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Sample records for macrophage tumoricidal function

  1. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  2. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  3. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  4. Immunoregulation by macrophages II. Separation of mouse peritoneal macrophages having tumoricidal and bactericidal activities and those secreting PGE and interleukin I

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, K.E.; Cahill, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    Macrophage subpopulations having bactericidal or tumoricidal activities and secreting interleukin I (IL1) or prostaglandin E (PGE) were identified through primary or secondary infection with Salmonella enteritidis and separated by sedimentation velocity. Bactericidal activity was measured by (3H)-thymidine release from Listeria monocytogenes and tumoricidal activity by 51Cr-release from C-4 fibrosarcoma or P815 mastocytoma cells. Macrophages with bactericidal activity were distinguished from those with tumoricidal activity a) during secondary infection when cytolytic activity occurred only at days 1-4 post injection and bactericidal activity remained high throughout and b) after sedimentation velocity separation. Cytolysis was consistently greatest among adherent cells of low sedimentation velocity, whereas cells with bactericidal activity increased in size during the infection. Tumour cytostasis (inhibition and promotion of (3H)-thymidine uptake) differed from cytolysis in that the former was more prolonged during infection and was also detected among large cells. Secretion of immunoregulatory molecules PGE and IL1 occurred maximally among different macrophage subpopulations separated by sedimentation velocity and depending on the type of stimulus used in vitro. There was an inverse correlation between IL1 production and PGE production after stimulation with C3-zymosan or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The development of immunity during infection may therefore be dependent upon the relative proportions of effector and regulatory macrophage subpopulations and the selective effects of environmental stimuli on these functions.

  5. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  6. Identification and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for macrophages at intermediate stages in the tumoricidal activation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Paulnock, D.M.; Lambert, L.E. )

    1990-01-15

    Macrophage activation for tumor cell killing is a multistep pathway in which responsive macrophages interact sequentially with priming and triggering stimuli in the acquisition of full tumoricidal activity. A number of mediators have been identified which have activating capability, including in particular IFN-gamma and bacterial LPS. Although the synergistic functional response of normal macrophages to sequential incubation with these activation signals has been well-established, characterization of the intermediate stages in the activation pathway has been difficult. We have developed a model system for examination of various aspects of macrophage activation, through the use of the murine macrophage tumor cell line, RAW 264.7. These cells, like normal macrophages, exhibit a strict requirement for interaction with both IFN-gamma and LPS in the development of tumor cytolytic activity. In addition, these cells can be stably primed by the administration of gamma-radiation. In the studies reported here, we have used RAW 264.7 cells treated with IFN-gamma alone or with IFN-gamma plus LPS to stimulate the production of rat mAb probes recognizing cell surface changes occurring during the activation process. In this way we have identified three Ag associated with intermediate stages of the activation process. One Ag, TM-1, is expressed on RAW 264.7 cells primed by IFN-gamma or gamma-radiation. This surface Ag thus identifies cells at the primed cell intermediate stage of the tumoricidal activation pathway regardless of the mechanism of activation. A second Ag, TM-2, is expressed on IFN-treated RAW 264.7 cells but not on RAW 264.7 cells primed with gamma-radiation alone. Expression of this Ag can be induced by treatment of irradiated cells with IFN-gamma, but is not induced by IFN-gamma treatment of a noncytolytic cell line, WEHI-3.

  7. Tumoricidal Effects of Macrophage-activating Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Relapsed/ Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander; Heninger, Erika; Broman, Aimee Teo; Hope, Chelsea; Phan, Funita; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Maroulakou, Ioanna; Callander, Natalie; Hematti, Peiman; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Sondel, Paul; Asimakopoulos, Fotis

    2015-01-01

    Myeloma remains a virtually incurable malignancy. The inevitable evolution of multi-drug resistant clones and widespread clonal heterogeneity limit the potential of traditional and novel therapies to eliminate minimal residual disease, a reliable harbinger of relapse. Here we show potent anti-myeloma activity of macrophage-activating immunotherapy (αCD40+CpG) that resulted in prolongation of progression-free and overall survival in an immunocompetent, preclinically validated, transplant-based model of multi-drug resistant, relapsed/refractory myeloma (t-Vκ*MYC). αCD40+CpG was effective in vivo in the absence of cytolytic NK, T or B cells and resulted in expansion of M1-polarized (cytolytic/tumoricidal) macrophages in the bone marrow. Moreover, we show that concurrent loss/inhibition of TPL2 (Cot, MAP3K8), a MAP3K that is recruited to activated CD40 complex and regulates macrophage activation/cytokine production, potentiated direct, ex vivo anti-myeloma tumoricidal activity of αCD40+CpG-activated macrophages, promoted production of antitumor cytokine IL12 in vitro and in vivo and synergized with αCD40+CpG to further prolong progression-free and overall survival in vivo. Our results support the combination of αCD40-based macrophage activation and TPL2 inhibition for myeloma immunotherapy. We propose that αCD40-mediated activation of innate antitumor immunity may be a promising approach to control/eradicate minimal residual disease following cytoreduction with traditional or novel anti-myeloma therapies. PMID:25941352

  8. Enhanced superoxide release and tumoricidal activity by a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population in response to activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Drath, D B

    1985-01-01

    The monocytic phagocyte population of rat lungs is heterogeneous. In addition to the freely lavagable alveolar macrophages, there is a fixed in situ tissue-associated subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages. The response of this subpopulation to classical macrophage activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure was monitored. Results indicate that this population can be activated both metabolically and functionally, as evidenced by enhanced release of superoxide anions and demonstrable tumoricidal activity against syngeneic and xenogeneic target cells. The pattern of metabolic activation of in situ tissue-associated macrophages differed somewhat from that of alveolar macrophages and was observed only after subsequent exposure of the cells to either zymosan particles or phorbol myristate acetate. Upon such exposure, the activated zymosan-treated tissue macrophages released approximately twice as much superoxide as the nonactivated cells and amounts comparable to the amounts released by activated alveolar macrophages. The tissue macrophages also displayed greater levels of cytotoxicity toward xenogenic targets than the alveolar cells and may have an important role in preventing microbial or tumor cell colonization of respiratory systems. PMID:2989181

  9. Enhanced superoxide release and tumoricidal activity by a postlavage, in situ pulmonary macrophage population in response to activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1985-07-01

    The monocytic phagocyte population of rat lungs is heterogeneous. In addition to the freely lavagable alveolar macrophages, there is a fixed in situ tissue-associated subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages. The response of this subpopulation to classical macrophage activation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG exposure was monitored. Results indicate that this population can be activated both metabolically and functionally, as evidenced by enhanced release of superoxide anions and demonstrable tumoricidal activity against syngeneic and xenogeneic target cells. The pattern of metabolic activation of in situ tissue-associated macrophages differed somewhat from that of alveolar macrophages and was observed only after subsequent exposure of the cells to either zymosan particles or phorbol myristate acetate. Upon such exposure, the activated zymosan-treated tissue macrophages released approximately twice as much superoxide as the nonactivated cells and amounts comparable to the amounts released by activated alveolar macrophages. The tissue macrophages also displayed greater levels of cytotoxicity toward xenogenic targets than the alveolar cells and may have an important role in preventing microbial or tumor cell colonization of respiratory systems. PMID:2989181

  10. Coumarin or warfarin treatment of mice does not increase the microbicidal or tumoricidal capacities of macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Filice, G. A.; Remington, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Benzopyrones have been shown to affect several functions of macrophages. We examined the effects of two benzopyrones, coumarin and warfarin, on the capacity of mouse macrophages to inhibit microorganisms and tumour target cells. Mice were treated with daily i.v. doses of either drug. Then the mice were challenged with lethal doses of Toxoplasma gondii or peritoneal macrophages from these mice were challenged in vitro with T. gondii or tumour target cells Survival of coumarin or warfarin-treated mice challenged with T. gondii was similar to that of control mice. Multiplication of T gondii and growth of tumour target cells were similar in preparations of macrophages from coumarin-treated, warfarin-treated, or control mice and were inhibited in preparations of activated macrophages from Corynebacterium parvum-treated mice that served as positive controls. Under our experimental conditions, benzopyrones did not activate mouse macrophages. PMID:7236495

  11. Extracellular calcium is not an absolute requirement for tumoricidal activation of RAW-264 macrophage-like cell line.

    PubMed

    Gorecka-Tisera, A M; McCulloch, M A

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of these studies was to establish whether extracellular calcium (Cao2+) plays a role in the process of activation of RAW-264 macrophages for tumor cell killing. We found that these cells were capable of developing a significant level of cytolytic activity under treatment with lymphokine (LK) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in the absence of Cao2+ and that responses developed in Ca2+-free media were only 6-18% lower in comparison with the responses developed in the presence of Cao2+. The determination of 45calcium uptake in RAW-264 cells treated with LK and LPS showed that the rate of 45calcium uptake has displayed no increase during either the course of activation or in activated, highly cytolytic cells. Finally, three calcium channel blockers examined here: verapamil, diltiazem and flunarizine, with concentrations ranging from 1 X 10(-7) M - 2.5 X 10(-5) M, showed no inhibitory effect on the process of activation. Nifedipine, another calcium channel blocker, inhibited the development of cytolytic activity with concentrations ranging from 1 X 10(-6) M - 2.5 X 10(-5) M. It could be argued, however, that this inhibition was nonspecific, since this agent was 13 times more potent with regard to the calcium ionophore A23187-induced release of beta-glucuronidase, the function which is entirely dependent on Cao2+. Taken together, these results suggest that Cao2+ is not an absolute requirement for the process of tumoricidal activation of RAW-264 macrophages but it may play some supportive role in this process. PMID:3461096

  12. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J; Müller, Dominik N; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  13. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  14. Origin and Functions of Tissue Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are distributed in tissues throughout the body and contribute to both homeostasis and disease. Recently, it has become evident that most adult tissue macrophages originate during embryonic development and not from circulating monocytes. Each tissue has its own composition of embryonically derived and adult-derived macrophages, but it is unclear whether macrophages of distinct origins are functionally interchangeable or have unique roles at steady state. This new understanding also prompts reconsideration of the function of circulating monocytes. Classical Ly6chi monocytes patrol the extravascular space in resting organs, and Ly6clo nonclassical monocytes patrol the vasculature. Inflammation triggers monocytes to differentiate into macrophages, but whether resident and newly recruited macrophages possess similar functions during inflammation is unclear. Here, we define the tools used for identifying the complex origin of tissue macrophages and discuss the relative contributions of tissue niche versus ontological origin to the regulation of macrophage functions during steady state and inflammation. PMID:25035951

  15. Functions of mononuclear phagocytes in mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol: a model of aberrant macrophage development.

    PubMed

    Dean, J H; Lauer, L D; Murray, M J; Luster, M I; Neptun, D; Adams, D O

    1986-10-15

    Administration of the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) lowers the systemic resistance of mice to challenge with either tumor cells or the facultative intracellular parasite Listeria monocytogenes. To assess the potential role of impaired mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) function in this depression of host resistance, we addressed the question of systemic perturbations of the MPS induced by administration of DES. A panel of objective quantitative markers which have been previously shown to identify and characterize macrophages in the several stages of development of activation was employed. DES perturbed the resident population of peritoneal macrophages by increasing their number approximately twofold and by enhancing their competence for phagocytosis, cytostasis of tumor cells, and secretion of plasminogen activator. When we examined the competence of the MPS in DES-treated mice to respond to challenge with activating stimuli, we found that DES systemically suppressed the development of macrophages, in response to either pyran copolymer or BCG, to develop tumoricidal function and to gain competence for secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates such as H2O2. Since these data suggested that DES inhibited the development of macrophages from a precursor stage (i.e., responsive macrophages) to activated macrophages in vivo, we tested this possibility directly by applying known activating signals in vitro to responsive macrophages. Responsive macrophages from DES-treated mice did not become activated in response to the application of two known potent activating signals (i.e., MAF + LPS). Taken together, the data indicate that DES systemically perturbs the MPS and does so by enhancing development of the early stages of maturation and suppressing subsequent development. PMID:3802203

  16. ROCK inhibition impedes macrophage polarity and functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yianzhu; Tejpal, Neelam; You, Junping; Li, Xian C; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play an important role in immune responses including allograft rejection and they are one of the potential targets of anti-rejection therapies in organ transplantation. Macrophage alloreactivity relies on their phenotype/polarity, motility, phagocytosis and matrix degradation, which in turn depend on proper functioning of actin cytoskeleton and its regulators, the small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effector the Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK). Several laboratories showed that administration of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 to the graft recipient inhibits chronic rejection or rodent cardiac allografts. Here we studied the effect of Y-27632 on mouse peritoneal macrophage structure, polarity and functions in in vitro assays. We show that Y-27632 inhibitor affects macrophage phenotype/polarity, phagocytosis, migration, and matrix degradation. These novel findings suggest that the impediment of macrophage structure and function via interference with the RhoA/ROCK pathway has a potential to be therapeutically effective in organ transplantation. PMID:26711331

  17. Protective and pathogenic functions of macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Wynn, Thomas A

    2011-11-01

    Macrophages are strategically located throughout the body tissues, where they ingest and process foreign materials, dead cells and debris and recruit additional macrophages in response to inflammatory signals. They are highly heterogeneous cells that can rapidly change their function in response to local microenvironmental signals. In this Review, we discuss the four stages of orderly inflammation mediated by macrophages: recruitment to tissues; differentiation and activation in situ; conversion to suppressive cells; and restoration of tissue homeostasis. We also discuss the protective and pathogenic functions of the various macrophage subsets in antimicrobial defence, antitumour immune responses, metabolism and obesity, allergy and asthma, tumorigenesis, autoimmunity, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and wound healing. Finally, we briefly discuss the characterization of macrophage heterogeneity in humans. PMID:21997792

  18. Functional alterations in macrophages after hypoxia selection.

    PubMed

    Degrossoli, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma

    2007-01-01

    Regions of low oxygen tension are common features of inflamed and infected tissues and provide physiologic selective pressure for the expansion of cells with enhanced hypoxia tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether macrophages resistant to death induced by hypoxia were accompanied by functional alterations. A mouse macrophage cell line (J774 cells) was used to obtain subpopulations of death-resistant macrophages induced by long-term exposure to severe hypoxia (<1% O(2)). The results indicated that exposing J774 macrophages to periods of severe hypoxia results in the selection of cells with phenotypes associated with the modulation of heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitric oxide (NO) production and reduced susceptibility to parasite Leishmania infection. Thus, we suggest that hypoxia-selected macrophages may influence the outcome of inflammation and infection. PMID:17202589

  19. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  20. Immunometabolism governs dendritic cell and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on intracellular metabolism in dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages provide new insights on the functioning of these critical controllers of innate and adaptive immunity. Both cell types undergo profound metabolic reprogramming in response to environmental cues, such as hypoxia or nutrient alterations, but importantly also in response to danger signals and cytokines. Metabolites such as succinate and citrate have a direct impact on the functioning of macrophages. Immunogenicity and tolerogenicity of DCs is also determined by anabolic and catabolic processes, respectively. These findings provide new prospects for therapeutic manipulation in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26694970

  1. Immunosenescence and macrophage functional plasticity: dysregulation of macrophage function by age-associated microenvironmental changes

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Robert D.; Suttles, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Summary The macrophage lineage displays extreme functional and phenotypic heterogeneity which appears to due in large part to the ability of macrophages to functionally adapt to changes in their tissue microenvironment. This functional plasticity plays a critical role in their ability to respond to tissue damage and/or infection and to contribute to clearance of damaged tissue and invading microorganisms, to contribute to recruitment of the adaptive immune system, and to contribute to resolution of the wound and of the immune response. Evidence has accumulated that environmental influences, such as stromal function and imbalances in hormones and cytokines, contribute significantly to the dysfunction of the adaptive immune system. The innate immune sytem also appears to be dysfunctional in aged animals and humans. Herein, the hypothesis is presented and discussed that the observed age-associated “dysfunction” of macrophages is the result of their functional adaptation to the age-associated changes in tissue environments. The resultant loss of orchestration of the manifold functional capabilities of macrophages would undermine the efficacy of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. If the macrophages maintain functional plasticity during this dysregulation, they would be a prime target of cytokine therapy that could enhance both innate and adaptive immune systems. PMID:15882345

  2. NMAAP1 Expressed in BCG-Activated Macrophage Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qihui; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Jing, Haifeng; Xie, Qi; Li, Peng; Li, Dong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are divided into two subpopulations: classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2). BCG (Bacilli Calmette-Guérin) activates disabled naïve macrophages to M1 macrophages, which act as inflammatory, microbicidal and tumoricidal cells through cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Various transcription factors and signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of macrophage activation and polarization. We discovered that BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) expressed a new molecule, and we named it Novel Macrophage Activated Associated Protein 1 (NMAAP1). The current study found that the overexpression of NMAAP1 in macrophages results in M1 polarization with increased expression levels of M1 genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Interleukin 12 (IL-12), Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and decreased expression of some M2 genes, such as Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), but not other M2 genes, including arginase-1 (Arg-1), Interleukin (IL-10), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1). Moreover, NMAAP1 overexpression in the RAW264.7 cell line increased cytotoxicity against MCA207 tumor cells, which depends on increased inflammatory cytokines rather than cell-cell contact. NMAAP1 also substantially enhanced the phagocytic ability of macrophages, which implies that NMAAP1 promoted macrophage adhesive and clearance activities. Our results indicate that NMAAP1 is an essential molecule that modulates macrophages phenotype and plays an important role in macrophage tumoricidal functions. PMID:26429502

  3. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology. PMID:27379093

  4. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology. PMID:27379093

  5. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  6. Jacalin-Activated Macrophages Exhibit an Antitumor Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Pereira Ruas, Luciana; Chain Veronez, Luciana; Herrero Geraldino, Thais; Rossetto de Morais, Fabiana; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have an ambiguous and complex role in the carcinogenic process, since these cells can be polarized into different phenotypes (proinflammatory, antitumor cells or anti-inflammatory, protumor cells) by the tumor microenvironment. Given that the interactions between tumor cells and TAMs involve several players, a better understanding of the function and regulation of TAMs is crucial to interfere with their differentiation in attempts to skew TAM polarization into cells with a proinflammatory antitumor phenotype. In this study, we investigated the modulation of macrophage tumoricidal activities by the lectin jacalin. Jacalin bound to macrophage surface and induced the expression and/or release of mainly proinflammatory cytokines via NF-κB signaling, as well as increased iNOS mRNA expression, suggesting that the lectin polarizes macrophages toward the antitumor phenotype. Therefore, tumoricidal activities of jacalin-stimulated macrophages were evaluated. High rates of tumor cell (human colon, HT-29, and breast, MCF-7, cells) apoptosis were observed upon incubation with supernatants from jacalin-stimulated macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that jacalin, by exerting a proinflammatory activity, can direct macrophages to an antitumor phenotype. Deep knowledge of the regulation of TAM functions is essential for the development of innovative anticancer strategies. PMID:27119077

  7. Regulation of macrophage development and function in peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, Yonit; Mortha, Arthur; Rahman, Adeeb; Merad, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are immune cells of haematopoietic origin that provide crucial innate immune defence and have tissue-specific functions in the regulation and maintenance of organ homeostasis. Recent studies of macrophage ontogeny, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic identity, have started to reveal the decisive role of the tissue stroma in the regulation of macrophage function. These findings suggest that most macrophages seed the tissues during embryonic development and functionally specialize in response to cytokines and metabolites that are released by the stroma and drive the expression of unique transcription factors. In this Review, we discuss how recent insights into macrophage ontogeny and macrophage–stroma interactions contribute to our understanding of the crosstalk that shapes macrophage function and the maintenance of organ integrity. PMID:26603899

  8. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-02-19

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for >50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and proresolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge. PMID:26892964

  9. Alterations in macrophage functions by environmental chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, D E

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of infectious diseases is rarely entirely attributed to a single entity, but instead is the result of a primary stress and one or more secondary factors that interfere with homeostasis and the ability of the host to cope with the primary etiologic assault. Any environmental chemical that can suppress the normal functioning of the host's body defenses would be expected to increase the risk of the host to such diseases. Within the lung, the alveolar macrophages are the crucial elements responsible for defending the body against such airborne viable agents. The effects of inhaled gases and particulates on these defense cells are a major concern of the environmental health scientist since such chemicals have the capability of adversely affecting the integrity and functioning of these pulmonary defense cells. The objective of this report is to provide an overview that will improve our understanding of how a variety of environmental chemicals can alter the biochemical, physiological and immunological functioning of these cells. PMID:6376106

  10. Production of type VI collagen by human macrophages: a new dimension in macrophage functional heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael; Cullen, Paul; Lorkowski, Julia; Stolle, Katrin; Robenek, Horst; Troyer, David; Rauterberg, Jürgen; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2008-04-15

    Macrophages derived from human blood monocytes perform many tasks related to tissue injury and repair. The main effect of macrophages on the extracellular matrix is considered to be destructive in nature, because macrophages secrete metalloproteinases and ingest foreign material as part of the remodeling process that occurs in wound healing and other pathological conditions. However, macrophages also contribute to the extracellular matrix and hence to tissue stabilization both indirectly, by inducing other cells to proliferate and to release matrix components, and directly, by secreting components of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin and type VIII collagen, as we have recently shown. We now report that monocytes and macrophages express virtually all known collagen and collagen-related mRNAs. Furthermore, macrophages secrete type VI collagen protein abundantly, depending upon their mode of activation, stage of differentiation, and cell density. The primary function of type VI collagen secreted by macrophages appears to be modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We suggest that the production of type VI collagen is a marker for a nondestructive, matrix-conserving macrophage phenotype that could profoundly influence physiological and pathophysiological conditions in vivo. PMID:18390756

  11. Functional characterization of the turkey macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to clone the turkey MIF (TkMIF) gene, express the active protein, and characte...

  12. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation: Origins and Functions.

    PubMed

    Decano, Julius L; Mattson, Peter C; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages influence various processes of cardiovascular inflammation. Whether they are of embryonic or post-natal hematopoietic origin, their balance in differential activation may direct the course of inflammation. Accelerated macrophage activation and accumulation through a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway may result in extensive tissue damage, adverse repair, and worsened clinical outcomes. Attenuation of such a mechanism and/or promotion of the anti-inflammatory macrophage activation may lead to early resolution of inflammation. Elucidating multiple novel mechanisms of monocyte and macrophage activation leads to a better understanding of their roles in vascular inflammation. In turn, this begets better therapeutic target identification and biomarker discovery. Combined with increasingly sensitive and specific imaging techniques, we continue to push back early detection and monitoring to provide us with a greater window for disease modification. The potential success of cytokine-targeted therapy will be solid proof of the inflammatory hypothesis of atherothrombosis. PMID:27125207

  13. Alveolar macrophage kinetics and function after interruption of canine marrow function

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, S.C.; Altman, L.C.; Kopecky, K.J.; Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.

    1982-03-01

    To study the kinetics and function of alveolar macrophages after interruption of marrow function, we performed serial bronchoalveolar lavages in dogs. The studies were performed before and after 9.0 to 9.5 Grey total body irradiation and marrow infusion. Monocytes had disappeared from the bloodstream by Day 7 after the irradiation. Alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased at Day 21. At Days 14 and 21 myeloperoxidase-positive alveolar macrophages were also significantly decreased. Beyond Day 30 the number of circulating monocytes, myeloperoxidase-positive and total alveolar macrophages had returned. Sex chromatin stains of alveolar macrophages obtained from a male dog that received female marrow indicated that the repopulating macrophages were of marrow origin. In vitro studies of alveolar macrophage migration and phagocytosis demonstrated increased activities beyond Day 30. These studies suggest that in this model the alveolar macrophage is dependent on the bone marrow for support and that the alveolar macrophage depletion may impair lung defense mechanisms.

  14. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  15. Functional modulation on macrophage by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhe; Guo, Shengnan; Hu, Xu; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Griffin, Noreen; Shan, Fengping

    2016-10-01

    Previously it was confirmed that naltrexone, a non-peptide δ-opioid receptor selective antagonist is mainly used for alcoholic dependence and opioid addiction treatment. However, there is increasing data on immune regulation of low dose naltrexone (LDN). The aim of this work was to explore the effect of LDN on the phenotype and function of macrophage. The changes of macrophage after treatment with LDN were examined using flow cytometry (FCM); FITC-dextran phagocytosis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have found that LDN enhances function of macrophage as confirmed by up-regulating MHC II molecule and CD64 on macrophage while down-regulating CD206 expression. Furthermore the productions of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, increased significantly. Macrophages in LDN treated group performed the enhanced phagocytosis. Therefore it is concluded that LDN could promote function of macrophage and this work has provided concrete data of impact on immune system by LDN. Especially the data would support interaction between CD4+T cell and macrophage in AIDS treatment with LDN in Africa (LDN has already been approved in Nigeria for the use in AIDS treatment). PMID:27561742

  16. Ginger extract inhibits LPS induced macrophage activation and function

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a dual role in host defence. They act as the first line of defence by mounting an inflammatory response to antigen exposure and also act as antigen presenting cells and initiate the adaptive immune response. They are also the primary infiltrating cells at the site of inflammation. Inhibition of macrophage activation is one of the possible approaches towards modulating inflammation. Both conventional and alternative approaches are being studied in this regard. Ginger, an herbal product with broad anti inflammatory actions, is used as an alternative medicine in a number of inflammatory conditions like rheumatic disorders. In the present study we examined the effect of ginger extract on macrophage activation in the presence of LPS stimulation. Methods Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated by LPS in presence or absence of ginger extract and production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. We also studied the effect of ginger extract on the LPS induced expression of MHC II, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 molecules. We also studied the antigen presenting function of ginger extract treated macrophages by primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results We observed that ginger extract inhibited IL-12, TNF-α, IL-1β (pro inflammatory cytokines) and RANTES, MCP-1 (pro inflammatory chemokines) production in LPS stimulated macrophages. Ginger extract also down regulated the expression of B7.1, B7.2 and MHC class II molecules. In addition ginger extract negatively affected the antigen presenting function of macrophages and we observed a significant reduction in T cell proliferation in response to allostimulation, when ginger extract treated macrophages were used as APCs. A significant decrease in IFN-γ and IL-2 production by T cells in response to allostimulation was also observed. Conclusion In conclusion ginger extract inhibits macrophage activation and APC function and indirectly inhibits T cell activation. PMID:18173849

  17. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  18. Macrophage heterogeneity in tissues: phenotypic diversity and functions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Siamon; Plüddemann, Annette; Martinez Estrada, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    During development and throughout adult life, macrophages derived from hematopoietic progenitors are seeded throughout the body, initially in the absence of inflammatory and infectious stimuli as tissue-resident cells, with enhanced recruitment, activation, and local proliferation following injury and pathologic insults. We have learned a great deal about macrophage properties ex vivo and in cell culture, but their phenotypic heterogeneity within different tissue microenvironments remains poorly characterized, although it contributes significantly to maintaining local and systemic homeostasis, pathogenesis, and possible treatment. In this review, we summarize the nature, functions, and interactions of tissue macrophage populations within their microenvironment and suggest questions for further investigation. PMID:25319326

  19. Surface plasma functionalization influences macrophage behavior on carbon nanowalls.

    PubMed

    Ion, Raluca; Vizireanu, Sorin; Stancu, Claudia Elena; Luculescu, Catalin; Cimpean, Anisoara; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-03-01

    The surfaces of carbon nanowall samples as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were treated with oxygen or nitrogen plasma to improve their wettability and to functionalize their surfaces with different functional groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results illustrated the effective conversion of the carbon nanowall surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and the incorporation of various amounts of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen functional groups during the treatments. The early inflammatory responses elicited by un-treated and modified carbon nanowall surfaces were investigated by quantifying tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha released by attached RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence studies were employed to investigate the changes in macrophage morphology and adhesive properties, while MTT assay was used to quantify cell proliferation. All samples sustained macrophage adhesion and growth. In addition, nitrogen plasma treatment was more beneficial for cell adhesion in comparison with un-modified carbon nanowall surfaces. Instead, oxygen plasma functionalization led to increased macrophage adhesion and spreading suggesting a more activated phenotype, confirmed by elevated cytokine release. Thus, our findings showed that the chemical surface alterations which occur as a result of plasma treatment, independent of surface wettability, affect macrophage response in vitro. PMID:25579904

  20. Electric fields are novel determinants of human macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Joseph I; Rajnicek, Ann M; McCaig, Colin D; Barker, Robert N; Wilson, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages are key cells in inflammation and repair, and their activity requires close regulation. The characterization of cues coordinating macrophage function has focused on biologic and soluble mediators, with little known about their responses to physical stimuli, such as the electrical fields that are generated naturally in injured tissue and which accelerate wound healing. To address this gap in understanding, we tested how properties of human monocyte-derived macrophages are regulated by applied electrical fields, similar in strengths to those established naturally. With the use of live-cell video microscopy, we show that macrophage migration is directed anodally by electrical fields as low as 5 mV/mm and is electrical field strength dependent, with effects peaking ∼300 mV/mm. Monocytes, as macrophage precursors, migrate in the opposite, cathodal direction. Strikingly, we show for the first time that electrical fields significantly enhance macrophage phagocytic uptake of a variety of targets, including carboxylate beads, apoptotic neutrophils, and the nominal opportunist pathogen Candida albicans, which engage different classes of surface receptors. These electrical field-induced functional changes are accompanied by clustering of phagocytic receptors, enhanced PI3K and ERK activation, mobilization of intracellular calcium, and actin polarization. Electrical fields also modulate cytokine production selectively and can augment some effects of conventional polarizing stimuli on cytokine secretion. Taken together, electrical signals have been identified as major contributors to the coordination and regulation of important human macrophage functions, including those essential for microbial clearance and healing. Our results open up a new area of research into effects of naturally occurring and clinically applied electrical fields in conditions where macrophage activity is critical. PMID:26718542

  1. Oleic acid may be the key contributor in the BAMLET-induced erythrocyte hemolysis and tumoricidal action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Mehboob; Dave, Sandeep; Gupta, Pawan; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A chance discovery of the tumoricidal action of a human milk fraction led to the characterization of the active component as oleic acid complex of the α-lactalbumin, which was given the acronym HAMLET. We report in this study that the oleic acid complex of bovine α-lactalbumin (BAMLET) is hemolytic to human erythrocytes as well as to those derived from some other mammals. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis suggested binding of BAMLET to erythrocytes prior to induction of hemolysis. Free OA was hemolytic albeit at higher concentrations, while sodium oleate caused hemolysis at far lower concentrations. Amiloride and BaCl2 offered protection against BAMLET-induced hemolysis suggesting the involvement of a cation leak channel in the process. BAMLET coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose was not only hemolytic but also tumoricidal to Jurkat and MCF-7 cells in culture. The Sepharose-linked preparation was however not toxic to non-cancerous peritoneal macrophages and primary adipocytes. The tumoricidal action was studied using the MTT-assay while apoptosis induction measured by the annexin V-propidium iodide assay. Repeated incubation of the immobilized BAMLET with erythrocytes depleted oleic acid and decreased the hemolytic activity of the complex. Incubation of MCF-7 and Jurkat cells with OA, soluble or immobilized BAMLET resulted in increase in the uptake of Lyso Tracker Red and Nile red by the cells. The data presented support the contention that oleic acid plays the key role, both in BAMLET-induced hemolysis and tumoricidal action. PMID:24039698

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid macrophage response to experimental cryptococcal meningitis: relationship between in vivo and in vitro measurements of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, J R; Hobbs, M M; Granger, D L; Durack, D T

    1988-01-01

    The functional abilities of macrophages from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have so far been little studied. We examined the acquisition of activation characteristics by CSF macrophages during the course of experimental cryptococcal meningitis. CSF macrophages developed the ability for increased reactive oxidative intermediate (H2O2) production and tumor and fungal cytotoxicity. Despite having been activated, CSF macrophages could not inhibit the growth of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. Immunosuppression with cyclosporine, which eliminates the natural resistance of rabbits to cryptococcal meningitis, did not prevent or diminish H2O2 production by CSF macrophages but did reduce their tumoricidal activity. Activation of CSF macrophages appears to be an integral part of the central nervous system immune response to C. neoformans in this model, but alone is insufficient to eliminate C. neoformans from the central nervous system. PMID:3346075

  3. Brain macrophages: evaluation of microglia and their functions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W E

    1992-01-01

    There is now evidence approaching, if not having already surpassed, overwhelming in support of microglial cells as macrophages. Consistent with this cellular identity, they appear to arise from monocytes in developing brain where amoeboid microglia function in removing cell death-associated debris and in regulating gliogenesis. In normal adult tissue, ramified microglial cells with down-regulated macrophage functional properties may serve a constitutive role in cleansing the extracellular fluid. Under all conditions of brain injury, microglia appear to activate and convert into active macrophages. Activated and reactive microglia participate in inflammation, removal of cellular debris and wound-healing, the latter through regulation of gliosis in scar formation and a potential contribution to neural regeneration and neovascularization. In the activated state, microglia also express MHC's and, thus, may function in antigen presentation and lymphocyte activation for CNS immune responses. As uniquely adapted tissue resident macrophages within the CNS, microglia serve a variety of functional roles over the lifespan of this tissue. These cells may therefore be involved in or contribute to some disease states; such has been indicated in multiple sclerosis and AIDS dementia complex. PMID:1638276

  4. The Ischemic Environment Drives Microglia and Macrophage Function

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Perego, Carlo; Pischiutta, Francesca; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Cells of myeloid origin, such as microglia and macrophages, act at the crossroads of several inflammatory mechanisms during pathophysiology. Besides pro-inflammatory activity (M1 polarization), myeloid cells acquire protective functions (M2) and participate in the neuroprotective innate mechanisms after brain injury. Experimental research is making considerable efforts to understand the rules that regulate the balance between toxic and protective brain innate immunity. Environmental changes affect microglia/macrophage functions. Hypoxia can affect myeloid cell distribution, activity, and phenotype. With their intrinsic differences, microglia and macrophages respond differently to hypoxia, the former depending on ATP to activate and the latter switching to anaerobic metabolism and adapting to hypoxia. Myeloid cell functions include homeostasis control, damage-sensing activity, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis, all distinctive features of these cells. Specific markers and morphologies enable to recognize each functional state. To ensure homeostasis and activate when needed, microglia/macrophage physiology is finely tuned. Microglia are controlled by several neuron-derived components, including contact-dependent inhibitory signals and soluble molecules. Changes in this control can cause chronic activation or priming with specific functional consequences. Strategies, such as stem cell treatment, may enhance microglia protective polarization. This review presents data from the literature that has greatly advanced our understanding of myeloid cell action in brain injury. We discuss the selective responses of microglia and macrophages to hypoxia after stroke and review relevant markers with the aim of defining the different subpopulations of myeloid cells that are recruited to the injured site. We also cover the functional consequences of chronically active microglia and review pivotal works on microglia regulation that offer new therapeutic possibilities for acute brain

  5. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  6. Ontogeny and functions of CNS macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Katsumoto, Atsuko; Lu, Haiyan; Miranda, Aline S.; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia, the only non-neuroepithelial cells found in the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS), originate during embryogenesis from the yolk sac and enter the CNS quite early (embryonic day 9.5-10 in mice). Thereafter, microglia are maintained independently of any input from the blood and in particular do not require hematopoietic stem cells as a source of replacement for senescent cells. Monocytes are hematopoietic cells, derived from bone marrow. The ontogeny of microglia and monocytes is important for understanding CNS pathologies. Microglial functions are distinct from those of blood-derived monocytes, which invade the CNS only under pathological conditions. Recent data reveal that microglia play an important role in managing neuronal cell death, neurogenesis and synaptic interactions. Here we discuss physiology of microglia and the functions of monocytes in CNS pathology. We address the roles of microglia and monocytes in neurodegenerative diseases as an example of CNS pathology. PMID:25193935

  7. Functional Roles of Syk in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Young-Su; Son, Young-Jin; Ryou, Chongsuk; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a series of complex biological responses to protect the host from pathogen invasion. Chronic inflammation is considered a major cause of diseases, such as various types of inflammatory/autoimmune diseases and cancers. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) was initially found to be highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and has been known to play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses. However, recent studies have reported that Syk is also involved in other biological functions, especially in innate immune responses. Although Syk has been extensively studied in adaptive immune responses, numerous studies have recently presented evidence that Syk has critical functions in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and is closely related to innate immune response. This review describes the characteristics of Syk-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes the recent findings supporting the crucial roles of Syk in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and diseases, and discusses Syk-targeted drug development for the therapy of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25045209

  8. Alternatively activated macrophages derived from monocytes and tissue macrophages are phenotypically and functionally distinct

    PubMed Central

    Gundra, Uma Mahesh; Girgis, Natasha M.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Jenkins, Stephen; Ward, Lauren N.; Kurtz, Zachary D.; Wiens, Kirsten E.; Tang, Mei San; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Allen, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages adopt an alternatively activated phenotype (AAMs) when activated by the interleukin-4receptor(R)α. AAMs can be derived either from proliferation of tissue resident macrophages or recruited inflammatory monocytes, but it is not known whether these different sources generate AAMs that are phenotypically and functionally distinct. By transcriptional profiling analysis, we show here that, although both monocyte and tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of Arg1, Chi3l3, and Retnla, only monocyte-derived AAMs up-regulated Raldh2 and PD-L2. Monocyte-derived AAMs were also CX3CR1-green fluorescent protein (GFP)high and expressed CD206, whereas tissue-derived AAMs were CX3CR1-GFP and CD206 negative. Monocyte-derived AAMs had high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and promoted the differentiation of FoxP3+ cells from naïve CD4+ cells via production of retinoic acid. In contrast, tissue-derived AAMs expressed high levels of uncoupling protein 1. Hence monocyte-derived AAM have properties associated with immune regulation, and the different physiological properties associated with AAM function may depend on the distinct lineage of these cells. PMID:24695852

  9. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  10. New insights into the multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function.

    PubMed

    Ginhoux, Florent; Schultze, Joachim L; Murray, Peter J; Ochando, Jordi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have protective roles in immunity to pathogens, tissue development, homeostasis and repair following damage. Maladaptive immunity and inflammation provoke changes in macrophage function that are causative of disease. Despite a historical wealth of knowledge about macrophages, recent advances have revealed unknown aspects of their development and function. Following development, macrophages are activated by diverse signals. Such tissue microenvironmental signals together with epigenetic changes influence macrophage development, activation and functional diversity, with consequences in disease and homeostasis. We discuss here how recent discoveries in these areas have led to a multidimensional concept of macrophage ontogeny, activation and function. In connection with this, we also discuss how technical advances facilitate a new roadmap for the isolation and analysis of macrophages at high resolution. PMID:26681460

  11. In vitro-differentiated embryonic stem cell macrophages: a model system for studying atherosclerosis-associated macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Moore, K J; Fabunmi, R P; Andersson, L P; Freeman, M W

    1998-10-01

    Monocytes/macrophages (Mo) appear to play a critical role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. In this study, we characterized in vitro-differentiated embryonic stem (ES) cell macrophages as a model system for studying atherosclerosis-associated Mo functions. Using immunofluorescence staining and Western analysis, we demonstrate that ES Mo express typical macrophage cell surface markers, as well as the known receptors for modified forms of low density lipoprotein (LDL), including the Mo scavenger receptors (SR-A type I and type II), CD36, and CD68. Differentiated ES Mo specifically bind and degrade 125I-labeled acetylated LDL with high affinity, and their incubation with acetylated LDL (15 microg/mL) for 48 hours produces characteristic "foamy" Mo, as visualized by oil red O staining. ES Mo also express matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMP-3, MMP-9), which have been implicated in collagen breakdown in the fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaques, and secrete cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6) in response to inflammatory stimuli. Transfection experiments, using a green fluorescent protein reporter gene, driven by the myeloid-specific promoter, CD11b, demonstrated that ES Mo can also be used to study macrophage-restricted gene expression in vitro. Taken together, these data demonstrate that ES Mo exhibit many properties typical of arterial lesion macrophages. Its ease of genetic manipulation makes it an attractive system for investigations of macrophage functions in vitro. PMID:9763539

  12. Recruiting specialized macrophages across the borders to restore brain functions

    PubMed Central

    Corraliza, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Although is well accepted that the central nervous system has an immune privilege protected by the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and maintained by the glia, it is also known that in homeostatic conditions, peripheral immune cells are able to penetrate to the deepest regions of brain without altering the structural integrity of the BBB. Nearly all neurological diseases, including degenerative, autoimmune or infectious ones, compromising brain functions, develop with a common pattern of inflammation in which macrophages and microglia activation have been regarded often as the “bad guys.” However, recognizing the huge heterogeneity of macrophage populations and also the different expression properties of microglia, there is increasing evidence of alternative conditions in which these cells, if primed and addressed in the correct direction, could be essential for reparative and regenerative functions. The main proposal of this review is to integrate studies about macrophage’s biology at the brain borders where the ultimate challenge is to penetrate through the BBB and contribute to change or even stop the course of disease. Thanks to the efforts made in the last century, this special wall is currently recognized as a highly regulated cooperative structure, in which their components form neurovascular units. This new scenario prompted us to review the precise cross-talk between the mind and body modes of immune response. PMID:25228859

  13. Changes in macrophage function modulated by the lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Cauvi, David M; Rivera, Isabel; Hawisher, Dennis; De Maio, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages (Mφs) play a critical role in the defense against pathogens, orchestrating the inflammatory response during injury and maintaining tissue homeostasis. During these processes, macrophages encounter a variety of environmental conditions that are likely to change their gene expression pattern, which modulates their function. In this study, we found that murine Mφs displayed two different subpopulations characterized by differences in morphologies, expression of surface markers and phagocytic capacity under non-stimulated conditions. These two subpopulations could be recapitulated by changes in the culture conditions. Thus, Mφs grown in suspension in the presence of serum were highly phagocytic, whereas subtraction of serum resulted in rapid attachment and reduced phagocytic activity. The difference in phagocytosis between these subpopulations was correlated with the expression levels of FcγR. These two cell subpopulations also differed in their responses to LPS and the expression of surface markers, including CD14, CD86, scavenger receptor A1, TLR4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor. Moreover, we found that the lipid/cholesterol content in the culture medium mediated the differences between these two cell subpopulations. Thus, we described a mechanism that modulates Mφ function depending on the exposure to lipids within their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:26951856

  14. Functional characterization of the turkey macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Myeongseon; Kim, Sungwon; Fetterer, Raymond H; Dalloul, Rami A

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to clone the turkey MIF (TkMIF) gene, express the active protein, and characterize its basic function. The full-length TkMIF gene was amplified from total RNA extracted from turkey spleen, followed by cloning into a prokaryotic (pET11a) expression vector. Sequence analysis revealed that TkMIF consists of 115 amino acids with 12.5 kDa molecular weight. Multiple sequence alignment revealed 100%, 65%, 95% and 92% identity with chicken, duck, eagle and zebra finch MIFs, respectively. Recombinant TkMIF (rTkMIF) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified through HPLC and endotoxin removal. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed an approximately 13.5 kDa of rTkMIF monomer containing T7 tag in soluble form. Western blot analysis showed that anti-chicken MIF (ChMIF) polyclonal antisera detected a monomer form of TkMIF at approximately 13.5 kDa size. Further functional analysis revealed that rTkMIF inhibits migration of both mononuclear cells and splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner, but was abolished by the addition of anti-ChMIF polyclonal antisera. qRT-PCR analysis revealed elevated transcripts of pro-inflammatory cytokines by rTkMIF in LPS-stimulated monocytes. rTkMIF also led to increased levels of IFN-γ and IL-17F transcripts in Con A-activated splenocytes, while IL-10 and IL-13 transcripts were decreased. Overall, the sequences of both the turkey and chicken MIF have high similarity and comparable biological functions with respect to migration inhibitory activities of macrophages and enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, suggesting that turkey and chicken MIFs would be biologically cross-reactive. PMID:27062968

  15. Macrophage reprogramming: influence of latex beads with various functional groups on macrophage phenotype and phagocytic uptake in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akilbekova, Dana; Philiph, Rachel; Graham, Austin; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in initiating immune responses with various functions ranging from wound healing to antimicrobial actions. The type of biomaterial is suggested to influence macrophage phenotype. Here, we show that exposing M1- and M2-activated macrophages to polystyrene latex beads bearing different functional groups can alter secretion profiles, providing a possible method for altering the course of the host response. Macrophages were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide or interleukin (IL) 4 and cultured for 24 h with 10 different latex beads. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and nitrite served as markers for the M1 phenotype and proangiogenic cytokine (IL-10) and arginase activity for M2 cells. The ability of the macrophages to phagocytize Escherichia coli particles and water contact angles of the polymers were also assessed. Different patterns of cytokine expression and phagocytosis activity were induced by the various particles. Particles did not polarize the cells toward one specific phenotype versus another, but rather induced changes in both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest a dependence of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activities on material type and cytokine stimuli. These data also illustrate how biomaterials can be exploited to alter host responses for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. PMID:24639060

  16. Tissue-Specific Signals Control Reversible Program of Localization and Functional Polarization of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tissue-resident macrophages are highly heterogeneous in terms of their functions and phenotypes as a consequence of adaptation to different tissue environments. Local tissue-derived signals are thought to control functional polarization of resident macrophages; however, the identity of these signals remains largely unknown. It is also unknown whether functional heterogeneity is a result of irreversible lineage-specific differentiation or a consequence of continuous but reversible induction of diverse functional programs. Here, we identified retinoic acid as a signal that induces tissue-specific localization and functional polarization of peritoneal macrophages through the reversible induction of transcription factor GATA6. We further found that GATA6 in macrophages regulates gut IgA production through peritoneal B-1 cells. These results provide insight into the regulation of tissue-resident macrophage functional specialization by tissue-derived signals. PMID:24792964

  17. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W.; Abraham, Nader G.; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2−/− and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2−/− mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2−/− macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2−/− mice. These findings indicate that HO-2–deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2−/− cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.—Bellner, L., Marrazzo, G., van Rooijen, N., Dunn, M. W., Abraham, N. G., Schwartzman, M. L. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing. PMID:25342128

  18. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, A. T. Y.; Hale, C.; Xia, J.; Tate, P. H.; Goulding, D.; Keane, J. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Forrester, L.; Billker, O.; Skarnes, W. C.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Dougan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection. PMID:25752829

  19. From Monocytes to M1/M2 Macrophages: Phenotypical vs. Functional Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Studies on monocyte and macrophage biology and differentiation have revealed the pleiotropic activities of these cells. Macrophages are tissue sentinels that maintain tissue integrity by eliminating/repairing damaged cells and matrices. In this M2-like mode, they can also promote tumor growth. Conversely, M1-like macrophages are key effector cells for the elimination of pathogens, virally infected, and cancer cells. Macrophage differentiation from monocytes occurs in the tissue in concomitance with the acquisition of a functional phenotype that depends on microenvironmental signals, thereby accounting for the many and apparently opposed macrophage functions. Many questions arise. When monocytes differentiate into macrophages in a tissue (concomitantly adopting a specific functional program, M1 or M2), do they all die during the inflammatory reaction, or do some of them survive? Do those that survive become quiescent tissue macrophages, able to react as naïve cells to a new challenge? Or, do monocyte-derived tissue macrophages conserve a “memory” of their past inflammatory activation? This review will address some of these important questions under the general framework of the role of monocytes and macrophages in the initiation, development, resolution, and chronicization of inflammation. PMID:25368618

  20. Transducin-like enhancer of split-1 is expressed and functional in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Federica; Copin, Corinne; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Vinod, Manjula; Zawadzki, Christophe; Susen, Sophie; Pattou, François; Haulon, Stéphan; Staels, Bart; Eeckhoute, Jérome; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages display heterogeneous phenotypes, including the classical M1 proinflammatory and the alternative M2 anti-inflammatory polarization states. The transducin-like enhancer of split-1 (TLE1) is a transcriptional corepressor whose functions in macrophages have not been studied yet. We report that TLE1 is highly expressed in human alternative macrophages in vitro and in atherosclerotic plaques as well as in adipose tissue M1/M2 mixed macrophages. TLE1 silencing in alternative macrophages decreases the expression of the M2 markers IL-1Ra and IL-10, while it exacerbates TNFα and CCL3 induction by lipopolysaccharide. Hence, TLE1 is expressed in human macrophages where it has potential anti-inflammatory and alternative phenotype promoting properties. PMID:26763127

  1. Macrophage functions are regulated by the substratum of murine decidual stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Redline, R W; McKay, D B; Vazquez, M A; Papaioannou, V E; Lu, C Y

    1990-01-01

    Because of their paternal antigens, the fetus and placenta may be considered an allograft in the maternal host. Local properties of the maternal-fetal interface, the placenta and decidua basalis, are important in preventing maternal immunologic rejection of the fetoplacental allograft. However, the exact nature of these local properties remains a fundamental unsolved problem in immunology. We now report that three macrophage functions were inhibited by the substratum formed by monolayers of decidual stromal cells via a novel pathway. Solid-phase inhibitors blocked macrophage adhesion, spreading, and lysis of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-resistant P815 mastocytoma tumor cells. Inhibition was not solely attributable to an inability of macrophages to adhere to decidual substratum because there were differences in macrophage functions on this surface versus polyhema where no adherence occurred. Because macrophages play a central role in cell-mediated immunity, including allograft rejection, inhibiting their function in the decidua basalis may help prevent maternal antifetal responses. Images PMID:2347918

  2. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  3. Microbial metabolite butyrate facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and function.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Shu, Dingming; Zheng, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Luo, Chenglong; Wang, Yan; Guo, Fuyou; Zou, Xian; Lv, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites from intestinal microbes modulate the mucosal immune system by regulating the polarization and expansion of T cells. Whether the microbial metabolites influence macrophage polarization, however, is poorly understood. Here, we show that the large bowel microbial fermentation product, butyrate, facilitates M2 macrophage polarization, in vitro and in vivo. The supernatant from butyrate-treated M2 macrophage increased the migration and enhanced the wound closure rate of MLE-12 cells. Butyrate attenuated intestinal inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, with a significant increase in colonic expression of the M2 macrophage-associated protein, Arg1. M2 macrophage treated with butyrate, had increased activation of the H3K9/STAT6 signaling pathway, suggesting a mechanism for butyrate facilitated M2 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our study indicated that commensal microbe-derived butyrate is a novel activator of STAT6-mediated transcription through H3K9 acetylation driving M2 macrophage polarization, and delineated new insights into the immune interplay underlying inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27094081

  4. The regulatory peptide pidotimod facilitates M2 macrophage polarization and its function.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenglan; Fu, Xudong; Fu, Aikun; Du, Wei; Ji, Jian; Li, Weifen

    2014-05-01

    Pidotimod is a synthetic dipeptide with biological and immunological activity in innate immune responses. It has been reported that pidotimod could promote functional maturation of dendritic cells, but little is known about the regulation of macrophages. Recent studies have demonstrated that M1 or M2 polarized macrophages are of great importance for responses to microorganism infection or host mediators. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of pidotimod on mouse bone marrow-derived macrophage polarization and its function. The results showed that pidotimod had no influence on M1-polarized macrophage. While interestingly, a significant increase of M2 marker gene expression (Arg1, Fizz1, Ym1, MR) was observed (p < 0.01) in IL-4-induced M2 macrophage treated with pidotimod. In addition, cell surface expression of mannose receptor was dramatically enhanced using fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Furthermore, the function of M2 macrophage was also determinated. The results showed that the supernatant of pidotimod-treated M2 macrophage could increase the migration (p < 0.05) and enhance the wound closure rate (p < 0.05) of MLE-12 cells. Collectively, it could be concluded that pidotimod significantly facilitated IL-4-induced M2 macrophage polarization and improves its function. PMID:24481486

  5. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Avian Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble factor produced by sensitized T lymphocytes and inhibits the random migration of macrophages. Recent studies have revealed a more prominent role for MIF as a multi-functional cytokine mediating both innate and adaptive immune r...

  6. Lipids as Tumoricidal Components of Human α-Lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumor Cells (HAMLET)

    PubMed Central

    Ho, James C. S.; Storm, Petter; Rydström, Anna; Bowen, Ben; Alsin, Fredrik; Sullivan, Louise; Ambite, Inès; Mok, K. H.; Northen, Trent; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids are internalized by receptor-mediated mechanisms or receptor-independent diffusion across cytoplasmic membranes and are utilized as nutrients, building blocks, and signaling intermediates. Here we describe how the association of long-chain fatty acids to a partially unfolded, extracellular protein can alter the presentation to target cells and cellular effects. HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of partially unfolded α-lactalbumin and oleic acid (OA). As OA lacks independent tumoricidal activity at concentrations equimolar to HAMLET, the contribution of the lipid has been debated. We show by natural abundance 13C NMR that the lipid in HAMLET is deprotonated and by chromatography that oleate rather than oleic acid is the relevant HAMLET constituent. Compared with HAMLET, oleate (175 μm) showed weak effects on ion fluxes and gene expression. Unlike HAMLET, which causes metabolic paralysis, fatty acid metabolites were less strongly altered. The functional overlap increased with higher oleate concentrations (500 μm). Cellular responses to OA were weak or absent, suggesting that deprotonation favors cellular interactions of fatty acids. Fatty acids may thus exert some of their essential effects on host cells when in the deprotonated state and when presented in the context of a partially unfolded protein. PMID:23629662

  7. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  8. Acute heart inflammation: ultrastructural and functional aspects of macrophages elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The heart is the main target organ of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. During the acute disease, tissue damage in the heart is related to the intense myocardium parasitism. To control parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. In response to inflammatory and immune stimulation, an intense migration and extravasation of monocytes occurs from the bloodstream into heart. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of tissue phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defence. Newly elicited monocyte-derived macrophages both undergo profound physiological changes and display morphological heterogeneity that greatly differs from originally non-inflammatory macrophages, and underlie their functional activities as potent inflammatory cells. Thus, activated macrophages play a critical role in the outcome of parasite infection. This review covers functional and ultrastructural aspects of heart inflammatory macrophages triggered by the acute Chagas' disease, including recent discoveries on morphologically distinct, inflammation-related organelles, termed lipid bodies, which are actively formed in vivo within macrophages in response to T. cruzi infection. These findings are defining a broader role for lipid bodies as key markers of macrophage activation during innate immune responses to infectious diseases and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. Modulation of macrophage activation may be central in providing therapeutic benefits for Chagas' disease control. PMID:18624767

  9. Expression and preliminary functional analysis of Siglec-F on mouse macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yin-he; Mao, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin (Siglec)-F is a mouse functional paralog of human Siglec-8 that induces apoptosis in human eosinophils, and therefore may be useful as the basis of treatments for a variety of disorders associated with eosinophil hyperactivity, such as asthma. The expression pattern and functions of this protein in various cell types remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of Siglec-F on mouse macrophages by immunocytochemical staining, and also to investigate the effects of Siglec-F engagement by a Siglec-F antibody on phagocytic activity of macrophages. The results showed that Siglec-F expression was detected on mouse alveolar macrophages, but not on peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, Siglec-F engagement did not affect the phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages in the resting state or in the activated state following stimulation by the proinflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Siglec-F expression on alveolar macrophages may be a result of adaptation. Macrophages actively regulate immune responses via production of cytokines. Therefore, further investigation of the effects of Siglec-F engagement on immune mediators or cytokines released by alveolar macrophages is required. PMID:22556177

  10. Effects of acute radon progeny exposure on rat alveolar macrophage number and function

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.F.; Newton, G.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    Alveolar macrophages play a key role in removal and translocation of inhaled particles and have been shown to influence proliferation of Alveolar Type II cells and fibroblasts. The effect of radon progeny on alveolar macrophage number and function is not documented. Functional impairment of alveolar macrophages may be an ancillary event in the induction of pulmonary lesions and may also indicate dose to the peripheral lung. In our study, rats were exposed to 1000 working level months (WLM) of radon progeny over a 3- to 5-h period, with a vector aerosol of environmental tobacco smoke. Groups of animals were sacrificed, and the lungs were lavaged immediately after exposure and on days 2, 18, 16, 21 and 29 after exposure. The numbers and viabilities of the lavaged macrophages were determined. Cytological preparations were made to determine the number of binucleated/multinucleated macrophages and macrophages containing micronuclei. The DNA content was measured flow-cytometrically using Hoechst 33342, and phagocytosis was assayed by determining the uptake of fluorescent microspheres. The numbers and viabilities of macrophages recovered from exposed animals were similar to the values measured for control animals. There was no evidence of an inflammatory reaction during any period after radon progeny exposure. Nuclear atypia, evidenced by increases in the number of binucleated cells and cells with micronuclei, occurred in animals 8 days after exposure, and this response peaked at 21 days after exposure. The phagocytic capability of the alveolar macrophages was not significantly affected at any time point after exposure. These results show that there was little functional impairment of alveolar macrophages in rats after acute radon-progeny exposure; however, there was long-standing interference with cell division, resulting in binucleated and micronucleated macrophages.

  11. Immunomodulatory Impact of Leishmania-Induced Macrophage Exosomes: A Comparative Proteomic and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Kasra; Olivier, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Released by many eukaryotic cells, the exosomes are 40–100 nm vesicles shown to operate over the complex processes of cell-cell communication. Among the metazoan cell lineages known to generate exosomes is the mononuclear phagocyte lineage, a lineage that parasites such as Leishmania are known to subvert as host cells. We previously reported that mouse macrophage signaling and functions are modified once co-incubated with exoproteome of Leishmania promastigotes. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we were curious to further compare the content of purified exosomes released by the J774 mouse macrophage cell line exposed or not to either LPS or to stationary phase Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Collectively, our analyses resulted in detection of 248 proteins, ∼50–80% of which were shared among the three sources studied. Using exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) and network analyses, we found that the macrophage exosomes display unique signatures with respect to composition and abundance of many functional groups of proteins, such as plasma membrane-associated proteins, chaperones and metabolic enzymes. Moreover, for the first time, L. mexicana surface protease GP63 is shown to be present in exosomes released from J774 macrophages exposed to stationary phase promastigotes. We observed that macrophage exosomes are able to induce signaling molecules and transcription factors in naive macrophages. Finally, using qRT-PCR, we monitored modulation of expression of multiple immune-related genes within macrophages exposed to exosomes. We found all three groups of exosomes to induce expression of immune-related genes, the ones collected from macrophages exposed to L. mexicana sharing properties with exosomes collected from macrophage left unexposed to any agonist. Overall, our results allowed depicting that protein sorting into macrophage-derived exosomes depends upon the cell status and how such distinct protein sorting can in turn impact the

  12. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. II. Peritoneal macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Rama Rao, G.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acute exposure to hamsters to microwave energy (2.45 GHz; 25 mW/cm2 for 60 min) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages that were significantly more viricidal to vaccinia virus as compared to sham-exposed or normal (minimum-handling) controls. Macrophages from microwave-exposed hamsters became activated as early as 6 h after exposure and remained activated for up to 12 days. The activation of macrophages by microwave exposure paralleled the macrophage activation after vaccinia virus immunization. Activated macrophages from vaccinia-immunized hamsters did not differ in their viricidal activity when the hamsters were microwave- or sham-exposed. Exposure for 60 min at 15 mW/cm2 did not activate the macrophages while 40 mW/cm2 exposure was harmful to some hamsters. Average maximum core temperatures in the exposed (25 mW/cm2) and sham groups were 40.5 degrees C (+/- 0.35 SD) and 38.4 degrees C (+/- 0.5 SD), respectively. In vitro heating of macrophages to 40.5 degrees C was not as effective as in vivo microwave exposure in activating macrophages to the viricidal state. Macrophages from normal, sham-exposed, and microwave-exposed hamsters were not morphologically different, and they all phagocytosed India ink particles. Moreover, immune macrophage cytotoxicity for virus-infected or noninfected target cells was not suppressed in the microwave-irradiated group (25 mW/cm2, 1 h) as compared to sham-exposed controls, indicating that peritoneal macrophages were not functionally suppressed or injured by microwave hyperthermia.

