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Sample records for macroscopic bioreaction models

  1. Validation of Travel-Time based Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport Models under Flow and Transport Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Prat, A.; Lu, C.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Travel-time based models are presented as an alternative to traditional spatially explicit models to solve nonlinear reactive-transport problems. The main advantage of the travel-time approach is that it does not require multi-dimensional characterization of physical and chemical parameters, and transport is one-dimensional. Spatial dimensions are replaced by groundwater travel time, defined as the time required by a water particle to reach an observation point or the outflow boundary, respectively. The fundamental hypothesis is that locations of the same groundwater age exhibit the same reactive-species concentrations. This is true in strictly advective-reactive transport in steady-state flows if the coefficients of reactions are uniform and the concentration is uniform over the inflow boundary. We hypothesize that the assumption still holds when adding some dispersion in coupled flow and transport dynamics. We compare a two-dimensional, spatially explicit, bioreactive, advective-dispersive transport model, considered as "virtual truth", with three 1-D travel-time based models which differ by the conceptualization of longitudinal dispersion: (i) neglecting dispersive mixing altogether, (ii) introducing a local-scale longitudinal dispersivity constant in time and space, and (iii) using an effective longitudinal dispersivity that increases linearly with distance. We consider biodegradation of organic matter catalyzed by non-competitive inhibitive microbial populations. The simulated inflow contains oxygen, nitrate, and DOC. The domain contains growing aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, the latter being inhibited by oxygen. This system is computed in 1-D, and in 2-D heterogeneous domains. We conclude that the conceptualization of nonlinear bioreactive transport in complex multi-dimensional domains by quasi 1-D travel-time models is valid for steady-state flow if the reactants are introduced over a wide cross-section, flow is at quasi-steady state, and dispersive

  2. Macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Moller, P.

    1995-07-01

    We discuss recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models, including the 1992 finite-range droplet model, the 1992 extended- Thomas-Fermi Strutinsky-integral model, and the 1994 Thomas-Fermi model, with particular emphasis on how well they extrapolate to new regions of nuclei. We also address what recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models are teaching us about such physically relevant issues as the nuclear curvature energy, a new congruence energy arising from a greater-than-average overlap of neutron and proton wave functions, the nuclear incompressibility coefficient, and the coulomb redistribution energy arising from a central density depression. We conclude with a brief discussion of the recently discovered rock of metastable superheavy nuclei near {sup 272}110 that had been correctly predicted by macroscopic-microscopic models, along with a possible new tack for reaching an island near {sup 290}110 beyond our present horizon.

  3. Macroscopic Models of Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. After giving a description of the basic physical phenomena to be modelled, we begin by formulating a sharp -interface free-boundary model for the destruction of superconductivity by an applied magnetic field, under isothermal and anisothermal conditions, which takes the form of a vectorial Stefan model similar to the classical scalar Stefan model of solid/liquid phase transitions and identical in certain two-dimensional situations. This model is found sometimes to have instabilities similar to those of the classical Stefan model. We then describe the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, in which the sharp interface is 'smoothed out' by the introduction of an order parameter, representing the number density of superconducting electrons. By performing a formal asymptotic analysis of this model as various parameters in it tend to zero we find that the leading order solution does indeed satisfy the vectorial Stefan model. However, at the next order we find the emergence of terms analogous to those of 'surface tension' and 'kinetic undercooling' in the scalar Stefan model. Moreover, the 'surface energy' of a normal/superconducting interface is found to take both positive and negative values, defining Type I and Type II superconductors respectively. We discuss the response of superconductors to external influences by considering the nucleation of superconductivity with decreasing magnetic field and with decreasing temperature respectively, and find there to be a pitchfork bifurcation to a superconducting state which is subcritical for Type I superconductors and supercritical for Type II superconductors. We also examine the effects of boundaries on the nucleation field, and describe in more detail the nature of the superconducting solution in Type II superconductors--the so-called 'mixed state'. Finally, we present some open questions concerning both the modelling and analysis of

  4. On the validity of travel-time based nonlinear bioreactive transport models in steady-state flow.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Finkel, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Travel-time based models simplify the description of reactive transport by replacing the spatial coordinates with the groundwater travel time, posing a quasi one-dimensional (1-D) problem and potentially rendering the determination of multidimensional parameter fields unnecessary. While the approach is exact for strictly advective transport in steady-state flow if the reactive properties of the porous medium are uniform, its validity is unclear when local-scale mixing affects the reactive behavior. We compare a two-dimensional (2-D), spatially explicit, bioreactive, advective-dispersive transport model, considered as "virtual truth", with three 1-D travel-time based models which differ in the conceptualization of longitudinal dispersion: (i) neglecting dispersive mixing altogether, (ii) introducing a local-scale longitudinal dispersivity constant in time and space, and (iii) using an effective longitudinal dispersivity that increases linearly with distance. The reactive system considers biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon, which is introduced into a hydraulically heterogeneous domain together with oxygen and nitrate. Aerobic and denitrifying bacteria use the energy of the microbial transformations for growth. We analyze six scenarios differing in the variance of log-hydraulic conductivity and in the inflow boundary conditions (constant versus time-varying concentration). The concentrations of the 1-D models are mapped to the 2-D domain by means of the kinematic (for case i), and mean groundwater age (for cases ii & iii), respectively. The comparison between concentrations of the "virtual truth" and the 1-D approaches indicates extremely good agreement when using an effective, linearly increasing longitudinal dispersivity in the majority of the scenarios, while the other two 1-D approaches reproduce at least the concentration tendencies well. At late times, all 1-D models give valid approximations of two-dimensional transport. We conclude that the

  5. On the validity of travel-time based nonlinear bioreactive transport models in steady-state flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Finkel, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-04-01

    Travel-time based models simplify the description of reactive transport by replacing the spatial coordinates with the groundwater travel time, posing a quasi one-dimensional (1-D) problem and potentially rendering the determination of multidimensional parameter fields unnecessary. While the approach is exact for strictly advective transport in steady-state flow if the reactive properties of the porous medium are uniform, its validity is unclear when local-scale mixing affects the reactive behavior. We compare a two-dimensional (2-D), spatially explicit, bioreactive, advective-dispersive transport model, considered as "virtual truth", with three 1-D travel-time based models which differ in the conceptualization of longitudinal dispersion: (i) neglecting dispersive mixing altogether, (ii) introducing a local-scale longitudinal dispersivity constant in time and space, and (iii) using an effective longitudinal dispersivity that increases linearly with distance. The reactive system considers biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon, which is introduced into a hydraulically heterogeneous domain together with oxygen and nitrate. Aerobic and denitrifying bacteria use the energy of the microbial transformations for growth. We analyze six scenarios differing in the variance of log-hydraulic conductivity and in the inflow boundary conditions (constant versus time-varying concentration). The concentrations of the 1-D models are mapped to the 2-D domain by means of the kinematic (for case i), and mean groundwater age (for cases ii & iii), respectively. The comparison between concentrations of the "virtual truth" and the 1-D approaches indicates extremely good agreement when using an effective, linearly increasing longitudinal dispersivity in the majority of the scenarios, while the other two 1-D approaches reproduce at least the concentration tendencies well. At late times, all 1-D models give valid approximations of two-dimensional transport. We conclude that the

  6. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  7. Macroscopic balance model for wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for multi-port wave rotors is described. The wave processes that effect energy exchange within the rotor passage are modeled using one-dimensional gas dynamics. Macroscopic mass and energy balances relate volume-averaged thermodynamic properties in the rotor passage control volume to the mass, momentum, and energy fluxes at the ports. Loss models account for entropy production in boundary layers and in separating flows caused by blade-blockage, incidence, and gradual opening and closing of rotor passages. The mathematical model provides a basis for predicting design-point wave rotor performance, port timing, and machine size. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with CFD calculations and three-port wave rotor experimental data. A four-port wave rotor design example is provided to demonstrate model applicability. The modeling approach is amenable to wave rotor optimization studies and rapid assessment of the trade-offs associated with integrating wave rotors into gas turbine engine systems.

  8. Modeling tumor cell migration: From microscopic to macroscopic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroulers, Christophe; Aubert, Marine; Badoual, Mathilde; Grammaticos, Basil

    2009-03-01

    It has been shown experimentally that contact interactions may influence the migration of cancer cells. Previous works have modelized this thanks to stochastic, discrete models (cellular automata) at the cell level. However, for the study of the growth of real-size tumors with several million cells, it is best to use a macroscopic model having the form of a partial differential equation (PDE) for the density of cells. The difficulty is to predict the effect, at the macroscopic scale, of contact interactions that take place at the microscopic scale. To address this, we use a multiscale approach: starting from a very simple, yet experimentally validated, microscopic model of migration with contact interactions, we derive a macroscopic model. We show that a diffusion equation arises, as is often postulated in the field of glioma modeling, but it is nonlinear because of the interactions. We give the explicit dependence of diffusivity on the cell density and on a parameter governing cell-cell interactions. We discuss in detail the conditions of validity of the approximations used in the derivation, and we compare analytic results from our PDE to numerical simulations and to some in vitro experiments. We notice that the family of microscopic models we started from includes as special cases some kinetically constrained models that were introduced for the study of the physics of glasses, supercooled liquids, and jamming systems.

  9. Hyperspectral unmixing using macroscopic and microscopic mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Ryan; Gader, Paul; Wilson, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic mixture models and algorithms for hyperspectral unmixing are presented. Unmixing algorithms are derived from an objective function. The objective function incorporates the linear mixture model for macroscopic unmixing and a nonlinear mixture model for microscopic unmixing. The nonlinear mixture model is derived from a bidirectional reflectance distribution function for microscopic mixtures. The algorithm is designed to unmix hyperspectral images composed of macroscopic or microscopic mixtures. The mixture types and abundances at each pixel can be estimated directly from the data without prior knowledge of mixture types. Endmembers can also be estimated. Results are presented using synthetic data sets of macroscopic and microscopic mixtures and using well-known, well-characterized laboratory data sets. The unmixing accuracy of this new physics-based algorithm is compared to linear methods and to results published for other nonlinear models. The proposed method achieves the best unmixing accuracy.

  10. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchinger, F.; Pearson, J.M.

    2005-11-01

    We show that the FRLDM model currently being used in macroscopic-microscopic fission-barrier calculations gives a rather poor agreement with measured charge radii. Considerable improvement in this respect can be made by adjusting the diffuseness parameter b.

  11. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  12. Microwave Diffraction Techniques from Macroscopic Crystal Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William Henry

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the construction of a diffractometer table and four microwave models which are built of styrofoam balls with implanted metallic reflecting spheres and designed to simulate the structures of carbon (graphite structure), sodium chloride, tin oxide, and palladium oxide. Included are samples of Bragg patterns and computer-analysis results.…

  13. Microscopic to Macroscopic Dynamical Models of Sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Woolley, Thomas; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin; Maini, Philip; Social; Evolutionary Neuroscience Research Group (Senrg) Collaboration

    To help them survive, social animals, such as humans, need to share knowledge and responsibilities with other members of the species. The larger their social network, the bigger the pool of knowledge available to them. Since time is a limited resource, a way of optimising its use is meeting amongst individuals whilst fulfilling other necessities. In this sense it is useful to know how many, and how often, early humans could meet during a given period of time whilst performing other necessary tasks, such as food gathering. Using a simplified model of these dynamics, which comprehend encounter and memory, we aim at producing a lower-bound to the number of meetings hunter-gatherers could have during a year. We compare the stochastic agent-based model to its mean-field approximation and explore some of the features necessary for the difference between low population dynamics and its continuum limit. We observe an emergent property that could have an inference in the layered structure seen in each person's social organisation. This could give some insight into hunter-gatherer's lives and the development of the social layered structure we have today. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  14. Modeling macroscopic response of random composites

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Rintoul, M.D.; Lo, D.C.S.

    1998-02-01

    Preliminary work is presented on an effort to generate synthetic constitutive data for random composite materials. The long-ranged goal is to use the overall response determined from finite element simulations of representative volumes (RV) of the heterogeneous material to construct a homogenized constitutive model. A simple composite of a matrix containing polydispersed spheres was chosen as the first configuration to simulate. Here the accuracy of the numerical simulation tools is tested by determining effective elastic constants of the ordered elastic composite in which equal-sized spheres are arranged in each of three cubic lattice configurations. The resulting anisotropic effective elastic constant values agree with theoretical results to better than 10%, with typical agreement being better than 4%.

  15. Analysis and Enhancements of a Prolific Macroscopic Model of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fietkiewicz, Christopher; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Macroscopic models of epilepsy can deliver surprisingly realistic EEG simulations. In the present study, a prolific series of models is evaluated with regard to theoretical and computational concerns, and enhancements are developed. Specifically, we analyze three aspects of the models: (1) Using dynamical systems analysis, we demonstrate and explain the presence of direct current potentials in the simulated EEG that were previously undocumented. (2) We explain how the system was not ideally formulated for numerical integration of stochastic differential equations. A reformulated system is developed to support proper methodology. (3) We explain an unreported contradiction in the published model specification regarding the use of a mathematical reduction method. We then use the method to reduce the number of equations and further improve the computational efficiency. The intent of our critique is to enhance the evolution of macroscopic modeling of epilepsy and assist others who wish to explore this exciting class of models further. PMID:27144054

  16. Fast Analytical Methods for Macroscopic Electrostatic Models in Biomolecular Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenli; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We review recent developments of fast analytical methods for macroscopic electrostatic calculations in biological applications, including the Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) and the generalized Born models for electrostatic solvation energy. The focus is on analytical approaches for hybrid solvation models, especially the image charge method for a spherical cavity, and also the generalized Born theory as an approximation to the PB model. This review places much emphasis on the mathematical details behind these methods. PMID:23745011

  17. Wave speeds in the macroscopic extended model for ultrarelativistic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Borghero, F.; Demontis, F.; Pennisi, S.

    2013-11-15

    Equations determining wave speeds for a model of ultrarelativistic gases are investigated. This model is already present in literature; it deals with an arbitrary number of moments and it was proposed in the context of exact macroscopic approaches in Extended Thermodynamics. We find these results: the whole system for the determination of the wave speeds can be divided into independent subsystems which are expressed by linear combinations, through scalar coefficients, of tensors all of the same order; some wave speeds, but not all of them, are expressed by square roots of rational numbers; finally, we prove that these wave speeds for the macroscopic model are the same of those furnished by the kinetic model.

  18. Macroscopic Modeling of In Vivo Drug Transport in Electroporated Tissue.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Bradley; Becker, Sid

    2016-03-01

    This study develops a macroscopic model of mass transport in electroporated biological tissue in order to predict the cellular drug uptake. The change in the macroscopic mass transport coefficient is related to the increase in electrical conductivity resulting from the applied electric field. Additionally, the model considers the influences of both irreversible electroporation (IRE) and the transient resealing of the cell membrane associated with reversible electroporation. Two case studies are conducted to illustrate the applicability of this model by comparing transport associated with two electrode arrangements: side-by-side arrangement and the clamp arrangement. The results show increased drug transmission to viable cells is possible using the clamp arrangement due to the more uniform electric field. PMID:26720199

  19. Fission barriers in a macroscopic-microscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolski, A.; Pomorski, K.; Bartel, J.

    2007-02-15

    In the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model, this study investigates fission barriers in the region of actinide nuclei. A very effective four-dimensional shape parametrization for fissioning nuclei is proposed. Taking, in particular, the left-right mass asymmetric and nonaxial shapes into account is demonstrated to have a substantial effect on fission barrier heights. The influence of proton versus neutron deformation differences on the potential energy landscape of fissioning nuclei is also discussed.

  20. The mirrors model: macroscopic diffusion without noise or chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiffaudel, Yann; Lefevere, Raphaël

    2016-03-01

    Before stating our main result, we first clarify through classical examples the status of the laws of macroscopic physics as laws of large numbers. We next consider the mirrors model in a finite d-dimensional domain and connected to particles reservoirs at fixed chemical potentials. The dynamics is purely deterministic and non-ergodic but takes place in a random environment. We study the macroscopic current of particles in the stationary regime. We show first that when the size of the system goes to infinity, the behaviour of the stationary current of particles is governed by the proportion of orbits crossing the system. This allows us to formulate a necessary and sufficient condition on the distribution of the set of orbits that ensures the validity of Fick’s law. Using this approach, we show that Fick’s law relating the stationary macroscopic current of particles to the concentration difference holds in three dimensions and above. The negative correlations between crossing orbits play a key role in the argument.

  1. Improved macroscopic traffic flow model for aggressive drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A. R.; Velasco, R. M.

    2011-03-24

    As has been done for the treatment of diluted gases, kinetic methods are formulated for the study of unidirectional freeway traffic. Fluid dynamic models obtained from kinetic equations have inherent restrictions, the principal one is the restriction to the low density regime. Macroscopic models obtained from kinetic equations tends to selfrestrict to this regime and makes impossible to observe the medium density region. In this work, we present some results heading to improve this model and extend the observable region. Now, we are presenting a fluid dynamic model for aggressive drivers obtained from kinetic assumptions to extend the model to the medium density region in order to study synchronization phenomena which is a very interesting transition phase between free flow and traffic jams. We are changing the constant variance prefactor condition imposed before by a variance prefactor density dependent, the numerical solution of the model is presented, analyzed and contrasted with the previous one. We are also comparing our results with heuristic macroscopic models and real traffic observations.

  2. Macroscopic traffic modeling with the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Azarm, A.; Stock, D.

    1996-03-15

    A traffic congestion forecasting model (ATOP), developed in the present investigation, is described briefly. Several macroscopic models, based on the solution of the partial differential equation of conservation of vehicles by the finite difference method, were tested using actual traffic data. The functional form, as well as the parameters, of the equation of state which describes the relation between traffic speed and traffic density, were determined for a section of the Long Island Expressway. The Lax method and the forward difference technique were applied. The results of extensive tests showed that the Lax method, in addition to giving very good agreement with the traffic data, produces stable solutions.

  3. Nuclear masses from unified macroscopic-microscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.F.

    1988-07-01

    We calculate ground-state masses for 4678 nuclei ranging from /sup 16/O to /sup 318/122 by means of an improved version of the macroscopic-microscopic model employed in our 1981 mass calculation, which uses a Yukawa-plus-exponential model for the macroscopic term and a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential as starting point for the microscopic term. Some of the new features now incorporated are a new model for the average pairing strength, the solution of the microscopic pairing equations by use of the Lipkin-Nogami method with approximate particle-number conservation, the use of experimental mass uncertainties in determining the model parameters, and an estimation of the theoretical error of the model by application of the maximum-likelihood method. Only five parameters are determined from least-squares fitting to the nuclear masses; the other constants in the model are taken from previous work with no adjustment. The resulting theoretical error in the calculated ground-state masses fo 1593 nuclei ranging from /sup 16/O to /sup 263/106 is 0.832 MeV. We also extend the calculation to some additional nuclei in the heavy and superheavy region that were not considered in 1981. The present calculation represents an interim report on a project in which we plan to make further improvements and extend the region of nuclei considered to the neutron and proton drip lines. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  4. Multiscale modelling of pharmaceutical powders: Macroscopic behaviour prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Jonathan; Ketterhagen, William; Elliott, James

    2013-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry uses computer models at many stages during drug development. Quantum and molecular models are used to predict the crystal structures of potential active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), whereas discrete element models are used to optimise the mechanical properties of mixtures of APIs and excipient powders. The present work combines the strengths of modelling from all of the mentioned length scales to predict the behaviour of macroscopic powder granules from first principles using the molecular and crystal structures of acetazolamide as an example API. Starting with a single molecule of acetazolamide, ab initio self-consistent field calculations were used to calculate the equilibrium gas phase structure, vibrational spectra, interaction energy with water molecules and perform potential energy scans. By using these results and following the CHARMM General Force Field parameterisation process, all of the parameters required to perform a molecular dynamics simulation were iteratively determined using the CHARMM program. Next, by using crystallographic data from literature, the monoclinic and triclinic forms of the acetazolamide crystal were simulated. Material properties like the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio, and surface energies have been calculated. These material properties are then used as input parameters in a discrete element model containing Thornton's plastic model and the JKR cohesive force to predict the behaviour of macroscopic acetazolamide powder in angle of repose tests and tabletting simulations. Similar methodologies can be employed in the future to evaluate at an early stage the performance of novel APIs and excipients for tabletting applications.

  5. A macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Lerman, K; Galstyan, A; Martinoli, A; Ijspeert, A

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we present a macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in a group of reactive robots. The model consists of a series of coupled differential equations that describe the dynamics of group behavior. After presenting the general model, we analyze in detail a case study of collaboration, the stick-pulling experiment, studied experimentally and in simulation by Ijspeert et al. [Autonomous Robots, 11, 149-171]. The robots' task is to pull sticks out of their holes, and it can be successfully achieved only through the collaboration of two robots. There is no explicit communication or coordination between the robots. Unlike microscopic simulations (sensor-based or using a probabilistic numerical model), in which computational time scales with the robot group size, the macroscopic model is computationally efficient, because its solutions are independent of robot group size. Analysis reproduces several qualitative conclusions of Ijspeert et al.: namely, the different dynamical regimes for different values of the ratio of robots to sticks, the existence of optimal control parameters that maximize system performance as a function of group size, and the transition from superlinear to sublinear performance as the number of robots is increased. PMID:11911788

  6. Macroscopic extension of RRK and Weisskopf models of unimolecular evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Hermite, Jean-Marc; Zamith, Sebastien

    2012-10-01

    The macroscopic behavior of two microscopic unimolecular evaporation models is examined. The temperature dependences of bulk equilibrium vapor pressures deduced from the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (RRK) model and from the Weisskopf model, respectively, are compared. The bulk vapor pressures of sodium given by both models are compared, over a wide temperature range, with the experimental vapor pressures. The Weisskopf model is in better agreement with the experimental data than the RRK theory: from the melting temperature to the critical temperature (˜ 370 K-2500 K), the vapor pressures of sodium calculated using the Weisskopf model agree with experimental values within 2%, whereas the RRK theory leads to errors of more than 40%. The Weisskopf theory satisfying the detailed balance principle, whereas the RRK theory does not, may explain this result.

  7. The geochemistry and bioreactivity of fly-ash from coal-burning power stations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Timothy; Wlodarczyk, Anna; Koshy, Lata; Brown, Patrick; Shao, Longyi; BéruBé, Kelly

    2009-07-01

    Fly-ash is a byproduct of the combustion of coal in power stations for the generation of electricity. The fly-ash forms from the melting of incombustible minerals found naturally in the coal. The very high coal combustion temperatures result in the formation of microscopic glass particles from which minerals such as quartz, haematite and mullite can later recrystallize. In addition to these minerals, the glassy fly-ash contains a number of leachable metals. Mullite is a well-known material in the ceramics industry and a known respiratory hazard. Macroscopically mullite can be found in a large range of morphologies; however microscopic crystals appear to favour a fibrous habit. Fly-ash is a recognized bioreactive material in rat lung, generating hydroxyl radicals, releasing iron, and causing DNA damage. However, the mechanisms of the bioreactivity are still unclear and the relative contributions of the minerals and leachable metals to that toxicity are not well known. PMID:19604058

  8. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake: soil and root resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopic physically-based plant root water uptake (RWU) model, based on water-potential-gradient formulation (Vogel et al., 2013), was used to simulate the observed soil-plant-atmosphere interactions at a forest site located in a temperate humid climate of central Europe and to gain an improved insight into the mutual interplay of RWU parameters that affects the soil water distribution in the root zone. In the applied RWU model, the uptake rates are directly proportional to the potential gradient and indirectly proportional to the local soil and root resistances to water flow. The RWU algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional dual-continuum model of soil water flow based on Richards' equation. The RWU model is defined by four parameters (root length density distribution, average active root radius, radial root resistance, and the threshold value of the root xylem potential). In addition, soil resistance to water extraction by roots is related to soil hydraulic conductivity function and actual soil water content. The RWU model is capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake, in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers, and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water, contributing to more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The present study focusses on the sensitivity analysis of the combined soil water flow and RWU model responses in respect to variations of RWU model parameters. Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154.

  9. Macroscopic singlet oxygen model incorporating photobleaching as an input parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    A macroscopic singlet oxygen model for photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used extensively to calculate the reacted singlet oxygen concentration for various photosensitizers. The four photophysical parameters (ξ, σ, β, δ) and threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]r,sh) can be found for various drugs and drug-light intervals using a fitting algorithm. The input parameters for this model include the fluence, photosensitizer concentration, optical properties, and necrosis radius. An additional input variable of photobleaching was implemented in this study to optimize the results. Photobleaching was measured by using the pre-PDT and post-PDT sensitizer concentrations. Using the RIF model of murine fibrosarcoma, mice were treated with a linear source with fluence rates from 12 - 150 mW/cm and total fluences from 24 - 135 J/cm. The two main drugs investigated were benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH). Previously published photophysical parameters were fine-tuned and verified using photobleaching as the additional fitting parameter. Furthermore, photobleaching can be used as an indicator of the robustness of the model for the particular mouse experiment by comparing the experimental and model-calculated photobleaching ratio.

