological management of painful or insensate DPN. Therefore, identifying novel therapeutic strategies remains paramount. Because DPN does not develop with either temporal or biochemical uniformity, its therapeutic management may benefit from a multifaceted approach that inhibits pathogenic mechanisms, manages inflammation, and increases cytoprotective responses. Finally, exercise has long been recognized as a part of the therapeutic management of diabetes, and exercise can delay and/or prevent the development of painful DPN. This review presents an overview of existing therapies that target both causal and symptomatic features of DPN and discusses the role of up-regulating cytoprotective pathways via modulating molecular chaperones. Overall, it may be unrealistic to expect that a single pharmacologic entity will suffice to ameliorate the multiple symptoms of human DPN. Thus, combinatorial therapies that target causal mechanisms and enhance endogenous reparative capacity may enhance nerve function and improve regeneration in DPN if they converge to decrease oxidative stress, improve mitochondrial bioenergetics, and increase response to trophic factors. PMID:22885705

  3. Stress chaperone GRP-78 functions in mineralized matrix formation.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sriram; Gao, Qi; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Blond, Sylvie; Predescu, Sanda A; George, Anne

    2011-03-18

    Mineralized matrix formation is a well orchestrated event requiring several players. Glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP-78) is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein that has been implicated in functional roles ranging from involvement in cancer biology to serving as a receptor for viruses. In the present study we explored the role of GRP-78 in mineralized matrix formation. Differential expression of GRP-78 mRNA and protein was observed upon in vitro differentiation of primary mouse calvarial cells. An interesting observation was that GRP-78 was identified in the secretome of these cells and in the bone matrix, suggesting an extracellular function during matrix formation. In vitro nucleation experiments under physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions indicated that GRP-78 can induce the formation of calcium phosphate polymorphs by itself, when bound to immobilized type I collagen and on demineralized collagen wafers. We provide evidence that GRP-78 can bind to DMP1 and type I collagen independent of each other in a simulated extracellular environment. Furthermore, we demonstrate the cell surface localization of GRP-78 and provide evidence that it functions as a receptor for DMP1 endocytosis in pre-osteoblasts and primary calvarial cells. Overall, this study represents a paradigm shift in the biological function of GRP-78. PMID:21239500

  4. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingbo; Metzler, Bernhard; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    In response to stress stimuli, mammalian cells activate an ancient signaling pathway leading to the transient expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs are a family of proteins serving as molecular chaperones that prevent the formation of nonspecific protein aggregates and assist proteins in the acquisition of their native structures. Physiologically, HSPs play a protective role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall but have an impact on immunoinflammatory processes in pathological conditions involved in the development of atherosclerosis. For instance, some members of HSPs have been shown to have immunoregulatory properties and modification of innate and adaptive response to HSPs, and can protect the vessel wall from the disease. On the other hand, a high degree of sequence homology between microbial and mammalian HSPs, due to evolutionary conservation, carries a risk of misdirected autoimmunity against HSPs expressed on the stressed cells of vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HSPs and anti-HSP antibodies have been shown to elicit production of proinflammatory cytokines. Potential therapeutic use of HSP in prevention of atherosclerosis involves achieving optimal balance between protective and immunogenic effects of HSPs and in the progress of research on vaccination. In this review, we update the progress of studies on HSPs and the integrity of the vessel wall, discuss the mechanism by which HSPs exert their role in the disease development, and highlight the potential clinic translation in the research field. PMID:22058161

  5. Pharmacological Chaperones for Misfolded Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Structural alterations provoked by mutations or genetic variations in the gene sequence of G protein-coupled receptors may lead to abnormal function of the receptor molecule and, ultimately, to disease. While some mutations lead to changes in domains involved in agonist binding, receptor activation or coupling to effectors, others may cause misfolding and lead to retention/degradation of the protein molecule by the quality control system of the cell. Several strategies, including genetic, chemical and pharmacological approaches have been shown to rescue function of trafficking-defective misfolded G protein-coupled receptors. Among these, pharmacological strategies offer the most promising therapeutic tool to promote proper trafficking of misfolded proteins to the plasma membrane. Pharmacological chaperones or “pharmacoperones,” are small compounds that permeate the plasma membrane, enter cells, and bind selectively to misfolded proteins and correct folding allowing routing of the target protein to the plasma membrane, where the receptor may bind and respond to agonist stimulation. In this review we describe new therapeutic opportunities based on misfolding of otherwise functional human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors. This particular receptor is highly sensitive to single changes in chemical charge and its intracellular traffic is delicately balanced between expression at the plasma membrane or retention/degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum; it is, therefore, a particularly instructive model to understand both protein routing and the molecular mechanisms whereby pharmacoperones rescue misfolded intermediates or conformationally defective receptors. PMID:21907908

  6. Histone Chaperone HIRA in Regulation of Transcription Factor RUNX1.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Aditi; Syed, Khaja Mohieddin; Joseph, Sunu; Scambler, Peter J; Dutta, Debasree