  13. Inhibition of immunological function mediated DNA damage of alveolar macrophages caused by cigarette smoke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takahiro; Hirono, Yuriko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Hutei, Yoshimi; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Ikuyo; Pinkerton, Kent E; Takeuchi, Minoru

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke impairs the pulmonary immune system, including alveolar macrophage function, although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully elucidated. This study investigates the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages, which is required for antigen-specific response to T cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 days using a Hamburg II smoking machine, and alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. The antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages was significantly inhibited in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. Major histocompatibility complex class II cell surface molecule-positive cells, B7-1 molecule-positive cells, and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression in alveolar macrophages were significantly decreased in mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with mice not exposed to cigarette smoke. In contrast, DNA damage and generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in alveolar macrophages were significantly increased by cigarette smoke exposure. These results suggest that inhibition of the antigen-presenting activity of alveolar macrophages may result from decreased expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and B7-1 molecules and interleukin-1beta messenger RNA gene expression following cigarette smoke exposure. Furthermore, inhibition of antigen presentation in alveolar macrophage may result from DNA damage induced by excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species being generated by alveolar macrophages following cigarette smoke exposure. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke impairs the immunological function of alveolar macrophages and, as a result, increases the risk for pulmonary infection. PMID:19922407

  14. The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a discriminator of macrophage function in the inflamed lung

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas J; Fujino, Naoya; Cook, Peter C; Svedberg, Freya R; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maciewicz, Rose A; Singh, Dave; Hussell, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Much of the biology surrounding macrophage functional specificity has arisen through examining inflammation-induced polarising signals, but this also occurs in homeostasis, requiring tissue-specific environmental triggers that influence macrophage phenotype and function. The TAM receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) mediates the non-inflammatory removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes through the bridging phosphatidylserine-binding molecules Gas6 or Protein S. We show that one such TAM receptor (Axl) is exclusively expressed on mouse airway macrophages, but not interstitial macrophages and other lung leukocytes, under homeostatic conditions and is constitutively ligated to Gas6. Axl expression is potently induced by GM-CSF expressed in the healthy and inflamed airway, and by type I interferon or TLR3 stimulation on human and mouse macrophages, indicating potential involvement of Axl in apoptotic cell removal under inflammatory conditions. Indeed, an absence of Axl does not cause sterile inflammation in health, but leads to exaggerated lung inflammatory disease upon influenza infection. These data imply that Axl allows specific identification of airway macrophages, and that its expression is critical for macrophage functional compartmentalisation in the airspaces or lung interstitium. We propose that this may be a critical feature to prevent excessive inflammation due to secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells that have not been cleared by efferocytosis. PMID:25603826

  15. Regulation of Macrophage, Dendritic Cell, and Microglial Phenotype and Function by the SOCS Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sarah M.; Heller, Nicola M.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells of dynamic phenotype that rapidly respond to external stimuli in the microenvironment by altering their phenotype to respond to and to direct the immune response. The ability to dynamically change phenotype must be carefully regulated to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses and subsequently to promote resolution of inflammation. The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins play a key role in regulating macrophage phenotype. In this review, we summarize research to date from mouse and human studies on the role of the SOCS proteins in determining the phenotype and function of macrophages. We will also touch on the influence of the SOCS on dendritic cell (DC) and microglial phenotype and function. The molecular mechanisms of SOCS function in macrophages and DCs are discussed, along with how dysregulation of SOCS expression or function can lead to alterations in macrophage/DC/microglial phenotype and function and to disease. Regulation of SOCS expression by microRNA is discussed. Novel therapies and unanswered questions with regard to SOCS regulation of monocyte–macrophage phenotype and function are highlighted. PMID:26579124

  16. Phenotypic, functional, and plasticity features of classical and alternatively activated human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Abdullah A; Logan, Jayden; Thomas, Emma; Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter D; Fantino, Emmanuelle

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are dynamic cells that mature under the influence of signals from the local microenvironment into either classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated macrophages with specific functional and phenotypic properties. Although the phenotypic identification of M1 and M2 macrophages is well established in mice, this is less clear for human macrophages. In addition, the persistence and reversibility of polarized human phenotypes is not well established. Human peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated into uncommitted macrophages (M0) and then polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes using LPS/IFN-γ and IL-4/IL-13, respectively. M1 and M2 were identified as CD64(+)CD80(+) and CD11b(+)CD209(+), respectively, by flow cytometry. Polarized M1 cells secreted IP-10, IFN-γ, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANTES, whereas M2 cells secreted IL-13, CCL17, and CCL18. Functionally, M2 cells were highly endocytic. In cytokine-deficient medium, the polarized macrophages reverted back to the M0 state within 12 days. If previously polarized macrophages were given the alternative polarizing stimulus after 6 days of resting in cytokine-deficient medium, a switch in polarization was seen (i.e., M1 macrophages switched to M2 and expressed CD11b(+)CD209(+) and vice versa). In summary, we report phenotypic identification of human M1 and M2 macrophages, their functional characteristics, and their ability to be reprogrammed given the appropriate stimuli. PMID:25870903

  17. Functional Relationship between Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor as Contributors to Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Laoui, Damya; Van Overmeire, Eva; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Raes, Geert

    2014-01-01

    The current review article describes the functional relationship between tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) as key cellular contributors to cancer malignancy on the one hand and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) as an important molecular contributor on the other. We recapitulate the available data on expression of M-CSF and the M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) in human tumor tissue as constituents of a stromal macrophage signature and on the limits of the predictive and prognostic value of plasma M-CSF levels. After providing an update on current insights into the nature of TAM heterogeneity at the level of M1/M2 phenotype and TAM subsets, we give an overview of experimental evidence, based on genetic, antibody-mediated, and pharmacological disruption of M-CSF/M-CSFR signaling, for the extent to which M-CSFR signaling can not only determine the TAM quantity, but can also contribute to shaping the phenotype and heterogeneity of TAM and other related tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIM). Finally, we review the accumulating information on the – sometimes conflicting – effects blocking M-CSFR signaling may have on various aspects of cancer progression such as tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to therapy and we thereby discuss in how far these different effects actually reflect a contribution of TAM. PMID:25339957

  18. PSGL-1 and mTOR regulate translation of ROCK-1 and physiological functions of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Richard; Nhan, Thomas Q; Law, G Lynn; Morris, David R; Liles, W Conrad; Schwartz, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) are critical molecules involved in the physiological functions of macrophages, such as chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We demonstrate that macrophage adherence promotes rapid changes in physiological functions that depend on translational upregulation of preformed ROCK-1 mRNA, but not ROCK-2 mRNA. Before adherence, both ROCK mRNAs were present in the cytoplasm of macrophages, whereas ROCK proteins were undetectable. Macrophage adherence promoted signaling through P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)/Akt/mTOR that resulted in synthesis of ROCK-1, but not ROCK-2. Following synthesis, ROCK-1 was catalytically active. In addition, there was a rapamycin/sirolimus-sensitive enhanced loading of ribosomes on preformed ROCK-1 mRNAs. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin abolished ROCK-1 synthesis in macrophages resulting in an inhibition of chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Macrophages from PSGL-1-deficient mice recapitulated pharmacological inhibitor studies. These results indicate that receptor-mediated regulation at the level of translation is a component of a rapid set of mechanisms required to direct the macrophage phenotype upon adherence and suggest a mechanism for the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of rapamycin/sirolimus. PMID:17245434

  19. The human alveolar macrophage: isolation, cultivation in vitro, and studies of morphologic and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A B; Cline, M J

    1971-07-01

    Human alveolar macrophages were lavaged from surgically resected lungs and from lungs of normal subjects. Macrophages that had been purified by glass adherence were maintained in tissue culture for as long as 54 days. After 3-4 wk in vitro they underwent transformation into multinucleated giant cells. These aged cells had more than 30 times the phagocytic capacity that the same group of cells had had after 1 day in vitro. Phagocytosis of heat-killed Candida albicans was inhibited by iodoacetate, sodium fluoride, potassium cyanide, and low partial pressures of oxygen, suggesting that these cells require both oxidative and glycolytic energy sources for maximal particle ingestion. Alveolar macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages killed Listeria monocytogenes with similar efficiency, but neutrophils were more efficient than either of the other cell types. Bacterial killing is probably not dependent upon myeloperoxidase in the monocyte-derived macrophage or in the alveolar macrophage since histochemical stains for peroxidase do not stain either cell type. C. albicans blastospores, which are killed by neutrophils and monocytes that contain myeloperoxidase, were not killed by human alveolar macrophages during the 4 hr of observation. Large cells with supernormal phagocytic capacity were recovered from patients with postobstructive pheumonia and from one patient with recurrent bacterial pneumonia, indicating that macrophage function can be altered in certain disease states. Human alveolar macrophages are unique human phagocytes in their dependence on an oxygen tension greater than 25 mm HG for maximal phagocytosis. Carbon dioxide tensions as high as 70 mm Hg did not alter phagocytosis when the pH of the medium was held constant. These data suggest that the increased susceptibility to pneumonia of patients with chronic bronchitis or atelectasis may be in part related to suboptimal phagocytosis by macrophages in areas of the lung with depressed oxygen tension. PMID

  20. Identifying functional microRNAs in macrophages with polarized phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Graff, Joel W; Dickson, Anne M; Clay, Gwendolyn; McCaffrey, Anton P; Wilson, Mary E

    2012-06-22

    Macrophages respond to external stimuli with rapid changes in expression of many genes. Different combinations of external stimuli lead to distinct polarized activation patterns, resulting in a spectrum of possible macrophage activation phenotypes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that can repress the expression of many target genes. We hypothesized that miRNAs play a role in macrophage polarization. miRNA expression profiles were determined in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M1, M2a, M2b, or M2c phenotypes. One miRNA guide strand and seven miRNA passenger strands were significantly altered. Changes were confirmed in MDMs from six separate donors. The amplitude of miRNA expression changes in MDMs was smaller than described studies of monocytes responding to inflammatory stimuli. Further investigation revealed this correlated with higher basal miRNA expression in MDMs compared with monocytes. The regulation of M1- and M2b-responsive miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-125a, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-222) was similar in differentiated THP-1 cells and primary MDMs. Studies in this model revealed cross-talk between IFNγ- and LPS-associated pathways regulating miRNA expression. Furthermore, expression of M1-associated transcripts was increased in THP-1 cells transfected with mimics of miR-29b, miR-125a-5p, or miR-155. The apparent inflammatory property of miR-29b and miR-125a-5p can be at least partially explained by repression of TNFAIP3, a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling. Overall, these data suggest miRNAs can contribute to changes in macrophage gene expression that occur in different exogenous activating conditions. PMID:22549785

  1. Effects of acidic mixtures on pulmonary macrophage functions: A pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phalen, R.F.; Kikkawa, Y.; Nadziejko, C.; Kleinman, M.T.

    1992-02-01

    Fischer 344 rats were examined for effects of inhaled nitric acid and ozone on macrophage cell function, to evaluate new endpoints for future acid inhalation studies. Pulmonary macrophage respiratory burst activity, production of arachidonic acid metabolites (leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4) by macrophages, and lavage fluid elastase inhibitory capacity were found to be affected by in vivo exposure to nitric acid vapor, alone or in combination with ozone. These results have implications with respect to the development of lung infections, asthma, and emphysema.

  2. The Impaired Function of Macrophages Induced by Strenuous Exercise Could Not Be Ameliorated by BCAA Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Linlin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on the functions of peritoneal macrophages in rats and to test the hypothesis that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation will be beneficial to the macrophages of rats from strenuous exercise. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: (C) Control, E) Exercise, (E1) Exercise with one week to recover, (ES) Exercise + Supplementation and (ES1) Exercise + Supplementation with 1 week to recover. All rats except those of the sedentary control were subjected to four weeks of strenuous exercise. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone and BCAA levels were tested. Peritoneal macrophages functions were also determined at the same time. The data showed that hemoglobin, testosterone, BCAA levels, and body weight in group E decreased significantly as compared with that of group C. Meanwhile, phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 17.07%, p = 0.031), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (decreased by 26%, p = 0.003) and MHC II mRNA (decreased by 22%, p = 0.041) of macrophages decreased in the strenuous exercise group as compared with group C. However, the chemotaxis of macrophages did not change significantly. In addition, BCAA supplementation could slightly increase the serum BCAA levels of rats from strenuous exercise (increased by 6.70%, p > 0.05). Moreover, the body weight, the blood hemoglobin, the serum testosterone and the function of peritoneal macrophages in group ES did not change significantly as compared with group E. These results suggest that long-term intensive exercise impairs the function of macrophages, which is essential for microbicidal capability. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunosuppression induced by strenuous exercise. Moreover, the impaired function of macrophage induced by strenuous exercise could not be ameliorated by BCAA supplementation in the dosing and timing used for this study. PMID:26506374

  3. The Impaired Function of Macrophages Induced by Strenuous Exercise Could Not Be Ameliorated by BCAA Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Linlin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of strenuous exercise on the functions of peritoneal macrophages in rats and to test the hypothesis that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation will be beneficial to the macrophages of rats from strenuous exercise. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: (C) Control, E) Exercise, (E1) Exercise with one week to recover, (ES) Exercise + Supplementation and (ES1) Exercise + Supplementation with 1 week to recover. All rats except those of the sedentary control were subjected to four weeks of strenuous exercise. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone and BCAA levels were tested. Peritoneal macrophages functions were also determined at the same time. The data showed that hemoglobin, testosterone, BCAA levels, and body weight in group E decreased significantly as compared with that of group C. Meanwhile, phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 17.07%, p = 0.031), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (decreased by 26%, p = 0.003) and MHC II mRNA (decreased by 22%, p = 0.041) of macrophages decreased in the strenuous exercise group as compared with group C. However, the chemotaxis of macrophages did not change significantly. In addition, BCAA supplementation could slightly increase the serum BCAA levels of rats from strenuous exercise (increased by 6.70%, p > 0.05). Moreover, the body weight, the blood hemoglobin, the serum testosterone and the function of peritoneal macrophages in group ES did not change significantly as compared with group E. These results suggest that long-term intensive exercise impairs the function of macrophages, which is essential for microbicidal capability. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunosuppression induced by strenuous exercise. Moreover, the impaired function of macrophage induced by strenuous exercise could not be ameliorated by BCAA supplementation in the dosing and timing used for this study. PMID:26506374

  4. Macrophages in spinal cord injury: phenotypic and functional change from exposure to myelin debris

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Cao, Kai; Sun, Xin; Chen, Yongxiong; Duan, Zhaoxia; Sun, Li; Guo, Lei; Bai, Paul; Sun, Dongming; Fan, Jianqing; He, Xijing; Young, Wise; Ren, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation and persistent inflammation contribute to the pathological process of spinal cord injury (SCI). It was reported that M2 macrophages were induced at 3–7 days after SCI but M2 markers were reduced or eliminated after 1 week. By contrast, M1 macrophage response is rapidly induced and then maintained at injured spinal cord. However, factors that modulate macrophage phenotype and function are poorly understood. We developed a model to distinguished bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) from residential microglia and explored how BMDMs change their phenotype and functions in response to the lesion-related factors in injured spinal cord. Infiltrating BMDMs expressing higher Mac-2 and lower CX3CR1 migrate to the epicenter of injury, while microglia expressing lower Mac-2 but higher CX3CR1 distribute to the edges of lesion. Myelin debris at the lesion site switches BMDMs from M2 phenotype towards M1-like phenotype. Myelin debris activate ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) for cholesterol efflux in response to myelin debris loading in vitro. However, this homeostatic mechanism in injured site is overwhelmed, leading to the development of foamy macrophages and lipid plaque in the lesion site. The persistence of these cells indicates a pro-inflammatory environment, associated with enhanced neurotoxicity and impaired wound healing. These foamy macrophages have poor capacity to phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils resulting in uningested neutrophils releasing their toxic contents and further tissue damage. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time that myelin debris generated in injured spinal cord modulates macrophage activation. Lipid accumulation following macrophage phenotype switch contributes to SCI pathology. PMID:25452166

  5. Macrophage functions measured by magnetic microparticles in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Winfried; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Kohlhäufl, Martin; Häussinger, Karl; Heyder, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse ferrimagnetic iron-oxide particles of 1.4 μm geometric diameter were used to study alveolar macrophage functions (phagocytosis, phagosome transport) and cytoskeletal integrity in healthy subjects and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in cultured macrophages. Dysfunctions in phagocytosis, in phagosome transport and cytoskeletal integrity correlated with an impaired alveolar clearance and could be induced in vitro by cytoskeletal drugs.

  6. Splenic Macrophage Subsets and Their Function during Blood-Borne Infections

    PubMed Central

    Borges da Silva, Henrique; Fonseca, Raíssa; Pereira, Rosana Moreira; Cassado, Alexandra dos Anjos; Álvarez, José Maria; D’Império Lima, Maria Regina

    2015-01-01

    The spleen is one of the major immunological sites for maintaining blood homeostasis. Previous studies showed that heterogeneous splenic macrophage populations contribute in complimentary ways to control blood-borne infections and induce effective immune responses. Marginal metallophilic macrophages (MMMΦs) and marginal zone macrophages (MZMΦs) are cells with great ability to internalize blood-borne pathogens such as virus or bacteria. Their localization adjacent to T- and B-cell-rich splenic areas favors the rapid contact between these macrophages and cells from adaptive immunity. Indeed, MMMΦs and MZMΦs are considered important bridges between innate and adaptive immunity. Although red pulp macrophages (RpMΦs) are mainly considered scavengers for senescent erythrocytes, several data indicate a role for RpMΦs in control of infections such as blood-stage malaria as well as in the induction of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review current data on how different macrophage subsets recognize and help eliminate blood-borne pathogens, and, in turn, how the inflammatory microenvironment in different phases of infection (acute, chronic, and after pathogen clearance) influences macrophage function and survival. PMID:26441984

  7. Suppression of macrophage functions impairs skeletal muscle regeneration with severe fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Segawa, Masashi; Fukada, So-ichiro Yamamoto, Yukiko; Yahagi, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masanori; Sato, Masaki; Ito, Takahito; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Hayashi, Shin'ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-10-15

    When damaged, skeletal muscle regenerates. In the early phases of regeneration, inflammatory cells such as neutrophils/granulocytes and macrophages infiltrate damaged muscle tissue. To reveal the roles of macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration, we injected an antibody, AFS98 that blocks the binding of M-CSF to its receptor into normal mice that received muscle damages. Anti-M-CSF receptor administration suppressed macrophage but not neutrophil infiltration. Histological study indicated that suppression of macrophages function leads to the incomplete muscle regeneration. In addition FACS and immunohistochemical study showed that the acute lack of macrophages delayed proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells in vivo. Furthermore, mice injected with the anti-M-CSF receptor antibody exhibited not only adipogenesis, but also significant collagen deposition, i.e., fibrosis and continuous high expression of connective tissue growth factor. Finally we indicate that these fibrosis markers were strongly enriched in CD90(+) cells that do not include myogenic cells. These results indicate that macrophages directly affect satellite cell proliferation and that a macrophage deficiency severely impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and causes fibrosis.

  8. Deletion of CGI-58 or adipose triglyceride lipase differently affects macrophage function and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Goeritzer, Madeleine; Schlager, Stefanie; Radovic, Branislav; Madreiter, Corina T.; Rainer, Silvia; Thomas, Gwynneth; Lord, Caleb C.; Sacks, Jessica; Brown, Amanda L.; Vujic, Nemanja; Obrowsky, Sascha; Sachdev, Vinay; Kolb, Dagmar; Chandak, Prakash G.; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Sattler, Wolfgang; Brown, J. Mark; Kratky, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Cellular TG stores are efficiently hydrolyzed by adipose TG lipase (ATGL). Its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) strongly increases ATGL-mediated TG catabolism in cell culture experiments. To investigate the consequences of CGI-58 deficiency in murine macrophages, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of CGI-58 in myeloid cells (macCGI-58−/− mice). CGI-58−/− macrophages accumulate intracellular TG-rich lipid droplets and have decreased phagocytic capacity, comparable to ATGL−/− macrophages. In contrast to ATGL−/− macrophages, however, CGI-58−/− macrophages have intact mitochondria and show no indications of mitochondrial apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that TG accumulation per se lacks a significant role in processes leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Another notable difference is the fact that CGI-58−/− macrophages adopt an M1-like phenotype in vitro. Finally, we investigated atherosclerosis susceptibility in macCGI-58/ApoE-double KO (DKO) animals. In response to high-fat/high-cholesterol diet feeding, DKO animals showed comparable plaque formation as observed in ApoE−/− mice. In agreement, antisense oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of CGI-58 in LDL receptor−/− mice did not alter atherosclerosis burden in the aortic root. These results suggest that macrophage function and atherosclerosis susceptibility differ fundamentally in these two animal models with disturbed TG catabolism, showing a more severe phenotype by ATGL deficiency. PMID:25316883

  9. Ambient fine and coarse particle suppression of alveolar macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, M T; Sioutas, C; Chang, M C; Boere, A J F; Cassee, F R

    2003-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are part of the innate immunological defense system and are among the first cells to respond to the effects of inhaled particles. Study of macrophage responses to particles is, therefore, relevant to understanding the mechanisms by which inhaled particles can adversely affect health. Size-fractionated ambient particles were collected at traffic-dominated sites in The Netherlands using a mobile high volume slit impactor system. AM were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from adult as well as aged rats and were incubated with for 4 h with collected particles at concentrations of 25-1000 pg per cell. Free radical generation by AM was measured with and without stimulation of AM with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). There were dose-dependent decreases in macrophage production of superoxide radicals as measured by the chemiluminescent method. Coarse particles were more toxic than were fine particles. Suppression of free radical production did not seem to be related to the presence of bioavailable iron or to endotoxin associated with the particles. There were no statistically significant differences related to age or strain of the rats tested. We conclude that in vitro tests using AM is a useful and rapid method for delineating differences in toxicity between environmental samples of size fractionated ambient particles. PMID:12523957

  10. Beneficial effect of enhanced macrophage function in the trauma patient.

    PubMed Central

    Browder, W; Williams, D; Pretus, H; Olivero, G; Enrichens, F; Mao, P; Franchello, A

    1990-01-01

    Host immunosuppression after trauma contributes to septic morbidity. The macrophage is a key element in the host immune response. This study evaluated glucan, a macrophage stimulant, in a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of 38 trauma patients undergoing surgery. Glucan (21 patients), 50 mg/m2, or placebo (17 patients) was given intravenously daily for 7 days. Delayed hypersensitivity skin testing was performed on days 1 and 7 after trauma. Serum interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were assayed after trauma. While the total mortality rate was significantly less in the glucan group (0% versus 29%) (p less than 0.05), the mortality rate from sepsis was not statistically different (0% versus 17.6%). Glucan therapy significantly decreased septic morbidity (9.5% versus 49%; p less than 0.05). Serum IL-1 had a greater increase in glucan patients on day 3 after trauma (143.4 +/- 19.3% versus 78.6 +/- 11.7%; p less than 0.05), but there was no difference thereafter. Serum TNF did not vary between groups. Early increase in IL-1 correlated with subsequent skin test conversion to positive. Neither serum IL-1 nor TNF was a reliable indicator of future sepsis. Further clinical trials are indicated to evaluate biologic response modifiers that activate macrophages in the trauma patient. PMID:2111126

  11. Rat lung macrophage tumor cytotoxin production: impairment by chronic in vivo cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Flick, D A; Gonzalez-Rothi, R J; Harris, J O; Gifford, G E

    1985-11-01

    Macrophages in the presence of bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimuli produce a soluble cytotoxin which is toxic to tumor cells. In this study, we examined various parameters of cytotoxin production from pulmonary lavage cells obtained from Fisher 344 cesarean-derived rats. Cultures of macrophages were derived from pulmonary lavage cells and stimulated in vitro with LPS. Cytotoxin production was assayed in vitro using an L-929 cell target assay. Pulmonary lavage preparations contained a relatively pure population of macrophages, and adherence studies revealed that nonadherent lavage cells contributed negligible amounts of cytotoxin, indicating that macrophages were responsible for cytotoxin production. After LPS stimulation, cytotoxin production became maximal within 10 h and thereafter plateaued. Doses of LPS above 0.1 microgram/ml were optimal for production, and in the absence of LPS, no cytotoxin was detected. Because cigarette smoke is the major etiological factor in the development of lung cancers and because smoking is known to profoundly alter the function of alveolar macrophages in humans and experimental animals, subsequent experiments examined the role of chronic cigarette smoke exposure on tumoricidal activity of lung macrophages. Rats were exposed in vivo for 8 wk to either cigarette smoke or air (sham-treated controls). When lavage cells were cultured and stimulated with LPS (1 microgram/ml), 5- to 10-fold less cytotoxin was produced by lavage cells from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. Similarly, using a direct cytotoxicity assay, lung macrophages of smoke-exposed animals also revealed marked impairment in cytotoxicity against L-929 cell targets, and this was noted over a wide range of macrophage:tumor target cell ratios. Another product of macrophages, interferon, was also decreased in rats exposed in vivo to cigarette smoke when compared to sham-treated controls. These results suggest that cigarette smoke exposure may impair pulmonary

  12. MiRNA-Mediated Macrophage Polarization and its Potential Role in the Regulation of Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Kobina; Li, Yutian; Huo, Jiuzhou; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are important components of the immune system, specialized in either removing pathogens as part of innate immunity or contributing to adaptive immunity through antigen presentation. Essential to such functions is classical activation (M1) and alternative activation (M2) of macrophages. M1 polarization of macrophages is characterized by production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, antimicrobial and tumoricidal activity, whereas M2 polarization of macrophages is linked to immunosuppression, tumorigenesis, wound repair, and elimination of parasites. MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with the ability to regulate gene expression and network of cellular processes. A number of studies have determined miRNA expression profiles in M1 and M2 polarized human and murine macrophages using microarray and RT-qPCR arrays techniques. More specifically, miR-9, miR-127, miR-155, and miR-125b have been shown to promote M1 polarization while miR-124, miR-223, miR-34a, let-7c, miR-132, miR-146a, and miR-125a-5p induce M2 polarization in macrophages by targeting various transcription factors and adaptor proteins. Further, M1 and M2 phenotypes play distinctive roles in cell growth and progression of inflammation-related diseases such as sepsis, obesity, cancer, and multiple sclerosis. Hence, miRNAs that modulate macrophage polarization may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. This review highlights recent findings in miRNA expression profiles in polarized macrophages from murine and human sources, and summarizes how these miRNAs regulate macrophage polarization. Last, therapeutic potential of miRNAs in inflammation-related diseases through modulation of macrophage polarization is also discussed. PMID:26954942

  13. Dietary glutamine supplementation partly reverses impaired macrophage function resulting from overload training in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Dong, Jingmei; Wang, Ru; Luo, Beibei

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of overload training on the function of peritoneal macrophages in rats, and to test the hypothesis that glutamine in vivo supplementation would partly reverse the eventual functional alterations induced by overload training in these cells. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group (C), overload training group (E1), overload training and restore one week group (E2), glutamine-supplementation group (EG1), and glutamine-supplementation and restore 1-week group (EG2). All rats, except those placed on sedentary control were subjected to 11 weeks of overload training protocol. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone, and corticosterone of rats were measured. Moreover, the functions (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, cytokines synthesis, reactive oxygen species generation) of peritoneal macrophages were determined. Data showed that blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone, corticosterone and body weight in the overload training group decreased significantly as compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the chemotaxis capacity (decreased by 31%, p = .003), the phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 27%, p = .005), the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (decreased by 35%, p = .003) and the cytokines response capability of macrophages were inhibited by overload training. However, the hindering of phagocytosis and the cytokines response capability of macrophages induced by overload training could be ameliorated and reversed respectively, by dietary glutamine supplementation. These results suggest that overload training impairs the function of peritoneal macrophages, which is essential for the microbicidal actions of macrophages. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunodepression induced by overload training. Nonetheless, dietary glutamine supplementation could partly reverse the impaired macrophage function resulting from overload training. PMID:25028814

  14. Role of cellular prion proteins in the function of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kayako; Sakudo, Akikazu; Masuyama, Jun; Xue, Guangai; Sugiura, Katsuaki; Onodera, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The cellular isoform of prion proteins (PrPC) is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, granulocytes, T and B lymphocyte natural killer cells, platelets, monocytes, dendritic cells, and follicular dendritic cells, which may act as carrier cells for the spread of its abnormal isoform (PrPSc) before manifesting transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In particular, macrophages and dendritic cells seem to be involved in the replication of PrPSc after ingestion. In addition, information on the role of PrPC during phagocytotic activity in these cells has been obtained. A recent study showed that resident macrophages from ZrchI PrP gene (Prnp)-deficient (Prnp-/-) mice show augmented phagocytotic activity compared to Prnp+/+ counterparts. In contrast, our study suggests that Rikn Prnp-/- peritoneal macrophages show pseudopodium extension arrest and up-regulation of phagocytotic activity compared to Prnp+/+ cells. Although reports regarding phagocytotic activity in resident and peritoneal macrophages are inconsistent between ZrchI and Rikn Prnp-/- mice, it seems plausible that PrPC in macrophages could contribute to maintain the immunological environment. This review will introduce the recent progress in understanding the functions of PrPC in macrophages and dendritic cells under physiological conditions and its involvement in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:19275736

  15. Suppression of Propionibacterium acnes-Induced Dermatitis by a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Jumihaidokuto, Modifying Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Koseki, Junichi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Matsubara, Yosuke; Iizuka, Seiichi; Imamura, Sachiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Junko; Kaneko, Atsushi; Aiba, Setsuya; Yamasaki, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Macrophages serve as sweepers of microbes and inflammation-derived wastes and regulators of inflammation. Some traditional Japanese medicines are reported to have adjuvant effects by modifying macrophages. Our aim was to characterize the actions of jumihaidokuto (JHT) for treatment of skin inflammations including acne vulgaris, in which Propionibacterium acnes has pathogenic roles. Methods. Dermatitis was induced in rat ears by intradermal injection of P. acnes. JHT or prednisolone (PDN) was given orally, and ear thickness and histology were evaluated. The effects of constituents and metabolites of JHT on monocytes were tested by cell-based assays using the human monocytic THP-1 cell. Results. JHT and PDN suppressed the ear thickness induced by P. acnes injection. Histological examinations revealed that JHT, but not PDN, promoted macrophage accumulation at 24 h after the injection. PDN suppressed the macrophage chemokine MCP-1 in the inflamed ears, while JHT did not affect it. The JHT constituents liquiritigenin and isoliquiritin increased expression of CD86 (type-1 macrophage marker) and CD192 (MCP-1 receptor) and enhanced phagocytosis by THP-1. Conclusions. JHT suppressed dermatitis, probably by enhancing type-1 macrophage functions, with an action different from PDN. JHT may be a beneficial drug in treatment of skin inflammation induced by P. acnes. PMID:26495013

  16. Intracellular chloride channel protein CLIC1 regulates macrophage function through modulation of phagosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lele; Salao, Kanin; Li, Hui; Rybicka, Joanna M.; Yates, Robin M.; Luo, Xu Wei; Shi, Xin Xin; Kuffner, Tamara; Tsai, Vicky Wang-Wei; Husaini, Yasmin; Wu, Liyun; Brown, David A.; Grewal, Thomas; Brown, Louise J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Breit, Samuel N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) is a 241 amino acid protein of the glutathione S transferase fold family with redox- and pH-dependent membrane association and chloride ion channel activity. Whilst CLIC proteins are evolutionarily conserved in Metazoa, indicating an important role, little is known about their biology. CLIC1 was first cloned on the basis of increased expression in activated macrophages. We therefore examined its subcellular localisation in murine peritoneal macrophages by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. In resting cells, CLIC1 is observed in punctate cytoplasmic structures that do not colocalise with markers for endosomes or secretory vesicles. However, when these macrophages phagocytose serum-opsonised zymosan, CLIC1 translocates onto the phagosomal membrane. Macrophages from CLIC1−/− mice display a defect in phagosome acidification as determined by imaging live cells phagocytosing zymosan tagged with the pH-sensitive fluorophore Oregon Green. This altered phagosomal acidification was not accompanied by a detectable impairment in phagosomal-lysosomal fusion. However, consistent with a defect in acidification, CLIC1−/− macrophages also displayed impaired phagosomal proteolytic capacity and reduced reactive oxygen species production. Further, CLIC1−/− mice were protected from development of serum transfer induced K/BxN arthritis. These data all point to an important role for CLIC1 in regulating macrophage function through its ion channel activity and suggest it is a suitable target for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22956539

  17. Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials augment macrophage function in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the function of Bacillus subtilis-based direct-fed microbials (DFMs) on macrophage functions, i.e., nitric oxide (NO) production and phagocytosis in broiler chickens. DFMs used in this study were eight single strains designated as Bs2084, LSSAO1, 3AP4, Bs1...

  18. Contact-dependent carcinoma aggregate dispersion by M2a macrophages via ICAM-1 and β2 integrin interactions.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Adriani, Giulia; Dang, Truong-Minh; Tu, Ting-Yuan; Penny, Hwei-Xian Leong; Wong, Siew-Cheng; Kamm, Roger D; Thiery, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-22

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can constitute up to 50% of the tumor mass and have strong implications in tumor progression and metastasis. Macrophages are plastic and can polarize to various subtypes that differ in terms of surface receptor expression as well as cytokine and chemokine production and effector function. Conventionally, macrophages are grouped into two major subtypes: the classically activated M1 macrophages and the alternatively activated M2 macrophages. M1 macrophages are pro-inflammatory, promote T helper (Th) 1 responses, and show tumoricidal activity, whereas M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. Herein, we present a microfluidic system integrating tumor cell aggregates and subtypes of human monocyte-derived macrophages in a three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold, in close co-culture with an endothelial monolayer to create an in vitro tumor microenvironment. This platform was utilized to study the role of individual subtypes of macrophages (M0, M1, M2a, M2b and M2c) in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) aggregate dispersion, as a representation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). A significant difference was observed when M2a macrophages were in direct contact with or separated from A549 aggregates, suggesting a possible mechanism for proximity-induced, contact-dependent dissemination via ICAM-1 and integrin β2 interactions. Indeed, M2a macrophages tended to infiltrate and release cells from carcinoma cell aggregates. These findings may help in the development of immunotherapies based on enhancing the tumor-suppressive properties of TAMs. PMID:26231039

  19. Contact-dependent carcinoma aggregate dispersion by M2a macrophages via ICAM-1 and β2 integrin interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Truong-Minh; Tu, Ting-Yuan; Leong Penny, Hwei-Xian; Wong, Siew-Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.; Thiery, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can constitute up to 50% of the tumor mass and have strong implications in tumor progression and metastasis. Macrophages are plastic and can polarize to various subtypes that differ in terms of surface receptor expression as well as cytokine and chemokine production and effector function. Conventionally, macrophages are grouped into two major subtypes: the classically activated M1 macrophages and the alternatively activated M2 macrophages. M1 macrophages are pro-inflammatory, promote T helper (Th) 1 responses, and show tumoricidal activity, whereas M2 macrophages contribute to tissue repair and promote Th2 responses. Herein, we present a microfluidic system integrating tumor cell aggregates and subtypes of human monocyte-derived macrophages in a three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold, in close co-culture with an endothelial monolayer to create an in vitro tumor microenvironment. This platform was utilized to study the role of individual subtypes of macrophages (M0, M1, M2a, M2b and M2c) in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) aggregate dispersion, as a representation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). A significant difference was observed when M2a macrophages were in direct contact with or separated from A549 aggregates, suggesting a possible mechanism for proximity-induced, contact-dependent dissemination via ICAM-1 and integrin β2 interactions. Indeed, M2a macrophages tended to infiltrate and release cells from carcinoma cell aggregates. These findings may help in the development of immunotherapies based on enhancing the tumor-suppressive properties of TAMs. PMID:26231039

  20. In vitro and in vivo studies of macrophage functions in amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, M; Chadee, K

    1988-01-01

    Experimental intrahepatic inoculation of the gerbil with Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites was used as a model of liver amebiasis to study the cellular immune response elicited by the parasite. It was shown that abscess-derived macrophages (5 to 20 days old) were deficient in their capacity to develop a respiratory burst, to secrete and express membrane-bound interleukin-1-like activity, and to kill E. histolytica trophozoites as well as to respond to lymphokines in vitro. However, macrophages isolated from the spleen and peritoneal cavities from the same infected animals were not significantly down regulated in these functions. Splenocytes from infected gerbils were shown to develop a strong responsiveness to amebic antigen, whereas their response to concanavalin A was suppressed. Crude E. histolytica extracts or conditioned medium down regulated murine BALB/c macrophage accessory and effector cell functions in vitro in a manner similar to abscess-derived macrophages, whereas crude extracts of the nonvirulent E. histolytica-like Laredo strain did not. Our results indicate that intrinsic or secreted products or both from E. histolytica are actively regulating macrophage functions at the abscess site and can possibly mediate other immunoregulatory mechanisms at distant targets. PMID:2903124

  1. Functions and mechanisms of microglia/macrophages in neuroinflammation and neurogenesis after stroke.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Liang; Yang, Qing-Wu

    2016-07-01

    Microglia/macrophages are the major immune cells involved in the defence against brain damage. Their morphology and functional changes are correlated with the release of danger signals induced by stroke. These cells are normally responsible for clearing away dead neural cells and restoring neuronal functions. However, when excessively activated by the damage-associated molecular patterns following stroke, they can produce a large number of proinflammatory cytokines that can disrupt neural cells and the blood-brain barrier and influence neurogenesis. These effects indicate the important roles of microglia/macrophages in the pathophysiological processes of stroke. However, the modifiable and adaptable nature of microglia/macrophages may also be beneficial for brain repair and not just result in damage. These distinct roles may be attributed to the different microglia/macrophage phenotypes because the M1 population is mainly destructive, while the M2 population is neuroprotective. Additionally, different gene expression signature changes in microglia/macrophages have been found in diverse inflammatory milieus. These biofunctional features enable dual roles for microglia/macrophages in brain damage and repair. Currently, it is thought that the proper inflammatory milieu may provide a suitable microenvironment for neurogenesis; however, detailed mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses that initiate or inhibit neurogenesis remain unknown. This review summarizes recent progress concerning the mechanisms involved in brain damage, repair and regeneration related to microglia/macrophage activation and phenotype transition after stroke. We also argue that future translational studies should be targeting multiple key regulating molecules to improve brain repair, which should be accompanied by the concept of a "therapeutic time window" for sequential therapies. PMID:27166859

  2. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects. PMID:26143263

  3. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  4. Nimbidin suppresses functions of macrophages and neutrophils: relevance to its antiinflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Sarwar Alam, M; Athar, M

    2004-05-01

    Nimbidin is a mixture of tetranortriterpenes and is the major active principle of the seed oil of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae) possessing potent antiinflammatory and antiarthritic activities. The present study revealed that nimbidin significantly inhibited some of the functions of macrophages and neutrophils relevant to the inflammatory response following both in vivo and in vitro exposure. Oral administration of 5-25 mg/kg nimbidin to rats for 3 consecutive days significantly inhibited the migration of macrophages to their peritoneal cavities in response to inflammatory stimuli and also inhibited phagocytosis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulated respiratory burst in these cells. In vitro exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to nimbidin also inhibited phagocytosis and PMA stimulated respiratory burst in these cells. Nimbidin also inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated macrophages following in vitro exposure, whereas interleukin 1 (IL-1) was only weakly inhibited. Probing the mechanism of NO inhibition revealed that nimbidin ameliorated the induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) without any inhibition in its catalytic activity. In addition, nimbidin also attenuated degranulation in neutrophils assessed in terms of release of beta-glucuronidase, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme. The results suggest that nimbidin suppresses the functions of macrophages and neutrophils relevant to inflammation. Thus nimbidin can be valuable in treating inflammation/inflammatory diseases. PMID:15174005

  5. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G; Brasier, Allan R

    2016-08-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled "Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma" in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential "two-hit" model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6C(hi) macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  6. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled “Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma” in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential “two-hit” model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6Chi macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  7. Adverse effects of wood smoke PM2.5 exposure on macrophage functions

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Christopher T.; Kobos, Emily; King, Quinton O.; Porter, Virginia; Jessop, Forrest; Ward, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between chronic biomass smoke exposure and increased respiratory infection. Pulmonary macrophages are instrumental in both the innate and the adaptive immune responses to respiratory infection. In the present study, in vitro systems were utilized where alveolar macrophages (AM) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMdM) were exposed to concentrated wood smoke-derived particulate matter (WS-PM) and mice were exposed in vivo to either concentrated WS-PM or inhaled WS. In vivo studies demonstrated that WS-exposed mice inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae had a higher bacterial load 24 h post-exposure, and corresponding AM were found to have decreased lymphocyte activation activity. Additionally, while classic markers of inflammation (cellular infiltration, total protein, neutrophils) were not affected, there were changes in pulmonary macrophages populations, including significant decreases in macrophages expressing markers of activation in WS-exposed mice. The lymphocyte activation activity of WS-PM-exposed AM was significantly suppressed, but the phagocytic activity appeared unchanged. In an effort to determine a pathway for WS-induced suppression, RelB activation, assessed by nuclear translocation, was observed in AM exposed to either inhaled WS or instilled WS-PM. Finally, an analysis of WS-PM fractions determined the presence of 4–5 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and preliminary work suggests a potential role for these PAHs to alter macrophage functions. These studies show a decreased ability of WS-exposed pulmonary macrophages to effectively mount a defense against infection, the effect lasts at least a week post-exposure, and appears to be mediated via RelB activation. PMID:23363038

  8. Yolk Sac Macrophages, Fetal Liver, and Adult Monocytes Can Colonize an Empty Niche and Develop into Functional Tissue-Resident Macrophages.

    PubMed

    van de Laar, Lianne; Saelens, Wouter; De Prijck, Sofie; Martens, Liesbet; Scott, Charlotte L; Van Isterdael, Gert; Hoffmann, Eik; Beyaert, Rudi; Saeys, Yvan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-04-19

    Tissue-resident macrophages can derive from yolk sac macrophages (YS-Macs), fetal liver monocytes (FL-MOs), or adult bone-marrow monocytes (BM-MOs). The relative capacity of these precursors to colonize a niche, self-maintain, and perform tissue-specific functions is unknown. We simultaneously transferred traceable YS-Macs, FL-MOs, and BM-MOs into the empty alveolar macrophage (AM) niche of neonatal Csf2rb(-/-) mice. All subsets produced AMs, but in competition preferential outgrowth of FL-MOs was observed, correlating with their superior granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reactivity and proliferation capacity. When transferred separately, however, all precursors efficiently colonized the alveolar niche and generated AMs that were transcriptionally almost identical, self-maintained, and durably prevented alveolar proteinosis. Mature liver, peritoneal, or colon macrophages could not efficiently colonize the empty AM niche, whereas mature AMs could. Thus, precursor origin does not affect the development of functional self-maintaining tissue-resident macrophages and the plasticity of the mononuclear phagocyte system is largest at the precursor stage. PMID:26992565

  9. Enhancement of B-cell translocation gene-1 expression by prostaglandin E2 in macrophages and the relationship to proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Suk, K; Sipes, D G; Erickson, K L

    1997-01-01

    Although prostaglandin (PG) E2 is known to suppress various macrophage functions, the molecular mechanisms by which that occurs are largely unknown. To understand better those mechanisms, differential screening of a cDNA library from PGE2-treated macrophages was performed. Subsequently, the DNA sequence of a differentially expressed cDNA clone was determined and the cDNA was identified as B-cell translocation gene-1 (BTG1), a recently cloned antiproliferative gene. A two-to threefold increase in macrophage BTG1 expression was observed after PGE2 treatment. PGE1 and platelet-activating factor, but not leukotrienes B4, and C4, or lipopolysaccharide, also enhanced BTG1 expression. Furthermore, this effect ws mimicked by dibutyryl cAMP which indicated the involvement of elevated cAMP in the PGE2-mediated enhancement of BTG1. Moreover, there was an inverse correlation between BTG1 mRNA expression and macrophage proliferation; however, BTG1 alteration was not associated with macrophage tumoricidal activation. Thus, BTG1 may play a role in PGE2-mediated inhibition of macrophage proliferation and not activation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9203975

  10. Expression and Function of Semaphorin 3A and Its Receptors in Human Monocyte-derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Dae; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.

    2016-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted and membrane-bound proteins. Recently, several roles of semaphorins in the immune system have emerged. Several semaphorins and their receptors are expressed in a variety of lymphoid and myeloid cells and affect immune cell functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation, chemotaxis, and cytokine production. However, the roles of class 3 semaphorins in human myeloid cells are not well known. Here we examined the regulation of expression of class 3 semaphorins and their receptors by inflammatory stimuli and their function in human macrophages. We show that the expression of Sema3A receptors (neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), NRP-2, plexin A1, plexin A2 and plexin A3) significantly increased during M-CSF-mediated differentiation of monocytes into macrophages under conditions that promote an M2 alternatively activated macrophage phenotype. Consistent with increased NRP-1 expression, cell surface binding of Sema3A increased during M2 differentiation. IFN-γ and LPS that promote classical M1 macrophage activation affected expression of NRP-1, NRP-2 and plexin A1. IFN-γ decreased NRP-1 expression and LPS suppressed NRP-2 and plexin A1 expression. Furthermore we show that Sema3A induced apoptosis in monocyte-derived macrophages, and cooperated with anti-Fas CH11 antibody to augment apoptosis. Our results suggest Sema3A plays a role in induction of apoptosis in monocyte-derived macrophages that are resistant to Fas-induced apoptosis and that its function can be modulated in inflammatory conditions. PMID:19480842

  11. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES NATURAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE EFFECTOR CELL FUNCTION: EFFECTS ON MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of MnCl2 in mice caused an increase in macrophage functional activity. Spleen cell antibody-dependent cellmediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against both chicken erythrocytes and P815 tumor cell targets was enhanced 24 hours following a single injection...

  12. Radon exposure mediated changes in lung macrophage morphology and function, in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Niiro, G.K.; Kretz, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary macrophages play a key role in the normal physiology of the respiratory system. Potential respiratory dysfunctions due to radon/radon daughter exposure-mediated damage of the macrophage lung cell population has been explored via in vitro technology. In this study, macrophages were isolated from lungs of normal healthy dogs by saline lavage, cultured for varying periods (0-96 h) in the presence or absence of radon gas, and assessed for radon dose-dependent changes in cell morphology and function. The in vitro culture procedure and the cell exposing system allowed for detailed alpha particle dosimetry, in relation to the assessed biological end points; i.e. (1) exposure-dependent changes in macrophage surface topography, (2) capacity to elaborate specific growth factor (CSF) essential for self maintenance, and (3) alterations in cell viability. Highlights of the morphologic assessment indicate that relatively low alpha particle doses arising from protracted radon/radon daughter exposure elicites pronounced topographic alterations of the exposed macrophage's cell surface. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke. PMID:6271676

  14. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-10-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke. PMID:6271676

  15. Functional characterization of macrophage receptors for in vitro phagocytosis of unopsonized Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Speert, D P; Wright, S D; Silverstein, S C; Mah, B

    1988-01-01

    The phagocytic receptor for unopsonized Pseudomonas aeruginosa was characterized functionally using human monocyte-derived macrophages. Freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes were unable to ingest unopsonized P. aeruginosa; ingestion did not occur until the cells had been in culture for 2 d and it became maximal after 4 d. Macrophages plated on coverslips derivatized with anti-BSA IgG or with human gamma-globulin lost the capacity to phagocytose unopsonized P. aeruginosa, unopsonized zymosan, and EIgG but bound C3bi-coated erythrocytes normally. Each of the four human IgG subclasses and Fc fragments of anti-BSA IgG inhibited phagocytosis of both unopsonized P. aeruginosa and EIgG. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and zymosan was markedly impaired and EIgG minimally inhibited if macrophages were plated on coverslips derivatized with mannan or when mannan was added to the phagocytosis buffer. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and zymosan, and binding of EC3bi was dependent on the presence of divalent cations, but phagocytosis of EIgG was not. The macrophage phagocytic receptor for unopsonized P. aeruginosa was inactivated by proteolytic enzymes. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by D-mannose, L-fucose, and alpha methyl mannoside, but not by L-mannose, D-fucose, or D-glucose. The same sugars inhibited phagocytosis of unopsonized zymosan. We conclude that phagocytosis of unopsonized P. aeruginosa by human monocyte-derived macrophages is facilitated by mannose receptors. Images PMID:3138287

  16. CCR2 Deficiency Impairs Macrophage Infiltration and Improves Cognitive Function after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Erene C.; Wang, Sarah H.; Lee, Chih Cheng; Bingham, Deborah; Zhang, Jiasheng; Cozen, Myrna L.; Charo, Israel; Huang, Eric J.; Liu, Jialing; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) provokes inflammatory responses, including a dramatic rise in brain macrophages in the area of injury. The pathway(s) responsible for macrophage infiltration of the traumatically injured brain and the effects of macrophages on functional outcomes are not well understood. C-C-chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is known for directing monocytes to inflamed tissues. To assess the role of macrophages and CCR2 in TBI, we determined outcomes in CCR2-deficient (Ccr2−/−) mice in a controlled cortical impact model. We quantified brain myeloid cell numbers post-TBI by flow cytometry and found that Ccr2−/− mice had greatly reduced macrophage numbers (∼80–90% reduction) early post-TBI, compared with wild-type mice. Motor, locomotor, and cognitive outcomes were assessed. Lack of Ccr2 improved locomotor activity with less hyperactivity in open field testing, but did not affect anxiety levels or motor coordination on the rotarod three weeks after TBI. Importantly, Ccr2−/− mice demonstrated greater spatial learning and memory, compared with wild-type mice eight weeks after TBI. Although there was no difference in the volume of tissue loss, Ccr2−/− mice had significantly increased neuronal density in the CA1-CA3 regions of the hippocampus after TBI, compared with wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that Ccr2 directs the majority of macrophage homing to the brain early after TBI and indicates that Ccr2 may facilitate harmful responses. Lack of Ccr2 improves functional recovery and neuronal survival. These results suggest that therapeutic blockade of CCR2-dependent responses may improve outcomes following TBI. PMID:24806994

  17. Downregulation of endogenous STAT3 augments tumoricidal activity of interleukin 15 activated dendritic cell against lymphoma and leukemia via TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Hira, Sumit Kumar; Mondal, Indrani; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Manna, Partha Pratim

    2014-10-01

    Effector functions in tumor resistance by dendritic cells (DCs) are less well characterized. In this study, we describe that the murine DCs upon stimulation with recombinant IL-15 in vitro or in vivo, expresses TNF superfamily member TRAIL which mediates cytotoxicity and growth inhibition against a murine lymphoma called Dalton lymphoma (DL) via apoptosis. Presence of tumor lysate or intact tumor cells significantly reduces the DC mediated tumoricidal effect, possibly via masking and down-regulating TRAIL in DCs. The antitumor effect of DC derived TRAIL was further augmented by deactivation of STAT3 in tumor cells by cucurbitacin I, which makes it more susceptible to DC derived TRAIL Treatment of tumor cells with cucurbitacin I upregulates TRAIL receptor expression in addition to activation of caspases. Compared to naïve DCs, DCs from tumor bearing mice are significantly impaired in TRAIL expression and consequent antitumor functions against DL which was partially restored by activation with IL-15 or LPS. Priming with recombinant IL-15 prolongs the survival of tumor bearing mice treated with cucurbitacin I. Naïve peripheral blood DCs derived from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have significant impairment in expression of TRAIL and consequent tumoricidal properties against TRAIL sensitive lymphoma cell lines and primary tumor cells compared to normal control. PMID:25139620

  18. Modulation of macrophage functionality induced in vitro by chlorpyrifos and carbendazim pesticides.

    PubMed

    Helali, Imen; Ferchichi, Saiida; Maaouia, Amal; Aouni, Mahjoub; Harizi, Hedi

    2016-09-01

    The immune response is the first defense against pathogens; however, it is very sensitive and can be impacted on by agrochemicals such as carbamate and organophosphate pesticides widely present in the environment. To understand how pesticides can affect immune cell function in vitro, this study investigated the effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and carbendazim (CBZ), the most commonly used pesticides worldwide, on murine immune cell (i.e. macrophage) functions, including lysosomal enzyme activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and nitric oxide (NO) production by isolated mouse peritoneal macrophages. This study showed for the first time that CPF and CBZ dose-relatedly reduced macrophage lysosomal enzyme activity and LPS-induced production of IL-1β, TNFα and NO. In general, the effects caused by CPF appeared more pronounced than those by CBZ. Collectively, these results demonstrated that CPF and CBZ exhibited marked immunomodulatory effects and could act as potent immunosuppressive factors in vitro. This inhibition of macrophage pro-inflammatory function may be an integral part of the underlying mode of action related to pesticide-induced immunosuppression. PMID:27429139

  19. Functions of omega-3 fatty acids and FFA4 (GPR120) in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Im, Dong-Soon

    2016-08-15

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), which are plentiful in fish oil, have been known for decades to be beneficial functional nutrients in different disease states. GPR120 is a G protein-coupled receptor for long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, including n-3 PUFAs, and was recently renamed free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4). Studies on FFA4-deficient mice and the development of specific pharmacological tools have started to unravel the functions of FFA4 associated with the actions of n-3 PUFAs in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and inflammation-related diseases. Here, the state of the art regarding the roles and functions of FFA4 and n-3 PUFA in macrophages are reviewed from the pharmacological perspective. In particular, the functions of n-3 PUFA on the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes of macrophages in different organs, such as, adipose tissues and liver, are discussed along with future research directions. PMID:25987421

  20. Plasma gelsolin improves lung host defense against pneumonia by enhancing macrophage NOS3 function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiping; Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Stossel, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin (pGSN) functions as part of the “extracellular actin-scavenging system,” but its potential to improve host defense against infection has not been studied. In a mouse model of primary pneumococcal pneumonia, recombinant human pGSN (rhu-pGSN) caused enhanced bacterial clearance, reduced acute inflammation, and improved survival. In vitro, rhu-pGSN rapidly improved lung macrophage uptake and killing of bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Francisella tularensis). pGSN triggers activating phosphorylation (Ser1177) of macrophage nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS3), an enzyme with important bactericidal functions in lung macrophages. rhu-pGSN failed to enhance bacterial killing by NOS3−/− macrophages in vitro or bacterial clearance in NOS3−/− mice in vivo. Prophylaxis with immunomodulators may be especially relevant for patients at risk for secondary bacterial pneumonia, e.g., after influenza. Treatment of mice with pGSN challenged with pneumococci on postinfluenza day 7 (the peak of enhanced susceptibility to secondary infection) caused a ∼15-fold improvement in bacterial clearance, reduced acute neutrophilic inflammation, and markedly improved survival, even without antibiotic therapy. pGSN is a potential immunomodulator for improving lung host defense against primary and secondary bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25957291

  1. Plasma gelsolin improves lung host defense against pneumonia by enhancing macrophage NOS3 function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiping; Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Stossel, Thomas P; Kobzik, Lester

    2015-07-01

    Plasma gelsolin (pGSN) functions as part of the "extracellular actin-scavenging system," but its potential to improve host defense against infection has not been studied. In a mouse model of primary pneumococcal pneumonia, recombinant human pGSN (rhu-pGSN) caused enhanced bacterial clearance, reduced acute inflammation, and improved survival. In vitro, rhu-pGSN rapidly improved lung macrophage uptake and killing of bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Francisella tularensis). pGSN triggers activating phosphorylation (Ser(1177)) of macrophage nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS3), an enzyme with important bactericidal functions in lung macrophages. rhu-pGSN failed to enhance bacterial killing by NOS3(-/-) macrophages in vitro or bacterial clearance in NOS3(-/-) mice in vivo. Prophylaxis with immunomodulators may be especially relevant for patients at risk for secondary bacterial pneumonia, e.g., after influenza. Treatment of mice with pGSN challenged with pneumococci on postinfluenza day 7 (the peak of enhanced susceptibility to secondary infection) caused a ∼15-fold improvement in bacterial clearance, reduced acute neutrophilic inflammation, and markedly improved survival, even without antibiotic therapy. pGSN is a potential immunomodulator for improving lung host defense against primary and secondary bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25957291

  2. Stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophage functions by neuropeptide Y and peptide YY. Involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Bernaez, I; Del Rio, M; Hernanz, A

    1993-01-01

    The peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) at concentrations from 10(-12) M to 10(-8) M have been shown in this study to stimulate significantly, in vitro, several functions of resting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of inert particles (latex beads) and foreign cells (Candida albicans), and production of superoxide anion measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with a maximal stimulation of the macrophage functions studied at 10(-10) M. These effects seem to be produced by specific receptors for the neuropeptides studied in peritoneal macrophages. Whereas the two peptides induced no change of intracellular cyclic AMP, they caused a significant stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) in murine macrophages. These results suggest that NPY and PYY produce their effects on macrophage function through PKC activation. PMID:8262554

  3. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways of Macrophages by Surface-Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanqin; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yange; Chen, Min; Ye, Shefang; Hou, Zhenqing; Ren, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) often involve improving their hydrophilicity and dispersion in biological media by modifying them through noncovalent or covalent functionalization. However, the potential adverse effects of surface-functionalized CNTs have not been well characterized. In this study, we functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) via carboxylation, to produce MWCNTs-COOH, and via poly (ethylene glycol) linking, to produce MWCNTs-PEG. We used these functionalized MWCNTs to study the effect of surface functionalization on MWCNTs-induced toxicity to macrophages, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Our results revealed that MWCNTs-PEG were less cytotoxic and were associated with less apoptotic cell death of macrophages than MWCNTs-COOH. Additionally, MWCNTs-PEG induced less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving less activation of NADPH oxidase compared with MWCNTs-COOH, as evidenced by membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox in macrophages. The less cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of MWCNTs-PEG compared with MWCNTs-COOH resulted from the lower cellular uptake of MWCNTs-PEG, which resulted in less activation of oxidative stress-responsive pathways, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. These results demonstrate that surface functionalization of CNTs may alter ROS-mediated cytotoxic and apoptotic response by modulating apoptotic signaling pathways. Our study thus provides new insights into the molecular basis for the surface properties affecting CNTs toxicity. PMID:23755279