  10. Explicit dosimetry for photodynamic therapy: macroscopic singlet oxygen modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Finlay, Jarod C.; Busch, Theresa M.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic agent responsible for cell killing for type-II photodynamic therapy (PDT). An empirical four-parameter macroscopic model is proposed to calculate the “apparent reacted 1O2 concentration”, [1O2]rx, as a clinical PDT dosimetry quantity. This model incorporates light diffusion equation and a set of PDT kinetics equations, which can be applied in any clinical treatment geometry. We demonstrate that by introducing a fitting quantity “apparent singlet oxygen threshold concentration” [1O2]rx,sd, it is feasible to determine the model parameters by fitting the computed [1O2]rx to the Photofrin-mediated PDT-induced necrotic distance using interstitially-measured Photofrin concentration and optical properties within each mouse. After determining the model parameters and the [1O2]rx,sd, we expect to use this model as an explicit dosimetry to assess PDT treatment outcome for a specific photosensitizer in an in vivo environment. The results also provide evidence that the [1O2]rx, because it takes into account the oxygen consumption (or light fluence rate) effect, can be a better predictor of PDT outcome than the PDT dose defined as the energy absorbed by the photosensitizer, which is proportional to the product of photosensitizer concentration and light fluence. PMID:20222102

  11. Using travel times to simulate multi-dimensional bioreactive transport in time-periodic flows.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Finkel, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2016-04-01

    In travel-time models, the spatially explicit description of reactive transport is replaced by associating reactive-species concentrations with the travel time or groundwater age at all locations. These models have been shown adequate for reactive transport in river-bank filtration under steady-state flow conditions. Dynamic hydrological conditions, however, can lead to fluctuations of infiltration velocities, putting the validity of travel-time models into question. In transient flow, the local travel-time distributions change with time. We show that a modified version of travel-time based reactive transport models is valid if only the magnitude of the velocity fluctuates, whereas its spatial orientation remains constant. We simulate nonlinear, one-dimensional, bioreactive transport involving oxygen, nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, considering periodic fluctuations of velocity. These fluctuations make the bioreactive system pulsate: The aerobic zone decreases at times of low velocity and increases at those of high velocity. For the case of diurnal fluctuations, the biomass concentrations cannot follow the hydrological fluctuations and a transition zone containing both aerobic and obligatory denitrifying bacteria is established, whereas a clear separation of the two types of bacteria prevails in the case of seasonal velocity fluctuations. We map the 1-D results to a heterogeneous, two-dimensional domain by means of the mean groundwater age for steady-state flow in both domains. The mapped results are compared to simulation results of spatially explicit, two-dimensional, advective-dispersive-bioreactive transport subject to the same relative fluctuations of velocity as in the one-dimensional model. The agreement between the mapped 1-D and the explicit 2-D results is excellent. We conclude that travel-time models of nonlinear bioreactive transport are adequate in systems of time-periodic flow if the flow direction does not change

  12. Using travel times to simulate multi-dimensional bioreactive transport in time-periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Finkel, Michael; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2016-04-01

    In travel-time models, the spatially explicit description of reactive transport is replaced by associating reactive-species concentrations with the travel time or groundwater age at all locations. These models have been shown adequate for reactive transport in river-bank filtration under steady-state flow conditions. Dynamic hydrological conditions, however, can lead to fluctuations of infiltration velocities, putting the validity of travel-time models into question. In transient flow, the local travel-time distributions change with time. We show that a modified version of travel-time based reactive transport models is valid if only the magnitude of the velocity fluctuates, whereas its spatial orientation remains constant. We simulate nonlinear, one-dimensional, bioreactive transport involving oxygen, nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, aerobic and denitrifying bacteria, considering periodic fluctuations of velocity. These fluctuations make the bioreactive system pulsate: The aerobic zone decreases at times of low velocity and increases at those of high velocity. For the case of diurnal fluctuations, the biomass concentrations cannot follow the hydrological fluctuations and a transition zone containing both aerobic and obligatory denitrifying bacteria is established, whereas a clear separation of the two types of bacteria prevails in the case of seasonal velocity fluctuations. We map the 1-D results to a heterogeneous, two-dimensional domain by means of the mean groundwater age for steady-state flow in both domains. The mapped results are compared to simulation results of spatially explicit, two-dimensional, advective-dispersive-bioreactive transport subject to the same relative fluctuations of velocity as in the one-dimensional model. The agreement between the mapped 1-D and the explicit 2-D results is excellent. We conclude that travel-time models of nonlinear bioreactive transport are adequate in systems of time-periodic flow if the flow direction does not change.

  13. Microscopic reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cárdenas, Fernando C.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.

    2016-09-01

    We present coarse-grained descriptions and computations of the time evolution of a lattice gas system of indistinguishable particles, whose microscopic laws of motion are exactly reversible, in order to investigate how or what kind of macroscopically irreversible behavior may eventually arise. With increasing coarse-graining and number of particles, relative fluctuations of entropy rapidly decrease and apparently irreversible behavior unfolds. Although that behavior becomes typical in those limits and within a certain range, it is never absolutely irreversible for any individual system with specific initial conditions. Irreversible behavior may arise in various ways. We illustrate one possibility by replacing detailed integer occupation numbers at lattice sites with particle probability densities that evolve diffusively.

  14. Applicability of Travel- and Exposure-Time Concepts to Nonlinear Bioreactive Transport in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arie Cirpka, Olaf; Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Loschko, Matthias; Finkel, Michael; Lu, Chuanhe

    2016-04-01

    Travel-time based concepts of modeling subsurface transport have been established as computationally efficient alternatives to spatially explicit simulation methods. The spatial coordinates are replaced by travel time, resulting in one-dimensional transport with a constant „velocity" of unity. The concept is straight forward in linear transport applications, and under these conditions the results are exact provided that the coefficients of linear transport don't vary in space. In nonlinear transport, mixing can jeopardize the validity of the approach. This holds particularly true for transverse mixing, exchanging solute mass between streamtubes. We have performed systematic analyses of nonlinear bioreactive transport, involving oxygen, nitrate, organic carbon, as well as aerobic and denitrifying bacteria to analyzed under which conditions the errors introduced by travel-time and similar formulations are negligible. In steady-state flows with uniform reactive parameters, an excellent agreement between multi-dimensional reactive transport results, affected by transverse dispersion and flow heterogeneity, and one-dimensional travel-time results could be achieved by mapping the reactive-species concentrations to the multi-dimensional domain according to the local mean groundwater age. Aliasing of local transverse dispersion to macroscopically longitudinal mixing can be addressed by using a distance-dependent longitudinal dispersion coefficient. The approach also works for transient flows as long as the direction of flow remains constant and only the magnitude varies. Under these conditions, the groundwater age for the time-averaged velocity field is an adequate mapping variable, provided that flow transients are accounted for in the one- and multi-dimensional simulations. If the reaction takes place only in specific regions, the time of exposure to the according conditions is a better predictor of reactive transport than the overall travel time. Spatially variable

  15. Macroscopic models for predicting changes in saturated porous media properties caused by microbial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Hooker, B.S.; Skeen, R.S.

    1996-09-01

    Analytical equations are developed to model changes in porosity, specific surface area, and permeability caused by biomass accumulation in porous media. The proposed equations do not assume any specific pattern for microbial growth but instead are based on macroscopic estimates of average biomass concentrations. For porous media with a pore-size distribution index value ({lambda}) equal to 3, the macroscopic model predictions of porosity, specific surface area, and permeability changes are in exact agreement with biofilm-model predictions. At other values of {lambda} between 2 and 5, simulated porosity profiles are identical and relative specific surface area and permeability profiles show minor deviations. In comparison to biofilm-based models, the macroscopic models are relatively simple to implement and are computationally more efficient. Simulations of biologically reactive flow in a one-dimensional column show that the macroscopic and biofilm approach based transport codes predict almost identical porosity and permeability profiles. The macroscopic models are simple and useful tools for estimating changes in various porous media properties during bioremediation of contaminated aquifers.

  16. Manufacturing of bioreactive nanofibers for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ho-Wang; Mutlu, Baris R; Wackett, Lawrence P; Aksan, Alptekin

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were successfully encapsulated in reactive membranes comprised of electrospun nanofibers that have biocompatible polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based cores entrapping the E. coli and silica-based, mechanically sturdy porous shells. The reactive membranes were produced in a continuous fashion using a coaxial electrospinning system coupled to a microfluidic timer that mixed and regulated the reaction time of the silica precursor and the PVA solution streams. A factorial design method was employed to investigate the effects of the three critical design parameters of the system (the flow rate of the core solution, protrusion of the core needle, and the viscosity of the core solution) and to optimize these parameters for reproducibly and continuously producing high-quality core/shell nanofibers. The feasibility of using the reactive membranes manufactured in this fashion for bioremediation of atrazine, a herbicide, was also investigated. The atrazine degradation rate (0.24 µmol/g of E. coli/min) of the encapsulated E. coli cells expressing the atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme AtzA was measured to be relatively close to that measured with the free cells in solution (0.64 µmol/g of E. coli/min). We show here that the low cost, high flexibility, water insolubility, and high degradation efficiency of the bioreactive membranes manufactured with electrospinning makes it feasible for their wide-spread use in industrial scale bioremediation of contaminated waters. PMID:24615064

  17. Kinetic Modelling of Macroscopic Properties Changes during Crosslinked Polybutadiene Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouin, Ludmila; Coquillat, Marie; Colin, Xavier; Verdu, Jacques; Nevière, Robert

    2008-08-01

    The thermal oxidation of additive free hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) isocyanate crosslinked rubber bulk samples has been studied at 80, 100 and 120 °C in air. The oxidation kinetics has been monitored by gravimetry and thickness distribution of oxidation products was determined by FTIR mapping. Changes of elastic shear modulus G' during oxidation were followed during oxidation at the same temperatures. The kinetic model established previously for HTPB has been adapted for bulk sample oxidation using previously determined set of kinetic parameters. Oxygen diffusion control of oxidation has been introduced into the model. The mass changes kinetic curves and oxidation products profiles were simulated and adequate fit was obtained. Using the rubber elasticity theory the elastic modulus changes were simulated taking into account the elastically active chains concentration changes due to chain scission and crosslinking reactions. The reasonable fit of G' as a function of oxidation time experimental curves was obtained.

  18. From microscopic taxation and redistribution models to macroscopic income distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertotti, Maria Letizia; Modanese, Giovanni

    2011-10-01

    We present here a general framework, expressed by a system of nonlinear differential equations, suitable for the modeling of taxation and redistribution in a closed society. This framework allows one to describe the evolution of income distribution over the population and to explain the emergence of collective features based on knowledge of the individual interactions. By making different choices of the framework parameters, we construct different models, whose long-time behavior is then investigated. Asymptotic stationary distributions are found, which enjoy similar properties as those observed in empirical distributions. In particular, they exhibit power law tails of Pareto type and their Lorenz curves and Gini indices are consistent with some real world ones.

  19. Microscopic and macroscopic modeling of femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Fokin, Vladimir B.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of femtosecond laser ablation of a bulk aluminum target is performed using two complementary approaches. The first method is single-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamics (HD) completed with a two-temperature equation of state (EOS). The second approach is a combination of classical molecular dynamics (MD) and a continuum model of a free electron subsystem. In both methods, an identical and accurate description of optical and transport properties of the electron subsystem is based on wide-range models reproducing effects of electron heat wave propagation, electron-phonon/ion coupling and laser energy absorption on a time-dependent profile of the dielectric function. For simulation of homogeneous nucleation in a metastable liquid phase, a kinetic model of nucleation is implemented in the HD approach. The phase diagrams of the EOS and MD potential are in good agreement that gives opportunity to compare the dynamics of laser ablation obtained by both methods directly. Results of simulation are presented in the range of incident fluences 0.1-20 J/cm2 and match well with experimental findings for an ablation crater depth. The MD accurately reproduces nonequilibrium phase transitions and takes into account surface effects on nanoscale. The HD approach demonstrates good qualitative agreement with the MD method in the dynamics of phase explosion and spallation. Other advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are examined and discussed.

  20. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  1. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  2. Macroscopic modeling for heat and water vapor transfer in dry snow by homogenization.

    PubMed

    Calonne, Neige; Geindreau, Christian; Flin, Frédéric

    2014-11-26

    Dry snow metamorphism, involved in several topics related to cryospheric sciences, is mainly linked to heat and water vapor transfers through snow including sublimation and deposition at the ice-pore interface. In this paper, the macroscopic equivalent modeling of heat and water vapor transfers through a snow layer was derived from the physics at the pore scale using the homogenization of multiple scale expansions. The microscopic phenomena under consideration are heat conduction, vapor diffusion, sublimation, and deposition. The obtained macroscopic equivalent model is described by two coupled transient diffusion equations including a source term arising from phase change at the pore scale. By dimensional analysis, it was shown that the influence of such source terms on the overall transfers can generally not be neglected, except typically under small temperature gradients. The precision and the robustness of the proposed macroscopic modeling were illustrated through 2D numerical simulations. Finally, the effective vapor diffusion tensor arising in the macroscopic modeling was computed on 3D images of snow. The self-consistent formula offers a good estimate of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to the snow density, within an average relative error of 10%. Our results confirm recent work that the effective vapor diffusion is not enhanced in snow. PMID:25011981

  3. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yen Vinokur, Marcel; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model’s accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  4. Microscopic Simulation and Macroscopic Modeling for Thermal and Chemical Non-Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Vinokur, Marcel; Clarke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the accurate microscopic simulation and macroscopic modeling of extreme non-equilibrium phenomena, such as encountered during hypersonic entry into a planetary atmosphere. The state-to-state microscopic equations involving internal excitation, de-excitation, dissociation, and recombination of nitrogen molecules due to collisions with nitrogen atoms are solved time-accurately. Strategies to increase the numerical efficiency are discussed. The problem is then modeled using a few macroscopic variables. The model is based on reconstructions of the state distribution function using the maximum entropy principle. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe the non-equilibrium gases. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients. The modeling is completely physics-based, and its accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used. The model makes no assumption at the microscopic level, and all possible collisional and radiative processes are allowed. The model is applicable to both atoms and molecules and their ions. Several limiting cases are presented to show that the model recovers the classical twotemperature models if all states are in one group and the model reduces to the microscopic equations if each group contains only one state. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out for both the uniform and linear distributions. Results show that the original over nine thousand microscopic equations can be reduced to 2 macroscopic equations using 1 to 5 groups with excellent agreement. The computer time is decreased from 18 hours to less than 1 second.

  5. Experimental test of macroscopic models for exchange anisotropy in FM/AF bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.; de Aguiar, F. M.; Lucena, M. A.; Fermin, J. R.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2004-05-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance measurements in two series of ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AF) bilayer samples of NiFe( t)/NiO and CoFe( t)/IrMn have been used to test macroscopic models for exchange anisotropy. The domain-wall model incorporating a rotatable anisotropy field is the one that best fits the data. All fields of interfacial origin extracted from the fits show the predicted 1 t dependence with the FM layer thickness.

  6. Determination of the low concentration correction in the macroscopic singlet oxygen model for PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    The macroscopic singlet oxygen model has been used for singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The photophysical parameters for commonly used sensitizers, HPPH and BPD, have been investigated in pre-clinical studies using mouse models. So far, studies have involved optimizing fitting algorithms to obtain the some of the photophysical parameters (ξ, σ, g) and the threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]rx,sh), while other parameters such as the low concentration correction, δ, has been kept as a constant. In this study, using photobleaching measurements of mice in vivo, the value of δ was also optimized and fit to better describe experimental data. Furthermore, the value of the specific photobleaching ratio (σ) was also fine-tuned using the photobleaching results. Based on literature values of δ, σ for photosensitizers can be uniquely determined using the additional photobleaching measurements. This routine will further improve the macroscopic model of singlet oxygen production for use in explicit dosimetry.

  7. Macroscopic degeneracy and order in the 3D plaquette Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Desmond A.; Mueller, Marco; Janke, Wolfhard

    2015-07-01

    The purely plaquette 3D Ising Hamiltonian with the spins living at the vertices of a cubic lattice displays several interesting features. The symmetries of the model lead to a macroscopic degeneracy of the low-temperature phase and prevent the definition of a standard magnetic order parameter. Consideration of the strongly anisotropic limit of the model suggests that a layered, “fuki-nuke” order still exists and we confirm this with multi-canonical simulations. The macroscopic degeneracy of the low-temperature phase also changes the finite-size scaling corrections at the first-order transition in the model and we see this must be taken into account when analyzing our measurements.

  8. Macroscopic modeling of anisotropic magnetostriction and magnetization in soft ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbengue, Serigne Saliou; Buiron, Nicolas; Lanfranchi, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic and magnetoelastic properties of soft ferromagnetic materials, used as laminated sheets, are sensitive to manufacturing processes such as rolling, cutting and coating. One of the effects of these processes is to induce an anisotropic behavior of materials. Therefore, an anhysteretic magnetostriction and magnetization calculation taking into account the anisotropy effect at macroscopic scale is presented. This model is based on the expression and then the minimization of the total energy in order to determine magnetization and magnetostriction at equilibrium. The total energy to minimize depends on energy terms identified from measurements of the magnetization and magnetostriction at a scale large enough to neglect the heterogeneity due to grains. Therefore, this approach attempts to reproduce ferromagnetic polycrystal behavior at macroscopic without knowing texture (Orientation Density Function) nor grain properties.

  9. Fission properties of Po isotopes in different macroscopic-microscopic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, J.; Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Schmitt, Ch

    2015-11-01

    Fission-barrier heights of nuclei in the Po isotopic chain are investigated in several macroscopic-microscopic models. Using the Yukawa-folded single-particle potential, the Lublin-Strasbourg drop (LSD) model, the Strutinsky shell-correction method to yield the shell corrections and the BCS theory for the pairing contributions, fission-barrier heights are calculated and found in quite good agreement with the experimental data. This turns out, however, to be only the case when the underlying macroscopic, liquid-drop (LD) type, theory is well chosen. Together with the LSD approach, different LD parametrizations proposed by Moretto et al are tested. Four deformation parameters describing respectively elongation, neck-formation, reflectional-asymmetric, and non-axiality of the nuclear shape thus defining the so called modified Funny Hills shape parametrization are used in the calculation. The present study clearly demonstrates that nuclear fission-barrier heights constitute a challenging and selective tool to discern between such different macroscopic approaches.

  10. Population dynamics of the modified theta model: macroscopic phase reduction and bifurcation analysis link microscopic neuronal interactions to macroscopic gamma oscillation.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Ikuhiro; Yoshida, Lui; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2014-06-01

    Gamma oscillations of the local field potential are organized by collective dynamics of numerous neurons and have many functional roles in cognition and/or attention. To mathematically and physiologically analyse relationships between individual inhibitory neurons and macroscopic oscillations, we derive a modification of the theta model, which possesses voltage-dependent dynamics with appropriate synaptic interactions. Bifurcation analysis of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) enables us to consider how synaptic interactions organize collective oscillations. We also develop the adjoint method (infinitesimal phase resetting curve) for simultaneous equations consisting of ordinary differential equations representing synaptic dynamics and a partial differential equation for determining the probability distribution of the membrane potential. This method provides a macroscopic phase response function (PRF), which gives insights into how it is modulated by external perturbation or internal changes of parameters. We investigate the effects of synaptic time constants and shunting inhibition on these gamma oscillations. The sensitivity of rising and decaying time constants is analysed in the oscillatory parameter regions; we find that these sensitivities are not largely dependent on rate of synaptic coupling but, rather, on current and noise intensity. Analyses of shunting inhibition reveal that it can affect both promotion and elimination of gamma oscillations. When the macroscopic oscillation is far from the bifurcation, shunting promotes the gamma oscillations and the PRF becomes flatter as the reversal potential of the synapse increases, indicating the insensitivity of gamma oscillations to perturbations. By contrast, when the macroscopic oscillation is near the bifurcation, shunting eliminates gamma oscillations and a stable firing state appears. More interestingly, under appropriate balance of parameters, two branches of bifurcation are found in our

  11. Measurement of cardiac output in children by bioreactance.

    PubMed

    Ballestero, Yolanda; López-Herce, Jesús; Urbano, Javier; Solana, Maria José; Botrán, Marta; Bellón, Jose M; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new bioreactance method for noninvasive cardiac output (CO) measurement (NICOM) in children. Ten patients between 1 and 144 months of age and with no hemodynamic disturbances were studied. Using bioreactance, heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac index (CI) measurements were made every 6-8 h. CI was 2.4 ± 1.03 l/min/1.73 m(2) (range 1-4.9 l/min/1.73 m(2)); There were significant correlations between CI and age (r = 0.50, P = 0.003), weight (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and MAP (r = 0.369, P = 0.037). Significant differences in CI (P < 0.001) were detected between children weighing <10 kg (1.9 ± 0.73 l/min/1.73 m(2); range 1-3.2), 10-20 kg (2.07 ± 0.7 l/min/1.73 m(2); range 1-3.6), and >20 kg (3.7 ± 0.8 l/min/1.73 m(2); range 2.4-4.9). We conclude that the CI measured by bioreactance in children varies with the age and weight of the patients and is lower than the normal range in a large percentage of measurements. These data suggest that this method is not useful for evaluating CI in small children. PMID:21318463

  12. Macroscopic Models of Local Field Potentials and the Apparent 1/f Noise in Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Claude; Destexhe, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The power spectrum of local field potentials (LFPs) has been reported to scale as the inverse of the frequency, but the origin of this 1/f noise is at present unclear. Macroscopic measurements in cortical tissue demonstrated that electric conductivity (as well as permittivity) is frequency-dependent, while other measurements failed to evidence any dependence on frequency. In this article, we propose a model of the genesis of LFPs that accounts for the above data and contradictions. Starting from first principles (Maxwell equations), we introduce a macroscopic formalism in which macroscopic measurements are naturally incorporated, and also examine different physical causes for the frequency dependence. We suggest that ionic diffusion primes over electric field effects, and is responsible for the frequency dependence. This explains the contradictory observations, and also reproduces the 1/f power spectral structure of LFPs, as well as more complex frequency scaling. Finally, we suggest a measurement method to reveal the frequency dependence of current propagation in biological tissue, and which could be used to directly test the predictions of this formalism. PMID:19348744

  13. Multivariate crash modeling for motor vehicle and non-motorized modes at the macroscopic level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Jiang, Ximiao

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic traffic crash analyses have been conducted to incorporate traffic safety into long-term transportation planning. This study aims at developing a multivariate Poisson lognormal conditional autoregressive model at the macroscopic level for crashes by different transportation modes such as motor vehicle, bicycle, and pedestrian crashes. Many previous studies have shown the presence of common unobserved factors across different crash types. Thus, it was expected that adopting multivariate model structure would show a better modeling performance since it can capture shared unobserved features across various types. The multivariate model and univariate model were estimated based on traffic analysis zones (TAZs) and compared. It was found that the multivariate model significantly outperforms the univariate model. It is expected that the findings from this study can contribute to more reliable traffic crash modeling, especially when focusing on different modes. Also, variables that are found significant for each mode can be used to guide traffic safety policy decision makers to allocate resources more efficiently for the zones with higher risk of a particular transportation mode. PMID:25790973

  14. An extended bioreaction database that significantly improves reconstruction and analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Michael; Sun, Jibin; Kamphans, Tom; Fekete, Sándor P; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-11-01

    The bioreaction database established by Ma and Zeng (Bioinformatics, 2003, 19, 270-277) for in silico reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks has been widely used. Based on more recent information in the reference databases KEGG LIGAND and Brenda, we upgrade the bioreaction database in this work by almost doubling the number of reactions from 3565 to 6851. Over 70% of the reactions have been manually updated/revised in terms of reversibility, reactant pairs, currency metabolites and error correction. For the first time, 41 spontaneous sugar mutarotation reactions are introduced into the biochemical database. The upgrade significantly improves the reconstruction of genome scale metabolic networks. Many gaps or missing biochemical links can be recovered, as exemplified with three model organisms Homo sapiens, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli. The topological parameters of the constructed networks were also largely affected, however, the overall network structure remains scale-free. Furthermore, we consider the problem of computing biologically feasible shortest paths in reconstructed metabolic networks. We show that these paths are hard to compute and present solutions to find such paths in networks of small and medium size. PMID:21952610

  15. Bridging the Gap between Mesoscopic and Macroscopic Models: The Case of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Griffa, M.; Condat, C. A.; Delsanto, S.; Morra, L.

    2005-04-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are valuable experimental tools in cancer research. By introducing an intermediate model, we have been able to successfully relate mesoscopic and macroscopic descriptions of spheroid growth. Since these descriptions stem from completely different roots (cell dynamics, and energy conservation and scaling arguments, respectively), their consistency validates both approaches and allows us to establish a direct correspondence between parameters characterizing processes occurring at different scales. Our approach may find applications as an example of bridging the gap between models at different scale levels in other contexts.

  16. Field-induced macroscopic barrier model for persistent photoconductivity in nanocrystalline oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun-Sik; Jeon, Sanghun

    2014-03-01

    Persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in nanocrystalline InZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) was studied using carrier fluctuation measurements and transient analysis. Low-frequency noise measurements and decay kinetics indicate that the band bending by the external field together with the ionized oxygen vacancy (Vo++) generated during the light exposure is the main cause of the PPC phenomenon. Based on these observations, a field-induced macroscopic barrier model is proposed as the origin of PPC for InZnO TFTs. In particular, this model explains that the carrier separation between e and Vo++ is induced by the external field applied to the three electrodes inside the transistor.

  17. Noninteractive macroscopic reliability model for ceramic matrix composites with orthotropic material symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    1989-01-01

    A macroscopic noninteractive reliability model for ceramic matrix composites is presented. The model is multiaxial and applicable to composites that can be characterized as orthotropic. Tensorial invariant theory is used to create an integrity basis with invariants that correspond to physical mechanisms related to fracture. This integrity basis is then used to construct a failure function per unit volume (or area) of material. It is assumed that the overall strength of the composite is governed by weakest link theory. This leads to a Weibull type model similar in nature to the principle of independent action (PIA) model for isotropic monolithic ceramics. An experimental program to obtain model parameters is briefly discussed. In addition, qualitative features of the model are illustrated by presenting reliability surfaces for various model parameters.

  18. Existence and stability of limit cycles in a macroscopic neuronal population model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Serafim; Gonçalves, Jorge; Terry, John R.

    2007-09-01

    We present rigorous results concerning the existence and stability of limit cycles in a macroscopic model of neuronal activity. The specific model we consider is developed from the Ki set methodology, popularized by Walter Freeman. In particular we focus on a specific reduction of the KII sets, denoted RKII sets. We analyse the unfolding of supercritical Hopf bifurcations via consideration of the normal forms and centre manifold reductions. Subsequently we analyse the global stability of limit cycles on a region of parameter space and this is achieved by applying a new methodology termed Global Analysis of Piecewise Linear Systems. The analysis presented may also be used to consider coupled systems of this type. A number of macroscopic mean-field approaches to modelling human EEG may be considered as coupled RKII networks. Hence developing a theoretical understanding of the onset of oscillations in models of this type has important implications in clinical neuroscience, as limit cycle oscillations have been demonstrated to be critical in the onset of certain types of epilepsy.

  19. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    . At the same time, however, there is increased urgency to develop such an understanding in order to more accurately quantify the process. In order to better understand the results obtained from our prior space experiments, and design future experiments, a detailed fluid dynamic model simulating the crystal growth mechanism is required. This will not only add to the fundamental knowledge on the crystallization of zeolites, but also be useful in predicting the limits of size and growth of these important industrial materials. Our objective is to develop macro/microscopic theoretical and computational models to study the effect of transport phenomena in the growth of crystals grown in solutions. Our effort has concentrated so far in the development of separate macroscopic and microscopic models. The major highlights of our accomplishments are described.

  20. Mapping Nonequilibrium onto Equilibrium: The Macroscopic Fluctuations of Simple Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailleur, Julien; Kurchan, Jorge; Lecomte, Vivien

    2007-10-01

    We study a simple transport model driven out of equilibrium by reservoirs at the boundaries, corresponding to the hydrodynamic limit of the symmetric simple exclusion process. We show that a nonlocal transformation of densities and currents maps the large deviations of the model into those of an open, isolated chain satisfying detailed balance, where rare fluctuations are the time reversals of relaxations. We argue that the existence of such a mapping is the immediate reason why it is possible for this model to obtain an explicit solution for the large-deviation function of densities through elementary changes of variables. This approach can be generalized to the other models previously treated with the macroscopic fluctuation theory.