    2015-05-22

    RUNX1 (Runt-related transcription factor 1) is indispensable for the generation of hemogenic endothelium. However, the regulation of RUNX1 during this developmental process is poorly understood. We investigated the role of the histone chaperone HIRA (histone cell cycle regulation-defective homolog A) from this perspective and report that HIRA significantly contributes toward the regulation of RUNX1 in the transition of differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells from hemogenic to hematopoietic stage. Direct interaction of HIRA and RUNX1 activates the downstream targets of RUNX1 implicated in generation of hematopoietic stem cells. At the molecular level, HIRA-mediated incorporation of histone H3.3 variant within the Runx1 +24 mouse conserved noncoding element is essential for the expression of Runx1 during endothelial to hematopoietic transition. An inactive chromatin at the intronic enhancer of Runx1 in absence of HIRA significantly repressed the transition of cells from hemogenic to hematopoietic fate. We expect that the HIRA-RUNX1 axis might open up a novel approach in understanding leukemogenesis in future. PMID:25847244

  7. Bacterial Discrimination by FISH using Molecular Chaperon GroE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Maruyama, A.; Kurusu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    FISH(Fluorescence In Situ hybridization) is a powerful method for the analysis of the phylogenetic classification of microorganism in the environment. In many cases, 16s rRNA sequences of microorganisms are employed as target probe. Here we showed that novel probe was used in FISH in order to discriminate among the bacteria including psychrophile, mesophile, and thermophile. Molecular Chaperon GroE is a best characterized protein based on Escherichia coli and essential for bacterial proliferation. In E. coli, the amount of GroEL protein per cell reaches to about 5% of total cellualr protein at heat-shock response. This response occurred at transcription levels, the amount of groEL mRNA increases at about 10-fold per cell, reaches to 0.4% of total synthesized RNA. Therefore, we considered that groEL gene was employed FISH analysis as a target probe. Moreover, we found that Gly-Gly-Met (GGM) repeats in the carboxy-terminal of GroEL strongly conserved among psychrophile and mesophile, but not thermophile. In this report, we attempted to discriminate among the bacteria including psychrophile, mesophile, and thermophile by FISH using the specific sequence of GroEL as a probe. Furthermore, we proposed the novel phylogenetic trees based on the amino acids sequences of carboxy-terminal of GroEL for bacterial evolution by temperature adaptation.

  8. Stress Chaperone GRP-78 Functions in Mineralized Matrix Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Gao, Qi; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Blond, Sylvie; Predescu, Sanda A.; George, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Mineralized matrix formation is a well orchestrated event requiring several players. Glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP-78) is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein that has been implicated in functional roles ranging from involvement in cancer biology to serving as a receptor for viruses. In the present study we explored the role of GRP-78 in mineralized matrix formation. Differential expression of GRP-78 mRNA and protein was observed upon in vitro differentiation of primary mouse calvarial cells. An interesting observation was that GRP-78 was identified in the secretome of these cells and in the bone matrix, suggesting an extracellular function during matrix formation. In vitro nucleation experiments under physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions indicated that GRP-78 can induce the formation of calcium phosphate polymorphs by itself, when bound to immobilized type I collagen and on demineralized collagen wafers. We provide evidence that GRP-78 can bind to DMP1 and type I collagen independent of each other in a simulated extracellular environment. Furthermore, we demonstrate the cell surface localization of GRP-78 and provide evidence that it functions as a receptor for DMP1 endocytosis in pre-osteoblasts and primary calvarial cells. Overall, this study represents a paradigm shift in the biological function of GRP-78. PMID:21239500

  9. Exploring lipids with nonlinear optical microscopy in multiple biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba

    Lipids are crucial biomolecules for the well being of humans. Altered lipid metabolism may give rise to a variety of diseases that affect organs from the cardiovascular to the central nervous system. A deeper understanding of lipid metabolic processes would spur medical research towards developing precise diagnostic tools, treatment methods, and preventive strategies for reducing the impact of lipid diseases. Lipid visualization remains a complex task because of the perturbative effect exerted by traditional biochemical assays and most fluorescence markers. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy enables interrogation of biological samples with minimum disturbance, and is particularly well suited for label-free visualization of lipids, providing chemical specificity without compromising on spatial resolution. Hyperspectral imaging yields large datasets that benefit from tailored multivariate analysis. In this thesis, CRS microscopy was combined with Raman spectroscopy and other label-free nonlinear optical techniques to analyze lipid metabolism in multiple biological systems. We used nonlinear Raman techniques to characterize Meibum secretions in the progression of dry eye disease, where the lipid and protein contributions change in ratio and phase segregation. We employed similar tools to examine lipid droplets in mice livers aboard a spaceflight mission, which lose their retinol content contributing to the onset of nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease. We also focused on atherosclerosis, a disease that revolves around lipid-rich plaques in arterial walls. We examined the lipid content of macrophages, whose variable phenotype gives rise to contrasting healing and inflammatory activities. We also proposed new label-free markers, based on lifetime imaging, for macrophage phenotype, and to detect products of lipid oxidation. Cholesterol was also detected in hepatitis C virus infected cells, and in specific strains of age-related macular degeneration diseased cells by

  10. Expression of the lysophospholipid receptor family and investigation of lysophospholipid-mediated responses in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Duong, Chinh Quoc; Bared, Salim Maa; Abu-Khader, Ahmad; Buechler, Christa; Schmitz, Anna; Schmitz, Gerd