  4. Toll-Like Receptors and Dectin-1, a C-Type Lectin Receptor, Trigger Divergent Functions in CNS Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Guan, Zhen; Beckwith, Kyle A.; Braun, Kaitlyn J.; Wei, Ping; McTigue, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) activates macrophages, endowing them with both reparative and pathological functions. The mechanisms responsible for these divergent functions are unknown but are likely controlled through stochastic activation of different macrophage receptor subtypes. Various danger-associated molecular patterns released from dying cells in the injured spinal cord likely activate distinct subtypes of macrophage pattern recognition receptors, including bacterial toll-like receptors (TLRs) and fungal C-type lectin receptors (e.g., dectin-1). To determine the in vivo consequences of activating these receptors, ligands specific for TLR2 or dectin-1 were microinjected, alone or in combination, into intact spinal cord. Both ligands elicit a florid macrophage reaction; however, only dectin-1 activation causes macrophage-mediated demyelination and axonal injury. Coactivating TLR2 reduced the injurious effects of dectin-1 activation. When injected into traumatically injured spinal cord, TLR2 agonists enhance the endogenous macrophage reaction while conferring neuroprotection. Indeed, dieback of axons was reduced, leading to smaller lesion volumes at the peak of the macrophage response. Moreover, the density of NG2+ cells expressing vimentin increased in and near lesions that were enriched with TLR2-activated macrophages. In dectin-1-null mutant (knock-out) mice, dieback of corticospinal tract axons also is reduced after SCI. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that the ability of macrophages to create an axon growth-permissive microenvironment or cause neurotoxicity is receptor dependent and it may be possible to exploit this functional dichotomy to enhance CNS repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT There is a growing appreciation that macrophages exert diverse functions in the injured and diseased CNS. Indeed, both macrophage-mediated repair and macrophage-mediated injury occur, and often these effector functions are elicited simultaneously. Understanding the

  5. Age decreases macrophage IL-10 expression: Implications for functional recovery and tissue repair in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Bailey, William M; Braun, Kaitlyn J; Gensel, John C

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages with different activation states are present after spinal cord injury (SCI). M1 macrophages purportedly promote secondary injury processes while M2 cells support axon growth. The average age at the time of SCI has increased in recent decades, however, little is known about how different physiological factors contribute to macrophage activation states after SCI. Here we investigate the effect of age on IL-10, a key indicator of M2 macrophage activation. Following mild-moderate SCI in 4 and 14 month old (MO) mice we detected significantly reduced IL-10 expression with age in the injured spinal cord. Specifically, CD86/IL-10 positive macrophages, also known as M2b or regulatory macrophages, were reduced in 14 vs. 4 MO SCI animals. This age-dependent shift in macrophage phenotype was associated with impaired functional recovery and enhanced tissue damage in 14-month-old SCI mice. In vitro, M2b macrophages release anti-inflammatory cytokines without causing neurotoxicity, suggesting that imbalances in the M2b response in 14-month-old mice may be contributing to secondary injury processes. Our data indicate that age is an important factor that regulates SCI inflammation and recovery even to mild-moderate injury. Further, alterations in macrophage activation states may contribute to recovery and we have identified the M2b phenotype as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26263843

  6. Function of microglia and macrophages in secondary damage after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; He, Xijing; Ren, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating type of neurological trauma with limited therapeutic opportunities. The pathophysiology of SCI involves primary and secondary mechanisms of injury. Among all the secondary injury mechanisms, the inflammatory response is the major contributor and results in expansion of the lesion and further loss of neurologic function. Meanwhile, the inflammation directly and indirectly dominates the outcomes of SCI, including not only pain and motor dysfunction, but also preventingneuronal regeneration. Microglia and macrophages play very important roles in secondary injury. Microglia reside in spinal parenchyma and survey the microenvironment through the signals of injury or infection. Macrophages are derived from monocytes recruited to injured sites from the peripheral circulation. Activated resident microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages induce and magnify immune and inflammatory responses not only by means of their secretory moleculesand phagocytosis, but also through their influence on astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and demyelination. In this review, we focus on the roles of microglia and macrophages in secondary injury and how they contribute to the sequelae of SCI. PMID:25422640

  7. Shaping macrophages function and innate immunity by bile acids: mechanisms and implication in cholestatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Calmus, Yvon; Poupon, Raoul

    2014-10-01

    The liver is selectively enriched in innate immune cells, macrophages (Kupffer cells), natural killer, and natural killer T cells. These cells release an array of mediators with cytotoxic, pro- and anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, fibrogenic, and mitogenic activity that function to fight infections, limit tissue injury, and promote wound healing. The diverse activity of macrophages is mediated by distinct subpopulations that develop in response to signals within their microenvironment. Understanding the mechanisms and role of the microenvironment contributing to modulation of macrophage populations is crucial for comprehension of the pathophysiology of liver injury in diverse conditions. Several studies initiated in the 1990s have shown that bile acids modulate innate and adaptive immunity. In the last decade, bile acids turned into hormones and signalling molecules involved in many metabolic and inflammatory processes. Biological properties of bile acids are thought to be mediated mainly through activation of the nuclear receptor FXR, the membrane receptor TGR5, as well as PK, ERK, MAP kinases signalling pathways. FXR and TGR5 agonists are currently under development for clinical purpose. This review analyses the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effects of bile acids on the macrophage and discuss their implications in the pathophysiology of cholestasis, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. PMID:25176586

  8. FUNCTIONAL PROTEOME OF MACROPHAGE CARRIED NANOFORMULATED ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY DEMONSTRATES ENHANCED PARTICLE CARRYING CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L.; Veerubhotla, Ram S.; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory has pioneered the development of long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART). NanoART serves to improve drug compliance, toxicities, and access to viral reservoirs. These all function to improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells’ functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  9. Functional proteome of macrophage carried nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy demonstrates enhanced particle carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L; Veerubhotla, Ram S; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2013-05-01

    Our laboratory developed long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) to improve drug compliance, reduce toxicities, and facilitate access of drug to viral reservoirs. These all function to inevitably improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells' functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  10. Antioxidant Defenses of Francisella tularensis Modulate Macrophage Function and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, Seham M; Sanchez, Belkys C; Varanat, Mrudula; Ma, Zhuo; Catlett, Sally V; Melendez, Juan Andres; Malik, Meenakshi; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-03-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia, has been used in the bioweapon programs of several countries in the past, and now it is considered a potential bioterror agent. Extreme infectivity and virulence of F. tularensis is due to its ability to evade immune detection and to suppress the host's innate immune responses. However, Francisella-encoded factors and mechanisms responsible for causing immune suppression are not completely understood. Macrophages and neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species as a defense mechanism for the clearance of phagocytosed microorganisms. ROS serve a dual role; at high concentrations they act as microbicidal effector molecules that destroy intracellular pathogens, and at low concentrations they serve as secondary signaling messengers that regulate the expression of various inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that the antioxidant defenses of F. tularensis maintain redox homeostasis in infected macrophages to prevent activation of redox-sensitive signaling components that ultimately result in suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and macrophage microbicidal activity. We demonstrate that antioxidant enzymes of F. tularensis prevent the activation of redox-sensitive MAPK signaling components, NF-κB signaling, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the accumulation of ROS in infected macrophages. We also report that F. tularensis inhibits ROS-dependent autophagy to promote its intramacrophage survival. Collectively, this study reveals novel pathogenic mechanisms adopted by F. tularensis to modulate macrophage innate immune functions to create an environment permissive for its intracellular survival and growth. PMID:26644475

  11. Kv1.3 channel blockade enhances the phagocytic function of RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Yan, Li; Gu, JingLi; Hao, Wei; Cao, JiMin

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to comprehend the largely unknown role of voltage-gated potassium channel 1.3 (Kv1.3) in the phagocytic function of macrophages. We found that blocking of the Kv1.3 channel with 100 pmol L(-1) Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin (ShK) enhanced the phagocytic capacities of both resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages in the chicken erythrocyte system. In the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Escherichia coli k-12 system, ShK increased the phagocytic capacities of resting RAW264.7 cells, but not of the LPS-stimulated cells, as LPS alone stimulated almost saturated phagocytosis of the macrophages. ShK increased the nitric oxide (NO) production in LPS-activated cells, but not in resting RAW264.7 cells. There was no effect of ShK alone on the cytokine secretions in resting RAW264.7 cells, but it suppressed IL-1β secretion in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. At a concentration of 100 pmol L(-1), ShK did not affect the viability of the tested cells. Kv1.3 was expressed in RAW264.7 cells; this expression was downregulated by LPS, but significantly upregulated by disrupting caveolin-dependent endocytosis with filipin III. In addition, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, did not affect the Kv1.3 expression. Thus, blocking of the Kv1.3 channel enhances the phagocytic capacity and NO production of this cell line. Our results suggest that Kv1.3 channel serves as a negative regulator of phagocytosis in macrophages and can therefore be a potential target in the treatment of macrophage dysfunction. PMID:26354506

  12. Immunomodulation of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage functions and antioxidant activities of 11 plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Ghonime, Mohammed; Emara, Mohamed; Shawky, Riham; Soliman, Hesham; El-Domany, Ramadan; Abdelaziz, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A group of 11 medicinal plants, including Lavandula pubescens, Trigonella foenugricium, Salsola schweinforthi, Calligonum comosum, Silene succulenta, Silene villosa, Bogonvillea glabra, Cakile maritime, Gomphrene celesoids, Mirabilis jalaba, and Silene nocturna growing in Egypt, were extracted and examined for their immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities. RAW 264.7 cells were recruited to investigate the immunomodulatory effect through multiple parameters analysis. First, the proliferation index of macrophages cells was evaluated revealing that Trigonella foenugricium, Silene succulenta and Silene villosa have a significant cytotoxic effect on RAW cells. Interestingly, we observed enhancement of macrophages phagocytic function of by all extracts except Cakile maritime, Gomphrena celosioides and Silene nocturna. Afterwards, macrophages were challenged by incubation with LPS and the effect of various extracts on inflammatory responses was investigated; the generation of NO from activated macrophage was substantially suppressed by 7 extracts namely, Trigonella foenugricium, Calligonum comosum, Silene succulenta, Bougainvillea glabra, Mirabilis jalaba, Gomphrena celosioides and Silene nocturna. TNF-α was decreased by percentage range from 3.8 to 85.8% and Trigonella foenugricium extract showed the highest inhibition of TNF-α release. All extracts except Trigonella foenugricium, Salsola schweinforthi, Silene succulenta and Mirabilis jalaba significantly inhibited COX-2 production from stimulated macrophage. Moreover, evaluating the potential antioxidant activity of these extracts showed that Trigonella foenugricium, Salsola schweinforthi, Calligonum comosum, Bogonvillea glabra and Mirabilis jalaba exhibited some antioxidant activities. Taken together, our results suggest that some of these extracts may have a considerable antinflammatory and antioxidant effects and may be a potential therapeutic choice in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25564700

  13. Oleic acid-embedded nanoliposome as a selective tumoricidal agent.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sujin; Lee, Sangah; Lee, Hyejin; Yoon, Jaejin; Lee, E K

    2016-10-01

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cell), a molecular complex of human α-lactalbumin and oleic acid, is known to have selective cytotoxic activity against certain types of tumors. This cytotoxicity is known to stem from water-insoluble oleic acid. In this study, we manufactured an alternative complex using liposome as an oleic acid delivery vesicle. We named this nanolipoplex LIMLET (LIposome Made LEthal to Tumor cell). The LIMLET vesicle contained approximately 90,200 oleic acid molecules inserted into its lipophilic phospholipid bilayer and had a nominal mean diameter of 127nm. Using a WST-1 assay, its cytotoxicity against two cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer) and A549 (human lung cancer), were tested. The results were compared with that of a normal cell line, Vero (from monkey kidney). We found that (1) LIMLET showed distinctive cytotoxicity against A549 and MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas bare liposomes (containing no oleic acid) had no toxicity, even at high concentrations, and (2) LIMLET demonstrated selective, concentration-dependent toxicity against the cancer cells: the LD50 values of MDA-MB-231 and A549 cells were 1.3 and 2.2nM LIMLET, respectively, whereas the LD50 of Vero was 5.7nM. The strength of the tumoricidal effect appeared to stem from the number of oleic acid molecules present. Our result suggests that LIMLET, like HAMLET, is an interesting nanolipoplex that can potentially be developed into tumor treatments. PMID:27424089

  14. Macrophage function in murine allogeneic bone marrow radiation chimeras in the early phase after transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, J.; Baccarini, M.; Vogt, B.; Lohmann-Matthes, M.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We tested several of the functions of macrophages (M phi) in the early phase after allogeneic bone marrow transfer to get information about this important aspect of the nonspecific immune system in the T-cell-deficient recipient. On days 3-5 after transfer, the number of M phi was reduced in the spleen, liver, lungs, and peritoneal cavity (Pe). The phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) by these M phi was normal or even enhanced, as in the case of Pe-M phi. Already on days 8-12 after transfer, the number of M phi in spleen and liver exceeded that of controls, whereas the number was still reduced in lungs and Pe. We examined their ability to kill P815 tumor cells, to produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), to phagocytose SRBC, to produce reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in vitro and to kill Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. Most functions were normal and often even enhanced, depending on the organ origin, but the ability of Pe-M phi to produce ROI was reduced. Proliferative response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and killing of YAC-1 tumor cells revealed a high frequency of macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and liver and a high natural killer (NK) activity in the liver. Altogether, enhanced nonspecific immune function, especially preactivated M phi, may enable chimeras to survive attacks by opportunistic pathogens.

  15. Blockade of prostaglandin production increases cachectin synthesis and prevents depression of macrophage functions after hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, W; Morrison, M H; Ayala, A; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1991-01-01

    Although hemorrhage severely depresses macrophage functions, it is not known whether the increased TNF-alpha or PGE2 production is responsible for it. To study this C3H/HeN mice were bled to mean blood pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 minutes, resuscitated, and treated with either ibuprofen (1.0 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle (saline). Hemorrhage increased plasma prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels by 151.7% +/- 40.0% (p less than 0.05) and significantly decreased peritoneal macrophage (pM phi) antigen presentation (AP) by 60.5% +/- 7.3%, Ia expression by 52.3% +/- 7.6%, and interleukin-1 (IL-1) synthesis by 60.5% +/- 12.3% compared to shams. However ibuprofen treatment reduced PGE2 plasma levels by 61.3% +/- 12.1% and significantly increased AP (+237.0% +/- 95.3%), Ia expression (+72.8% +/- 27.5%), IL-1 synthesis (+235.7% +/- 134.7%), and cachectin synthesis (+485.8% +/- 209.0%) compared to vehicle-treated animals. These results indicate that prostaglandins but not cachectin are involved in the suppression of pM phi functions following hemorrhage because blockade of prostaglandin synthesis improved depressed macrophage functions despite enhanced cachectin synthesis. PMID:1998408

  16. Polarization of macrophages towards M1 phenotype by a combination of 2-deoxy-d-glucose and radiation: Implications for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Abdullah; Afrin, Farhat; Adhikari, Jawahar Singh; Dwarakanath, Bilikere Srinivasa Rao

    2016-02-01

    2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) has been found to enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs in several tumor cell lines in vitro. Systemic administration of 2-DG together with localized irradiation of the tumor leads to tumor regression and cure (disease free survival), which correlate with the differential levels of anti-tumor immunity observed in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) bearing mice. Macrophages being a major player of the innate immune system, we investigated the activation status of splenic macrophages during radio-sensitization of EAT in mice as well as in peritoneal macrophages ex vivo and macrophagic cell line (Raw 264.7) in vitro. Results suggest that under in vivo conditions, the combined treatment (2-DG+radiation) restores the M1 phenotype in spleen that correlated with the tumor response. However, 2-DG neither induced significant cytotoxicity nor enhanced radiation-induced cell death in peritoneal macrophages and the macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7). Further, increased arborization and enhanced functional status (expression of MHC class II, CD80, CD86 and phagocytosis) were observed after the combined treatment. Besides this activation, the combined treatment also skewed the macrophages towards M1 phenotype as evidenced by the enhanced secretion of IL-12, IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ. These observations suggest that 2-DG not only preserves the survival of normal macrophages during irradiation, but also activates macrophages by polarizing towards M1 phenotype, which is known to be tumoricidal in nature. This study for the first time sheds light on a potential antitumor immune activation by 2-DG involving macrophagic stimulation during in vivo radio-sensitization of tumors, besides the other known antitumor effects of this glucose analogue. PMID:26597503

  17. Toll-like receptor 9 modulates macrophage antifungal effector function during innate recognition of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kasperkovitz, Pia V; Khan, Nida S; Tam, Jenny M; Mansour, Michael K; Davids, Peter J; Vyas, Jatin M

    2011-12-01

    Phagocytic responses are critical for effective host defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens. Macrophages sample the phagosomal content and orchestrate the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA and is activated by fungal DNA. Here we demonstrate that specific triggering of TLR9 recruitment to the macrophage phagosomal membrane is a conserved feature of fungi of distinct phylogenetic origins, including Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Malassezia furfur, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The capacity to trigger phagosomal TLR9 recruitment was not affected by a loss of fungal viability or cell wall integrity. TLR9 deficiency has been linked to increased resistance to murine candidiasis and to restriction of fungal growth in vivo. Macrophages lacking TLR9 demonstrate a comparable capacity for phagocytosis and normal phagosomal maturation compared to wild-type macrophages. We now show that TLR9 deficiency increases macrophage tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production in response to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, independent of yeast viability. The increase in TNF-α production was reversible by functional complementation of the TLR9 gene, confirming that TLR9 was responsible for negative modulation of the cytokine response. Consistently, TLR9 deficiency enhanced the macrophage effector response by increasing macrophage nitric oxide production. Moreover, microbicidal activity against C. albicans and S. cerevisiae was more efficient in TLR9 knockout (TLR9KO) macrophages than in wild-type macrophages. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TLR9 is compartmentalized selectively to fungal phagosomes and negatively modulates macrophage antifungal effector functions. Our data support a model in which orchestration of antifungal innate immunity involves a complex interplay of fungal ligand combinations, host cell machinery rearrangements, and TLR cooperation and antagonism. PMID:21947771

  18. Elucidation of monocyte/macrophage dynamics and function by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Rejane; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are a diverse population of innate immune cells that play a critical role in homeostasis and inflammation. These cells are surveillant by nature and closely monitor the vasculature and surrounding tissue during states of health and disease. Given their abundance and strategic positioning throughout the body, myeloid cells are among the first responders to any inflammatory challenge and are active participants in most immune-mediated diseases. Recent studies have shed new light on myeloid cell dynamics and function by use of an imaging technique referred to as intravital microscopy (IVM). This powerful approach allows researchers to gain real-time insights into monocytes and macrophages performing homeostatic and inflammatory tasks in living tissues. In this review, we will present a contemporary synopsis of how intravital microscopy has revolutionized our understanding of myeloid cell contributions to vascular maintenance, microbial defense, autoimmunity, tumorigenesis, and acute/chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26162402

  19. Chronic Household Air Pollution Exposure Is Associated with Impaired Alveolar Macrophage Function in Malawian Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Chimpini, Chikondi; Semple, Sean; Russell, David G.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Household air pollution in low income countries is an important cause of mortality from respiratory infection. We hypothesised that chronic smoke exposure is detrimental to alveolar macrophage function, causing failure of innate immunity. We report the relationship between macrophage function and prior smoke exposure in healthy Malawians. Methods Healthy subjects exposed daily to cooking smoke at home volunteered for bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophage particulate content was measured as a known correlate of smoke exposure. Phagocytosis and intraphagosomal function (oxidative burst and proteolysis) were measured by a flow cytometric assay. Cytokine responses in macrophages were compared following re-exposure in vitro to wood smoke, before and after glutathione depletion. Results Volunteers had a range of alveolar macrophage particulate loading. The macrophage capacity for phagosomal oxidative burst was negatively associated with alveolar macrophage particulate content (n = 29, r2 = 0.16, p = 0.033), but phagocytosis per se and proteolytic function were unaffected. High particulate content was associated with lower baseline CXCL8 release (ratio 0.51, CI 0.29–0.89) and lower final concentrations on re-exposure to smoke in vitro (ratio 0.58, CI 0.34–0.97). Glutathione depletion augmented CXCL8 responses by 1.49x (CI 1.02–2.17) compared with wood smoke alone. This response was specific to smoke as macrophages response to LPS were not modulated by glutathione. Conclusion Chronic smoke exposure is associated with reduced human macrophage oxidative burst, and dampened inflammatory cytokine responses. These are critical processes in lung defence against infection and likely to underpin the relationship between air pollution and pneumonia. PMID:26406307

  20. The effect of space and parabolic flight on macrophage hematopoiesis and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Gerren, R. A.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We used weak electric fields to monitor macrophage spreading in microgravity. Using this technique, we demonstrated that bone marrow-derived macrophages responded to microgravity within 8 s. We also showed that microgravity differentially altered two processes associated with bone marrow-derived macrophage development. Spaceflight enhanced cellular proliferation and inhibited differentiation. These data indicate that the space/microgravity environment significantly affects macrophages.

  1. Effects of Nanosized Lithium Carbonate Particles on the Functional Activity of Macrophages During Development of Hepatocarcinoma 29.

    PubMed

    Konenkov, V I; Borodin, Yu I; Makarova, O P; Bgatova, N P; Rachkovskaya, L N

    2015-08-01

    The functional activity of macrophages in response to injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles after initiation of hepatocarcinoma 29 in male CBA mice was evaluated by the production of NO, arginase activity, and absorption of zymosan granules. In intact animals, NO production by peritoneal macrophages increased by 4 times and arginase activity 3.1 times in response to a single injection of nanosized particles into the hip muscle. The level of NO production by macrophages remained high after 4 and 5 injections, while arginase activity returned to normal. The level of phagocytic peritoneal macrophages increased by 1.4 times after 5 injections of the particles. The level of NO production by macrophages gradually increased in animals with hepatocarcinoma developing in the hip muscle: by 1.6 times on day 3, 3.2 times on day 7, and by 2.6 times on day 13 in comparison with the corresponding parameters in intact animals. The increase of NO production by peritoneal macrophages after tumor process initiation was not paralleled by changes in arginase activity and absorption of zymosan granules. The results indicated that injection of nanosized lithium carbonate particles after inoculation of hepatocarcinoma 29 cells in the right hip muscle tissue was inessential for the function of peritoneal macrophages by the studied parameters. PMID:26388569

  2. Age-related changes in tissue macrophages precede cardiac functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alexander R; Godwin, James W; Chandran, Anjana; Hersey, Lucy; Ilinykh, Alexei; Debuque, Ryan; Wang, Lina; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs) are abundant in the murine heart but the extent to which the cTM phenotype changes with age is unknown. This study characterizes aging-dependent phenotypic changes in cTM subsets. Using theCx3cr1(GFP/+) mouse reporter line where GFP marks cTMs, and the tissue macrophage marker Mrc1, we show that two major cardiac tissue macrophage subsets, Mrc1-GFP(hi) and Mrc1+GFP(hi) cTMs, are present in the young (<10 week old) mouse heart, and a third subset, Mrc1+GFP(lo), comprises ~50% of total Mrc1+ cTMs from 30 weeks of age. Immunostaining and functional assays show that Mrc1+ cTMs are the principal myeloid sentinels in the mouse heart and that they retain proliferative capacity throughout life. Gene expression profiles of the two Mrc1+ subsets also reveal that Mrc1+GFP(lo) cTMs have a decreased number of immune response genes (Cx3cr1, Lpar6, CD9, Cxcr4, Itga6 and Tgfβr1), and an increased number of fibrogenic genes (Ltc4s, Retnla, Fgfr1, Mmp9 and Ccl24), consistent with a potential role for cTMs in cardiac fibrosis. These findings identify early age-dependent gene expression changes in cTMs, with significant implications for cardiac tissue injury responses and aging-associated cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24861132

  3. The Phenotypic and Functional Features of Human M2 Macrophages Generated Under Low Serum Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, L V; Shevela, E Ya; Tikhonova, M A; Ostanin, A A; Chernykh, E R

    2016-02-01

    The phenotypic and functional features of human M2 macrophages, in particular, their immunosuppressive activity, can considerably vary depending on M2 polarizing stimulus. This study was aimed at the investigation of cytokine production and pro-apoptogenic/inhibitory molecule expression in macrophages generated with GM-CSF using either standard conditions (M1) or deficiency of serum/growth factors (M2-LS cells). In contrast to M1, M2-LS cells were characterized by an enhanced content of CD206(+), B7-H1(+), FasL(+) and TRAIL(+) cells along with a decreased production of IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, TNF-α, IL-17 and MCP-1. In addition, M2-LS exhibited a lower T cell stimulatory activity in MLC that was associated with the higher numbers of apoptotic and the lower numbers of proliferating T cells. B7-H1 plays a key role in M2-LS-mediated cytotoxic effects as the neutralization of B7-H1 reduces the apoptosis-inducing activity of M2-LS, while the blocking of CD206 and TRAIL reduces the cytostatic activity of M2 macrophages. PMID:26678544

  4. The microbial metabolite butyrate regulates intestinal macrophage function via histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pamela V; Hao, Liming; Offermanns, Stefan; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-02-11

    Given the trillions of microbes that inhabit the mammalian intestines, the host immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerance to commensals and immunity against pathogens to avoid unnecessary immune responses against otherwise harmless bacteria. Misregulated responses can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remain largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate, which is secreted in high amounts by commensal bacteria, can modulate the function of intestinal macrophages, the most abundant immune cell type in the lamina propria. Treatment of macrophages with n-butyrate led to the down-regulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-12, but did not affect levels of TNF-α or MCP-1. These effects were independent of toll-like receptor signaling and activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, two pathways that could be affected by short-chain fatty acids. In this study, we provide several lines of evidence that suggest that these effects are due to the inhibition of histone deacetylases by n-butyrate. These findings elucidate a pathway in which the host may maintain tolerance to intestinal microbiota by rendering lamina propria macrophages hyporesponsive to commensal bacteria through the down-regulation of proinflammatory effectors. PMID:24390544

  5. Acute exercise stimulates macrophage function: possible role of NF-kappaB pathways.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Elza M S; Rodrigues, Mariana F; Krause, Maurício S; Vianna, Damiana R; Almeida, Bibiana S; Rossato, Juliane S; Oliveira, Lino P; Curi, Rui; de Bittencourt, Paulo I Homem

    2007-01-01

    Moderate physical activity when performed on a regular basis presents a number of benefits to the whole organism, especially regarding immune system function, such as augmenting resistance to infections and to cancer growth. Although glutamine production by active muscle cells as well as neuroendocrine alterations mediated by the chronic adaptation to exercise may play a role, the entire mechanism by which exercise makes the immune system aware of challenges remains mostly uncovered. This is particularly true for the effects of an acute exercise session on immune function. In this work, circulating monocytes/macrophages from sedentary rats submitted to an acute (1 h) swimming session were tested for the ability of phagocytosing zymosan particles, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced hydrogen peroxide production, nitric oxide (NO) release (assessed by nitrate and nitrite production) and the expression of NO synthases (NOS-1, NOS-2 and NOS-3). The results showed that an exercise bout induced a 2.4-fold rise in macrophage phagocytic capacity (p = 0.0041), a 9.6-fold elevation in PMA-induced hydrogen peroxide release into the incubation media (1-h, p = 0.0022) and a 95.5%-augmentation in nitrite basal production (1-h incubation; p = 0.0220), which was associated with a marked expression of NOS-2 (the inducible NOS isoform; p = 0.0319), but not in other NOS gene products. Although NOS-2 expression is nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent, no systemic oxidative stress was found, as inferred from the data of plasma TBARS and glutathione disulphide (GSSG) to glutathione (GSH) ratio in circulating blood erythrocytes which remained constant after the acute exercise. Also, no stressful situation seemed to be faced by monocytes/macrophages, since the expression of the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) remained unchanged. We conclude that NF-kappaB-dependent induction of NOS-2 and macrophage activation must be related to local factor(s) produced in the surroundings of

  6. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  7. In Vitro Screening of Tumoricidal Properties of International Medicinal Herbs: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2010-01-01

    With growing use of anticancer complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) worldwide, there is a need to assess and screen commercially available natural products for relative tumoricidal properties under standard experimental conditions. In the current study, we screened and ranked 264 traditional Chinese and Egyptian herbal medicines for tumoricidal potency against malignant neuroblastoma in vitro. The data obtained show that tumoricidal potencies of plants were randomly dispersed throughout similar orders, families and genera under the Division: Magnoliophyta, class: Magnoliopsida, subclasses: Asteridae, Caryophyllidae, Dilleniidae, Hamamelididae, Magnoliidae and Rosidae. The most potent plant extracts (LC50 < 0.08 mg/ml) were prepared from gromwell root also known as ‘Hong Tiao Zi Cao’ (Lithospermum Erythrorhizon) Family (Boraginaceae) > beth root (Trillium Pendulum), Family (Liliaceae) and galbanum (Ferula Galbaniflua), Family (Apiaceae). Gromwell root is traditionally used in the preparation of Chinese medicinal tea. In addition, galbanum was highly regarded for its sacred and medicinal value according to ancient texts and the bible. Future research will be required to isolate and identify chemical constituents within these plants which are responsible for tumoricidal effects. PMID:20564497

  8. Regulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production and function in macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojing; Yan, Wenjun; Zheng, Hua; Du, Qinglin; Zhang, Lixing; Ban, Yi; Li, Na; Wei, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 and Interleukin-12 are produced primarily by pathogen-activated antigen-presenting cells, particularly macrophages and dendritic cells. IL-10 and IL-12 play very important immunoregulatory roles in host defense and immune homeostasis. Being anti- and pro-inflammatory in nature, respectively, their functions are antagonistically opposing. A comprehensive and in-depth understanding of their immunological properties and signaling mechanisms will help develop better clinical intervention strategies in therapy for a wide range of human disorders. Here, we provide an update on some emerging concepts, controversies, unanswered questions, and opinions regarding the immune signaling of IL-10 and IL-12. PMID:26918147

  9. The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux as a HDL function index in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Narita, Ichiei; Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux are considered to be a key player in atherosclerotic formation in relation to the function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The HDL function can be evaluated by the reaction between lipid-loaded macrophages and lipid-acceptors in the HDL fraction from the plasma, apolipoprotein B-depleted serum, and/or whole serum/plasma. Recent studies have reported that an impaired cholesterol efflux of HDL is observed in patients with cardiometabolic diseases, such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. A population-based cohort study has reported an inverse association between the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL and the incidence of atherosclerotic disease, regardless of the serum HDL-cholesterol level. Moreover, in this paper, when we summarized several clinical interventional studies of statin treatment that examined cholesterol efflux, a potential increase in the efflux in patients treated with statins was implied. However, the effect was not fully defined in the current situation because of the small sample sizes, lack of a unified protocol for measuring the efflux, and short-term intervention periods without cardiovascular outcomes in available studies. Further investigation is necessary to determine the effect of drugs on cholesterol efflux. With additional advanced studies, cholesterol efflux is a promising laboratory index to understand the HDL function. PMID:27087419

  10. Morphologic and functional characterization of granulocytes and macrophages in embryonic and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lieschke, G J; Oates, A C; Crowhurst, M O; Ward, A C; Layton, J E

    2001-11-15

    The zebrafish is a useful model organism for developmental and genetic studies. The morphology and function of zebrafish myeloid cells were characterized. Adult zebrafish contain 2 distinct granulocytes, a heterophil and a rarer eosinophil, both of which circulate and are generated in the kidney, the adult hematopoietic organ. Heterophils show strong histochemical myeloperoxidasic activity, although weaker peroxidase activity was observed under some conditions in eosinophils and erythrocytes. Embryonic zebrafish have circulating immature heterophils by 48 hours after fertilization (hpf). A zebrafish myeloperoxidase homologue (myeloid-specific peroxidase; mpx) was isolated. Phylogenetic analysis suggested it represented a gene ancestral to the mammalian myeloperoxidase gene family. It was expressed in adult granulocytes and in embryos from 18 hpf, first diffusely in the axial intermediate cell mass and then discretely in a dispersed cell population. Comparison of hemoglobinized cell distribution, mpx gene expression, and myeloperoxidase histochemistry in wild-type and mutant embryos confirmed that the latter reliably identified a population of myeloid cells. Studies in embryos after tail transection demonstrated that mpx- and peroxidase-expressing cells were mobile and localized to a site of inflammation, indicating functional capability of these embryonic granulocytes. Embryonic macrophages removed carbon particles from the circulation by phagocytosis. Collectively, these observations have demonstrated the early onset of zebrafish granulopoiesis, have proved that granulocytes circulate by 48 hpf, and have demonstrated the functional activity of embryonic granulocytes and macrophages. These observations will facilitate the application of this genetically tractable organism to the study of myelopoiesis. PMID:11698295

  11. C9orf72 is required for proper macrophage and microglial function in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, J G; Bogdanik, L; Yáñez, A; Lall, D; Wolf, A J; Muhammad, A K M G; Ho, R; Carmona, S; Vit, J P; Zarrow, J; Kim, K J; Bell, S; Harms, M B; Miller, T M; Dangler, C A; Underhill, D M; Goodridge, H S; Lutz, C M; Baloh, R H

    2016-03-18

    Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Decreased expression of C9orf72 is seen in expansion carriers, suggesting that loss of function may play a role in disease. We found that two independent mouse lines lacking the C9orf72 ortholog (3110043O21Rik) in all tissues developed normally and aged without motor neuron disease. Instead, C9orf72 null mice developed progressive splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy with accumulation of engorged macrophage-like cells. C9orf72 expression was highest in myeloid cells, and the loss of C9orf72 led to lysosomal accumulation and altered immune responses in macrophages and microglia, with age-related neuroinflammation similar to C9orf72 ALS but not sporadic ALS human patient tissue. Thus, C9orf72 is required for the normal function of myeloid cells, and altered microglial function may contribute to neurodegeneration in C9orf72 expansion carriers. PMID:26989253

  12. Neonatal malnutrition programs the oxidant function of macrophages in response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Costa, Thacianna Barreto Da; Morais, Natália Gomes De; Pedrosa, Amanda Lúcia F; De Albuquerque, Suênia Da Cunha G; De Castro, Maria Carolina A B; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo A; Cavalcanti, Milena De Paiva; De Castro, Célia Maria M B

    2016-06-01

    Experimental maternal nutrition restriction models are used to investigate short or long-term consequences of nutritional deficiency on puppies' growth. By assuming that the immune function is directly related to host's nutritional status, the current study aims to investigate the effects of neonatal malnutrition on oxidative stress and on the cell death of the alveolar macrophage after in vitro infection by Candida albicans. Wistar rats were suckled by mothers fed on diets containing 17% protein (Nourished group) or 8% protein (Malnourished group) in the current assay. Both groups received the standard diet used in the vivarium until adulthood, after weaning. The results showed that the offspring from mothers fed on low-protein diet presented lower body weight from 5 days of life on. Their low weight remained until adulthood when it was compared to that of rats in the nourished group. Superoxide and nitric oxide production was lower in malnourished animals and it was accompanied by low inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression levels in systems in which the alveolar macrophages were challenged by immunogenic stimulus. No significant differences were observed in comparisons performed between the nourished and malnourished groups in any of the analyzed cell viability (apoptosis/necrosis) parameters. The fungal inoculum-stimulated system induced higher oxidative stress and cell death by necrosis. The current study demonstrated that dietary restriction during lactation alters the oxidant function of alveolar macrophages in puppies; It happens from the gene transcription step to the release of mediators, thus compromising the host's defenses against Candida albicans. It raises the possibility that Candida albicans may cease to be a commensal fungus to become a pathogen in offspring that have suffered nutritional deficiency during critical developmental periods, due to impaired immune responses. PMID:27001703

  13. Functional significance of macrophage-derived exosomes in inflammation and pain

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Marguerite K.; Tian, Yuzhen; Qureshi, Rehman A.; Gormley, Michael; Ertel, Adam; Gao, Ruby; Lopez, Enrique Aradillas; Alexander, Guillermo M.; Sacan, Ahmet; Fortina, Paolo; Ajit, Seena K.

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, secreted microvesicles transporting microRNAs (miRNAs), mRNAs, and proteins through bodily fluids, facilitate intercellular communication and elicit immune responses. Exosomal contents vary depending on the source and the physiological conditions of cells and can provide insights into how cells and systems cope with physiological perturbations. Previous analysis of circulating miRNAs in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a debilitating chronic pain disorder, revealed a subset of miRNAs in whole blood that are altered in the disease. To determine functional consequences of alterations in exosomal biomolecules in inflammation and pain, we investigated exosome-mediated information transfer in vitro, in a rodent model of inflammatory pain and in exosomes from patients with CRPS. Mouse macrophage cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) secrete exosomes containing elevated levels of cytokines and miRNAs that mediate inflammation. Transcriptome sequencing of exosomal RNA revealed global alterations in both innate and adaptive immune pathways. Exosomes from LPS-stimulated cells were sufficient to cause NF-kappaB activation in naïve cells, indicating functionality in recipient cells. A single injection of exosomes attenuated thermal hyperalgesia in a mouse model of inflammatory pain, suggesting an immunoprotective role for macrophage-derived exosomes. We also show that circulating miRNAs altered in patients with complex regional pain syndrome are trafficked by exosomes. Macrophage-derived exosomes carry a protective signature that is altered when secreting cells are exposed to an inflammatory stimulus. With their systemic signaling capabilities, exosomes can induce pleiotropic effects potentially mediating the multifactorial pathology underlying chronic pain and should be explored for their therapeutic utility. PMID:24792623

  14. Effect of aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia on functions of peritoneal macrophages isolated from CCl4 intoxicated male albino mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The current practice of ingesting phytochemicals for supporting the immune system or fighting infections is based on centuries-old tradition. Macrophages are involved at all the stages of an immune response. The present study focuses on the immunostimulant properties of Tinospora cordifolia extract that are exerted on circulating macrophages isolated from CCl4 (0.5 ml/kg body weight) intoxicated male albino mice. Methods Apart from damaging the liver system, carbon tetrachloride also inhibits macrophage functions thus, creating an immunocompromised state, as is evident from the present study. Such cell functions include cell morphology, adhesion property, phagocytosis, enzyme release (myeloperoxidase or MPO), nitric oxide (NO) release, intracellular survival of ingested bacteria and DNA fragmentation in peritoneal macrophages isolated from these immunocompromised mice. T. cordifolia extract was tested for acute toxicity at the given dose (150 mg/kg body weight) by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Results The number of morphologically altered macrophages was increased in mice exposed to CCl4. Administration of CCl4 (i.p.) also reduced the phagocytosis, cell adhesion, MPO release, NO release properties of circulating macrophages of mice. The DNA fragmentation of peritoneal macrophages was observed to be higher in CCl4 intoxicated mice. The bacterial killing capacity of peritoneal macrophages was also adversely affected by CCl4. However oral administration of aqueous fraction of Tinospora cordifolia stem parts at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight (in vivo) in CCl4 exposed mice ameliorated the effect of CCl4, as the percentage of morphologically altered macrophages, phagocytosis activity, cell adhesion, MPO release, NO release, DNA fragmentation and intracellular killing capacity of CCl4 intoxicated peritoneal macrophages came closer to those of the control group. No acute toxicity was identified in oral administration of the aqueous extract of Tinospora

  15. Quercus infectoria galls possess antioxidant activity and abrogates oxidative stress-induced functional alterations in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2008-02-15

    The present study reports the antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria galls. The antioxidant potency of galls was investigated employing several established in vitro model systems. Their protective efficacy on oxidative modulation of murine macrophages was also explored. Gall extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and possess a potent reducing power. HPTLC analysis of the extract suggested it to contain 19.925% tannic acid (TA) and 8.75% gallic acid (GA). The extract potently scavenged free radicals including DPPH (IC(50)~0.5 microg/ml), ABTS (IC(50)~1 microg/ml), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (IC(50)~2.6 microg/ml) and hydroxyl (*OH) radicals (IC(50)~6 microg/ml). Gall extract also chelated metal ions and inhibited Fe(3+) -ascorbate-induced oxidation of protein and peroxidation of lipids. Exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) induced oxidative stress in them and altered their phagocytic functions. These macrophages showed elevated secretion of lysosomal hydrolases, and attenuated phagocytosis and respiratory burst. Activity of macrophage mannose receptor (MR) also diminished following oxidant exposure. Pretreatment of macrophages with gall extract preserved antioxidant armory near to control values and significantly protected against all the investigated functional mutilations. MTT assay revealed gall extract to enhance percent survival of tBOOH exposed macrophages. These results indicate that Q. infectoria galls possess potent antioxidant activity, when tested both in chemical as well as biological models. PMID:18076871

  16. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. PMID:25681694

  17. Effects of ketanserin on experimental colitis in mice and macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, JUNHUA; SHAO, LIMEI; SHEN, JIAQING; JIANG, WEILIANG; FENG, YUN; ZHENG, PING; LIU, FEI

    2016-01-01

    Ketanserin is a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)-2A receptor (5-HT2AR) antagonist. Studies have suggested that ketanserin exerts anti-inflammatory effects independent of the baroreflex; however, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of ketanserin in colitis and the possible underlying mechanisms. The expression of 5-HT2AR was assessed in the colon tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. The therapeutic potential of ketanserin was investigated in the mice with colitis. In the colon tissue samples from the patients with IBD, a high expression level of 5-HT2AR was observed. Treatment with ketanserin attenuated the progression of experimental colitis in the mice, as indicated by body weight assessment, colon length, histological scores and cytokine release. The colonic macrophages from the ketanserin-treated mice with colitis exhibited a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines, with M2 polarization and impaired migration. The knockdown of 5-HT2AR using siRNA partly abolished the inhibitory effects of ketanserin on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bone marrow derived-macrophages (BMDMs), thus demonstrating that the inhibitory effects of ketanserin on the production of inflammatory cytokines are partly dependent on 5-HT2AR. Ketanserin also inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in BMDMs. In conclusion, the findings of the present study demonstrate that ketanserin alleviates colitis. Its anti-inflammatory effects may be due to the promotion of the anti-inflammatory function of macrophages through 5-HT2AR/NF-κB. PMID:26865503

  18. Activation of a distinct subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages following exposure to biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Do, C; Burd, T; Hong, L L

    1994-03-01

    A distinct subpopulation of tissue-associated pulmonary macrophages (TAPM) displayed tumoricidal activity towards syngeneic and xenogeneic targets following in vitro incubation with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP). This subpopulation, as well as, the predominant population of freely lavagable alveolar macrophages destroyed allogeneic targets following a similar incubation with either 6-0-stearoyl MDP (S-MDP) or recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma-induced in vivo tumoricidal activation of both populations of pulmonary macrophage was most effective when delivered either intravenously or via osmotic minipump infusion and least effective when administered by direct intratracheal instillation. The separate populations also displayed in vivo activation in response to liposome-encapsulated i.v. administered S-MDP. Under comparable conditions, IFN-alpha was not nearly as effective. Metabolic activation of TAPM, assessed by the release of increased levels of superoxide free radicals during phagocytosis, occurred following 24 hr exposure to S-MDP or lipopolysaccharide. Incorporation of these agents into multilamellar vesicle liposomes further augmented the release of superoxide observed at 24 hrs. Our results collectively demonstrated that a subpopulation of lung macrophage, a tissue-associated pulmonary macrophage, may be activated to a tumoricidal state and to release pronounced levels of oxygen free radicals following either in vitro or in situ treatment with several biological response modifiers. PMID:8194852

  19. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on macrophage differentiation, growth, and function: comparison of liquid and agar culture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Both spaceflight and skeletal unloading suppress the haematopoietic differentiation of macrophages (Sonnenfeld et al., Aviat. Space Environ. Med., 61:648-653, 1990; Armstrong et al., J. Appl. Physiol., 75:2734-2739, 1993). The mechanism behind this reduction in haematopoiesis has yet to be elucidated. However, changes in bone marrow extracellular matrix (ECM) may be involved. To further understand the role of ECM products in macrophage differentiation, we have performed experiments evaluating the effects of fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV on macrophage development and function. Bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured on four different ECM substrates in liquid culture medium showed less growth than those cultured on plastic. Significant morphological differences were seen on each of the substrates used. Phenotypically and functionally, as measured by class II major histocompatibility molecule (MHCII) expression, MAC-2 expression, and the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), these macrophages were similar. In contrast, bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in suspension, using agar, showed no difference in growth when exposed to ECM proteins. However, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion was affected by fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that the ECM products fibronectin, laminin, collagen type I, and collagen type IV have profound effects on macrophage development and function. Additionally, we suggest that an ECM-supplemented agar culture system provides an environment more analogous to in vivo bone marrow than does a traditional liquid culture system.

  20. Piperine metabolically regulates peritoneal resident macrophages to potentiate their functions against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Xu, Li-Hui; Huang, Mei-Yun; Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Hou, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zi-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-10-20

    Pepper, a daily-used seasoning for promoting appetite, is widely used in folk medicine for treating gastrointestinal diseases. Piperine is the major alkaloid in pepper and possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the mechanism for linking metabolic and medicinal activities of piperine remains unknown. Here we report that piperine robustly boosts mTORC1 activity by recruiting more system L1 amino acid transporter (SLC7A5/SLC3A2) to the cell membrane, thus promoting amino acid metabolism. Piperine-induced increase of mTORC1 activity in resident peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs) is correlated with enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α upon LPS stimulation. Such an enhancement of cytokine production could be abrogated by inhibitors of the mTOR signaling pathway, indicating mTOR's action in this process. Moreover, piperine treatment protected resident pMΦs from bacterium-induced apoptosis and disappearance, and increased their bacterial phagocytic ability. Consequently, piperine administration conferred mice resistance against bacterial infection and even sepsis. Our data highlight that piperine has the capacity to metabolically reprogram peritoneal resident macrophages to fortify their innate functions against bacterial infection. PMID:26439699

  1. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  2. Reactive-Oxygen-Species-Mediated P. aeruginosa Killing Is Functional in Human Cystic Fibrosis Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cifani, Noemi; Pompili, Barbara; Anile, Marco; Patella, Miriam; Diso, Daniele; Venuta, Federico; Cimino, Giuseppe; Quattrucci, Serena; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Porto, Paola Del

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen for chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. About 80% of adult CF patients have chronic P. aeruginosa infection, which accounts for much of the morbidity and most of the mortality. Both bacterial genetic adaptations and defective innate immune responses contribute to the bacteria persistence. It is well accepted that CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction impairs the airways-epithelium-mediated lung defence; however, other innate immune cells also appear to be affected, such as neutrophils and macrophages, which thus contribute to this infectious pathology in the CF lung. In macrophages, the absence of CFTR has been linked to defective P. aeruginosa killing, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. To learn more about macrophage dysfunction in CF patients, we investigated the generation of the oxidative burst and its impact on bacterial killing in CF macrophages isolated from peripheral blood or lung parenchyma of CF patients, after P. aeruginosa infection. Our data demonstrate that CF macrophages show an oxidative response of similar intensity to that of non-CF macrophages. Intracellular ROS are recognized as one of the earliest microbicidal mechanisms against engulfed pathogens that are activated by macrophages. Accordingly, NADPH inhibition resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular bacteria survival in CF and non-CF macrophages, both as monocyte-derived macrophages and as lung macrophages. These data strongly suggest that the contribution of ROS to P. aeruginosa killing is not affected by CFTR mutations. PMID:23977124

  3. Regulation of macrophage and dendritic cell function by pathogens and through immunomodulation in the avian mucosa.

    PubMed

    de Geus, Eveline D; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2013-11-01

    Macrophages (MPh) and dendritic cells (DC) are members of the mononuclear phagocyte system. In chickens, markers to distinguish MPh from DC are lacking, but whether MPh and DC can be distinguished in humans and mice is under debate, despite the availability of numerous markers. Mucosal MPh and DC are strategically located to ingest foreign antigens, suggesting they can rapidly respond to invading pathogens. This review addresses our current understanding of DC and MPh function, the receptors expressed by MPh and DC involved in pathogen recognition, and the responses of DC and MPh against respiratory and intestinal pathogens in the chicken. Furthermore, potential opportunities are described to modulate MPh and DC responses to enhance disease resistance, highlighting modulation through nutraceuticals and vaccination. PMID:23542704

  4. In vitro screening for the tumoricidal properties of international medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Soliman, Karam F A

    2009-03-01

    There is growing use of anticancer complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) worldwide. The purpose of the current study is to assess a sizeable variety of natural and plant sources of diverse origin, to ascertain prospective research directives for cancer treatment and potential new chemotherapy drug sources. In this study, 374 natural extracts (10 microg/mL-5 mg/mL) were evaluated for dose-dependent tumoricidal effects using immortal neuroblastoma of spontaneous malignant origin. The findings indicate no pattern of tumoricidal effects by diverse plants with similar families/genus under the classes Pinopsida, Equisetopsida, Lycopodiosida, Filicosida, Liliopsida Monocotyledons or Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons. The results indicate that many of the most commonly used CAMs exhibited relatively weak tumoricidal effects including cats claw, astragalus, ginseng, echinacea, mistletoe, milk thistle, slippery elm, cayenne, chamomile, don quai, meadowsweet, motherwort and shepherd's purse. The data demonstrate that the most potent plant extracts were randomly dispersed within the plantae kingdom (LC(50) = 31-490 microg/mL) in order of the lowest LC(50) Dioscorea villosa (Dioscoreaceae) > Sanguinaria canadensis (Papaveraceae) > Dipsacus asper (Dipsacaceae) > Populus balsamifera (Salicaceae) > Boswellia carteri (Burseraceae) > Cyamopsis psoralioides (Fabaceae) > Rhamnus cathartica (Rhamnaceae) > Larrea tridentate (Zygophyllaceae) > Dichroa febrifuga (Hydrangeaceae) > Batschia canescens (Boraginaceae) > Kochia scoparia (Chenopodiaceae) > Solanum xanthocarpum (Solanaceae) > Opoponax chironium (Umbelliferae) > Caulophyllum thalictroides (Berberidaceae) > Dryopteris crassirhizoma (Dryopteridaceae) > Garcinia cambogia (Clusiaceae) > Vitex agnus-castus (Verbenaceae) > Calamus draco (Arecaceae). These findings show tumoricidal effect by extracts of wild yam root, bloodroot, teasel root, bakuchi seed, dichroa root, kanta kari, garcinia fruit, mace, dragons blood and the biblically

  5. In Vitro Screening for the Tumoricidal Properties of International Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing use of anticancer complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) worldwide. The purpose of the current study is to assess a sizeable variety of natural and plant sources of diverse origin, to ascertain prospective research directives for cancer treatment and potential new chemotherapy drug sources. In this study, 374 natural extracts (10 μg/mL-5 mg/mL) were evaluated for dose-dependent tumoricidal effects using immortal neuroblastoma of spontaneous malignant origin. The findings indicate no pattern of tumoricidal effects by diverse plants with similar families/genus under the classes Pinopsida, Equisetopsida, Lycopodiosida, Filicosida, Liliopsida Monocotyledons or Magnoliopsida Dicotyledons. The results indicate that many of the most commonly used CAMs exhibited relatively weak tumoricidal effects including cats claw, astragalus, ginseng, echinacea, mistletoe, milk thistle, slippery elm, cayenne, chamomile, don quai, meadowsweet, motherwort and shepherd's purse. The data demonstrate that the most potent plant extracts were randomly dispersed within the plantae kingdom (LC50 = 31-490 μg/mL) in order of the lowest LC50 Dioscorea villosa (Dioscoreaceae) > Sanguinaria canadensis (Papaveraceae) > Dipsacus asper (Dipsacaceae) > Populus balsamifera (Salicaceae) > Boswellia carteri (Burseraceae) > Cyamopsis psoralioides (Fabaceae) > Rhamnus cathartica (Rhamnaceae) > Larrea tridentate (Zygophyllaceae) > Dichroa febrifuga (Hydrangeaceae) > Batschia canescens (Boraginaceae) > Kochia scoparia (Chenopodiaceae) > Solanum xanthocarpum (Solanaceae) > Opoponax chironium (Umbelliferae) > Caulophyllum thalictroides (Berberidaceae) > Dryopteris crassirhizoma (Dryopteridaceae) > Garcinia cambogia (Clusiaceae) > Vitex agnus-castus (Verbenaceae) > Calamus draco (Arecaceae). These findings show tumoricidal effect by extracts of wild yam root, bloodroot, teasel root, bakuchi seed, dichroa root, kanta kari, garcinia fruit, mace, dragons blood and the biblically referenced

  6. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N'-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC-paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC-PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  7. Nanomedicine engulfed by macrophages for targeted tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwen; Feng, Song; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Zhu, Qiuyun; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages, exhibiting high intrinsic accumulation and infiltration into tumor tissues, are a novel drug vehicle for directional drug delivery. However, the low drug-loading (DL) capacity and the drug cytotoxicity to the cell vehicle have limited the application of macrophages in tumor therapy. In this study, different drugs involving small molecular and nanoparticle drugs were loaded into intrinsic macrophages to find a better way to overcome these limitations. Their DL capacity and cytotoxicity to the macrophages were first compared. Furthermore, their phagocytic ratio, dynamic distributions, and tumoricidal effects were also investigated. Results indicated that more lipid-soluble molecules and DL particles can be phagocytized by macrophages than hydrophilic ones. In addition, the N-succinyl-N′-octyl chitosan (SOC) DL particles showed low cytotoxicity to the macrophage itself, while the dynamic biodistribution of macrophages engulfed with different particles/small molecules showed similar profiles, mainly excreted from liver to intestine pathway. Furthermore, macrophages loaded with SOC–paclitaxel (PTX) particles exhibited greater therapeutic efficacies than those of macrophages directly carrying small molecular drugs such as doxorubicin and PTX. Interestingly, macrophages displayed stronger targeting ability to the tumor site hypersecreting chemokine in immunocompetent mice in comparison to the tumor site secreting low levels of chemokine in immunodeficiency mice. Finally, results demonstrated that macrophages carrying SOC–PTX are a promising pharmaceutical preparation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:27601898

  8. Cell-Specific Determinants of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Function in Adipocytes and Macrophages ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Lefterova, Martina I.; Steger, David J.; Zhuo, David; Qatanani, Mohammed; Mullican, Shannon E.; Tuteja, Geetu; Manduchi, Elisabetta; Grant, Gregory R.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activator receptor γ (PPARγ) is the target of antidiabetic thiazolidinedione drugs, which improve insulin resistance but have side effects that limit widespread use. PPARγ is required for adipocyte differentiation, but it is also expressed in other cell types, notably macrophages, where it influences atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, and inflammation. A central question is whether PPARγ binding in macrophages occurs at genomic locations the same as or different from those in adipocytes. Here, utilizing chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq), we demonstrate that PPARγ cistromes in mouse adipocytes and macrophages are predominantly cell type specific. In thioglycolate-elicited macrophages, PPARγ colocalizes with the hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 in areas of open chromatin and histone acetylation, near a distinct set of immune genes in addition to a number of metabolic genes shared with adipocytes. In adipocytes, the macrophage-unique binding regions are marked with repressive histone modifications, typically associated with local chromatin compaction and gene silencing. PPARγ, when introduced into preadipocytes, bound only to regions depleted of repressive histone modifications, where it increased DNA accessibility, enhanced histone acetylation, and induced gene expression. Thus, the cell specificity of PPARγ function is regulated by cell-specific transcription factors, chromatin accessibility, and histone marks. Our data support the existence of an epigenomic hierarchy in which PPARγ binding to cell-specific sites not marked by repressive marks opens chromatin and leads to local activation marks, including histone acetylation. PMID:20176806

  9. Glucose-6-phosphatase-β, implicated in a congenital neutropenia syndrome, is essential for macrophage energy homeostasis and functionality

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyun Sik; Cheung, Yuk Yin; Lee, Young Mok; Mansfield, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase-β (G6Pase-β or G6PC3) deficiency, also known as severe congenital neutropenia syndrome 4, is characterized not only by neutropenia but also by impaired neutrophil energy homeostasis and functionality. We now show the syndrome is also associated with macrophage dysfunction, with murine G6pc3−/− macrophages having impairments in their respiratory burst, chemotaxis, calcium flux, and phagocytic activities. Consistent with a glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) metabolism deficiency, G6pc3−/− macrophages also have a lower glucose uptake and lower levels of G6P, lactate, and ATP than wild-type macrophages. Furthermore, the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits and membrane translocation of p47phox are down-regulated, and G6pc3−/− macrophages exhibit repressed trafficking in vivo both during an inflammatory response and in pregnancy. During pregnancy, the absence of G6Pase-β activity also leads to impaired energy homeostasis in the uterus and reduced fertility of G6pc3−/− mothers. Together these results show that immune deficiencies in this congenital neutropenia syndrome extend beyond neutrophil dysfunction. PMID:22246029

  10. Effects of dietary restriction or swimming on lymphocytes and macrophages functionality from old rats.

    PubMed

    Meneguello-Coutinho, Marcela; Caperuto, Erico; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Chamusca, Grabriela; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; Navalta, James Wilfred; Wasinski, Frederick; Cavaglieri, Claudia Regina; Prestes, Jonato; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira; Bacurau, Reury Frank

    2014-01-01

    Although aging compromises the functionality of macrophages (MΦ) and lymphocytes (LY), and dietary restriction (DR) and exercise partially counterbalance immunosenescence, it is unknown what effects of both strategies have on the functionality of these immune cells. Rats were randomly distributed into adult control (AD), older group (OLD), older submitted to 50% of DR (DR) and older submitted to swimming (EX) (n = 10 in each group). The function of immune cells (proliferative index, phagocytic capacity and H₂O₂ production), the weight and protein content of lymphoid organs (thymus and spleen), plasma glutamine concentration, interleukins (IL-1, IL-2, IL-6) and, immunoglobulins (IgA and IgG) were analysed. There was an increase of 74% in body weight in aged animals as compared with the AD group, while body weight reduced 19% in the DR as compared with the OLD group. Swimming training stimulated MΦ phagocytosis, while the EX group presented a decrease of the proliferative capacity of LY from the mesenteric lymph nodes (44% and 62%, respectively), when stimulated with ConA and LPS as compared with the old rats. These data demonstrated that DR and exercise affects differentially MΦ and LY function. PMID:24206426

  11. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype. PMID:25319333

  12. Lipids as tumoricidal components of human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET): unique and shared effects on signaling and death.