  1. A model of cellular dosimetry for macroscopic tumors in radiopharmaceutical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Baechler, Sébastien; Fu, De-Xue; Esaias, Caroline; Pomper, Martin G.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Sgouros, George

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In the radiopharmaceutical therapy approach to the fight against cancer, in particular when it comes to translating laboratory results to the clinical setting, modeling has served as an invaluable tool for guidance and for understanding the processes operating at the cellular level and how these relate to macroscopic observables. Tumor control probability (TCP) is the dosimetric end point quantity of choice which relates to experimental and clinical data: it requires knowledge of individual cellular absorbed doses since it depends on the assessment of the treatment’s ability to kill each and every cell. Macroscopic tumors, seen in both clinical and experimental studies, contain too many cells to be modeled individually in Monte Carlo simulation; yet, in particular for low ratios of decays to cells, a cell-based model that does not smooth away statistical considerations associated with low activity is a necessity. The authors present here an adaptation of the simple sphere-based model from which cellular level dosimetry for macroscopic tumors and their end point quantities, such as TCP, may be extrapolated more reliably. Methods: Ten homogenous spheres representing tumors of different sizes were constructed in GEANT4. The radionuclide 131I was randomly allowed to decay for each model size and for seven different ratios of number of decays to number of cells, Nr: 1000, 500, 200, 100, 50, 20, and 10 decays per cell. The deposited energy was collected in radial bins and divided by the bin mass to obtain the average bin absorbed dose. To simulate a cellular model, the number of cells present in each bin was calculated and an absorbed dose attributed to each cell equal to the bin average absorbed dose with a randomly determined adjustment based on a Gaussian probability distribution with a width equal to the statistical uncertainty consistent with the ratio of decays to cells, i.e., equal to Nr-1∕2. From dose volume histograms the surviving fraction of cells

  2. Macroscopic modelling of bioethanol production from potato peel wastes in batch cultures supplemented with inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Richelle, A; Ben Tahar, I; Hassouna, M; Bogaerts, Ph

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic nitrogen supplementation is commonly used to boost fermentation metabolism in yeast cultures. However, an excessive addition can induce an opposite effect. Hence, it is important to ensure that the ammonia supplemented to the culture leads to an improvement of the ethanol production while avoiding undesirable inhibition effects. To this end, a macroscopic model describing the influence of ammonia addition on Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism during bioethanol production from potato peel wastes has been developed. The model parameters are obtained by a simplified identification methodology in five steps. It is validated with experimental data and successfully predicts the dynamics of growth, substrate consumption (ammonia and fermentable sugar sources) and bioethanol production, even in cross validation. The model is used to determine the optimal quantity of supplemented ammonia required for maximizing bioethanol production from potato peel wastes in batch cultures. PMID:26059818

  3. Macroscopic cloud properties in the WRF NWP model: An assessment using sky camera and ceilometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbizu-Barrena, Clara; Pozo-Vázquez, David; Ruiz-Arias, José A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquín.

    2015-10-01

    The ability of six microphysical parameterizations included in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model to represent various macroscopic cloud characteristics at multiple spatial and temporal resolutions is investigated. In particular, the model prediction skills of cloud occurrence, cloud base height, and cloud cover are assessed. When it is possible, the results are provided separately for low-, middle-, and high-level clouds. The microphysical parameterizations assessed are WRF single-moment six-class, Thompson, Milbrandt-Yau, Morrison, Stony Brook University, and National Severe Storms Laboratory double moment. The evaluated macroscopic cloud properties are determined based on the model cloud fractions. Two cloud fraction approaches, namely, a binary cloud fraction and a continuous cloud fraction, are investigated. Model cloud cover is determined by overlapping the vertically distributed cloud fractions following three different strategies. The evaluation is conducted based on observations gathered with a ceilometer and a sky camera located in Jaén (southern Spain). The results prove that the reliability of the WRF model mostly depends on the considered cloud parameter, cloud level, and spatiotemporal resolution. In our test bed, it is found that WRF model tends to (i) overpredict the occurrence of high-level clouds irrespectively of the spatial resolution, (ii) underestimate the cloud base height, and (iii) overestimate the cloud cover. Overall, the best cloud estimates are found for finer spatial resolutions (1.3 and 4 km with slight differences between them) and coarser temporal resolutions. The roles of the parameterization choice of the microphysics scheme and the cloud overlapping strategy are, in general, less relevant.

  4. Global properties of even-even superheavy nuclei in macroscopic-microscopic models

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Andrzej; Lojewski, Zdzislaw; Sieja, Kamila; Kowal, Michal

    2005-10-01

    A systematic study of global properties of superheavy nuclei in the framework of macroscopic-microscopic method is performed. Equilibrium deformations, masses, quadrupole moments, radii, shell energies, fission barriers and half-lives are calculated using the following macroscopic models: Myers-Swiatecki liquid drop, droplet, Yukawa-plus-exponential, and Lublin-Strasbourg drop. Shell and pairing energies are calculated in Woods-Saxon potential with a universal set of parameters. The analysis covers a wide range of even-even superheavy nuclei from Z=100 to 122. Magic and semimagic numbers occurring in this region are indicated and their influence on the observables is discussed. The strongest shell effects appear at proton number Z=114 and at neutron number N=184. Deformed shell closures are found at N=152 and 162. Spontaneous fission half-lives are calculated in a dynamical approach where the full minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional deformation space of {beta} deformations is performed. The fission half-lives obtained this way are two orders of magnitude smaller than the ones resulting from static calculations. The agreement of theoretical results and experimental data is satisfying.

  5. A Microscopic “Social Norm” Model to Obtain Realistic Macroscopic Velocity and Density Pedestrian Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Zanlungo, Francesco; Ikeda, Tetsushi; Kanda, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a “social norm” in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The “social norm” is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same “social norm” (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians). By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns. PMID:23227202

  6. Shock structure and temperature overshoot in macroscopic multi-temperature model of mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarević, Damir; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Simić, Srboljub

    2014-10-01

    The paper discusses the shock structure in macroscopic multi-temperature model of gaseous mixtures, recently established within the framework of extended thermodynamics. The study is restricted to weak and moderate shocks in a binary mixture of ideal gases with negligible viscosity and heat conductivity. The model predicts the existence of temperature overshoot of heavier constituent, like more sophisticated approaches, but also puts in evidence its non-monotonic behavior not documented in other studies. This phenomenon is explained as a consequence of weak energy exchange between the constituents, either due to large mass difference, or large rarefaction of the mixture. In the range of small Mach number it is also shown that shock thickness (or equivalently, the inverse of Knudsen number) decreases with the increase of Mach number, as well as when the mixture tends to behave like a single-component gas (small mass difference and/or presence of one constituent in traces).

  7. A macroscopic model for countercurrent gas-liquid flow in packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Dankworth, D.C.; Sundaresan, S. )

    1989-08-01

    A macroscopic model based on the volume-averaged equations of motion is presented for countercurrent gas-liquid flow in a packed bed. The model yields a column-limited flooding point as the loss of existence of uniform states. It correctly predicts the existence of two uniform states below the flooding point. The lower branch corresponds to the trends commonly observed experimentally. It is shown that the upper branch is made unattainable by the gas distributor/support plate at the bottom of the column. The occurrence of premature flooding induced by the support plate is also explained. It is suggested that the occurrence of spontaneous liquid segregation, necessitating frequent liquid redistribution in columns with large dumped packings and porosities, is a consequence of the loss of stability of the uniform state in the lower branch.

  8. Shock structure and temperature overshoot in macroscopic multi-temperature model of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Madjarević, Damir Simić, Srboljub; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2014-10-15

    The paper discusses the shock structure in macroscopic multi-temperature model of gaseous mixtures, recently established within the framework of extended thermodynamics. The study is restricted to weak and moderate shocks in a binary mixture of ideal gases with negligible viscosity and heat conductivity. The model predicts the existence of temperature overshoot of heavier constituent, like more sophisticated approaches, but also puts in evidence its non-monotonic behavior not documented in other studies. This phenomenon is explained as a consequence of weak energy exchange between the constituents, either due to large mass difference, or large rarefaction of the mixture. In the range of small Mach number it is also shown that shock thickness (or equivalently, the inverse of Knudsen number) decreases with the increase of Mach number, as well as when the mixture tends to behave like a single-component gas (small mass difference and/or presence of one constituent in traces)

  9. Multiphase Bioreaction Microsystem with Automated On-Chip Droplet Operation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Burns, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    A droplet-based bioreaction microsystem has been developed with automated droplet generation and confinement. On-chip electronic sensing is employed to track the position of the droplets by sensing the oil/aqueous interface in real time. The sensing signal is also used to control the pneumatic supply for moving as well as automatically generating four different nanoliter-sized droplets. The actual size of droplets is very close to the designed droplet size with a standard deviation less than 3% of the droplet size. The automated droplet generation can be completed in less than 2 sec, which is 5 times faster than using manual operation that takes at least 10 sec. Droplets can also be automatically confined in the reaction region with feedback pneumatic control and digital or analog sensing. As an example bioreaction, PCR has been successfully performed in the automated generated droplets. Although the amplification yield was slightly reduced with the droplet confinement, especially while using the analog sensing method, adding additional reagents effectively alleviated this inhibition. PMID:20445885

  10. Studying enzymatic bioreactions in a millisecond microfluidic flow mixer

    PubMed Central

    Buchegger, Wolfgang; Haller, Anna; van den Driesche, Sander; Kraft, Martin; Lendl, Bernhard; Vellekoop, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the pre-steady state development of enzymatic bioreactions using a microfluidic mixer is presented. To follow such reactions fast mixing of reagents (enzyme and substrate) is crucial. By using a highly efficient passive micromixer based on multilaminar flow, mixing times in the low millisecond range are reached. Four lamination layers in a shallow channel reduce the diffusion lengths to a few micrometers only, enabling very fast mixing. This was proven by confocal fluorescence measurements in the channel’s cross sectional area. Adjusting the overall flow rate in the 200 μm wide and 900 μm long mixing and observation channel makes it possible to investigate enzyme reactions over several seconds. Further, the device enables changing the enzyme/substrate ratio from 1:1 up to 3:1, while still providing high mixing efficiency, as shown for the enzymatic hydrolysis using β-galactosidase. This way, the early kinetics of the enzyme reaction at multiple enzyme/substrate concentrations can be collected in a very short time (minutes). The fast and easy handling of the mixing device makes it a very powerful and convenient instrument for millisecond temporal analysis of bioreactions. PMID:22662071

  11. Numerical model for macroscopic quantum superpositions based on phase-covariant quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buraczewski, A.; Stobińska, M.

    2012-10-01

    Macroscopically populated quantum superpositions pose a question to what extent the macroscopic world obeys quantum mechanical laws. Recently, such superpositions for light, generated by an optimal quantum cloner, have been demonstrated. They are of fundamental and technological interest. We present numerical methods useful for modeling of these states. Their properties are governed by a Gaussian hypergeometric function, which cannot be reduced to either elementary or easily tractable functions. We discuss the method of efficient computation of this function for half-integer parameters and a moderate value of its argument. We show how to dynamically estimate a cutoff for infinite sums involving this function performed over its parameters. Our algorithm exceeds double precision and is parallelizable. Depending on the experimental parameters it chooses one of the several ways of summation to achieve the best efficiency. The methods presented here can be adjusted for analysis of similar experimental schemes. Program summary Program title: MQSVIS Catalogue identifier: AEMR_ v1_ 0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1643 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13212 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C with OpenMP extensions (main numerical program), Python (helper scripts). Computer: Modern PC (tested on AMD and Intel processors), HP BL2x220. Operating system: Unix/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes (OpenMP). RAM: 200 MB for single run for 1000×1000 tile Classification: 4.15, 18. External routines: OpenMP Nature of problem: Recently, macroscopically populated quantum superpositions for light, generated by an optimal quantum cloner, have

  12. Study of tissue oxygen supply rate in a macroscopic photodynamic therapy singlet oxygen model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liu, Baochang; Penjweini, Rozhin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An appropriate expression for the oxygen supply rate (Γs) is required for the macroscopic modeling of the complex mechanisms of photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is unrealistic to model the actual heterogeneous tumor microvascular networks coupled with the PDT processes because of the large computational requirement. In this study, a theoretical microscopic model based on uniformly distributed Krogh cylinders is used to calculate Γs=g (1−[O32]/[O32]0) that can replace the complex modeling of blood vasculature while maintaining a reasonable resemblance to reality; g is the maximum oxygen supply rate and [O32]/[O32]0 is the volume-average tissue oxygen concentration normalized to its value prior to PDT. The model incorporates kinetic equations of oxygen diffusion and convection within capillaries and oxygen saturation from oxyhemoglobin. Oxygen supply to the tissue is via diffusion from the uniformly distributed blood vessels. Oxygen can also diffuse along the radius and the longitudinal axis of the cylinder within tissue. The relations of Γs to [3O2]/[3O2]0 are examined for a biologically reasonable range of the physiological parameters for the microvasculature and several light fluence rates (ϕ). The results show a linear relationship between Γs and [3O2]/[3O2]0, independent of ϕ and photochemical parameters; the obtained g ranges from 0.4 to 1390  μM/s. PMID:25741665

  13. A two-scale model for sheared fault gouge: Competition between macroscopic disorder and local viscoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, A. E.; Carlson, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a model for sheared gouge layers that accounts for the local increase in temperature at the grain contacts during sliding. We use the shear transformation zone theory, a statistical thermodynamic theory, to describe irreversible macroscopic plastic deformations due to local rearrangements of the gouge particles. We track the temperature evolution at the grain contacts using a one-dimensional heat diffusion equation. At low temperatures, the strength of the asperities is limited by the flow strength, as predicted by dislocation creep models. At high temperatures, some of the constituents of the grains may melt leading to the degradation of the asperity strength. Our model predicts a logarithmic rate dependence of the steady state shear stress in the quasistatic regime. In the dense flow regime the frictional strength decreases rapidly with increasing slip rate due to thermal softening at the granular interfaces. The transient response following a step in strain rate includes a direct effect and a following evolution effect, both of which depend on the magnitude and direction of the velocity step. In addition to frictional heat, the energy budget includes an additional energy sink representing the fraction of external work consumed in increasing local disorder. The model links low-speed and high-speed frictional response of gouge layers and provides an essential ingredient for multiscale modeling of earthquake ruptures with enhanced coseismic weakening.

  14. Improving macroscopic modeling of the effect of water and osmotic stresses on root water uptake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorda Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modeling of water and salt stresses on root water uptake is critical for predicting impacts of global change and climate variability on crop production and soil water balances. Soil-hydrological models use reduction functions to represent the effect of osmotic stress in transpiration. However, these functions, which were developed empirically, present limitations in relation to the time and spatial scale at which they need to be used, fail to include compensation processes and do not agree on how water and salt stresses interact. This research intends to develop a macroscopic reduction function for water and osmotic stresses based on biophysical knowledge. Simulation experiments are conducted for a range of atmospheric conditions, soil and plant properties, irrigation water quality and scheduling using a 3-D physically-based model that resolves flow and transport to individual root segments and that couples flow in the soil and root system (Schröder et al., 2013). The effect of salt concentrations on water flow in the soil-root system is accounted for by including osmotic water potential gradients between the solution at the soil root interface and the root xylem sap in the hydraulic gradient between the soil and root. In a first step, simulation experiments are carried out in a soil volume around a single root segment. We discuss how the simulation setup can be defined so as to represent: (i) certain characteristics of the root system such as rooting depth and root length density, (ii) plant transpiration rate, (iii) leaching fraction of the irrigation, and (iii) salinity of the irrigation water. The output of these simulation experiments gives a first insight in the effect of salinity on transpiration and on the relation between the bulk salinity in the soil voxel, which is used in macroscopic salt stress functions of models that do not resolve processes at the root segment scale, and the salinity at the soil-root interface, which determines the actual

  15. A master equation formalism for macroscopic modeling of asynchronous irregular activity states.

    PubMed

    El Boustani, Sami; Destexhe, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to modeling asynchronous irregular (AI) activity states, which resemble the complex activity states seen in the cerebral cortex of awake animals. Most of models have considered balanced networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons in which AI states are sustained through recurrent sparse connectivity, with or without external input. In this letter we propose a mesoscopic description of such AI states. Using master equation formalism, we derive a second-order mean-field set of ordinary differential equations describing the temporal evolution of randomly connected balanced networks. This formalism takes into account finite size effects and is applicable to any neuron model as long as its transfer function can be characterized. We compare the predictions of this approach with numerical simulations for different network configurations and parameter spaces. Considering the randomly connected network as a unit, this approach could be used to build large-scale networks of such connected units, with an aim to model activity states constrained by macroscopic measurements, such as voltage-sensitive dye imaging. PMID:19210171

  16. A robust macroscopic model for normal–shear coupling, asymmetric and anisotropic behaviors of polycrystalline SMAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghi, M.; Damanpack, A. R.; Liao, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this article is to develop a robust macroscopic bi-axial model to capture self-accommodation, martensitic transformation/orientation/reorientation, normal–shear deformation coupling and asymmetric/anisotropic strain generation in polycrystalline shape memory alloys. By considering the volume fraction of martensite and its preferred direction as scalar and directional internal variables, constitutive relations are derived to describe basic mechanisms of accommodation, transformation and orientation/reorientation of martensite variants. A new definition is introduced for maximum recoverable strain, which allows the model to capture the effects of tension–compression asymmetry and transformation anisotropy. Furthermore, the coupling effects between normal and shear deformation modes are considered by merging inelastic strain components together. By introducing a calibration approach, material and kinetic parameters of the model are recast in terms of common quantities that characterize a uniaxial phase kinetic diagram. The solution algorithm of the model is presented based on an elastic-predictor inelastic-corrector return mapping process. In order to explore and demonstrate capabilities of the proposed model, theoretical predictions are first compared with existing experimental results on uniaxial tension, compression, torsion and combined tension–torsion tests. Afterwards, experimental results of uniaxial tension, compression, pure bending and buckling tests on {{NiTi}} rods and tubes are replicated by implementing a finite element method along with the Newton–Raphson and Riks techniques to trace non-linear equilibrium path. A good qualitative and quantitative correlation is observed between numerical and experimental results, which verifies the accuracy of the model and the solution procedure.

  17. A macroscopic model for slightly compressible gas slip-flow in homogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseux, D.; Parada, F. J. Valdes; Tapia, J. A. Ochoa; Goyeau, B.

    2014-05-01

    The study of gas slip-flow in porous media is relevant in many applications ranging from nanotechnology to enhanced oil recovery and in any situation involving low-pressure gas-transport through structures having sufficiently small pores. In this paper, we use the method of volume averaging for deriving effective-medium equations in the framework of a slightly compressible gas flow. The result of the upscaling process is an effective-medium model subjected to time- and length-scale constraints, which are clearly identified in our derivation. At the first order in the Knudsen number, the macroscopic momentum transport equation corresponds to a Darcy-like model involving the classical intrinsic permeability tensor and a slip-flow correction tensor that is also intrinsic. It generalizes the Darcy-Klinkenberg equation for ideal gas flow, and exhibits a more complex form for dense gas. The component values of the two intrinsic tensors were computed by solving the associated closure problems on two- and three-dimensional periodic unit cells. Furthermore, the dependence of the slip-flow correction with the porosity was also verified to agree with approximate analytical results. Our predictions show a power-law relationship between the permeability and the slip-flow correction that is consistent with other works. Nevertheless, the generalization of such a relationship to any configuration requires more analysis.

  18. Capturing non-equilibrium phenomena in rarefied polyatomic gases: A high-order macroscopic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Behnam; Struchtrup, Henning

    2014-05-01

    A high-order macroscopic model for the accurate description of rarefied polyatomic gas flows is introduced based on a kinetic equation of Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK)-type, where the different energy exchange processes are accounted for by two collision terms. The order of magnitude method is applied to the primary moment equations to acquire the optimized moment definitions and the final scaled set of Grad's 36 moment equations for polyatomic gases. The two Knudsen numbers of the system are used for model reduction in terms of their powers, which yields a wide range of different reduced systems, a total of 13 different orders. These include, at lower order, a modification of the Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) equations which shows considerable extended range of validity in comparison to the classical NSF equations. The highest order of accuracy considered gives a set of 18 regularized partial differential equations (PDEs) (R18). Attenuation and speed of linear waves are studied as the first application of the many sets of equations. For frequencies where the internal degrees of freedom are effectively frozen, the equations reproduce the behavior of monatomic gases.

  19. In vivo outcome study of BPD-mediated PDT using a macroscopic singlet oxygen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    Macroscopic modeling of the apparent reacted singlet oxygen concentration ([1O2]rx) for use with photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed and studied for benzoporphryin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD), a common photosensitizer. The four photophysical parameters (ξ, σ, β, δ) and threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]rx, sh) have been investigated and determined using the RIF model of murine fibrosarcomas and interstitial treatment delivery. These parameters are examined and verified further by monitoring tumor growth post-PDT. BPD was administered at 1 mg/kg, and mice were treated 3 hours later with fluence rates ranging between 75 - 150 mW/cm2 and total fluences of 100 - 350 J/cm2. Treatment was delivered superficially using a collimated beam. Changes in tumor volume were tracked following treatment. The tumor growth rate was fitted for each treatment condition group and compared using dose metrics including total light dose, PDT dose, and reacted singlet oxygen. Initial data showing the correlation between outcomes and various dose metrics indicate that reacted singlet oxygen serves as a good dosimetric quantity for predicting PDT outcome.

  20. Quantification and macroscopic modeling of the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of strained gels with varying fibrin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Benkherourou, M; Guméry, P Y; Tranqui, L; Tracqui, P

    2000-11-01

    The mechanical properties of fibrin gels under uniaxial strains have been analyzed for low fibrin concentrations using a free-floating gel device. We were able to quantify the viscous and elastic moduli of gels with fibrin concentration ranging from 0.5 to 3 mg/ml, reporting significant differences of biogels moduli and dynamical response according to fibrin concentration. Furthermore, considering sequences of successively imposed step strains has revealed the strain-hardening properties of fibrin gels for strain amplitude below 5%. This nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of the gels has been precisely analyzed through numerical simulations of the overall gel response to the strain steps sequences. Phenomenological power laws relating the instantaneous and relaxed elasticity moduli to fibrin concentration have been validated, with concentration exponent in the order of 1.2 and 1.0, respectively. This continuous description of strain-dependent mechanical moduli was then used to simulate the biogel behavior when continuously time-varying strains are applied. We discuss how this experimental setup and associated macroscopic modeling of fibrin gels enable a further quantification of cell traction forces and mechanotransduction processes induced by biogel compaction or stretching. PMID:11077740

  1. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role for the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm

  2. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role formore » the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm), packed with homogeneous and

  3. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  4. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-07-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H {f/L} of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity (ϕ L) and bonding electron density (n {b/L}). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n {b/L}, together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H {f/L} for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  5. Macroscopic Models of Radiative Transfer as Applied to Computation of the Radiation Field in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a new three dimensional half-moment model for radiative transfer is presented for a gray medium. It describes the evolution of the zeroth and first directional half moments of the radiative intensity. The closure is provided, similarly to Dubroca and Klar, by the maximum entropy concept. This work generalizes that model to three dimensions. The model presented here (the derivation being done in Ripoll and Wray, called the M(sup 1/2)(sub 1) model, is a hyperbolic system consisting of a total of eight equations in three dimensions, four equations for each direction. Each half model has the classical form of a macroscopic moment model in which the pressure tensor is constructed from the well-known Eddington tensor with a particular Eddington factor. Moreover, different source and border terms occur. The latter introduce couplings between the macroscopic and microscopic quantities and between the + and - streams, through the intensity in the plane perpendicular to the flux. The main theoretical application of the half moment model, treated in this paper, is its reduction to a full moment model, called M(sup +)(sub 1), for the particular but important case of a hot, opaque source radiating in a cold transparent (or semi-transparent) medium for very specific applications, such as stellar interiors or atmospheres, or combustion problems. The structure of the paper is as follows. In section 2, the model M(sup 1/2)(sub 1) is presented. In section 3, for the particular case of a hot, opaque source radiating into a cold medium, the half moment model is reduced to the M(sup +)(sub 1) model. In section 4, we first solve a simple and academic problem to validate the models, followed by a simplified solar atmosphere.

  6. Macroscopic rates, microscopic observations, and molecular models of the dissolution of carbonate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Martin, Scot T.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk and surface energies are calculated for endmembers of the isostructural rhombohedral carbonate mineral family, including Ca, Cd, Co, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Zn compositions. The calculations for the bulk agree with the densities, bond distances, bond angles, and lattice enthalpies reported in the literature. The calculated energies also correlate with measured dissolution rates: the lattice energies show a log-linear relationship to the macroscopic dissolution rates at circumneutral pH. Moreover, the energies of ion pairs translated along surface steps are calculated and found to predict experimentally observed microscopic step retreat velocities. Finally, pit formation excess energies decrease with increasing pit size, which is consistent with the nonlinear dissolution kinetics hypothesized for the initial stages of pit formation.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROTOCOL: BIOREACTION SYSTEM CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a generic test plan for bioreaction systems that use biological tools to act as contaminant sorbers and biodegraders. These are usually biofilters and bioreactors which are packed bed reactors using peat, soil, etc., biotrickling filters which handle liquid phase ...

  8. Effects of “Aging” on Bioreactive Chemical Retention, Transformation, and Transport in Soil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how aging can affect the behavior of bioreactive chemicals in the soil. This paper will focus on the sorption process, which can directly or indirectly control transformation and transport processes. Most commonly, aging effects have been characterized by b...

  9. Effects of “aging” on bioreactive chemical retention, transformation, and transport in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how aging can affect the behavior of bioreactive chemicals in the soil. This paper will focus on the sorption process, which can directly or indirectly control transformation and transport processes. Most commonly, aging effects have been characterized by b...

  10. Cardiac index assessment using bioreactance in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kober, David; Trepte, Constantin; Petzoldt, Martin; Nitzschke, Rainer; Herich, Lena; Reuter, Daniel A; Haas, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    This clinical study compared the cardiac index (CI) assessed by the totally non-invasive method of bioreactance (CIBR) (NICOM™, Cheetah Medical, Vancouver, USA) to transpulmonary thermodilution (CITD) during cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma. The hypothesis was that CI could be assessed by bioreactance in an accurate and precise manner including accurate trending ability when compared to transpulmonary thermodilution. In 15 patients CIBR and CITD were assessed after induction of anesthesia, after opening of the peritoneum, hourly during the operative procedure, and 30 min after extubation. Trending ability was assessed between the described timepoints. In total 84 points of measurement were analyzed. Concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures correlating the CIBR and CITD was 0.32. Bias was 0.26 l/min/m(2) (limits of agreement -1.39 and 1.92 l/min/m(2)). The percentage error was 50.7 %. Trending ability quantified by the mean of angles θ which are made by the ΔCI vector and the line of identity (y = x) showed a value for CIBR of θ = 23.4°. CI assessment by bioreactance showed acceptable accuracy and trending ability. However, its precision was poor. Therefore, CI measurement can not be solely based on bioreactance in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:23689837

  11. Explicit dosimetry for 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a-mediated photodynamic therapy: macroscopic singlet oxygen modeling.