    2004-06-01

    Some of the biological effects of lipoproteins have been attributed to their association with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC). These lysophospholipids mediate multiple biological responses via several G protein-coupled receptors (GPR). The expression of these receptors, however, has not been systematically investigated in primary human monocytes and macrophages as major cells involved in atherosclerosis. The mRNAs for all 15 receptors described so far were detected in monocytes, macrophages, foam cells and high density lipoprotein (HDL(3))-treated cells using real time RT-PCR. Immunoblots revealed that S1P(1), S1P(2), S1P(4), LPA(1), LPA(2) and GPR65 are expressed in monocytes and macrophages, while S1P(5) and LPA(3) have not been detected. S1P(3) was induced during differentiation but down-regulated by lipid-loading and HDL(3), whereas LPA(1) was down-regulated in differentiated macrophages. The influence of S1P on macrophages was investigated and the induction of CD32 indicates an enhanced phagocytic activity. Altogether, these data give insights into the expression and regulation of lysophospholipid receptors in primary human monocytes, macrophages and foam cells. PMID:15158762

  11. Reprogramming macrophages to an anti-inflammatory phenotype by helminth antigens reduces murine atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Ine M J; Stöger, J Lauran; Goossens, Pieter; Pöttgens, Chantal; Gijbels, Marion J J; Wijnands, Erwin; van der Vorst, Emiel P C; van Gorp, Patrick; Beckers, Linda; Engel, David; Biessen, Erik A L; Kraal, Georg; van Die, Irma; Donners, Marjo M P C; de Winther, Menno P J

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven inflammatory disease of the vessel wall, characterized by the chronic activation of macrophages. We investigated whether the helminth-derived antigens [soluble egg antigens (SEAs)] could modulate macrophage inflammatory responses and protect against atherosclerosis in mice. In bone marrow-derived macrophages, SEAs induce anti-inflammatory macrophages, typified by high levels of IL-10 and reduced secretion of proinflammatory mediators. In hyperlipidemic LDLR(-/-) mice, SEA treatment reduced plaque size by 44%, and plaques were less advanced compared with PBS-injected littermate controls. The atheroprotective effect of SEAs was found to be mainly independent of cholesterol lowering and T-lymphocyte responses but instead could be attributed to diminished myeloid cell activation. SEAs reduced circulating neutrophils and inflammatory Ly6C(high) monocytes, and macrophages showed high IL-10 production. In line with the observed systemic effects, atherosclerotic lesions of SEA-treated mice showed reduced intraplaque inflammation as inflammatory markers [TNF-α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and CD68], neutrophil content, and newly recruited macrophages were decreased. We show that SEA treatment protects against atherosclerosis development by dampening inflammatory responses. In the future, helminth-derived components may provide novel opportunities to treat chronic inflammatory diseases, as they diminish systemic inflammation and reduce the activation of immune cells. PMID:24043262

  12. Interactions of Attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis phoP Mutant with Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Nadia L.; Gomez, Ana B.; Neyrolles, Olivier; Gicquel, Brigitte; Martin, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis phoP mutant SO2 derived from a clinical isolate was shown to be attenuated in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and in vivo mouse infection model and has demonstrated a high potential as attenuated vaccine candidate against tuberculosis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyze the adhesion and the intracellular growth and trafficking of SO2 in human macrophages. Our results indicate an enhanced adhesion to phagocitic cells and impaired intracellular replication of SO2 in both monocyte-derived macrophages and human cell line THP-1 in comparison with the wild type strain, consistent with murine model. Intracellular trafficking analysis in human THP-1 cells suggest that attenuation of SO2 within macrophages could be due to an impaired ability to block phagosome-lysosome fusion compared with the parental M. tuberculosis strain. No differences were found between SO2 and the wild-type strains in the release and mycobacterial susceptibility to nitric oxide (NO) produced by infected macrophages. Conclusions/Significance SO2 has enhanced ability to bind human macrophages and differs in intracellular trafficking as to wild-type M. tuberculosis. The altered lipid profile expression of the phoP mutant SO2 and its inability to secrete ESAT-6 is discussed. PMID:20885976

  13. AR-12 Inhibits Multiple Chaperones Concomitant With Stimulating Autophagosome Formation Collectively Preventing Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Ecroyd, Heath; Tritsch, Sarah R; Bavari, Sina; Reid, St Patrick; Proniuk, Stefan; Zukiwski, Alexander; Jacob, Abraham; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Giovannoni, Federico; García, Cybele C; Damonte, Elsa; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J; Dent, Paul

    2016-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that AR-12 (OSU-03012) reduces the function and ATPase activities of multiple HSP90 and HSP70 family chaperones. Combined knock down of chaperones or AR-12 treatment acted to reduce the expression of virus receptors and essential glucosidase proteins. Combined knock down of chaperones or AR-12 treatment inactivated mTOR and elevated ATG13 S318 phosphorylation concomitant with inducing an endoplasmic reticulum stress response that in an eIF2α-dependent fashion increased Beclin1 and LC3 expression and autophagosome formation. Over-expression of chaperones prevented the reduction in receptor/glucosidase expression, mTOR inactivation, the ER stress response, and autophagosome formation. AR-12 reduced the reproduction of viruses including Mumps, Influenza, Measles, Junín, Rubella, HIV (wild type and protease resistant), and Ebola, an effect replicated by knock down of multiple chaperone proteins. AR-12-stimulated the co-localization of Influenza, EBV and HIV virus proteins with LC3 in autophagosomes and reduced viral protein association with the chaperones HSP90, HSP70, and GRP78. Knock down of Beclin1 suppressed drug-induced autophagosome formation and reduced the anti-viral protection afforded by AR-12. In an animal model of hemorrhagic fever virus, a transient exposure of animals to low doses of AR-12 doubled animal survival from ∼30% to ∼60% and suppressed liver damage as measured by ATL, GGT and LDH release. Thus through inhibition of chaperone protein functions; reducing the production, stability and processing of viral proteins; and stimulating autophagosome formation/viral protein degradation, AR-12 acts as a broad-specificity anti-viral drug in vitro and in vivo. We argue future patient studies with AR-12 are warranted. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2286-2302, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27187154