    PubMed

    Ho, James C S; Storm, Petter; Rydström, Anna; Bowen, Ben; Alsin, Fredrik; Sullivan, Louise; Ambite, Inès; Mok, K H; Northen, Trent; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-06-14

    Long-chain fatty acids are internalized by receptor-mediated mechanisms or receptor-independent diffusion across cytoplasmic membranes and are utilized as nutrients, building blocks, and signaling intermediates. Here we describe how the association of long-chain fatty acids to a partially unfolded, extracellular protein can alter the presentation to target cells and cellular effects. HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of partially unfolded α-lactalbumin and oleic acid (OA). As OA lacks independent tumoricidal activity at concentrations equimolar to HAMLET, the contribution of the lipid has been debated. We show by natural abundance (13)C NMR that the lipid in HAMLET is deprotonated and by chromatography that oleate rather than oleic acid is the relevant HAMLET constituent. Compared with HAMLET, oleate (175 μm) showed weak effects on ion fluxes and gene expression. Unlike HAMLET, which causes metabolic paralysis, fatty acid metabolites were less strongly altered. The functional overlap increased with higher oleate concentrations (500 μm). Cellular responses to OA were weak or absent, suggesting that deprotonation favors cellular interactions of fatty acids. Fatty acids may thus exert some of their essential effects on host cells when in the deprotonated state and when presented in the context of a partially unfolded protein. PMID:23629662

  13. Cooperative and alternate functions for STIM1 and STIM2 in macrophage activation and in the context of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sogkas, Georgios; Stegner, David; Syed, Shahzad N; Vögtle, Timo; Rau, Eduard; Gewecke, Britta; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Gessner, Johannes Engelbert

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling in immune cells, including macrophages, controls a wide range of effector functions that are critical for host defense and contribute to inflammation and autoimmune diseases. However, receptor-mediated Ca2+ responses consist of complex mechanisms that make it difficult to identify the pathogenesis and develop therapy. Previous studies have revealed the importance of the Ca2+ sensor STIM1 and store-operated Ca2+-entry (SOCE) for Fcγ-receptor activation and IgG-induced inflammation. Here, we identify the closely related STIM2 as mediator of cell migration and cytokine production downstream of GPCR and TLR4 activation in macrophages and show that mice lacking STIM2 are partially resistant to inflammatory responses in peritonitis and LPS-induced inflammation. Interestingly, STIM2 modulates the migratory behavior of macrophages independent from STIM1 and without a strict requirement for Ca2+ influx. While STIM2 also contributes in part to FcγR activation, the C5a-induced amplification of IgG-mediated phagocytosis is mainly dependent on STIM1. Blockade of STIM-related functions limits mortality in experimental models of AIHA and LPS-sepsis in normal mice. These results suggest benefits of Ca2+-inhibition for suppression of exacerbated immune reactions and illustrate the significance of alternate functions of STIM proteins in macrophage activation and in the context of innate immune inflammation. PMID:26417434

  14. Cooperative and alternate functions for STIM1 and STIM2 in macrophage activation and in the context of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sogkas, Georgios; Stegner, David; Syed, Shahzad N; Vögtle, Timo; Rau, Eduard; Gewecke, Britta; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Gessner, Johannes Engelbert

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling in immune cells, including macrophages, controls a wide range of effector functions that are critical for host defense and contribute to inflammation and autoimmune diseases. However, receptor-mediated Ca(2+) responses consist of complex mechanisms that make it difficult to identify the pathogenesis and develop therapy. Previous studies have revealed the importance of the Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and store-operated Ca(2+)-entry (SOCE) for Fcγ-receptor activation and IgG-induced inflammation. Here, we identify the closely related STIM2 as mediator of cell migration and cytokine production downstream of GPCR and TLR4 activation in macrophages and show that mice lacking STIM2 are partially resistant to inflammatory responses in peritonitis and LPS-induced inflammation. Interestingly, STIM2 modulates the migratory behavior of macrophages independent from STIM1 and without a strict requirement for Ca(2+) influx. While STIM2 also contributes in part to FcγR activation, the C5a-induced amplification of IgG-mediated phagocytosis is mainly dependent on STIM1. Blockade of STIM-related functions limits mortality in experimental models of AIHA and LPS-sepsis in normal mice. These results suggest benefits of Ca(2+)-inhibition for suppression of exacerbated immune reactions and illustrate the significance of alternate functions of STIM proteins in macrophage activation and in the context of innate immune inflammation. PMID:26417434

  15. Changes in lymphocyte subsets and macrophage functions from high, short-term dietary ethanol in C57/BL6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Abril, E.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of a diet containing 7% ethanol (36% of total calories) for 8 days to male C57/BL6 mice resulted in significant changes in functioning of macrophages. Peritoneal exudate macrophages from the ethanol-fed mice released more tumor cell cytotoxic materials upon culturing in vitro than cells from controls. However, peritoneal exudate cells continued to respond to exogenous beta carotene in vitro to produce additional cytotoxic materials. Phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells in vitro was suppressed in cells from ethanol treated mice. The number of splenic lymphocytes of various subsets was significantly changed by the ethanol exposure. Total T cells and T suppressor cells were lower, with a significant decrease in B cells containing IgM on their surface. The percentage of spleen cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced. It is concluded that short-term chronic consumption of dietary ethanol, which was sufficient to produce physical dependence, results in significant alterations in lymphocyte subtypes and suppression of some macrophage functions.

  16. Long-term effect of early protein malnutrition on growth curve, hematological parameters and macrophage function of rats.

    PubMed

    Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel; Laraya, Rodrigo Domingues; Silva, Paula Roberta Colacino; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Felipe, Ionice; Mathias, Paulo Cezar

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of mild-early maternal protein malnutrition on weight gain, hematological parameters and macrophage function in rats at adult age, we compared rats whose dams were fed diets containing either 9.5% (low protein-LPD) or 23% protein (normal-NPD) for the first 12 d of lactation. At 80 d of age, the functions of spreading, phagocytosis and killing Candida albicans were determined in resident peritoneal macrophages, whereas leukocytes and red blood cells were counted in peripheral blood. The number of resident peritoneal macrophages from LPD was the same as from NPD, but the ability of spreading and phagocytosing opsonised yeast was impaired. Besides, they were not able to block the germ tube formation or kill C. albicans to the same extent as in the control group. The low protein diet produced a significant reduction in the pups' growth and in hematological parameters although no difference was found in leukocyte counts. Taken together the data suggest that protein malnutrition during early lactation induces permanent alterations in macrophage function, body composition and hematological status, which are not restored completely even after a normal protein diet is supplied. PMID:17330504

  17. Surface morphology and function of human pulmonary alveolar macrophages from smokers and non-smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Ando, M; Sugimoto, M; Nishi, R; Suga, M; Horio, S; Kohrogi, H; Shimazu, K; Araki, S

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages were obtained by saline lavage from 23 healthy male volunteers--10 non-smokers and 13 cigarette smokers. Lavage produced three times as many alveolar macrophages in smokers than in non-smokers. When macrophages from smokers and from non-smokers were incubated in vitro, more cells from smokers adhered to glass, spread out, and showed enhanced nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction. The surface morphology of alveolar macrophages from smokers showed more with a plate like appearance and ridge like membrane surface, while the macrophages from non-smokers were predominantly spherical with ruffles. The proportions of cells which stained highly for beta galactosidase were 55% in smokers and 11% in non-smokers. Thus, in a resting state in vitro, alveolar macrophages from smokers were more active than those from non-smokers. When, however, macrophages from smokers and non-smokers were incubated with immunobeads and with opsonised or non-opsonised BCG, the phagocytic activity and stimulated NBT reduction of alveolar macrophages from smokers were similar to or somewhat less than those of non-smokers. Images PMID:6438822

  18. Immunophenotypic differences between osteoclasts and macrophage polykaryons: immunohistological distinction and implications for osteoclast ontogeny and function.

    PubMed Central

    Athanasou, N A; Quinn, J

    1990-01-01

    The antigenic phenotype of human fetal osteoclasts was compared with that of human tissue macrophages and macrophage polykaryons in foreign body lesions using a large number of monoclonal antibodies directed against myeloid (granulocyte/mononuclear phagocyte) antigens. Osteoclasts expressed a restricted range of macrophage-associated antigens including CD13, CD15A, CD44, CD45, CD54, (ICAM-1), CD71 (transferrin receptor), and CD68. These antigens were also present on macrophages and macrophage polykaryons both of which also strongly expressed CD11a,b,c, CD18, (LFA family), CD14, CD31, CD36, CD37, CD39 and CD43 antigens. There was also weak and occasional expression of CD16 (FcRIII), CD25 (interleukin 2 receptor), CD32 (FcRII), CD35 (C3b receptor) and HLA-DR by macrophage polykaryons. The presence of some macrophage associated antigens on osteoclasts is consistent with their originating from cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. The numerous differences in antigenic phenotype between osteoclasts and macrophage polykaryons, however, suggest that their pathways of development and differentiation are not identical. The differences discerned in antigenic phenotype should also permit distinction between these polykaryons (and possibly their mononuclear precursors) in normal and diseased tissues. Images PMID:2266187

  19. Purification and sidewall functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and resulting bioactivity in two macrophage models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Raymond F.; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Ming; Ka, Ibrahima; Yang, Feng; Ma, Dongling; Porter, Dale W.; Wu, Nianqiang; Holian, Andrij

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the consequences of surface carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on bioactivity. Since commercial raw MWCNT contain impurities that may affect their bioactivity, HCl refluxing was exploited to purify raw “as-received” MWCNT by removing the amorphous carbon layer on the MWCNT surface and reducing the metal impurities (e.g. Ni). The removal of amorphous carbon layer was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, the HCl-purified MWCNT provided more available reaction sites, leading to enhanced sidewall functionalization. The sidewall of HCl-purified MWCNT was further functionalized with the −COOH moiety by HNO3 oxidation. This process resulted in four distinct MWCNT: raw, purified, −COOH-terminated raw MWCNT, and −COOH-terminated purified MWCNT. Freshly isolated alveolar macrophages from C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to these nanomaterials to determine the effects of the surface chemistry on the bioactivity in terms of cell viability and inflammasome activation. Inflammasome activation was confirmed using inhibitors of cathepsin B and Caspase-1. Purification reduced the cell toxicity and inflammasome activation slightly compared to raw MWCNT. In contrast, functionalization of MWCNT with the −COOH group dramatically reduced the cytotoxicity and inflammasome activation. Similar results were seen using THP-1 cells supporting their potential use for high-throughput screening. This study demonstrated that the toxicity and bioactivity of MWCNT were diminished by removal of the Ni contamination and/or addition of −COOH groups to the sidewalls. PMID:23480196

  20. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M; Terman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68-100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p < 0.0001). SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal RBCs

  1. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M.; Terman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68–100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p < 0.0001). SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal

  2. Phenotypical and functional characterization of alveolar macrophage subpopulations in the lungs of NO2-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Garn, Holger; Siese, Anette; Stumpf, Sabine; Wensing, Anka; Renz, Harald; Gemsa, Diethard

    2006-01-01

    Background Alveolar macrophages (AM) are known to play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions in the lung, e.g. during the development of chronic lung diseases. Exposure of rats to NO2 has recently been shown to induce a shift in the activation type of AM that is characterized by reduced TNF-α and increased IL-10 production. So far it is unclear, whether a functional shift in the already present AM population or the occurrence of a new, phenotypically different AM population is responsible for these observations. Methods AM from rat and mice were analyzed by flow cytometry for surface marker expression and in vivo staining with PKH26 was applied to characterize newly recruited macrophages. Following magnetic bead separation, AM subpopulations were further analyzed for cytokine, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. Following in vitro stimulation, cytokines were quantitated in the culture supernatants by ELISA. Results In untreated rats the majority of AM showed a low expression of the surface antigen ED7 (CD11b) and a high ED9 (CD172) expression (ED7-/ED9high). In contrast, NO2 exposure induced the occurrence of a subpopulation characterized by the marker combination ED7+/ED9low. Comparable changes were observed in mice and by in vivo labeling of resident AM using the dye PKH26 we could demonstrate that CD11b positive cells mainly comprise newly recruited AM. Subsequent functional analyses of separated AM subpopulations of the rat revealed that ED7+ cells showed an increased expression and production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 whereas TNF-α production was lower compared to ED7- AM. However, iNOS and IL-12 expression were also increased in the ED7+ subpopulation. In addition, these cells showed a significantly higher mRNA expression for the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-7, -8, -9, and -12. Conclusion NO2 exposure induces the infiltration of an AM subpopulation

  3. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology. PMID:25555439

  4. Effects of inhaled ceramic fibres on macrophage function of rat lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Y; Yamato, H; Kido, M; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Fujino, A; Yokosaki, Y

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the biological effect of ceramic fibres on the clearance function of alveolar macrophages (AMs) morphological changes and phagocytic activity of AMs were assessed. Rats were exposed to respirable ceramic fibres with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 4.4 microns and a concentration of 20.1 mg/m3 in an exposure chamber. They were killed after one week (group A) and two weeks (group B) of exposure, and four weeks (group C) and 12 weeks (group D) after exposure for two weeks. The AMs recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from each test group were incubated with yeast and phagocytic activity was determined by counting the number of yeast cells in AMs. Morphological features of AMs were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and quantified according to morphological changes. Total cell counts in BAL fluid from exposed rats in group A were higher than in control rats. Phagocytic activity of exposed AMs in group B and C exceeded that of control AMs. Morphological changes of the exposed AMs in groups A, B, and C were greater than those of control AMs. These findings suggest that ceramic fibres induced the phagocytic activity and morphological changes in AMs, and that the clearance function of AMs was stimulated by the inhaled ceramic fibres. Images Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:8124467

  5. The Development of Macrophage-Mediated Cell Therapy to Improve Skeletal Muscle Function after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rybalko, Viktoriya; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Merscham-Banda, Melissa; Suggs, Laura J.; Farrar, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration following acute injury is a multi-step process involving complex changes in tissue microenvironment. Macrophages (MPs) are one of the key cell types involved in orchestration and modulation of the repair process. Multiple studies highlight the essential role of MPs in the control of the myogenic program and inflammatory response during skeletal muscle regeneration. A variety of MP phenotypes have been identified and characterized in vitro as well as in vivo. As such, MPs hold great promise for cell-based therapies in the field of regenerative medicine. In this study we used bone-marrow derived in vitro LPS/IFN-y-induced M1 MPs to enhance functional muscle recovery after tourniquet-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury (TK-I/R). We detected a 15% improvement in specific tension and force normalized to mass after M1 (LPS/IFN-γ) MP transplantation 24 hours post-reperfusion. Interestingly, we found that M0 bone marrow-derived unpolarized MPs significantly impaired muscle function highlighting the complexity of temporally coordinated skeletal muscle regenerative program. Furthermore, we show that delivery of M1 (LPS/IFN-γ) MPs early in regeneration accelerates myofiber repair, decreases fibrotic tissue deposition and increases whole muscle IGF-I expression. PMID:26717325

  6. The age-related neuroinflammatory environment promotes macrophage activation, which negatively impacts synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Costello, Derek A; Keenan, Kathryn; McManus, Róisín M; Falvey, Aidan; Lynch, Marina A

    2016-07-01

    The impact of infiltration of macrophages into the brain is debatable with evidence of both beneficial and detrimental effects. Recent work suggests that inflammatory macrophages, with an inflammatory phenotype that resembles the M1 activation state, may be detrimental, whereas anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages may be beneficial. We set up a model to examine the response of bone marrow-derived macrophages to the inflammatory milieu that occurs in the aged brain. Expression of MHCII and CD40 was increased in macrophages incubated with soluble brain extract prepared from aged, compared with young, mice and this was accompanied by increased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. Analysis of soluble brain extract indicated that it contained increased concentrations of several inflammatory mediators and, importantly, when bone marrow-derived macrophages were incubated in the inflammatory cytokines that were increased and applied to hippocampal slices, long-term potentiation was inhibited. The data suggest that infiltrating macrophages respond to local conditions and, in the case of aging, adopt an inflammatory phenotype that ultimately has a neurodetrimental effect. PMID:27255823

  7. Superoxide production by phagocytosing macrophages in relation to the intracellular distribution of oxygen.

    PubMed

    James, P E; Grinberg, O Y; Swartz, H M

    1998-07-01

    We simultaneously measured the concentration of oxygen ([O2]) within the phagosomal and extracellular compartments of macrophages. By combining electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry techniques with that of spin-trapping, we found that a significant difference in oxygen concentration ([O2]) exists between these two compartments and we were able to monitor (1) how [O2] in the extracellular compartment and the rate of mitochondrial consumption affected this difference in [O2], and (2) to what extent this gradient of [O2] influenced production of reactive oxygen species by phagosomes. Under conditions where the [O2] in the inflowing gas was high (210 microM; air), the [O2] in the extracellular and phagosomal compartments was 180 and 141 microM, respectively. This was sufficient to maintain maximum superoxide production in these cells. When extracellular [O2] was reduced to 84 or 36 microM, the [O2] in phagosomes within the cells (31.7 and 7.7 microM, respectively) was too low to maintain superoxide production by the NADPH-oxidase system within the phagosomes. The [O2] in the extracellular compartments of these samples, however, was always sufficient to maintain superoxide production by phagosomes at the cell surface. Our findings suggest that the distribution of oxygen surrounding and within macrophages can influence their ability to perform microbicidal and tumoricidal functions, even at an [O2] in the media that appears to be adequate. PMID:9665279

  8. Macrophage-tumor cell interactions regulate the function of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell-macrophage interactions change as the tumor progresses, and the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a major role in this interplay. In early stages, macrophages employ their killing mechanisms, particularly the generation of high concentrations of NO and its derivative reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to initiate tumor cell apoptosis and destroy emerging transformed cells. If the tumor escapes the immune system and grows, macrophages that infiltrate it are reprogramed in situ by the tumor microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) and immunosuppressive cytokines inhibit iNOS activity and lead to production of low amounts of NO/RNS, which are pro-angiogenic and support tumor growth and metastasis by inducing growth factors (e.g., VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We review here the different roles of NO/RNS in tumor progression and inhibition, and the mechanisms that regulate iNOS expression and NO production, highlighting the role of different subtypes of macrophages and the microenvironment. We finally claim that some tumor cells may become resistant to macrophage-induced death by increasing their expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which leads to inhibition of iNOS translation. This implies that some cooperation between tumor cells and macrophages is required to induce tumor cell death, and that tumor cells may control their fate. Thus, in order to induce susceptibility of tumors cells to macrophage-induced death, we suggest a new therapeutic approach that couples manipulation of miR-146a levels in tumors with macrophage therapy, which relies on ex vivo stimulation of macrophages and their re-introduction to tumors. PMID:23785333

  9. Macrophage-tumor cell interactions regulate the function of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Rahat, Michal A; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell-macrophage interactions change as the tumor progresses, and the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a major role in this interplay. In early stages, macrophages employ their killing mechanisms, particularly the generation of high concentrations of NO and its derivative reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to initiate tumor cell apoptosis and destroy emerging transformed cells. If the tumor escapes the immune system and grows, macrophages that infiltrate it are reprogramed in situ by the tumor microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) and immunosuppressive cytokines inhibit iNOS activity and lead to production of low amounts of NO/RNS, which are pro-angiogenic and support tumor growth and metastasis by inducing growth factors (e.g., VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We review here the different roles of NO/RNS in tumor progression and inhibition, and the mechanisms that regulate iNOS expression and NO production, highlighting the role of different subtypes of macrophages and the microenvironment. We finally claim that some tumor cells may become resistant to macrophage-induced death by increasing their expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which leads to inhibition of iNOS translation. This implies that some cooperation between tumor cells and macrophages is required to induce tumor cell death, and that tumor cells may control their fate. Thus, in order to induce susceptibility of tumors cells to macrophage-induced death, we suggest a new therapeutic approach that couples manipulation of miR-146a levels in tumors with macrophage therapy, which relies on ex vivo stimulation of macrophages and their re-introduction to tumors. PMID:23785333

  10. Microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages: functionally distinct populations that act in concert in CNS plasticity and repair

    PubMed Central

    London, Anat; Cohen, Merav; Schwartz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Functional macrophage heterogeneity is recognized outside the central nervous system (CNS), where alternatively activated macrophages can perform immune-resolving functions. Such functional heterogeneity was largely ignored in the CNS, with respect to the resident microglia and the myeloid-derived cells recruited from the blood following injury or disease, previously defined as blood-derived microglia; both were indistinguishably perceived detrimental. Our studies have led us to view the myeloid-derived infiltrating cells as functionally distinct from the resident microglia, and accordingly, to name them monocyte-derived macrophages (mo-MΦ). Although microglia perform various maintenance and protective roles, under certain conditions when they can no longer provide protection, mo-MΦ are recruited to the damaged CNS; there, they act not as microglial replacements but rather assistant cells, providing activities that cannot be timely performed by the resident cells. Here, we focus on the functional heterogeneity of microglia/mo-MΦ, emphasizing that, as opposed to the mo-MΦ, microglia often fail to timely acquire the phenotype essential for CNS repair. PMID:23596391

  11. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization. PMID:26854393

  12. In vitro modeling of endothelial interaction with macrophages and pericytes demonstrates Notch signaling function in the vascular microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Ian W; Du, Jing; Cong, Zhuangzhuang; Cho, Bennet S; Klein, Alyssa M; Dieck, Chelsea L; Chaudhri, Reyhaan A; Cuervo, Henar; Herts, James H; Kitajewski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by complex interactions between endothelial cells and support cells of the vascular microenvironment, such as tissue myeloid cells and vascular mural cells. Multicellular interactions during angiogenesis are difficult to study in animals and challenging in a reductive setting. We incorporated stromal cells into an established bead-based capillary sprouting assay to develop assays that faithfully reproduce major steps of vessel sprouting and maturation. We observed that macrophages enhance angiogenesis, increasing the number and length of endothelial sprouts, a property we have dubbed "angiotrophism." We found that polarizing macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory profile further increased their angiotrophic stimulation of vessel sprouting, and this increase was dependent on macrophage Notch signaling. To study endothelial/pericyte interactions, we added vascular pericytes directly to the bead-bound endothelial monolayer. These pericytes formed close associations with the endothelial sprouts, causing increased sprout number and vessel caliber. We found that Jagged1 expression and Notch signaling are essential for the growth of both endothelial cells and pericytes and may function in their interaction. We observed that combining endothelial cells with both macrophages and pericytes in the same sprouting assay has multiplicative effects on sprouting. These results significantly improve bead-capillary sprouting assays and provide an enhanced method for modeling interactions between the endothelium and the vascular microenvironment. Achieving this in a reductive in vitro setting represents a significant step toward a better understanding of the cellular elements that contribute to the formation of mature vasculature. PMID:26965898

  13. Optimization on conditions of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides liposome by RSM and its effects on the peritoneal macrophages function.

    PubMed

    Bo, Ruonan; Ma, Xia; Feng, Yibo; Zhu, Qian; Huang, Yee; Liu, Zhenguang; Liu, Cui; Gao, Zhenzhen; Hu, Yuanliang; Wang, Deyun

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the preparation conditions of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides liposome (LBPL) by response surface methodology (RSM) and to investigate the effect of LBPL activating function of peritoneal macrophages. LBPL was prepared using the reverse-phase evaporation method. The optimal preparation conditions of LBPL by RSM were as follows: the ratio of lipid to drug (w/w) of 25:1, the ultrasound time of 14 min and the ratio of soybean phospholipids to cholesterol (w/w) of 2.4:1. Under these conditions, the experimental encapsulation efficiency of LBPL was 86.37±0.63%, which was close to the predicted value. These indicated that LBPL with high entrapping efficiency and small particle size could be prepared by the reverse-phase evaporation method, which is applied easily. Furthermore, macrophages are the key players in the innate immune system. LBPL could effectively enhance peritoneal macrophages phagocytosis and resulted in inducing NO (nitric oxide) production in mouse peritoneal macrophages. PMID:25498628

  14. Glutathione Oxidation Is Associated With Airway Macrophage Functional Impairment in Children With Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Teague, W. Gerald; Burwell, Leandrea; Brown, Meredith S.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2011-01-01

    Airway cellular dysfunction is a differentiating feature of severe asthma in children that may be related to an imbalance of the antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). We hypothesized that oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of children with severe asthma would contribute to altered airway macrophage (AM) GSH homeostasis and AM cellular dysfunction. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 64 asthmatic children (severe asthma, n = 43). GSH, GSSG, markers of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and IL-8 were quantified in the BAL supernatant. GSH, GSSG, activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase, apoptosis, and phagocytosis were assessed in isolated AMs. Children with severe asthma had increased GSSG, lipid peroxidation, byproducts of DNA oxidation, and inflammation in the ELF. This imbalance of GSH homeostasis was also noted intracellularly within the AMs and was associated with decreased HDAC activities, increased apoptosis, and impaired phagocytosis. In vitro GSH supplementation inhibited apoptosis and rescued phagocytosis in children with severe asthma. Severe asthma in children is characterized by altered airway and intracellular AM GSH homeostasis that translates to impaired AM function. Interventions to restore airway GSH homeostasis may be warranted in children with severe asthma. PMID:20975618

  15. Glutathione oxidation is associated with airway macrophage functional impairment in children with severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Teague, W Gerald; Burwell, Leandrea; Brown, Meredith S; Brown, Lou Ann S

    2011-02-01

    Airway cellular dysfunction is a differentiating feature of severe asthma in children that may be related to an imbalance of the antioxidant, glutathione (GSH). We hypothesized that oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of children with severe asthma would contribute to altered airway macrophage (AM) GSH homeostasis and AM cellular dysfunction. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 64 asthmatic children (severe asthma, n = 43). GSH, GSSG, markers of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and IL-8 were quantified in the BAL supernatant. GSH, GSSG, activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase, apoptosis, and phagocytosis were assessed in isolated AMs. Children with severe asthma had increased GSSG, lipid peroxidation, byproducts of DNA oxidation, and inflammation in the ELF. This imbalance of GSH homeostasis was also noted intracellularly within the AMs and was associated with decreased HDAC activities, increased apoptosis, and impaired phagocytosis. In vitro GSH supplementation inhibited apoptosis and rescued phagocytosis in children with severe asthma. Severe asthma in children is characterized by altered airway and intracellular AM GSH homeostasis that translates to impaired AM function. Interventions to restore airway GSH homeostasis may be warranted in children with severe asthma. PMID:20975618

  16. The effect of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and function of rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Harper, A; Gharibian, J; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1978-04-01

    Alveolar macrophages harvested by bronchopulmonary lavage from rats exposed to tobacco smoke for 30 days ("smokers") showed alterations in oxidative metabolism, lactate production and phagocytosis of inert starch particles when compared with control macrophages. Phagocytosis of viable Staphylococcus aureus was unaffected by tobacco smoke. Glucose oxidation measured by conversion of glucose-1-14C to 14CO2 moderately affected while oxidation of glucose-6-14C to 14CO2 was not. Smokers routinely yielded fewer cells than controls, though these cells contained approximately 17% more protein than did controls. Opsonization of particles was not necessary for macrophages from either smoker or control animals to manifest a respiratory burst and increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide release during phagocytosis. The glycolytic inhibitors, sodium fluoride and iodoacetamide, while effectively blocking glycolysis, did not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophages from either group. The results reported clearly distinguish alveolar macrophages from other phagocytic cells (peritoneal macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes) and suggest a state of non-specific activation caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:205549

  17. The MAPK ERK5, but not ERK1/2, inhibits the progression of monocytic phenotype to the functioning macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuening; Pesakhov, Stella; Harrison, Jonathan S; Kafka, Michael; Danilenko, Michael; Studzinski, George P

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways present targets for pharmacological agents with potential for treatment of neoplastic diseases, with some disease remissions already recorded. However, cellular compensatory mechanisms usually negate the initial success. For instance, attempts to interrupt aberrant signaling downstream of the frequently mutated ras by inhibiting ERK1/2 has shown only limited usefulness for cancer therapy. Here, we examined how ERK5, that overlaps the functions of ERK1/2 in cell proliferation and survival, functions in a manner distinct from ERK1/2 in human AML cells induced to differentiate by 1,25D-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D). Using inhibitors of ERK1/2 and of MEK5/ERK5 at concentrations specific for each kinase in HL60 and U937 cells, we observed that selective inhibition of the kinase activity of ERK5, but not of ERK1/2, in the presence of 1,25D resulted in macrophage-like cell morphology and enhancement of phagocytic activity. Importantly, this was associated with increased expression of the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR), but was not seen when M-CSFR expression was knocked down. Interestingly, inhibition of ERK1/2 led to activation of ERK5 in these cells. Our results support the hypothesis that ERK5 negatively regulates the expression of M-CSFR, and thus has a restraining function on macrophage differentiation. The addition of pharmacological inhibitors of ERK5 may influence trials of differentiation therapy of AML. - Highlights: • ERK5 has at least some functions in AML cells which are distinct from those of ERK1/2. • ERK5 activity negatively controls the expression of M-CSFR. • ERK5 retards the progression of differentiation from monocyte to functional macrophage.

  18. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  19. Alterations in rat pulmonary macrophage function by the immunosuppressive agents cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Kahan, B D

    1983-06-01

    Disturbances of the immune response of the lung induced by the action of immunosuppressive agents on the functional abilities of rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were analyzed following in vitro incubation or in vivo administration (for 30 days) of cyclosporinea, (CsA) azathioprine (Az) or prednisolone (Pr). Two major parameters were analyzed: oxygen consumption and superoxide release as indices of the overall state of oxygen metabolism of these cells reflecting the integrity of PAM oxidative mechanisms of microbicidal activity, and chemotaxis, an event clinically important for normal defense to infection. In vitro incubation with cyclosporine at concentrations as low as 10(-9) M caused a 52% inhibition of PAM superoxide release, but Az had no effect at concentrations up to 10(-6) M. Prednisolone caused a 38% inhibition of superoxide release; comparable levels of inhibition with Pr required concentrations at least 10-fold greater than with cyclosporine. Further experiments indicated that cyclosporine induced a 40% inhibition after contact with PAM for only 30 min. In vivo experiments indicated that cyclosporine (5 mg/kg), Az (20 mg/kg), or Pr (2 or 0.5 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally had no effect on the number of PAM available for host defense, PAM oxygen consumption, or PAM superoxide release. However, PAM from cyclosporine-treated animals demonstrated complete inhibition of active migration or chemotaxis in modified Boyden chambers upon incubation with formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). The effect was apparently dampened by simultaneous administration of Pr with cyclosporine. These experiments suggest that with the exception of a marked effect on chemotaxis the in vivo effects of physiologic amounts of cyclosporine on PAM function are modest compared with the marked depression after in vitro addition. PMID:6306880

  20. Effects of IRF1 and IFN-β interaction on the M1 polarization of macrophages and its antitumor function

    PubMed Central

    XIE, CHANGLI; LIU, CUIYING; WU, BITAO; LIN, YAN; MA, TINGTING; XIONG, HAIYU; WANG, QIN; LI, ZIWEI; MA, CHENYU; TU, ZHIGUANG

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages that differentiate from precursor monocytes can be polarized into a classically activated (M1) or alternatively activated (M2) status depending on different stimuli. Generally, interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are considered the classical stimuli with which to establish M1 polarization. IFN regulatory factor (IRF)1 and IFN-β are two crucial molecules involved in IFN-γ- and LPS-initialed signaling. However, the association between IRF1 and IFN-β in the context of the M1 polarization of macrophages is not yet fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that U937-derived macrophages, in response to IFN-γ and LPS stimulation, readily acquire an M1 status, indicated by the increased expression of interleukin (IL)-12, IL-6, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the M1-specific cell surface antigen, CD86, and the decreased expression of the M2-specific mannose receptor, CD206. However, the knockdown of IRF1 in U937-derived macrophages led to an impaired M1 status, as indicated by the decreased expression of the above-mentioned M1 markers, and the increased expression of the M2 markers, CD206 and IL-10. A similar phenomenon was observed in the M1 macrophages in which IFN-β was inhibited. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IRF1 and IFN-β may interact with each other in the IFN-γ- and LPS-initiated signaling pathway, and contribute to the IRF5 regulation of M1 macrophages. In addition, the conditioned medium collected from the M1 macrophages in which IRF1 or IFN-β were inhibited, exerted pro-tumor effects on the HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells, as indicated by an increase in proliferation, the inhibition of apoptosis and an enhanced invasion capability. The findings of our study suggest that the interactions of IRF1, IFN-β and IRF5 are involved in the M1 polarization of macro phages and have antitumor functions. These data may provide a novel antitumor strategy for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27176664

  1. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bannantine, John P; Stabel, Judith R; Laws, Elizabeth; D Cardieri, Maria Clara; Souza, Cleverson D

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages. PMID:26076028

  2. Rhinovirus infection of allergen-sensitized and -challenged mice induces eotaxin release from functionally polarized macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Deepti R; Bowman, Emily R; Schneider, Dina; Wang, Qiong; Shim, Jee; Zhao, Ying; Linn, Marisa J; McHenry, Christina L; Gosangi, Babina; Bentley, J Kelley; Tsai, Wan C; Sajjan, Umadevi S; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Hershenson, Marc B

    2010-08-15

    Human rhinovirus is responsible for the majority of virus-induced asthma exacerbations. To determine the immunologic mechanisms underlying rhinovirus (RV)-induced asthma exacerbations, we combined mouse models of allergic airways disease and human rhinovirus infection. We inoculated OVA-sensitized and challenged BALB/c mice with rhinovirus serotype 1B, a minor group strain capable of infecting mouse cells. Compared with sham-infected, OVA-treated mice, virus-infected mice showed increased lung infiltration with neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, airway cholinergic hyperresponsiveness, and increased lung expression of cytokines including eotaxin-1/CCL11, IL-4, IL-13, and IFN-gamma. Administration of anti-eotaxin-1 attenuated rhinovirus-induced airway eosinophilia and responsiveness. Immunohistochemical analysis showed eotaxin-1 in the lung macrophages of virus-infected, OVA-treated mice, and confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed colocalization of rhinovirus, eotaxin-1, and IL-4 in CD68-positive cells. RV inoculation of lung macrophages from OVA-treated, but not PBS-treated, mice induced expression of eotaxin-1, IL-4, and IL-13 ex vivo. Macrophages from OVA-treated mice showed increased expression of arginase-1, Ym-1, Mgl-2, and IL-10, indicating a shift in macrophage activation status. Depletion of macrophages from OVA-sensitized and -challenged mice reduced eosinophilic inflammation and airways responsiveness following RV infection. We conclude that augmented airway eosinophilic inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in RV-infected mice with allergic airways disease is directed in part by eotaxin-1. Airway macrophages from mice with allergic airways disease demonstrate a change in activation state characterized in part by altered eotaxin and IL-4 production in response to RV infection. These data provide a new paradigm to explain RV-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:20644177

  3. Interplay between invertebrate C3a with vertebrate macrophages: functional characterization of immune activities of amphioxus C3a.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Li, Mengyang; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    Our current knowledge of the structure and function of C3a comes from the study of vertebrate C3a anaphylatoxins, virtually nothing is known about the structure and function of C3a molecules in invertebrates. Here we demonstrated that C3a from the invertebrate chordate Branchiostoma japonicum, BjC3a, was similar to vertebrate C3a possessing potential antibacterial activity, as revealed by sequence analysis and computational modeling. The antibacterial activity of BjC3a was definitely confirmed by both antibacterial assay and TEM observation showing that recombinant BjC3a was directly bactericidal. Additionally, recombinant BjC3a, like vertebrate C3a, was capable of inducing sea bass macrophage migration and enhancing macrophage phagocytosis and respiratory burst response. Moreover, recombinant BjC3a-desArg (generated by removal of the C-terminal arginine), like mammalian C3a-desArg, retained the immunological activities of BjC3a such as antibacterial and respiratory burst-stimulating activities, indicating that the immunological functions of C3a-desArg were conserved throughout chordate evolution. Altogether, our findings show that invertebrate (amphioxus) BjC3a is able to interact with vertebrate (sea bass) macrophages and mediate immune activities, suggesting the emergence of the inflammatory pathway of the complement system similar to that of vertebrates in the basal chordate amphioxus. PMID:23954696

  4. Functions of miR-146a and miR-222 in Tumor-associated Macrophages in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanshuang; Zhao, Lianmei; Shi, Bianhua; Ma, Sisi; Xu, Zhenbiao; Ge, Yehua; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play critical roles in promoting tumor progression and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying TAM regulation remain to be further investigated and may make significant contributions to cancer treatment. Mammalian microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified as important regulators of gene expression that function by repressing specific target genes mainly at the post-transcriptional level. However, systematic studies of the functions and mechanisms of miRNAs in TAMs in tumor tissues are rare. In this study, miR-146a and miR-222 were shown to be significantly decreased in TAMs associated with the up-regulated NF-κB p50 subunit. miR-146a promoted the expression of some M2 macrophage phenotype molecules, and miR-146a antagomir transfected RAW264.7 monocyte-macrophage cells inhibited 4T1 tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, overexpression of miR-222 inhibited TAM chemotaxis, and miR-222 in TAMs inhibited 4T1 tumor growth by targeting CXCL12 and inhibiting CXCR4. These data revealed that miRNAs influence breast tumor growth by promoting the M2 type polarization or regulating the recruitment of TAMs. These observations suggest that endogenous miRNAs may exert an important role in controlling the polarization and function of TAMs in breast cancer. PMID:26689540

  5. [Corticosterone reception by alveolar macrophages when their functional activity has changed].

    PubMed

    Shishkina, L N; Maianskiĭ, D N; Shutko, G V; Sergeev, P V

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 3H-corticosterone by rat alveolar macrophages was studied before and after stimulation with zymosan in vivo. Thirty min after incubation of the macrophagal monolayer from intact animals with 3H-corticosterone accumulation of the hormone by the cells came to an end. As the concentration of 3H-corticosterone in the incubation medium was raised, the binding of the hormone with the saturated (receptor) system of alveolar macrophages terminated upon absorption of 10.6 fmol per 10(6) cells. Further raising of the level of the bound hormone was effected by the unsaturated (lipid) system. Stimulation with zymosan led not only to an increase in the number of the cells of the bronchoalveolar tract but also to an elevation of the intensity of 3H-corticosterone engulfment by alveolar macrophages. The number of binding sites per cell in the zymosan-activated macrophages increased 1.5-fold. This may be an important moment determining the development and liquidation of mononuclear infiltrations in the lung. PMID:3967077

  6. Alteration of some cellular function in amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa transfected macrophages: a time dependent approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; KarMahapatra, Santanu; Das, Sabyasachi; Roy, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the free radical generation and antioxidant enzymes status in murine peritoneal macrophage during in vitro amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ARPA) treatment with different time interval. Methods Peritoneal macrophages were treated with 1×108 CFU/mL ARPA cell suspension in vitro for different time interval (1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h) and super oxide anion generation, NO generation, reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were analyzed. Results Super oxide anion generation and NO generation got peak at 12 h, indicating maximal free radical generation through activation of NADPH oxidase in murine peritoneal macrophages during ARPA transfection. Reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing time of ARPA transfection. All the changes in peritoneal macrophages after 12 h in vitro ARPA transfection had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro ARPA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant system and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophage. PMID:23569818

  7. Apoptosis is an innate defense function of macrophages against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Behar, SM; Martin, CJ; Booty, MG; Nishimura, T; Zhao, X; Gan, H; Divangahi, M; Remold, HG

    2011-01-01

    Two different forms of death are commonly observed when Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages die: (i) necrosis, a death modality defined by cell lysis and (ii) apoptosis, a form of death that maintains an intact plasma membrane. Necrosis is a mechanism used by bacteria to exit the macrophage, evade host defenses, and spread. In contrast, apoptosis of infected macrophages is associated with diminished pathogen viability. Apoptosis occurs when tumor necrosis factor activates the extrinsic death domain pathway, leading to caspase-8 activation. In addition, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization leading to activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway is required. Both pathways lead to caspase-3 activation, which results in apoptosis. We have recently demonstrated that during mycobacterial infection, cell death is regulated by the eicosanoids, prostaglandin E2 (proapoptotic) and lipoxin (LX)A4 (pronecrotic). Although PGE2 protects against necrosis, virulent Mtb induces LXA4 and inhibits PGE2 production. Under such conditions, mitochondrial inner membrane damage leads to macrophage necrosis. Thus, virulent Mtb subverts eicosanoid regulation of cell death to foil innate defense mechanisms of the macrophage. PMID:21307848

  8. Cytotoxicity of protein-carbon nanotubes on J774 macrophages is a functionalization grade-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Montes-Fonseca, Silvia Lorena; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Arzate-Quintana, Carlos; Silva-Cazares, Macrina Beatriz; González Horta, Carmen; Orrantia-Borunda, Erasmo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as carriers in medicine due to their ability to be functionalized with chemical substances. However, cytotoxicity analysis is required prior to use for in vivo models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of CNTs functionalized with a 46 kDa surface protein from Entamoeba histolytica (P46-CNTs) on J774A macrophages. With this purpose, CNTs were synthesized by spray pyrolysis and purified (P-CNTs) using sonication for 48 h. A 46 kDa protein, with a 4.6-5.4 pI range, was isolated from E. histolytica HM1:IMSS strain trophozoites using an OFFGEL system. The P-CNTs were functionalized with the purified 46 kDa protein, classified according to their degree of functionalization, and characterized by Raman and Infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT, apoptosis, and morphological assays. The results demonstrated that P46-CNTs exhibited cytotoxicity dependent upon the functionalized grade. Contrary to what was expected, P46-CNTs with a high grade of functionalization were more toxic to J774 macrophages than P46-CNTs with a low grade of functionalization, than P-CNTs, and had a similar level of toxicity as UP-CNT. This suggests that the nature of the functionalized protein plays a key role in the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles. PMID:26075262

  9. Cytotoxicity of Protein-Carbon Nanotubes on J774 Macrophages Is a Functionalization Grade-Dependent Effect

    PubMed Central

    Montes-Fonseca, Silvia Lorena; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Arzate-Quintana, Carlos; Silva-Cazares, Macrina Beatriz; González Horta, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as carriers in medicine due to their ability to be functionalized with chemical substances. However, cytotoxicity analysis is required prior to use for in vivo models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of CNTs functionalized with a 46 kDa surface protein from Entamoeba histolytica (P46-CNTs) on J774A macrophages. With this purpose, CNTs were synthesized by spray pyrolysis and purified (P-CNTs) using sonication for 48 h. A 46 kDa protein, with a 4.6–5.4 pI range, was isolated from E. histolytica HM1:IMSS strain trophozoites using an OFFGEL system. The P-CNTs were functionalized with the purified 46 kDa protein, classified according to their degree of functionalization, and characterized by Raman and Infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT, apoptosis, and morphological assays. The results demonstrated that P46-CNTs exhibited cytotoxicity dependent upon the functionalized grade. Contrary to what was expected, P46-CNTs with a high grade of functionalization were more toxic to J774 macrophages than P46-CNTs with a low grade of functionalization, than P-CNTs, and had a similar level of toxicity as UP-CNT. This suggests that the nature of the functionalized protein plays a key role in the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles. PMID:26075262

  10. Effect of fumonisins on macrophage immune functions and gene expression of cytokines in broilers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yeong-Hsiang; Ding, Shih-Torng; Chang, Ming-Huang

    2006-08-01

    Fumonisin (FB1), a mycotoxin, is produced by Fusarium moniliforme and F. proliferatum. A prevalence survey in Taiwan by our laboratory showed that there was a contamination rate of 40% in domestic animal feeds, and the average contaminated level was 4.5 mg/kg. Ninety-six birds were allotted into four treatments fed with diets containing 0 (control), 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of FB1 for three weeks. The results showed that the growth performance was not influenced by the FB1 challenge, but relative bursa weight was significantly decreased. The activity of serum aspartate aminotransferase, and the serum levels of albumin and cholesterol were significantly elevated by the FB1 challenges. When broilers were stimulated with injection of lipopolysaccharides, mRNA abundance (determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR) interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-gamma, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) reached a plateau at 3 h, and declined at 6 h. A FB1 challenge for three weeks increased cytokine mRNA abundance in broilers. The results also showed that 15 mg FB1 per kg feed significantly inhibited the expression of IL-1beta, IL-2, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, but had no effect on iNOS. The macrophage functional profile was significantly changed under an exposure of 15 mg FB1 per kg for three weeks. Taken together, our results suggest that FB1 up to 15 mg/kg does not affect growth performance, but impairs some parameters of blood biochemistry and the immunocompetence in broilers. PMID:16921924

  11. Characterization of Scedosporium apiospermum glucosylceramides and their involvement in fungal development and macrophage functions.

    PubMed

    Rollin-Pinheiro, Rodrigo; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; de Meirelles, Jardel Vieira; Souza, Lauro M de; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is an emerging fungal pathogen that causes both localized and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. Glucosylceramides (CMH, GlcCer) are the main neutral glycosphingolipids expressed in fungal cells. In this study, glucosylceramides (GlcCer) were extracted and purified in several chromatographic steps. Using high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), N-2'-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-1-β-D-glucopyranosyl-9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine was identified as the main GlcCer in S. apiospermum. A monoclonal antibody (Mab) against this molecule was used for indirect immunofluorescence experiments, which revealed that this CMH is present on the surface of the mycelial and conidial forms of S. apiospermum. Treatment of S. apiospermum conidia with the Mab significantly reduced fungal growth. In addition, the Mab also enhanced the phagocytosis and killing of S. apiospermum by murine cells. In vitro assays were performed to evaluate the CMHs for their cytotoxic activities against the mammalian cell lines L.929 and RAW, and an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation was observed. Synergistic in vitro interactions were observed between the Mab against GlcCer and both amphotericin B (AmB) and itraconazole. Because Scedosporium species develop drug resistance, the number of available antifungal drugs is limited; our data indicate that combining immunotherapy with the available drugs might be a viable treatment option. These results suggest that in S. apiospermum, GlcCer are most likely cell wall components that are targeted by antifungal antibodies, which directly inhibit fungal development and enhance macrophage function; furthermore, these results suggest the combined use of monoclonal antibodies against GlcCer and antifungal drugs for antifungal immunotherapy. PMID:24878570

  12. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  13. Characterization of Scedosporium apiospermum Glucosylceramides and Their Involvement in Fungal Development and Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rollin-Pinheiro, Rodrigo; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; de Meirelles, Jardel Vieira; de Souza, Lauro M.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is an emerging fungal pathogen that causes both localized and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. Glucosylceramides (CMH, GlcCer) are the main neutral glycosphingolipids expressed in fungal cells. In this study, glucosylceramides (GlcCer) were extracted and purified in several chromatographic steps. Using high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), N-2′-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-1-β-D-glucopyranosyl-9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine was identified as the main GlcCer in S. apiospermum. A monoclonal antibody (Mab) against this molecule was used for indirect immunofluorescence experiments, which revealed that this CMH is present on the surface of the mycelial and conidial forms of S. apiospermum. Treatment of S. apiospermum conidia with the Mab significantly reduced fungal growth. In addition, the Mab also enhanced the phagocytosis and killing of S. apiospermum by murine cells. In vitro assays were performed to evaluate the CMHs for their cytotoxic activities against the mammalian cell lines L.929 and RAW, and an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation was observed. Synergistic in vitro interactions were observed between the Mab against GlcCer and both amphotericin B (AmB) and itraconazole. Because Scedosporium species develop drug resistance, the number of available antifungal drugs is limited; our data indicate that combining immunotherapy with the available drugs might be a viable treatment option. These results suggest that in S. apiospermum, GlcCer are most likely cell wall components that are targeted by antifungal antibodies, which directly inhibit fungal development and enhance macrophage function; furthermore, these results suggest the combined use of monoclonal antibodies against GlcCer and antifungal drugs for antifungal immunotherapy. PMID:24878570

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Modulates Macrophage Antifungal Effector Function during Innate Recognition of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kasperkovitz, Pia V.; Khan, Nida S.; Tam, Jenny M.; Mansour, Michael K.; Davids, Peter J.; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytic responses are critical for effective host defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens. Macrophages sample the phagosomal content and orchestrate the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes unmethylated CpG DNA and is activated by fungal DNA. Here we demonstrate that specific triggering of TLR9 recruitment to the macrophage phagosomal membrane is a conserved feature of fungi of distinct phylogenetic origins, including Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Malassezia furfur, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The capacity to trigger phagosomal TLR9 recruitment was not affected by a loss of fungal viability or cell wall integrity. TLR9 deficiency has been linked to increased resistance to murine candidiasis and to restriction of fungal growth in vivo. Macrophages lacking TLR9 demonstrate a comparable capacity for phagocytosis and normal phagosomal maturation compared to wild-type macrophages. We now show that TLR9 deficiency increases macrophage tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production in response to C. albicans and S. cerevisiae, independent of yeast viability. The increase in TNF-α production was reversible by functional complementation of the TLR9 gene, confirming that TLR9 was responsible for negative modulation of the cytokine response. Consistently, TLR9 deficiency enhanced the macrophage effector response by increasing macrophage nitric oxide production. Moreover, microbicidal activity against C. albicans and S. cerevisiae was more efficient in TLR9 knockout (TLR9KO) macrophages than in wild-type macrophages. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TLR9 is compartmentalized selectively to fungal phagosomes and negatively modulates macrophage antifungal effector functions. Our data support a model in which orchestration of antifungal innate immunity involves a complex interplay of fungal ligand combinations, host cell machinery rearrangements, and TLR cooperation and antagonism. PMID:21947771

  15. Innate defence functions of macrophages can be biased by nano-sized ceramic and metallic particles.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marilena; Gatti, Antonietta M; Savarino, Graziana; Quattroni, Paola; Martinelli, Lucia; Monari, Emanuela; Boraschi, Diana

    2004-01-01

    Nano-sized particles of ceramic and metallic materials are generated by high-tech industrial activities, and can be generated from worn-out replacement and prosthetic implants. The interaction with the human body of such nanoparticles has been investigated, with a particular emphasis on innate defence mechanisms. Human macrophages (PMA-differentiated myelomonocytic U-937 cells) were exposed in vitro to non-toxic concentrations of TiO(2), SiO(2), ZrO(2), or Co nanoparticles, and their inflammatory response (expression of TLR receptors and co-receptors, and cytokine production) was examined. Expression of TLR receptors was generally unaffected by exposure to the different nanoparticles, except for some notable cases. Exposure to nanoparticles of ZrO(2) (and to a lesser extent TiO(2)), upregulated expression of viral TLR receptors TLR3 and TLR7. Expression of TLR10 was also increased by TiO(2) and ZrO(2) nanoparticles. On the other hand, TLR9 expression was decreased by SiO(2) nano-particles, and expression of the co-receptor CD14 was inhibited by Co nanoparticles. Basal and LPS-induced production of cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-1Ra was examined in macrophages exposed to nanoparticles. SiO(2) nanoparticles strongly biased naive macrophages towards inflammation (M1 polarisation), by selectively inducing production of inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. SiO(2) nanoparticles also significantly amplified the inflammatory phenotype of LPS-polarised M1 macrophages. Other ceramic nanoparticles had little influence on cytokine production, either in resting macrophages, or in LPS-activated cells. Generally, Co nanoparticles had an overall pro-inflammatory effect on naive macrophages, by reducing anti-inflammatory IL-1Ra and inducing inflammatory TNF-alpha. However, Co nanoparticles reduced production of IL-1beta and IL-1Ra, but not TNF-alpha, in LPS-polarised M1 macrophages. Thus, exposure to different nanoparticles can modulate, in different ways, the

  16. Th2 cytokine-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle function depend on alternatively activated macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric nematode infection induces a strong Th2 cytokine response and is characterized by increased infiltration of various immune cells including macrophages. The role of these immune cells in host defense against enteric nematode infection, however, remains poorly defined. The present study invest...

  17. Metabolic and functional characteristics of alveolar macrophages recovered from rats exposed to marijuana smoke.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Price, L; Huber, G L

    1979-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages were obtained by bronchopulmonary lavage from male rats after 30 consecutive days of in vivo exposure to marijuana and tobacco smoke. No significant differences were found between either group of experimental animals and controls in the number of cells recovered, the protein content per 10(6) cells, or the percentage of cells that adhered to plastic surfaces. The ability of macrophages to phagocytize viable bacteria was not affected by exposure to either marijuana or tobacco smoke in that both treatment groups ingested Staphylococcus aureus over a 60-min period as well as did control cells. Differences were found between the groups, however, with respect to cellular metabolism. Marijuana smoke inhalation caused a small decrease in the amount of oxygen consumed by macrophages during phagocytosis, as compared with control cells. This may have been reflected in the even greater decrease in superoxide formation observed during particle engulfment by these treated cells. Tobacco smoke, on the other hand, increased oxygen consumption and was without effect on superoxide release. Neither tobacco nor marijuana smoke treatment had an effect on the direct oxidation of glucose via the hexose monophosphate shunt. Our results indicate that, despite several metabolic alterations in response to marijuana and tobacco smoke, alveolar macrophages were not compromised with respect to their ability to ingest a particulate challenge. PMID:225274

  18. Aldose reductase participates in the downregulation of T cell functions due to suppressor macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Toshiaki; Tatano, Yutaka; Tomioka, Haruaki

    2016-01-01

    The cell-to-cell contact of T lymphocytes with immunosuppressive macrophages causes marked changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation of some cytosolic proteins of T cells. By phosphoproteome analysis, we identified a 36-kDa protein as aldose reductase (AR). The AR expression in T cells was not changed by TCR stimulation or due to cell-to-cell transmission of suppressor signals from immunosuppressive macrophages. Therefore, AR phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is essential for the transduction of TCR-mediated T-cell stimulatory signals, and moreover plays important roles for the cross-talk of immunosuppressive macrophage-derived suppressor signals with the signaling pathways for T-cell activation. Moreover, AR played important roles in the upregulation of ERK1/2-mediated signaling pathways in T lymphocytes. Notably, the enzymatic activity of AR was not required for its signaling action. Taken together, it is concluded that AR mediates intracellular transmission of the suppressor signal of immunosuppressive macrophages toward downstream ERK1/2 pathways, possibly through its direct interaction with acceptor proteins. PMID:26868163

  19. Molecular cloning and function characterization of a new macrophage-activating protein from Tremella fuciformis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Liang; Chang, An-Ju; Kuo, Xhao-Kai; Sheu, Fuu

    2014-02-19

    Silver ear mushroom ( Tremella fuciformis ) is an edible fungus with health benefits. In this study, we purified a new T. fuciformis protein (TFP) and demonstrated its ability to activate primary murine macrophages. The isolation procedure involved ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. TFP naturally formed a 24 kDa homodimeric protein and did not contain glycan residues. The TFP gene was cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method, and the cDNA sequence of TFP was composed of 408 nucleotides with a 336 nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 112 amino acid protein. TFP was capable of stimulating TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-1ra, and IL-12 production in addition to CD86/MHC class II expression, mRNA expression of M1-type chemokines, and nuclear NF-κB accumulation in murine peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, TFP failed to stimulate TLR4-neutralized and TLR4-knockout macrophages, suggesting that TLR4 is a required receptor for TFP signaling on macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that TFP may be an important bioactive compound from T. fuciformis that induces M1-polarized activation through a TLR4-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:24400969

  20. Cutting Edge: CLEC5A Mediates Macrophage Function and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Brian W; Eppert, Bryan L; Flury, Jennifer L; Garcia, Sara Morgado; Donica, Walter R; Osterburg, Andrew; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Cua, Daniel J; Borchers, Michael T

    2016-04-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a devastating disease with no effective therapies. We investigated the role of the C-type lectin receptor, CLEC5A, in macrophage activation and pulmonary pathogenesis in a mouse model of COPD. We demonstrate that CLEC5A is expressed on alveolar macrophages in mice exposed long-term to cigarette smoke (CS), as well as in human smokers. We also show that CLEC5A-mediated activation of macrophages enhanced cytokine elaboration alone, as well as in combination with LPS or GM-CSF in CS-exposed mice. Furthermore, usingClec5a-deficient mice, we demonstrate that CS-induced macrophage responsiveness is mediated by CLEC5A, and CLEC5A is required for the development of inflammation, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and airspace enlargement. These findings suggest a novel mechanism that promotes airway inflammation and pathologies in response to CS exposure and identifies CLEC5A as a novel target for the therapeutic control of COPD pathogenesis. PMID:26927798

  1. Slc11a1 limits intracellular growth of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium by promoting macrophage immune effector functions and impairing bacterial iron acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Fritsche, Gernot; Crouch, Marie-Laure V.; Barton, Howard C.; Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2009-01-01

    The natural-resistance associated macrophage protein 1, Slc11a1, is a phagolysosomal transporter for protons and divalent ions including iron, that confers host protection against diverse intracellular pathogens including Salmonella. We investigated and compared the regulation of iron homeostasis and immune function in RAW264.7 murine phagocytes stably transfected with non-functional Slc11a1 and functional Slc11a1 controls in response to an infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). We report that macrophages lacking functional Slc11a1 displayed an increased expression of transferrin receptor 1, resulting in enhanced acquisition of transferrin-bound iron. In contrast, cellular iron release mediated via ferroportin 1 was significantly lower in Salmonella-infected Slc11a1-negative macrophages in comparison to phagocytes bearing Slc11a1. Lack of Slc11a1 led to intracellular persistence of S. Typhimurium within macrophages which was paralleled by a reduced formation of nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in Slc11a1-negative macrophages following Salmonella infection, whereas interleukin-10 production was increased. Moreover, Slc11a1-negative phagocytes exhibited higher cellular iron content, resulting in increased iron acquisition by intracellular Salmonella. Our observations indicate a bifunctional role for Slc11a1 within phagocytes. Slc11a restricts iron availability, which firstly augments pro-inflammatory macrophage effector functions and secondly concomitantly limits microbial iron access. PMID:19500110

  2. The role of lipid-activated nuclear receptors in shaping macrophage and dendritic cell function: From physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Mate; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Nagy, Laszlo

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors linking lipid signaling to the expression of the genome. There is increasing appreciation of the involvement of this receptor network in the metabolic programming of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), essential members of the innate immune system. In this review we focus on the role of retinoid X receptor, retinoic acid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor γ, liver X receptor, and vitamin D receptor in shaping the immune and metabolic functions of macrophages and DCs. We also provide an overview of the contribution of macrophage- and DC-expressed nuclear receptors to various immunopathologic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, asthma, and some others. We suggest that systematic analyses of the roles of these receptors and their activating lipid ligands in immunopathologies combined with complementary and focused translational and clinical research will be crucial for the development of new therapies using the many molecules available to target nuclear receptors. PMID:23905916

  3. Macrophage Polarization in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24910531

  4. Interleukin-15-Induced CD56+ Myeloid Dendritic Cells Combine Potent Tumor Antigen Presentation with Direct Tumoricidal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I. Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  5. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Disrupt Neonatal Alveolar Macrophage Mitochondria and Derange Cellular Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Sowmya S; Ping, Xiao Du; Harris, Frank L; Ronda, Necol J; Brown, Lou Ann S; Gauthier, Theresa W

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol exposure alters the function of alveolar macrophages (AM), impairing immune defenses in both adult and neonatal lungs. Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are biological markers of prenatal alcohol exposure in newborns. FAEEs contribute to alcohol-induced mitochondrial (MT) damage in multiple organs. We hypothesized that in utero ethanol exposure would increase FAEEs in the neonatal lung and that direct exposure of neonatal AM to FAEEs would contribute to MT injury and cellular dysfunction. Methods FAEEs were measured in neonatal guinea pig lungs after ± in utero ethanol exposure via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The NR8383 cell line and freshly isolated neonatal guinea pig AM were exposed to ethyl oleate (EO) in vitro. MT membrane potential, MT reactive oxygen species generation (mROS), phagocytosis, and apoptosis were evaluated after exposure to EO ± the MT-specific antioxidant mito-TEMPO (mitoT) or ± the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Whole lung FAEEs were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Cellular results were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance, followed by the Student–Newman–Keuls Method for post hoc comparisons. Results In utero ethanol significantly increased ethyl linoleate and the combinations of ethyl oleate + linoleate + linolenate (OLL), and OLL + stearate in the neonatal lung. In vitro EO caused significant MT dysfunction in both NR8383 and primary neonatal AM, as indicated by increased mROS and loss of MT membrane potential. Impaired phagocytosis and apoptosis were significantly increased in both the cell line and primary AM after EO exposure. MitoT conferred significant but only partial protection against EO-induced MT injury, as did caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK. Conclusions In utero ethanol exposure increased FAEEs in the neonatal guinea pig lung. Direct exposure to the FAEE EO significantly contributed to AM dysfunction, in part via oxidant injury to the MT and in part via secondary

  6. Use of carbosilane dendrimer to switch macrophage polarization for the acquisition of antitumor functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perisé-Barrios, Ana J.; Gómez, Rafael; Corbí, Angel L.; de La Mata, Javier; Domínguez-Soto, Angeles; Muñoz-Fernandez, María A.