    PubMed

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M; Zhu, Timothy C

    2015-12-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a photosensitizer, ground-state oxygen ([(3)O2]), and light excitation at an appropriate wavelength, which results in production of reactive singlet oxygen ([(1)O2]rx). We use an empirical macroscopic model based on four photochemical parameters for the calculation of [(1)O2]rx threshold concentration ([(1)O2]rx,sh) causing tissue necrosis in tumors after PDT. For this reason, 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-mediated PDT was performed interstitially on mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. A linear light source at 665 nm with total energy released per unit length of 12 to 100  J/cm and source power per unit length (LS) of 12 to 150  mW/cm was used to induce different radii of necrosis. Then the amount of [(1)O2]rx calculated by the macroscopic model incorporating explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and HPPH concentration was correlated to the necrotic radius to obtain the model parameters and [(1)O2]rx,sh. We provide evidence that [(1)O2]rx is a better dosimetric quantity for predicting the treatment outcome than PDT dose, which is proportional to the time integral of the products of the photosensitizer concentration and light fluence rate. PMID:26720883

  12. Explicit dosimetry for 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a-mediated photodynamic therapy: macroscopic singlet oxygen modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-12-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a photosensitizer, ground-state oxygen ([O]), and light excitation at an appropriate wavelength, which results in production of reactive singlet oxygen ([]rx). We use an empirical macroscopic model based on four photochemical parameters for the calculation of []rx threshold concentration ([]rx,sh) causing tissue necrosis in tumors after PDT. For this reason, 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-mediated PDT was performed interstitially on mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. A linear light source at 665 nm with total energy released per unit length of 12 to 100 J/cm and source power per unit length (LS) of 12 to 150 mW/cm was used to induce different radii of necrosis. Then the amount of []rx calculated by the macroscopic model incorporating explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and HPPH concentration was correlated to the necrotic radius to obtain the model parameters and []rx,sh. We provide evidence that []rx is a better dosimetric quantity for predicting the treatment outcome than PDT dose, which is proportional to the time integral of the products of the photosensitizer concentration and light fluence rate.

  13. Using Denatured Egg White as a Macroscopic Model for Teaching Protein Structure and Introducing Protein Synthesis for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2007-12-01

    The success of teaching molecular and atomic phenomena depends on the didactical strategy and the media selection adopted, in consideration of the level of abstraction of the subject to be taught and the students' capability to deal with abstract operations. Dale's cone of experience was employed to plan three 50-minute classes to discuss protein denaturation from a chemical point of view. Only low abstraction level activities were selected: (i) two demonstrations showing the denaturation of albumin by heating and by changing the solvent, (ii) the assembly of a macroscopic model representing the protein molecule, and (iii) a role-play for simulating glucagon synthesis. A student-centered approach and collaborative learning were used throughout the classes. The use of macroscopic models is a powerful didactical strategy to represent molecular and atomic events. They can convert microscopic entities into touchable objects, reducing the abstraction level required to discuss chemistry with high school students. Thus, interesting topics involving molecules and their behavior can take place efficiently when mediated by concrete experiences.

  14. Bioreactance Is Not Interchangeable with Thermodilution for Measuring Cardiac Output during Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gaabsoo; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Choi, Soo Joo; Kwon, Ji Hae; Heo, Burn Young; Gwak, Mi Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter is widely used for the assessment of cardiac output (CO) in patients undergoing liver transplantation. However, the unclearness of the risk-benefit ratio of this method has led to an interest in less invasive modalities. Thus, we evaluated whether noninvasive bioreactance CO monitoring is interchangeable with thermodilution technique. Methods Nineteen recipients undergoing adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation were enrolled in this prospective observational study. COs were recorded automatically by the two devices and compared simultaneously at 3-minute intervals. The Bland–Altman plot was used to evaluate the agreement between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable agreement was defined as a percentage error of limits of agreement <30%. The four quadrant plot was used to evaluate concordance between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable concordance was defined as a concordance rate >92%. Results A total of 2640 datasets were collected. The mean CO difference between the two techniques was 0.9 l/min, and the 95% limits of agreement were -3.5 l/min and 5.4 l/min with a percentage error of 53.9%. The percentage errors in the dissection, anhepatic, and reperfusion phase were 50.6%, 56.1%, and 53.5%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two techniques was 54.8%. Conclusion Bioreactance and thermodilution failed to show acceptable interchangeability in terms of both estimating CO and tracking CO changes in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Thus, the use of bioreactance as an alternative CO monitoring to thermodilution, in spite of its noninvasiveness, would be hard to recommend in these surgical patients. PMID:26017364

  15. Continuous Feedback and Macroscopic Coherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, Paolo; Vitali, David

    1996-01-01

    We show that a model, recently introduced for quantum nondemolition measurements of a quantum observable, can be adapted to obtain a measurement scheme which is able to slow down the destruction of macroscopic coherence due to the measurement apparatus.

  16. Macroscopic modeling of heat and water vapor transfer with phase change in dry snow based on an upscaling method: Influence of air convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonne, N.; Geindreau, C.; Flin, F.

    2015-12-01

    At the microscopic scale, i.e., pore scale, dry snow metamorphism is mainly driven by the heat and water vapor transfer and the sublimation-deposition process at the ice-air interface. Up to now, the description of these phenomena at the macroscopic scale, i.e., snow layer scale, in the snowpack models has been proposed in a phenomenological way. Here we used an upscaling method, namely, the homogenization of multiple-scale expansions, to derive theoretically the macroscopic equivalent modeling of heat and vapor transfer through a snow layer from the physics at the pore scale. The physical phenomena under consideration are steady state air flow, heat transfer by conduction and convection, water vapor transfer by diffusion and convection, and phase change (sublimation and deposition). We derived three different macroscopic models depending on the intensity of the air flow considered at the pore scale, i.e., on the order of magnitude of the pore Reynolds number and the Péclet numbers: (A) pure diffusion, (B) diffusion and moderate convection (Darcy's law), and (C) strong convection (nonlinear flow). The formulation of the models includes the exact expression of the macroscopic properties (effective thermal conductivity, effective vapor diffusion coefficient, and intrinsic permeability) and of the macroscopic source terms of heat and vapor arising from the phase change at the pore scale. Such definitions can be used to compute macroscopic snow properties from 3-D descriptions of snow microstructures. Finally, we illustrated the precision and the robustness of the proposed macroscopic models through 2-D numerical simulations.

  17. A Lumped, Macroscopic Approach to Modeling Soil Moisture, CO2 Transport, and Chemical Weathering in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporato, A. M.; Parolari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ecohydrological processes in the root zone act as a dynamic interface between the atmosphere and the deeper soil layers, modulating the conditions that drive chemical weathering along the soil profile. Among these processes, soil moisture dynamics respond to intermittent rainfall pulses and to runoff and evapotranspiration losses. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO2) and its associated acidity are introduced into the soil moisture via root and microbial respiration. The coupling of soil moisture and CO2 dynamics in the root zone acts as an important controller of the critical zone development through the chemical weathering and water chemistry exported through runoff and percolation. Due to spatial and temporal variability and non-linearity, modeling these coupled root zone soil moisture and CO2 dynamics presents a number of challenges. In this talk, a lumped, macroscopic approach to modeling soil moisture, CO2 transport, and chemical weathering in the critical zone is introduced. The model considers a homogeneous soil column, therefore simplifying known spatial heterogeneities, and focuses on temporal variability resulting from non-linear processes and stochastic rainfall forcing. First, at short time-scales, the deterministic temporal evolution of soil moisture, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, and alkalinity is analyzed using a dynamical system approach. Second, at longer inter-annual time-scales where rainfall stochasticity becomes an important driver of the system behavior, the system is analyzed probabilistically and its average behavior described using a novel macroscopic approach. This averaging of the nonlinear stochastic dynamics results in a closure problem that is addressed through a first-order approximation of non-linear fluxes, including the correlation between soil moisture and solutes. The model provides a method to assess how changes in external forcing or system properties propagate into and alter critical zone structure and function, and to isolate

  18. Macroscopic constraints on string unification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    The comparison of sting theory with experiment requires a huge extrapolation from the microscopic distances, of order of the Planck length, up to the macroscopic laboratory distances. The quantum effects give rise to large corrections to the macroscopic predictions of sting unification. I discus the model-independent constraints on the gravitational sector of string theory due to the inevitable existence of universal Fradkin-Tseytlin dilatons. 9 refs.

  19. Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins: relation to bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins is the basis of nanoparticle bio-reactivity. This interaction gives rise to the formation of a dynamic nanoparticle-protein corona. The protein corona may influence cellular uptake, inflammation, accumulation, degradation and clearance of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanoparticle surface can induce conformational changes in adsorbed protein molecules which may affect the overall bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle. In depth understanding of such interactions can be directed towards generating bio-compatible nanomaterials with controlled surface characteristics in a biological environment. The main aim of this review is to summarise current knowledge on factors that influence nanoparticle-protein interactions and their implications on cellular uptake. PMID:23870291

  20. Study of hydrogen isotopes behavior in tungsten by a multi trapping macroscopic rate equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodille, E. A.; Ferro, Y.; Fernandez, N.; Becquart, C. S.; Angot, T.; Layet, J. M.; Bisson, R.; Grisolia, C.

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies show that in tungsten a mono vacancy can contain up to six hydrogen isotopes (HIs) at 300 K with detrapping energies varying with the number of HIs in the vacancy. Using these predictions, a multi trapping rate equation model has been built and used to model thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) experiments performed on single crystal tungsten after deuterium ions implantation. Detrapping energies obtained from the model to adjust temperature of TDS spectrum observed experimentally are in good agreement with DFT values within a deviation below 10%. The desorption spectrum as well as the diffusion of deuterium in the bulk are rationalized in light of the model results.

  1. Macroscopic modeling of pedestrian and bicycle crashes: A cross-comparison of estimation methods.

    PubMed

    Amoh-Gyimah, Richard; Saberi, Meead; Sarvi, Majid

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a cross-comparison of different estimation methods to model pedestrian and bicycle crashes. The study contributes to macro level safety studies by providing further methodological and empirical evidence on the various factors that influence the frequency of pedestrian and bicycle crashes at the planning level. Random parameter negative binomial (RPNB) models are estimated to explore the effects of various planning factors associated with total, serious injury and minor injury crashes while accounting for unobserved heterogeneity. Results of the RPNB models were compared with the results of a non-spatial negative binomial (NB) model and a Poisson-Gamma-CAR model. Key findings are, (1) the RPNB model performed best with the lowest mean absolute deviation, mean squared predicted error and Akaiki information criterion measures and (2) signs of estimated parameters are consistent if these variables are significant in models with the same response variables. We found that vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT), population, percentage of commuters cycling or walking to work, and percentage of households without motor vehicles have a significant and positive correlation with the number of pedestrian and bicycle crashes. Mixed land use is also found to have a positive association with the number of pedestrian and bicycle crashes. Results have planning and policy implications aimed at encouraging the use of sustainable modes of transportation while ensuring the safety of pedestrians and cyclist. PMID:27209153

  2. Tundish Open Eye Formation in Inert Gas-Shrouded Tundishes: A Macroscopic Model from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor

    2016-07-01

    Open eye formation in tundishes can result in reoxidation of liquid steel leading to the formation of harmful inclusions. Moreover, it is also a site for heat loss, gas absorption, and slag emulsification. All these factors make it necessary to understand the fundamentals of open eye formation, which in turn will allow us to prevent or control its harmful effects. In the present study, the bubble plume regions in a ladle and tundish were compared, and it was observed that there are significant differences between the two. Moreover, a simplistic model for predicting the open eye area in tundishes for `thin slag' practices was derived using the principles of conservation of mass and momentum. The proposed model was able to predict open eye areas in tundish reasonably well and was compared with other models, and experimental results.

  3. The Macroscopic Entrainment Processes of Simulated Cumulus Ensemble. Part II: Testing the Entraining-Plume Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, Akio

    1997-04-01

    According to Part I of this paper, it seems that ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP), such as the spectral cumulus ensemble model in the Arakawa-Schubert parameterization, is an acceptable simplification for tropical deep convection. Since each subensemble in the spectral cumulus ensemble model is formally analogous to an entraining plume, the latter is examined using the simulated data from a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The authors first follow the analysis procedure of Warner. With the data from a nonprecipitating experiment, the authors show that the entraining-plume model cannot simultaneously predict the mean liquid water profile and cloud top height of the clouds simulated by the CRM. However, the mean properties of active elements of clouds, which are characterized by strong updrafts, can be described by an entraining plume of similar top height.With the data from a precipitating experiment, the authors examine the spectral cumulus ensemble model using the Paluch diagram. It is found that the spectral cumulus ensemble model appears adequate if different types of clouds in the spectrum are interpreted as subcloud elements with different entrainment characteristics. The resolved internal structure of clouds can thus be viewed as a manifestation of a cloud spectrum. To further investigate whether the fractional rate of entrainment is an appropriate parameter for characterizing cloud types in the spectral cumulus ensemble model, the authors stratify the simulated saturated updrafts (subcloud elements) into different types according to their eventual heights and calculate the cloud mass flux and mean moist static energy for each type. Entrainment characteristics are then inferred through the cloud mass flux and in-cloud moist static energy. It is found that different types of subcloud elements have distinguishable thermodynamic properties and entrainment characteristics. However, for each cloud

  4. Studying Nuclear Level Densities of 238U in the Nuclear Reactions within the Macroscopic Nuclear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Rohallah; Rahmatinejad, Azam; Kakavand, Tayeb; Taheri, Fariba; Aghajani, Maghsood; Khooy, Asghar

    2016-02-01

    In this work the nuclear level density parameters of 238U have been extracted in the back-shifted Fermi gas model (BSFGM), as well as the constant temperature model (CTM), through fitting with the recent experimental data on nuclear level densities measured by the Oslo group. The excitation functions for 238U(p,2nα)233Pa, and 238U(p,4n)235Np reactions and the fragment yields for the fragments of the 238U(p,f) reaction have been calculated using obtained level density parameters. The results are compared to their corresponding experimental values. It was found that the extracted excitation functions and the fragment yields in the CTM coincide well with the experimental values in the low-energy region. This finding is according to the claim made by the Oslo group that the extracted level densities of 238U show a constant temperature behaviour.

  5. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models of reflection asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Iimura, H.; Buchinger, F.

    2008-12-15

    We show that the charge radii of reflection-asymmetric nuclei calculated in the frame of the finite-range droplet model are in better agreement with measured charge radii when reflection asymmetry is taken into account. However discrepancies between experimental and calculated changes in mean square charge radii still remain for some isotopic chains. These discrepancies cannot be removed by empirically including dynamic contributions to the quadrupole deformation.

  6. From Stories to Scientific Models and Back: Narrative framing in modern macroscopic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Hans U.

    2015-04-01

    Narrative in science learning has become an important field of inquiry. Most applications of narrative are extrinsic to science-such as when they are used for creating affect and context. Where they are intrinsic, they are often limited to special cases and uses. To extend the reach of narrative in science, a hypothesis of narrative framing of natural and technical scenes is formulated. The term narrative framing is used in a double sense, to represent (1) the enlisting of narrative intelligence in the perception of phenomena and (2) the telling of stories that contain conceptual elements used in the creation of scientific models of these phenomena. The concrete case for narrative framing is made by conceptual analyses of simple stories of natural phenomena and of products related to modern continuum thermodynamics that reveal particular figurative structures. Importantly, there is evidence for a medium-scale perceptual gestalt called force of nature that is structured metaphorically and narratively. The resulting figurative conceptual structure gives rise to the notion of natural agents acting and suffering in storyworlds. In order to show that formal scientific models are deeply related to these storyworlds, a link between using (i.e. simulating) models and storytelling is employed. This link has recently been postulated in studies of narrative in computational science and economics.

  7. Macroscopic limits of individual-based models for motile cell populations with volume exclusion.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Louise; Maini, Philip K; Baker, Ruth E

    2012-09-01

    Partial differential equation models are ubiquitous in studies of motile cell populations, giving a phenomenological description of events which can be analyzed and simulated using a wide range of existing tools. However, these models are seldom derived from individual cell behaviors and so it is difficult to accurately include biological hypotheses on this spatial scale. Moreover, studies which do attempt to link individual- and population-level behavior generally employ lattice-based frameworks in which the artifacts of lattice choice at the population level are unclear. In this work we derive limiting population-level descriptions of a motile cell population from an off-lattice, individual-based model (IBM) and investigate the effects of volume exclusion on the population-level dynamics. While motility with excluded volume in on-lattice IBMs can be accurately described by Fickian diffusion, we demonstrate that this is not the case off lattice. We show that the balance between two key parameters in the IBM (the distance moved in one step and the radius of an individual) determines whether volume exclusion results in enhanced or slowed diffusion. The magnitude of this effect is shown to increase with the number of cells and the rate of their movement. The method we describe is extendable to higher-dimensional and more complex systems and thereby provides a framework for deriving biologically realistic, continuum descriptions of motile populations. PMID:23030940

  8. A three-dimensional meso-macroscopic model for Li-Ion intercalation batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allu, S.; Kalnaus, S.; Simunovic, S.; Nanda, J.; Turner, J. A.; Pannala, S.

    2016-06-09

    Through this study, we present a three-dimensional computational formulation for electrode-electrolyte-electrode system of Li-Ion batteries. The physical consistency between electrical, thermal and chemical equations is enforced at each time increment by driving the residual of the resulting coupled system of nonlinear equations to zero. The formulation utilizes a rigorous volume averaging approach typical of multiphase formulations used in other fields and recently extended to modeling of supercapacitors [1]. Unlike existing battery modeling methods which use segregated solution of conservation equations and idealized geometries, our unified approach can model arbitrary battery and electrode configurations. The consistency of multi-physics solution also allowsmore » for consideration of a wide array of initial conditions and load cases. The formulation accounts for spatio-temporal variations of material and state properties such as electrode/void volume fractions and anisotropic conductivities. The governing differential equations are discretized using the finite element method and solved using a nonlinearly consistent approach that provides robust stability and convergence. The new formulation was validated for standard Li-ion cells and compared against experiments. Finally, its scope and ability to capture spatio-temporal variations of potential and lithium distribution is demonstrated on a prototypical three-dimensional electrode problem.« less

  9. A three-dimensional meso-macroscopic model for Li-Ion intercalation batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu, S.; Kalnaus, S.; Simunovic, S.; Nanda, J.; Turner, J. A.; Pannala, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a three-dimensional computational formulation for electrode-electrolyte-electrode system of Li-Ion batteries. The physical consistency between electrical, thermal and chemical equations is enforced at each time increment by driving the residual of the resulting coupled system of nonlinear equations to zero. The formulation utilizes a rigorous volume averaging approach typical of multiphase formulations used in other fields and recently extended to modeling of supercapacitors [1]. Unlike existing battery modeling methods which use segregated solution of conservation equations and idealized geometries, our unified approach can model arbitrary battery and electrode configurations. The consistency of multi-physics solution also allows for consideration of a wide array of initial conditions and load cases. The formulation accounts for spatio-temporal variations of material and state properties such as electrode/void volume fractions and anisotropic conductivities. The governing differential equations are discretized using the finite element method and solved using a nonlinearly consistent approach that provides robust stability and convergence. The new formulation was validated for standard Li-ion cells and compared against experiments. Its scope and ability to capture spatio-temporal variations of potential and lithium distribution is demonstrated on a prototypical three-dimensional electrode problem.

  10. Revealing the activation pathway for TMEM16A chloride channels from macroscopic currents and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vite, Juan A; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Figueroa, Iván A Aréchiga; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia; Hartzell, H Criss; Arreola, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    TMEM16A (ANO1), the pore-forming subunit of calcium-activated chloride channels, regulates several physiological and pathophysiological processes such as smooth muscle contraction, cardiac and neuronal excitability, salivary secretion, tumour growth and cancer progression. Gating of TMEM16A is complex because it involves the interplay between increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), membrane depolarization, extracellular Cl(-) or permeant anions and intracellular protons. Our goal here was to understand how these variables regulate TMEM16A gating and to explain four observations. (a) TMEM16A is activated by voltage in the absence of intracellular Ca(2+). (b) The Cl(-) conductance is decreased after reducing extracellular Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]o). (c) ICl is regulated by physiological concentrations of [Cl(-)]o. (d) In cells dialyzed with 0.2 μM [Ca(2+)]i, Cl(-) has a bimodal effect: at [Cl(-)]o <30 mM TMEM16A current activates with a monoexponential time course, but above 30 mM, [Cl(-)]o ICl activation displays fast and slow kinetics. To explain the contribution of Vm, Ca(2+) and Cl(-) to gating, we developed a 12-state Markov chain model. This model explains TMEM16A activation as a sequential, direct, and Vm-dependent binding of two Ca(2+) ions coupled to a Vm-dependent binding of an external Cl(-) ion, with Vm-dependent transitions between states. Our model predicts that extracellular Cl(-) does not alter the apparent Ca(2+) affinity of TMEM16A, which we corroborated experimentally. Rather, extracellular Cl(-) acts by stabilizing the open configuration induced by Ca(2+) and by contributing to the Vm dependence of activation. PMID:27138167

  11. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models of axial asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Iimura, H.; Buchinger, F.

    2007-11-15

    We show that the charge radii of axially asymmetric nuclei calculated in the frame of the finite-range droplet model are in better agreement with measured charge radii when axial asymmetry is taken into account. This improvement is mainly the result of a new set of ground-state quadrupole deformations {beta}{sub 2}, generated when masses are calculated including axial asymmetry, and to a much lesser degree due to the inclusion of the axial asymmetry in the calculation of the charge radii itself.

  12. Models of stratum corneum intercellular membranes: 2H NMR of macroscopically oriented multilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, D B; Thewalt, J L; Bloom, M; Kitson, N

    1994-01-01

    Deuterium NMR was used to characterize model membrane systems approximating the composition of the intercellular lipid lamellae of mammalian stratum corneum (SC). The SC models, equimolar mixtures of ceramide:cholesterol:palmitic acid (CER:CHOL:PA) at pH 5.2, were contrasted with the sphingomyelin:CHOL:PA (SPM:CHOL:PA) system, where the SPM differs from the CER only in the presence of a phosphocholine headgroup. The lipids were prepared both as oriented samples and as multilamellar dispersions, and contained either perdeuterated palmitic acid (PA-d31) or [2,2,3,4,6-2H5]CHOL (CHOL-d5). SPM:CHOL:PA-d31 formed liquid-ordered membranes over a wide range of temperatures, with a maximum order parameter of approximately 0.4 at 50 degrees C for positions C3-C10 (the plateau region). The quadrupolar splitting at C2 was significantly smaller, suggesting an orientational change at this position, possibly because of hydrogen bonding with water and/or other surface components. A comparison of the longitudinal relaxation times obtained at theta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees (where theta is the angle between the normal to the glass plates and the magnetic field) revealed a significant T1Z anisotropy for all positions. In contrast to the behavior observed with the SPM system, lipid mixtures containing CER exhibited a complex polymorphism. Between 20 and 50 degrees C, a significant portion of the entire membrane (as monitored by both PA-d31 and CHOL-d5) was found to exist as a solid phase, with the remainder either a gel or liquid-ordered phase. The proportion of solid decreased as the temperature was increased and disappeared entirely above 50 degrees C. Between 50 and 70 degrees C, the membrane underwent a liquid-ordered to isotropic phase transition. These transitions were reversible but displayed considerable hysteresis, especially the conversion from a fluid phase to solid. The order profiles, relaxation behavior, and angular dependence of these parameters suggest strongly that

  13. Models of stratum corneum intercellular membranes: 2H NMR of macroscopically oriented multilayers.

    PubMed

    Fenske, D B; Thewalt, J L; Bloom, M; Kitson, N

    1994-10-01

    Deuterium NMR was used to characterize model membrane systems approximating the composition of the intercellular lipid lamellae of mammalian stratum corneum (SC). The SC models, equimolar mixtures of ceramide:cholesterol:palmitic acid (CER:CHOL:PA) at pH 5.2, were contrasted with the sphingomyelin:CHOL:PA (SPM:CHOL:PA) system, where the SPM differs from the CER only in the presence of a phosphocholine headgroup. The lipids were prepared both as oriented samples and as multilamellar dispersions, and contained either perdeuterated palmitic acid (PA-d31) or [2,2,3,4,6-2H5]CHOL (CHOL-d5). SPM:CHOL:PA-d31 formed liquid-ordered membranes over a wide range of temperatures, with a maximum order parameter of approximately 0.4 at 50 degrees C for positions C3-C10 (the plateau region). The quadrupolar splitting at C2 was significantly smaller, suggesting an orientational change at this position, possibly because of hydrogen bonding with water and/or other surface components. A comparison of the longitudinal relaxation times obtained at theta = 0 degrees and 90 degrees (where theta is the angle between the normal to the glass plates and the magnetic field) revealed a significant T1Z anisotropy for all positions. In contrast to the behavior observed with the SPM system, lipid mixtures containing CER exhibited a complex polymorphism. Between 20 and 50 degrees C, a significant portion of the entire membrane (as monitored by both PA-d31 and CHOL-d5) was found to exist as a solid phase, with the remainder either a gel or liquid-ordered phase. The proportion of solid decreased as the temperature was increased and disappeared entirely above 50 degrees C. Between 50 and 70 degrees C, the membrane underwent a liquid-ordered to isotropic phase transition. These transitions were reversible but displayed considerable hysteresis, especially the conversion from a fluid phase to solid. The order profiles, relaxation behavior, and angular dependence of these parameters suggest strongly that

  14. Macroscopic orientation effects in broadline NMR-spectra of model membranes at high magnetic field strength

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, T.; Möps, A.; Dolainsky, C.; Brückner, S.; Bayerl, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLV) in high magnetic fields has been studied and a method to prevent such effects is herewith proposed. The orientation effect was measured with 2H-, 31P-NMR and electron microscopy on MLVs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine with 30 mol% cholesterol. We present the first freeze—etch electron microscopy data obtained from MLV samples that were frozen directly in the NMR magnet at a field strength of 9.4 Tesla. These experiments clearly show that the MLVs adopt an ellipsoidal (but not a cylindrical) shape in the magnetic field. Best fit 31P-NMR lineshape calculations assuming an ellipsoidal distribution of molecular director axes to the experimentally obtained spectra provide a quantitative measure of the average semiaxis ratio of the ellipsoidal MLVs and its change with temperature. The application of so-called spherical supported vesicles (SSV) is found to prevent any partial orientation effects so that undistorted NMR powder pattern of the bilayer can be measured independently of magnetic field strength and temperature. The usefulness of SSVs is further demonstrated by a direct comparison of spectral data such as 31P-and 2H-NMR lineshapes and relaxation times as well as 2H-NMR dePaked spectra obtained for both model systems. These experiments show that spectral data obtained from partially oriented MLVs are not unambiguous to interpret, in particular, if an external parameter such as temperature is varied. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:19431822

  15. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, M; Di Tommaso, D; Du, Z; de Leeuw, N H

    2012-11-21

    Calcite-water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Firstly, we employ classical Molecular Dynamics simulations of calcite surfaces containing an etch pit and a growth terrace, to show that the local environment in water around structurally different surface sites is distinct. In addition to observing the expected formation of more calcium-water interactions and hydrogen-bonds at lower-coordinated sites, we also observed subtle differences in hydrogen bonding around acute versus obtuse edges and corners. We subsequently used this information to refine the protonation constants for the calcite surface sites, according to the Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation (CD-MUSIC) approach. The subtle differences in hydrogen bonding translate into markedly different charging behaviour versus pH, in particular for acute versus obtuse corner sites. The results show quantitatively that calcite surface reactivity is directly related to surface topography. The information obtained in this study is not only crucial for the improvement of existing macroscopic surface models of the reactivity of calcite towards contaminants, but also improves our atomic-level understanding of mineral-water interactions. PMID:23042085

  16. Static and Statistical Properties of Hot Rotating Nuclei in a Macroscopic Temperature-Dependent Finite-Range Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabov, E.G.; Adeev, G.D.