  14. Meta-analysis of heat- and chemically upregulated chaperone genes in plant and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Finka, Andrija; Mattoo, Rayees U. H.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are central to cellular protein homeostasis. In mammals, protein misfolding diseases and aging cause inflammation and progressive tissue loss, in correlation with the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates and the defective expression of chaperone genes. Bacteria and non-diseased, non-aged eukaryotic cells effectively respond to heat shock by inducing the accumulation of heat-shock proteins (HSPs), many of which molecular chaperones involved in protein homeostasis, in reducing stress damages and promoting cellular recovery and thermotolerance. We performed a meta-analysis of published microarray data and compared expression profiles of HSP genes from mammalian and plant cells in response to heat or isothermal treatments with drugs. The differences and overlaps between HSP and chaperone genes were analyzed, and expression patterns were clustered and organized in a network. HSPs and chaperones only partly overlapped. Heat-shock induced a subset of chaperones primarily targeted to the cytoplasm and organelles but not to the endoplasmic reticulum, which organized into a network with a central core of Hsp90s, Hsp70s, and sHSPs. Heat was best mimicked by isothermal treatments with Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas less toxic drugs, some of which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, weakly expressed different subsets of Hsp chaperones. This type of analysis may uncover new HSP-inducing drugs to improve protein homeostasis in misfolding and aging diseases. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12192-010-0216-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20694844

  15. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis), and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases. PMID:23533311

  16. HDL-Mimetic PLGA Nanoparticle To Target Atherosclerosis Plaque Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA–HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA–HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers. PMID:25650634

  17. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  18. Origin and Functions of Tissue Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are distributed in tissues throughout the body and contribute to both homeostasis and disease. Recently, it has become evident that most adult tissue macrophages originate during embryonic development and not from circulating monocytes. Each tissue has its own composition of embryonically derived and adult-derived macrophages, but it is unclear whether macrophages of distinct origins are functionally interchangeable or have unique roles at steady state. This new understanding also prompts reconsideration of the function of circulating monocytes. Classical Ly6chi monocytes patrol the extravascular space in resting organs, and Ly6clo nonclassical monocytes patrol the vasculature. Inflammation triggers monocytes to differentiate into macrophages, but whether resident and newly recruited macrophages possess similar functions during inflammation is unclear. Here, we define the tools used for identifying the complex origin of tissue macrophages and discuss the relative contributions of tissue niche versus ontological origin to the regulation of macrophage functions during steady state and inflammation. PMID:25035951

  19. Non-traditional cytokines: How catecholamines and adipokines influence macrophages in immunity, metabolism and the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Mark A.; Carson, Monica J.; Nair, Meera G.

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines and adipokines function as hormones; catecholamines as neurotransmitters in the sympathetic nervous system, and adipokines as mediators of metabolic processes. It has become increasingly clear, however, that both also function as immunomodulators of innate and adaptive immune cells, including macrophages. Macrophages can respond to, as well as produce their own catecholamines. Dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline are the most abundant catecholamines in the body, and can induce both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses in macrophages, as well as non-immune processes such as thermogenesis. Though they are responsive to adipokines, particularly lipoproteins, leptin, and adiponectin, macrophages generally do synthesize their own adipokines, with the exception being resistin-like molecules. Adipokines contribute to adverse metabolic and immune response by stimulating lipid accumulation, foam cell formation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Adipokines can also promote balance or resolution during metabolic and immune processes by promoting reverse lipid transport and expression of Th2 cytokines. This review will explore the mechanisms by which catecholamines and adipokines influence macrophage function in neural pathways, immunity and metabolism. PMID:25703786

  20. HIV-1 assembly in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly of newly synthesized Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) particles are poorly understood. Most of the work on HIV-1 assembly has been performed in T cells in which viral particle budding and assembly take place at the plasma membrane. In contrast, few studies have been performed on macrophages, the other major target of HIV-1. Infected macrophages represent a viral reservoir and probably play a key role in HIV-1 physiopathology. Indeed macrophages retain infectious particles for long periods of time, keeping them protected from anti-viral immune response or drug treatments. Here, we present an overview of what is known about HIV-1 assembly in macrophages as compared to T lymphocytes or cell lines. Early electron microscopy studies suggested that viral assembly takes place at the limiting membrane of an intracellular compartment in macrophages and not at the plasma membrane as in T cells. This was first considered as a late endosomal compartment in which viral budding seems to be similar to the process of vesicle release into multi-vesicular bodies. This view was notably supported by a large body of evidence involving the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) machinery in HIV-1 budding, the observation of viral budding profiles in such compartments by immuno-electron microscopy, and the presence of late endosomal markers associated with macrophage-derived virions. However, this model needs to be revisited as recent data indicate that the viral compartment has a neutral pH and can be connected to the plasma membrane via very thin micro-channels. To date, the exact nature and biogenesis of the HIV assembly compartment in macrophages remains elusive. Many cellular proteins potentially involved in the late phases of HIV-1 cycle have been identified; and, recently, the list has grown rapidly with the publication of four independent genome-wide screens. However, their respective roles in infected cells

  1. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Palmar, Jim; Bautista, Jordan; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gómez, Alexis; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD. PMID:26491604

  2. Exploring the mechanisms used by promiscuous chaperones to assist protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew I.