    2015-02-01

    Tumor microenvironment favors the escape from immunosurveillance by promoting immunosuppression and blunting pro-inflammatory responses. Since most tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) exhibit an M2-like tumor cell growth promoting polarization, we have studied the role of 2G-03NN24 carbosilane dendrimer in M2 macrophage polarization to evaluate the potential application of dendrimers in tumor immunotherapy. We found that the 2G-03NN24 dendrimer decreases LPS-induced IL-10 production from in vitro generated monocyte-derived M2 macrophages, and also switches their gene expression profile towards the acquisition of M1 polarization markers (INHBA, SERPINE1, FLT1, EGLN3 and ALDH1A2) and the loss of M2 polarization-associated markers (EMR1, IGF1, FOLR2 and SLC40A1). Furthermore, 2G-03NN24 dendrimer decreases STAT3 activation. Our results indicate that the 2G-03NN24 dendrimer can be a useful tool for antitumor therapy by virtue of its potential ability to limit the M2-like polarization of TAM.Tumor microenvironment favors the escape from immunosurveillance by promoting immunosuppression and blunting pro-inflammatory responses. Since most tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) exhibit an M2-like tumor cell growth promoting polarization, we have studied the role of 2G-03NN24 carbosilane dendrimer in M2 macrophage polarization to evaluate the potential application of dendrimers in tumor immunotherapy. We found that the 2G-03NN24 dendrimer decreases LPS-induced IL-10 production from in vitro generated monocyte-derived M2 macrophages, and also switches their gene expression profile towards the acquisition of M1 polarization markers (INHBA, SERPINE1, FLT1, EGLN3 and ALDH1A2) and the loss of M2 polarization-associated markers (EMR1, IGF1, FOLR2 and SLC40A1). Furthermore, 2G-03NN24 dendrimer decreases STAT3 activation. Our results indicate that the 2G-03NN24 dendrimer can be a useful tool for antitumor therapy by virtue of its potential ability to limit the M2-like polarization of TAM

  7. Characterization of the effects of three Lactobacillus species on the function of chicken macrophages.

    PubMed

    Brisbin, Jennifer T; Davidge, Lianne; Roshdieh, Ala; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-06-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus salivarius can influence the adaptive immune responses in chickens but vary in their ability to do so. The present study attempted to identify how these three bacteria alter the innate immune system. A chicken macrophage cell line, MQ-NCSU, was co-cultured with the three live Lactobacillus species, alone or in combination, grown at different temperatures for various durations of time. Late exponential growth phase bacteria were more immunostimulatory, while bacterial growth temperature had little effect. L. acidophilus and L. salivarius significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) production and phagocytosis, while L. reuteri did not. In fact, L reuteri was shown to inhibit NO production of macrophages when co-cultured with the other bacteria or when cells were pre-treated with LPS. The results demonstrate a possible molecular mechanism for the immunomodulatory effects of L. acidophilus and L. salivarius, and a unique immunomodulatory ability of L. reuteri. PMID:25847283

  8. Cell viability, adhesion and function of RAW 264.7 macrophages on fluorinated xerogel-derived nitric oxide permeable membrane for the application of cellular sensing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wook Sung; Seo, Bochan; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Ok-Kyun; Shin, Jae Ho; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-11-01

    Organically modified xerogels have an advantage over gas sensing applications due to their open, rigid structure and hydrophobicity. Here we evaluated the biocompatibility of xerogel-derived nitric oxide (NO) permeable membranes modified with fluorinated functional groups for application in cellular sensing by growing RAW 264.7 macrophages on them. We examined the cell viability, adhesion and growth of RAW 264.7 macrophages on NO permselective membrane and other cell-adhesive matrices, poly L-lysine and collagen. The surface roughness of each membrane was obtained from topographic atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. In addition, we measured the level of NO release of RAW 264.7 macrophages by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation using a Griess assay to confirm the function of cells. The fluorinated xerogel-derived membrane had a very smooth surface with rms roughness 2.1 Å and did not show cytotoxic effects in RAW 264.7 macrophages. As a result, the morphology and function of adhering RAW 264.7 macrophage showed no differences from those of other cell-adhesive membranes. Finally, we successfully detected NO release in RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated by LPS, using a planar-type xerogel-derived NO sensor. Therefore, we suggest that fluorinated xerogel-derived membrane could be used as both a NO permeable and cell-adhesive membrane for cellular sensing applications. PMID:25958535

  9. Gliotoxin Suppresses Macrophage Immune Function by Subverting Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-Trisphosphate Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Schlam, Daniel; Canton, Johnathan; Carreño, Marvin; Kopinski, Hannah; Freeman, Spencer A.; Grinstein, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, spreads in the environment by releasing numerous conidia that are capable of reaching the small alveolar airways of mammalian hosts. In otherwise healthy individuals, macrophages are responsible for rapidly phagocytosing and eliminating these conidia, effectively curbing their germination and consequent invasion of pulmonary tissue. However, under some circumstances, the fungus evades phagocyte-mediated immunity and persists in the respiratory tree. Here, we report that A. fumigatus escapes macrophage recognition by strategically targeting phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] metabolism through gliotoxin, a potent immunosuppressive mycotoxin. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that, in response to the toxin, macrophages cease to ruffle, undergo abrupt membrane retraction, and fail to phagocytose large targets effectively. Gliotoxin was found to prevent integrin activation and interfere with actin dynamics, both of which are instrumental for phagocytosis; similar effects were noted in immortalized and primary phagocytes. Detailed studies of the underlying molecular mechanisms of toxicity revealed that inhibition of phagocytosis is attributable to impaired accumulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and the associated dysregulation of downstream effectors, including Rac and/or Cdc42. Strikingly, in response to the diacylglycerol mimetic phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, gliotoxin-treated macrophages reactivate beta integrins, reestablish actin dynamics, and regain phagocytic capacity, despite the overt absence of plasmalemmal PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Together, our findings identify phosphoinositide metabolism as a critical upstream target of gliotoxin and also indicate that increased diacylglycerol levels can bypass the requirement for PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling during membrane ruffling and phagocytosis. PMID:27048806

  10. Dissociation of bactericidal activity from other functions of activated macrophages in exudates induced by thioglycolate medium.

    PubMed Central

    Spitalny, G L

    1981-01-01

    Macrophages displayed increased spreading, increased Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis, and increased secretion of plasminogen activator when collected from the peritoneal cavities of either Listeria-immune mice challenged intraperitoneally 3 days earlier with Listeria or nonimmune mice injected intraperitoneally 3 days earlier with fluid thioglycolate medium. In contrast, macrophages from the thioglycolate-induced peritoneal exudates were severely impaired in vitro in their ability to destroy Listeria. Injection of thioglycolate markedly interfered with the destruction of sublethal intraperitoneal challenge of Listeria, which resulted in nonimmune animals dying of an overwhelming systemic infection. In animals immune to Listeria, injection of thioglycolate delayed the onset of the expression of immunity to an intraperitoneal challenge of bacteria. The thioglycolate-induced suppression of bactericidal activity was determined to be confined to the site of injection. Results of experiments indicated that the colloidal agar in thioglycolate medium was the cause of the impairment of macrophage bactericidal activity. In addition to the impairment of bactericidal activity induced by agar, additional studies showed that an intraperitoneal injection of colloidal agar (0.075% wt/vol) by itself was a sufficient inflammatory stimulus for the accumulation of a large number of host phagocytic cells. Images PMID:6795125

  11. B lymphocyte function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: impact of regulatory T lymphocytes and macrophages--modulation by antirheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J

    1988-04-01

    The present work analyses B lymphocyte functions in vitro in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The impact of gold salts and penicillamine on human B lymphocyte function in vitro is discussed. Synovial fluid monocytes/macrophages increased both the polyclonally induced and the antigen-induced blood lymphocyte proliferation and increased the numbers of immunoglobulin-secreting blood B lymphocytes generated by pokeweed mitogen (PWM), a T cell-dependent polyclonal activator. The lymphostimulatory factor(s) interleukin-1, which can be produced by monocytes/macrophages, was found in most cell-free synovial fluid specimens, but only in a few paired serum samples. Thus, in vivo activated synovial monocytes/macrophages may modulate lymphocyte functions. Compared to blood, synovial fluid T lymphocytes comprised fewer T4+ (helper/inducer) cells and more T8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic) cells. Synovial fluid lymphocytes proliferated poorly when stimulated polyclonally. However, the proliferative responses to microbial antigens as well as the lectin-induced lymphokine production equaled those of blood lymphocytes. In about half of RA patients, T4+ cells from synovial fluid increased the PWM-induced immunoglobulin secretion by autologous blood B lymphocytes to higher levels as compared to similar experiments with blood T4+ cells. Synovial fluid T8+ cells suppressed PWM-induced immunoglobulin production of autologous mononuclear cells to the same degree as seen with blood T8+ cells. A large proportion of synovial fluid T subsets expressed Ia antigens, probably due to in vivo activation. Thus, synovial T helper/inducer and T suppressor/cytotoxic cells may modulate the functional activities of synovial B lymphocytes. Among mononuclear cells isolated from synovial fluid and synovial tissue, considerable numbers of B lymphocytes spontaneously secreting IgG were found; fewer B cells secreted IgM and IgA. Rheumatoid factor activity was noted in about 7% of the IgG-producing cells

  12. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  13. Modulation of Macrophage Functional Polarity towards Anti-Inflammatory Phenotype with Plasmid DNA Delivery in CD44 Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Rastogi, Ruchir; Shelke, Juili; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to modulate macrophage polarity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype using plasmid DNA (pDNA) expressing interleukin-4 (IL4) or interleukin-10 (IL10)-encapsulated in hyaluronic acid-poly(ethyleneimine) (HA-PEI) nanoparticles (NPs). The HA-PEI/pDNA NPs with spherical shape, average size of 186 nm were efficiently internalized by J774A.1 macrophages. Transfection of HA-PEI/pDNA-IL4 and HA-PEI/pDNA-IL10 NPs increased IL4 and IL10 gene expression in J774 macrophages which could re-program the macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype as evidenced by a significant increase in the Arg/iNOS level, and upregulation of CD206 and CD163 compared to untreated macrophages. Following intraperitoneal (IP) injection to C57BL/6 mice, HA-PEI NPs effectively targeted peritoneal macrophages over-expressing CD44 receptor. In an in vivo model of stimulated peritoneal macrophages, IP administration of HA-PEI/pDNA-IL4 and HA-PEI/pDNA-IL10 to C57BL/6 mice significantly increased the Arg/iNOS ratio and CD163 expression in the cells. Furthermore, HA-PEI/pDNA-IL10 NPs significantly increased peritoneal and serum IL10 levels which effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammation by reducing level of TNF-α and IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages and in the peritoneal fluid. The results demonstrated that pDNA-IL10-encapsulate HA-PEI NPs skewed macrophage functional polarity from M1 toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype which may be a promising platform for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26577684

  14. Modulation of Macrophage Functional Polarity towards Anti-Inflammatory Phenotype with Plasmid DNA Delivery in CD44 Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Rastogi, Ruchir; Shelke, Juili; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to modulate macrophage polarity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype using plasmid DNA (pDNA) expressing interleukin-4 (IL4) or interleukin-10 (IL10)-encapsulated in hyaluronic acid-poly(ethyleneimine) (HA-PEI) nanoparticles (NPs). The HA-PEI/pDNA NPs with spherical shape, average size of 186 nm were efficiently internalized by J774A.1 macrophages. Transfection of HA-PEI/pDNA-IL4 and HA-PEI/pDNA-IL10 NPs increased IL4 and IL10 gene expression in J774 macrophages which could re-program the macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype as evidenced by a significant increase in the Arg/iNOS level, and upregulation of CD206 and CD163 compared to untreated macrophages. Following intraperitoneal (IP) injection to C57BL/6 mice, HA-PEI NPs effectively targeted peritoneal macrophages over-expressing CD44 receptor. In an in vivo model of stimulated peritoneal macrophages, IP administration of HA-PEI/pDNA-IL4 and HA-PEI/pDNA-IL10 to C57BL/6 mice significantly increased the Arg/iNOS ratio and CD163 expression in the cells. Furthermore, HA-PEI/pDNA-IL10 NPs significantly increased peritoneal and serum IL10 levels which effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammation by reducing level of TNF-α and IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages and in the peritoneal fluid. The results demonstrated that pDNA-IL10-encapsulate HA-PEI NPs skewed macrophage functional polarity from M1 toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype which may be a promising platform for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26577684

  15. Virulent and Avirulent Strains of Toxoplasma gondii Which Differ in Their Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Content Induce Similar Biological Functions in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Niehus, Sebastian; Smith, Terry K.; Azzouz, Nahid; Campos, Marco A.; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) from several protozoan parasites are thought to elicit a detrimental stimulation of the host innate immune system aside their main function to anchor surface proteins. Here we analyzed the GPI biosynthesis of an avirulent Toxoplasma gondii type 2 strain (PTG) by metabolic radioactive labeling. We determined the biological function of individual GPI species in the PTG strain in comparison with previously characterized GPI-anchors of a virulent strain (RH). The GPI intermediates of both strains were structurally similar, however the abundance of two of six GPI intermediates was significantly reduced in the PTG strain. The side-by-side comparison of GPI-anchor content revealed that the PTG strain had only ∼34% of the protein-free GPIs as well as ∼70% of the GPI-anchored proteins with significantly lower rates of protein N-glycosylation compared to the RH strain. All mature GPIs from both strains induced comparable secretion levels of TNF-α and IL-12p40, and initiated TLR4/MyD88-dependent NF-κBp65 activation in macrophages. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PTG and RH strains differ in their GPI biosynthesis and possess significantly different GPI-anchor content, while individual GPI species of both strains induce similar biological functions in macrophages. PMID:24489660

  16. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-12-15

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction. PMID:26453331

  17. Deficiency of the B Cell-Activating Factor Receptor Results in Limited CD169+ Macrophage Function during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haifeng C.; Huang, Jun; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Grusdat, Melanie; Shinde, Prashant; McIlwain, David R.; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Gommerman, Jennifer; Löhning, Max; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W.; Pieper, Kathrin; Sic, Heiko; Speletas, Matthaios; Eibel, Hermann; Ware, Carl F.; Tumanov, Alexei V.; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell development and humoral immunity in mice and humans. While the role of BAFF in B cells has been widely described, its role in innate immunity remains unknown. Using BAFF receptor (BAFFR)-deficient mice, we characterized BAFFR-related innate and adaptive immune functions following infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We identified a critical role for BAFFR signaling in the generation and maintenance of the CD169+ macrophage compartment. Consequently, Baffr−/− mice exhibited limited induction of innate type I interferon production after viral infection. Lack of BAFFR signaling reduced virus amplification and presentation following viral infection, resulting in highly reduced antiviral adaptive immune responses. As a consequence, BAFFR-deficient mice showed exacerbated and fatal disease after viral infection. Mechanistically, transient lack of B cells in Baffr−/− animals resulted in limited lymphotoxin expression, which is critical for maintenance of CD169+ cells. In conclusion, BAFFR signaling affects both innate and adaptive immune activation during viral infections. IMPORTANCE Viruses cause acute and chronic infections in humans resulting in millions of deaths every year. Innate immunity is critical for the outcome of a viral infection. Innate type I interferon production can limit viral replication, while adaptive immune priming by innate immune cells induces pathogen-specific immunity with long-term protection. Here, we show that BAFFR deficiency not only perturbed B cells, but also resulted in limited CD169+ macrophages. These macrophages are critical in amplifying viral particles to trigger type I interferon production and initiate adaptive immune priming. Consequently, BAFFR deficiency resulted in reduced enforced viral replication, limited type I interferon production, and reduced adaptive immunity compared to BAFFR

  18. Eosinophils and type 2 cytokine signaling in macrophages orchestrate development of functional beige fat

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yifu; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Odegaard, Justin I.; Cui, Xiaojin; Tian, Xiaoyu; Locksley, Richard M.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Beige fat, which expresses the thermogenic protein UCP1, provides a defense against cold and obesity. Although a cold environment is the physiologic stimulus for inducing beige fat in mice and humans, the events that lead from the sensing of cold to the development of beige fat remain poorly understood. Here, we identify the efferent beige fat thermogenic circuit, consisting of eosinophils, type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4/13 and alternatively activated macrophages. Genetic loss of eosinophils or IL-4/13 signaling impairs cold-induced biogenesis of beige fat. Mechanistically, macrophages recruited to cold-stressed subcutaneous white adipose tissue (scWAT) undergo alternative activation to induce tyrosine hydroxylase expression and catecholamine production, factors required for browning of scWAT. Conversely, administration of IL-4 to thermoneutral mice increases beige fat mass and thermogenic capacity to ameliorate pre-established obesity. Together, our findings have uncovered the efferent circuit controlling biogenesis of beige fat and provide support for its targeting to treat obesity. PMID:24906148

  19. Potential Link between the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) System and Defective Alveolar Macrophage Phagocytic Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Barnawi, Jameel; Tran, Hai; Jersmann, Hubertus; Pitson, Stuart; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Meech, Robyn; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are defective in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic cells, with a similar defect in response to cigarette smoke. The exact mechanisms for this defect are unknown. Sphingolipids including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are involved in diverse cellular processes and we hypothesised that a comprehensive analysis of this system in alveolar macrophages in COPD may help to delineate the reasons for defective phagocytic function. Methods We compared mRNA expression of sphingosine kinases (SPHK1/2), S1P receptors (S1PR1-5) and S1P-degrading enzymes (SGPP1, SGPP2, SGPL1) in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages from 10 healthy controls, 7 healthy smokers and 20 COPD patients (10 current- and 10 ex-smokers) using Real-Time PCR. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was investigated using flow cytometry. Functional associations were assessed between sphingosine signalling system components and alveolar macrophage phagocytic ability in COPD. To elucidate functional effects of increased S1PR5 on macrophage phagocytic ability, we performed the phagocytosis assay in the presence of varying concentrations of suramin, an antagonist of S1PR3 and S1PR5. The effects of cigarette smoking on the S1P system were investigated using a THP-1 macrophage cell line model. Results We found significant increases in SPHK1/2 (3.4- and 2.1-fold increases respectively), S1PR2 and 5 (4.3- and 14.6-fold increases respectively), and SGPL1 (4.5-fold increase) in COPD vs. controls. S1PR5 and SGPL1 expression was unaffected by smoking status, suggesting a COPD “disease effect” rather than smoke effect per se. Significant associations were noted between S1PR5 and both lung function and phagocytosis. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of SPHK1, SPHK2, S1PR2 and S1PR5 by THP-1 macrophages, confirming the results in

  20. LPS-inducible factor(s) from activated macrophages mediates cytolysis of Naegleria fowleri amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Marciano-Cabral, F.

    1986-03-01

    Soluble cytolytic factors of macrophage origin have previously been described with respect to their tumoricidal activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism and possible factor(s) responsible for cytolysis of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri by activated peritoneal macrophages from B6C3F1 mice. Macrophages or conditioned medium (CM) from macrophage cultures were incubated with /sup 3/H-Uridine labeled amoebae. Percent specific release of label served as an index of cytolysis. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Corynebacterium parvum macrophages demonstrated significant cytolysis of amoebae at 24 h with an effector to target ratio of 10:1. Treatment of macrophages with inhibitors of RNA or protein synthesis blocked amoebicidal activity. Interposition of a 1 ..mu..m pore membrane between macrophages and amoebae inhibited killing. Inhibition in the presence of the membrane was overcome by stimulating the macrophages with LPS. CM from SPS-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cultures of activated macrophages was cytotoxic for amoebae. The activity was heat sensitive and was recovered from ammonium sulfate precipitation of the CM. Results indicate that amoebicidal activity is mediated by a protein(s) of macrophage origin induced by target cell contact or stimulation with LPS.

  1. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2016-09-01

    Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many cancers. However, the exact mechanisms as to how hWJSCs inhibit tumor growth are not known. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of cancer cells to high hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels from H2 O2 -releasing drugs causes their death. We therefore explored whether the tumoricidal effect of hWJSCs on lymphoma cells was mediated via H2 O2 . We first exposed lymphoma cells to six different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) concentrates of hWJSC-conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) (3, 5, 10, 30, 50, 100 kDa) for 48 h. Since, the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate showed the greatest cell inhibition we then investigated whether the tumoricidal effect of the specific 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate on two different lymphoma cell lines (Ramos and Toledo) was mediated via accumulation of H2 O2 . We used a battery of assays (MTT, propidium iodide, mitochondria membrane potential, apoptosis, cell cycle, oxidative stress enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation) to test this mechanism. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death and apoptosis in both lymphoma cell lines. There were significant increases in superoxide dismutase with concomitant decreases in glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and thioredoxin peroxidase activities. H2 O2 levels, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation were also significantly increased in both lymphoma cell lines. The results suggested that the hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate regulates cellular H2 O2 leading to a tumoricidal effect and may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2045-2055, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392313

  2. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity. PMID:27337479

  3. Functional Alteration of Tumor-infiltrating Myeloid Cells in RNA Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Shime, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Misako

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages, as well as dendritic cells (DCs), are derived from myeloid progenitor cells. Recent evidence suggests that tumor-infiltrating macrophages differ in many aspects from conventional tissue macrophages, including nature, function and markers. Tumors usually contain various myeloid lineage cells in their non-parenchymal environment. In immunotherapy for cancer, tumor cells and non-parenchymal cells are exposed to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and tumor-cell-derived nucleic acids. In addition, a dsRNA mimic, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), exhibits strong adjuvant activity, which acts both on the immune system and tumor constituents. Herein we discuss the RNA recognition system and unique cellular output in tumor-associated myeloid cells in response to immunotherapy. We especially focus on the mechanism by which RNA adjuvant alters the tumor-supportive nature of tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells to those with tumoricidal activity. We discuss how RNA administration makes tumor cells collapse and its significance of evoking cell death signals in tumor cells and macrophages. This knowledge will be applicable to the development of an alternative immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:26168476

  4. Immune modulation of metalloproteinase production in human macrophages. Selective pretranslational suppression of interstitial collagenase and stromelysin biosynthesis by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, S D; Campbell, E J; Kobayashi, D K; Welgus, H G

    1990-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a lymphokine that activates mononuclear phagocytes. To test the hypothesis that IFN-gamma might have important effects upon the ability of human mononuclear phagocytes to degrade extracellular matrix, we have studied the action of this cytokine on the production of metalloproteinases and the counterregulatory tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) by the human alveolar macrophage. We have found that IFN-gamma potently and selectively suppresses the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of two metalloproteinases--interstitial collagenase and stromelysin--by 50-90% at doses greater than or equal to 10 U/ml. The synthesis of TIMP and 92-kD type IV collagenase was also diminished by IFN-gamma, but these responses required 50- to 100-fold higher concentrations of the cytokine. All doses of IFN-gamma increased total and secreted protein synthesis slightly, indicating a highly specific effect on metalloenzyme biosynthesis. Inhibition of metalloproteinase expression occurred at a pretranslational level, as evidenced by parallel reductions in enzyme biosynthesis and collagenase-specific steady-state mRNA levels. Interestingly, the effect of IFN-gamma on metalloenzyme production was not readily reversible. Therefore, while IFN-gamma activates the macrophage and renders it tumoricidal, this enhanced function appears to be attained at the expense of the cell's capacity to degrade extracellular matrix. Images PMID:2170447

  5. Monocyte/macrophage cytokine activity regulates vascular smooth muscle cell function within a degradable polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Battiston, K G; Ouyang, B; Labow, R S; Simmons, C A; Santerre, J P

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies rely on the ability to promote cell proliferation and migration into porous biomaterial constructs, as well as to support specific phenotypic states of the cells in vitro. The present study investigated the use of released factors from monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDM) and the mechanism by which they regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) response in a VSMC-monocyte co-culture system within a porous degradable polyurethane (D-PHI) scaffold. VSMCs cultured in monocyte/MDM-conditioned medium (MCM), generated from the culture of monocytes/MDM on D-PHI scaffolds for up to 28 days, similarly affected VSMC contractile marker expression, growth and three-dimensional migration when compared to direct VSMC-monocyte co-culture. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were identified as two cytokines present in MCM, at concentrations that have previously been shown to influence VSMC phenotype. VSMCs cultured alone on D-PHI scaffolds and exposed to MCP-1 (5 ng ml(-1)) or IL-6 (1 ng ml(-1)) for 7 days experienced a suppression in contractile marker expression (with MCP-1 or IL-6) and increased growth (with MCP-1) compared to no cytokine medium supplementation. These effects were also observed in VSMC-monocyte co-culture on D-PHI. Neutralization of IL-6, but not MCP-1, was subsequently shown to decrease VSMC growth and enhance calponin expression for VSMC-monocyte co-cultures on D-PHI scaffolds for 7 days, implying that IL-6 mediates VSMC response in monocyte-VSMC co-cultures. This study highlights the use of monocytes and their derived macrophages in conjunction with immunomodulatory biomaterials, such as D-PHI, as agents for regulating VSMC response, and demonstrates the importance of monocyte/MDM-released factors, such as IL-6 in particular, in this process. PMID:24361424

  6. Activation of mouse macrophages causes no change in expression and function of phorbol diesters' receptors, but is accompanied by alterations in the activity and kinetic parameters of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Berton, G; Cassatella, M; Cabrini, G; Rossi, F

    1985-01-01

    Mouse peritoneal macrophages activated in vivo by the injection of Corynebacterium parvum release larger amounts of superoxide anion (O2-) than macrophages from control mice when stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The biochemical bases for this enhanced response of activated macrophages have been investigated by studying the expression and function of receptors for the stimulant, and the activity of the enzyme NADPH oxidase which is responsible for the production of O2- in leucocytes. Studies of binding of phorbol dibutyrate, an agent closely related to PMA, showed that the affinity constants (Kds) and the number of binding sites were the same in resident and activated peritoneal macrophages. The activity of the NADPH oxidase was, however, different in the two macrophage populations which differ in their capacity to release O2-. NADPH oxidase activity was studied in macrophage monolayers after lysis with deoxycholate. The main features of this activity were as follows: stimulation of macrophages with PMA or zymosan caused an increase in NADPH-dependent O2- production; NADPH oxidase activity in the lysates followed the same dose-response curve for different concentrations of PMA as O2- release by intact macrophages; O2- release by intact macrophages could be fully accounted for by NADPH-dependent O2- production by macrophage lysates; activity was strictly substrate-specific, in that NADH could not substitute for NADPH; after stimulation with PMA or zymosan, NADPH oxidase activity was higher in lysates of C. parvum-activated macrophages than in lysates of resident macrophages; NADPH oxidase activities of activated and resident macrophages differed markedly in their kinetic parameters. The NADPH oxidase of macrophages activated by C. parvum or trehalose dimycolate of mycobacterial origin displayed a five to seven times lower Km compared to the enzyme in resident macrophages. PMID:2981767

  7. The impact of anti-inflammatory cytokines provoked by CD163 positive macrophages on ventricular functional recovery after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takao; Kameyama, Tomoki; Noto, Takahisa; Nakadate, Teruo; Ueno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kunihiro; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Present study aimed to investigate the impact of anti-inflammatory cytokines provoked by the hemoglobin scavenger receptor, CD163, on left ventricular (LV) functional recovery after successful reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Intraplaque hemorrhage accelerates plaque destabilization. Extracellular hemoglobin is cleared by CD163, a macrophage scavenger receptor. This process provokes secretion of anti-inflammatory atheroprotective cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10. In 40 patients with the first AMI, coronary atherothrombotic debris was retrieved during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), stained with antibodies to CD163 and IL-10. LV function was determined by echocardiography before PCI and 6 months after PCI. %CD163 was defined as ratio of CD163 (+)-cells to whole cells. %IL-10 was expressed as the ratio of positively stained areas per total tissue. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the amount of CD163 (+)-cells: CD163 > 10 % (CD163high, n = 20) and CD163 ≤ 10 % (CD163low, n = 20). CD163high group had significantly higher %IL-10. Final thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow grade was significantly lower in CD163high group. In subgroups with the final TIMI-3 flow (CD163high-Reflow, n = 15 and CD163low-Reflow, n = 20), the time to reperfusion, infarct size, LV dimensions and fractional shortening (%FS) before PCI were similar. Significant correlation was observed between %IL10 and changes in LV dimensions (diastole, r = -0.49, P = 0.01; systole, r = -0.65, P < 0.01) or %FS (r = 0.51, P < 0.01) at 6 months after PCI. Plaque with CD163(+)-macrophages could impair distal flow after primary PCI. However, CD163(+)-macrophages enhance the anti-inflammatory cytokine expression that aids in ventricular functional recovery if distal flow can be achieved by successful reperfusion. PMID:23873589

  8. MHC Class I-Related Neonatal Fc Receptor for IgG Is Functionally Expressed in Monocytes, Intestinal Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Meng, Gang; Dickinson, Bonny L.; Li, Xiaotong; Mizoguchi, Emiko; Miao, Lili; Wang, Yuansheng; Robert, Caroline; Wu, Benyan; Smith, Phillip D.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, an MHC class I-related molecule, functions to transport IgG across polarized epithelial cells and protect IgG from degradation. However, little is known about whether FcRn is functionally expressed in immune cells. We show here that FcRn mRNA was identifiable in human monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. FcRn heavy chain was detectable as a 45-kDa protein in monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and in purified human intestinal macrophages, peripheral blood monocytes, and dendritic cells by Western blot analysis. FcRn colocalized in vivo with macrosialin (CD68) and Ncl-Macro, two macrophage markers, in the lamina propria of human small intestine. The heavy chain of FcRn was associated with the β2-microglobulin (β2m) light chain in U937 and THP-1 cells. FcRn bound human IgG at pH 6.0, but not at pH 7.5. This binding could be inhibited by human IgG Fc, but not Fab. FcRn could be detected on the cell surface of activated, but not resting, THP-1 cells. Furthermore, FcRn was uniformly present intracellularly in all blood monocytes and intestinal macrophages. FcRn was detectable on the cell surface of a significant fraction of monocytes at lower levels and on a small subset of tissue macrophages that expressed high levels of FcRn on the cell surface. These data show that FcRn is functionally expressed and its cellular distribution is regulated in monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, suggesting that it may confer novel IgG binding functions upon these cell types relative to typical FcγRs: FcγRI, FcγRII, and FcγRIII. PMID:11207281

  9. Platelet-derived CXCL12 regulates monocyte function, survival, differentiation into macrophages and foam cells through differential involvement of CXCR4–CXCR7

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, M; von Ungern-Sternberg, S N I; Seizer, P; Schlegel, F; Büttcher, M; Sindhu, N A; Müller, S; Mack, A; Gawaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and release CXCL12 (SDF-1), which governs differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors into either endothelial or macrophage-foam cells. CXCL12 ligates CXCR4 and CXCR7 and regulates monocyte/macrophage functions. This study deciphers the relative contribution of CXCR4–CXCR7 in mediating the effects of platelet-derived CXCL12 on monocyte function, survival, and differentiation. CXCL12 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that ligate CXCR4–CXCR7 induced a dynamic bidirectional trafficking of the receptors, causing CXCR4 internalization and CXCR7 externalization during chemotaxis, thereby influencing relative receptor availability, unlike MCP-1. In vivo we found enhanced accumulation of platelets and platelet-macrophage co-aggregates in peritoneal fluid following induction of peritonitis in mice. The relative surface expression of CXCL12, CXCR4, and CXCR7 among infiltrated monocytes was also enhanced as compared with peripheral blood. Platelet-derived CXCL12 from collagen-adherent platelets and recombinant CXCL12 induced monocyte chemotaxis specifically through CXCR4 engagement. Adhesion of monocytes to immobilized CXCL12 and CXCL12-enriched activated platelet surface under static and dynamic arterial flow conditions were mediated primarily through CXCR7 and were counter-regulated by neutralizing platelet-derived CXCL12. Monocytes and culture-derived-M1–M2 macrophages phagocytosed platelets, with the phagocytic potential of culture-derived-M1 macrophages higher than M2 involving CXCR4–CXCR7 participation. CXCR7 was the primary receptor in promoting monocyte survival as exerted by platelet-derived CXCL12 against BH3-mimetic induced apoptosis (phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activation, loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential). In co-culture experiments with platelets, monocytes predominantly differentiated into CD163+ macrophages, which was attenuated upon CXCL12 neutralization and CXCR4/CXCR7 blocking antibodies

  10. Centrifugation of Cultured Osteoblasts And Macrophages as a Model To Study How Gravity Regulates The Function of Skeletal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Searby, Nancy D.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Sutijono, Darrell; Yu, Joon-Ho; Malouvier, Alexander; Doty, Steven B.; Morey-Holton, Emily; Weinstein, Steven L.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical loading helps define the architecture of weight-bearing bone via the tightly regulated process of skeletal turnover. Turnover occurs by the concerted activity of osteoblasts, responsible for bone formation. and osteoclasts, responsible for bone resorption. Osteoclasts are specialized megakaryon macrophages, which differentiate from monocytes in response to resorption stimuli, such as reduced weight-bearing. Habitation in space dramatically alters musculoskeletal loading, which modulates both cell function and bone structure. Our long-term objective is to define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate skeletal adaptations to altered gravity environments. Our experimental approach is to apply hypergravity loads by centrifugation to rodents and cultured cells. As a first step, we examined the influence of centrifugation on the structure of cancellous bone in rats to test the ability of hypergravity to change skeletal architecture. Since cancellous bone undergoes rapid turnover we expected the most dramatic structural changes to occur in the shape of trabeculae of weight-bearing, cancellous bone. To define the cellular responses to hypergravity loads, we exposed cultured osteoblasts and macrophages to centrifugation. The intraosseous and intramedullary pressures within long bones in vivo reportedly range from 12-40 mm Hg, which would correspond to 18-59 gravity (g) in our cultures. We assumed that hydrostatic pressure from the medium above the cell layer is at least one major component of the mechanical load generated by centrifuging cultured cells. and therefore we exposed the cells to 10-50g. In osteoblasts, we examined the structure of their actin and microtubule networks, production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and cell survival. Analysis of the shape of the cytoskeletal networks provides evidence for the ability of centrifugation to affect cell structure, while the production of PGE2 serves as a convenient marker for mechanical stimulation. We

  11. Functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding macrophage migration inhibitory factor are associated with Gram-negative bacteremia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Das, Rituparna; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Yang, Ivana V; van Duin, David; Levy, Rebecca; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Montgomery, Ruth R; Shaw, Albert; Schwartz, David A; Bucala, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an immune mediator encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus. We found the genotype conferring low expression of MIF to be enriched in a cohort of 180 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, compared with 229 healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; P = .04), an association that was more pronounced in older adults (OR, 4.6; P = .01). Among older subjects, those with low expression of MIF demonstrated 20% reduced MIF production from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes and 30% lower monocyte surface Toll-like receptor 4, compared with those with high expression. Our work suggests that older adults with low expression of MIF may be predisposed to hyporesponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacterial infection. PMID:24158957

  12. Functional Polymorphisms in the Gene Encoding Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Are Associated With Gram-Negative Bacteremia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rituparna; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Yang, Ivana V.; van Duin, David; Levy, Rebecca; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Shaw, Albert; Schwartz, David A.; Bucala, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an immune mediator encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus. We found the genotype conferring low expression of MIF to be enriched in a cohort of 180 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, compared with 229 healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; P = .04), an association that was more pronounced in older adults (OR, 4.6; P = .01). Among older subjects, those with low expression of MIF demonstrated 20% reduced MIF production from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes and 30% lower monocyte surface Toll-like receptor 4, compared with those with high expression. Our work suggests that older adults with low expression of MIF may be predisposed to hyporesponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacterial infection. PMID:24158957

  13. Effects of Liposomal Compositions with Oxidized Dextrans on Functional Activity of U937 Macrophage-Like Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kozhin, P M; Chechushkov, A V; Zaitseva, N S; Lemza, A E; Men'shchikova, E B; Troitskii, A V; Shkurupy, V A

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effects of liposomal pharmaceutical compositions with oxidized dextrans on functional activity of U937 monocyte/macrophage-like cells. Liposomes in the emulsion contained oxidized dextran with a molecular weights of 40 kDa or 70 kDa or isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) conjugated with oxidized dextran (40 kDa). Cell viability was evaluated by MTT test; mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of superoxide anion and H2O2 were studied by fluorescent methods. The studied compositions exhibited no cytotoxic effect and even improved cell viability and mitochondrial respiration. Liposomes with oxidized 40 kDa dextran, including those with INAH-conjugated dextran, inhibited production of superoxide anion, but increased H2O2 generation. PMID:26601843

  14. Association of downregulated HDAC 2 with the impaired mitochondrial function and cytokine secretion in the monocytes/macrophages from gestational diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xin; Yu, Hongna; Jia, Bei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Cui, Qing; Liu, Zhifen; Sun, Chengming; Chu, Yongli

    2016-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases in later life, yet with underlying mechanisms unclear. The present study was to explore the association of upregulated histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC 2) with the impaired mitochondrial function and the cytokine secretion in the monocytes/macrophages from GDM patients. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial function, proinflamatory cytokine secretion and the HDAC 2 level in the serum or in the monocytes/macrophages from GDM patients, investigated the influence by HDAC 2 inhibitor, AR-42 (N-hydroxy-4-[[(2S)-3-methyl-2-phenylbutanoyl]amino]benzamide), on the mitochondrial function and cytokine secretion in the isolated GDM monocytes/macrophages. Results demonstrated an increased mitochondria size, mitochondrial superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an undermined mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) in the GDM monocytes/macrophages. And the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 were also markedly higher in the GDM pregnancies, while the expression and activity of HDAC 2 was downregulated. Moreover, AR-42-mediated HDAC 2 inhibition in vitro contributed to the impaired mitochondrial function and the proinflamatory cytokine secretion. In conclusion, this study suggests an association of the impaired mitochondrial function and the promoted proinflamatory cytokine secretion with the reduced HDAC 2 activity in GDM. These findings may present HDAC 2 as a target for GDM treatment. PMID:26936353

  15. Physiological function and inflamed-brain migration of mouse monocyte-derived macrophages following cellular uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles-Implication of macrophage-based drug delivery into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hsin-I; Kang, Wen; Shi, Yingli; Zhou, Guangzhou; Lu, Yuanan

    2016-05-30

    This study was designed to use superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as evaluating tools to study monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM)-mediated delivery of small molecular agents into the diseased brains. MDM were tested with different-configured SPIONs at selected concentrations for their impacts on carrier cells' physiological and migratory properties, which were found to depend largely on particle size, coating, and treatment concentrations. SHP30, a SPION of 30-nm core size with oleic acids plus amphiphilic polymer coating, was identified to have high cellular uptake efficiency and cause little cytotoxic effects on MDM. At lower incubation dose (25μg/mL), few alteration was observed in carrier cells' physiological and in vivo migratory functions, as tested in a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute neuroinflammation mouse model. Nevertheless, significant increase in monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation, and decrease in in vivo carrier MDM inflamed-brain homing ability were found in groups treated with a higher dose of SHP30at 100μg/mL. Overall, our results have identified MDM treatment at 25μg/mL SHP30 resulted in little functional changes, provided valuable parameters for using SPIONs as evaluating tools to study MDM-mediated therapeutics carriage and delivery, and supported the concepts of using monocytes-macrophages as cellular vehicles to transport small molecular agents to the brain. PMID:27001531

  16. Ca2+ signaling but not store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is required for the function of macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaeth, Martin; Zee, Isabelle; Concepcion, Axel R.; Maus, Mate; Shaw, Patrick; Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Zahra, Aleena; Kozhaya, Lina; Weidinger, Carl; Philips, Jennifer; Unutmaz, Derya; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels is essential for immunity to infection. CRAC channels are formed by ORAI1 proteins in the plasma membrane and activated by stromal interaction molecules 1 (STIM1) and STIM2 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 genes that abolish SOCE cause severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections due to impaired T cell function. SOCE has also been observed in cells of the innate immune system such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) and may provide Ca2+ signals required for their function. The specific role of SOCE in macrophage and DC function, and its contribution to innate immunity, however, is not well defined. We found that non-selective inhibition of Ca2+ signaling strongly impairs many effector functions of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and dendritic cells (BMDCs) including phagocytosis, inflammasome activation, and priming of T cells. Surprisingly however, macrophages and DCs from mice with conditional deletion of Stim1 and Stim2 genes – and therefore complete inhibition of SOCE – showed no major functional defects. Their differentiation, FcR-dependent and independent phagocytosis, phagolysosome fusion, cytokine production, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and their ability to present antigens to activate T cells was preserved. Our findings demonstrate that STIM1, STIM2 and SOCE are dispensable for many critical effector functions of macrophages and DCs, which has important implications for CRAC channel inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to suppress pathogenic T cells while not interfering with myeloid cell functions required for innate immunity. PMID:26109647

  17. Age-Dependent Changes in FasL (CD95L) Modulate Macrophage Function in a Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Roychoudhury, Jayeeta; Doggett, Teresa A.; Apte, Rajendra S.; Ferguson, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the effect of aging on Fas ligand (FasL) function in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods. Young and aged mice were laser treated to induce CNV. Bone marrow chimeras were performed between young and aged mice. FasL protein expression was examined in the eye and soluble FasL (sFasL) was measured in the blood. Young and aged mice were treated with a matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor and systemic sFasL was neutralized by antibody treatment. Macrophages from young and aged mice were tested for sFasL-mediated cytokine production and migration. Results. The elevated CNV response observed with aging was dependent on bone marrow–derived cells. FasL expression in the eye was increased with age, but decreased following laser treatment. Aged mice had higher levels of sFasL in the blood compared to young mice. Systemic treatment with an MMP inhibitor decreased bloodborne sFasL, and reduced CNV in young and aged mice. Systemic neutralization of sFasL reduced CNV only in aged mice. sFasL increased cytokine production in aged macrophages and proangiogenic M2 macrophages. Aged M2 macrophages had elevated Fas (CD95) expression and displayed increased migration in response to sFasL compared to M1 macrophages derived from young animals. Conclusions. Age modulates FasL function where increased MMP cleavage leads to a loss of function in the eye. The released form of FasL (sFasL) preferentially induces the migration of proangiogenic M2 macrophages into the laser lesions and increases proangiogenic cytokines promoting CNV. FasL may be a viable target for therapeutic intervention in aged-related neovascular disease. PMID:23821188

  18. [Functional activity of alveolar macrophages in patients with bronchial asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Liamina, S V; Kalish, S V; Malysheva, E V; Iurenev, G L; Malyshev, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma (BA) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a widespread clinical situation. The two pathologies are known to influence each other leading to disturbances in immune responsiveness. We studied phenotypes and phenotypic plasticity of immune cells (alveolar macrophages) in patients with BA and GERD. It was shown that BA and GERD are largely associated with AM of proinflammatory M2 and anti-inflammatory M1 phenotypes respectively. Population of AM with MI phenotype increases in patients having both BA and GERD compared with that in BA alone. In vitro experiments showed that acidic milieu promotes shifting the phenotype toward the predominance of M1, i.e. simulates the situation characteristic of GERD. Combination of BA and GERD narrows the interval within which AM can change MI phenotype (i.e. makes them more "rigid") but broadens the range in which they can change M2 phenotype. Also, GERD promotes the development of morphological rigidity of AM. Patients with BA given steroid therapy undergo inversion of phenotypic plasticity of AM. These data characterize the immunological component of BA and/or GERD pathogenesis. They help to better understand mechanisms of development of broncho-pulmonary pathology in GERD patients and can be used to work out new methods for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:24417067

  19. Molecular function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and a novel therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nishihira, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a unique protein that participates in inflammation, immune responses, and cell growth. An array of in vitro and in vivo experiments has demonstrated that MIF is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Blockade of MIF bioactivities by either neutralizing anti-MIF antibodies or antagonists prevents inflammatory cytokine cascade, which strongly suggests that an anti-MIF therapeutic strategy is feasible for treatment of IBD. Recently, we developed a new therapeutic approach for IBD by administration of antisense MIF oligonucleotides in conjugation with schizophyllan (SPG), a member of the glucan family. SPG specifically binds Dectin-1 expressed in antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and the antisense MIF/SPG complex is incorporated into the cells. In in vivo experiments of colitis models in mice, we found that intraperitoneal administration of the complex ameliorated the clinical signs of colitis and improved the histological scores. This novel therapy designed to knock down the MIF production in APCs is expected to be clinically applicable for the treatment of IBD. PMID:23050964

  20. Efferocytosis impairs pulmonary macrophage and lung antibacterial function via PGE2/EP2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Alexandra I.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Lee, Sang Pyo; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The ingestion of apoptotic cells (ACs; termed “efferocytosis”) by phagocytes has been shown to trigger the release of molecules such as transforming growth factor β, interleukin-10 (IL-10), nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Although the antiinflammatory actions of these mediators may contribute to the restoration of homeostasis after tissue injury, their potential impact on antibacterial defense is unknown. The lung is highly susceptible to diverse forms of injury, and secondary bacterial infections after injury are of enormous clinical importance. We show that ACs suppress in vitro phagocytosis and bacterial killing by alveolar macrophages and that this is mediated by a cyclooxygenase–PGE2–E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2)–adenylyl cyclase–cyclic AMP pathway. Moreover, intrapulmonary administration of ACs demonstrated that PGE2 generated during efferocytosis and acting via EP2 accounts for subsequent impairment of lung recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as enhanced generation of IL-10 in vivo. These results suggest that in addition to their beneficial homeostatic influence, antiinflammatory programs activated by efferocytosis in the lung have the undesirable potential to dampen innate antimicrobial responses. They also identify an opportunity to reduce the incidence and severity of pneumonia in the setting of lung injury by pharmacologically targeting synthesis of PGE2 or ligation of EP2. PMID:19124657

  1. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on porcine alveolar macrophage function as determined using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. The main target of infection is the porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM). Infection of PAM by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that a...

  2. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on porcine alveolar macrophage function as determined using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. The major target of infection is the alveolar macrophage (AM). Infection of AMs by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not...

  3. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor treatment results in recovery of motor function after white matter damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Jennifer K; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Zhang, Min; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-01-01

    Clinical stroke usually results from a cerebral ischaemic event, and is frequently a debilitating condition with limited treatment options. A significant proportion of clinical strokes result from specific damage to the subcortical white matter (SWM), but currently there are few animal models available to investigate the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic strategies to promote recovery. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that has been previously shown to promote neuroprotective effects after brain damage; however, the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Here, it is reported that GM-CSF treatment results in dramatic functional improvement in a white matter model of stroke in mice. SWM stroke was induced in mice by unilateral injections of the vasoconstrictor, endothelin-1 (ET-1). The results reveal that ET-1-induced stroke impairs skilled motor function on the single pellet-reaching task and results in forelimb asymmetry, in adult mice. Treatment with GM-CSF, after stroke, restores motor function and abolishes forelimb asymmetry. The results also indicate that GM-CSF promotes its effects by activating mammalian target of rapamycin signalling mechanisms in the brain following stroke injury. Additionally, a significant increase in GM-CSF receptor expression was found in the ipsilateral hemisphere of the ET-1-injected brain. Taken together, the present study highlights the use of an under-utilized mouse model of stroke (using ET-1) and suggests that GM-CSF treatment can attenuate ET-1-induced functional deficits. PMID:26474338

  4. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies. PMID:26210152

  5. virB-Mediated Survival of Brucella abortus in Mice and Macrophages Is Independent of a Functional Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase or NADPH Oxidase in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao-Hui; den Hartigh, Andreas B.; de Lima Santos, Renato; Adams, L. Garry; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2002-01-01

    The Brucella abortus virB locus is required for establishing chronic infection in the mouse. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we investigated whether virB is involved in evasion of the bactericidal activity of NADPH oxidase and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in macrophages. Elimination of NADPH oxidase or iNOS activity in macrophages in vitro increased recovery of wild-type B. abortus but not recovery of a virB mutant. In mice lacking either NADPH oxidase or iNOS, however, B. abortus infected and persisted to the same extent as it did in congenic C57BL/6 mice up until 60 days postinfection, suggesting that these host defense mechanisms are not critical for limiting bacterial growth in the mouse. A virB mutant did not exhibit increased survival in either of the knockout mouse strains, indicating that this locus does not contribute to evasion of nitrosative or oxidative killing mechanisms in vivo. PMID:12183526

  6. The Nramp1 protein and its role in resistance to infection and macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Canonne-Hergaux, F; Gruenheid, S; Govoni, G; Gros, P

    1999-01-01

    Susceptibility to infectious diseases is under genetic control in humans. Animal models provide an ideal tool to study the genetic component of susceptibility and to identify candidate genes that can then be tested for association or linkage studies in human populations from endemic areas of disease. The Nramp1 gene was isolated by positional cloning the host resistance locus Bcg/Ity/Lsh, and mutations at this locus impair the resistance of mice to infections with intracellular parasites, such as Salmonella, Leishmania, and Mycobacterium. Allelic variants at the human Nramp1 homologue have recently been found to be associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis and leprosy in humans. The Nramp1 protein is an integral membrane protein expressed exclusively in the lysosomal compartment of monocytes and macrophages. After phagocytosis, Nramp1 is targeted to the membrane of the microbe-containing phagosome, where it may modify the intraphagosomal milieu to affect microbial replication. Although the biochemical mechanism of action of Nramp1 at that site remains unknown, Nramp homologues have been identified in many other animal species and actually define a protein family conserved from bacteria to humans. Some of these homologues have been shown to be divalent cation transporters. Recently, a second member of the mammalian Nramp family, Nramp2, was discovered and shown to be mutated in animal models of iron deficiency. The Nramp2 protein was subsequently shown to be the major transferrin-independent iron uptake system of the intestine. Together, these results suggest that Nramp1 may control intracellular microbial replication by actively removing iron or other divalent cations from the phagosomal space. PMID:10417735

  7. Glucocorticoid-Augmented Efferocytosis Inhibits Pulmonary Pneumococcal Clearance in Mice by Reducing Alveolar Macrophage Bactericidal Function.

    PubMed

    Stolberg, Valerie R; McCubbrey, Alexandra L; Freeman, Christine M; Brown, Jeanette P; Crudgington, Sean W; Taitano, Sophina H; Saxton, Bridget L; Mancuso, Peter; Curtis, Jeffrey L

    2015-07-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) increase community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) incidence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by unknown mechanisms. Apoptosis is increased in the lungs of COPD patients. Uptake of apoptotic cells (ACs) ("efferocytosis") by alveolar macrophages (AMøs) reduces their ability to combat microbes, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most common cause of CAP in COPD patients. Having shown that ICS significantly increase AMø efferocytosis, we hypothesized that this process, termed glucocorticoid-augmented efferocytosis, might explain the association of CAP with ICS therapy in COPD. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of fluticasone, AC, or both on AMøs of C57BL/6 mice in vitro and in an established model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Fluticasone plus AC significantly reduced TLR4-stimulated AMø IL-12 production, relative to either treatment alone, and decreased TNF-α, CCL3, CCL5, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant/CXCL1, relative to AC. Mice treated with fluticasone plus AC before infection with viable pneumococci developed significantly more lung CFUs at 48 h. However, none of the pretreatments altered inflammatory cell recruitment to the lungs at 48 h postinfection, and fluticasone plus AC less markedly reduced in vitro mediator production to heat-killed pneumococci. Fluticasone plus AC significantly reduced in vitro AMø killing of pneumococci, relative to other conditions, in part by delaying phagolysosome acidification without affecting production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. These results support glucocorticoid-augmented efferocytosis as a potential explanation for the epidemiological association of ICS therapy of COPD patients with increased risk for CAP, and establish murine experimental models to dissect underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:25987742

  8. PIAS1 and STAT-3 impair the tumoricidal potential of IFN-γ-stimulated mouse dendritic cells generated with IL-15.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Neale T; LaCasse, Collin J; Larmonier, Claire B; Alizadeh, Darya; Trad, Malika; Janikashvili, Nona; Bonnotte, Bernard; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Primarily defined by their antigen-presenting property, dendritic cells (DCs) are being implemented as cancer vaccines in immunotherapeutic interventions. DCs can also function as direct tumor cell killers. How DC cytotoxic activity can be efficiently harnessed and the mechanisms controlling this nonconventional property are not fully understood. We report here that the tumoricidal potential of mouse DCs generated from myeloid precursors with GM-CSF and IL-15 (IL-15 DCs) can be triggered with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand lipopolysaccharide to a similar extent compared with that of their counterparts, conventionally generated with IL-4 (IL-4 DCs). The mechanism of tumor cell killing depends on the induction of iNOS expression by DCs. In contrast, interferon (IFN)-γ induces the cytotoxic activity of IL-4 but not IL-15 DCs. Although the IFN-γ-STAT-1 signaling pathway is overall functional in IL-15 DCs, IFN-γ fails to induce iNOS expression in these cells. iNOS expression is negatively controlled in IFN-γ-stimulated IL-15 DCs by the cooperation between the E3 SUMO ligase PIAS1 and STAT-3, and can be partially restored with PIAS1 siRNA and STAT-3 inhibitors. PMID:24777831

  9. Suppression of developmental anomalies by maternal macrophages in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, T.; Hata, S.; Kusafuka, T. )

    1990-11-01

    We tested whether nonspecific tumoricidal immune cells can suppress congenital malformations by killing precursor cells destined to cause such defects. Pretreatment of pregnant ICR mice with synthetic (Pyran copolymer) and biological (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) agents significantly suppressed radiation- and chemical-induced congenital malformations (cleft palate, digit anomalies, tail anomalies, etc.). Such suppressive effects were associated with the activation of maternal macrophages by these agents, but were lost either after the disruption of activated macrophages by supersonic waves or by inhibition of their lysosomal enzyme activity with trypan blue. These results indicate that a live activated macrophage with active lysosomal enzymes can be an effector cell to suppress maldevelopment. A similar reduction by activated macrophages was observed in strain CL/Fr, which has a high spontaneous frequency of cleft lips and palates. Furthermore, Pyran-activated maternal macrophages could pass through the placenta, and enhanced urethane-induced cell killing (but not somatic mutation) in the embryo. It is likely that a maternal immunosurveillance system eliminating preteratogenic cells allows for the replacement with normal totipotent blast cells during the pregnancy to protect abnormal development.

  10. Early hematopoiesis and macrophage development.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Palis, James

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm that all blood cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been challenged by two findings. First, there are tissue-resident hematopoietic cells, including subsets of macrophages that are not replenished by adult HSCs, but instead are maintained by self-renewal of fetal-derived cells. Second, during embryogenesis, there is a conserved program of HSC-independent hematopoiesis that precedes HSC function and is required for embryonic survival. The presence of waves of HSC-independent hematopoiesis as well as fetal HSCs raises questions about the origin of fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages. In the murine embryo, historical examination of embryonic macrophage and monocyte populations combined with recent reports utilizing genetic lineage-tracing approaches has led to a model of macrophage ontogeny that can be integrated with existing models of hematopoietic ontogeny. The first wave of hematopoiesis contains primitive erythroid, megakaryocyte and macrophage progenitors that arise in the yolk sac, and these macrophage progenitors are the source of early macrophages throughout the embryo, including the liver. A second wave of multipotential erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) also arises in the yolk sac. EMPs colonize the fetal liver, initiating myelopoiesis and forming macrophages. Lineage tracing indicates that this second wave of macrophages are distributed in most fetal tissues, although not appreciably in the brain. Thus, fetal-derived adult tissue-resident macrophages, other than microglia, appear to predominately derive from EMPs. While HSCs emerge at midgestation and colonize the fetal liver, the relative contribution of fetal HSCs to tissue macrophages at later stages of development is unclear. The inclusion of macrophage potential in multiple waves of hematopoiesis is consistent with reports of their functional roles throughout development in innate immunity, phagocytosis, and tissue morphogenesis and remodeling

  11. Macrophages from Patients with Cirrhotic Ascites Showed Function Alteration of Host Defense Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Abdel Motaal M.; Kadaru, Abdel Gadir Y.; Omer, Ibtihal; Musa, Ahmed M.; Enan, Khalid; El Khidir, Isam M.; Williams, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with cirrhotic ascites (PCA) are susceptible to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) which has increased morbidity and mortality. Since some host defense aspects of peritoneal macrophages (PMф) from PCA are altered this study examined factors related to receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Methods Twelve PCA were studied. PMɸ were isolated from ascitic fluid (AF) samples removed from these patients. Uptake of mannose receptor (MR)-specific ligand, fluorescein isothiocyanate-mannosylated-bovine serum albumin (FITC-man-BSA), by patients' PMɸ and controls, a human monocytic cell line, was measured pre- and post-IL-4 treatment. Phagocytosis of FITC-labeled yeast particles by patients' PMɸ was measured pre- and post-IL-4 treatment. Fluorescence values were obtained using a spectrofuorometer. MRC1 gene was analyzed in blood samples from PCA and controls, healthy donors, using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Results Past SBP episode(s) were reported in 58.3% of patients. Mean AF volume analyzed per patient was 1.3L. PMɸ ratio in cell yield was 53.73% (SD 18.1). Mean uptake absorbance of patients' PMф was 0.0841 (SD 0.077) compared to 0.338 (SD 0.34) of controls, P = 0.023. Following IL-4 treatment absorbance increased to 0.297 (SD 0.28) in patients' PMф (P = 0.018 on paired sample t-test), and to 0.532 (SD 0.398 in controls (P = 0.053 on independent sample t-test). Mean phagocytosis absorbance of patients' PMф was 0.1250 (SD 0.032) before IL-4 treatment compared to 0.2300 (SD 0.104) after (P = 0.026). PCR analysis for MRC1 gene was negative in all PCA samples compared to positive results in all controls. Conclusion Since decreased phagocytosis and MR uptake were enhanced post-IL-4 treatment MR downregulation pre-treatment is plausible. Negative PCR results for MRC1 might suggest an anomaly, but this awaits further ellucidation. These altered host defense findings are relevant to infection pathophysiology, and their

  12. Nucleoside uptake in macrophages from various murine strains: a short-time and a two-step stimulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Busolo, F.; Conventi, L.; Grigolon, M.; Palu, G. )

    1991-06-28

    Kinetics of (3H)-uridine uptake by murine peritoneal macrophages (pM phi) is early altered after exposure to a variety of stimuli. Alterations caused by Candida albicans, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) were similar in SAVO, C57BL/6, C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice, and were not correlated with an activation process as shown by the amount of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) being released. Short-time exposure to all stimuli resulted in an increased nucleoside uptake by SAVO pM phi, suggesting that the tumoricidal function of this cell either depends from the type of stimulus or the time when the specific interaction with the cell receptor is taking place. Experiments with priming and triggering signals confirmed the above findings, indicating that the increase or the decrease of nucleoside uptake into the cell depends essentially on the chemical nature of the priming stimulus. The triggering stimulus, on the other hand, is only able to amplify the primary response.