    2005-09-01

    A macroscopic temperature-dependent model that takes into account nuclear forces of finite range is used to calculate the static and statistical properties of hot rotating compound nuclei. The level-density parameter is approximated by an expression of the leptodermous type. The resulting expansion coefficients are in good agreement with their counterparts proposed previously by A.V. Ignatyuk and his colleagues. The effect of taking simultaneously into account the temperature of a nucleus and its angular momentum on the quantities under study, such as the heights and positions of fission barriers and the effective moments of inertia of nuclei at the barrier, is considered, and the importance of doing this is demonstrated. The fissility parameter (Z{sup 2}/A){sub crit} and the position of the Businaro-Gallone point are studied versus temperature. It is found that, with increasing temperature, both parameters are shifted to the region of lighter nuclei. It is shown that the inclusion of temperature leads to qualitatively the same effects as the inclusion of the angular momentum of a nucleus, but, quantitatively, thermal excitation leads to smaller effects than rotational excitation.

  17. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  18. Generation of sustained field potentials by gradients of polarization within single neurons: a macroscopic model of spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Julia; Makarov, Valeri A; Herreras, Oscar

    2010-05-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a pathological wave of depolarization of the neural tissue producing a negative macroscopic field potential (V(o)), used as a marker for diagnostic purposes. The cellular basis of SD and neuronal mechanisms of generation of V(o) at the microscopic level are poorly understood. Using a CA1 mathematical model and experimental verification, we examined how transmembrane currents in single cells scale up in the extracellular space shaping V(o). The model includes an array of 17,000 realistically modeled neurons (responsible for generating transmembrane currents) dynamically coupled to a virtual aggregate/extracellular space (responsible for V(o)). The SD wave in different tissue bands is simulated by imposing membrane shunts in the corresponding dendritic elements as suggested by experimentally assessed drop in membrane resistance. We show that strong isopotential depolarization of wide domains (as in the main SD phase) produce broad central cancellation of axial and transmembrane currents in single cells. When depolarization is restricted to narrow dendritic domains (as in the late SD phase), the internal cancellation shrinks and the transmembrane current increases. This explains why in the laminated CA1 the V(o) is smaller in the main phase of SD, when both dendritic layers are seized, than in the SD tail restricted to an apical band. Moreover, scattering of the neuronal somatas (as in cortical regions) further decreases the aggregate V(o) due to the volume averaging. Although mechanistically the V(o) associated to SD is similar to customary transient fields, its changes maybe related to spatial factors in single cells rather than cell number or depolarization strength. PMID:20220074

  19. A Multiscale Model Based On Intragranular Microstructure: Influence Of Grain-Scale Substructure On Macroscopic Behaviour Of An IF-Steel During Complex Load Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Gerald; Abed-Meraim, Farid; Berveiller, Marcel; Zineb, Tarak Ben; Lemoine, Xavier

    2007-05-17

    A microstructural model, based on Peeters' works, is implemented into a large strain self-consistent scheme, leading to the multiscale model which achieves, for each grain, the calculation of slip activity, with help of regularized formulation drawn from the visco-plasticity framework, and the dislocation microstructure evolution. This paper focuses on the relationship between macroscopic hardening/softening effects and induced microstructure during monotonic and two-stage strain paths.

  20. A Multiscale Model Based On Intragranular Microstructure: Influence Of Grain-Scale Substructure On Macroscopic Behaviour Of An IF-Steel During Complex Load Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Gérald; Abed-Meraim, Farid; Zineb, Tarak Ben; Lemoine, Xavier; Berveiller, Marcel

    2007-05-01

    A microstructural model, based on Peeters' works, is implemented into a large strain self-consistent scheme, leading to the multiscale model which achieves, for each grain, the calculation of slip activity, with help of regularized formulation drawn from the visco-plasticity framework, and the dislocation microstructure evolution. This paper focuses on the relationship between macroscopic hardening/softening effects and induced microstructure during monotonic and two-stage strain paths.

  1. Transition from Static to Dynamic Macroscopic Friction in the Framework of the Frenkel-Kontorova Model (aplication to Crustal Earthquake)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, N. I.; Bambakidis, G.

    2011-12-01

    A new generation of experiments on dry macroscopic friction [1-4] has revealed that the transition from static to dynamic friction is essentially a spatially and temporally nonuniform process, initiated by a rupture-like detachment front. We show the suitability of the Frenkel-Kontorova model for describing this transition. The model developed predicts the existence of two types of detachment fronts, explaining both the variability and abrupt change of the velocity observed in experiments. The quantitative relation obtained between the velocity of the detachment front and the ratio of shear to normal stress is consistent with experiments (see Figure 1). The model provides a functional dependence (algebraic relations) between slip velocity and shear stress, and predicts that slip velocity is independent of normal stress. Paradoxically transition from static to dynamic friction does not depend explicitly on both static and dynamic friction coefficients even so the beginning and termination of transition process are controlled by those coefficients. In the proposed model, friction occurs due to movement of a certain type of defect (i.e. a dislocation or slip pulse) nucleated on the frictional surfaces by the presence of asperities. This constitutes a fundamental distinction between our approach to macro-friction and the approaches of others such as the Burridge-Knopoff and rate-and-state types of models. The model is suitable to describe quantitatively the relations between kinematic and dynamic parameters of the rupture process during a crustal earthquake [5]. These relations will be demonstrated on 2004 Parkfield earthquake. [1] S. M. Rubinstein, G. Cohen, and J. Fineberg, Nature (London) 430, 1005 (2004) [2] S. M. Rubinstein, G. Cohen, and J. Fineberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 226103 (2007) [3] O. Ben-David, S.M. Rubinstein and J. Fineberg, Nature 463, 76 (2010) [4] O. Ben-David, G. Cohen, J. Fineberg, Science 330, 211 (2010), DOI: 10.1126/science.1194777 [5] N

  2. A Model Study of Inclusions Deposition, Macroscopic Transport, and Dynamic Removal at Steel-Slag Interface for Different Tundish Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Ni, Peiyuan; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation results of inclusions macroscopic transport as well as dynamic removal in tundishes. A novel treatment was implemented using the deposition velocity calculated by a revised unified Eulerian deposition model to replace the widely used Stokes rising velocity in the boundary conditions for inclusions removal at the steel-slag interface in tundishes. In this study, the dynamic removal for different size groups of inclusions at different steel-slag interfaces (smooth or rough) with different absorption conditions at the interface (partially or fully absorbed) in two tundish designs was studied. The results showed that the dynamic removal ratios were higher for larger inclusions than for smaller inclusions. Besides, the dynamic removal ratio was higher for rough interfaces than for smooth interfaces. On the other hand, regarding the cases when inclusions are partially or fully absorbed at a smooth steel-slag interface, the removal ratio values are proportional to the absorption proportion of inclusions at the steel-slag interface. Furthermore, the removal of inclusions in two tundish designs, i.e., with and without a weir and a dam were compared. Specifically, the tundish with a weir and a dam exhibited a better performance with respect to the removal of bigger inclusions (radii of 5, 7, and 9 μm) than that of the case without weir and dam. That was found to be due to the strong paralleling flow near the middle part of the top surface. However, the tundish without weir and dam showed a higher removal ratio of smaller inclusions (radius of 1 μm). The reason could be the presence of a paralleling flow near the inlet zone, where the inclusions deposition velocities were much higher than in other parts.

  3. A Model Study of Inclusions Deposition, Macroscopic Transport, and Dynamic Removal at Steel-Slag Interface for Different Tundish Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Ni, Peiyuan; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation results of inclusions macroscopic transport as well as dynamic removal in tundishes. A novel treatment was implemented using the deposition velocity calculated by a revised unified Eulerian deposition model to replace the widely used Stokes rising velocity in the boundary conditions for inclusions removal at the steel-slag interface in tundishes. In this study, the dynamic removal for different size groups of inclusions at different steel-slag interfaces (smooth or rough) with different absorption conditions at the interface (partially or fully absorbed) in two tundish designs was studied. The results showed that the dynamic removal ratios were higher for larger inclusions than for smaller inclusions. Besides, the dynamic removal ratio was higher for rough interfaces than for smooth interfaces. On the other hand, regarding the cases when inclusions are partially or fully absorbed at a smooth steel-slag interface, the removal ratio values are proportional to the absorption proportion of inclusions at the steel-slag interface. Furthermore, the removal of inclusions in two tundish designs, i.e., with and without a weir and a dam were compared. Specifically, the tundish with a weir and a dam exhibited a better performance with respect to the removal of bigger inclusions (radii of 5, 7, and 9 μm) than that of the case without weir and dam. That was found to be due to the strong paralleling flow near the middle part of the top surface. However, the tundish without weir and dam showed a higher removal ratio of smaller inclusions (radius of 1 μm). The reason could be the presence of a paralleling flow near the inlet zone, where the inclusions deposition velocities were much higher than in other parts.

  4. Rank distributions: a panoramic macroscopic outlook.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions-top-down, bottom-up, and global-and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails. PMID:24580176

  5. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  6. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: from macroscopic multiscale models to a 1D rheological description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-07-01

    One of the critical points of the thermomechanical fatigue design process is the correct description of the cyclic behavior of the material. This work focuses on the material of automotive brake discs, namely flake graphite cast iron. The specificity of this material is its asymmetric behavior under tensile and compressive loadings, which is due to the shape of graphite that acts as small cracks. Multiscale models inspired from the literature are first presented. They lead to a good description of the material behavior under cyclic loadings. An elastoviscoplastic constitutive model is then proposed in a one-dimensional setting in order to accurately describe cyclic tests from room temperature up to {600^{circ}{C}}.

  7. Micro-macroscopic coupled modeling of batteries and fuel cells. 2: Application to nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, W.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Liaw, B.Y.

    1998-10-01

    The micro-macroscopic coupled model developed in a companion paper is applied to predict the discharge and charge behaviors of nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) and nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) cells. The model integrates important microscopic phenomena such as proton or hydrogen diffusion and conduction of electrons in active materials into the macroscopic calculations of species and charge transfer. Simulation results for a full Ni-Cd cell and single MH electrode are presented and validated against the pseudo two-dimensional numerical model in the literature. In good agreement with the previous results, the present family of models is computationally more efficient and is particularly suitable for simulations of complex test conditions, such as the dynamic stress test and pulse charging for electric vehicles. In addition, a mathematical model for full Ni-MH cells is presented and sample simulations are performed for discharge and recharge with oxygen generation and recombination taken into account. These gas reactions represent an important mechanism for battery overcharge in the electric vehicle application.

  8. Salinization alters fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems across land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, S.; Kaushal, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    There has been increased salinization of fresh water over decades due to the use of road salt deicers, wastewater discharges, saltwater intrusion, human-accelerated weathering, and groundwater irrigation. Salinization can mobilize bioreactive elements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur) chemically via ion exchange and/or biologically via influencing of microbial activity. However, the effects of salinization on coupled biogeochemical cycles are still not well understood. We investigated potential impacts of increased salinization on fluxes of bioreactive elements from stream ecosystems (sediments and riparian soils) to overlying stream water and evaluated the implications of percent urban land use on salinization effects. Two-day incubations of sediments and soils with stream and deionized water across three salt levels were conducted at eight routine monitoring stations across a land-use gradient at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Results indicated (1) salinization typically increased sediment releases of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (ammonium + ammonia + dissolved organic nitrogen), and sediment transformations of nitrate; (2) salinization generally decreased DOC aromaticity and fluxes of soluble reactive phosphorus from both sediments and soils; (3) the effects of increased salinization on sediment releases of DOC and TKN and DOC quality increased with percentage watershed urbanization. Biogeochemical responses to salinization varied between sediments and riparian soils in releases of DOC and DIC, and nitrate transformations. The differential responses of riparian soils and sediments to increased salinization were likely due to differences in organic matter sources and composition. Our results suggest that short-term increases in salinization can cause releases of significant amounts of labile organic

  9. [Individual particle morphology and bioreactivity of PM10 in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Shao, Long-yi; Song, Xiao-yan; Liu, Jun-xia; Zhou, Lin

    2009-12-01

    Inhalable particulates, including PM10 and PM2.5, were collected on the campus of China University of Mining and Technology during the Summer Olympic Games of Beijing in 2008. The mass concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were monitored. The morphology and size distribution of individual particles in PM10 and PM2.5 were investigated by a high-resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and image analysis (IA). The toxicity reflected by bioreactivity of PM10 during the Olympic Games was also studied by Plasmid DNA assay. The results showed that the mass levels of PM10 and PM2.5 were well below 81.6 microg x m(-3) and 54.6 microg x m(-3), meeting the second ambient air quality standard of China. The ratio of PM2.5 and PM10 was averaged 0.63, indicating that the PM10 is dominated by fine particles. In terms of microscopic morphology, four types of particles were identified, including spherical particles, soot aggregates, minerals and unresolved fine particles, with the spherical particles and unresolved particles being the predominant components. Most PM10 and PM2.5 particles were in the size range of 0.1-0.4 microm, displaying a unimodal pattern. Volume-size distribution of PM10 exhibited a bimodal pattern with the peaks in 0.4-0.5 pm and 1-2.5 microm, and PM2.5 particles were mainly concentrated in the range of 1-2.5 microm. The results from plasmid assay showed that the bioreactivity of PM10 during the Olympic games was obviously lower than those of past summers, with the TD20 (toxic dosage of PM10 causing 20% plasmid DNA damage) being higher than those of the past summers. PMID:20187370

  10. Effective diffusivity in partially-saturated carbon-fiber gas diffusion layers: Effect of local saturation and application to macroscopic continuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Salaberri, Pablo A.; Gostick, Jeff T.; Hwang, Gisuk; Weber, Adam Z.; Vera, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    Macroscopic continuum models are an essential tool to understand the complex transport phenomena that take place in gas diffusion layers (GDLs) used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Previous work has shown that macroscopic models require effective properties obtained under uniform saturation conditions to get a consistent physical formulation. This issue, mostly unappreciated in the open literature, is addressed in detail in this work. To this end, lattice Boltzmann simulations were performed on tomographic images of dry and water-invaded carbon-paper GDL subsamples with nearly uniform porosity and saturation distributions. The computed effective diffusivity shows an anisotropic dependence on local porosity similar to that reported for morphologically analogous GDLs. In contrast, the dependence on local saturation is rather isotropic, following a nearly quadratic power law. The capability of the local correlations to recover the layer-scale properties obtained from inhomogeneous GDLs is checked by global averaging. Good agreement is found between the upscaled results and the diffusivity data of the GDL from which the present subsamples were taken, as well as other global data presented in the literature. A higher blockage effect of local saturation is, however, expected for the under-the-rib region in operating PEFCs.

  11. Variability in Bioreactivity Linked to Changes in Size and Zeta Potential of Diesel Exhaust Particles in Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Srijata; Zhang, Lin; Subramaniam, Prasad; Lee, Ki-Bum; Garfunkel, Eric; Strickland, Pamela A. Ohman.; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Ryan, Mary; Porter, Alex; Schwander, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Acting as fuel combustion catalysts to increase fuel economy, cerium dioxide (ceria, CeO2) nanoparticles have been used in Europe as diesel fuel additives (Envirox™). We attempted to examine the effects of particles emitted from a diesel engine burning either diesel (diesel exhaust particles, DEP) or diesel doped with various concentrations of CeO2 (DEP-Env) on innate immune responses in THP-1 and primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Batches of DEP and DEP-Env were obtained on three separate occasions using identical collection and extraction protocols with the aim of determining the reproducibility of particles generated at different times. However, we observed significant differences in size and surface charge (zeta potential) of the DEP and DEP-Env across the three batches. We also observed that exposure of THP-1 cells and PBMC to identical concentrations of DEP and DEP-Env from the three batches resulted in statistically significant differences in bioreactivity as determined by IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-12p40 mRNA (by qRT-PCR) and protein expression (by ELISPOT assays). Importantly, bioreactivity was noted in very tight ranges of DEP size (60 to 120 nm) and zeta potential (−37 to −41 mV). Thus, these physical properties of DEP and DEP-Env were found to be the primary determinants of the bioreactivity measured in this study. Our findings also point to the potential risk of over- or under- estimation of expected bioreactivity effects (and by inference of public health risks) from bulk DEP use without taking into account potential batch-to-batch variations in physical (and possibly chemical) properties. PMID:24825358

  12. Microscopic and macroscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.; De Groot, A.J.; Pierce, T.G. |

    1993-06-01

    Atomistic Molecular Dynamics and Lagrangian Continuum Mechanics can be very similarly adapted to massively-parallel computers. Millions of degrees of freedom can be treated. The two complementary approaches, microscopic and macroscopic, are being applied to increasingly realistic flows of fluids and solids. The two approaches can also be combined in a hybrid simulation scheme. Hybrids combine the fundamental constitutive advantage of atoms with the size advantage of the continuum picture.

  13. Bioreactance: a new tool for cardiac output and thoracic fluid content monitoring during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kossari, Niloufar; Hufnagel, Gilles; Squara, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Outpatient hemodialysis therapy (HD) can be associated with hemodynamic compromise. Bioreactance has recently been shown to provide accurate, noninvasive, continuous, measurements of cardiac output (CO) and thoracic impedance (Zo) from which thoracic fluid content (TFC) can be derived assuming TFC=1000/Zo. This study was designed to evaluate the changes in TFC in comparison with the traditional indices of fluid removal (FR) and to understand the trends in CO changes in HD patients. Minute-by-minute changes in TFC and CO were prospectively collected using the bioreactance system (NICOM) in HD patients of a single unit. Changes in body weight (DeltaW), hematocrit (DeltaHct), and amount of FR were also measured. Twenty-five patients (age 77 +/- 11 years) were included. The TFC decreased in all patients by an average of 5.4 +/- 7.9 kohm(-1), weight decreased by 1.48 +/- 0.98 kg, and FR averaged 2.07 +/- 1.93 L over a 3- to 4-hour HD session. There were good correlations between DeltaTFC and DeltaW (R=0.80, P<0.0001) and FR (R=0.85, P<0.0001). DeltaHct (4.13 +/- 3.42%) was poorly correlated with DeltaTFC (R=0.35, P=0.12) and FR (R=0.40, P=0.07). The regression line between FR and TFC yielded FR=1.0024-0.1985TFC; thus, a 1 kohm(-1) change of Zo correlates with an approximately 200 mL change in total body water. The change in CO (-0.52 +/- 0.49 L/min m(2)) during HD did not correlate with FR (R=0.15, P=NS). Changes in TFC represented the monitored variable most closely related to FR. CO remained fairly constant in this stable patient cohort. Further studies in high-risk patients are warranted to understand whether TFC and CO monitoring can improve HD session management. PMID:19758300

  14. Interstellar simulations using a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo model with a full gas-grain network including bulk diffusion in ice mantles

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Qiang; Herbst, Eric

    2014-06-01

    We have designed an improved algorithm that enables us to simulate the chemistry of cold dense interstellar clouds with a full gas-grain reaction network. The chemistry is treated by a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach that includes photon penetration and bulk diffusion. To determine the significance of these two processes, we simulate the chemistry with three different models. In Model 1, we use an exponential treatment to follow how photons penetrate and photodissociate ice species throughout the grain mantle. Moreover, the products of photodissociation are allowed to diffuse via bulk diffusion and react within the ice mantle. Model 2 is similar to Model 1 but with a slower bulk diffusion rate. A reference Model 0, which only allows photodissociation reactions to occur on the top two layers, is also simulated. Photodesorption is assumed to occur from the top two layers in all three models. We found that the abundances of major stable species in grain mantles do not differ much among these three models, and the results of our simulation for the abundances of these species agree well with observations. Likewise, the abundances of gas-phase species in the three models do not vary. However, the abundances of radicals in grain mantles can differ by up to two orders of magnitude depending upon the degree of photon penetration and the bulk diffusion of photodissociation products. We also found that complex molecules can be formed at temperatures as low as 10 K in all three models.

  15. Chemical composition and bioreactivity of PM2.5 during 2013 haze events in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kin-Fai; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Huang, Ru-Jin; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cao, Jun-Ji; Han, Yongming; Lui, Ka-Hei; Ning, Zhi; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Lee, Shun-Cheng; Hu, Di; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Renjian

    2016-02-01

    Chemical composition and bioreactivity of PM2.5 samples collected from Beijing (BJ), Xi'an (XA), Xiamen (XM) and Hong Kong (HK) in China during haze events were characterized. PM2.5 mass concentrations in BJ, XA, XM and HK in the episodes were found to be 258 ± 100 μg m-3, 233 ± 52 μg m-3, 46 ± 9 μg m-3 and 48 ± 13 μg m-3, respectively. Significant increase of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium concentrations in northern cities were observed. High contributions of biomass burning emissions to organic carbon (OC) in northern cities were estimated in this study implying frequent biomass burning during the haze periods. The urea concentrations in PM2.5 were 1855 ± 755 ng m-3 (BJ), 1124 ± 243 ng m-3 (XA), 543 ± 104 ng m-3 (XM) and 363 ± 61 ng m-3 (HK) suggesting higher or close to upper limits compared to other regions in the world. Dose-dependent alterations in oxidative potential, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α levels were also investigated. The oxidative potential levels are BJ > XM > XA > HK, whereas levels of IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α were BJ > XA > XM > HK. The sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, OC, urea and levoglucosan are associated with oxidative-inflammatory responses. These experimental results are crucial for the policymakers to implement cost-effective abatement strategies for improving air quality.

  16. Microscopic, Macroscopic, and Megascopic Melts: a simple model to synthesize simulation, spectroscopy, shock, and sink/float constraints on silicate melts and magma oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Thomas, C.; Wolf, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Silicate melts are the essential agents of planetary differentiation and evolution. Their phase relations, element partitioning preferences, density, and transport properties determine the fates of heat and mass flow in the high-temperature interior of active planets. In the early Earth and in extrasolar super-Earth-mass terrestrial planets it is these properties at very high pressure (> 100 GPa) that control the evolution from possible magma oceans to solid-state convecting mantles. Yet these melts are complex, dynamic materials that present many challenges to experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding or prediction of their properties. There has been encouraging convergence among various approaches to understanding the structure and dynamics of silicate melts at multiple scales: nearest- and next-nearest neighbor structural information is derived from spectroscopic techniques such as high-resolution multinuclear NMR; first-principles molecular dynamics probe structure and dynamics at scales up to hundreds of atoms; Archimedean, ultrasonic, sink/float, and shock wave methods probe macroscopic properties (and occasionally dynamics); and deformation and diffusion experiments probe dynamics at macroscopic scale and various time scales. One challenge that remains to integrating all this information is a predictive model of silicate liquid structure that agrees with experiments and simulation both at microscopic and macroscopic scale. In addition to our efforts to collect macroscopic equation of state data using shock wave methods across ever-wider ranges of temperature, pressure, and composition space, we have introduced a simple model of coordination statistics around cations that can form the basis of a conceptual and predictive link across scales and methods. This idea is explored in this presentation specifically with regard to the temperature dependence of sound speed in ultramafic liquids. This is a highly uncertain quantity and yet it is key, in

  17. Macroscopic dynamics of cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchón, S. A.; Condat, C. A.

    2007-04-01

    Macroscopic modeling is used to describe various aspects of cancer growth. A recently proposed “dysnamical exponent” hypothesis is critically examined in the context of the angiogenic development. It is also shown that the emergence of necroses facilitates the growth of avascular tumors; the model yields an excellent fit to available experimental data, allowing for the determination of growth parameters. Finally, the global effects of an applied antitumoral immunotherapy are investigated. It is shown that, in the long run, the application of a therapeutical course leads to bigger tumors by weakening the intraspecific competition between surviving viable cancer cells. The strength of this model lies in its simplicity and in the amount of information that can be gleaned using only very general ideas.

  18. Evaluation of solid polymeric organic materials for use in bioreactive sediment capping to stimulate the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Maphosa, Farai; De Vrieze, Jo; Haest, Pieter Jan; Boon, Nico; Smidt, Hauke; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie

    2014-03-01

    In situ bioreactive capping is a promising technology for mitigation of surface water contamination by discharging polluted groundwater. Organohalide respiration (OHR) of chlorinated ethenes in bioreactive caps can be stimulated through incorporation of solid polymeric organic materials (SPOMs) that provide a sustainable electron source for organohalide respiring bacteria. In this study, wood chips, hay, straw, tree bark and shrimp waste, were assessed for their long term applicability as an electron donor for OHR of cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in sediment microcosms. The initial release of fermentation products, such as acetate, propionate and butyrate led to the onset of extensive methane production especially in microcosms amended with shrimp waste, straw and hay, while no considerable stimulation of VC dechlorination was obtained in any of the SPOM amended microcosms. However, in the longer term, short chain fatty acids accumulation decreased as well as methanogenesis, whereas high dechlorination rates of VC and cDCE were established with concomitant increase of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and vcrA and bvcA gene numbers both in the sediment and on the SPOMs. A numeric simulation indicated that a capping layer of 40 cm with hay, straw, tree bark or shrimp waste is suffice to reduce the groundwater VC concentration below the threshold level of 5 μg/l before discharging into the Zenne River, Belgium. Of all SPOMs, the persistent colonization of tree bark by D. mccartyi combined with the lowest stimulation of methanogenesis singled out tree bark as a long-term electron donor for OHR of cDCE/VC in bioreactive caps. PMID:23955471

  19. Evaluation of a Laboratory-Scale Bioreactive In Situ Sediment Cap for the Treatment of Organic Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Himmelheber, David W.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Hughes, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of bioreactive sediment caps, in which microorganisms capable of contaminant transformation are placed within an in situ cap, provides a potential remedial design that can sustainably treat sediment and groundwater contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability and limitations of a mixed, anaerobic dechlorinating consortium to treat chlorinated ethenes within a sand-based cap. Results of batch experiments demonstrate that a tetrachloroethene (PCE)-to-ethene mixed consortium was able to completely dechlorinate dissolved-phase PCE to ethene when supplied only with sediment porewater obtained from a sediment column. To simulate a bioreactive cap, laboratory-scale sand columns inoculated with the mixed culture were placed in series with an upflow sediment column and directly supplied sediment effluent and dissolved-phase chlorinated ethenes. The mixed consortium was not able to sustain dechlorination activity at a retention time of 0.5 days without delivery of amendments to the sediment effluent, evidenced by the loss of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorination to vinyl chloride. When soluble electron donor was supplied to the sediment effluent, complete dechlorination of cis-DCE to ethene was observed at retention times of 0.5 days, suggesting that sediment effluent lacked sufficient electron donor to maintain active dechlorination within the sediment cap. Introduction of elevated contaminant concentrations also limited biotransformation performance of the dechlorinating consortium within the cap. These findings indicate that in situ bioreactive capping can be a feasible remedial approach, provided that residence times are adequate and that appropriate levels of electron donor and contaminant exist within the cap. PMID:21872291

  20. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  1. Stability of an overland flow scheme in the framework of a fully coupled eco-hydrological model based on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendicino, Giuseppe; Pedace, Jessica; Senatore, Alfonso

    2015-04-01

    Cellular Automata are often used for modeling the evolution in time of environmental systems mainly because they are directly compatible with parallel programming. Nevertheless, defining the optimal time step criterion for integrating forward in time numerical processes can further enhance model computational efficiency. To this aim, a numerical stability analysis of an original overland flow model, within the framework of a fully coupled eco-hydrological system based on the Macroscopic Cellular Automata paradigm, is performed. According to the other modules of the system describing soil water flow, soil-surface-atmosphere fluxes and vegetation dynamics, overland flow model equations were derived through a direct discrete formulation (i.e. no differential equations were discretized), adopting the diffusion wave model as an approximation of the full De Saint Venant equations and including the capability of accounting for specific processes, such as the increasing roughness effects due to vegetation growth or surface-soil water exchanges. Suitable formulations of robust tools usually applied in the stability analyses, such as Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy and von Neumann conditions, were initially derived for the CA-based overland flow model. Afterwards, the theoretical stability conditions were compared to experimental time step constraints through several numerical simulations of a 5-h rain event. Specifically, adopting a constant (i.e. not adaptive) time step for simulations, and discretizing head losses in a way that increases model stability, experimental upper limits preventing numerical instability were found for 13 test cases with different slopes, precipitation intensities, vegetation densities and depths of surface depressions. Even though von Neumann condition and experimental values were well positively correlated, the latter were almost always sensibly lower, excluding cases when free surface gradients tended to zero. Therefore, based on the original method

  2. Local Realism of Macroscopic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Paterek, T.; Kay, A.; Kurzyński, P.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2011-08-01

    We identify conditions under which correlations resulting from quantum measurements performed on macroscopic systems (systems composed of a number of particles of the order of the Avogadro number) can be described by local realism. We argue that the emergence of local realism at the macroscopic level is caused by an interplay between the monogamous nature of quantum correlations and the fact that macroscopic measurements do not reveal properties of individual particles.