    There are two popular theories to explain how molecular chaperones boost the yield of folded protein in the cell: According to the Anfinsen cage model, (ACM) chaperonins protect denatured proteins from aggregation. A competing theory, the iterative annealing model (IAM) claims that ATP regulated chaperone binding and release accelerates folding by freeing proteins from long-lived kinetic traps. We present experimental and kinetic evidence to argue that the IAM is not a complete picture of how the GroEL/ES chaperonin works. Surprisingly some substrate proteins experience folding rate enhancements without undergoing multiple rounds of ATP-induced binding and release from the chaperonin. An explanation of this data requires going beyond the ACM and IAM models. Our work uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the folding of a highly frustrated protein within a chaperonin cavity. The chaperonin interior is modeled by a sphere with variable degree of attraction to the protein inside. We demonstrate that this cavity, similar to the weakly hydrophobic interior of the GroEL cavity upon complexion with ATP and GroES, is sufficient to accelerate the folding of a frustrated protein by more than an order of magnitude. Our simulations uncover a novel form of the IAM in which the substrate exhibits spontaneous binding and release from the wall of the chaperonin cage. This mimics the behavior observed in the standard IAM, with the difference that thermal fluctuations, rather than ATP, allow the substrate to unbind from the chaperone. An growing number of smaller cageless chaperones have been discovered that can assist protein folding without the consumption of ATP, including artificial "minichaperones" (fragments of larger chaperones). It is tempting to speculate that the same thermally-driven IAM mechanism could play a role with these chaperones as well. We performed additional simulations of protein folding outside the sphere. We find that in order to accelerate

  3. PPAR-γ activation by Tityus serrulatus venom regulates lipid body formation and lipid mediator production.

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-01-01

    Tityus serrulatus venom (TsV) consists of numerous peptides with different physiological and pharmacological activities. Studies have shown that scorpion venom increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production, contributing to immunological imbalance, multiple organ dysfunction, and patient death. We have previously demonstrated that TsV is a venom-associated molecular pattern (VAMP) recognized by TLRs inducing intense inflammatory reaction through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators prostaglandin (PG)E2 and leukotriene (LT)B4. Lipid bodies (LBs) are potential sites for eicosanoid production by inflammatory cells. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) is implicated in LB formation and acts as an important modulator of lipid metabolism during inflammation. In this study, we used murine macrophages to evaluate whether the LB formation induced by TsV after TLR recognition correlates with lipid mediator generation by macrophages and if it occurs through PPAR-γ activation. We demonstrate that TsV acts through TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation and PPAR-γ activation to induce LB formation and generation of PGE2 and LTB4. Our data also show that PPAR-γ negatively regulates the pro-inflammatory NF-κB transcription factor. Based on these results, we suggest that during envenomation, LBs constitute functional organelles for lipid mediator production through signaling pathways that depend on cell surface and nuclear receptors. These findings point to the inflammatory mechanisms that might also be triggered during human envenomation by TsV. PMID:25450800

  4. The storage lipids in Tangier disease. A physical chemical study.

    PubMed

    Katz, S S; Small, D M; Brook, J G; Lees, R S

    1977-06-01

    The physical states and phase behavior of the lipids of the spleen, liver, and splenic artery from a 38-yr-old man with Tangier disease were studied. Many intracellular lipid droplets in the smectic liquid crystalline state were identified by polarizing microscopy in macrophages in both the spleen and liver, but not in the splenic artery. The droplets within individual cells melted sharply over a narrow temperature range, indicating a uniform lipid composition of the droplets of each cell. However different cells melted over a wide range, 20-53 degrees C indicating heterogeneity of lipid droplet composition between cells. Furthermore, most of the cells (81%) had droplets in the liquid crystalline state at 37 degrees C. X-ray diffraction studies of splenic tissue at 37 degrees C revealed a diffraction pattern typical of cholesterol esters in the smectic liquid crystalline state. Differential scanning calorimetry of spleen showed a broad reversible transition from 29-52 degrees C, with a maximum mean transition temperature at 42 degrees C, correlating closely with the polarizing microscopy observations. The enthalpy of the transition, 0.86+/-0.07 cal/g of cholesterol ester, was quantitatively similar to that of the liquid crystalline to liquid transition of pure cholesterol esters indicating that nearly all of the cholesterol esters in the tissue were free to undergo the smectic-isotropic phase transition. Lipid compositions of spleen and liver were determined, and when plotted on the cholesterol-phospholipid-cholesterol ester phase diagram, fell within the two phase zone. The two phases, cholesterol ester droplets and phospholipid bilayers were isolated by ultracentrifugation of tissue homogenates. Lipid compositions of the separated phases approximated those predicted by the phase diagram. Extracted lipids from the spleen, when dispersed in water and ultracentrifuged, underwent phase separation in a similar way. Thus (a) most of the storage lipids in the liver and