  13. Critical Role of TLR2 and MyD88 for Functional Response of Macrophages to a Group IIA-Secreted Phospholipase A2 from Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Leiguez, Elbio; Giannotti, Karina Cristina; Moreira, Vanessa; Matsubara, Márcio Hideki; Gutiérrez, José María; Lomonte, Bruno; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Balsinde, Jesús; Teixeira, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The snake venom MT-III is a group IIA secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) enzyme with functional and structural similarities with mammalian pro-inflammatory sPLA2s of the same group. Previously, we demonstrated that MT-III directly activates the innate inflammatory response of macrophages, including release of inflammatory mediators and formation of lipid droplets (LDs). However, the mechanisms coordinating these processes remain unclear. In the present study, by using TLR2−/− or MyD88−/− or C57BL/6 (WT) male mice, we report that TLR2 and MyD88 signaling have a critical role in MT-III-induced inflammatory response in macrophages. MT-III caused a marked release of PGE2, PGD2, PGJ2, IL-1β and IL-10 and increased the number of LDs in WT macrophages. In MT-III-stimulated TLR2−/− macrophages, formation of LDs and release of eicosanoids and cytokines were abrogated. In MyD88−/− macrophages, MT-III-induced release of PGE2, IL-1β and IL-10 was abrogated, but release of PGD2 and PGJ2 was maintained. In addition, COX-2 protein expression seen in MT-III-stimulated WT macrophages was abolished in both TLR2−/− and MyD88−/− cells, while perilipin 2 expression was abolished only in MyD88−/− cells. We further demonstrated a reduction of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and a release of the TLR2 agonists palmitic and oleic acid from MT-III-stimulated WT macrophages compared with WT control cells, thus suggesting these fatty acids as major messengers for MT-III-induced engagement of TLR2/MyD88 signaling. Collectively, our findings identify for the first time a TLR2 and MyD88-dependent mechanism that underlies group IIA sPLA2-induced inflammatory response in macrophages. PMID:24718259

  14. Live cell imaging to understand monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell function in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Sara; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Ley, Klaus

    2016-06-27

    Intravital imaging is an invaluable tool for understanding the function of cells in healthy and diseased tissues. It provides a window into dynamic processes that cannot be studied by other techniques. This review will cover the benefits and limitations of various techniques for labeling and imaging myeloid cells, with a special focus on imaging cells in atherosclerotic arteries. Although intravital imaging is a powerful tool for understanding cell function, it alone does not provide a complete picture of the cell. Other techniques, such as flow cytometry and transcriptomics, must be combined with intravital imaging to fully understand a cell's phenotype, lineage, and function. PMID:27270892

  15. Functional consequences for primary human alveolar macrophages following treatment with long, but not short, multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Grandolfo, Davide; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a potential human health hazard, primarily via inhalation. In the lung, alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide the first line of immune cellular defense against inhaled materials. We hypothesized that, 1 and 5 days after treating AMs with short (0.6 μm in length; MWCNT-0.6 μm) and long (20 μm in length; MWCNT-20 μm) MWCNTs for 24 hours, AMs would exhibit increased markers of adverse bioreactivity (cytokine release and reactive oxygen species generation) while also having a modified functional ability (phagocytosis and migration). Methods Primary human AMs were treated with short and long MWCNTs for 24 hours, 1 and 5 days after which toxicity end points, including cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, and inflammatory mediator release, were measured. AM functional end points involving phagocytic ability and migratory capacity were also measured. Results AM viability was significantly decreased at 1 and 5 days after treatment with MWCNT-20 μm, while superoxide levels and inflammatory mediator release were significantly increased. At the same time, there was reduced phagocytosis and migratory capacity alongside increased expression of MARCO; this coincided with frustrated phagocytosis observed by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, the adverse bioreactivity of the shorter MWCNT-0.6 μm with AMs (and any resulting reduction in AM functional ability) was substantially less marked or absent altogether. Conclusion This study shows that after 24-hour treatment with long, but not short, MWCNTs, AM function is severely affected up to 5 days after the initial exposure. This has potentially significant pathophysiological consequences for individuals who may be intentionally (via therapeutic applications) or unintentionally exposed to these nanomaterials. PMID:25960651

  16. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  17. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage.

    PubMed

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S S; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  18. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  19. Developmental derivation of embryonic and adult macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shepard, J L; Zon, L I

    2000-01-01

    The macrophage cell lineage continually arises from hematopoietic stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and adult life. Previous theories proposed that macrophages are the recent progeny of bone marrow-derived monocytes and that they function primarily in phagocytosis. More recently, however, observations have shown that the ontogeny of macrophages in early mouse and human embryos is different from that occurring during adult development, and that the embryonic macrophages do not follow the monocyte pathway. Fetal macrophages are thought to differentiate from yolk sac-derived primitive macrophages before the development of adult monocytes. Further support for a separate lineage of fetal macrophages has come from studies of several species, including chicken, zebrafish, Xenopus, Drosophila, and C. elegans. The presence of fetal macrophages in PU.1-null mice indicates their independence from monocyte precursors and their existence as an alternative macrophage lineage. PMID:10608497

  20. MACROPHAGE FUNCTIONAL POLARIZATION (M1/M2) IN RESPONSE TO VARYING FIBER AND PORE DIMENSIONS OF ELECTROSPUN SCAFFOLDS

    PubMed Central

    Garg, K.; Pullen, N.A.; Oskeritzian, C.A.; Ryan, J.J.; Bowlin, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of fiber and pore size of an electrospun scaffold on the polarization of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMΦs) towards regenerative (M2) or inflammatory (M1) phenotypes. BMMΦs were seeded on Polydioxanone (PDO) scaffolds electrospun from varying polymer concentrations (60, 100, and 140 mg/ml). Higher polymer concentrations yielded larger diameter fibers with larger pore sizes and porosity. BMMΦ cultured on these scaffolds showed a correlation between increasing fiber/pore size and increased expression of the M2 marker Arginase 1 (Arg1), along with decreased expression of the M1 marker inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Secretion of the angiogenic cytokines VEGF, TGF-β1 and bFGF was higher among cultures employing larger fiber/pore size scaffolds (140 mg/ml). Using a 3D in vitro angiogenesis bead assay, we have demonstrated that the M2-like profile of BMMΦ induced by the 140 mg/ml is functional. Furthermore, our results show that the pore size of a scaffold is a more critical regulator of the BMMΦ polarization compared to the fiber diameter. The study also shows a potential role for MyD88 in regulating M1 BMMΦ signaling on the large vs. small fiber/pore size PDO scaffold. These data are instructive for the rationale design of implantable prosthetics designed to promote in situ regeneration. PMID:23515178

  1. Effect of helium neon laser irradiation on the bactericidal and digestive function of macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Mingji; Yuan, Weizhong; Hong, Zheng; Lan, Xin

    1996-09-01

    The effect of He-Ne laser on the intracellular bactericidal and digestive function to C albicans of mice peritoneal M(theta) has been studied with the fluorescence microscope after acridine organge staining. The results indicated that the bactericidal and digestive function of M(theta) in irradiated groups, expressed more active than that in the non-irradiated group, and showed significant difference. The comparison between the different irradiated groups also showed marked difference. Ultrastructure changes of M(theta) were observed under the E/M and the content of a-Acetate Naphthy esterase in lysosome were measured by image analysis, the results demonstrated that M(theta) in the irradiated groups present marked change in ultrastructure and the GN, GA, GA/CA, IOD of esterase increased significantly. The results suggested that the He-Ne laser with appropriate dosage could activate M(theta) , and enhance anti-infection immunity.

  2. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  3. A superhydrophilic titanium implant functionalized by ozone gas modulates bone marrow cell and macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    Sunarso; Toita, Riki; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-08-01

    Bone-forming cells and Mϕ play key roles in bone tissue repair. In this study, we prepared a superhydrophilic titanium implant functionalized by ozone gas to modulate osteoconductivity and inhibit inflammatory response towards titanium implants. After 24 h of ozone gas treatment, the water contact angle of the titanium surface became zero. XPS analysis revealed that hydroxyl groups were greatly increased, but carbon contaminants were largely decreased 24 h after ozone gas functionalization. Also, ozone gas functionalization did not alter titanium surface topography. Superhydrophilic titanium (O3-Ti) largely increased the aspect ratio, size and perimeter of cells when compared with untreated titanium (unTi). In addition, O3-Ti facilitated rat bone marrow derived MSCs differentiation and mineralization evidenced by greater ALP activity and bone-like nodule formation. Interestingly, O3-Ti did not affect RAW264.7 Mϕ proliferation. However, naive RAW264.7 Mϕ cultured on unTi produced a two-fold larger amount of TNFα than that on O3-Ti. Furthermore, O3-Ti greatly mitigated proinflammatory cytokine production, including TNFα and IL-6 from LSP-stimulated RAW264.7 Mϕ. These results demonstrated that a superhydrophilic titanium prepared by simple ozone gas functionalization successfully increased MSCs proliferation and differentiation, and mitigated proinflammatory cytokine production from both naive and LPS-stimulated Mϕ. This superhydrophilic surface would be useful as an endosseous implantable biomaterials and as a biomaterial for implantation into other tissues. PMID:27344451

  4. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    bisphosphonates in model studies; In vitro, zoledronic acid causes increased apoptotic cell death; in vivo the drug has been shown to inhibit the production of pro-angiogenic factor MMP-9, as well as most recent evidence showing it can trigger the reversal of the TAMs phenotype from pro-tumoral M2 to tumoricidal M1. There is thus accumulating evidence supporting the hypothesis that effects on TAMs may contribute to the anti-tumour effect of bisphosphonates. This review will focus in detail on the role of tumour associated macrophages in breast cancer progression, the actions of bisphosphonates on macrophages in vitro and in tumour models in vivo and summarise the evidence supporting the potential for the targeting of tumour macrophages with bisphosphonates. PMID:22005011

  5. Different in vitro exposure regimens of murine primary macrophages to silver nanoparticles induce different fates of nanoparticles and different toxicological and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Villiers, Florent; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Sorieul, Stéphanie; Mure, Geoffrey; Gerdil, Adèle; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are used in a variety of consumers' goods. Their toxicological impact is currently intensely studied, mostly upon acute exposure, but their intracellular dissolution and fate is rather poorly documented. In this study, murine primary macrophages were exposed to a single high but non-lethal dose of Ag-NPs or to repeated, low doses of Ag-NPs. Cells were either collected immediately after acute exposure or after 72 h of recovery in the NP-free exposure medium. Ag intracellular content and distribution were analyzed by particle-induced X-ray emission, transmission electron microscopy coupled to energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In parallel, macrophage functionality as well as inflammatory and thiol-responses were assessed after Ag-NP exposure. We show that Ag accumulation in macrophages is similar upon acute and repeated exposure to Ag-NPs, and that Ag is partly expelled from cells during the 72 h recovery stage. However, acute exposure leads to a strong response of macrophages, characterized by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, phagocytic capacity and nitric oxide (NO) production upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Under this condition, we also show an increased release of proinflammatory cytokines as well as a decreased release of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This response is reversible since these biomarkers reach their basal level after the recovery phase; and is much less intense in repeatedly exposed cells. These results suggest that repeated exposure of macrophages to Ag-NPs, which is a more realistic exposure scenario than acute exposure, leads to significant Ag intracellular accumulation but a much less intense toxicological response. PMID:26554598

  6. MEK1/2 inhibitors activate macrophage ABCG1 expression and reverse cholesterol transport-An anti-atherogenic function of ERK1/2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Yuanli; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Jie; Cao, Xingyue; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Luyuan; Miao, Qing Robert; Hajjar, David P; Duan, Yajun; Han, Jihong

    2016-09-01

    Expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), a molecule facilitating cholesterol efflux to HDL, is activated by liver X receptor (LXR). In this study, we investigated if inhibition of ERK1/2 can activate macrophage ABCG1 expression and functions. MEK1/2 inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, increased ABCG1 mRNA and protein expression, and activated the natural ABCG1 promoter but not the promoter with the LXR responsive element (LXRE) deletion. Inhibition of ABCG1 expression by ABCG1 siRNA did enhance the formation of macrophage/foam cells and it attenuated the inhibitory effect of MEK1/2 inhibitors on foam cell formation. MEK1/2 inhibitors activated macrophage cholesterol efflux to HDL in vitro, and they enhanced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in vivo. ApoE deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice receiving U0126 treatment had reduced sinus lesions in the aortic root which was associated with activated macrophage ABCG1 expression in the lesion areas. MEK1/2 inhibitors coordinated the RXR agonist, but not the LXR agonist, to induce ABCG1 expression. Furthermore, induction of ABCG1 expression by MEK1/2 inhibitors was associated with activation of SIRT1, a positive regulator of LXR activity, and inactivation of SULT2B1 and RIP140, two negative regulators of LXR activity. Taken together, our study suggests that MEK1/2 inhibitors activate macrophage ABCG1 expression/RCT, and inhibit foam cell formation and lesion development by multiple mechanisms, supporting the concept that ERK1/2 inhibition is anti-atherogenic. PMID:27365310

  7. IL-17A influences essential functions of the monocyte/macrophage lineage and is involved in advanced murine and human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Erbel, Christian; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Okuyucu, Deniz; Wangler, Susanne; Dietz, Alex; Zhao, Li; Stellos, Konstantinos; Little, Kristina M; Lasitschka, Felix; Doesch, Andreas; Hakimi, Maani; Dengler, Thomas J; Giese, Thomas; Blessing, Erwin; Katus, Hugo A; Gleissner, Christian A

    2014-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Lesion progression is primarily mediated by cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. IL-17A is a proinflammatory cytokine, which modulates immune cell trafficking and is involved inflammation in (auto)immune and infectious diseases. But the role of IL-17A still remains controversial. In the current study, we investigated effects of IL-17A on advanced murine and human atherosclerosis, the common disease phenotype in clinical care. The 26-wk-old apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed a standard chow diet and treated either with IL-17A mAb (n = 15) or irrelevant Ig (n = 10) for 16 wk. Furthermore, essential mechanisms of IL-17A in atherogenesis were studied in vitro. Inhibition of IL-17A markedly prevented atherosclerotic lesion progression (p = 0.001) by reducing inflammatory burden and cellular infiltration (p = 0.01) and improved lesion stability (p = 0.01). In vitro experiments showed that IL-17A plays a role in chemoattractance, monocyte adhesion, and sensitization of APCs toward pathogen-derived TLR4 ligands. Also, IL-17A induced a unique transcriptome pattern in monocyte-derived macrophages distinct from known macrophage types. Stimulation of human carotid plaque tissue ex vivo with IL-17A induced a proinflammatory milieu and upregulation of molecules expressed by the IL-17A-induced macrophage subtype. In this study, we show that functional blockade of IL-17A prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression and induces plaque stabilization in advanced lesions in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. The underlying mechanisms involve reduced inflammation and distinct effects of IL-17A on monocyte/macrophage lineage. In addition, translational experiments underline the relevance for the human system. PMID:25261478

  8. IL-17A Influences Essential Functions of the Monocyte/Macrophage Lineage and Is Involved in Advanced Murine and Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Okuyucu, Deniz; Wangler, Susanne; Dietz, Alex; Zhao, Li; Stellos, Konstantinos; Little, Kristina M.; Lasitschka, Felix; Doesch, Andreas; Hakimi, Maani; Dengler, Thomas J.; Giese, Thomas; Blessing, Erwin; Katus, Hugo A.; Gleissner, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease. Lesion progression is primarily mediated by cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. IL-17A is a proinflammatory cytokine, which modulates immune cell trafficking and is involved inflammation in (auto)immune and infectious diseases. But the role of IL-17A still remains controversial. In the current study, we investigated effects of IL-17A on advanced murine and human atherosclerosis, the common disease phenotype in clinical care. The 26-wk-old apolipoprotein E–deficient mice were fed a standard chow diet and treated either with IL-17A mAb (n = 15) or irrelevant Ig (n = 10) for 16 wk. Furthermore, essential mechanisms of IL-17A in atherogenesis were studied in vitro. Inhibition of IL-17A markedly prevented atherosclerotic lesion progression (p = 0.001) by reducing inflammatory burden and cellular infiltration (p = 0.01) and improved lesion stability (p = 0.01). In vitro experiments showed that IL-17A plays a role in chemoattractance, monocyte adhesion, and sensitization of APCs toward pathogen-derived TLR4 ligands. Also, IL-17A induced a unique transcriptome pattern in monocyte-derived macrophages distinct from known macrophage types. Stimulation of human carotid plaque tissue ex vivo with IL-17A induced a proinflammatory milieu and upregulation of molecules expressed by the IL-17A–induced macrophage subtype. In this study, we show that functional blockade of IL-17A prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression and induces plaque stabilization in advanced lesions in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice. The underlying mechanisms involve reduced inflammation and distinct effects of IL-17A on monocyte/macrophage lineage. In addition, translational experiments underline the relevance for the human system. PMID:25261478

  9. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is rendered enzymatically inactive by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants but retains its immunomodulatory function.

    PubMed

    Dickerhof, Nina; Schindler, Lisa; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important player in the regulation of the inflammatory response. Elevated plasma MIF is found in sepsis, arthritis, cystic fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Immunomodulatory activities of MIF include the ability to promote survival and recruitment of inflammatory cells and to amplify pro-inflammatory cytokine production. MIF has an unusual nucleophilic N-terminal proline with catalytic tautomerase activity. It remains unclear whether tautomerase activity is required for MIF function, but small molecules that inhibit tautomerase activity also inhibit the pro-inflammatory activities of MIF. A prominent feature of the acute inflammatory response is neutrophil activation and production of reactive oxygen species, including myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid. We hypothesized that MPO-derived oxidants would oxidize the N-terminal proline of MIF and alter its biological activity. MIF was exposed to hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid and the oxidative modifications on MIF were examined by LC-MS/MS. Imine formation and carbamylation was observed on the N-terminal proline in response to MPO-dependent generation of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These modifications led to a complete loss of tautomerase activity. However, modified MIF still increased CXCL-8/IL-8 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and blocked neutrophil apoptosis, indicating that tautomerase activity is not essential for these biological functions. Pre-treatment of MIF with hypochlorous acid protected the protein from covalent modification by the MIF inhibitor 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP). Therefore, oxidant generation at inflammatory sites may protect MIF from inactivation by more disruptive electrophiles, including drugs designed to target the tautomerase activity of MIF. PMID:26453918

  10. Molecular and functional characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) homolog of human from lymphatic filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit; Hoti, S L; Meena, R L; Vasuki, V; Sankari, T; Kaliraj, P

    2012-11-01

    The ability of nematode parasites to survive in a highly complex immune system involves diverse strategies including production of a variety of host immune modulators. Various parasite-associated surface antigens or excretory and secretory products may possibly play a role in the host-parasite interactions and successful survival of parasite in their respective host. One among these molecules is a human cytokine homolog, macrophage migration inhibitory factor-1 (MIF-1) in various parasites. We identified a homolog of this cytokine from human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti, expression cloned and investigated its molecular characteristics and catalytic properties. We also assessed the humoral reactivity of the recombinant MIF-1 of W. bancrofti (rWb-MIF-1) against sera belonging to different categories of individuals viz. microfilaremic, chronic patients, endemic normal, and non-endemic normal. Our results showed that the complete coding sequence of W. bancrofti is 1,078 bp, comprising two introns and three exons: first and second introns being 577 and 153 bp long, while the three exons I, II, and III being 108, 173, and 67 bp long, respectively. The rWb-MIF-1 was overexpressed in a salt-inducible host, Escherichia coli GJ 1158, and its functional activity was determined by dopachrome tautomerase and insulin reduction assays. The results of both the assays showed that the purified protein is functionally active and hence folded appropriately. The rWb-MIF-1 protein did not show elevation of specific IgG4 antibodies in microfilaremic cases, a hallmark in case of lymphatic filariasis, while it showed IgE reactivity in some of these cases (five out of ten). PMID:22875393

  11. Quantitative Profiling of Protein S-Glutathionylation Reveals Redox-Dependent Regulation of Macrophage Function During Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Jicheng; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Chu, Rosalie K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2015-12-23

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are emerging functional materials increasingly utilized for commercial and medical applications. Due to the potential hazard effects of ENPs to human health, it is significant to assess and understand the underlying mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Here, we investigate protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) as an underlying regulatory mechanism for ENP-induced oxidative stress in macrophages by applying a recently developed quantitative redox proteomics approach for site-specific measurements of SSG. Three high-volume production ENPs (SiO2, Fe3O4 and CoO) were selected as representative ENPs with low, moderate, and high reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity, respectively. Among these nanoparticles, we observe that CoO led to the most significant dose-dependent oxidative stress and increase of protein SSG modifications in macrophages. Our site-specific SSG changes highlighted a broad set of redox sensitive proteins and their specific Cys residues potentially implicated in stress response. Functional analysis revealed that the most significantly enriched functional categories for SSG-modified proteins were stress response, cellular structure change, and cell death or survival. Moreover, ENPs-induce oxidative stress levels (CoO > Fe3O4 > SiO2) were found to correlate well with the levels of impairment of macrophage phagocytic activity and the overall degrees of increases in SSG. RNA silencing knockdown experiment of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) also led to a decreased phagocytic activity in macrophages, which suggested a regulatory role of SSG in phagocytosis. Together, the results provided valuable insights of protein SSG as a potential regulatory mechanism in response to nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress and immunity dysfunction.

  12. Quantitative Profiling of Protein S-Glutathionylation Reveals Redox-Dependent Regulation of Macrophage Function During Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Duan, Jicheng; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Chu, Rosalie K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2015-12-23

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are emerging functional materials increasingly utilized for commercial and medical applications. Due to the potential hazard effects of ENPs to human health, it is significant to assess and understand the underlying mechanisms of nanotoxicity. Here, we investigate protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) as an underlying regulatory mechanism for ENP-induced oxidative stress in macrophages by applying a recently developed quantitative redox proteomics approach for site-specific measurements of SSG. Three high-volume production ENPs (SiO2, Fe3O4 and CoO) were selected as representative ENPs with low, moderate, and high reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity, respectively. Among these nanoparticles, we observe that CoO ledmore » to the most significant dose-dependent oxidative stress and increase of protein SSG modifications in macrophages. Our site-specific SSG changes highlighted a broad set of redox sensitive proteins and their specific Cys residues potentially implicated in stress response. Functional analysis revealed that the most significantly enriched functional categories for SSG-modified proteins were stress response, cellular structure change, and cell death or survival. Moreover, ENPs-induce oxidative stress levels (CoO > Fe3O4 > SiO2) were found to correlate well with the levels of impairment of macrophage phagocytic activity and the overall degrees of increases in SSG. RNA silencing knockdown experiment of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) also led to a decreased phagocytic activity in macrophages, which suggested a regulatory role of SSG in phagocytosis. Together, the results provided valuable insights of protein SSG as a potential regulatory mechanism in response to nanomaterial-induced oxidative stress and immunity dysfunction.« less

  13. Altered function of monocytes/macrophages in patients with autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    LIN, RUI; ZHANG, JIE; ZHOU, LU; WANG, BANGMAO

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) involves the intervention of the innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study, the alterations in monocytes/Kupffer cells (KCs) were investigated in patients with AIH. A total of 21 patients with AIH at different stages of the disease, and 7 controls with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were selected. The abundance of VAV1 and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) in the liver and KCs was analyzed. In addition, the expression levels of HLA-DR and CD80 in the peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) were measured, and phagocytosis of PBMs was assessed. KCs of AIH patients exhibited higher expression levels of VAV1 and PAK1. This upregulated expression was associated with disease progression. A reduced expression of HLA-DR and CD80, and reduced capacity of E. coli phagocytosis in PBMs was observed for patients with AIH. This downregulated expression was associated with disease progression. The results of the current study indicated that defective function of KCs and PBMs may be involved in the pathogenesis of AIH. PMID:26986756

  14. The hematopoietic cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor is important for cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Markus; Both, Martin; Kranig, Simon A.; Pitzer, Claudia; Klugmann, Matthias; Vogt, Gerhard; Draguhn, Andreas; Schneider, Armin

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported expression of hematopoietic growth factor GM-CSF and its receptor (GM-CSFR) in CNS neurons. Here we evaluated this system in learning and memory formation using GM-CSF deficient mice. In complementation, GM-CSF signalling was manipulated specifically in adult murine hippocampus by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated GM-CSFR alpha overexpression or knock-down. GM-CSF ablation caused various hippocampus and amygdala-dependent deficits in spatial and fear memory while rendering intact basic parameters like motor function, inherent anxiety, and pain threshold levels. Corroborating these data, spatial memory of AAV-injected mice was positively correlated with GM-CSFRα expression levels. Hippocampal neurons of knock-out mice showed markedly pruned dendritic trees, reduced spine densities, and lower percentages of mature spines. Despite such morphological alterations, long-term potentiation (LTP) was unimpaired in the knock-out hippocampus. Collectively, these results suggest that GM-CSF signalling plays a major role in structural plasticity relevant to learning and memory. PMID:23019518

  15. Ozone-enhanced pulmonary infection with Streptococcus zooepidemicus in mice. The role of alveolar macrophage function and capsular virulence factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Park, P.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Ozone exposure has been shown to increase the susceptibility of mice to pulmonary bacterial infection. We report here the differences in susceptibility of two strains of mice (C3H/HeJ and C57Bl/6) to pulmonary challenge with Streptococcus zooepidemicus, and demonstrate an association between O3 exposure, reduced alveolar macrophage (AM) function, and increased mortality to infection. After a 3-h exposure to air or to 0.4 or 0.8 ppm O3, mice received an infection of bacteria by aerosol. Subsequent mortality observed over a 20-day period for any given exposure concentration was greater in the C3H/HeJ mice than in the C57Bl/6 mice. Phagocytosis assays identified the AM from O3-exposed lungs as having an impaired ability to engulf the bacteria. Baseline phagocytic activity in C3H/HeJ mice was lower than that in C57Bl/6 mice. Microbiologic assessment of the lungs at various times after infection revealed that the streptococci proliferated rapidly in the lungs of O3-exposed mice, grew more quickly upon isolation, and displayed a mucoid colony appearance indicative of increased encapsulation. In vitro assays confirmed that the encapsulated isolates prevented binding of the bacteria to AM, and reinfection of nonexposed mice with the encapsulated isolate resulted in increased mortality compared with infection with similar numbers of the original unencapsulated bacteria. We have demonstrated that O3 inhalation impairs AM activity in the lung. The streptococci are then able to proliferate and more fully express virulence factors, in particular, the antiphagocytic capsule, which prohibits the ingestion of bacteria by pulmonary phagocytes and leads to increased severity of infection.

  16. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Turaga, Soumya M; Sorensen, Mia D; Rayman, Patricia; Flavahan, William A; Hale, James S; Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Wu, Qiulian; Jarrar, Awad; Kim, Sung-Hak; Fox, Paul L; Nakano, Ichiro; Rich, Jeremy N; Ransohoff, Richard M; Finke, James; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-08-01

    Shifting the balance away from tumor-mediated immune suppression toward tumor immune rejection is the conceptual foundation for a variety of immunotherapy efforts currently being tested. These efforts largely focus on activating antitumor immune responses but are confounded by multiple immune cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) in a low-dose administration paradigm, which resulted in prolonged survival in a syngeneic mouse model of glioma. In coculture studies, patient-derived CSCs but not nonstem tumor cells selectively drove MDSC-mediated immune suppression. A cytokine screen revealed that CSCs secreted multiple factors that promoted this activity, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was produced at high levels by CSCs. Addition of MIF increased production of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase-1 in MDSCs in a CXCR2-dependent manner, whereas blocking MIF reduced arginase-1 production. Similarly to 5-FU, targeting tumor-derived MIF conferred a survival advantage to tumor-bearing animals and increased the cytotoxic T cell response within the tumor. Importantly, tumor cell proliferation, survival, and self-renewal were not impacted by MIF reduction, demonstrating that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039. PMID:27145382

  17. The expression of functional IL-2 receptor on activated macrophages depends on the stimulus applied.

    PubMed Central

    Valitutti, S; Carbone, A; Castellino, F; Maggiano, N; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Musiani, P

    1989-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes (Mo) synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) when activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This production is strongly enhanced by the addition of supernatant from phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells. To evaluate the factor(s) responsible for this enhancement we studied the effect of several cytokines on the PGE2 metabolism. Recombinant interleukin-1 (IL-1) or recombinant IL-2 strongly enhanced PGE2 synthesis in LPS-stimulated Mo cultures, whereas recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) partially inhibited its production. To see whether the effect of IL-2 on Mo was due to the presence of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) on the cell surface, flow cytometric analysis and electron microscopy were used to investigate IL-2R expression in unstimulated and stimulated Mo. Stimulated, but not resting, Mo displayed the p55 IL-2R chain on their cellular surface and associated with the polyribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm. This finding strongly suggested that the p55 chain of the IL-2R was synthesized by activated Mo. To confirm this result, 125I-labelled IL-2 was bound under high- and low-affinity conditions and cross-linked to Mo cultured in the presence of LPS, IFN-gamma or IL-1. The cross-linked 125I-IL-2/IL-2R complexes were analysed by SDS-PAGE. Mo cultured with LPS, IFN-gamma and IL-1 expressed the p55 protein detected by low-affinity cross-linking, whereas only LPS-stimulated Mo displayed a barely detectable band with an apparent MW of 70,000 under high-affinity binding conditions. In addition, stimulated Mo were found capable of producing the soluble form of IL-2R. Finally, LPS-activated Mo only responded to the addition of IL-2 by an increase in PGE2 production, suggesting that the function of IL-2R on activated Mo is linked to the stimulus applied. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2661416

  18. Toll-like Receptor function of murine macrophages, probed by cytokine induction, is biphasic and is not impaired globally with age.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Goutham; Palasiewicz, Karol; Ucker, David S

    2016-07-01

    Aging is associated with a waning of normal immune function. This "immunosenescence" is characterized by a diverse repertoire of seemingly discreet and unbalanced immune alterations. A number of studies have suggested that aging-associated alterations in innate immune responsiveness, especially responsiveness dependent on Toll-like Receptor (TLR) engagement, are causally involved. We find, however, that the magnitude and dose-dependency of responsiveness to TLR engagement (assessed with respect to cytokine production) in distinct populations of murine macrophages are not altered generally with animal age or as a consequence of immunosenescence. Responses elicited with a wide array of TLR agonists were examined by extensive functional analyses, principally on the level of the individual cell. These studies reveal an intriguing "all-or-nothing" response behavior of macrophages, independent of animal age. Although reports to the contrary have been cited widely, aging-associated immune decline cannot be attributed to widespread alterations in the extents of TLR-dependent innate immune macrophage responses. PMID:27453067

  19. Macrophage function in alloxan diabetic mice: expression of adhesion molecules, generation of monokines and oxygen and NO radicals

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, W; Klimek, M; Bryniarski, K; Ptak, M; Majcher, P

    1998-01-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial and mycotic infections in poorly controlled diabetic patients or animals is frequently attributed to impaired activities of professional phagocytes (granulocytes, macrophages) in hypoinsulinaemic milieu. We measured production of monokines (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)), active NO and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), as well as expression of several cell surface adhesion molecules (Mac-1, -2 and -3, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and FcγRII), by thioglycollate medium-induced peritoneal macrophages of normoglycaemic and alloxan diabetic CBA/J mice (blood glucose level in the range 300 or 500 mg/dl). Macrophages of animals with moderate diabetes (300 mg/dl) produced significantly more IL-6 and TNF-α and ROIs than cells of control mice and showed an increased expression of all cell surface molecules, except Mac-3. NO/NO2 production was not affected. Administration of insulin restored enhanced values to normal levels, except for the production of ROIs which remained unusually high. We conclude that two separate mechanisms influence macrophage physiology in diabetes—lack of saturation of insulin receptors on macrophages and an indirect effect due to formation of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGE) on their surfaces. The latter is possibly responsible for increased generation of ROIs, since it cannot be down-regulated by prolonged insulin treatment. How the increased activity of macrophages of moderately diabetic mice (enhanced production of proinflammatory monokines and oxygen radicals as well as expression of molecules) is related to their ability to kill bacteria is now under investigation. PMID:9764597

  20. Macrophage response to bacteria: induction of marked secretory and cellular activities by lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R; Fischer, W; Keist, R; Bassetti, S

    1992-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) from various bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Listeria monocytogenes, were examined for the ability to induce secretory and cellular responses in a pure population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes. Some of the highly purified LTAs, in particular LTAs from Bacillus subtilis, S. pyogenes, E. faecalis, and Enterococcus hirae, were able to affect each of the macrophage parameters measured, i.e., reductive capacity, secretion of tumor necrosis factor and nitrite, and tumoricidal activity. As after stimulation with whole organisms or other bacterial products, secretion of tumor necrosis factor induced by these LTAs reached its maximum within the first few hours of the interaction, while secretion of nitrite and tumoricidal activity required 24 to 36 h for full expression. Other purified LTAs, i.e., LTAs from Streptococcus sanguis, S. pneumoniae, and L. monocytogenes, as well as lipomannan from Micrococcus luteus affected only some of these parameters, while native LTA from S. aureus was inactive. There was no obvious correlation between biological activity and chain length, kind of glycosyl substituents, glycolipid structures, or fatty acid composition of LTAs. Deacylation of LTAs resulted in a complete loss of activity, and deacylated LTAs did not impair the activity of their acylated counterparts, suggesting that acyl chains may be essential for binding of LTA to the cell surface. The results demonstrate that some LTA species are potent inducers of macrophage secretory and cellular activities. PMID:1500175

  1. Comparative catfish macrophage function in families expressing high and low survivor phenotype following experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two channel catfish families were identified as displaying a high (>90%) or low (<10%) survival phenotype in repeated experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri. In order to gain understanding of the biological basis of these phenotypes, primary macrophages were prepared from head kidney tiss...

  2. Fibroblasts profiling in scarring trachoma identifies IL-6 as a functional component of a fibroblast-macrophage pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Kechagia, Jenny Z; Ezra, Daniel G; Burton, Matthew J; Bailly, Maryse

    2016-01-01

    Trachoma is a conjunctiva scarring disease, which is the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying progressive fibrosis in trachoma are unknown. To investigate the contribution of local resident fibroblasts to disease progression, we isolated conjunctival fibroblasts from patients with scarring trachoma and matching control individuals, and compared their gene expression profiles and functional properties in vitro. We show that scarring trachoma fibroblasts substantially differ from control counterparts, displaying pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory features matched by an altered gene expression profile. This pro-inflammatory signature was exemplified by increased IL-6 expression and secretion, and a stronger response to macrophage-mediated stimulation of contraction. We further demonstrate that scarring trachoma fibroblasts can promote Akt phosphorylation in macrophages in an IL-6 -dependent manner. Overall this work has uncovered a distinctive molecular fingerprint for scarring trachoma fibroblasts, and identified IL-6- as a potential contributor to the chronic conjunctival fibrosis, mediating reciprocal pro-fibrotic/pro-inflammatory interactions between macrophages and fibroblasts. PMID:27321784

  3. Fibroblasts profiling in scarring trachoma identifies IL-6 as a functional component of a fibroblast-macrophage pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Kechagia, Jenny Z.; Ezra, Daniel G.; Burton, Matthew J.; Bailly, Maryse

    2016-01-01

    Trachoma is a conjunctiva scarring disease, which is the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying progressive fibrosis in trachoma are unknown. To investigate the contribution of local resident fibroblasts to disease progression, we isolated conjunctival fibroblasts from patients with scarring trachoma and matching control individuals, and compared their gene expression profiles and functional properties in vitro. We show that scarring trachoma fibroblasts substantially differ from control counterparts, displaying pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory features matched by an altered gene expression profile. This pro-inflammatory signature was exemplified by increased IL-6 expression and secretion, and a stronger response to macrophage-mediated stimulation of contraction. We further demonstrate that scarring trachoma fibroblasts can promote Akt phosphorylation in macrophages in an IL-6 –dependent manner. Overall this work has uncovered a distinctive molecular fingerprint for scarring trachoma fibroblasts, and identified IL-6- as a potential contributor to the chronic conjunctival fibrosis, mediating reciprocal pro-fibrotic/pro-inflammatory interactions between macrophages and fibroblasts. PMID:27321784

  4. The Nlrp3 Inflammasome Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Growth in the Liver by Promoting Natural Killer Cell Tumoricidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Dagenais, Maryse; Douglas, Todd; Champagne, Claudia; Morizot, Alexandre; Rodrigue-Gervais, Ian Gaël; Breton, Valérie; Colpitts, Sara L; Beauchemin, Nicole; Saleh, Maya

    2015-10-20

    The crosstalk between inflammation and tumorigenesis is now clearly established. However, how inflammation is elicited in the metastatic environment and the corresponding contribution of innate immunity pathways in suppressing tumor growth at secondary sites are poorly understood. Here, we show that mice deficient in Nlrp3 inflammasome components had exacerbated liver colorectal cancer metastatic growth, which was mediated by impaired interleukin-18 (IL-18) signaling. Control of tumor growth was independent of differential cancer cell colonization or proliferation, intestinal microbiota effects, or tumoricidal activity by the adaptive immune system. Instead, the inflammasome-IL-18 pathway impacted maturation of hepatic NK cells, surface expression of the death ligand FasL, and capacity to kill FasL-sensitive tumors. Our results define a regulatory signaling circuit within the innate immune system linking inflammasome activation to effective NK-cell-mediated tumor attack required to suppress colorectal cancer growth in the liver. PMID:26384545

  5. Tumoricidal activity of low-energy 160-KV versus 6-MV X-rays against platinum-sensitized F98 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Barth, Rolf F.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Nakkula, Robin J.; Yang, Weilian; Palmer, Alycia M.; Turro, Claudia; Weldon, Michael; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Mo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to investigate the differences in effects between 160-kV low-energy and 6-MV high-energy X-rays, both by computational analysis and in vitro studies; (ii) to determine the effects of each on platinum-sensitized F98 rat glioma and murine B16 melanoma cells; and (iii) to describe the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of a Pt(II) terpyridine platinum (Typ-Pt) complex. Simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to determine enhancement in absorption of low- versus high-energy X-rays by Pt and to determine dose enhancement factors (DEFs) for a Pt-sensitized tumor phantom. In vitro studies were carried out using Typ-Pt and again with carboplatin due to the unexpected in vivo toxicity of Typ-Pt. Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. In agreement with computations and simulations, in vitro data showed up to one log unit reduction in surviving fractions (SFs) of cells treated with 1–4 µg/ml of Typ-Pt and irradiated with 160-kV versus 6-MV X-rays. DEFs showed radiosensitization in the 50–200 keV range, which fell to approximate unity at higher energies, suggesting marginal interactions at MeV energies. Cells sensitized with 1–5 or 7 µg/ml of carboplatin and then irradiated also showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in SFs. However, it was unlikely this was due to increased interactions. Theoretical and in vitro studies presented here demonstrated that the tumoricidal activity of low-energy X-rays was greater than that of high-energy X-rays against Pt-sensitized tumor cells. Determining whether radiosensitization is a function of increased interactions will require additional studies. PMID:25266332

  6. Tumoricidal activity of low-energy 160-KV versus 6-MV X-rays against platinum-sensitized F98 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sara N; Pradhan, Anil K; Barth, Rolf F; Nahar, Sultana N; Nakkula, Robin J; Yang, Weilian; Palmer, Alycia M; Turro, Claudia; Weldon, Michael; Bell, Erica Hlavin; Mo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to investigate the differences in effects between 160-kV low-energy and 6-MV high-energy X-rays, both by computational analysis and in vitro studies; (ii) to determine the effects of each on platinum-sensitized F98 rat glioma and murine B16 melanoma cells; and (iii) to describe the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo toxicity of a Pt(II) terpyridine platinum (Typ-Pt) complex. Simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to determine enhancement in absorption of low- versus high-energy X-rays by Pt and to determine dose enhancement factors (DEFs) for a Pt-sensitized tumor phantom. In vitro studies were carried out using Typ-Pt and again with carboplatin due to the unexpected in vivo toxicity of Typ-Pt. Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. In agreement with computations and simulations, in vitro data showed up to one log unit reduction in surviving fractions (SFs) of cells treated with 1-4 µg/ml of Typ-Pt and irradiated with 160-kV versus 6-MV X-rays. DEFs showed radiosensitization in the 50-200 keV range, which fell to approximate unity at higher energies, suggesting marginal interactions at MeV energies. Cells sensitized with 1-5 or 7 µg/ml of carboplatin and then irradiated also showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in SFs. However, it was unlikely this was due to increased interactions. Theoretical and in vitro studies presented here demonstrated that the tumoricidal activity of low-energy X-rays was greater than that of high-energy X-rays against Pt-sensitized tumor cells. Determining whether radiosensitization is a function of increased interactions will require additional studies. PMID:25266332

  7. Prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 as the common target on cancer cells and macrophages to abolish angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, metastasis, and stem-like cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Liu, Ling; Girish, Gannareddy V; Lala, Peeyush K

    2014-01-01

    We previously established that COX-2 overexpression promotes breast cancer progression and metastasis. As long-term use of COX-2 inhibitors (COX-2i) can promote thrombo-embolic events, we tested an alternative target, prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 subtype (EP4), downstream of COX-2. Here we used the highly metastatic syngeneic murine C3L5 breast cancer model to test the role of EP4-expressing macrophages in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C/D production, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis in situ, the role of EP4 in stem-like cell (SLC) functions of tumor cells, and therapeutic effects of an EP4 antagonist RQ-15986 (EP4A). C3L5 cells expressed all EP receptors, produced VEGF-C/D, and showed high clonogenic tumorsphere forming ability in vitro, functions inhibited with COX-2i or EP4A. Treating murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line with COX-2i celecoxib and EP4A significantly reduced VEGF-A/C/D production in vitro, measured with quantitative PCR and Western blots. Orthotopic implants of C3L5 cells in C3H/HeJ mice showed rapid tumor growth, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis (CD31/LYVE-1 and CD31/PROX1 immunostaining), and metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs. Tumors revealed high incidence of EP4-expressing, VEGF-C/D producing macrophages identified with dual immunostaining of F4/80 and EP4 or VEGF-C/D. Celecoxib or EP4A therapy at non-toxic doses abrogated tumor growth, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs. Residual tumors in treated mice revealed markedly reduced VEGF-A/C/D and phosphorylated Akt/ERK proteins, VEGF-C/D positive macrophage infiltration, and proliferative/apoptotic cell ratios. Knocking down COX-2 or EP4 in C3L5 cells or treating cells in vitro with celecoxib or EP4A and treating tumor-bearing mice in vivo with the same drug reduced SLC properties of tumor cells including preferential co-expression of COX-2 and SLC markers ALDH1A, CD44, OCT-3/4, β-catenin, and SOX-2. Thus, EP4 is an excellent therapeutic target to block

  8. Prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 as the common target on cancer cells and macrophages to abolish angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, metastasis, and stem-like cell functions.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Liu, Ling; Girish, Gannareddy V; Lala, Peeyush K

    2014-09-01

    We previously established that COX-2 overexpression promotes breast cancer progression and metastasis. As long-term use of COX-2 inhibitors (COX-2i) can promote thrombo-embolic events, we tested an alternative target, prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 subtype (EP4), downstream of COX-2. Here we used the highly metastatic syngeneic murine C3L5 breast cancer model to test the role of EP4-expressing macrophages in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C/D production, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis in situ, the role of EP4 in stem-like cell (SLC) functions of tumor cells, and therapeutic effects of an EP4 antagonist RQ-15986 (EP4A). C3L5 cells expressed all EP receptors, produced VEGF-C/D, and showed high clonogenic tumorsphere forming ability in vitro, functions inhibited with COX-2i or EP4A. Treating murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line with COX-2i celecoxib and EP4A significantly reduced VEGF-A/C/D production in vitro, measured with quantitative PCR and Western blots. Orthotopic implants of C3L5 cells in C3H/HeJ mice showed rapid tumor growth, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis (CD31/LYVE-1 and CD31/PROX1 immunostaining), and metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs. Tumors revealed high incidence of EP4-expressing, VEGF-C/D producing macrophages identified with dual immunostaining of F4/80 and EP4 or VEGF-C/D. Celecoxib or EP4A therapy at non-toxic doses abrogated tumor growth, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs. Residual tumors in treated mice revealed markedly reduced VEGF-A/C/D and phosphorylated Akt/ERK proteins, VEGF-C/D positive macrophage infiltration, and proliferative/apoptotic cell ratios. Knocking down COX-2 or EP4 in C3L5 cells or treating cells in vitro with celecoxib or EP4A and treating tumor-bearing mice in vivo with the same drug reduced SLC properties of tumor cells including preferential co-expression of COX-2 and SLC markers ALDH1A, CD44, OCT-3/4, β-catenin, and SOX-2. Thus, EP4 is an excellent therapeutic target to block

  9. Macrophage-Mediated Trogocytosis Leads to Death of Antibody-Opsonized Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Challa, Dilip K; Ram, Sripad; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the complex behavior of effector cells such as monocytes or macrophages in regulating cancerous growth is of central importance for cancer immunotherapy. Earlier studies using CD20-specific antibodies have demonstrated that the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated transfer of the targeted receptors from tumor cells to these effector cells through trogocytosis can enable escape from antibody therapy, leading to the viewpoint that this process is protumorigenic. In the current study, we demonstrate that persistent trogocytic attack results in the killing of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Further, antibody engineering to increase FcγR interactions enhances this tumoricidal activity. These studies extend the complex repertoire of activities of macrophages to trogocytic-mediated cell death of HER2-overexpressing target cells and have implications for the development of effective antibody-based therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1879-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27226489

  10. Effect of a high-intensity exercise training on the metabolism and function of macrophages and lymphocytes of walker 256 tumor bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Belmonte, Mônica Aparecida; Navarro, Francisco; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Pesquero, Jorge Luiz; Araújo, Ronaldo Carvalho; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that moderately intense training promotes augmented immune function, whereas strenuous exercise can cause immunosupression. Because the combat of cancer requires high immune function, high-intensity exercise could negatively affect the host organism; however, despite the epidemiologic data, there is a lack of experimental evidence to show that high-intensity training is harmful to the immune system. Therefore, we tested the influence of high-intensity treadmill training (10 weeks, 5 days/week, 30 mins/day, 85% VO(2)max) on immune system function and tumor development in Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats. The metabolism of glucose and glutamine in lymphocytes and macrophages was assessed, in addition to some functional parameters such as hydrogen peroxide production, phagocytosis, and lymphocyte proliferative responses. The metabolism of Walker 256 cells was also investigated. Results demonstrated that high-intensity training increased the life span of tumor-bearing rats, promoted a reduction in tumor mass, and prevented indicators of cachexia. Several changes, such as a reduction in body weight and food intake and activation of glutamine metabolism in macrophages and lymphocytes induced by the presence of Walker 256 tumor, were prevented by high intensity training. The reduction in tumor growth was associated with an impairment of tumor cell glucose and glutamine metabolism. These data suggest that high-intensity exercise training may be a viable strategy against tumors. PMID:17959841

  11. Distinct functions of macrophage-derived and cancer cell-derived cathepsin Z combine to promote tumor malignancy via interactions with the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Leila; Gocheva, Vasilena; Kester, Jemila C.; Hunter, Karen E.; Quick, Marsha L.; Sevenich, Lisa; Wang, Hao-Wei; Peters, Christoph; Tang, Laura H.; Klimstra, David S.; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    During the process of tumor progression, cancer cells can produce the requisite growth- and invasion-promoting factors and can also rely on noncancerous cells in the tumor microenvironment as an alternative, cell-extrinsic source. However, whether the cellular source influences the function of such tumor-promoting factors remains an open question. Here, we examined the roles of the cathepsin Z (CtsZ) protease, which is provided by both cancer cells and macrophages in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in humans and mice. We found that tumor proliferation was exclusively regulated by cancer cell-intrinsic functions of CtsZ, whereas tumor invasion required contributions from both macrophages and cancer cells. Interestingly, several of the tumor-promoting functions of CtsZ were not dependent on its described catalytic activity but instead were mediated via the Arg–Gly–Asp (RGD) motif in the enzyme prodomain, which regulated interactions with integrins and the extracellular matrix. Together, these results underscore the complexity of interactions within the tumor microenvironment and indicate that cellular source can indeed impact molecular function. PMID:25274726

  12. Onionin A inhibits ovarian cancer progression by suppressing cancer cell proliferation and the protumour function of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboki, Junko; Fujiwara, Yukio; Horlad, Hasita; Shiraishi, Daisuke; Nohara, Toshihiro; Tayama, Shingo; Motohara, Takeshi; Saito, Yoichi; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Tashiro, Hironori; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in tumour development by modulating the tumour microenvironment, and targeting of protumour activation or the M2 polarization of TAMs is expected to be an effective therapy for cancer patients. We previously demonstrated that onionin A (ONA), a natural low molecular weight compound isolated from onions, has an inhibitory effect on M2 macrophage polarization. In the present study, we investigated whether ONA had a therapeutic anti-ovarian cancer effect using in vitro and in vivo studies. We found that ONA reduced the extent of ovarian cancer cell proliferation induced by co-culture with human macrophages. In addition, we also found that ONA directly suppressed cancer cell proliferation. A combinatorial effect with ONA and anti-cancer drugs was also observed. The activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is involved in cell proliferation and chemo-resistance, was significantly abrogated by ONA in ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the administration of ONA suppressed cancer progression and prolonged the survival time in a murine ovarian cancer model under single and combined treatment conditions. Thus, ONA is considered useful for the additional treatment of patients with ovarian cancer owing to its suppression of the protumour activation of TAMs and direct cytotoxicity against cancer cells. PMID:27404320

  13. Cutaneous Na+ storage strengthens the antimicrobial barrier function of the skin and boosts macrophage-driven host defense.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Schatz, Valentin; Friedrich, Diana; Schröder, Agnes; Kopp, Christoph; Siegert, Isabel; Maronna, Andreas; Wendelborn, David; Linz, Peter; Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Neubert, Patrick; Fischer, Fabian; Teufel, Stefan; David, Jean-Pierre; Neufert, Clemens; Cavallaro, Alexander; Rakova, Natalia; Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Schuler, Gerold; Uder, Michael; Bogdan, Christian; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Immune cells regulate a hypertonic microenvironment in the skin; however, the biological advantage of increased skin Na(+) concentrations is unknown. We found that Na(+) accumulated at the site of bacterial skin infections in humans and in mice. We used the protozoan parasite Leishmania major as a model of skin-prone macrophage infection to test the hypothesis that skin-Na(+) storage facilitates antimicrobial host defense. Activation of macrophages in the presence of high NaCl concentrations modified epigenetic markers and enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38/MAPK)-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) activation. This high-salt response resulted in elevated type-2 nitric oxide synthase (Nos2)-dependent NO production and improved Leishmania major control. Finally, we found that increasing Na(+) content in the skin by a high-salt diet boosted activation of macrophages in a Nfat5-dependent manner and promoted cutaneous antimicrobial defense. We suggest that the hypertonic microenvironment could serve as a barrier to infection. PMID:25738463

  14. Cutaneous Na+ storage strengthens the antimicrobial barrier function of the skin and boosts macrophage-driven host defense

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Schatz, Valentin; Friedrich, Diana; Schröder, Agnes; Kopp, Christoph; Siegert, Isabel; Maronna, Andreas; Wendelborn, David; Linz, Peter; Binger, Katrina J.; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Neubert, Patrick; Fischer, Fabian; Teufel, Stefan; David, Jean-Pierre; Neufert, Clemens; Cavallaro, Alexander; Rakova, Natalia; Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N.; Schuler, Gerold; Uder, Michael; Bogdan, Christian; Luft, Friedrich C.; Titze, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Summary Immune cells regulate a hypertonic microenvironment in the skin; however, the biological advantage of increased skin Na+ concentrations is unknown. We found that Na+ accumulated at the site of bacterial skin infections in humans and in mice. We used the protozoan parasite Leishmania major as a model of skin-prone macrophage infection to test the hypothesis that skin-Na+ storage facilitates antimicrobial host defense. Activation of macrophages in the presence of high NaCl concentrations modified epigenetic markers and enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38/MAPK)-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) activation. This high-salt response resulted in elevated type-2 nitric oxide synthase (Nos2)-dependent NO production and improved Leishmania major control. Finally, we found that increasing Na+ content in the skin by a high-salt diet boosted activation of macrophages in an Nfat5-dependent manner and promoted cutaneous antimicrobial defense. We suggest that the hypertonic microenvironment could serve as a barrier to infection. PMID:25738463

  15. Onionin A inhibits ovarian cancer progression by suppressing cancer cell proliferation and the protumour function of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tsuboki, Junko; Fujiwara, Yukio; Horlad, Hasita; Shiraishi, Daisuke; Nohara, Toshihiro; Tayama, Shingo; Motohara, Takeshi; Saito, Yoichi; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Tashiro, Hironori; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in tumour development by modulating the tumour microenvironment, and targeting of protumour activation or the M2 polarization of TAMs is expected to be an effective therapy for cancer patients. We previously demonstrated that onionin A (ONA), a natural low molecular weight compound isolated from onions, has an inhibitory effect on M2 macrophage polarization. In the present study, we investigated whether ONA had a therapeutic anti-ovarian cancer effect using in vitro and in vivo studies. We found that ONA reduced the extent of ovarian cancer cell proliferation induced by co-culture with human macrophages. In addition, we also found that ONA directly suppressed cancer cell proliferation. A combinatorial effect with ONA and anti-cancer drugs was also observed. The activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is involved in cell proliferation and chemo-resistance, was significantly abrogated by ONA in ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the administration of ONA suppressed cancer progression and prolonged the survival time in a murine ovarian cancer model under single and combined treatment conditions. Thus, ONA is considered useful for the additional treatment of patients with ovarian cancer owing to its suppression of the protumour activation of TAMs and direct cytotoxicity against cancer cells. PMID:27404320

  16. Maternal-Derived Hepatitis B Virus e Antigen Alters Macrophage Function in Offspring to Drive Viral Persistence after Vertical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongjun; Kuo, Cheng-Fu; Akbari, Omid; Ou, Jing-Hsiung James

    2016-05-17

    In contrast to horizontal transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) between adults, which often leads to self-limited acute infection, vertical transmission of HBV from mother to child often leads to chronic infection. However, the mechanisms linking vertical transmission with chronic infection are not known. We developed a mouse model to study the effect of maternal HBV infection on HBV persistence in offspring and found that HBV carried by the mother impaired CD8(+) T cell responses to HBV in her offspring, resulting in HBV persistence. This impairment of CD8(+) T cell responses was mediated by hepatic macrophages, which were predisposed by maternal HBV e antigen (HBeAg) to support HBV persistence by upregulation of inhibitory ligand PD-L1 and altered polarization upon restimulation with HBeAg. Depletion of hepatic macrophages led to CD8(+) T cell activation and HBV clearance in the offspring, raising the possibility of targeting macrophages to treat chronic HBV patients. PMID:27156385

  17. Interleukin-10 Alters Effector Functions of Multiple Genes Induced by Borrelia burgdorferi in Macrophages To Regulate Lyme Disease Inflammation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Philipp, Mario T.; Singh, Shree R.; Morici, Lisa A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Dennis, Vida A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates inflammatory responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. How IL-10 modulates these inflammatory responses still remains elusive. We hypothesize that IL-10 inhibits effector functions of multiple genes induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammation. Because macrophages are essential in the initiation of inflammation, we used mouse J774 macrophages and live B. burgdorferi spirochetes as the model target cell and stimulant, respectively. First, we employed transcriptome profiling to identify genes that were induced by stimulation of cells with live spirochetes and that were perturbed by addition of IL-10 to spirochete cultures. Spirochetes significantly induced upregulation of 347 genes at both the 4-h and 24-h time points. IL-10 inhibited the expression levels, respectively, of 53 and 65 of the 4-h and 24-h genes, and potentiated, respectively, at 4 h and 24 h, 65 and 50 genes. Prominent among the novel identified IL-10-inhibited genes also validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, IRAK3, TRAF1, IRG1, PTGS2, MMP9, IFI44, IFIT1, and CD40. Proteome analysis using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed the IL-10 modulation/and or potentiation of RANTES/CCL5, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, MIP-1α/CCL3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)/CSF3, CXCL1, CXCL5, CCL2, CCL4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1α, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-9. Similar results were obtained using sonicated spirochetes or lipoprotein as stimulants. Our data show that IL-10 alters effectors induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammatory responses. Moreover, for the first time, this study provides global insight into potential mechanisms used by IL-10 to control Lyme disease inflammation. PMID

  18. Macrophages and cellular immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

    2015-12-01

    The invertebrate Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful model for understanding blood cell development and immunity. Drosophila is a holometabolous insect, which transitions through a series of life stages from embryo, larva and pupa to adulthood. In spite of this, remarkable parallels exist between Drosophila and vertebrate macrophages, both in terms of development and function. More than 90% of Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes) are macrophages (plasmatocytes), making this highly tractable genetic system attractive for studying a variety of questions in macrophage biology. In vertebrates, recent findings revealed that macrophages have two independent origins: self-renewing macrophages, which reside and proliferate in local microenvironments in a variety of tissues, and macrophages of the monocyte lineage, which derive from hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses two macrophage lineages with a conserved dual ontogeny. These parallels allow us to take advantage of the Drosophila model when investigating macrophage lineage specification, maintenance and amplification, and the induction of macrophages and their progenitors by local microenvironments and systemic cues. Beyond macrophage development, Drosophila further serves as a paradigm for understanding the mechanisms underlying macrophage function and cellular immunity in infection, tissue homeostasis and cancer, throughout development and adult life. PMID:27117654

  19. PPARs in alveolar macrophage biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Monica R; Standiford, Theodore J; Reddy, Raju C

    2007-01-01

    PPARs, most notably PPAR-gamma, play a crucial role in regulating the activation of alveolar macrophages, which in turn occupy a pivotal place in the immune response to pathogens and particulates drawn in with inspired air. In this review, we describe the dual role of the alveolar macrophage as both a first-line defender through its phagocytotic activity and a regulator of the immune response. Depending on its state of activation, the alveolar macrophage may either enhance or suppress different aspects of immune function in the lung. We then review the role of PPAR-gamma and its ligands in deactivating alveolar macrophages-thus limiting the inflammatory response that, if unchecked, could threaten the essential respiratory function of the alveolus-while upregulating the cell's phagocytotic activity. Finally, we examine the role that inadequate or inappropriate PPAR-gamma responses play in specific lung diseases. PMID:18000531

  20. Macrophage function as studied by the clearance of /sup 125/I-labeled polyvinylpyrrolidone in iron-deficient and iron-replete mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kuvibidila, S.; Wade, S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of iron deficiency and iron repletion on in vivo macrophage function determined by the clearance of /sup 125/I-labeled polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Two experiments were done. There were four groups of C57BL/6 female mice in experiment 1: the iron-deficient (ID), pair-fed (PF), control (C) and the high iron (HI) groups. In experiment 2, there were three ID groups (severe to moderate anemia), three PF, one C and four ID groups that were fed adequate iron for 14 (R-14), 7 (R-7), 3 (R-3) days before or on the day of PVP injection (R-0). The overall rate of PVP clearance from blood was lower in ID than in C or PF groups. This clearance is expressed by a constant, K, calculated from natural log (ln) of the cpm and the time postadministration of PVP that blood was drawn. The theoretical individual macrophages function (alpha PVP), derived from K and the weights of body, spleen and liver, was also lower in ID than in C or PF groups. The impairment was most severe with the most severe iron deficiency. Repletion for 7 to 15 d before PVP administration resulted in a partial correction of the clearance. Moderate undernutrition in the PF group had no effect.