  3. Including Thermal Fluctuations in Actomyosin Stable States Increases the Predicted Force per Motor and Macroscopic Efficiency in Muscle Modelling.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Lorenzo; Washio, Takumi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    Muscle contractions are generated by cyclical interactions of myosin heads with actin filaments to form the actomyosin complex. To simulate actomyosin complex stable states, mathematical models usually define an energy landscape with a corresponding number of wells. The jumps between these wells are defined through rate constants. Almost all previous models assign these wells an infinite sharpness by imposing a relatively simple expression for the detailed balance, i.e., the ratio of the rate constants depends exponentially on the sole myosin elastic energy. Physically, this assumption corresponds to neglecting thermal fluctuations in the actomyosin complex stable states. By comparing three mathematical models, we examine the extent to which this hypothesis affects muscle model predictions at the single cross-bridge, single fiber, and organ levels in a ceteris paribus analysis. We show that including fluctuations in stable states allows the lever arm of the myosin to easily and dynamically explore all possible minima in the energy landscape, generating several backward and forward jumps between states during the lifetime of the actomyosin complex, whereas the infinitely sharp minima case is characterized by fewer jumps between states. Moreover, the analysis predicts that thermal fluctuations enable a more efficient contraction mechanism, in which a higher force is sustained by fewer attached cross-bridges. PMID:27626630

  4. The bioreactivity of the sub-10 μm component of volcanic ash: Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat.

    PubMed

    Jones, Timothy; Bérubé, Kelly

    2011-10-30

    With the recent eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyafallajökull and resulting ash cloud over much of Europe there was considerable concern about possible respiratory hazards. Volcanic ash can contain minerals that are known human respiratory health hazards such as cristobalite. Short-term ash exposures can cause skin sores, respiratory and ocular irritations and exacerbation of pre-existing lung conditions such as asthma. Long-term occupational level exposures to crystalline silicon dioxide can cause lung inflammation, oedema, fibrosis and cancer. The potential health effects would be dependent on factors including mineralogy, surface chemistry, size, and levels and duration of exposure. Bulk ash from the Soufrière Hills volcano was sourced and inhalable (<2.5 μm) ash samples prepared and physicochemically characterised. The fine ash samples were tested for bioreactivity by SDS-PAGE which determined the strength of binding between mineral grains and lung proteins. Selected proteins bound tightly to cristobalite, and bound loosely to other ash components. A positive correlation was seen between the amount of SiO(2) in the sample and the strength of the binding. The strength of binding is a function of the mineral's bioreactivity, and therefore, a potential geo-biomarker of respiratory risk. PMID:21872393

  5. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2011-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process. PMID:21533072

  6. Development and Characterization of a Rate-Dependent Three-Dimensional Macroscopic Plasticity Model Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    Several key capabilities have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the material/models for composite materials currently available within commercial transient dynamic finite element codes such as LS-DYNA. Some of the specific desired features that have been identified include the incorporation of both plasticity and damage within the material model, the capability of using the material model to analyze the response of both three-dimensional solid elements and two dimensional shell elements, and the ability to simulate the response of composites composed with a variety of composite architectures, including laminates, weaves and braids. In addition, a need has been expressed to have a material model that utilizes tabulated experimentally based input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to utilizing discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength) and analytical functions based on curve fitting. To begin to address these needs, an orthotropic macroscopic plasticity based model suitable for implementation within LS-DYNA has been developed. Specifically, the Tsai-Wu composite failure model has been generalized and extended to a strain-hardening based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The coefficients in the yield function are determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions, along with selected off-axis curves. Incorporating rate dependence into the yield function is achieved by using a series of tabluated input curves, each at a different constant strain rate. The non-associative flow-rule is used to compute the evolution of the effective plastic strain. Systematic procedures have been developed to determine the values of the various coefficients in the yield function and the flow rule based on the tabulated input data. An algorithm based on the radial return method has been developed to facilitate the numerical implementation of the material

  7. Macroscopic impacts of cloud and precipitation processes on maritime shallow convection as simulated by a large eddy simulation model with bin microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, W. W.; Wang, L.-P.; Prabha, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses impacts of cloud and precipitation processes on macrophysical properties of shallow convective clouds as simulated by a large eddy model applying warm-rain bin microphysics. Simulations with and without collision-coalescence are considered with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations of 30, 60, 120, and 240 mg-1. Simulations with collision-coalescence include either the standard gravitational collision kernel or a novel kernel that includes enhancements due to the small-scale cloud turbulence. Simulations with droplet collisions were discussed in Wyszogrodzki et al. (2013) focusing on the impact of the turbulent collision kernel. The current paper expands that analysis and puts model results in the context of previous studies. Despite a significant increase of the drizzle/rain with the decrease of CCN concentration, enhanced by the effects of the small-scale turbulence, impacts on the macroscopic cloud field characteristics are relatively minor. Model results show a systematic shift in the cloud-top height distributions, with an increasing contribution of deeper clouds for stronger precipitating cases. We show that this is consistent with the explanation suggested in Wyszogrodzki et al. (2013); namely, the increase of drizzle/rain leads to a more efficient condensate offloading in the upper parts of the cloud field. A second effect involves suppression of the cloud droplet evaporation near cloud edges in low-CCN simulations, as documented in previous studies (e.g., Xue and Feingold, 2006). We pose the question whether the effects of cloud turbulence on drizzle/rain formation in shallow cumuli can be corroborated by remote sensing observations, for instance, from space. Although a clear signal is extracted from model results, we argue that the answer is negative due to uncertainties caused by the temporal variability of the shallow convective cloud field, sampling and spatial resolution of the satellite data, and overall accuracy of

  8. Transient Macroscopic Chemistry in the DSMC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, M. J.; Macrossan, M. N.; Abdel-Jawad, M.

    2008-12-01

    In the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a combination of statistical and deterministic procedures applied to a finite number of `simulator' particles are used to model rarefied gas-kinetic processes. Traditionally, chemical reactions are modelled using information from specific colliding particle pairs. In the Macroscopic Chemistry Method (MCM), the reactions are decoupled from the specific particle pairs selected for collisions. Information from all of the particles within a cell is used to determine a reaction rate coefficient for that cell. MCM has previously been applied to steady flow DSMC simulations. Here we show how MCM can be used to model chemical kinetics in DSMC simulations of unsteady flow. Results are compared with a collision-based chemistry procedure for two binary reactions in a 1-D unsteady shock-expansion tube simulation and during the unsteady development of 2-D flow through a cavity. For the shock tube simulation, close agreement is demonstrated between the two methods for instantaneous, ensemble-averaged profiles of temperature and species mole fractions. For the cavity flow, a high degree of thermal non-equilibrium is present and non-equilibrium reaction rate correction factors are employed in MCM. Very close agreement is demonstrated for ensemble averaged mole fraction contours predicted by the particle and macroscopic methods at three different flow-times. A comparison of the accumulated number of net reactions per cell shows that both methods compute identical numbers of reaction events. For the 2-D flow, MCM required similar CPU and memory resources to the particle chemistry method. The Macroscopic Chemistry Method is applicable to any general DSMC code using any viscosity or non-reacting collision models and any non-reacting energy exchange models. MCM can be used to implement any reaction rate formulations, whether these be from experimental or theoretical studies.

  9. Variations in the source, metal content and bioreactivity of technogenic aerosols: a case study from Port Talbot, Wales, UK.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Merolla, Luciano; Gibbons, Wes; Greenwell, Leona; Jones, Tim; Richards, Roy

    2004-10-15

    is the most bioreactive (both whole and soluble) and the soluble fraction of the metal-depleted NW sample is the least bioreactive. The metal content of the aerosol samples, especially soluble metals such as Zn, is suggested to be the primary component responsible for oxidative damage of the DNA, and therefore most implicated in any health effects arising from the inhalation of these particulate cocktails. PMID:15364519

  10. Nitrogen reduction using bioreactive thin-layer capping (BTC) with biozeolite: A field experiment in a eutrophic river.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenming; Huang, Tinglin; Yuan, Baoling

    2016-04-01

    Bioreactive thin-layer capping (BTC) with biozeolite provides a potential remediation design that can sustainably treat N contamination from sediment and overlying water in eutrophic water bodies. Nitrogen (N) reduction using BTC with biozeolite was examined in a field incubation experiment in a eutrophic river in Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. The biozeolite was zeolite with attached bacteria, including two isolated heterotrophic nitrifiers (Bacillus spp.) and two isolated aerobic denitrifiers (Acinetobacter spp.). The results showed that the total nitrogen (TN) reduction efficiency of the overlying water by BTC with biozeolite (with thickness of about 2mm) reached a maximum (56.69%) at day 34, and simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification occurred in the BTC system until day 34. There was a significant difference in the TN concentrations of the overlying water between biozeolite capping and control (t-test; p<0.05). The biozeolite had very strong in situ bioregeneration ability. Carbon was the main source of nitrifier growth. However, both dissolved oxygen (DO) and carbon concentrations affected denitrifier growth. In particular, DO concentrations greater than 3mg/L inhibited denitrifier growth. Therefore, BTC with biozeolite was found to be a feasible technique to reduce N in a eutrophic river. However, it is necessary to further strengthen the adaptability of aerobic denitrifiers through changing domestication methods or conditions. PMID:27090702

  11. Characterization of chemical components and bioreactivity of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during incense burning.

    PubMed

    Lui, K H; Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cao, Jun-Ji; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Lee, S C; Hu, Di; Ho, K F

    2016-06-01

    The chemical and bioreactivity properties of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emitted during controlled burning of different brands of incense were characterized. Incenses marketed as being environmentally friendly emitted lower mass of PM2.5 particulates than did traditional incenses. However, the environmentally friendly incenses produced higher total concentrations of non-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs). Human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were exposed to the collected PM2.5, followed by determining oxidative stress and inflammation. There was moderate to strong positive correlation (R > 0.60, p < 0.05) between selected PAHs and OPAHs against oxidative-inflammatory responses. Strong positive correlation was observed between interleukin 6 (IL-6) and summation of total Group B2 PAHs/OPAHs (∑7PAHs/ΣOPAHs). The experimental data indicate that emissions from the environmentally friendly incenses contained higher concentrations of several PAH and OPAH compounds than did traditional incense. Moreover, these PAHs and OPAHs were strongly correlated with inflammatory responses. The findings suggest a need to revise existing regulation of such products. PMID:26994327

  12. Dip-pen nanolithography on (bio)reactive monolayer and block-copolymer platforms: deposition of lines of single macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ramon B; Shovsky, Alexander; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G Julius

    2006-11-01

    The application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip-mediated molecular transfer (dip-pen nanolithography or DPN) to fabricate nanopatterned (bio)reactive platforms based on dendrimers on reactive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and polymer thin films is discussed. The transfer of high-molar-mass polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (generation 5) and the rapid in situ covalent attachment of the deposited adsorbates onto reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) terminated SAMs on gold and NHS-activated polystyrene-block-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PS(690)-b-PtBA(1210)) block copolymer thin films were investigated as strategies to suppress line broadening by surface diffusion in DPN. By exploiting carefully controlled environmental conditions (such as temperature and relative humidity), scan rates, and in particular the covalent attachment of the dendrimers to the reactive films, the observed line broadening and hence the lateral diffusion of dendrimers was substantially less pronounced compared to that observed with DPN of thiols on gold. By this method, high-definition patterns of dendrimers were conveniently fabricated down to 30-nm length scales. The presence of primary amino groups in the deposited dendrimers ultimately offers the possibility to anchor biochemically relevant molecules, such as proteins and polypeptides, to these nanostructured platforms for a wide range of possible applications in the life sciences and in particular for the investigation of controlled cell-surface interactions. PMID:17192974

  13. Optimal Estimation of Ion-Channel Kinetics from Macroscopic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuhui; Yao, Jing; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Jiuping

    2012-01-01

    Markov modeling provides an effective approach for modeling ion channel kinetics. There are several search algorithms for global fitting of macroscopic or single-channel currents across different experimental conditions. Here we present a particle swarm optimization(PSO)-based approach which, when used in combination with golden section search (GSS), can fit macroscopic voltage responses with a high degree of accuracy (errors within 1%) and reasonable amount of calculation time (less than 10 hours for 20 free parameters) on a desktop computer. We also describe a method for initial value estimation of the model parameters, which appears to favor identification of global optimum and can further reduce the computational cost. The PSO-GSS algorithm is applicable for kinetic models of arbitrary topology and size and compatible with common stimulation protocols, which provides a convenient approach for establishing kinetic models at the macroscopic level. PMID:22536358

  14. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  15. Assessing Macroscopic Evapotranspiration Function Response to Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharun, M.; Vervoort, R. W.; Turnbull, T.; Henry, J.; Adams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) by forests can reach up to 100% of rainfall in Australia, and is a substantial component of the water balance. Transpiration is a major part of the ET and it is well-known that transpiration depends on a combination of physiological and environmental controls. As a consequence of well-ventilated canopies of eucalypt forests and close decoupling to the atmosphere, atmospheric conditions exert a large control over transpiration. We measured a suit of environmental variables including temperature, humidity, radiation, and soil moisture concurrently with transpiration in a range of eucalypt forests. We observed that atmospheric demand (VPD) exerts the strongest control over transpiration. Experimental evidence also showed a strong dependency of the control on soil moisture abundance in the top soil layer. In many eco-hydrological models actual ET is represented with a linear transformation of potential ET based on the soil moisture condition, a so-called macroscopic approach. Such ET functions lump various soil and plant factors, are not experimentally supported and therefore quite poorly validated. Different combinations of atmospheric demand and soil moisture availability lead to diverse behaviour of the macroscopic ET function. Based on our observations in this study, we propose a novel approach that improves portray of transpiration, evaporation, drainage and hence the loss of water from the root zone. We used a modified version of the Norwegian HBV model to test our approach over a medium size catchment (150 km2) in south east Australia.

  16. Peak Cardiac Power Measured Non-Invasively with a Bioreactance Technique is a Predictor of Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Hannah; Helmke, Stephen; Williams, Paula; Teruya, Sergio; Jones, Margaret; Burkhoff, Daniel; Mancini, Donna; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a powerful predictor of survival, providing an indirect assessment of cardiac output (CO). Hypothesis Non-invasive indices of CO derived from bioreactance methodology would add significantly to peak VO2 as a means of risk stratifying patients with heart failure. Methods 127 patients (53±14 years of age, 66% male) with heart failure and an average EF = 31±15 underwent a symptom-limited CPET using a bicycle ergometer while measuring CO noninvasively by a bioreactance technique. Peak cardiac power was derived from the product of the peak mean arterial blood pressure and CO divided by 451. Results Follow-up averaged 404±179 days (median, 366 days) to assess end points including death (n=3), heart transplant (n=10), or left ventricular assisted device (LVAD) implantation (n=2). Peak VO2 and peak power had similar area under the curves (0.77 and 0.76), which increased to 0.83 when combined. Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival curves demonstrated different outcomes in the subgroup with a VO2 <14 ml*kg-1*min-1 when stratified by a cardiac power above or below 1.5 Watts (92.2% vs. 82.1% at 1 year and 81.6% vs. 58.3% at last follow-up, p=0.02 by log-rank test). Conclusions Among patients with heart failure, peak cardiac power measured with bioreactance methodology and peak VO2 had similar associations with adverse outcomes and peak power added independent prognostic information to peak VO2 in subjects with advanced disease (e.g. VO2 < 14 ml*kg-1*min-1). PMID:21091609

  17. A surface-plasmon resonance phase modulation bio-reaction detection system with (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Hsu, I.-Hung; Tseng, Eddie; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2007-12-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a very important metrology in biology detection. Phase modulation is one of the SPR detection technologies and the sample changes can be recognized from the phase variation. It is able to detect very tiny bio sample variation due to its high sensitivity. In this study, the optical system design based on a paraboloidal lens-based surface plasmon resonance instrument will be used to control the SPR critical angle. The charge coupled device camera (CCD camera) will be used to record the images of the bio-reaction and (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm will be adopted to retrieve the phase fringes of the whole spot from the intensity maps. The combination of the angle control SPR system and the (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm will expand the whole spot detection ability from the intensity to phase modulation because the intensity maps are going to be recorded for the (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm calculation. The difference between (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm and Five-Step Algorithm1 is that (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm only needs one image map at one time during the bio reaction and Five-Step Algorithm requires five image maps. Therefore, (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm will reduce the process of experiment and the requirement of the memory. The different concentration alcohols were measured by the optical system to verify the (5,1) phase-shifting algorithm applied in SPR phase modulation measurement and to prove the idea is workable and successful.

  18. High resolution and dynamic imaging of biopersistence and bioreactivity of extra and intracellular MWNTs exposed to microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Goode, Angela E; Gonzalez Carter, Daniel A; Motskin, Michael; Pienaar, Ilse S; Chen, Shu; Hu, Sheng; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Ryan, Mary P; Shaffer, Milo S P; Dexter, David T; Porter, Alexandra E

    2015-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are increasingly being developed both as neuro-therapeutic drug delivery systems to the brain and as neural scaffolds to drive tissue regeneration across lesion sites. MWNTs with different degrees of acid oxidation may have different bioreactivities and propensities to aggregate in the extracellular environment, and both individualised and aggregated MWNTs may be expected to be found in the brain. Before practical application, it is vital to understand how both aggregates and individual MWNTs will interact with local phagocytic immune cells, the microglia, and ultimately to determine their biopersistence in the brain. The processing of extra- and intracellular MWNTs (both pristine and when acid oxidised) by microglia was characterised across multiple length scales by correlating a range of dynamic, quantitative and multi-scale techniques, including: UV-vis spectroscopy, light microscopy, focussed ion beam scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic, live cell imaging revealed the ability of microglia to break apart and internalise micron-sized extracellular agglomerates of acid oxidised MWNTs, but not pristine MWNTs. The total amount of MWNTs internalised by, or strongly bound to, microglia was quantified as a function of time. Neither the significant uptake of oxidised MWNTs, nor the incomplete uptake of pristine MWNTs affected microglial viability, pro-inflammatory cytokine release or nitric oxide production. However, after 24 h exposure to pristine MWNTs, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Small aggregates and individualised oxidised MWNTs were present in the cytoplasm and vesicles, including within multilaminar bodies, after 72 h. Some evidence of morphological damage to oxidised MWNT structure was observed including highly disordered graphitic structures, suggesting possible biodegradation. This work demonstrates the utility of dynamic

  19. High resolution and dynamic imaging of biopersistence and bioreactivity of extra and intracellular MWNTs exposed to microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Carter, Daniel A.; Motskin, Michael; Pienaar, Ilse S.; Chen, Shu; Hu, Sheng; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Ryan, Mary P.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Dexter, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are increasingly being developed both as neuro-therapeutic drug delivery systems to the brain and as neural scaffolds to drive tissue regeneration across lesion sites. MWNTs with different degrees of acid oxidation may have different bioreactivities and propensities to aggregate in the extracellular environment, and both individualised and aggregated MWNTs may be expected to be found in the brain. Before practical application, it is vital to understand how both aggregates and individual MWNTs will interact with local phagocytic immune cells, the microglia, and ultimately to determine their biopersistence in the brain. The processing of extra- and intracellular MWNTs (both pristine and when acid oxidised) by microglia was characterised across multiple length scales by correlating a range of dynamic, quantitative and multi-scale techniques, including: UV-vis spectroscopy, light microscopy, focussed ion beam scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic, live cell imaging revealed the ability of microglia to break apart and internalise micron-sized extracellular agglomerates of acid oxidised MWNT, but not pristine MWNTs. The total amount of MWNTs internalised by, or strongly bound to, microglia was quantified as a function of time. Neither the significant uptake of oxidised MWNTs, nor the incomplete uptake of pristine MWNTs affected microglial viability, pro-inflammatory cytokine release or nitric oxide production. However, after 24 hrs exposure to pristine MWNTs, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Small aggregates and individualised oxidised MWNTs were present in the cytoplasm and vesicles, including within multilaminar bodies, after 72 hours. Some evidence of morphological damage to oxidised MWNT structure was observed including highly disordered graphitic structures, suggesting possible biodegradation. This work demonstrates the utility of dynamic

  20. Deterministic Creation of Macroscopic Cat States

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Daniel; Twamley, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging. For this reason, the observation of such effects on larger scale systems is currently one of the most attractive goals in quantum science. Many experimental protocols have been proposed for both the creation and observation of quantum states on macroscopic scales, in particular, in the field of optomechanics. The majority of these proposals, however, rely on performing measurements, making them probabilistic. In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation. We study the prototypical optomechanical Membrane In The Middle model and show that by controlling the membrane’s opacity, and through careful choice of the optical cavity initial state, we can deterministically create and grow the spatial extent of the membrane’s position into a large cat state. It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved. PMID:26345157

  1. Deterministic Creation of Macroscopic Cat States.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Daniel; Twamley, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging. For this reason, the observation of such effects on larger scale systems is currently one of the most attractive goals in quantum science. Many experimental protocols have been proposed for both the creation and observation of quantum states on macroscopic scales, in particular, in the field of optomechanics. The majority of these proposals, however, rely on performing measurements, making them probabilistic. In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation. We study the prototypical optomechanical Membrane In The Middle model and show that by controlling the membrane's opacity, and through careful choice of the optical cavity initial state, we can deterministically create and grow the spatial extent of the membrane's position into a large cat state. It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved. PMID:26345157

  2. Macroscopic definition of distributed swarm morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar, Fidel; Pujol, Mar; Rizo, Ramón

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present a system that will be able to obtain microscopic assembly behaviours for a robotic swarm to achieve an assembly target (macroscopic model). It will be designed taking into consideration the essential features of a self-assembling system needed to be implemented in a real robotic swarm. This system is composed of a typology of generative languages PD0L, and an algorithm for generating individual rules to be processed by the robots. The assembly process will be performed in a distributed manner, and will be also designed to require minimal communication capabilities between robots. Both the expressive capacities of language and the rule generation algorithm will be demonstrated by evaluating their performance with a core set of test morphologies widely used in self-assembly tasks. Furthermore, we compare the assembly time and the number of messages required between a classic controller (centralised) and our distributed approach.

  3. Atomistic Simulation of the Transition from Atomistic to Macroscopic Cratering

    SciTech Connect

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2008-07-11

    Using large-scale atomistic simulations, we show that the macroscopic cratering behavior emerges for projectile impacts on Au at projectile sizes between 1000 and 10 000 Au atoms at impact velocities comparable to typical meteoroid velocities. In this size regime, we detect a compression of material in Au nanoparticle impacts similar to that observed for hypervelocity macroscopic impacts. The simulated crater volumes agree with the values calculated using the macroscopic crater size scaling law, in spite of a downwards extrapolation over more than 15 orders of magnitude in terms of the impactor volume. The result demonstrates that atomistic simulations can be used as a tool to understand the strength properties of materials in cases where only continuum models have been possible before.

  4. Graphene chiral liquid crystals and macroscopic assembled fibres

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2011-01-01

    Chirality and liquid crystals are both widely expressed in nature and biology. Helical assembly of mesophasic molecules and colloids may produce intriguing chiral liquid crystals. To date, chiral liquid crystals of 2D colloids have not been explored. As a typical 2D colloid, graphene is now receiving unprecedented attention. However, making macroscopic graphene fibres is hindered by the poor dispersibility of graphene and by the lack of an assembly method. Here we report that soluble, chemically oxidized graphene or graphene oxide sheets can form chiral liquid crystals in a twist-grain-boundary phase-like model with simultaneous lamellar ordering and long-range helical frustrations. Aqueous graphene oxide liquid crystals were continuously spun into metres of macroscopic graphene oxide fibres; subsequent chemical reduction gave the first macroscopic neat graphene fibres with high conductivity and good mechanical performance. The flexible, strong graphene fibres were knitted into designed patterns and into directionally conductive textiles. PMID:22146390

  5. Cloud Macroscopic Organization: Order Emerging from Randomness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Tianle

    2011-01-01

    Clouds play a central role in many aspects of the climate system and their forms and shapes are remarkably diverse. Appropriate representation of clouds in climate models is a major challenge because cloud processes span at least eight orders of magnitude in spatial scales. Here we show that there exists order in cloud size distribution of low-level clouds, and that it follows a power-law distribution with exponent gamma close to 2. gamma is insensitive to yearly variations in environmental conditions, but has regional variations and land-ocean contrasts. More importantly, we demonstrate this self-organizing behavior of clouds emerges naturally from a complex network model with simple, physical organizing principles: random clumping and merging. We also demonstrate symmetry between clear and cloudy skies in terms of macroscopic organization because of similar fundamental underlying organizing principles. The order in the apparently complex cloud-clear field thus has its root in random local interactions. Studying cloud organization with complex network models is an attractive new approach that has wide applications in climate science. We also propose a concept of cloud statistic mechanics approach. This approach is fully complementary to deterministic models, and the two approaches provide a powerful framework to meet the challenge of representing clouds in our climate models when working in tandem.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media with conduits to estimate macroscopic continuous time random walk model parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Anwar, S.; Cortis, A.; Sukop, M.

    2008-10-20

    Lattice Boltzmann models simulate solute transport in porous media traversed by conduits. Resulting solute breakthrough curves are fitted with Continuous Time Random Walk models. Porous media are simulated by damping flow inertia and, when the damping is large enough, a Darcy's Law solution instead of the Navier-Stokes solution normally provided by the lattice Boltzmann model is obtained. Anisotropic dispersion is incorporated using a direction-dependent relaxation time. Our particular interest is to simulate transport processes outside the applicability of the standard Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE) including eddy mixing in conduits. The ADE fails to adequately fit any of these breakthrough curves.