  5. Functions of the histone chaperone nucleolin in diseases.

    PubMed

    Storck, Sébastien; Shukla, Manu; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Alteration of nuclear morphology is often used by pathologist as diagnostic marker for malignancies like cancer. In particular, the staining of cells by the silver staining methods (AgNOR) has been proved to be an important tool for predicting the clinical outcome of some cancer diseases. Two major argyrophilic proteins responsible for the strong staining of cells in interphase are the nucleophosmin (B23) and the nucleolin (C23) nucleolar proteins. Interestingly these two proteins have been described as chromatin associated proteins with histone chaperone activities and also as proteins able to regulate chromatin transcription. Nucleolin seems to be over-expressed in highly proliferative cells and is involved in many aspect of gene expression: chromatin remodeling, DNA recombination and replication, RNA transcription by RNA polymerase I and II, rRNA processing, mRNA stabilisation, cytokinesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, nucleolin is also found on the cell surface in a wide range of cancer cells, a property which is being used as a marker for the diagnosis of cancer and for the development of anti-cancer drugs to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells. In addition to its implication in cancer, nucleolin has been described not only as a marker or as a protein being involved in many diseases like viral infections, autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's disease pathology but also in drug resistance. In this review we will focus on the chromatin associated functions of nucleolin and discuss the functions of nucleolin or its use as diagnostic marker and as a target for therapy PMID:17484127

  6. A comparison of two distinct murine macrophage gene expression profiles in response to Leishmania amazonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The experimental murine model of leishmaniasis has been widely used to characterize the immune response against Leishmania. CBA mice develop severe lesions, while C57BL/6 present small chronic lesions under L. amazonensis infection. Employing a transcriptomic approach combined with biological network analysis, the gene expression profiles of C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after L. amazonensis infection in vitro, were compared. These strains were selected due to their different degrees of susceptibility to this parasite. Results The genes expressed by C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after infection, differ greatly, both with respect to absolute number as well as cell function. Uninfected C57BL/6 macrophages express genes involved in the deactivation pathway of macrophages at lower levels, while genes related to the activation of the host immune inflammatory response, including apoptosis and phagocytosis, have elevated expression levels. Several genes that participate in the apoptosis process were also observed to be up-regulated in C57BL/6 macrophages infected with L. amazonensis, which is very likely related to the capacity of these cells to control parasite infection. By contrast, genes involved in lipid metabolism were found to be up-regulated in CBA macrophages in response to infection, which supports the notion that L. amazonensis probably modulates parasitophorous vacuoles in order to survive and multiply in host cells. Conclusion The transcriptomic profiles of C57BL/6 macrophages, before and after infection, were shown to be involved in the macrophage pathway of activation, which may aid in the control of L. amazonensis infection, in contrast to the profiles of CBA cells. PMID:22321871

  7. MicroRNA-33-dependent regulation of macrophage metabolism directs immune cell polarization in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Mireille; Ediriweera, Hasini N; Gundra, U Mahesh; Sheedy, Frederick J; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Hutchison, Susan B; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; van Solingen, Coen; Fullerton, Morgan D; Cecchini, Katharine; Rayner, Katey J; Steinberg, Gregory R; Zamore, Phillip D; Fisher, Edward A; Loke, P'ng; Moore, Kathryn J

    2015-12-01

    Cellular metabolism is increasingly recognized as a controller of immune cell fate and function. MicroRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates cellular lipid metabolism and represses genes involved in cholesterol efflux, HDL biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation. Here, we determined that miR-33-mediated disruption of the balance of aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation instructs macrophage inflammatory polarization and shapes innate and adaptive immune responses. Macrophage-specific Mir33 deletion increased oxidative respiration, enhanced spare respiratory capacity, and induced an M2 macrophage polarization-associated gene profile. Furthermore, miR-33-mediated M2 polarization required miR-33 targeting of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but not cholesterol efflux. Notably, miR-33 inhibition increased macrophage expression of the retinoic acid-producing enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, subfamily A2 (ALDH1A2) and retinal dehydrogenase activity both in vitro and in a mouse model. Consistent with the ability of retinoic acid to foster inducible Tregs, miR-33-depleted macrophages had an enhanced capacity to induce forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) expression in naive CD4(+) T cells. Finally, treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with miR-33 inhibitors for 8 weeks resulted in accumulation of inflammation-suppressing M2 macrophages and FOXP3(+) Tregs in plaques and reduced atherosclerosis progression. Collectively, these results reveal that miR-33 regulates macrophage inflammation and demonstrate that miR-33 antagonism is atheroprotective, in part, by reducing plaque inflammation by promoting M2 macrophage polarization and Treg induction. PMID:26517695

  8. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  9. Hsp72 chaperone function is dispensable for protection against stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ari M; Steel, Rohan; Anderson, Robin L