  1. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates in vitro mature human neutrophil and eosinophil function, surface receptor expression, and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, A F; Williamson, D J; Gamble, J R; Begley, C G; Harlan, J M; Klebanoff, S J; Waltersdorph, A; Wong, G; Clark, S C; Vadas, M A

    1986-01-01

    A purified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) was a powerful stimulator of mature human eosinophils and neutrophils. The purified rH GM-CSF enhanced the cytotoxic activity of neutrophils and eosinophils against antibody-coated targets, stimulated phagocytosis of serum-opsonized yeast by both cell types in a dose-dependent manner, and stimulated neutrophil-mediated iodination in the presence of zymosan. In addition, rH GM-CSF enhanced N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine(FMLP)-stimulated degranulation of Cytochalasin B pretreated neutrophils and FMLP-stimulated superoxide production. In contrast, rH GM-CSF did not promote adherence of granulocytes to endothelial cells or plastic surfaces. rH GM-CSF selectively enhanced the surface expression of granulocyte functional antigens 1 and 2, and the Mo1 antigen. rH GM-CSF induced morphological changes and enhanced the survival of both neutrophils and eosinophils by 6 and 9 h, respectively. These experiments show that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor can selectively stimulate mature granulocyte function. PMID:3021817

  2. Regulation of IκBα Function and NF-κB Signaling: AEBP1 Is a Novel Proinflammatory Mediator in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Majdalawieh, Amin; Ro, Hyo-Sung

    2010-01-01

    NF-κB comprises a family of transcription factors that are critically involved in various inflammatory processes. In this paper, the role of NF-κB in inflammation and atherosclerosis and the regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway are summarized. The structure, function, and regulation of the NF-κB inhibitors, IκBα and IκBβ, are reviewed. The regulation of NF-κB activity by glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling and IκBα sumoylation is also discussed. This paper focuses on the recently reported regulatory function that adipocyte enhancer-binding protein 1 (AEBP1) exerts on NF-κB transcriptional activity in macrophages, in which AEBP1 manifests itself as a potent modulator of NF-κB via physical interaction with IκBα and a critical mediator of inflammation. Finally, we summarize the regulatory roles that recently identified IκBα-interacting proteins play in NF-κB signaling. Based on its proinflammatory roles in macrophages, AEBP1 is anticipated to serve as a therapeutic target towards the treatment of various inflammatory conditions and disorders. PMID:20396415

  3. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) as a mediator of macrophage helminthotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J; Goldenberg, S; Meltzer, M S; Pearce, E

    1990-01-01

    Lymphokine-activated macrophages are cytotoxic for larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. That soluble secreted factors may mediate this cytotoxicity was suggested by the observation that culture supernatant fluids from stimulated macrophages also exhibited larvacidal activity. These fluids contain the monokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Several observations indicated that TNF is directly toxic to schistosome larvae. Cytotoxic sera taken from BCG- or S. mansoni-immunized mice after endotoxin challenge killed schistosomula in vitro, and upon gel filtration the larvacidal factor(s) in the sera co-eluted with the tumoricidal activity defined as TNF. Recombinant-derived TNF exhibited direct toxicity to schistosomula at high concentrations, or at lower concentrations in the presence of IFN gamma. The larvacidal activity of macrophage supernatant fluids was abrogated by addition of either anti-TNF antisera or Zn+2, which has been shown to inhibit TNF-induced damage of tumour cells. Anti-TNF and Zn+2 likewise suppressed schistosomulum killing by lymphokine-activated peritoneal macrophages or the IC-21 macrophage line, indicating that TNF also plays a role in the effector mechanism of larval killing by whole cells. PMID:2314921

  4. CRIg Functions as a Macrophage Pattern Recognition Receptor to Directly Bind and Capture Blood-Borne Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhutian; Surewaard, Bas G J; Wong, Connie H Y; Geoghegan, Joan A; Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2016-07-13

    Kupffer cells (KCs), the vast pool of intravascular macrophages in the liver, help to clear blood-borne pathogens. The mechanisms by which KCs capture circulating pathogens remain unknown. Here we use intra-vital imaging of mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus to directly visualize the dynamic process of bacterial capture in the liver. Circulating S. aureus were captured by KCs in a manner dependent on the macrophage complement receptor CRIg, but the process was independent of complement. CRIg bound Staphylococcus aureus specifically through recognition of lipoteichoic acid (LTA), but not cell-wall-anchored surface proteins or peptidoglycan. Blocking the recognition between CRIg and LTA in vivo diminished the bacterial capture in liver and led to systemic bacterial dissemination. All tested Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative, bacteria bound CRIg in a complement-independent manner. These findings reveal a pattern recognition role for CRIg in the direct capture of circulating Gram-positive bacteria from the bloodstream. PMID:27345697

  5. Macrophages and Alcohol-Related Liver Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Cynthia; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that macrophages have a critical role in the development of alcohol-induced inflammation in the liver. To define the precise pathogenic function of these cells during alcoholic liver disease (ALD), it is extremely important to conduct extensive studies in clinical settings that further elucidate the phenotypic diversity of macrophages in the context of ALD. Research to date already has identified several characteristics of macrophages that underlie the cells’ actions, including macrophage polarization and their phenotypic diversity. Other analyses have focused on the contributions of resident versus infiltrating macrophages/monocytes, as well as on the roles of macrophage mediators, in the development of ALD. Findings point to the potential of macrophages as a therapeutic target in alcoholic liver injury. Future studies directed toward understanding how alcohol affects macrophage phenotypic switch in the liver and other tissues, whether the liver microenvironment determines macrophage function in ALD, and if targeting of macrophages alleviates alcoholic liver injury, will provide promising strategies to manage patients with alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26717583

  6. Indirubin-3′-(2,3 dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804) is a potent modulator of LPS-stimulated macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, Abigail S.; Anderson, Amy L.; Rice, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Indirubin is a deep-red bis-indole isomer of indigo blue, both of which are biologically active ingredients in Danggui Longhui Wan, an ancient Chinese herbal tea mixture used to treat neoplasia and chronic inflammation and to enhance detoxification of xenobiotics. Multiple indirubin derivatives have been synthesized and shown to inhibit cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and glycogen-synthase kinase (GSK-3β) with varying degrees of potency. Several indirubins are also aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, with AhR-associated activities covering a wide range of potencies, depending on molecular structure. This study examined the effects of indirubin-3′-(2,3 dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804), a novel indirubin with potent STAT3 inhibitory properties, on basal and LPS-inducible activities in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. Using a focused commercial qRT-PCR array platform (SuperArray®), the effects of E804 on expression of a suite of genes associated with stress and toxicity were determined. Most genes up-regulated by LPS treatment were suppressed by E804; including LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and receptors, apoptosis control genes, and oxidative stress response genes. Using qRT-PCR as a follow up to the commercial arrays, E804 treatment suppressed LPS-induced COX-2, iNOS, IL-6 and IL-10 gene expression, though the effects on iNOS and COX-2 protein expression were less dramatic. E804 also inhibited LPS-induced secretion of IL-6 and IL-10. Functional endpoints, including iNOS and lysozyme enzymatic activity, phagocytosis of fluorescent latex beads, and intracellular killing of bacteria, were also examined, and in each experimental condition E804 suppressed activities. Collectively, these results indicate that E804 is a potent modulator of pro-inflammatory profiles in LPS-treated macrophages. -- Highlights: ► RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with 1 μM Indirubin E804, 1 μg/ml LPS, or both. ► E804 suppresses LPS-induced expression of i

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Secreted Hookworm Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) that Interacts with the Human MIF Receptor CD74

    SciTech Connect

    Cho,Y.; Jones, B.; Vermeire, J.; Leng, L.; DiFedele, L.; Harrison, L.; Xiong, H.; Kwong, Y.; Chen, Y.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Hookworms, parasitic nematodes that infect nearly one billion people worldwide, are a major cause of anemia and malnutrition. We hypothesize that hookworms actively manipulate the host immune response through the production of specific molecules designed to facilitate infection by larval stages and adult worm survival within the intestine. A full-length cDNA encoding a secreted orthologue of the human cytokine, Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) has been cloned from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. Elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structure of recombinant AceMIF (rAceMIF) revealed an overall structural homology with significant differences in the tautomerase sites of the human and hookworm proteins. The relative bioactivities of human and hookworm MIF proteins were compared using in vitro assays of tautomerase activity, macrophage migration, and binding to MIF receptor CD74. The activity of rAceMIF was not inhibited by the ligand ISO-1, which was previously determined to be an inhibitor of the catalytic site of human MIF. These data define unique immunological, structural, and functional characteristics of AceMIF, thereby establishing the potential for selectively inhibiting the hookworm cytokine as a means of reducing parasite survival and disease pathogenesis.

  8. Persistence of the bacterial pathogen Granulibacter bethesdensis in Chronic Granulomatous Disease monocytes and macrophages lacking a functional NADPH oxidase1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessica; Song, Helen H.; Zarember, Kol A.; Mills, Teresa A.; Gallin, John I.

    2013-01-01

    Granulibacter bethesdensis is a Gram-negative pathogen in patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD), a deficiency in the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. Repeated isolation of genetically identical strains from the same patient over years, and prolonged waxing and waning seropositivity in some subjects, raises the possibility of long-term persistence. G. bethesdensis resists killing by serum, CGD polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and antimicrobial peptides, indicating resistance to non-oxidative killing mechanisms. While G. bethesdensis extends the survival of PMN, persistent intracellular bacterial survival might rely on longer-lived macrophages and their precursor monocytes. Therefore, we examined phagocytic killing by primary human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Cells from both normal and CGD subjects internalized G. bethesdensis similarly. G. bethesdensis stimulated superoxide production in normal monocytes, but to a lesser degree than in normal PMN. Normal but not CGD monocytes and MDM killed G. bethesdensis and required in vitro treatment with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to maintain this killing effect. Although in vitro IFN-γ did not enhance G. bethesdensis killing in CGD monocytes, it restricted growth in proportion to CGD PMN residual superoxide production, providing a potential method to identify patients responsive to IFN-γ therapy. In IFN-γ-treated CGD MDM, G. bethesdensis persisted for the duration of the study (7 days) without decreasing viability of the host cells. These results indicate that G. bethesdensis is highly resistant to oxygen-independent microbicides of myeloid cells, requires an intact NADPH oxidase for clearance, and can persist long-term in CGD mononuclear phagocytes, likely relating to the persistence of this microorganism in infected CGD patients. PMID:23956436

  9. Tissue-resident macrophages: then and now.

    PubMed

    Davies, Luke C; Taylor, Philip R

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages have been at the heart of immune research for over a century and are an integral component of innate immunity. Macrophages are often viewed as terminally differentiated monocytic phagocytes. They infiltrate tissues during inflammation, and form polarized populations that perform pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory functions. Tissue-resident macrophages were regarded as differentiated monocytes, which seed the tissues to perform immune sentinel and homeostatic functions. However, tissue-resident macrophages are not a homogeneous population, but are in fact a grouping of cells with similar functions and phenotypes. In the last decade, it has been revealed that many of these cells are not terminally differentiated and, in most cases, are not derived from haematopoiesis in the adult. Recent research has highlighted that tissue-resident macrophages cannot be grouped into simple polarized categories, especially in vivo, when they are exposed to complex signalling events. It has now been demonstrated that the tissue environment itself is a major controller of macrophage phenotype, and can influence the expression of many genes regardless of origin. This is consistent with the concept that cells within different tissues have diverse responses in inflammation. There is still a mountain to climb in the field, as it evolves to encompass not only tissue-resident macrophage diversity, but also categorization of specific tissue environments and the plasticity of macrophages themselves. This knowledge provides a new perspective on therapeutic strategies, as macrophage subsets can potentially be manipulated to control the inflammatory environment in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25684236

  10. Tissue-resident macrophages: then and now

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C; Taylor, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages have been at the heart of immune research for over a century and are an integral component of innate immunity. Macrophages are often viewed as terminally differentiated monocytic phagocytes. They infiltrate tissues during inflammation, and form polarized populations that perform pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory functions. Tissue-resident macrophages were regarded as differentiated monocytes, which seed the tissues to perform immune sentinel and homeostatic functions. However, tissue-resident macrophages are not a homogeneous population, but are in fact a grouping of cells with similar functions and phenotypes. In the last decade, it has been revealed that many of these cells are not terminally differentiated and, in most cases, are not derived from haematopoiesis in the adult. Recent research has highlighted that tissue-resident macrophages cannot be grouped into simple polarized categories, especially in vivo, when they are exposed to complex signalling events. It has now been demonstrated that the tissue environment itself is a major controller of macrophage phenotype, and can influence the expression of many genes regardless of origin. This is consistent with the concept that cells within different tissues have diverse responses in inflammation. There is still a mountain to climb in the field, as it evolves to encompass not only tissue-resident macrophage diversity, but also categorization of specific tissue environments and the plasticity of macrophages themselves. This knowledge provides a new perspective on therapeutic strategies, as macrophage subsets can potentially be manipulated to control the inflammatory environment in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25684236

  11. Macrophages: Their Emerging Roles in Bone.

    PubMed

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Pettit, Allison R; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages are present in nearly all tissues and are critical for development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Resident tissue macrophages of bone, termed osteal macrophages, are recently classified myeloid cells that are distinct from osteoclasts. Osteal macrophages are located immediately adjacent to osteoblasts, regulate bone formation, and play diverse roles in skeletal homeostasis. Genetic or pharmacological modulation of macrophages in vivo results in significant bone phenotypes, and these phenotypes depend on which macrophage subsets are altered. Macrophages are also key mediators of osseous wound healing and fracture repair, with distinct roles at various stages of the repair process. A central function of macrophages is their phagocytic ability. Each day, billions of cells die in the body and efferocytosis (phagocytosis of apoptotic cells) is a critical process in both clearing dead cells and recruitment of replacement progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis. Recent data suggest a role for efferocytosis in bone biology and these new mechanisms are outlined. Finally, although macrophages have an established role in primary tumors, emerging evidence suggests that macrophages in bone support cancers which preferentially metastasize to the skeleton. Collectively, this developing area of osteoimmunology raises new questions and promises to provide novel insights into pathophysiologic conditions as well as therapeutic and regenerative approaches vital for skeletal health. PMID:26531055

  12. Purinergic signaling during macrophage differentiation results in M2 alternative activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages represent a highly heterogenic cell population of the innate immune system, with important roles in the initiation and resolution of the inflammatory response. Purinergic signaling regulates both M1 and M2 macrophage function at different levels by controlling the secretion of cytokines, phagocytosis, and the production of reactive oxygen species. We found that extracellular nucleotides arrest macrophage differentiation from bone marrow precursors via adenosine and P2 receptors. This results in a mature macrophage with increased expression of M2, but not M1, genes. Similar to adenosine and ATP, macrophage growth arrested with LPS treatment resulted in an increase of the M2-related marker Ym1. Recombinant Ym1 was able to affect macrophage proliferation and could, potentially, be involved in the arrest of macrophage growth during hematopoiesis. PMID:26382298

  13. Development and maintainance of resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero, Elisa Gomez; Geissmann, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the many roles of macrophages in health and disease states in vivo remain poorly understood. The purpose of this Review is to present and discuss current knowledge on the developmental biology of macrophages, as it underlies the concept of a layered myeloid system composed of ‘resident’ macrophages that mostly originate from yolk sac progenitors and of ‘passenger’ or ‘transitory’ myeloid cells that originate and renew from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and to provide a framework to investigate the functions of macrophages in vivo. PMID:26681456

  14. Low-pathogenicity Mycoplasma spp. alter human monocyte and macrophage function and are highly prevalent among patients with ventilator-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, T J; Gadsby, N J; Templeton, K E; McMullan, R; McKenna, J P; Rennie, J; Robb, C T; Walsh, T S; Rossi, A G; Conway Morris, A; Simpson, A J

    2016-01-01

    Background Ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) remains a significant problem within intensive care units (ICUs). There is a growing recognition of the impact of critical-illness-induced immunoparesis on the pathogenesis of VAP, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We hypothesised that, because of limitations in their routine detection, Mycoplasmataceae are more prevalent among patients with VAP than previously recognised, and that these organisms potentially impair immune cell function. Methods and setting 159 patients were recruited from 12 UK ICUs. All patients had suspected VAP and underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). VAP was defined as growth of organisms at >104 colony forming units per ml of BAL fluid on conventional culture. Samples were tested for Mycoplasmataceae (Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp.) by PCR, and positive samples underwent sequencing for speciation. 36 healthy donors underwent BAL for comparison. Additionally, healthy donor monocytes and macrophages were exposed to Mycoplasma salivarium and their ability to respond to lipopolysaccharide and undertake phagocytosis was assessed. Results Mycoplasmataceae were found in 49% (95% CI 33% to 65%) of patients with VAP, compared with 14% (95% CI 9% to 25%) of patients without VAP. Patients with sterile BAL fluid had a similar prevalence to healthy donor BAL fluid (10% (95% CI 4% to 20%) vs 8% (95% CI 2% to 22%)). The most common organism identified was M. salivarium. Blood monocytes from healthy volunteers incubated with M. salivarium displayed an impaired TNF-α response to lipopolysaccharide (p=0.0003), as did monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) (p=0.024). MDM exposed to M. salivarium demonstrated impaired phagocytosis (p=0.005). Discussion and conclusions This study demonstrates a high prevalence of Mycoplasmataceae among patients with VAP, with a markedly lower prevalence among patients with suspected VAP in whom subsequent cultures refuted the diagnosis. The most

  15. The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin Can Function as an Attachment and Entry Receptor for Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Liong, Stella; Tate, Michelle D.; Irimura, Tatsuro; Denda-Nagai, Kaori; Brooks, Andrew G.; Londrigan, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Specific protein receptors that mediate internalization and entry of influenza A virus (IAV) have not been identified for any cell type. Sialic acid (SIA), the primary attachment factor for IAV hemagglutinin, is expressed by numerous cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids, confounding efforts to identify specific receptors involved in virus infection. Lec1 Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) epithelial cells express cell surface SIA and bind IAV yet are largely resistant to infection. Here, we demonstrate that expression of the murine macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) by Lec1 cells enhanced Ca2+-dependent IAV binding and restored permissivity to infection. Lec1 cells expressing MGL1 were infected in the presence or absence of cell surface SIA, indicating that MGL1 can act as a primary receptor or as a coreceptor with SIA. Lec1 cells expressing endocytosis-deficient MGL1 mediated Ca2+-dependent IAV binding but were less sensitive to IAV infection, indicating that direct internalization via MGL1 can result in cellular infection. Together, these studies identify MGL1 as a cell surface glycoprotein that can act as an authentic receptor for both attachment and infectious entry of IAV. PMID:24257596

  16. Macrophage Heterogeneity in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boorsma, Carian E.; Draijer, Christina; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are among the most abundant cells in the respiratory tract, and they can have strikingly different phenotypes within this environment. Our knowledge of the different phenotypes and their functions in the lung is sketchy at best, but they appear to be linked to the protection of gas exchange against microbial threats and excessive tissue responses. Phenotypical changes of macrophages within the lung are found in many respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper will give an overview of what macrophage phenotypes have been described, what their known functions are, what is known about their presence in the different obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis), and how they are thought to contribute to the etiology and resolution of these diseases. PMID:23533311

  17. Oncosuppressive functions of decorin

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Thomas; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is rapidly emerging as a prominent contributor to various fundamental processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan gene family, is assuming a central role as a potent soluble tumor repressor. Decorin binds and antagonizes various receptor tyrosine kinases and inhibits downstream oncogenic signaling in several solid tumors. Among other functions, decorin evokes cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antimetastatic, and antiangiogenic programs. Recent work has revealed a paradigmatic shift in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its tumoricidal properties. Decorin adversely compromises the genetic signature of the tumor microenvironment and induces endothelial cell autophagy downstream of VEGFR2. Moreover, decorin selectively evokes destruction of tumor cell mitochondria downstream of Met through mitophagy. Acting as a partial agonist, decorin signals via proautophagic receptors and triggers procatabolic processes that parallel the classical tumoricidal properties of this multifaceted proteoglycan. PMID:27308453

  18. Much More than M1 and M2 Macrophages, There are also CD169+ and TCR+ Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Olleros, Maria L.; Vesin, Dominique; Garcia, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are considered to be precursor cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system, and macrophages are one of the leading members of this cellular system. Macrophages play highly diverse roles in maintaining an organism’s integrity by either directly participating in pathogen elimination or repairing tissue under sterile inflammatory conditions. There are different subpopulations of macrophages and each one has its own characteristics and functions. In this review, we summarize present knowledge on the polarization of macrophages that allows the generation of subpopulations called classically activated macrophages or M1 and alternative activated macrophages or M2. Furthermore, there are macrophages that their origin and characterization still remain unclear but have been involved as main players in some human pathologies. Thus, we also review three other categories of macrophages: tumor-associated macrophages, CD169+ macrophages, and the recently named TCR+ macrophages. Based on the literature, we provide information on the molecular characterization of these macrophage subpopulations and their specific involvement in several human pathologies such as cancer, infectious diseases, obesity, and asthma. The refined characterization of the macrophage subpopulations can be useful in designing new strategies, supplementing those already established for the treatment of diseases using macrophages as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074923

  19. Effect of Penicillium mycotoxins on the cytokine gene expression, reactive oxygen species production, and phagocytosis of bovine macrophage (BoMacs) function.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Young; Mead, Philip J; Sharma, Bhawani S; Quinton, V Margaret; Boermans, Herman J; Smith, Trevor K; Swamy, H V L N; Karrow, Niel A

    2015-12-25

    Bovine macrophages (BoMacs) were exposed to the following Penicillium mycotoxins (PM): citrinin (CIT), ochratoxin A (OTA), patulin (PAT), mycophenolic acid (MPA) and penicillic acid (PA). PM exposure at the concentration that inhibits proliferation by 25% (IC25) differentially for 24h altered the gene expression of various cytokines. OTA significantly induced IL-1α expression (p<0.05), while the expression of IL-6 was suppressed (p<0.01). MPA significantly induced the expression of IL-1α (p<0.05) and reduced the expression of IL-12α (p<0.01) and IL-10 (p<0.01). PAT significantly suppressed the expression of IL-23 (p<0.01), IL-10 (p<0.05) and TGF-β (p<0.05). Some PMs also affected reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phagocytosis of Mycobacterium avium ssp. Paratuberculosis (MAP) at higher concentrations. PAT and PA for example, significantly decreased the percent phagocytosis of MAP at 5.0 (p<0.01) and 15.6 μM (p<0.01), respectively, but only PA significantly suppressed PAM-3-stimulated ROS production at 62.5 (p<0.05) and 250.0 μM (p<0.01). OTA significantly increased the percent phagocytosis of MAP at 6.3 (p<0.05) and 12.5 μM (p<0.01). These findings suggest that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of PMs can affect macrophage function, which could affect immunoregulation and innate disease resistance to pathogens. PMID:26394380

  20. Macrophage activation by OM-85 BV.

    PubMed

    Mauël, J

    1992-01-01

    Peritoneal or bone-marrow-derived murine macrophages were exposed for 24 h in vitro to dilutions of the bacterial extract OM-85 BV, in the presence or absence of other added compounds [macrophage-activating factor (MAF), recombinant murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)]. Various metabolic responses and functional activities were then measured. Glucose oxidation through the hexose monophosphate shunt pathway was markedly stimulated in OM-85 BV-treated macrophages compared to control macrophages. Similarly, OM-85 BV primed macrophages for superoxide production upon triggering by phorbol myristate acetate. Both effects were further enhanced by simultaneous treatment of the cells with MAF with OM-85 BV. The bacterial extract also induced macrophages to release large amounts of nitrite (a marker of the activated state). As regards functional responses, coincubation with MAF and OM-85 BV activated macrophages to destroy target cells as well as intracellular microorganisms; in the latter case, similar results were obtained when MAF was replaced by IFN-gamma. In all these tests, the possibility that the observed effects were due to contamination of the bacterial extracts by endotoxin could be excluded. The above results indicate that OM-85 BV induces metabolic and functional properties in macrophages that are characteristic of the activated state and are important for host defence. PMID:1332156

  1. Macrophage Plasticity in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonti, Elena; Sciorati, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are one of the first barriers of host defence against pathogens. Beyond their role in innate immunity, macrophages play increasingly defined roles in orchestrating the healing of various injured tissues. Perturbations of macrophage function and/or activation may result in impaired regeneration and fibrosis deposition as described in several chronic pathological diseases. Heterogeneity and plasticity have been demonstrated to be hallmarks of macrophages. In response to environmental cues they display a proinflammatory (M1) or an alternative anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. A lot of evidence demonstrated that after acute injury M1 macrophages infiltrate early to promote the clearance of necrotic debris, whereas M2 macrophages appear later to sustain tissue healing. Whether the sequential presence of two different macrophage populations results from a dynamic shift in macrophage polarization or from the recruitment of new circulating monocytes is a subject of ongoing debate. In this paper, we discuss the current available information about the role that different phenotypes of macrophages plays after injury and during the remodelling phase in different tissue types, with particular attention to the skeletal muscle. PMID:24860823

  2. Chemiluminescent responses of alveolar macrophages from normal and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated rabbits as a function of age.

    PubMed Central

    Chida, K; Myrvik, Q N; Leake, E S; Gordon, M R; Wood, P H; Ricardo, M J

    1987-01-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) responses of alveolar macrophages (AM) from normal and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated infant and adult rabbits were compared. AM from 1-, 7-, and 14-day-old normal rabbits exhibited much lower peak CL responses than did AM from 28- and 42-day-old normal animals as well as rabbits 2 to 3 or 5 to 6 months and 1 to 2 years of age. The most striking differences among AM from infant and adult rabbits were noted when AM were obtained from 28-day-old and 5- to 6-month old rabbits 21 days after the rabbits were immunized with 200 micrograms of BCG intravenously. In this case, AM from 5- to 6-month-old animals gave peak counts per minute of 400,000 to 500,000 whereas AM from 28-day-old rabbits vaccinated with BCG (harvested at 49 days of age) gave peak counts per minute of only 40,715 +/- 2,688. These data reveal that AM from neonatal animals are grossly deficient as responders to phorbol myristate acetate-induced CL. This deficiency, which improved with age, is still apparent in AM from 28-day-old animals. The data also reveal that BCG vaccination of 28-day-old animals yields AM that are poor responders to phorbol myristate acetate compared with AM from BCG-vaccinated animals 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 months of age. AM from animals vaccinated with BCG at 28 days of age contained fewer and smaller electron-dense lysosomelike structures than did AM from adult rabbits similarly vaccinated. These findings provide an explanation for the difficulties infants have in developing effective cell-mediated immune responses against intracellular parasites. Images PMID:3553004

  3. Functional and receptor binding characterization of recombinant murine macrophage inflammatory protein 2: sequence analysis and mutagenesis identify receptor binding epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Jerva, L. F.; Sullivan, G.; Lolis, E.

    1997-01-01

    Murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a member of the alpha-chemokine family, is one of several proteins secreted by cells in response to lipopolysaccharide. Many of the alpha-chemokines, such as interleukin-8, gro-alpha/MGSA, and neutrophil activating peptide-2 (NAP-2), are associated with neutrophil activation and chemotaxis. We describe the expression, purification, and characterization of murine MIP-2 from Pichia pastoris. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that MIP-2 exhibits a highly ordered secondary structure consistent with the alpha/beta structures of other chemokines. Recombinant MIP-2 is chemotactic for human and murine neutrophils and up-regulates cell surface expression of Mac-1. MIP-2 binds to human and murine neutrophils with dissociation constants of 6.4 nM and 2.9 nM, respectively. We further characterize the binding of MIP-2 to the human types A and B IL-8 receptors and the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. MIP-2 displays low-affinity binding to the type A IL-8 receptor (Kd > 120 nM) and high-affinity binding to the type B IL-8 receptor (Kd 5.7 nM) and the murine receptor (Kd 6.8 nM). The three-dimensional structure of IL-8 and sequence analysis of six chemokines (IL-8, gro-alpha, NAP-2, ENA-78, KC, and MIP-2) that display high-affinity binding to the IL-8 type B receptor are used to identify an extended N-terminal surface that interacts with this receptor. Two mutants of MIP-2 establish that this region is also involved in binding and activating the murine homologue of the IL-8 receptor. Differences in the sequence between IL-8 and related chemokines identify a unique hydrophobic/aromatic region surrounded by charged residues that is likely to impart specificity to IL-8 for binding to the type A receptor. PMID:9260277

  4. Modulation of rat monocyte/macrophage innate functions by increasing intensities of swimming exercise is associated with heat shock protein status.

    PubMed

    Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Marques, Claudia Vieira; da Silva, Gustavo Stumpf; Heck, Thiago Gomes; de Oliveira Junior, Lino Pinto; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-10-01

    Moderate exercise positively impacts innate immune functions, bringing about a better resistance against infections and general immunosurveillance. Exercise of high workloads (i.e., high intensity and/or duration) such as elite marathon, on the other hand, may have detrimental effects over immune function, but neither how long nor how intense should be the exercise sessions to be deleterious is known, this being a matter of intense dispute. Exercise is, at the same time, one of the most powerful inducers of the 70 kDa family of heat shock proteins (HSPAs, formerly known as HSP70s), which are protein chaperones characterized by a marked anti-inflammatory potency, when located intracellularly (iHSPA), but may act as pro-inflammatory cytokines if in the extracellular space (eHSPA). The above observations led us to suppose that short-term exercise could impose long-lasting effects on macrophage function that should be related to the eHSPA-to-iHSPA ratio, viz. H-index. Sedentary adult male Wistar rats were then submitted to 20 min swimming sessions with an overload (as a percentage of body weight attached to the tail base) of either 2, 4, 6, or 8 %. Control animals were maintained at rest in shallow water. Monocyte/macrophage functions (phagocytic capacity, nitric oxide [NO], and hydrogen peroxide [H2O2]) were assessed just after and 12 h after exercise and compared with HSPA status and oxidative stress markers. The results showed that exercise increased phagocytosis and H2O2 immediately after the bouts in a workload-dependent way. This was accompanied by increased H-index but no alteration in the redox status. Enhanced phagocytic capacity persisted for up to 12 h, when a marked rise in NO production was also observed, but H-index resumes its control values, suggesting that immune alertness returned to basal levels. Of note was the detection of the cognate form of eHSPA (encoded by hspa8 gene and formerly known as HSP73) in the rat sera. In total, acute exercise

  5. Macrophage Polarization in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Cassol, Edana; Poli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are terminally differentiated cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system that also encompasses dendritic cells, circulating blood monocytes, and committed myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Both macrophages and their monocytic precursors can change their functional state in response to microenvironmental cues exhibiting a marked heterogeneity. However, there are still uncertainties regarding distinct expression patterns of surface markers that clearly define macrophage subsets, particularly in the case of human macrophages. In addition to their tissue distribution, macrophages can be functionally polarized into M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (alternatively activated) as well as regulatory cells in response to both exogenous infections and solid tumors as well as by systems biology approaches. PMID:22194670

  6. Origin, Development, and Homeostasis of Tissue-resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are versatile cells of the hematopoietic system that display remarkable functional diversity encompassing innate immune responses, tissue development, and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages are present in almost all tissues of the body and display distinct location-specific phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Recent studies also demonstrate distinct origins of tissue-resident macrophages. This emerging picture of ontological, functional, and phenotypic heterogeneity within tissue macrophages has altered our understanding of these cells, which play important roles in many human diseases. In this review, we discuss the different origins of tissue macrophages, the transcription factors regulating their development, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis at steady state. PMID:25319325

  7. The contribution of macrophages to normal and pathological pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Schust, Danny J

    2010-06-01

    Macrophages represent one of the major leukocyte subsets in the uterine decidua. Owing to their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, decidual macrophages can participate in diverse activities during pregnancy. At baseline, decidual macrophages are characterized by an immunosuppressive phenotype and M2 polarization, supporting feto-maternal immune tolerance. In early pregnancy, macrophage-derived pro-angiogenic factors prompt vascular remodeling within the uterine wall to ensure appropriate utero-placental circulation. Upon invasion by pathogens, pattern recognition receptors on decidual macrophages help to alter the characteristics of these malleable cells toward an M1, inflammatory phenotype. Similar inflammatory characteristics are seen in those macrophages that accumulate in the lower segment of the uterus to drive cervical ripening. Disturbances in the tight control that balances macrophage function during pregnancy can trigger the development of pregnancy complications. Here, we discuss the physiologic role of uterine macrophages at different stages of pregnancy and describe their relevance in selected pregnancy disorders. PMID:20163399

  8. Susceptibility to Aspergillus Infections in Rats with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease via Deficiency Function of Alveolar Macrophages and Impaired Activation of TLR2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuting; Xu, Hong; Li, Li; Yuan, Weifeng; Zhang, Deming; Huang, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more susceptible to Aspergillus. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are not known. In this study, we used cigarette smoke exposure to generate COPD rat model. colony-forming units (CFU) count assessment and phagocytosis were applied to evaluate the defense function of COPD rats against Aspergillus challenge. ELISA, western blotting, and GST-Rac1 pull-down assays were conducted to determine the expressions of cytokines and TLR2-associated signaling pathway. Our data showed that Aspergillus burdens increased, phagocytosis of Aspergillus as well as the expressions of inflammatory cytokines from alveolar macrophages (AMs) were impaired in COPD rats compared with normal rats. Though TLR2 signaling-related proteins were induced in response to the stimulation of Aspergillus or Pam3csk4 (TLR2 agonist), the activation of TLR2-associated signaling pathway was apparently interfered in rats with COPD, compared to that in normal rats. Taken together, our study demonstrated that COPD caused the deficiency of AMs function and impaired the activation of TLR2/PI3K/Rac 1 signaling pathway, leading to invasion of Aspergillus infection, which also provides a future basis for the infection control in COPD patients. PMID:27312383

  9. High Intracellular Concentrations of Posaconazole Do Not Impact on Functional Capacities of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and Monocyte-Derived Macrophages In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Farowski, Fedja; Cornely, Oliver A; Hartmann, Pia

    2016-06-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used antifungal for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal infections. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular concentration of posaconazole in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was greatly increased compared to the plasma concentration. As these professional phagocytes are crucial to combat fungal infections, we set out to investigate if and how, beneficial or deleterious, this high loading of intracellular posaconazole impacts the functional capacities of these cells. Here, we show that high intracellular concentrations of posaconazole do not significantly impact PMN and monocyte-derived macrophage function in vitro In particular, killing capacity and cytoskeletal features of PMN, such as migration, are not affected, indicating that these cells serve as vehicles for posaconazole to the site of infection. Moreover, since posaconazole as such slowed the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, infected neutrophils released less reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these findings, we propose that the delivery of posaconazole by neutrophils to the site of Aspergillus species infection warrants control of the pathogen and preservation of tissue integrity at the same time. PMID:27021317

  10. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two major functions of the intestinal epithelium are to act as a physical barrier and to regulate the movement of nutrients, ions and fluid. Nematode infection induces alterations in smooth and epithelial cell function, including increased fluid in the intestinal lumen, which are attributed to a ST...

  11. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gillian M.; Nicol, Marlynne Q.; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J.; Nash, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  12. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α, and TNF-α expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-α was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  13. Monoclonal antibody against macrophage colony-stimulating factor suppresses circulating monocytes and tissue macrophage function but does not alter cell infiltration/activation in cutaneous lesions or clinical outcomes in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Masek-Hammerman, K; Peeva, E; Ahmad, A; Menon, S; Afsharvand, M; Peng Qu, R; Cheng, J B; Syed, J; Zhan, Y; O'Neil, S P; Pleasic-Williams, S; Cox, L A; Beidler, D

    2016-02-01

    This study's objective was to assess the effects of PD-0360324, a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody against macrophage colony-stimulating factor in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE). Patients with active subacute CLE or discoid lupus erythematosus were randomized to receive 100 or 150 mg PD-0360324 or placebo via intravenous infusion every 2 weeks for 3 months. Blood and urine samples were obtained pre- and post-treatment to analyse pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic changes in CD14(+) CD16(+) monocytes, urinary N-terminal telopeptide (uNTX), alanine/aspartate aminotransferases (ALT/AST) and creatine kinase (CK); tissue biopsy samples were taken to evaluate macrophage populations and T cells using immunohistochemistry. Clinical efficacy assessments included the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). Among 28 randomized/analysed patients, peak/trough plasma concentrations increased in a greater-than-dose-proportional manner with dose increases from 100 to 150 mg. Statistically significant differences were observed between active treatment and placebo groups in changes from baseline in CD14(+) CD16(+) cells, uNTX, ALT, AST and CK levels at most time-points. The numbers, density and activation states of tissue macrophages and T cells did not change from baseline to treatment end. No between-group differences were seen in CLASI. Patients receiving PD-0360324 reported significantly more adverse events than those receiving placebo, but no serious adverse events. In patients with CLE, 100 and 150 mg PD-0360324 every 2 weeks for 3 months suppressed a subset of circulating monocytes and altered activity of some tissue macrophages without affecting cell populations in CLE skin lesions or improving clinical end-points. PMID:26376111

  14. Molecular Characterization of E-Type Prostanoid Receptor 4 (EP4) from Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) and Its Functional Analysis in the Monocytes/Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rong, Ye-Jing; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in a broad spectrum of physiological and pathological processes by interacting with E-type prostanoid receptors (EPs). EP4 is one of four EP subtypes known to mediate the immune response in mammalian monocytes/macrophages. However, the precise function and characteristics of EP4 in fish remain unclear. In this study, we characterized a novel EP4-like (PaEP4L) gene from ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis. The cDNA sequence of PaEP4L is 2781 nucleotides (nts) in length, encoding a polypeptide of 459 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 51.17 kDa. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that PaEP4L shared 76% amino acid identity with that of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). PaEP4L mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) in all tested tissues and head kidney-derived monocytes/macrophages (MO/MФ). It varied greatly in liver, spleen and MO/MФ upon Vibrio anguillarum infection. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of PaEP4L in cell homogenates from ayu MO/MФ upon V. anguillarum infection. Moreover, anti-PaEP4L IgG reversed the down-regulation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) mRNA expression as well as phagocytosis in ayu MO/MФ caused by PGE2. There were no significant differences in the respiratory burst response between PGE2 treated and untreated cells. We further found that cAMP mediated PGE2/PaEP4L signal in ayu MO/MФ. In conclusion, our results indicate that PaEP4L mediates PGE2 effects on ayu MO/MФ function, revealing that EP4 also plays a role in the modulation of cells of the fish's innate immune system. PMID:26809077

  15. Molecular Characterization of E-Type Prostanoid Receptor 4 (EP4) from Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) and Its Functional Analysis in the Monocytes/Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Ye-Jing; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in a broad spectrum of physiological and pathological processes by interacting with E-type prostanoid receptors (EPs). EP4 is one of four EP subtypes known to mediate the immune response in mammalian monocytes/macrophages. However, the precise function and characteristics of EP4 in fish remain unclear. In this study, we characterized a novel EP4-like (PaEP4L) gene from ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis. The cDNA sequence of PaEP4L is 2781 nucleotides (nts) in length, encoding a polypeptide of 459 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 51.17 kDa. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that PaEP4L shared 76% amino acid identity with that of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). PaEP4L mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR) in all tested tissues and head kidney-derived monocytes/macrophages (MO/MФ). It varied greatly in liver, spleen and MO/MФ upon Vibrio anguillarum infection. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase of PaEP4L in cell homogenates from ayu MO/MФ upon V. anguillarum infection. Moreover, anti-PaEP4L IgG reversed the down-regulation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) mRNA expression as well as phagocytosis in ayu MO/MФ caused by PGE2. There were no significant differences in the respiratory burst response between PGE2 treated and untreated cells. We further found that cAMP mediated PGE2/PaEP4L signal in ayu MO/MФ. In conclusion, our results indicate that PaEP4L mediates PGE2 effects on ayu MO/MФ function, revealing that EP4 also plays a role in the modulation of cells of the fish’s innate immune system. PMID:26809077

  16. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes JM; Wouters, Maartje CA; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes. PMID:25760768

  17. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Palmar, Jim; Bautista, Jordan; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gómez, Alexis; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD. PMID:26491604

  18. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites. PMID:25537601

  19. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce "activated macrophages" that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as "classical" and "alternative" or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases that provide

  20. Inhalation of particulate lead oxide disrupts pulmonary macrophage-mediated functions important for host defense and tumor surveillance in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Zelikoff, J.T.; Parsons, E.; Schlesinger, R.B. )

    1993-08-01

    Lead, an immunomodulator and potential human carcinogen, is a major airborne pollutant in industrial environments which poses a serious threat to human health. Despite the wide-spread occurrence of respirable lead particles in the air, and the potential human health risks, effects associated with inhalation of particulate lead on the the lung have been poorly studied. This study was performed to determine whether inhalation of particulate lead oxide (PbO), at a concentration below the currently acceptable air lead standard for occupational exposure, disrupts macrophage (M phi) functions important for maintaining pulmonary immunocompetence. These functions include phagocytosis, production of reactive oxygen intermediates, and the biological activity of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Rabbits exposed to PbO at 30 micrograms/m3 for 4 days (3 hr/day) were sacrificed and their lungs lavaged immediately, 24 hr, and 72 hr after the final exposure. Lactate dehydrogenase (a marker of lung cell damage) and lysozyme activity (a marker of lysosome permeability), measured in the lavage fluid, were significantly increased 24 and 72 hr after exposure. PbO produced neutrophil infiltration nor effects on M phi viability or total numbers. Effects on M phi functions were as follows. Phagocytic uptake of latex particles was reduced with increasing post-exposure time reaching a maximum inhibition at 72 hr. Inhalation of PbO enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2-) production in a time-dependent manner; effects on H2O2 began at 24 hr and were persistent up to 72 hr. Effects on TNF-alpha release/activity appeared earliest and were persistent up to 72 hr. Immediately and 24 hr after exposure, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activity of TNF-alpha was depressed by 62 and 50%, respectively; after 72 hr, TNF-alpha release was significantly enhanced compared to control levels.

  1. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  2. Anti-tumour strategies aiming to target tumour-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Mo, Chunfen; Wang, Yongsheng; Wei, Dandan; Xiao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a predominant population of inflammatory cells that present in solid tumours. TAMs are mostly characterized as alternatively activated M2-like macrophages and are known to orchestrate nearly all stages of tumour progression. Experimental investigations indicate that TAMs contribute to drug-resistance and radio-protective effects, and clinical evidence shows that an elevated number of TAMs and their M2 profile are correlated with therapy failure and poor prognosis in cancer patients. Recently, many studies on TAM-targeted strategies have made significant progress and some pilot works have achieved encouraging results. Among these, connections between some anti-tumour drugs and their influence on TAMs have been suggested. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in TAM-targeted strategies for tumour therapy. Based on the proposed mechanisms, those strategies are grouped into four categories: (i) inhibiting macrophage recruitment; (ii) suppressing TAM survival; (iii) enhancing M1-like tumoricidal activity of TAMs; (iv) blocking M2-like tumour-promoting activity of TAMs. It is desired that further attention be drawn to this research field and more effort be made to promote TAM-targeted tumour therapy. PMID:23113570

  3. Macrophage epoxygenase determines a profibrotic transcriptome signature.

    PubMed

    Behmoaras, Jacques; Diaz, Ana Garcia; Venda, Lara; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Srivastava, Prashant; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Webster, Zoe; Moyon, Ben; Pusey, Charles D; Abraham, David J; Petretto, Enrico; Cook, Terence H; Aitman, Timothy J

    2015-05-15

    Epoxygenases belong to the cytochrome P450 family. They generate epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, which are known to have anti-inflammatory effects, but little is known about their role in macrophage function. By high-throughput sequencing of RNA in primary macrophages derived from rodents and humans, we establish the relative expression of epoxygenases in these cells. Zinc-finger nuclease-mediated targeted gene deletion of the major rat macrophage epoxygenase Cyp2j4 (ortholog of human CYP2J2) resulted in reduced epoxyeicosatrienoic acid synthesis. Cyp2j4(-/-) macrophages have relatively increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ levels and show a profibrotic transcriptome, displaying overexpression of a specific subset of genes (260 transcripts) primarily involved in extracellular matrix, with fibronectin being the most abundantly expressed transcript. Fibronectin expression is under the control of epoxygenase activity in human and rat primary macrophages. In keeping with the in vitro findings, Cyp2j4(-/-) rats show upregulation of type I collagen following unilateral ureter obstruction of the kidney, and quantitative proteomics analysis (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) showed increased renal type I collagen and fibronectin protein abundance resulting from experimentally induced crescentic glomerulonephritis in these rats. Taken together, these results identify the rat epoxygenase Cyp2j4 as a determinant of a profibrotic macrophage transcriptome that could have implications in various inflammatory conditions, depending on macrophage function. PMID:25840911

  4. Optimized Generation of Functional Neutrophils and Macrophages from Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Ex Vivo Models of X(0)-Linked, AR22(0)- and AR47(0)- Chronic Granulomatous Diseases.

    PubMed

    Brault, Julie; Goutagny, Erwan; Telugu, Narasimha; Shao, Kaifeng; Baquié, Mathurin; Satre, Véronique; Coutton, Charles; Grunwald, Didier; Brion, Jean-Paul; Barlogis, Vincent; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Plantaz, Dominique; Hescheler, Jürgen; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Sarić, Tomo; Stasia, Marie José

    2014-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited orphan disorder caused by mutations in one of the five genes encoding reduced nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide-phosphate oxidase subunits, which subsequently lead to impairment in the production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). In order to offer several cell line models of CGD and therefore support research on pathophysiology and new therapeutic approaches, we optimized protocols to differentiate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from wild-type, X(0)-, AR22(0)- and AR47(0)-CGD patient's fibroblasts into neutrophils and into macrophages. Aberrant genetic clones were discarded after chromosome karyotyping and array-comparative genomic hybridization analysis. All remaining iPSC lines showed human embryonic stem cell-like morphology, expressed all tested pluripotency markers and formed embryoid bodies that contained cells originating from all three primary germ layers. Furthermore, each CGD patient-specific iPSC line retained the gp91 (phox) , p47 (phox) , and p22 (phox) mutations found in the corresponding patient's neutrophils. The average production of CD34(+) progenitors was of 1.5×10(6) cells after 10 days of differentiation of 10×10(6) iPSCs. They were terminally differentiated into about 3×10(5) neutrophils or into 3×10(7) macrophages. Based on morphological, phenotypical, and functional criteria both phagocyte types were mature and indistinguishable from the native human neutrophils and macrophages. However, neutrophils and macrophages derived from X(0)-, AR22(0)-, and AR47(0)-CGD patient-specific iPSC lines lacked ROS production and the corresponding mutated proteins. To simplify the phagocytes' production upon request, progenitors can be cryopreserved. In conclusion, we describe a reproducible, simple, and efficient way to generate neutrophils and macrophages from iPSCs and provide a new cellular model for the AR22(0)-CGD genetic form that has not been described before. PMID:25469316

  5. Expression of functional NK1 receptors in human alveolar macrophages: superoxide anion production, cytokine release and involvement of NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Bardelli, Claudio; Gunella, Gabriele; Varsaldi, Federica; Balbo, Pietro; Del Boca, Elisa; Bernardone, Ilaria Seren; Amoruso, Angela; Brunelleschi, Sandra

    2005-06-01

    1 Substance P (SP) is deeply involved in lung pathophysiology and plays a key role in the modulation of inflammatory-immune processes. We previously demonstrated that SP activates guinea-pig alveolar macrophages (AMs) and human monocytes, but a careful examination of its effects on human AMs is still scarce. 2 This study was undertaken to establish the role of SP in human AM isolated from healthy smokers and non-smokers, by evaluating the presence of tachykinin NK(1) receptors (NK-1R) and SP's ability to induce superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production and cytokine release, as well as activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. 3 By Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence, we demonstrate that authentic NK-1R are present on human AMs, a three-fold enhanced expression being observed in healthy smokers. These NK-1R are functional, as SP and NK(1) agonists dose-dependently induce O(2)(-) production and cytokine release. In AMs from healthy smokers, SP evokes an enhanced respiratory burst and a significantly increased release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha as compared to healthy non-smokers, but has inconsistent effects on IL-10 release. The NK(1) selective antagonist CP 96,345 ((2S,3S)-cis-2-diphenylmethyl-N[(2-methoxyphenyl)-methyl]-1-azabicyclo-octan-3-amine)) competitively antagonized SP-induced effects. 4 SP activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a three-fold increased nuclear translocation being observed in AMs from healthy smokers. This effect is receptor-mediated, as it is reproduced by the NK(1) selective agonist [Sar(9)Met(O(2))(11)]SP and reverted by CP 96,345. 5 These results clearly indicate that human AMs possess functional NK-1R on their surface, which are upregulated in healthy smokers, providing new insights on the mechanisms involved in tobacco smoke toxicity. PMID:15778738

  6. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice. In addition, CD4+ T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4+ T cells from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response. PMID:24769793

  7. Effect of aflatoxins on rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, V; Costa, G B; Seminara, S

    1990-01-01

    Phagocytosis, intracellular killing of Candida albicans, and superoxide production by rat peritoneal macrophages exposed to aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, B2a, and M1 at several times and concentrations were analyzed to evaluate the intensity of a depressive effect for each mycotoxin. All aflatoxins used at very low concentrations had a depressive effect on the functions of macrophages. The biggest impairment of phagocytosis, intracellular killing, and spontaneous superoxide production was observed in macrophages exposed to aflatoxins B1 and M1. PMID:2176448

  8. Amphibian macrophage development and antiviral defenses.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage lineage cells represent the cornerstone of vertebrate physiology and immune defenses. In turn, comparative studies using non-mammalian animal models have revealed that evolutionarily distinct species have adopted diverse molecular and physiological strategies for controlling macrophage development and functions. Notably, amphibian species present a rich array of physiological and environmental adaptations, not to mention the peculiarity of metamorphosis from larval to adult stages of development, involving drastic transformation and differentiation of multiple new tissues. Thus it is not surprising that different amphibian species and their respective tadpole and adult stages have adopted unique hematopoietic strategies. Accordingly and in order to establish a more comprehensive view of these processes, here we review the hematopoietic and monopoietic strategies observed across amphibians, describe the present understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving amphibian, an in particular Xenopus laevis macrophage development and functional polarization, and discuss the roles of macrophage-lineage cells during ranavirus infections. PMID:26705159

  9. Heat Shock Protein gp96 Is a Master Chaperone for Toll-like Receptors and Is Important in the Innate Function of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Bei; Dai, Jie; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Zammit, David J.; Lefrançois, Leo; Li, Zihai

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone for cell-surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Little is known about its roles in chaperoning other TLRs or in the biology of macrophage in vivo. We generated a macrophage-specific gp96-deficient mouse. Despite normal development and activation by interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-1β, the mutant macrophages failed to respond to ligands of both cell-surface and intracellular TLRs including TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9. Furthermore, we found that TLR4 and TLR9 preferentially interacted with a super-glycosylated gp96 species. The categorical loss of TLRs in gp96-deficient macrophages operationally created a conditional and cell-specific TLR null mouse. These mice were resistant to endotoxin shock but were highly susceptible to Listeria monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate that gp96 is the master chaperone for TLRs and that macrophages, but not other myeloid cells, are the dominant source of proinflammatory cytokines during endotoxemia and Listeria infections. PMID:17275357

  10. Manipulating the NF-κB pathway in macrophages using mannosylated, siRNA-delivering nanoparticles can induce immunostimulatory and tumor cytotoxic functions.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ryan A; Barham, Whitney; Sharman, Kavya; Tikhomirov, Oleg; Giorgio, Todd D; Yull, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are critically important in the context of solid tumor progression. Counterintuitively, these host immune cells can often support tumor cells along the path from primary tumor to metastatic colonization and growth. Thus, the ability to transform protumor TAMs into antitumor, immune-reactive macrophages would have significant therapeutic potential. However, in order to achieve these effects, two major hurdles would need to be overcome: development of a methodology to specifically target macrophages and increased knowledge of the optimal targets for cell-signaling modulation. This study addresses both of these obstacles and furthers the development of a therapeutic agent based on this strategy. Using ex vivo macrophages in culture, the efficacy of mannosylated nanoparticles to deliver small interfering RNA specifically to TAMs and modify signaling pathways is characterized. Then, selective small interfering RNA delivery is tested for the ability to inhibit gene targets within the canonical or alternative nuclear factor-kappaB pathways and result in antitumor phenotypes. Results confirm that the mannosylated nanoparticle approach can be used to modulate signaling within macrophages. We also identify appropriate gene targets in critical regulatory pathways. These findings represent an important advance toward the development of a novel cancer therapy that would minimize side effects because of the targeted nature of the intervention and that has rapid translational potential. PMID:27274241

  11. Manipulating the NF-κB pathway in macrophages using mannosylated, siRNA-delivering nanoparticles can induce immunostimulatory and tumor cytotoxic functions

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ryan A; Barham, Whitney; Sharman, Kavya; Tikhomirov, Oleg; Giorgio, Todd D; Yull, Fiona E

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are critically important in the context of solid tumor progression. Counterintuitively, these host immune cells can often support tumor cells along the path from primary tumor to metastatic colonization and growth. Thus, the ability to transform protumor TAMs into antitumor, immune-reactive macrophages would have significant therapeutic potential. However, in order to achieve these effects, two major hurdles would need to be overcome: development of a methodology to specifically target macrophages and increased knowledge of the optimal targets for cell-signaling modulation. This study addresses both of these obstacles and furthers the development of a therapeutic agent based on this strategy. Using ex vivo macrophages in culture, the efficacy of mannosylated nanoparticles to deliver small interfering RNA specifically to TAMs and modify signaling pathways is characterized. Then, selective small interfering RNA delivery is tested for the ability to inhibit gene targets within the canonical or alternative nuclear factor-kappaB pathways and result in antitumor phenotypes. Results confirm that the mannosylated nanoparticle approach can be used to modulate signaling within macrophages. We also identify appropriate gene targets in critical regulatory pathways. These findings represent an important advance toward the development of a novel cancer therapy that would minimize side effects because of the targeted nature of the intervention and that has rapid translational potential. PMID:27274241

  12. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  13. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  14. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  15. Flagellin or lipopolysaccharide treatment modified macrophage populations after colorectal radiation of rats.

    PubMed

    Lacavé-Lapalun, Jean-Victor; Benderitter, Marc; Linard, Christine

    2013-07-01

    Radiation-induced acute intestinal toxicity remains a major limitation to the delivery of tumoricidal doses of colorectal irradiation. Recent reports indicate that Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists TLR4 and TLR5 protect against toxicity due to intestinal irradiation. The phenotype (M1 or M2) of macrophages expressing TLRs may play a role in tissue repair. The aim was to investigate whether administration of TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or TLR5 agonist flagellin after irradiation modified the recruitment and phenotype of colonic macrophages and improved tissue damage. Rats were exposed to single 20- or 27-Gy doses of colorectal irradiation. TLR4 agonist LPS or TLR5 agonist flagellin (at 50 or 200 µg/rat) was administered i.p. 3 days after irradiation. Flow cytometric analysis, immunostaining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis were used to assess the M1/M2 phenotype and crypt cell proliferation 7 days after irradiation. Irradiation (20 and 27 Gy) increased TLR4⁺ and TLR5⁺ macrophage frequency in the mucosa. LPS or flagellin administration maintained this elevated frequency after the 27-Gy irradiation. LPS and flagellin drove macrophages toward the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype by increasing Arg1 and CD163 expression and microenvironmental effector molecules (C-C motif chemokine 22, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-10). Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining, Ki67 expression, and antimicrobial factor Reg3γ showed that the M2 shift correlated with epithelial regeneration. In conclusion, administration of either LPS or flagellin after colorectal irradiation may provide effective protection against epithelial remodeling. This tissue repair was associated with an M2 macrophage shift. Using TLR agonists to moderately activate innate immunity should be considered as a strategy for protecting healthy tissue from irradiation. PMID:23596059

  16. The Many Alternative Faces of Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens. They also initiate acquired immunity by processing and presenting antigens and provide the downstream effector functions. Analysis of large gene expression datasets from multiple cells and tissues reveals sets of genes that are co-regulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. In macrophages, the gene clusters include lineage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and genes required for endocytosis and lysosome function. Macrophages enter tissues and alter their function to deal with a wide range of challenges related to development and organogenesis, tissue injury, malignancy, sterile, or pathogenic inflammatory stimuli. These stimuli alter the gene expression to produce “activated macrophages” that are better equipped to eliminate the cause of their influx and to restore homeostasis. Activation or polarization states of macrophages have been classified as “classical” and “alternative” or M1 and M2. These proposed states of cells are not supported by large-scale transcriptomic data, including macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets, where the supposed markers do not correlate with other. Individual macrophage cells differ markedly from each other, and change their functions in response to doses and combinations of agonists and time. The most studied macrophage activation response is the transcriptional cascade initiated by the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. This response is reviewed herein. The network topology is conserved across species, but genes within the transcriptional network evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. There is also considerable divergence in the sets of target genes between mouse strains, between individuals, and in other species such as pigs. The deluge of complex information related to macrophage activation can be accessed with new analytical tools and new databases

  17. MyD88 mediates in vivo effector functions of alveolar macrophages in acute lung inflammatory responses to carbon nanotube exposure.