  7. Microtomography of macroscopic snow samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzl, M.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, D.; Steiner, S.; Heggli, M.

    2010-12-01

    During the last 10 years X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) has proved to be the first successful method to measure the true three-dimensional (3-D) structure of snow on the ground. Micro-CT is used to reconstruct 3-D microstructures as a source for numerical simulations, to conduct long-term observations of metamorphism or the behavior of snow under stress and to derive macroscopic parameters describing the microstructure of snow like specific surface area or density. However, micro-CT was confined to small samples with a typically evaluated size of 5 x 5 x 5 mm3. One reason for the small size was the limited computational power, the other the sample preparation. Based on the replica method for 3-D micro-CT samples introduced by Heggli et al. (2009), we are now able to visualize snow samples up to 70 mm height, and about 10 mm diameter, with a resolution of 10 μm. Because inclusion of small air bubbles during the casting process can not be avoided, we make two scans, one before and one after sublimation, the two scans are then registered and subtracted. After image segmentation and morphological image processing the replica can be analysed in the same way as direct snow measurements. Based on such samples, we imaged highly fragile snow samples, like new snow, buried surface hoar and other weak layers. The samples show a fascinating new image of how complex snow layers are. Most samples show strong density gradients within a structurally similar layer. We think that this technique will improve our understanding of snow metamorphism and snow properties. Heggli, M.; Frei, E.; Schneebeli, M., 2009: Instruments and Methods. Snow Replica method for three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic imaging. J. Glaciol. 55, 192: 631-639.

  8. Patient-calibrated agent-based modelling of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): From microscopic measurements to macroscopic predictions of clinical progression

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Paul; Edgerton, Mary E.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)—a significant precursor to invasive breast cancer—is typically diagnosed as microcalcifications in mammograms. However, the effective use of mammograms and other patient data to plan treatment has been restricted by our limited understanding of DCIS growth and calcification. We develop a mechanistic, agent-based cell model and apply it to DCIS. Cell motion is determined by a balance of biomechanical forces. We use potential functions to model interactions with the basement membrane and amongst cells of unequal size and phenotype. Each cell’s phenotype is determined by genomic/proteomic- and microenvironment-dependent stochastic processes. Detailed “sub-models” describe cell volume changes during proliferation and necrosis; we are the first to account for cell calcification. We introduce the first patient-specific calibration method to fully constrain the model based upon clinically-accessible histopathology data. After simulating 45 days of solid-type DCIS with comedonecrosis, the model predicts: necrotic cell lysis acts as a biomechanical stress relief, and is responsible for the linear DCIS growth observed in mammography; the rate of DCIS advance varies with the duct radius; the tumour grows 7 to 10 mm per year—consistent with mammographic data; and the mammographic and (post-operative) pathologic sizes are linearly correlated—in quantitative agreement with the clinical literature. Patient histopathology matches the predicted DCIS microstructure: an outer proliferative rim surrounds a stratified necrotic core with nuclear debris on its outer edge and calcification in the centre. This work illustrates that computational modelling can provide new insight on the biophysical underpinnings of cancer. It may one day be possible to augment a patient’s mammography and other imaging with rigorously-calibrated models that help select optimal surgical margins based upon the patient’s histopathologic data. PMID:22342935

  9. Simulations of Self-Expanding Braided Stent Using Macroscopic Model of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys Covering R-Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M.; Sedlák, P.; Kruisová, A.; Landa, M.

    2014-07-01

    Self-expanding stents or stentgrafts made from Nitinol superelastic alloy are widely used for a less invasive treatment of disease-induced localized flow constriction in the cardiovascular system. The therapy is based on insertion of a stent into a blood vessel to maintain the inner diameter of the vessel; it provides highly effective results at minimal cost and with reduced hospital stays. However, since stent is an external mechanical healing tool implemented into human body for quite a long time, information on the mechanical performance of it is of fundamental importance with respect to patient's safety and comfort. Advantageously, computational structural analysis can provide valuable information on the response of the product in an environment where in vivo experimentation is extremely expensive or impossible. With this motivation, a numerical model of a particular braided self-expanding stent was developed. As a reasonable approximation substantially reducing computational demands, the stent was considered to be composed of a set of helical springs with specific constrains reflecting geometry of the structure. An advanced constitutive model for NiTi-based shape memory alloys including R-phase transition was employed in analysis. Comparison to measurements shows a very good match between the numerical solution and experimental results. Relation between diameter of the stent and uniform radial pressure on its surface is estimated. Information about internal phase and stress state of the material during compression loading provided by the model is used to estimate fatigue properties of the stent during cyclic loading.

  10. Thermodynamics of Bioreactions.

    PubMed

    Held, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic principles have been applied to enzyme-catalyzed reactions since the beginning of the 1930s in an attempt to understand metabolic pathways. Currently, thermodynamics is also applied to the design and analysis of biotechnological processes. The key thermodynamic quantity is the Gibbs energy of reaction, which must be negative for a reaction to occur spontaneously. However, the application of thermodynamic feasibility studies sometimes yields positive Gibbs energies of reaction even for reactions that are known to occur spontaneously, such as glycolysis. This article reviews the application of thermodynamics in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It summarizes the basic thermodynamic relationships used for describing the Gibbs energy of reaction and also refers to the nonuniform application of these relationships in the literature. The review summarizes state-of-the-art approaches that describe the influence of temperature, pH, electrolytes, solvents, and concentrations of reacting agents on the Gibbs energy of reaction and, therefore, on the feasibility and yield of biological reactions. PMID:27276551

  11. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; García-Mendoza, Humberto; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A.; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-01-01

    The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD). Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP) and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4) were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue. PMID:24163822

  12. Effect of the plasmid-DNA vaccination on macroscopic and microscopic damage caused by the experimental chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C; García-Mendoza, Humberto; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Vallejo, Maite; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-01-01

    The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD). Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP) and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4) were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue. PMID:24163822

  13. Equilibrium Macroscopic Structure Revisited from Spatial Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Koretaka

    2016-02-01

    In classical systems, we reexamine how macroscopic structures in equilibrium state connect with spatial constraint on the systems. For example, volume and density as the constraint for liquids in rigid box, and crystal lattice as the constraint for crystalline solids. We find that in disordered states, equilibrium macroscopic structure, depending on temperature and on multibody interactions in the system, can be well characterized by a single special microscopic structure independent of temperature and of interactions. The special microscopic structure depends only on the spatial constraint. We demonstrate the present findings providing (i) significantly efficient and systematic prediction of macroscopic structures for possible combination of constituents in multicomponent systems using first-principles calculations, and (ii) unique and accurate prediction of multibody interactions in given system from measured macroscopic structure, without performing trial-and-error simulation.

  14. Macroscopic strings and ``quirks'' at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junhai; Luty, Markus A.

    2009-11-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model containing additional heavy particles (``quirks'') charged under a new unbroken non-abelian gauge group as well as the standard model. We assume that the quirk mass m is in the phenomenologically interesting range 100 GeV-TeV, and that the new gauge group gets strong at a scale Λ < m. In this case breaking of strings is exponentially suppressed, and quirk production results in strings that are long compared to Λ-1. The existence of these long stable strings leads to highly exotic events at colliders. For 100 eV lsimΛ <~ keV the strings are macroscopic, giving rise to events with two separated quirk tracks with measurable curvature toward each other due to the string interaction. For keV <~ Λ <~ MeV the typical strings are mesoscopic: too small to resolve in the detector, but large compared to atomic scales. In this case, the bound state appears as a single particle, but its mass is the invariant mass of a quirk pair, which has an event-by-event distribution. For MeV <~ Λ <~ m, the strings are microscopic, and the quirks annihilate promptly within the detector. For colored quirks, this can lead to hadronic fireball events with ~ 103 hadrons with energy of order GeV emitted in conjunction with hard decay products from the final annihilation.

  15. Variation in Quantity, Source and Bioreactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter in Streams Draining Watersheds along a Gradient of Agricultural Land Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, P.; Lu, Y.; Jaffe, R.; Du, Y.; Findlay, R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to address the effects of agricultural land use on stream water dissolved organic matter (DOM), we sampled a regional group of second to third order streams draining watersheds along a gradient of percentage agricultural lands in northwestern Alabama, USA. Samples were collected under baseflow conditions, five different times over the year 2014. We analyzed dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, DOM optical properties (i.e. ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectrophotometry), and DOM bioreactivity over the course of 22 d incubation. We found that air temperature and antecedent precipitation intensity (API) were two major factors positively controlling DOC concentrations. High DOC concentrations were associated with high fluorescence index values, low percent contributions from terrestrially derived humic-like DOM fluorescence component (C1), and high percent contributions from microbially derived humic-like DOM fluorescence component (C3). We suggest that elevated microbial DOM production under high temperature and API was the primary reason for DOC enrichment in stream water. Percentage agricultural land was the secondary predictor of DOM characteristics. The percentages of forest land use within watersheds positively correlated with percent protein-like DOM fluorescence component (C4). DOC concentrations and relative abundance of humic-like DOM fluorescence components (C1, C2 and C3) were higher in agricultural streams than in forested streams, which could be attributed to flow path differences between agricultural and forested watersheds. Larger amount and percentage of bioreactive DOC was observed in agricultural streams, which might decrease oxygen level and impact fluvial ecosystem in downstream regions during degradation.

  16. From a Microscopic to a Macroscopic Model for Alzheimer Disease: Two-Scale Homogenization of the Smoluchowski Equation in Perforated Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, Bruno; Lorenzani, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the homogenization of a set of Smoluchowski's discrete diffusion-coagulation equations modeling the aggregation and diffusion of β -amyloid peptide (Aβ ), a process associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. In particular, we define a periodically perforated domain Ω _{ɛ }, obtained by removing from the fixed domain Ω (the cerebral tissue) infinitely many small holes of size ɛ (the neurons), which support a non-homogeneous Neumann boundary condition describing the production of Aβ by the neuron membranes. Then, we prove that, when ɛ → 0, the solution of this micromodel two-scale converges to the solution of a macromodel asymptotically consistent with the original one. Indeed, the information given on the microscale by the non-homogeneous Neumann boundary condition is transferred into a source term appearing in the limiting (homogenized) equations. Furthermore, on the macroscale, the geometric structure of the perforated domain induces a correction in that the scalar diffusion coefficients defined at the microscale are replaced by tensorial quantities.

  17. Macroscopic quantum phenomena from the large N perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. H.; Hu, B. L.; Subaşi, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena (MQP) is a relatively new research venue, with exciting ongoing experiments and bright prospects, yet with surprisingly little theoretical activity. What makes MQP intellectually stimulating is because it is counterpoised against the traditional view that macroscopic means classical. This simplistic and hitherto rarely challenged view need be scrutinized anew, perhaps with much of the conventional wisdoms repealed. In this series of papers we report on a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of MQP, with the hope of constructing a viable theoretical framework for this new endeavour. The three major themes discussed in these three essays are the large N expansion, the correlation hierarchy and quantum entanglement for systems of 'large' sizes, with many components or degrees of freedom. In this paper we use different theories in a variety of contexts to examine the conditions or criteria whereby a macroscopic quantum system may take on classical attributes, and, more interestingly, that it keeps some of its quantum features. The theories we consider here are, the O(N) quantum mechanical model, semiclassical stochastic gravity and gauge / string theories; the contexts include that of a 'quantum roll' in inflationary cosmology, entropy generation in quantum Vlasov equation for plasmas, the leading order and next-to-leading order large N behaviour, and hydrodynamic / thermodynamic limits. The criteria for classicality in our consideration include the use of uncertainty relations, the correlation between classical canonical variables, randomization of quantum phase, environment-induced decoherence, decoherent history of hydrodynamic variables, etc. All this exercise is to ask only one simple question: Is it really so surprising that quantum features can appear in macroscopic objects? By examining different representative systems where detailed theoretical analysis has been carried out, we find that there is no a priori

  18. µPIV Applied to Macroscopic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindken, Ralph; Westerweel, Jerry

    2001-11-01

    In most technological and industrial applications the flow is characterized by a high Reynolds number. Current turbulence models are not tested under high Re number flow conditions. For that purpose we plan to measure various flows at very high Re numbers in a high-pressure wind tunnel. At high pressure the turbulent scales become very small in the order of 10 to 30 µm. The subject of this talk is the development of a measuring device that is able to resolve 10 µm scales in a 0.5 x 0.5 m2 measuring section. We use a µPIV system with a working distance of 0.3 to 1.0 m. The µPIV system consists of a 200 mJ Nd:YAG laser, a 1k x 1.3k double shutter CCD-camera and a long distance microscope. The system is tested in a highly turbulent pipe flow and a turbulent jet flow. Extra effort is necessary for guiding the laser light to the measuring area and to determine high seeding quality. Particles in various sizes from 270 nm to 1.5 µm are tested. Two problems arise: Non-uniform seeding with nm-particles in a large wind tunnel and the costs for a large amount of tracer particles in a macroscopic flow. Measurements in the high-pressure wind tunnel at the DLR in Göttingen, Germany are planned.

  19. Macroscopic entanglement of many-magnon states

    SciTech Connect

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Akira; Sugita, Ayumu

    2005-03-01

    We study macroscopic entanglement of various pure states of a one-dimensional N-spin system with N>>1. Here, a quantum state is said to be macroscopically entangled if it is a superposition of macroscopically distinct states. To judge whether such superposition is hidden in a general state, we use an essentially unique index p: A pure state is macroscopically entangled if p=2, whereas it may be entangled but not macroscopically if p<2. This index is directly related to fundamental stabilities of many-body states. We calculate the index p for various states in which magnons are excited with various densities and wave numbers. We find macroscopically entangled states (p=2) as well as states with p=1. The former states are unstable in the sense that they are unstable against some local measurements. On the other hand, the latter states are stable in the senses that they are stable against any local measurements and that their decoherence rates never exceed O(N) in any weak classical noises. For comparison, we also calculate the von Neumann entropy S{sub N/2}(N) of a subsystem composed of N/2 spins as a measure of bipartite entanglement. We find that S{sub N/2}(N) of some states with p=1 is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum value N/2. On the other hand, S{sub N/2}(N) of the macroscopically entangled states with p=2 is as small as O(log N)<

  20. Macroscopic impacts of cloud and precipitation processes in shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Wojciech; Slawinska, Joanna; Pawlowska, Hanna; Wyszogrodzki, Andrzej

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents application of the EULAG model combined with a sophisticated double-moment warm-rain microphysics scheme to the model intercomparison case based on RICO (Rain in Cumulus over Ocean) field observations. As the simulations progress, the cloud field gradually deepens and a relatively sharp temperature and moisture inversions develop in the lower troposphere. Two contrasting aerosol environments are considered, referred to as pristine and polluted, together with two contrasting subgridscale mixing scenarios, the homogeneous and the extremely inhomogeneous mixing. Pristine and polluted environments feature mean cloud droplet concentrations around 40 and 150 mg-1, respectively, and large differences in the rain characteristics. Various measures are used to contrast evolution of macroscopic cloud field characteristics, such as the mean cloud fraction, the mean cloud width, or the height of the center of mass of the cloud field, among others. Macroscopic characteristics appear similar regardless of the aerosol characteristics or the homogeneity of the subgrid-scale mixing.

  1. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  2. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial.

  3. Macroscopic dynamics of polar nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut R; Pleiner, Harald; Ziebert, Falko

    2006-08-01

    We present the macroscopic equations for polar nematic liquid crystals. We consider the case where one has both, the usual nematic director, n[over ] , characterizing quadrupolar order as well as the macroscopic polarization, P , representing polar order, but where their directions coincide and are rigidly coupled. In this case one has to choose P as the independent macroscopic variable. Such equations are expected to be relevant in connection with nematic phases with unusual properties found recently in compounds composed of banana-shaped molecules. Among the effects predicted, which are absent in conventional nematic liquid crystals showing only quadrupolar order, are pyro-electricity and its analogs for density and for concentration in mixtures as well as a flow alignment behavior, which is more complex than in usual low molecular weight nematics. We also discuss the formation of defect structures expected in such systems. PMID:17025458

  4. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial. PMID:24870613

  5. Macroscopic response and directional disorder dynamics in chemically substituted ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parravicini, Jacopo; DelRe, Eugenio; Agranat, Aharon J.; Parravicini, Gianbattista

    2016-03-01

    Using temperature-resolved dielectric spectroscopy in the range 25-320 K we investigate the macroscopic response, phase symmetry, and order/disorder states in bulk ferroelectric K1-yLiyTa1-xNbx (KLTN). Four long-range symmetry phases are identified with their relative transitions. Directional analysis of the order/disorder states using Fröhlich entropy indicates global symmetry breaking along the growth axis and an anisotropic dipolar effective thermodynamic behavior, which ranges from disordered to ordered at the same temperature for different directions in the sample. Results indicate that the macroscopic polarization, driven by nanosized polar regions, follows a microscopic perovskite eight-sites lattice model.

  6. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations.

    PubMed

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems. PMID:25019705

  7. Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M. R.; Sussman, B. J.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; England, D.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  8. Macroscopic effects in attosecond pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchon, T.; Hauri, C. P.; Varjú, K.; Mansten, E.; Swoboda, M.; López-Martens, R.; L'Huillier, A.

    2008-02-01

    We examine how the generation and propagation of high-order harmonics in a partly ionized gas medium affect their strength and synchronization. The temporal properties of the resulting attosecond pulses generated in long gas targets can be significantly influenced by macroscopic effects, in particular by the intensity in the medium and the degree of ionization which control the dispersion. Under some conditions, the use of gas targets longer than the absorption length can lead to the generation of compressed attosecond pulses. We show these macroscopic effects experimentally, using a 6 mm-long argon-filled gas cell as the generating medium.

  9. Macroscopic response in active nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Gandhi; John, Sajeev; Li, Er Ping

    2013-09-15

    We derive macroscopic equations of motion for the slowly varying electric field amplitude in three-dimensional active nonlinear optical nanostructures. We show that the microscopic Maxwell equations and polarization dynamics can be simplified to a macroscopic one-dimensional problem in the direction of group velocity. For a three-level active material, we derive the steady-state equations for normal mode frequency, threshold pumping, nonlinear Bloch mode amplitude, and lasing in photonic crystals. Our analytical results accurately recapture the results of exact numerical methods. PMID:24104802

  10. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    2016-04-22

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only key evidence for macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We study systematically the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. We also discuss the experimental implementation of this scheme. PMID:27152802

  11. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only key evidence for macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We study systematically the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. We also discuss the experimental implementation of this scheme.

  12. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  13. Separation of the Microscopic and Macroscopic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zandt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the possibility of observing interference in quantum magnification experiments such as the celebrated "Schroedinger cat". Uses the possibility of observing interference for separating the realm of microscopic from macroscopic dynamics; estimates the dividing line to fall at system sizes of about 100 Daltons. (MLH)

  14. Collective Phenomena in Macroscopic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2007-08-01

    A hypothesis of the magnetostatic turbulence and its implications of astrophysics / D.D. Ryutov and B.A. Remingtonn-- Coherent structures and turbulence in electron plasmas / M. Rome ... [et al.] -- Self-organization of non-linear vortices in plasma lens for ion-beam-focusing in crossed radial electrical and longitudinal magnetic fields / V. Maslov, I. Onishchenko and A. Goncharov -- Collective processes at kinetic levels in dusty plasmas / P.K. Shukla and B. Eliasson -- Magnetic field generation in anisotropic relativistic plasma regimes / F. Pegoraro, F. Califano and D. del Sarto -- Generation and observation of coherent, long-lived structures in a laser-plasma channel / T. V. Liseykina ... [et al.] -- Theoretical resolution of magnetic reconnection in high energy plasmas / B. Coppi -- The power of being flat: conformal invariance in two-dimensional turbulence / A. Celani -- Stochastic resonance: from climate to biology / R. Benzi -- Energy-enstrophy theory for coupled fluid/rotating sphere system-exact solutions for super-rotations / C. C. Lim -- Thermophoretic convection of silica nanoparticles / A. Vailati ... [et al.] -- Fluctuations and pattern formation in fluids with competing interactions / A. Imperio, D. Pini and L. Reatto -- Alternatives and paradoxes in rotational and gravitational instabilities / J.P. Goedbloed -- Poynting jets and MHD winds from rapidly rotating magnetized stars / R.V.E. Lovelace, M.M. Romanova, G.V. Ustyugova and A.V. Koldoba -- Turbulence and transport in astrophysical accretion disks / J.M. Stone -- Gravitational instabilities in gaseous discs and the formation of supermassive Black Hole seeds at high redshifts / G. Lodato -- Fine Structure and Dynamics of Sunspot Penumbra / M. Ryutova, T. Berger and A. Title -- Phase Mixing in Mond / L. Ciotti, C. Nipoti and P. Londrillo -- MHD simulations of jet acceleration: the role of disk resistivity / G. Bodo ... [et al.] -- Hamiltonian structure of a collisionless reconnection model valid

  15. Macroscopic noncontextuality as a principle for almost-quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Joe; Sainz, Ana Belén

    2015-04-01

    Quantum mechanics allows only certain sets of experimental results (or "probabilistic models") for Bell-type quantum nonlocality experiments. A derivation of this set from simple physical or information theoretic principles would represent an important step forward in our understanding of quantum mechanics, and this problem has been intensely investigated in recent years. "Macroscopic locality," which requires the recovery of locality in the limit of large numbers of trials, is one of several principles discussed in the literature that place a bound on the set of quantum probabilistic models. A similar question can also be asked about probabilistic models for the more general class of quantum contextuality experiments. Here, we extend the macroscopic locality principle to this more general setting, using the hypergraph approach of Acín, Fritz, Leverrier, and Sainz [Comm. Math. Phys. 334(2), 533-628 (2015), 10.1007/s00220-014-2260-1], which provides a framework to study both phenomena of nonlocality and contextuality in a unified manner. We find that the set of probabilistic models allowed by our macroscopic noncontextuality principle is equivalent to an important and previously studied set in this formalism, which is slightly larger than the quantum set. In the particular case of Bell scenarios, this set is equivalent to the set of "almost-quantum" models, which is of particular interest since the latter was recently shown to satisfy all but one of the principles that have been proposed to bound quantum probabilistic models, without being implied by any of them (or even their conjunction). Our condition is the first characterization of the almost-quantum set from a simple physical principle.

  16. Microscopic time-reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: Still a paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, H.A.; Dellago, Ch.; Hoover, W.G.; Kum, O. |

    1995-09-13

    Microscopic time reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility are a paradoxical combination. This was first observed by J. Loschmidt in 1876 and was explained, for conservative systems, by L. Boltzmann the following year. Both these features are also present in modern simulations of classic many-body systems in steady nonequilibrium states. We illustrate them here for the simplest possible models, a continuous one-dimensional model of field-driven diffusion, the so-called driven Lorentz gas or Galton Board, and an ergodic time reversible dissipative map.

  17. Macroscopic phase decomposition in block copolymers driven by thermooxidative reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shaobin

    Macroscopic phase separations have been observed in a commercial styrene- block-butadiene-block-styrene (SBS) triblock copolymer (Kraton 1102), an as-synthesized SBS triblock copolymer, an as-synthesized styrene-block-butadiene (SB) diblock copolymer and a commercial styrene-block-isoprene-block-styrene (SIS) triblock copolymer (Kraton 1107) at elevated temperatures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on macroscopic phase separations in neat copolymers, including block copolymers. The temporal evolution of the structure, growth dynamics, origin and mechanism of the macroscopic phase separations have been investigated. A theoretical model has been established to describe such phase separation in SB diblock copolymer and numerical simulations have been undertaken to predict the structure evolution and growth dynamics. For styrene-butadiene block copolymers, the phase transition process consists of the first and second phase separations. The origin of such phase separations is attributed to chain scission and crosslinking reactions due to thermooxidative degradation. The formation of phase separated domains is the result of separation of polystyrene-rich domains from polybutadiene-rich domains. A mechanism, termed secondary spinodal decomposition, has been proposed to explain second phase separation. It has also demonstrated that the theoretical model and numerical simulations capture the essential features of the experimental observations. Growth rate was seen to depend on phase separation as well as reaction kinetics. The universal scaling laws have been shown to be invalid in macroscopic phase separations of styrene-butadiene block copolymers. The macroscopic phase separation process is more complex in the SIS triblock copolymer. It consists of a first phase separation, phase dissolution and a second phase separation. The origin of such phase decompositions has been shown to be a progressive chain scission reaction during thermal oxidative

  18. The collapse and revival of Bell-nonlocality of two macroscopic fields interacting with resonant atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Cheng-Li; Liao, Chang-Geng; Chen, Zi-Hong

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the nonlocality dynamics of two initially entangled macroscopic fields each interacting with a resonant two-level atom. The nonlocality of macroscopic field is characterized by the extent to which the Bell Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH)'s inequality for continuous-variable states is violated. We show that the collapse and revival of the Bell-nonlocality are similar to the collapse and revival of the atomic population inversion of the Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM).

  19. Bioreactive self-assembled monolayers on hydrogen-passivated Si(111) as a new class of atomically flat substrates for biological scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, P; Nock, S; Spudich, J A; Volkmuth, W D; Chu, S; Cicero, R L; Wade, C P; Linford, M R; Chidsey, C E

    1997-07-01

    This is the first report of bioreactive self-assembled monolayers, covalently bound to atomically flat silicon surfaces and capable of binding biomolecules for investigation by scanning probe microscopy and other surface-related assays and sensing devices. These monolayers are stable under a wide range of conditions and allow tailor-made functionalization for many purposes. We describe the substrate preparation and present an STM and SFM characterization, partly performed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes as tapping-mode supertips. Furthermore, we present two strategies of introducing in situ reactive headgroup functionalities. One method entails a free radical chlorosulfonation process with subsequent sulfonamide formation. A second method employs singlet carbenemediated hydrogen-carbon insertion of a heterobifunctional, amino-reactive trifluoromethyl-diazirinyl crosslinker. We believe that this new substrate is advantageous to others, because it (i) is atomically flat over large areas and can be prepared in a few hours with standard equipment, (ii) is stable under most conditions, (iii) can be modified to adjust a certain degree of reactivity and hydrophobicity, which allows physical adsorption or covalent crosslinking of the biological specimen, (iv) builds the bridge between semiconductor microfabrication and organic/biological molecular systems, and (v) is accessible to nanopatterning and applications requiring conductive substrates. PMID:9245759

  20. Macroscopic invisibility cloak for visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-21

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufacturing techniques. A transparent cloak made of two pieces of calcite is created. This cloak is able to conceal a macroscopic object with a maximum height of 2 mm, larger than 3500 free-space-wavelength, inside a transparent liquid environment. Its working bandwidth encompassing red, green, and blue light is also demonstrated. PMID:21405275

  1. Macroscopic Invisibility Cloak for Visible Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufacturing techniques. A transparent cloak made of two pieces of calcite is created. This cloak is able to conceal a macroscopic object with a maximum height of 2 mm, larger than 3500 free-space-wavelength, inside a transparent liquid environment. Its working bandwidth encompassing red, green, and blue light is also demonstrated.

  2. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only a key evidence of macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity-modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We present systematic studies on the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. The state generation method is general and it can be implemented with either optomechanical or electromechanical systems. The authors are supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. NSF-DMR-0956064 and the DARPA ORCHID program through AFOSR.