    2009-05-01

    In addition to its role as a molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects cells against a wide range of apoptosis inducing stresses. However, it is unclear if these two roles are functionally related or whether Hsp72 inhibits apoptosis by a mechanism independent of chaperone activity. The N-terminal adenosine triphosphatase domain, substrate-binding domain and the C-terminal EEVD regulatory motif of Hsp72 are all essential for chaperone activity. In this study, we show that Hsp72 mutants with a functional substrate-binding domain but lacking chaperone activity retain their ability to protect cells against apoptosis induced by heat and tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, a deletion mutant lacking a functional substrate-binding domain has no protective capacity. The ability of the Hsp72 substrate-binding domain to inhibit apoptosis independent of the regulatory effects of the adenosine triphosphate-binding domain indicates that the inhibition of apoptosis may involve a stable binding interaction with a regulatory substrate rather than Hsp72 chaperone activity. PMID:18819021

  10. Mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin affects its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Ecroyd, Heath; Meehan, Sarah; Horwitz, Joseph; Aquilina, J Andrew; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V; Macphee, Cait E; Carver, John A

    2007-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin is a member of the sHsp (small heat-shock protein) family that prevents misfolded target proteins from aggregating and precipitating. Phosphorylation at three serine residues (Ser19, Ser45 and Ser59) is a major post-translational modification that occurs to alphaB-crystallin. In the present study, we produced recombinant proteins designed to mimic phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin by incorporating a negative charge at these sites. We employed these mimics to undertake a mechanistic and structural investigation of the effect of phosphorylation on the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin to protect against two types of protein misfolding, i.e. amorphous aggregation and amyloid fibril assembly. We show that mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin results in more efficient chaperone activity against both heat-induced and reduction-induced amorphous aggregation of target proteins. Mimick-ing phosphorylation increased the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin against one amyloid-forming target protein (kappa-casein), but decreased it against another (ccbeta-Trp peptide). We observed that both target protein identity and solution (buffer) conditions are critical factors in determining the relative chaperone ability of wild-type and phosphorylated alphaB-crystallins. The present study provides evidence for the regulation of the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin by phosphorylation and indicates that this may play an important role in alleviating the pathogenic effects associated with protein conformational diseases. PMID:16928191

  11. ATP-dependent molecular chaperones in plastids--More complex than expected.

    PubMed

    Trösch, Raphael; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Willmund, Felix

    2015-09-01

    Plastids are a class of essential plant cell organelles comprising photosynthetic chloroplasts of green tissues, starch-storing amyloplasts of roots and tubers or the colorful pigment-storing chromoplasts of petals and fruits. They express a few genes encoded on their organellar genome, called plastome, but import most of their proteins from the cytosol. The import into plastids, the folding of freshly-translated or imported proteins, the degradation or renaturation of denatured and entangled proteins, and the quality-control of newly folded proteins all require the action of molecular chaperones. Members of all four major families of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones (chaperonin/Cpn60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp100 families) have been identified in plastids from unicellular algae to higher plants. This review aims not only at giving an overview of the most current insights into the general and conserved functions of these plastid chaperones, but also into their specific plastid functions. Given that chloroplasts harbor an extreme environment that cycles between reduced and oxidized states, that has to deal with reactive oxygen species and is highly reactive to environmental and developmental signals, it can be presumed that plastid chaperones have evolved a plethora of specific functions some of which are just about to be discovered. Here, the most urgent questions that remain unsolved are discussed, and guidance for future research on plastid chaperones is given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25596449

  12. Targeting Hsp90 and its co-chaperones to treat Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Laura J.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD), characterized by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid (Aβ), currently lacks effective treatment. Chaperone proteins, such as the heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, form macromolecular complexes with co-chaperones, which can regulate tau metabolism and Aβ processing. While small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 have been successful at ameliorating tau and Aβ burden, their development into drugs to treat disease has been slow due to the off- and on-target effects of this approach as well as challenges with the pharmacology of current scaffolds. Thus, other approaches are being developed to improve these compounds and to target co-chaperones of Hsp90 in an effort to limit these liabilities. Areas Covered This article discusses the most current developments in Hsp90 inhibitors including advances in blood-brain barrier permeability, decreased toxicity, and homolog-specific small molecule inhibitors. In addition, we discuss current strategies targeting Hsp90 co-chaperones rather than Hsp90 itself to reduce off-target effects. Expert Opinion While Hsp90 inhibitors have proven their efficacy at reducing tau pathology, they have yet to meet with success in the clinic. The development of Hsp90/tau complex specific inhibitors and further development of Hsp90 co-chaperone specific drugs should yield more potent, less toxic therapeutics. PMID:25069659

  13. Evolution of a plant-specific copper chaperone family for chloroplast copper homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Stübe, Roland; Argüello, José M.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-01-01

    Metallochaperones traffic copper (Cu+) from its point of entry at the plasma membrane to its destination. In plants, one destination is the chloroplast, which houses plastocyanin, a Cu-dependent electron transfer protein involved in photosynthesis. We present a previously unidentified Cu+ chaperone that evolved early in the plant lineage by an alternative-splicing event of the pre-mRNA encoding the chloroplast P-type ATPase in Arabidopsis 1 (PAA1). In several land plants, recent duplication events created a separate chaperone-encoding gene coincident with loss of alternative splicing. The plant-specific Cu+ chaperone delivers Cu+ with specificity for PAA1, which is flipped in the envelope relative to prototypical bacterial ATPases, compatible with a role in Cu+ import into the stroma and consistent with the canonical catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. The ubiquity of the chaperone suggests conservation of this Cu+-delivery mechanism and provides a unique snapshot into the evolution of a Cu+ distribution pathway. We also provide evidence for an interaction between PAA2, the Cu+-ATPase in thylakoids, and the Cu+-chaperone for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (CCS), uncovering a Cu+ network that has evolved to fine-tune Cu+ distribution. PMID:25468978