    PubMed

    Frank, Evan A; Birch, M Eileen; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are rapidly emerging as high-priority occupational toxicants. CNT powders contain fibrous particles that aerosolize readily in places of manufacture and handling, posing an inhalation risk for workers. Studies using animal models indicate that lung exposure to CNTs causes prolonged inflammatory responses and diffuse alveolar injury. The mechanisms governing CNT-induced lung inflammation are not fully understood but have been suggested to involve alveolar macrophages (AMs). In the current study, we sought to systematically assess the effector role of AMs in vivo in the induction of lung inflammatory responses to CNT exposures and investigate their cell type-specific mechanisms. Multi-wall CNTs characterized for various physicochemical attributes were used as the CNT type. Using an AM-specific depletion and repopulation approach in a mouse model, we unambiguously demonstrated that AMs are major effector cells necessary for the in vivo elaboration of CNT-induced lung inflammation. We further investigated in vitro AM responses and identified molecular targets which proved critical to pro-inflammatory responses in this model, namely MyD88 as well as MAPKs and Ca(2+)/CamKII. We further demonstrated that MyD88 inhibition in donor AMs abrogated their capacity to reconstitute CNT-induced inflammation when adoptively transferred into AM-depleted mice. Taken together, this is the first in vivo demonstration that AMs act as critical effector cell types in CNT-induced lung inflammation and that MyD88 is required for this in vivo effector function. AMs and their cell type-specific mechanisms may therefore represent potential targets for future therapeutic intervention of CNT-related lung injury. PMID:26272622

  18. The Role of Decidual Macrophages During Normal and Pathological Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ning, Fen; Liu, Huishu; Lash, Gendie E

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages perform many specific functions including host defense, homeostasis, angiogenesis, and tissue development. Macrophages are the second most abundant leukocyte population in the non-pregnant endometrium and pregnant decidua and likely play a central role in the establishment and maintenance of normal pregnancy. Importantly, aberrantly activated uterine macrophages can affect trophoblast function and placental development, which may result in various adverse pregnancy outcomes ranging from pre-eclampsia to fetal growth restriction or demise. Only by fully understanding the roles of macrophage in pregnancy will we be able to develop interventions for the treatment of these various pregnancy complications. This review discusses the general origin and classification of monocytes and macrophages and focuses on the phenotype and functional roles of decidual macrophage at the maternal-fetal interface in normal pregnancy, as well as discussing the potential contribution of the abnormal state of these cells to various aspects of pregnancy pathologies. PMID:26750089

  19. Developmental origin of lung macrophage diversity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Serena Y S; Krasnow, Mark A

    2016-04-15

    Macrophages are specialized phagocytic cells, present in all tissues, which engulf and digest pathogens, infected and dying cells, and debris, and can recruit and regulate other immune cells and the inflammatory response and aid in tissue repair. Macrophage subpopulations play distinct roles in these processes and in disease, and are typically recognized by differences in marker expression, immune function, or tissue of residency. Although macrophage subpopulations in the brain have been found to have distinct developmental origins, the extent to which development contributes to macrophage diversity between tissues and within tissues is not well understood. Here, we investigate the development and maintenance of mouse lung macrophages by marker expression patterns, genetic lineage tracing and parabiosis. We show that macrophages populate the lung in three developmental waves, each giving rise to a distinct lineage. These lineages express different markers, reside in different locations, renew in different ways, and show little or no interconversion. Thus, development contributes significantly to lung macrophage diversity and targets each lineage to a different anatomical domain. PMID:26952982

  20. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Timothy A; Strand, Nicholas S; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S; Moon, Randall T

    2014-07-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC(+), mpo(+)) and macrophages (mpeg1(+)) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/β-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  1. [The biological activity of macrophages in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in immune response as phagocytes, antigen presenting cells and as effector cells of delayed-type hypersensitivity. Moreover, the activity of macrophages is associated with modulation of many biological processes during the whole life and depends on the actual macrophage phenotype induced under the influence of various microenvironmental stimuli. In pregnancy, placental macrophages induce the development of maternal tolerance to fetal antigens, while fetal macrophages are responsible for proper formation of tissues and organs. Residual macrophages play a very important role in tissue homeostasis, apoptotic cell clearance to prevent autoimmunization and first defense in infections. The inflammatory response of macrophages may be modulated by pathogens. Their suppressive activity is observed in immunologically privileged organs such as testes. In pathologies, macrophages are responsible for tissue damage in a case of nonspecific activation followed by overproduction of proinflammatory factors. Suppression of a specific immune response against tumors is mainly the effect of tumor associated macrophage (TAM) action. On the other hand, presentation of allergens or self-antigens by macrophages and their nonspecific activation by necrotic adipocytes leads to the induction of a chronic inflammatory response and impairment of immunity. Therefore, modulation of macrophage functions may be the key for improvement of therapy of cancer and allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. PMID:22922151

  2. Modulating macrophage response to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Toral

    Macrophages recruited to the site of biomaterial implantation are the primary mediators of the chronic foreign body response to implanted materials. Since foreign body response limits performance and functional life of numerous implanted biomaterials/medical devices, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate this response. In this work we have explored two independent approaches to modulate the macrophage inflammatory response to biomaterials. The first approach targets surface integrins, cell surface receptors that mediate cell adhesion to biomaterials through adhesive proteins spontaneously adsorbed on biomaterial surfaces. The second approach involves surface modification of biomaterials using nanotopographic features since nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. More specifically, Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanorod surface was investigated for its role in modulating macrophage adhesion and survival in vitro and foreign body response in vivo. For the first approach, we have investigated the role of integrin Mac-1 and RGD-binding integrins in the in-vivo osteolysis response and macrophage inflammatory processes of phagocytosis as well as inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to particulate biomaterials. We have also investigated the in vivo foreign body response (FBR) to subcutaneously implanted biomaterials by evaluating the thickness of fibrous capsule formed around the implants after 2 weeks of implantation. The role of Mac-1 integrin was isolated using a Mac-1 KO mouse and comparing it to a WT control. The role of RGD binding integrins in FBR was investigated by coating the implanted biomaterial with ELVAX(TM) polymer loaded with Echistatin which contains the RGD sequence. For the in-vivo osteolysis study and to study the in-vitro macrophage response to particulate biomaterials, we used the RGD peptide encapsulated in ELVAX

  3. Embryonic and adult-derived resident cardiac macrophages are maintained through distinct mechanisms at steady state and during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J; Beaudin, Anna E; Sojka, Dorothy K; Carrero, Javier A; Calderon, Boris; Brija, Thaddeus; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Ivanov, Stoyan; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Schilling, Joel D; Schwendener, Reto; Sergin, Ismail; Razani, Babak; Forsberg, E Camilla; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Unanue, Emil R; Colonna, Marco; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Mann, Douglas L

    2014-01-16

    Cardiac macrophages are crucial for tissue repair after cardiac injury but are not well characterized. Here we identify four populations of cardiac macrophages. At steady state, resident macrophages were primarily maintained through local proliferation. However, after macrophage depletion or during cardiac inflammation, Ly6c(hi) monocytes contributed to all four macrophage populations, whereas resident macrophages also expanded numerically through proliferation. Genetic fate mapping revealed that yolk-sac and fetal monocyte progenitors gave rise to the majority of cardiac macrophages, and the heart was among a minority of organs in which substantial numbers of yolk-sac macrophages persisted in adulthood. CCR2 expression and dependence distinguished cardiac macrophages of adult monocyte versus embryonic origin. Transcriptional and functional data revealed that monocyte-derived macrophages coordinate cardiac inflammation, while playing redundant but lesser roles in antigen sampling and efferocytosis. These data highlight the presence of multiple cardiac macrophage subsets, with different functions, origins, and strategies to regulate compartment size. PMID:24439267

  4. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  5. Macrophage heterogeneity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Udalova, Irina A; Mantovani, Alberto; Feldmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages are very important in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The increase in the number of sublining macrophages in the synovium is an early hallmark of active rheumatic disease, and high numbers of macrophages are a prominent feature of inflammatory lesions. The degree of synovial macrophage infiltration correlates with the degree of joint erosion, and depletion of these macrophages from inflamed tissue has a profound therapeutic benefit. Research has now uncovered an unexpectedly high level of heterogeneity in macrophage origin and function, and has emphasized the role of environmental factors in their functional specialization. Although the heterogeneous populations of macrophages in RA have not been fully characterized, preliminary results in mouse models of arthritis have contributed to our understanding of the phenotype and ontogeny of synovial macrophages, and to deciphering the properties of monocyte-derived infiltrating and tissue-resident macrophages. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive polarization of macrophages towards proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes could lead to identification of signalling pathways that inform future therapeutic strategies. PMID:27383913

  6. Ostertagia ostertagi macrophage migration inhibition factor is present at all developmental stages and may cross-regulate host functions through host receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) of Ostertagia ostertagi, a parasitic nematode infecting the bovine abomasum, is characterized in the present study. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that there appears to be at least 3 OoMIFs encoded by distinct transcripts, including OoMIF1a, OoMIF1b, and...

  7. Generation and Characterization of Mouse Regulatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Hill, Marcelo; Cuturi, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, cell therapy has become a promising approach to therapeutically manipulate immune responses in autoimmunity, cancer, and transplantation. Several types of lymphoid and myeloid cells origin have been generated in vitro and tested in animal models. Their efficacy to decrease pharmacological treatment has successfully been established. Macrophages play an important role in physiological and pathological processes. They represent an interesting cell population due to their high plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we describe a protocol to differentiate murine regulatory macrophages in vitro from bone marrow precursors. We also describe several methods to assess macrophage classical functions, as their bacterial killing capacity and antigen endocytosis and degradation. Importantly, regulatory macrophages also display suppressive characteristics, which are addressed by the study of their hypostimulatory T lymphocyte capacity and polyclonal T lymphocyte activation suppression. PMID:26530796

  8. The functional dissection of the plasma corona of SiO₂-NPs spots histidine rich glycoprotein as a major player able to hamper nanoparticle capture by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fedeli, Chiara; Segat, Daniela; Tavano, Regina; Bubacco, Luigi; De Franceschi, Giorgia; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Lubian, Elisa; Selvestrel, Francesco; Mancin, Fabrizio; Papini, Emanuele

    2015-11-14

    A coat of strongly-bound host proteins, or hard corona, may influence the biological and pharmacological features of nanotheranostics by altering their cell-interaction selectivity and macrophage clearance. With the goal of identifying specific corona-effectors, we investigated how the capture of amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NPs; Ø = 26 nm; zeta potential = -18.3 mV) by human lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages is modulated by the prominent proteins of their plasma corona. LC MS/MS analysis, western blotting and quantitative SDS-PAGE densitometry show that Histidine Rich Glycoprotein (HRG) is the most abundant component of the SiO2-NP hard corona in excess plasma from humans (HP) and mice (MP), together with minor amounts of the homologous Kininogen-1 (Kin-1), while it is remarkably absent in their Foetal Calf Serum (FCS)-derived corona. HRG binds with high affinity to SiO2-NPs (HRG Kd ∼2 nM) and competes with other plasma proteins for the NP surface, so forming a stable and quite homogeneous corona inhibiting nanoparticles binding to the macrophage membrane and their subsequent uptake. Conversely, in the case of lymphocytes and monocytes not only HRG but also several common plasma proteins can interchange in this inhibitory activity. The depletion of HRG and Kin-1 from HP or their plasma exhaustion by increasing NP concentration (>40 μg ml(-1) in 10% HP) lead to a heterogeneous hard corona, mostly formed by fibrinogen (Fibr), HDLs, LDLs, IgGs, Kallikrein and several minor components, allowing nanoparticle binding to macrophages. Consistently, the FCS-derived SiO2-NP hard corona, mainly formed by hemoglobin, α2 macroglobulin and HDLs but lacking HRG, permits nanoparticle uptake by macrophages. Moreover, purified HRG competes with FCS proteins for the NP surface, inhibiting their recruitment in the corona and blocking NP macrophage capture. HRG, the main component of the plasma-derived SiO2-NPs' hard corona, has antiopsonin characteristics and

  9. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Bygd, Hannah C.; Forsmark, Kiva D.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

    2014-11-25

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successful implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials.

  10. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bygd, Hannah C.; Forsmark, Kiva D.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

    2014-11-25

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successfulmore » implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials.« less

  11. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bygd, Hannah C; Forsmark, Kiva D; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successful implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials. PMID:26932379

  12. MicroRNA regulation of macrophages in human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuanyuan; Schober, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in the innate immune system and contribute to a broad spectrum of pathologies, like in the defence against infectious agents, in inflammation resolution, and wound repair. In the past several years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated to play important roles in immune diseases by regulating macrophage functions. In this review, we will summarize the role of miRNAs in the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages, in the classical and alternative activation of macrophages, and in the regulation of phagocytosis and apoptosis. Notably, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to the cellular cholesterol metabolism, which is of key importance for the inflammatory activation and phagocytic activity of macrophages. miRNAs functionally link various mechanisms involved in macrophage activation and contribute to initiation and resolution of inflammation. miRNAs represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets in different conditions, such as infectious diseases, atherosclerosis, and cancer. PMID:27137182

  13. In vitro effects of nanosized diamond particles on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shkurupy, V A; Arkhipov, S A; Neshchadim, D V; Akhramenko, E S; Troitskii, A V

    2015-02-01

    The effects of synthetic diamond nanoparticles (4-6 nm) on mouse macrophage biotropism and biocompatibility and the modulation of the macrophage functions (expression of IL-1α, TNF-α, GM-CSF, bFGF, and TGF-β) by nanoparticles in different concentrations were studied in vitro during exposure of different duration. Macrophage endocytosis of nanodiamonds increased with increasing the concentration of nanoparticles in culture and incubation time. Nanodiamonds exhibited high biotropism and biocompatibility towards macrophages; in doses of 10-20 μg/ml, they induced expression of GM-CSF and TGF-β, inhibited expression of bFGF, and did not stimulate IL-1α and TNF-α. These data indicate that nanodiamond capture by macrophages in the studied experimental model led to modulation of the functional status of macrophages that determine their capacity to stimulate reparative processes without increasing proinflammatory and profibrogenic status. PMID:25705036

  14. Macrophage Autophagy in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Grassia, Gianluca; Platt, Andrew M.; Carnuccio, Rosa; Ialenti, Armando; Maffia, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play crucial roles in atherosclerotic immune responses. Recent investigation into macrophage autophagy (AP) in atherosclerosis has demonstrated a novel pathway through which these cells contribute to vascular inflammation. AP is a cellular catabolic process involving the delivery of cytoplasmic contents to the lysosomal machinery for ultimate degradation and recycling. Basal levels of macrophage AP play an essential role in atheroprotection during early atherosclerosis. However, AP becomes dysfunctional in the more advanced stages of the pathology and its deficiency promotes vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and plaque necrosis. In this paper, we will discuss the role of macrophages and AP in atherosclerosis and the emerging evidence demonstrating the contribution of macrophage AP to vascular pathology. Finally, we will discuss how AP could be targeted for therapeutic utility. PMID:23401644

  15. Schistosome Soluble Egg Antigen Decreases Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Effector Function With Concomitant Arrest of Macrophage Phago-Lysosome Maturation.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Andrew R; Mace, Emily M; Lesteberg, Kelsey; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Mandalakas, Anna M; Graviss, Edward A; Orange, Jordan S; Makedonas, George

    2016-08-01

    Helminth-infected individuals possess a higher risk of developing tuberculosis, but the precise immunologic mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis control remains unclear. We hypothesized that a perturbation of the M. tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T-cell response weakens the ability of macrophages to contain M. tuberculosis We exposed peripheral blood mononuclear cells from M. tuberculosis-infected humans to schistosome soluble egg antigen (SEA) and then profiled M. tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T cells via multiparametric flow cytometry. SEA decreased the frequency of cells producing interferon γ (6.79% vs 3.20%; P = .017) and tumor necrosis factor α (6.98% vs 2.96%; P = .012), with a concomitant increase in the median fluorescence intensity of interleukin 4 (IL-4; P < .05) and interleukin 10 (IL-10; 1440 vs 1273; P < .05). Macrophages polarized with SEA-exposed, autologous CD4(+) T-cell supernatant had a 2.19-fold decreased colocalization of lysosomes and M. tuberculosis (P < .05). When polarized with IL-4 or IL-10, macrophages had increased expression of CD206 (P < .0001), 1.5-fold and 1.9 fold increased intracellular numbers of M. tuberculosis per macrophage (P < .0005), and 1.4-fold and 1.7-fold decreased colocalization between M. tuberculosis and lysosomes (P < .001). This clarifies a relationship in which helminth-induced CD4(+) T cells disrupt M. tuberculosis control by macrophages, thereby providing a mechanism for the observation that helminth infection advances the progression of tuberculosis among patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27389351

  16. Investigating the function of a novel protein from Anoectochilus formosanus which induced macrophage differentiation through TLR4-mediated NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Lee, Wan-Tzu; Hung, Chih-Liang; Yang, Ching; Sheu, Fuu

    2012-09-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus is a therapeutic orchid appreciated as a traditional Chinese medicine in Asia. The extracts of A. formosanus have been reported to possess hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor activates. A novel protein was isolated from A. formosanus, and its immunomodulatory effect on murine peritoneal macrophage was investigated. Macrophages obtained from ascites of thioglycollate-induced BALB/c were co-cultured with IPAF (0-20 μg/ml) for 24 h and then harvested for flow cytometry analysis. The cytokine/chemokine production was measured by real time PCR and ELISA. The interaction between IPAF and toll like receptors (TLRs) was investigated by TLR gene knockout (KO) mice and fluorescence labeled IPAF. The activation of NF-κB was assessed by EMSA. IPAF stimulated the TNF-α and IL-1β production, upregulated the CD86 and MHC II expression, and enhanced the phagocytic activity of macrophages. IPAF induced gene expression of IL-12 and Th1-assosiated cytokines/chemokines. The stimulating effect of IPAF was impaired, and the IPAF-macrophage interaction was reduced in TLR4(-/-) C57BL/10ScNJ mice. In addition, IPAF stimulated expressions of TLR signal-related genes and the activation of NF-κB. IPAF could induce classical activated macrophage differentiation via TLR4-dependent NF-κB activation and had potential of IPAF to modulate the Th1 response. These findings provided valuable information regarding the immune modulatory mechanism of A. formosanus, and indicated the possibility of IPAF as a potential peptide drug. PMID:22749731

  17. ERK Signaling Is Essential for Macrophage Development.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Edward T; Shukla, Supriya; Nagy, Nancy; Boom, W Henry; Beck, Rose C; Zhou, Lan; Landreth, Gary E; Harding, Clifford V

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages depend on colony stimulating factor 1 (also known as M-CSF) for their growth and differentiation, but the requirements for intracellular signals that lead to macrophage differentiation and function remain unclear. M-CSF is known to activate ERK1 and ERK2, but the importance of this signaling pathway in macrophage development is unknown. In these studies, we characterized a novel model of Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) mice in which the ERK2 isoform is deleted from macrophages in the background of global ERK1 deficiency. Cultures of M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow precursors from these mice yielded reduced numbers of macrophages. Whereas macrophages developing from M-CSF-stimulated bone marrow of Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) mice showed essentially complete loss of ERK2 expression, the reduced number of macrophages that develop from Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) bone marrow show retention of ERK2 expression, indicating selective outgrowth of a small proportion of precursors in which Cre-mediated deletion failed to occur. The bone marrow of Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) mice was enriched for CD11b+ myeloid cells, CD11b(hi) Gr-1(hi) neutrophils, Lin- c-Kit+ Sca-1+ hematopoietic stem cells, and Lin- c-Kit+ CD34+ CD16/32+ granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Culture of bone marrow Lin- cells under myeloid-stimulating conditions yielded reduced numbers of monocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that the defect in production of macrophages is not due to a reduced number of progenitors, but rather due to reduced ability of progenitors to proliferate and produce macrophages in response to M-CSF-triggered ERK signaling. Macrophages from Erk1(-/-) Erk2(flox/flox) Lyz2(Cre/Cre) bone marrow showed reduced induction of M-CSF-regulated genes that depend on the ERK pathway for their expression. These data demonstrate that ERK1/ERK2 play a critical role in driving M-CSF-dependent proliferation of bone marrow progenitors for production of

  18. Antitumor effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Koga, Y; Naraparaju, V R; Yamamoto, N

    1999-01-01

    Cancerous cells secrete alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase) into the blood stream, resulting in deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (known as Gc protein), which is a precursor for macrophage activating factor (MAF). Incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF). Administration of GcMAF to cancer-bearing hosts can bypass the inactivated MAF precursor and act directly on macrophages for efficient activation. Therapeutic effects of GcMAF on Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice were assessed by survival time and serum NaGalase activity, because serum NaGalase activity was proportional to tumor burden. A single administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) to eight mice on the same day after transplantation of the tumor (5 x 10(5) cells) showed a mean survival time of 21 +/- 3 days for seven mice, with one mouse surviving more than 60 days, whereas tumor-bearing controls had a mean survival time of 13 +/- 2 days. Six of the eight mice that received two GcMAF administrations, at Day 0 and Day 4 after transplantation, survived up to 31 +/- 4 days whereas, the remaining two mice survived for more than 60 days. Further, six of the eight mice that received three GcMAF administrations with 4-day intervals showed an extended survival of at least 60 days, and serum NaGalase levels were as low as those of control mice throughout the survival period. The cure with subthreshold GcMAF-treatments (administered once or twice) of tumor-bearing mice appeared to be a consequence of sustained macrophage activation by inflammation resulting from the macrophage-mediated tumoricidal process. Therefore, a protracted macrophage activation induced by a few administrations of minute amounts of GcMAF eradicated the murine ascites tumor. PMID:9893164

  19. Mechanism by which orally administered beta-1,3-glucans enhance the tumoricidal activity of antitumor monoclonal antibodies in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Yan, Jun; Baran, Jarek T; Allendorf, Daniel J; Hansen, Richard D; Ostroff, Gary R; Xing, Pei Xiang; Cheung, Nai-Kong V; Ross, Gordon D

    2004-07-15

    Antitumor mAb bind to tumors and activate complement, coating tumors with iC3b. Intravenously administered yeast beta-1,3;1,6-glucan functions as an adjuvant for antitumor mAb by priming the inactivated C3b (iC3b) receptors (CR3; CD11b/CD18) of circulating granulocytes, enabling CR3 to trigger cytotoxicity of iC3b-coated tumors. Recent data indicated that barley beta-1,3;1,4-glucan given orally similarly potentiated the activity of antitumor mAb, leading to enhanced tumor regression and survival. This investigation showed that orally administered yeast beta-1,3;1,6-glucan functioned similarly to barley beta-1,3;1,4-glucan with antitumor mAb. With both oral beta-1,3-glucans, a requirement for iC3b on tumors and CR3 on granulocytes was confirmed by demonstrating therapeutic failures in mice deficient in C3 or CR3. Barley and yeast beta-1,3-glucan were labeled with fluorescein to track their oral uptake and processing in vivo. Orally administered beta-1,3-glucans were taken up by macrophages that transported them to spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow. Within the bone marrow, the macrophages degraded the large beta-1,3-glucans into smaller soluble beta-1,3-glucan fragments that were taken up by the CR3 of marginated granulocytes. These granulocytes with CR3-bound beta-1,3-glucan-fluorescein were shown to kill iC3b-opsonized tumor cells following their recruitment to a site of complement activation resembling a tumor coated with mAb. PMID:15240666

  20. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  1. Ursolic acid enhances macrophage autophagy and attenuates atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuilong; Iwanowycz, Stephen; Saaoud, Fatma; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Yuzhen; Sergin, Ismail; Razani, Babak; Fan, Daping

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage autophagy has been shown to be protective against atherosclerosis. We previously discovered that ursolic acid (UA) promoted cancer cell autophagy. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether UA enhances macrophage autophagy in the context of atherogenesis. Cell culture study showed that UA enhanced autophagy of macrophages by increasing the expression of Atg5 and Atg16l1, which led to altered macrophage function. UA reduced pro-interleukin (IL)-1β protein levels and mature IL-1β secretion in macrophages in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), without reducing IL-1β mRNA expression. Confocal microscopy showed that in LPS-treated macrophages, UA increased LC3 protein levels and LC3 appeared to colocalize with IL-1β. In cholesterol-loaded macrophages, UA increased cholesterol efflux to apoAI, although it did not alter mRNA or protein levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Electron microscopy showed that UA induced lipophagy in acetylated LDL-loaded macrophages, which may result in increased cholesterol ester hydrolysis in autophagolysosomes and presentation of free cholesterol to the cell membrane. In LDLR(-/-) mice fed a Western diet to induce atherogenesis, UA treatment significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion size, accompanied by increased macrophage autophagy. In conclusion, the data suggest that UA promotes macrophage autophagy and, thereby, suppresses IL-1β secretion, promotes cholesterol efflux, and attenuates atherosclerosis in mice. PMID:27063951

  2. Macrophages in Tumor Microenvironments and the Progression of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ning-Bo; Lü, Mu-Han; Fan, Ya-Han; Cao, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed innate immune cells that play indispensable roles in the innate and adaptive immune response to pathogens and in-tissue homeostasis. Macrophages can be activated by a variety of stimuli and polarized to functionally different phenotypes. Two distinct subsets of macrophages have been proposed, including classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. M1 macrophages express a series of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules, such as IL-12, IL-23, TNF-α, iNOS and MHCI/II. In contrast, M2 macrophages express a wide array of anti-inflammatory molecules, such as IL-10, TGF-β, and arginase1. In most tumors, the infiltrated macrophages are considered to be of the M2 phenotype, which provides an immunosuppressive microenvironment for tumor growth. Furthermore, tumor-associated macrophages secrete many cytokines, chemokines, and proteases, which promote tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and immunosuppression. Recently, it was also found that tumor-associated macrophages interact with cancer stem cells. This interaction leads to tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. So mediating macrophage to resist tumors is considered to be potential therapy. PMID:22778768

  3. TIGIT negatively regulates inflammation by altering macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Lu, Pu-Han; Liu, Lei; Fang, Ze-Min; Duan, Wu; Liu, Zhe-Long; Wang, Cong-Yi; Zhou, Ping; Yu, Xue-Feng; He, Wen-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages function as an essential component of innate immune system, contributing to both the initiation and appropriate resolution of inflammation. The exposure of macrophages to the microbial products, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can strongly shift the balance between tissue homeostasis and inflammation in favor of causing systemic damage, in which macrophage M1 polarization play important roles. Strategies aiming at restoring the balance of macrophage polarization remain to be further explored. Herein, we have demonstrated that poliovirus receptor (PVR), the receptor of TIGIT, was dramatically upregulated on the surface of mouse peritoneal macrophages when exposed to LPS. TIGIT-Fc fusion protein not only inhibited the macrophage activation, but also skewed M1/M2 balance toward an anti-inflammatory profile, especially enhanced the secretion of IL-10. The activation of TIGIT/PVR pathway in macrophages correlated with increased nuclear translocation of c-Maf, which promotes IL-10 transcription. Treatment with fibroblasts stably secreting TIGIT-Fc fusion protein significantly reversed the lethal and sublethal endotoxic shock, which facilitated peritoneal macrophages to switch towards anti-inflammatory M2 cytokine profiles. These findings highlight a novel role of the TIGIT/PVR pathway in macrophage M2 polarization and suggest that TIGIT may have the potential to optimize the treatment of macrophage-involved inflammatory diseases. PMID:26307002

  4. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  5. The functional dissection of the plasma corona of SiO2-NPs spots histidine rich glycoprotein as a major player able to hamper nanoparticle capture by macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedeli, Chiara; Segat, Daniela; Tavano, Regina; Bubacco, Luigi; de Franceschi, Giorgia; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Lubian, Elisa; Selvestrel, Francesco; Mancin, Fabrizio; Papini, Emanuele

    2015-10-01

    A coat of strongly-bound host proteins, or hard corona, may influence the biological and pharmacological features of nanotheranostics by altering their cell-interaction selectivity and macrophage clearance. With the goal of identifying specific corona-effectors, we investigated how the capture of amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NPs; Ø = 26 nm; zeta potential = -18.3 mV) by human lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages is modulated by the prominent proteins of their plasma corona. LC MS/MS analysis, western blotting and quantitative SDS-PAGE densitometry show that Histidine Rich Glycoprotein (HRG) is the most abundant component of the SiO2-NP hard corona in excess plasma from humans (HP) and mice (MP), together with minor amounts of the homologous Kininogen-1 (Kin-1), while it is remarkably absent in their Foetal Calf Serum (FCS)-derived corona. HRG binds with high affinity to SiO2-NPs (HRG Kd ~2 nM) and competes with other plasma proteins for the NP surface, so forming a stable and quite homogeneous corona inhibiting nanoparticles binding to the macrophage membrane and their subsequent uptake. Conversely, in the case of lymphocytes and monocytes not only HRG but also several common plasma proteins can interchange in this inhibitory activity. The depletion of HRG and Kin-1 from HP or their plasma exhaustion by increasing NP concentration (>40 μg ml-1 in 10% HP) lead to a heterogeneous hard corona, mostly formed by fibrinogen (Fibr), HDLs, LDLs, IgGs, Kallikrein and several minor components, allowing nanoparticle binding to macrophages. Consistently, the FCS-derived SiO2-NP hard corona, mainly formed by hemoglobin, α2 macroglobulin and HDLs but lacking HRG, permits nanoparticle uptake by macrophages. Moreover, purified HRG competes with FCS proteins for the NP surface, inhibiting their recruitment in the corona and blocking NP macrophage capture. HRG, the main component of the plasma-derived SiO2-NPs' hard corona, has antiopsonin characteristics and uniquely

  6. Myelopotentiating effect of curcumin in tumor-bearing host: Role of bone marrow resident macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva; Bharti, Alok Chandra; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-08-15

    The present investigation was undertaken to study if curcumin, which is recognized for its potential as an antineoplastic and immunopotentiating agent, can also influence the process of myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host. Administration of curcumin to tumor-bearing host augmented count of bone marrow cell (BMC) accompanied by an up-regulated BMC survival and a declined induction of apoptosis. Curcumin administration modulated expression of cell survival regulatory molecules: Bcl2, p53, caspase-activated DNase (CAD) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) along with enhanced expression of genes of receptors for M-CSF and GM-CSF in BMC. The BMC harvested from curcumin-administered hosts showed an up-regulated colony forming ability with predominant differentiation into bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), responsive for activation to tumoricidal state. The number of F4/80 positive bone marrow resident macrophages (BMM), showing an augmented expression of M-CSF, was also augmented in the bone marrow of curcumin-administered host. In vitro reconstitution experiments indicated that only BMM of curcumin-administered hosts, but not in vitro curcumin-exposed BMM, augmented BMC survival. It suggests that curcumin-dependent modulation of BMM is of indirect nature. Such prosurvival action of curcumin is associated with altered T{sub H1}/T{sub H2} cytokine balance in serum. Augmented level of serum-borne IFN-γ was found to mediate modulation of BMM to produce enhanced amount of monokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α), which are suggested to augment the BMC survival. Taken together the present investigation indicates that curcumin can potentiate myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host, which may have implications in its therapeutic utility. Highlights: ► Curcumin augments myelopoiesis in tumor-bearing host. ► Bone marrow resident macrophages mediate curcumin-dependent augmented myelopoiesis. ► Serum borne cytokine are implicated in modulation of bone marrow resident

  7. IFN-beta-induced reduction of superoxide anion generation by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Boraschi, D; Ghezzi, P; Salmona, M; Tagliabue, A

    1982-01-01

    Resident mouse peritoneal macrophages (M phi) produced significant amounts of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to phagocytic stimuli. When M phi were exposed in vitro for 20 hr to fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta), their capacity to release O2- was significantly reduced, such reduction being more evident with increasing IFN-beta concentrations. In contrast, O2- production by M phi exposed for 20 hr to the lymphokine macrophage activating factor (MAF) or treated with either MAF or IFN-beta for 4 hr was not significantly different from that of control cells. This pattern of activity closely followed that of M phi-mediated suppression of lymphocyte proliferation, which was dramatically reduced by 20 hr exposure of M phi to IFN-beta, but unchanged by treatment with MAF. No correlation was however found between superoxide anion generation and enhancement of tumoricidal capacity in IFN-beta-treated M phi. We thus concluded that O2- does not play a relevant role in IFN-beta-induced M phi cytolysis, whereas the reduction of O2- production could be of major importance in the decrease of M phi suppression induced by IFN-beta. PMID:6175565

  8. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:27383571

  9. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  10. In vitro interactions between macrophages and aluminum-containing adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Rimaniol, Anne-Cécile; Gras, Gabriel; Clayette, Pascal

    2007-09-17

    Intramuscular administration of aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines induces an infiltration of aluminum-containing macrophages between muscle fibers. In vitro stimulation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with aluminum hydroxide (AlOOH) induces similar intracellular crystalline inclusions as well as phenotypical and functional modifications. We compared in this study the ability of other adjuvants to exert similar changes in macrophages in vitro. All mineral salts, i.e. aluminic (AlOOH, AlPO(4)) and non-aluminic mineral adjuvants (CaPO(4), FePO(4)) but not emulsion were able to increase macrophages capacity to potentiate autologous memory T lymphocyte proliferation, while only aluminic adjuvants induced CD83 expression and increased CD86 on macrophages. All together, this suggests that aluminic and non-aluminic adjuvants exerted their immunoactivities by distinct mechanisms on macrophages. PMID:17689842

  11. The Divergent Roles of Macrophages in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Sahar; Reed, Elaine F

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes the phenotype and function of macrophages in the context of solid organ transplantation and will focus on fundamental insights into their paradoxical pro-inflammatory versus suppressive function. We will also discuss the therapeutic potential of regulatory macrophages in tolerance induction. Recent findings Macrophages are emerging as an essential element of solid organ transplantation. Macrophages are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemia reperfusion injury, as well as both acute and chronic rejection, exacerbating injury through secretion of inflammatory effectors and by amplifying adaptive immune responses. Notably, not all responses associated with macrophages are deleterious to the graft, and graft protection can in fact be conferred by macrophages. This has been attributed to the presence of macrophages with tissue-repair capabilities, as well as the effects of regulatory macrophages. Summary The explosion of new information on the role of macrophages in solid organ transplantation has opened up new avenues of research and the possibility of therapeutic intervention. However, the role of myeloid cells in graft rejection, resolution of rejection and tissue repair remains poorly understood. A better understanding of plasticity and regulation of monocyte polarization is vital for the development of new therapies for the treatment of acute and chronic transplant rejection. PMID:26154913

  12. Phenotypic modulation of macrophages in response to plaque lipids

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Samantha; Leitinger, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The accumulation of macrophages in the vascular wall is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. The biological properties of atherosclerotic plaque macrophages determine lesion size, composition and stability. In atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages encounter a microenvironment that is comprised of a variety of lipid oxidation products, each of which has diverse biological effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the effects of plaque lipids on macrophage phenotypic polarization. Recent findings Atherosclerotic lesions in mice and in humans contain various macrophage phenotypes, which play different roles in mediating inflammation, the clearance of dead cells, and possibly resolution. Macrophages alter their phenotype and biological function in response to plaque lipids through the upregulation of specific sets of genes. Interaction of oxidized lipids with pattern recognition receptors and activation of the inflammasome by cholesterol crystals drive macrophages towards an inflammatory M1 phenotype. A new phenotype, Mox, develops when oxidized phospholipids activate stress response genes via Nrf2. Other lipid mediators such as nitrosylated-fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acid-derived products polarize plaque macrophages towards anti-inflammatory and proresolving phenotypes. Summary A deeper understanding of how lipids that accumulate in atherosclerotic plaques affect macrophage phenotype and function and thus atherosclerotic lesion development and stability will help to devise novel strategies for intervention. PMID:21841486

  13. A novel functional T cell hybridoma recognizes macrophage cell death induced by bacteria: a possible role for innate lymphocytes in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Koichi

    2006-06-15

    We have established a novel TCRalphabeta (TCRVbeta6)(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cell hybridoma designated B6HO3. When the B6HO3 cells were cocultured with bacterial-infected J774 macrophage-like cells, IFN-gamma production by B6HO3 cells was triggered through direct cell-cell contact with dying J774 cells infected with Listeria monocytogenes (LM), Shigella flexneri, or Salmonella typhimurium that expressed the type III secretion system, but not with intact J774 cells infected with heat-killed LM, nonhemolytic lysteriolysin O-deficient (Hly(-)) LM, plasmid-cured Shigella, or stationary-phase Salmonella. However, the triggering of B6HO3 cells for IFN-gamma production involved neither dying hepatoma cells infected with LM nor dying J774 cells caused by gliotoxin treatment or freeze thawing. Cycloheximide and Abs to H-2K(d), H-2D(d), Ia(d), CD1d, TCRVbeta6, and IL-12 did not inhibit the contact-dependent IFN-gamma response, indicating that this IFN-gamma response did not require de novo protein synthesis in bacterial-infected J774 cells and was TCR and IL-12 independent. Thus, in an as yet undefined way, B6HO3 hybridoma recognizes a specialized form of macrophage cell death resulting from bacterial infection and consequently produces IFN-gamma. Moreover, contact-dependent interaction of minor subsets of splenic alphabeta T cells, including NKT cells with dying LM-infected J774 and bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) cells, proved to provide an IFN-gamma-productive stimulus for these minor T cell populations, to which the parental T cell of the B6HO3 hybridoma appeared to belong. Unexpectedly, subsets of gammadelta T and NK cells similarly responded to dying LM-infected macrophage cells. These results propose that innate lymphocytes may possess a recognition system sensing macrophage cell "danger" resulting from bacterial infection. PMID:16751404

  14. Tobacco smoke and the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Davies, P; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Our results indicate that tobacco smoke exposure to varying duration causes morphological, biochemical and functional alterations in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The results of these changes is a population of alveolar macrophages made up of larger cells, with a reduced nucleus-cytoplasmic ratio, which are heavily loaded with heterolysosomes containing lipid. Though their fractional complement of mitochondria remains the same, an increase in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area may be related to an enhanced oxidative metabolism. The cell is biochemically activated particularly following chronic exposure and is functionally impaired with respect to phagocytosis. PMID:232822

  15. Macrophages: sentinels and regulators of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Franken, Lars; Schiwon, Marzena; Kurts, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The important role of macrophages in host defense against a variety of pathogens has long been recognized and has been documented and reviewed in numerous publications. Recently, it has become clear that tissue macrophages are not entirely derived from monocytes, as has been assumed for a long time, but rather show an ontogenetic dichotomy in most tissues: while part of the tissue macrophages are derived from monocytes, a major subset is prenatally seeded from the yolk sac. The latter subset shows a remarkable longevity and is maintained by self-renewal in the adult animal. This paradigm shift poses interesting questions: are these two macrophage subsets functionally equivalent cells that are recruited into the tissue at different development stages, or are both macrophage subsets discrete cell types with distinct functions, which have to exist side by side? Is the functional specialization that can be observed in most macrophages due to their lineage or due to their anatomical niche? This review will give an overview about what we know of macrophage ontogeny and will discuss the influence of the macrophage lineage and location on their functional specialization. PMID:26880038

  16. ROS play a critical role in the differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages and the occurrence of tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Chen, Kun; Pobezinskaya, Yelena; Linnoila, Ilona; Liu, Zheng-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation to different types of macrophages determines their distinct functions. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis owing to their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions similar to those of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is critical for macrophage differentiation and that inhibition of superoxide (O2−) production specifically blocks the differentiation of M2 macrophages. We found that when monocytes are triggered to differentiate, O2− is generated and is needed for the biphasic ERK activation, which is critical for macrophage differentiation. We demonstrated that ROS elimination by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and other ROS inhibitors blocks macrophage differentiation. However, the inhibitory effect of ROS elimination on macrophage differentiation is overcome when cells are polarized to classically activated (M1), but not M2, macrophages. More importantly, the continuous administration of the ROS inhibitor BHA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models. Targeting TAMs by blocking ROS can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment. PMID:23752925

  17. Pulmonary Macrophage Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Arumugam, Paritha; Sakagami, Takuro; Lachmann, Nico; Chalk, Claudia; Sallese, Anthony; Abe, Shuichi; Trapnell, Cole; Carey, Brenna; Moritz, Thomas; Malik, Punam; Lutzko, Carolyn; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection-risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independent of hematologic progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using GM-CSF receptor-β deficient (Csf2rb−/−) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA/CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe, well-tolerated, and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations, normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Results identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP. PMID:25274301

  18. Macrophages: Master Regulators of Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Barron, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages are found in close proximity with collagen-producing myofibroblasts and indisputably play a key role in fibrosis. They produce profibrotic mediators that directly activate fibroblasts, including transforming growth factor-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor, and control extracellular matrix turnover by regulating the balance of various matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases. Macrophages also regulate fibrogenesis by secreting chemokines that recruit fibroblasts and other inflammatory cells. With their potential to act in both a pro- and antifibrotic capacity, as well as their ability to regulate the activation of resident and recruited myofibroblasts, macrophages and the factors they express are integrated into all stages of the fibrotic process. These various, and sometimes opposing, functions may be performed by distinct macrophage subpopulations, the identification of which is a growing focus of fibrosis research. Although collagen-secreting myofibroblasts once were thought of as the master “producers” of fibrosis, this review will illustrate how macrophages function as the master “regulators” of fibrosis. PMID:20665377

  19. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients. PMID:18058096

  20. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis. PMID:27519940

  1. Macrophages: An Inflammatory Link Between Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Corliss, Bruce A; Azimi, Mohammad S; Munson, Jennifer M; Peirce, Shayn M; Murfee, Walter L

    2016-02-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis often occur in response to tissue injury or in the presence of pathology (e.g., cancer), and it is these types of environments in which macrophages are activated and increased in number. Moreover, the blood vascular microcirculation and the lymphatic circulation serve as the conduits for entry and exit for monocyte-derived macrophages in nearly every tissue and organ. Macrophages both affect and are affected by the vessels through which they travel. Therefore, it is not surprising that examination of macrophage behaviors in both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis has yielded interesting observations that suggest macrophages may be key regulators of these complex growth and remodeling processes. In this review, we will take a closer look at macrophages through the lens of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, examining how their dynamic behaviors may regulate vessel sprouting and function. We present macrophages as a cellular link that spatially and temporally connects angiogenesis with lymphangiogenesis, in both physiological growth and in pathological adaptations, such as tumorigenesis. As such, attempts to therapeutically target macrophages in order to affect these processes may be particularly effective, and studying macrophages in both settings will accelerate the field's understanding of this important cell type in health and disease. PMID:26614117

  2. A potent tumoricidal co-drug ‘Bet-CA' - an ester derivative of betulinic acid and dichloroacetate selectively and synergistically kills cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Selective targeting of cancer cells employing multiple combinations as co-drug holds promise for new generation therapeutics. Betulinic acid (BA), a plant secondary metabolite kills cancer cells and Dichloroacetate (DCA) is capable of reversing the Warburg phenotype by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). Here, we report synthesis, characterization and tumoricidal potential of a co-drug Bet-CA, where a DCA molecule has been appended on C-3 hydroxyl group of BA to generate an ester derivative for increased solubility and subsequent cleavage by internal esterase(s) to release one unit each of BA and DCA. In vitro studies revealed pronounced synergistic cytotoxicity of Bet-CA against a broad spectrum of cancer cells and it selectively killed them when co-cultured with human fibroblasts. Bet-CA treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, significantly altered mitochondrial membrane potential gradient (ΔΨm); followed by the release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) which prompted cells to undergo mitochondria mediated apoptosis. In vivo experimentation expectedly exhibited tumor inhibitory potential of Bet-CA and clinically achievable doses did not produce any apparent toxicity. Taken together, results suggestively raise an important corollary hypothesis stating that Bet-CA selectively and synergistically combats cancer without producing toxic manifestations and emerges to be the prospect for the new generation therapeutics. PMID:25585916

  3. Macrophage plasticity and polarization in tissue repair and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Biswas, Subhra K; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocyte plasticity includes the expression of functions related to the resolution of inflammation, tissue repair and remodelling, particularly when these cells are set in an M2 or an M2-like activation mode. Macrophages are credited with an essential role in remodelling during ontogenesis. In extraembryonic life, under homeostatic conditions, the macrophage trophic and remodelling functions are recapitulated in tissues such as bone, mammary gland, decidua and placenta. In pathology, macrophages are key components of tissue repair and remodelling that occur during wound healing, allergy, parasite infection and cancer. Interaction with cells bearing stem or progenitor cell properties is likely an important component of the role of macrophages in repair and remodelling. These properties of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage may represent a tool and a target for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:23096265

  4. How Mouse Macrophages Sense What Is Going On

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus; Pramod, Akula Bala; Croft, Michael; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Ting, Jenny P.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central to both innate and adaptive immunity. With few exceptions, macrophages are the first cells that sense trouble and respond to disturbances in almost all tissues and organs. They sense their environment, inhibit or kill pathogens, take up apoptotic and necrotic cells, heal tissue damage, and present antigens to T cells. Although the origins (yolk sac versus monocyte-derived) and phenotypes (functions, gene expression profiles, surface markers) of macrophages vary between tissues, they have many receptors in common that are specific to one or a few molecular species. Here, we review the expression and function of almost 200 key macrophage receptors that help the macrophages sense what is going on, including pathogen-derived molecules, the state of the surrounding tissue cells, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, antibodies and immune complexes, altered self molecules, extracellular matrix components, and cytokines, including chemokines. PMID:27313577

  5. Role of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Sadaf; Werfel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common and most intensively studied chronic inflammatory skin diseases. Several cofactors, such as an impaired skin barrier function, modifications of the immune system, and a complex genetic background, direct the course of AD. Within this complex network, macrophages play a pivotal role in enhanced susceptibility to cutaneous infections and act as central connecting components in the pathogenesis of AD on the cellular level. In AD, macrophages are known to accumulate in acutely and chronically inflamed skin. During the early and short inflammatory phase, macrophages exert proinflammatory functions like antigen-presenting phagocytosis and the production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors that facilitate the resolution of inflammation. However, persistence of pro-inflammatory activity and altered function of macrophages result in the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as AD. The exact mechanism of macrophages activation in these processes is not yet completely understood. Further studies should be performed to clarify the dysregulated mechanism of macrophages activation in AD, and this would allow us to target these cells with versatile functions for therapeutic purpose and improve and control the disease. In this paper, we highlight the new findings on dysregulated function of macrophages and the importance of these cells in the pathogenesis of AD in general and the contribution of these cells in enhanced susceptibility against microbial infections in particular. PMID:23533313

  6. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  7. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  8. Lipoxygenase products mediate the attachment of rat macrophages to glomeruli in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Baud, L.; Sraer, J.; Delarue, F.; Bens, M.; Balavoine, F.; Schlondorff, D.; Ardaillou, R.; Sraer, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Because there is an accumulation of macrophages in the Bowman's space during human and experimental glomerulonephritis, the authors have studied the binding of (/sup 3/H)-uridine labeled macrophages to isolated glomeruli. Binding was related to the glomerular protein and macrophage concentrations, temperature, time of incubation, and was a saturable process. Macrophage adherence depended on glomerular lipoxygenase activity but not on glomerular cyclooxygenase activity since preincubation of glomeruli with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited this phenomenon whereas preincubation with indomethacin was ineffective. Glomeruli interacted with macrophages in converting arachidonic acid (C20:4) to prostaglandins (PG) since productions of 6 keto-PGF1 alpha, TXB2, and PGD2 by glomeruli and macrophages incubated in combination were much greater than the sums of their respective productions by glomeruli and macrophages incubated separately. Macrophages were the source of the supplementary synthesis of PG which was abolished when these cells were pretreated with aspirin. Stimulation of macrophages by glomeruli was blunted by pretreatment of glomeruli with NDGA. Production of PG and of 12-HETE by macrophages was stimulated by a lipid extract of glomeruli containing the oxygenated metabolites of C20:4. Direct addition of 12-HPETE also stimulated macrophage functions. These data suggest that macrophage attachment to glomeruli and macrophage stimulation in the presence of glomeruli depend on glomerular lipoxygenase activity.

  9. Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W.; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Betty Y. S.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

  10. Generation of a novel mouse model for the inducible depletion of macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gheryani, Nabeia; Coffelt, Seth B; Gartland, Alison; Rumney, Robin M H; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Lewis, Claire E; Tozer, Gillian M; Greaves, David R; Dear, T Neil; Miller, Gaynor

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in tissue homeostasis, innate immunity, inflammation, and wound repair. Macrophages are also essential during development, severely limiting the use of mouse models in which these cells have been constitutively deleted. Consequently, we have developed a transgenic model of inducible macrophage depletion in which macrophage-specific induction of the cytotoxic diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) is achieved by administration of doxycycline. Induction of the DTA protein in transgenic animals resulted in a significant 50% reduction in CD68+ macrophages of the liver, spleen, and bone over a period of 6 weeks. Pertinently, the macrophages remaining after doxycycline treatment were substantially smaller and are functionally impaired as shown by reduced inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide. This inducible model of macrophage depletion can now be utilized to determine the role of macrophages in both development and animal models of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22927121

  11. Antagonism of miR-328 Increases the Antimicrobial Function of Macrophages and Neutrophils and Rapid Clearance of Non-typeable Haemophilus Influenzae (NTHi) from Infected Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Hock L.; Kaiko, Gerard E.; Plank, Maximilian; Li, JingJing; Maltby, Steven; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Jarnicki, Andrew; Yang, Ming; Mattes, Joerg; Hansbro, Philip M.; Foster, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacterial infections of the lung are life threatening and underpin chronic lung diseases. Current treatments are often ineffective potentially due to increasing antibiotic resistance and impairment of innate immunity by disease processes and steroid therapy. Manipulation miRNA directly regulating anti-microbial machinery of the innate immune system may boost host defence responses. Here we demonstrate that miR-328 is a key element of the host response to pulmonary infection with non-typeable haemophilus influenzae and pharmacological inhibition in mouse and human macrophages augments phagocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and microbicidal activity. Moreover, inhibition of miR-328 in respiratory models of infection, steroid-induced immunosuppression, and smoke-induced emphysema enhances bacterial clearance. Thus, miRNA pathways can be targeted in the lung to enhance host defence against a clinically relevant microbial infection and offer a potential new anti-microbial approach for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:25894560

  12. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particle Extracts (DEPe) Impairs Some Polarization Markers and Functions of Human Macrophages through Activation of AhR and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ), well-known to play an important role in immune response, also respond to environmental toxic chemicals such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Potential effects of DEPs towards MΦ polarization, a key hall-mark of MΦ physiology, remain however poorly documented. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of a reference DEP extract (DEPe) on human MΦ polarization. Human blood monocytes-derived MΦ were incubated with IFNγ+LPS or IL-4 to obtain M1 and M2 subtypes, respectively; a 24 h exposure of polarizing MΦ to 10 μg/ml DEPe was found to impair expression of some macrophagic M1 and M2 markers, without however overall inhibition of M1 and M2 polarization processes. Notably, DEPe treatment increased the secretion of the M1 marker IL-8 and the M2 marker IL-10 in both MΦ subtypes, whereas it reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 and IL-12p40 secretion in M1 MΦ. In M2 MΦ, DEPe exposure led to a reduction of CD200R expression and of CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 secretion, associated with a lower chemotaxis of CCR4-positive cells. DEPe activated the Nrf2 and AhR pathways and induced expression of their reference target genes such as Hmox-1 and cytochrome P-4501B1 in M1 and M2 MΦ. Nrf2 or AhR silencing through RNA interference prevented DEPe-related down-regulation of IL-6. AhR silencing also inhibited the down-secretion of IL-12p40 and CCL18 in M1- and M2-DEPe-exposed MΦ, respectively. DEPs are therefore likely to alter expression of some M1 and M2 markers in an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent manner; such regulations may contribute to deleterious immune effects of atmospheric DEP. PMID:25710172

  13. Mice with Genetic Deletion of Group VIA Phospholipase A2β Exhibit Impaired Macrophage Function and Increased Parasite Load in Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Janhavi; Blase, Jennifer R; Hoft, Daniel F; Marentette, John O; Turk, John; McHowat, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection, which is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is associated with intense inflammation during the acute and chronic phases. The pathological progression of Chagas disease is influenced by the infiltration and transmigration of inflammatory cells across the endothelium to infected tissues, which are carefully regulated processes involving several molecular mediators, including adhesion molecules and platelet-activating factor (PAF). We have shown that PAF production is dependent upon calcium-independent group VIA phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β) following infection of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) with T. cruzi, suggesting that the absence of iPLA2β may decrease the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the heart to manage parasite accumulation. Cardiac endothelial cells isolated from iPLA2β-knockout (iPLA2β-KO) mice infected withT. cruzi demonstrated decreased PAF production compared to that by cells isolated from wild-type (WT) mice but demonstrated increases in adhesion molecule expression similar to those seen in WT mice. Myocardial inflammation in iPLA2β-KO mice infected with T. cruzi was similar in severity to that in WT mice, but the iPLA2β-KO mouse myocardium contained more parasite pseudocysts. Upon activation, macrophages from iPLA2β-KO mice produced significantly less nitric oxide (NO) and caused lessT. cruzi inhibition than macrophages from wild-type mice. Thus, the absence of iPLA2β activity does not influence myocardial inflammation, but iPLA2β is essential forT. cruzi clearance. PMID:26857573

  14. Macrophages promote matrix protrusive and invasive function of breast cancer cells via MIP-1β dependent upregulation of MYO3A gene in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Tewari, Brij Nath; Shrivastava, Richa; Malik, Showkat Ahmad; Lone, Mehraj U-Din; Jain, Nem Kumar; Tripathi, Chakrapani; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Dixit, Sameer; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Negi, Mahendra Pal Singh; Srivastava, Mukesh; Misra, Sanjeev; Bhatt, Madan Lal Brahma; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2016-07-01

    The potential of a tumor cell to metastasize profoundly depends on its microenvironment, or "niche" interactions with local components. Tumor-associated-macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant subpopulation of tumor stroma and represent a key component of tumor microenvironment. The dynamic interaction of cancer cells with neighboring TAMs actively drive cancer progression and metastatic transformation through intercellular signaling networks that need better elucidation. Thus, current study was planned for discerning paracrine communication networks operational between TAMs, and breast cancer cells with special reference to cancer cell invasion and dissemination to distant sites. Here, we report role of MIP-1β in enhancing invasive potential of metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. In addition, the poorly metastatic MCF-7 cells were also rendered invasive by MIP-1β. The MIP-1β-driven cancer cell invasion was dependent on upregulated expression levels of MYO3A gene, which encodes an unconventional myosin super-family protein harboring a kinase domain. Ex ovo study employing Chick-embryo-model and in vivo Syngenic 4T1/BALB/c mice-model further corroborated aforementioned in vitro findings, thereby substantiating their physiological relevance. Concordantly, human breast cancer specimen exhibited significant association between mRNA expression levels of MIP-1β and MYO3A. Both, MIP-1β and MYO3A exhibited positive correlation with MMP9, an established molecular determinant of cancer cell invasion. Higher expression of these genes correlated with poor survival of breast cancer patients. Collectively, these results point toward so far undisclosed MIP-1β/MYO3A axis being operational during metastasis, wherein macrophage-derived MIP-1β potentiated cancer cell invasion and metastasis via up regulation of MYO3A gene within cancer cells. Our study exposes opportunities for devising potential anti-metastatic strategies for efficient clinical

  15. Interleukin-12 inhibits the hepatocellular carcinoma growth by inducing macrophage polarization to the M1-like phenotype through downregulation of Stat-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Cheng, Feng; Ma, Ting-Ting; Xiong, Hai-Yu; Li, Zi-Wei; Xie, Chang-Li; Liu, Cui-Ying; Tu, Zhi-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Novel early detection biomarkers and efficacious therapy strategies are needed. Macrophages recruited from circulation monocytes are the major component of solid cancer and play an important role in the carcinogenesis. Whether overexpression of L-12 in monocytes could induce the phenotype directional differentiation into tumoricidal M1 macrophages and inhibit HCC growth in tumor microenvironment was investigated in this study. For the establishment of the monocyte/IL-12 and polarization of M1-like macrophage, the IL-12 overexpressing recombinant monocyte/IL-12 cells were established by infecting with pAd5F35-CMV/IL-12 adenovirus and co-cultured with HCC SMMC-7721 and Hep3B cells. It was found that the phenotype of monocyte/IL-12 polarized to M1-like macrophages with CD197high IL-12high CD206low IL-10low, and decreased expression of TGF-β, VEGF-A, and MMP-9. In order to explore the mechanism underlying the macrophages polarization, we detected the Stat-3 pathway and its downstream transcription factor c-myc, and found that the p-Stat-3 and c-myc were down-regulated. To evaluate the effects of monocyte/IL-12 on inhibiting HCC growth, various assays including CCK8, flow cytometry, colony-forming and Transwell assays in vitro, and xenograft mouse models and immunohistochemical analyses in vivo were used to detect the HCC growth and relative markers. Treated with IL-12 overexpressing monocytes, the xenograft tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo. These results have proven that IL-12-overexpressed monocytes could directionally differentiate to M1-like macrophages through downregulation of Stat-3 and result in the inhibition of HCC growth. PMID:27003285

  16. Exposure to p,p'-DDE Alters Macrophage Reactivity and Increases Macrophage Numbers in Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Lauren H; Crow, John Allen; Stokes, John V; Howell, George E; Ross, Matthew K; Pruett, Stephen B; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to p,p'-DDE (DDE), the main bioaccumulative metabolite of the organochlorine insecticide p,p'-DDT, is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and immunomodulation. The present study was carried out to determine whether DDE perturbs adipose tissue homeostasis through modulation of macrophage function. Treatment with DDE or a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor prior to lipopolysaccharide exposure significantly decreased production of prostaglandins (PG) from J774a.1 macrophages in vitro. Similarly, J774A.1 cell lysates incubated with DDE or a specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (NS-398) produced significantly less PGE2 and PGF2α. Macrophage polarization studies revealed a pattern of DDE effects that were not fully consistent with a purely pro- or purely anti- M1 or M2 effect. However, DDE suppressed expression of two M1 markers (induced by an M1 stimulus) and enhanced expression of an M2 marker (induced by an M2 stimulus). Further studies including assessment of macrophage function are needed to fully characterize the effects of DDE on macrophage polarization. Obesity is characterized by an increase in the number of resident adipose tissue macrophages. To assess monocyte/macrophage recruitment to the adipose tissue in vivo, male C57Bl/6H mice were treated with 2 mg/kg DDE or corn oil vehicle for 5 days by gavage. Epididymal fat pads were digested and macrophage populations were analyzed by flow cytometry. In DDE-treated animals, there was a significant increase (37%) in F4/80(+)CD11b(+) macrophages/g of epididymal adipose over vehicle (P < .05). Together, these results suggest a role for DDE in the enhancement of adipose tissue macrophage recruitment and/or proliferation, as well as modulation of immune cell function that may contribute to the etiology of metabolic diseases associated with organochlorine exposure. PMID:26748080

  17. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  18. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daniel; Phan, Ngoc; Isely, Christopher; Bruene, Lucas; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  19. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages. PMID:27095137

  20. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. PMID:27104973

  1. Accumulation of M1-like macrophages in type 2 diabetic islets is followed by a systemic shift in macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Cucak, Helena; Grunnet, Lars Groth; Rosendahl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human T2D is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammation, loss of β-cells, and diminished insulin production. Local islet immunity is still poorly understood, and hence, we evaluated macrophage subpopulations in pancreatic islets in the well-established murine model of T2D, the db/db mouse. Already at 8 weeks of disease, on average, 12 macrophages were observed in the diabetic islets, whereas only two were recorded in the nondiabetic littermates. On a detailed level, the islet resident macrophages increased fourfold compared with nondiabetic littermates, whereas a pronounced recruitment (eightfold) of a novel subset of macrophages (CD68+F4/80-) was observed. The majority of the CD68+F4/80+ but only 40% of the CD68+F4/80- islet macrophages expressed CD11b. Both islet-derived macrophage subsets expressed moderate MHC-II, high galectin-3, and low CD80/CD86 levels, suggesting the cells to be macrophages rather than DCs. On a functional level, the vast majority of the macrophages in the diabetic islets was of the proinflammatory, M1-like phenotype. The systemic immunity in diabetic animals was characterized by a low-grade inflammation with elevated cytokine levels and increase of splenic cytokine, producing CD68+F4/80- macrophages. In late-stage diabetes, the cytokine signature changed toward a TGF-β-dominated profile, coinciding with a significant increase of galectin-3-positive macrophages in the spleen. In summary, our results show that proinflammatory M1-like galectin-3+ CD80/CD86(low) macrophages invade diabetic islets. Moreover, the innate immunity matures in a diabetes-dependent manner from an initial proinflammatory toward a profibrotic phenotype, supporting the concept that T2D is an inflammatory disease. PMID:24009176

  2. Natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF) augments natural killer cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal response against colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Sigal, R K; Williams, N N; Daly, J M

    1991-04-01

    The therapy of colorectal cancer may be improved by biologic response modifiers that enhance natural killer (NK) cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms. This study examined the effect of a recently discovered cytokine purified from the supernatant of an Ebstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (RPMI-8866), natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF), on NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 24 hr in the presence or absence of NKSF (3.6 pM) or interleukin-2 (1 nM). The cultured lymphocytes were analyzed for lytic potential toward chromium-51-labeled colon carcinoma targets SW 1116, 498 LI, and WC 1. ADCC was measured by incubating chromium-51-labeled SW 1116 or WC 1 targets with the monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, an IgG2a antibody reactive with gastrointestinal cancer-associated cell antigen, or control mouse IgG prior to testing NKSF-treated or control PBL effectors in a 6-hr cytotoxicity assay. NKSF significantly enhanced NK cytolysis of colon carcinoma and NK-resistant lymphoma cell lines, and on a molar basis was approximately 300 times more potent than interleukin-2 in generating NK cytotoxicity. Furthermore, NKSF significantly augmented lymphocyte-mediated ADCC against colon carcinoma targets, and the combination of NKSF with the antibody CO17-1A had an additive effect on lymphocyte tumoricidial capacity. Thus, NKSF may have a potential role in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:1673486

  3. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 wi