  14. Novel RNA chaperone domain of RNA-binding protein La is regulated by AKT phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnert, Julia; Sommer, Gunhild; Zierk, Avery W.; Fedarovich, Alena; Brock, Alexander; Fedarovich, Dzmitry; Heise, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The cellular function of the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La has been linked to translation of viral and cellular mRNAs. Recently, we have shown that the human La protein stimulates IRES-mediated translation of the cooperative oncogene CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. However, there is little known about the underlying molecular mechanism by which La stimulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation, and we propose that its RNA chaperone activity is required. Herein, we show that La binds close to the CCND1 start codon and demonstrate that La's RNA chaperone activity can change the folding of its binding site. We map the RNA chaperone domain (RCD) within the C-terminal region of La in close proximity to a novel AKT phosphorylation site (T389). Phosphorylation at T389 by AKT-1 strongly impairs its RNA chaperone activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the RCD as well as T389 is required to stimulate CCND1 IRES-mediated translation in cells. In summary, we provide a model whereby a novel interplay between RNA-binding, RNA chaperoning and AKT phosphorylation of La protein regulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation. PMID:25520193

  15. The Trigger Factor Chaperone Encapsulates and Stabilizes Partial Folds of Substrate Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Kushagra; Vreede, Jocelyne; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    How chaperones interact with protein chains to assist in their folding is a central open question in biology. Obtaining atomistic insight is challenging in particular, given the transient nature of the chaperone-substrate complexes and the large system sizes. Recent single-molecule experiments have shown that the chaperone Trigger Factor (TF) not only binds unfolded protein chains, but can also guide protein chains to their native state by interacting with partially folded structures. Here, we used all-atom MD simulations to provide atomistic insights into how Trigger Factor achieves this chaperone function. Our results indicate a crucial role for the tips of the finger-like appendages of TF in the early interactions with both unfolded chains and partially folded structures. Unfolded chains are kinetically trapped when bound to TF, which suppresses the formation of transient, non-native end-to-end contacts. Mechanical flexibility allows TF to hold partially folded structures with two tips (in a pinching configuration), and to stabilize them by wrapping around its appendages. This encapsulation mechanism is distinct from that of chaperones such as GroEL, and allows folded structures of diverse size and composition to be protected from aggregation and misfolding interactions. The results suggest that an ATP cycle is not required to enable both encapsulation and liberation. PMID:26512985

  16. Engineering and Evolution of Molecular Chaperones and Protein Disaggregases with Enhanced Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Korrie L.; Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector. PMID:27014702

  17. Engineering and Evolution of Molecular Chaperones and Protein Disaggregases with Enhanced Activity.

    PubMed

    Mack, Korrie L; Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved a sophisticated proteostasis network to ensure that proteins acquire and retain their native structure and function. Critical components of this network include molecular chaperones and protein disaggregases, which function to prevent and reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, proteostasis networks have limits, which when exceeded can have fatal consequences as in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A promising strategy is to engineer proteostasis networks to counter challenges presented by specific diseases or specific proteins. Here, we review efforts to enhance the activity of individual molecular chaperones or protein disaggregases via engineering and directed evolution. Remarkably, enhanced global activity or altered substrate specificity of various molecular chaperones, including GroEL, Hsp70, ClpX, and Spy, can be achieved by minor changes in primary sequence and often a single missense mutation. Likewise, small changes in the primary sequence of Hsp104 yield potentiated protein disaggregases that reverse the aggregation and buffer toxicity of various neurodegenerative disease proteins, including α-synuclein, TDP-43, and FUS. Collectively, these advances have revealed key mechanistic and functional insights into chaperone and disaggregase biology. They also suggest that enhanced chaperones and disaggregases could have important applications in treating human disease as well as in the purification of valuable proteins in the pharmaceutical sector. PMID:27014702

  18. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  19. Role of Nonspecific Interactions in Molecular Chaperones through Model-Based Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew D.; Huang, Wenjun; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2012-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are large proteins or protein complexes from which many proteins require assistance in order to fold. One unique property of molecular chaperones is the cavity they provide in which proteins fold. The interior surface residues which make up the cavities of molecular chaperone complexes from different organisms has recently been identified, including the well-studied GroEL-GroES chaperonin complex found in Escherichia coli. It was found that the interior of these protein complexes is significantly different than other protein surfaces and that the residues found on the protein surface are able to resist protein adsorption when immobilized on a surface. Yet it remains unknown if these residues passively resist protein binding inside GroEL-GroEs (as demonstrated by experiments that created synthetic mimics of the interior cavity) or if the interior also actively stabilizes protein folding. To answer this question, we have extended entropic models of substrate protein folding inside GroEL-GroES to include interaction energies between substrate proteins and the GroEL-GroES chaperone complex. This model was tested on a set of 528 proteins and the results qualitatively match experimental observations. The interior residues were found to strongly discourage the exposure of any hydrophobic residues, providing an enhanced hydrophobic effect inside the cavity that actively influences protein folding.