  3. Macroscopic invisibility cloaking of visible light

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianzhong; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Kyle; Pendry, John B.; Zhang, Shuang

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, which used to be confined to the realm of fiction, have now been turned into a scientific reality thanks to the enabling theoretical tools of transformation optics and conformal mapping. Inspired by those theoretical works, the experimental realization of electromagnetic invisibility cloaks has been reported at various electromagnetic frequencies. All the invisibility cloaks demonstrated thus far, however, have relied on nano- or micro-fabricated artificial composite materials with spatially varying electromagnetic properties, which limit the size of the cloaked region to a few wavelengths. Here, we report the first realization of a macroscopic volumetric invisibility cloak constructed from natural birefringent crystals. The cloak operates at visible frequencies and is capable of hiding, for a specific light polarization, three-dimensional objects of the scale of centimetres and millimetres. Our work opens avenues for future applications with macroscopic cloaking devices. PMID:21285954

  4. Low-noise macroscopic twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskhakov, Timur Sh.; Usenko, Vladyslav C.; Filip, Radim; Chekhova, Maria V.; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Applying a multiphoton-subtraction technique to the two-color macroscopic squeezed vacuum state of light generated via high-gain parametric down-conversion we conditionally prepare a different state of light: bright multimode low-noise twin beams. A lower noise in the sum of the photon numbers opens a possibility to encode information into this variable while keeping the nonclassical character of the state. The obtained results demonstrate up to eightfold suppression of noise in each beam while preserving and even moderately improving the nonclassical photon-number correlations between the beams. The prepared low-noise macroscopic state, containing up to 2000 photons per mode, is not among the Gaussian states achievable through nonlinear optical processes. Apart from that, we suggest a method for measuring quantum efficiency, which is based on the Fano factor measurement. The proposed technique substantially improves the usefulness of twin beams for quantum communication and metrology.

  5. Can a macroscopic gyroscope feel torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Yasskin, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    We demonstrate that for a large class of Lagrangian-based torsion theories a macroscopic gyroscope is insensitive to the torsion field: there can be no coupling of the torsion to the gyroscope's angular momentum of rotation. To detect torsion a polarized system with a net elementary particle spin is needed. These conclusions are evident from the conservation laws, which form the basis for deriving the equations of motion.

  6. Macroscopic aspects of the Unruh effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Detlev; Verch, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Macroscopic concepts pertaining to the Unruh effect are elaborated and used to clarify its physical manifestations. Based on a description of the motion of accelerated, spatially extended laboratories in Minkowski space in terms of Poincaré transformations, it is shown that, from a macroscopic perspective, an accelerated observer will not register with his measuring instruments any global thermal effects of acceleration in the inertial (Minkowskian) vacuum state. As is explained, this result is not in conflict with the well-known fact that microscopic probes used as thermometers respond non-trivially to acceleration if coupled to the vacuum. But this response cannot be interpreted as the effect of some exchange of thermal energy with a gas surrounding the observer; in fact, it is induced by the measuring process itself. It is also shown that genuine equilibrium states in a uniformly accelerated laboratory cannot be spatially homogeneous. In particular, these states coincide with the homogeneous inertial vacuum at sufficiently large distances from the horizon of the observer and consequently have the same (zero) temperature there. The analysis is carried out in the theory of a free massless scalar field; however the conclusion that the Unruh effect is not of a macroscopic thermal origin is generally valid.

  7. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  8. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  9. Effects of Microstructure Variations on Macroscopic Terahertz Metafilm Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    O'Hara, John F.; Smirnova, Evgenya; Azad, Abul K.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Taylor, Antoinette J.

    2007-01-01

    The properties of planar, single-layer metamaterials, or metafilms, are studied by varying the structural components of the split-ring resonators used to comprise the overall medium. Measurements and simulations reveal how minor design variations in split-ring resonator structures can result in significant changes in the macroscopic properties of the metafilm. A transmission-line/circuit model is also used to clarify some of the behavior and design limitations of the metafilms. Though our results are illustrated in the terahertz frequency range, the work has broader implications, particularly with respect to filtering, modulation, and switching devices.

  10. Macroscopic Universality: Why QCD in Matter is Subtle

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, R.A.; Nowak, M.A.; Papp, G.; Zahed, I. |||||

    1996-12-01

    We use a chiral random matrix model with 2{ital N}{sub {ital f}} flavors to mock up the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential. We show that the 1/{ital N} approximation breaks down in the quenched state with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The breakdown condition is set by the divergence of a two-point function that is shown to follow the general lore of macroscopic universality. In this state, the fermionic fluctuations are not suppressed in the large {ital N} limit. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Direct comparison of nanoindentation and macroscopic measurements of bone viscoelasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Tara N.; Zhang, Jingzhou; Ovaert, Timothy C.; Roeder, Ryan K.; Niebur, Glen L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation has become a standard method for measuring mechanical properties of bone, especially within microstructural units such as individual osteons or trabeculae. The use of nanoindentation to measure elastic properties has been thoroughly studied and validated. However, it is also possible to assess time dependent properties of bone by nanoindentation. The goal of this study was to compare time dependent mechanical properties of bone measured at the macroscopic level with those measured by nanoindentation. Twelve samples were prepared from the posterior distal femoral cortex of young cows. Initially, dogbone samples were prepared and subjected to torsional stress relaxation in a saline bath at 37 C. A 5 mm thick disk was subsequently sectioned from the gage length, and subjected to nanoindentation. Nanoindentation was performed on hydrated samples using a standard protocol with 20 indents performed in 20 different osteons in each sample. Creep and stress relaxation data were fit to a Burgers four parameter rheological model, a five parameter generalized Maxwell model, and a three parameter standard linear solid. For Burgers viscoelastic model, the time constants measured by nanoindentation and torsion were weakly negatively correlated, while for the other two models the time constants were uncorrelated. The results support the notion that the viscoelastic behavior of bone at the macroscopic scale is primarily due to microstructural features, interfaces, or fluid flow, rather than viscous behavior of the bone tissue. As viscoelasticity affects the fatigue behavior of materials, the microscale properties may provide a measure of bone quality associated with initial damage formation. PMID:22098905

  12. Interdisciplinary applications of network dynamics: From microscopic to Macroscopic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hawoong

    ``Everything touches everything.'' We are living in a connected world, which has been modeled successfully by complex networks. Ever since, network science becomes new paradigm for understanding our connected yet complex world. After investigating network structure itself, our focus naturally moved to dynamics of/on the network because our connected world is not static but dynamic. In this presentation, we will briefly review the historical development of network science and show some applications of network dynamics ranging from microscopic (metabolic engineering, PNAS, 104 13638) to macroscopic scale (price of anarchy in transportation network, Phys.Rev.Lett. 101 128701). Supported by National Research Foundation of Korea through Grant No. 2011-0028908.

  13. Pathways toward understanding Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B. L.; Subaşi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena refer to quantum features in objects of 'large' sizes, systems with many components or degrees of freedom, organized in some ways where they can be identified as macroscopic objects. This emerging field is ushered in by several categories of definitive experiments in superconductivity, electromechanical systems, Bose-Einstein condensates and others. Yet this new field which is rich in open issues at the foundation of quantum and statistical physics remains little explored theoretically (with the important exception of the work of A J Leggett [1], while touched upon or implied by several groups of authors represented in this conference. Our attitude differs in that we believe in the full validity of quantum mechanics stretching from the testable micro to meso scales, with no need for the introduction of new laws of physics.) This talk summarizes our thoughts in attempting a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of quantum macroscopic phenomena, with the goal of ultimately revealing or building a viable theoretical framework. Three major themes discussed in three intended essays are the large N expansion [2], the correlation hierarchy [3] and quantum entanglement [4]. We give a sketch of the first two themes and then discuss several key issues in the consideration of macro and quantum, namely, a) recognition that there exist many levels of structure in a composite body and only by judicious choice of an appropriate set of collective variables can one give the best description of the dynamics of a specific level of structure. Capturing the quantum features of a macroscopic object is greatly facilitated by the existence and functioning of these collective variables; b) quantum entanglement, an exclusively quantum feature [5], is known to persist to high temperatures [6] and large scales [7] under certain conditions, and may actually decrease with increased connectivity in a quantum network [8]. We use entanglement as a

  14. General framework for quantum macroscopicity in terms of coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadin, Benjamin; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-02-01

    We propose a universal language to assess macroscopic quantumness in terms of coherence, with a set of conditions that should be satisfied by any measure of macroscopic coherence. We link the framework to the resource theory of asymmetry. We show that the quantum Fisher information gives a good measure of macroscopic coherence, enabling a rigorous justification of a previously proposed measure of macroscopicity. This picture lets us draw connections between different measures of macroscopicity and evaluate them; we show that another widely studied measure fails one of our criteria.

  15. Macroscopic optomechanical superposition via periodic qubit flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wenchao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate macroscopic superpositions of well-distinguishable coherent states in an optomechanical system via periodic qubit flipping. Our scheme does not require the single-photon strong-coupling rate of an optomechanical system. The generated mechanical superposition state can be reconstructed using mechanical quantum-state reconstruction. The proposed scheme relies on recycling of an atom, fast atomic qubit flipping, and coherent state mapping between a single-photon superposition state and an atomic superposition state. We discuss the experimental feasibility of our proposal under current technology.

  16. Compressor Has No Moving Macroscopic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max

    1995-01-01

    Compressor containing no moving macroscopic parts functions by alternating piston and valve actions of successive beds of magnetic particles. Fabricated easily because no need for precisely fitting parts rotating or sliding on each other. Also no need for lubricant fluid contaminating fluid to be compressed. Compressor operates continuously, eliminating troublesome on/off cycling of other compressors, and decreasing consumption of energy. Phased cells push fluid from bottom to top, adding increments of pressure. Each cell contains magnetic powder particles loose when electromagnet coil deenergized, but tightly packed when coil energized.

  17. A Macroscopic Realization of the Weak Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimori, Arito

    2003-01-01

    A.J.Leggett suggested in 1977 that a permanent electric dipole moment due to the parity-nonconserving electron-nucleon interaction, even though it is extremely small, could be measured in the superfluid He-3 B because the moment should be proportional to the size of the sample in this system. If this moment is observed, it will be the first example of a macroscopic realization of the weak interaction. In our planned experiments, a high electric field of up to 6 kV/cm is applied between two parallel electrodes in the He-3 sample. We expect to observe the NMR frequency of the lowest-lying spin-wave mode trapped by the liquid crystal-like texture of the B phase rotation axis in our geometry. The interaction of the electric field and the macroscopic permanent electric dipole moment, which is oriented along the rotation axis, will cause a small change in the texture and hence a small increase in the frequency of the spin wave mode. Besides the basic ideas, we present the purpose and the design of our first cell that is under construction.

  18. Entangling macroscopic diamonds at room temperature: Bounds on the continuous-spontaneous-localization parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Sebastiano; Bonsignori, Riccarda; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Fant, Lorenzo; Martini, Mirco; Peirone, Simone; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    A recent experiment [K. C. Lee et al., Science 334, 1253 (2011)], 10.1126/science.1211914 succeeded in detecting entanglement between two macroscopic specks of diamonds, separated by a macroscopic distance, at room temperature. This impressive result is a further confirmation of the validity of quantum theory in (at least parts of) the mesoscopic and macroscopic domain, and poses a challenge to collapse models, which predict a violation of the quantum superposition principle, which is bigger the larger the system. We analyze the experiment in the light of such models. We will show that the bounds placed by experimental data are weaker than those coming from matter-wave interferometry and noninterferometric tests of collapse models.

  19. Quantum correlations of lights in macroscopic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sua, Yong Meng

    This dissertation presents a detailed study in exploring quantum correlations of lights in macroscopic environments. We have explored quantum correlations of single photons, weak coherent states, and polarization-correlated/polarization-entangled photons in macroscopic environments. These included macroscopic mirrors, macroscopic photon number, spatially separated observers, noisy photons source and propagation medium with loss or disturbances. We proposed a measurement scheme for observing quantum correlations and entanglement in the spatial properties of two macroscopic mirrors using single photons spatial compass state. We explored the phase space distribution features of spatial compass states, such as chessboard pattern by using the Wigner function. The displacement and tilt correlations of the two mirrors were manifested through the propensities of the compass states. This technique can be used to extract Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations (EPR) of the two mirrors. We then formulated the discrete-like property of the propensity P b(m,n), which can be used to explore environmental perturbed quantum jumps of the EPR correlations in phase space. With single photons spatial compass state, the variances in position and momentum are much smaller than standard quantum limit when using a Gaussian TEM 00 beam. We observed intrinsic quantum correlations of weak coherent states between two parties through balanced homodyne detection. Our scheme can be used as a supplement to decoy-state BB84 protocol and differential phase-shift QKD protocol. We prepared four types of bipartite correlations +/- cos2(theta1 +/- theta 2) that shared between two parties. We also demonstrated bits correlations between two parties separated by 10 km optical fiber. The bits information will be protected by the large quantum phase fluctuation of weak coherent states, adding another physical layer of security to these protocols for quantum key distribution. Using 10 m of highly nonlinear

  20. Temporal bone fracture under lateral impact: biomechanical and macroscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Montava, Marion; Masson, Catherine; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Mancini, Julien; Soussan, Jerome; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2016-03-01

    This work was conducted to study biomechanical properties and macroscopic analysis of petrous fracture by lateral impact. Seven embalmed intact human cadaver heads were tested to failure using an electrohydraulic testing device. Dynamic loading was done at 2 m/s on temporal region with maximal deflection to 12 mm. Anthropometric and pathological data were determined by pretest and posttest computed tomography images, macroscopic evaluation, and anatomical dissection. Biomechanical data were obtained. Results indicated the head to have nonlinear structural response. The overall mean values of failure forces, deflections, stiffness, occipital, and frontal peak acceleration were 7.1 kN (±1.1), 9.1 mm (±1.8), 1.3 kN/mm (±0.4), 90.5 g (±22.5), and 65.4 g (±16), respectively. The seven lateral impacts caused fractures, temporal fractures in six cases. We observed very strong homogeneity for the biomechanical and pathological results between different trials in our study and between data from various experiments and our study. No statistical correlation was found between anthropometric, biomechanical, and pathological data. These data will assist in the development and validation of finite element models of head injury. PMID:26036776

  1. Macroscopic conductivity of free fermions in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.; Hertling, C.

    2014-05-01

    We conclude our analysis of the linear response of charge transport in lattice systems of free fermions subjected to a random potential by deriving general mathematical properties of its conductivity at the macroscopic scale. The present paper belongs to a succession of studies on Ohm and Joule's laws from a thermodynamic viewpoint starting with [1-3]. We show, in particular, the existence and finiteness of the conductivity measure μΣ for macroscopic scales. Then we prove that, similar to the conductivity measure associated to Drude's model, μΣ converges in the weak*-topology to the trivial measure in the case of perfect insulators (strong disorder, complete localization), whereas in the limit of perfect conductors (absence of disorder) it converges to an atomic measure concentrated at frequency ν = 0. However, the AC-conductivity μΣ|ℝ\\{0} does not vanish in general: We show that μΣ(ℝ\\{0}) > 0, at least for large temperatures and a certain regime of small disorder.

  2. On the macroscopic quantization in mesoscopic rings and single-electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.

    2016-05-01

    In this letter we investigate the phenomenon of macroscopic quantization and consider particle on the ring interacting with the dissipative bath as an example. We demonstrate that even in presence of environment, there is macroscopically quantized observable which can take only integer values in the zero temperature limit. This fact follows from the total angular momentum conservation combined with momentum quantization for bare particle on the ring. The nontrivial thing is that the model under consideration, including the notion of quantized observable, can be mapped onto the Ambegaokar-Eckern-Schon model of the single-electron box (SEB). We evaluate SEB observable, originating after mapping, and reveal new physics, which follows from the macroscopic quantization phenomenon and the existence of additional conservation law. Some generalizations of the obtained results are also presented.

  3. Ground testing of bioconvective variables such as morphological characterizations and mechanisms which regulate macroscopic patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Adriel D.

    1992-01-01

    Conditions simulating low- and high-gravity, reveal changes in macroscopic pattern formation in selected microorganisms, but whether these structures are gravity dependent is not clear. Two theories have been identified in the fluid dynamics community which support macroscopic pattern formation. The first one is gravity dependent (fluid density models) where small concentrated regions of organisms sink unstably, and the second is gravity independent (wave reinforcement theory) where organisms align their movements in concert, such that either their swimming strokes beat in phase or their vortices entrain neighbors to follow parallel paths. Studies have shown that macroscopic pattern formation is consistent with the fluid density models for protozoa and algae and wave reinforcement hypothesis for caprine spermatozoa.

  4. Macroscopic approach to the Casimir friction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    The general formula is derived for the vacuum friction force between two parallel perfectly flat planes bounding two material media separated by a vacuum gap and moving relative to each other with a constant velocity v. The material media are described in the framework of macroscopic electrodynamics whereas the nonzero temperature and dissipation are taken into account by making use of the Kubo formulas from non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics. The formula obtained provides a rigorous basis for calculation of the vacuum friction force within the quantum field theory methods in the condensed matter physics. The revealed v dependence of the vacuum friction force proves to be the following: for zero temperature ( T = 0) it is proportional to (v/ c)3 and for T > 0 this force is linear in v/ c.

  5. Macroscopically local correlations can violate information causality.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel; Salles, Alejo; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    Although quantum mechanics is a very successful theory, its foundations are still a subject of intense debate. One of the main problems is that quantum mechanics is based on abstract mathematical axioms, rather than on physical principles. Quantum information theory has recently provided new ideas from which one could obtain physical axioms constraining the resulting statistics one can obtain in experiments. Information causality (IC) and macroscopic locality (ML) are two principles recently proposed to solve this problem. However, none of them were proven to define the set of correlations one can observe. In this study, we show an extension of IC and study its consequences. It is shown that the two above-mentioned principles are inequivalent: if the correlations allowed by nature were the ones satisfying ML, IC would be violated. This gives more confidence in IC as a physical principle, defining the possible correlation allowed by nature. PMID:21266986

  6. Making Macroscopic Assemblies of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; Colbert, Daniel T.; Smith, Ken A.; Walters, Deron A.; Casavant, Michael J.; Qin, Xiaochuan; Yakobson, Boris; Hauge, Robert H.; Saini, Rajesh Kumar; Chiung, Wan-Ting; Huffman, Charles B.

    2005-01-01

    A method of aligning and assembling single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to fabricate macroscopic structures has been invented. The method entails suspending SWNTs in a fluid, orienting the SWNTs by use of a magnetic and/or electric field, and then removing the aligned SWNTs from suspension in such a way as to assemble them while maintaining the alignment. SWNTs are essentially tubular extensions of fullerene molecules. It is desirable to assemble aligned SWNTs into macroscopic structures because the common alignment of the SWNTs in such a structure makes it possible to exploit, on a macroscopic scale, the unique mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties that individual oriented SWNTs exhibit at the molecular level. Because of their small size and high electrical conductivity, carbon nanotubes, and especially SWNTs, are useful for making electrical connectors in integrated circuits. Carbon nanotubes can be used as antennas at optical frequencies, and as probes in scanning tunneling microscopes, atomic-force microscopes, and the like. Carbon nanotubes can be used with or instead of carbon black in tires. Carbon nanotubes are useful as supports for catalysts. Ropes of SWNTs are metallic and, as such, are potentially useful in some applications in which electrical conductors are needed - for example, they could be used as additives in formulating electrically conductive paints. Finally, macroscopic assemblies of aligned SWNTs can serve as templates for the growth of more and larger structures of the same type. The great variety of tubular fullerene molecules and of the structures that could be formed by assembling them in various ways precludes a complete description of the present method within the limits of this article. It must suffice to present a typical example of the use of one of many possible variants of the method to form a membrane comprising SWNTs aligned substantially parallel to each other in the membrane plane. The apparatus used in this variant

  7. Macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Guo, Peng-Tao; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Yan; Ma, Si-Ping; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Macroscopic serosal classification of gastric cancer has been reported in previous studies, but rarely reported about it of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to propose a macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer and to investigate clinical significance of this classification. Materials and methods: Morphologic features of colorectal cancer were analyzed according to the macroscopic serosal appearance and clinicopathologic characteristics of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Microscopic serosal structure was compared between different types under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. Results: Macroscopic serosal classification was divided into normal type, reactive type, nodular type and colloid type according to the macroscopic serosal appearance and microscopic structure. There were significant differences in tumor size, tumor gross type, histological type, histological grade, tumor necrosis, pT stage, number of nodes metastasis, lymph node metastasis ratio, pN stage, M stage and peritoneal metastasis between patients with different serosal types. Univariate analysis of prognosis revealed macroscopic serosal classification as one of factors significantly correlated with patient survival. However, multivariate analysis only revealed TNM stage significantly correlated with patient survival, while macroscopic serosal classification did not, maybe due to insufficient samples. Conclusions: Macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer is preliminarily defined and divided into four types. Different macroscopic serosal types indicate different clinicopathologic features and correlate with prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer, but still cannot be proven as an independent factor. PMID:26884925

  8. Photo- and bio-reactivity patterns of dissolved organic matter from biomass and soil leachates and surface waters in a subtropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meilian; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2014-09-15

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements and optical properties were applied to assess the photo- and bio-reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from different sources, including biomass leaching, soil leaching and surface waters in a subtropical wetland ecosystem. Samples were exposed to light and/or dark incubated through controlled laboratory experiments. Changes in DOC, ultraviolet (UV-Vis) visible absorbance, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) were performed to assess sample degradation. Degradation experiments showed that while significant amounts of DOC were consumed during bio-incubation for biomass leachates, a higher degree of bio-recalcitrance for soil leachate and particularly surface waters was displayed. Photo- and bio-humification transformations were suggested for sawgrass, mangrove, and seagrass leachates, as compared to substantial photo-degradation and very little to almost no change after bio-incubation for the other samples. During photo-degradation in most cases the EEM-PARAFAC components displayed photo-decay as compared to a few cases which featured photo-production. In contrast during bio-incubation most EEM-PARAFAC components proved to be mostly bio-refractory although some increases and decreases in abundance were also observed. Furthermore, the sequential photo- followed by bio-degradation showed, with some exceptions, a "priming effect" of light exposure on the bio-degradation of DOM, and the combination of these two processes resulted in a DOM composition more similar to that of the natural surface water for the different sub-environments. In addition, for leachate samples there was a general enrichment of one of the EEM-PARAFAC humic-like component (Ex/Em: <260(305)/416 nm) during photo-degradation and an enrichment of a microbial humc-like component (Ex/Em: <260(325)/406 nm and of a tryptophan-like component (Ex/Em: 300/342 nm) during the bio-degradation process

  9. Backreaction of cosmological perturbations in covariant macroscopic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2008-09-01

    The problem of corrections to Einstein’s equations arising from averaging of inhomogeneities (backreaction) in the cosmological context has gained considerable attention recently. We present results of analyzing cosmological perturbation theory in the framework of Zalaletdinov’s fully covariant macroscopic gravity. We show that this framework can be adapted to the setting of cosmological perturbations in a manner which is free from gauge related ambiguities. We derive expressions for the backreaction which can be readily applied in any situation (not necessarily restricted to the linear perturbations considered here) where the metric can be brought to the perturbed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker form. In particular, these expressions can be employed in toy models studying nonlinear structure formation, and possibly also in N-body simulations. Additionally, we present results of example calculations which show that the backreaction remains negligible well into the matter dominated era.

  10. Dissipative Optomechanical Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States.

    PubMed

    Abdi, M; Degenfeld-Schonburg, P; Sameti, M; Navarrete-Benlloch, C; Hartmann, M J

    2016-06-10

    The transition from quantum to classical physics remains an intensely debated question even though it has been investigated for more than a century. Further clarifications could be obtained by preparing macroscopic objects in spatial quantum superpositions and proposals for generating such states for nanomechanical devices either in a transient or a probabilistic fashion have been put forward. Here, we introduce a method to deterministically obtain spatial superpositions of arbitrary lifetime via dissipative state preparation. In our approach, we engineer a double-well potential for the motion of the mechanical element and drive it towards the ground state, which shows the desired spatial superposition, via optomechanical sideband cooling. We propose a specific implementation based on a superconducting circuit coupled to the mechanical motion of a lithium-decorated monolayer graphene sheet, introduce a method to verify the mechanical state by coupling it to a superconducting qubit, and discuss its prospects for testing collapse models for the quantum to classical transition. PMID:27341233

  11. Dissipative Optomechanical Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, M.; Degenfeld-Schonburg, P.; Sameti, M.; Navarrete-Benlloch, C.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The transition from quantum to classical physics remains an intensely debated question even though it has been investigated for more than a century. Further clarifications could be obtained by preparing macroscopic objects in spatial quantum superpositions and proposals for generating such states for nanomechanical devices either in a transient or a probabilistic fashion have been put forward. Here, we introduce a method to deterministically obtain spatial superpositions of arbitrary lifetime via dissipative state preparation. In our approach, we engineer a double-well potential for the motion of the mechanical element and drive it towards the ground state, which shows the desired spatial superposition, via optomechanical sideband cooling. We propose a specific implementation based on a superconducting circuit coupled to the mechanical motion of a lithium-decorated monolayer graphene sheet, introduce a method to verify the mechanical state by coupling it to a superconducting qubit, and discuss its prospects for testing collapse models for the quantum to classical transition.

  12. Dissipative macroscopic quantum tunneling in type-I superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2011-11-01

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling of interfaces separating normal and superconducting regions in type-I superconductors. A mathematical model is developed that describes dissipative quantum escape of a two-dimensional manifold from a planar potential well. It corresponds to, e.g., a current-driven quantum depinning of the interface from a grain boundary or from an artificially manufactured pinning layer. Effective action is derived and instantons of the equations of motion are investigated. The crossover between thermal activation and quantum tunneling is studied and the crossover temperature is computed. Our results, together with recent observation of nonthermal low-temperature magnetic relaxation in lead, suggest the possibility of a controlled measurement of quantum depinning of the interface in a type-I superconductor.

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in a stack of capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Tomio; Machida, Masahiko

    2008-04-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the phase dynamics in capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ's) is constructed. We quantize the capacitively-coupled IJJ model in terms of the canonical quantization method. The multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch is clarified. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2 -enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ's.

  14. Macroscopic properties of fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean Francois, T.; Adler, P.; Bogdanov, I.; Mourzenko, V.

    2006-12-01

    There are two basic problems to be addressed. The first one is to solve precisely the partial differential equations which govern the phenomena which occur in these media and which are of interest in a large number of applications. The second one is to define a methodology in order to be able to estimate the macroscopic properties of real media by using quantities which are easily measurable on the field. Two major steps are needed for the numerical solution (1). First, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh of the fractures and of the porous matrix located in between is constructed; second, the governing partial equations are discretized and solved, in a finite volume formulation. A brief overview of the various problems which have been addressed so far, will be given: single and two phase flows, unsteady flows around a well, dispersion of an active and a passive solute, mechanical properties. This set of codes enabled us to cope with the second basic problem. Our approach is based on the systematic use of the excluded volume of fractures (which will be defined). The number of fractures per unit volume can be replaced by the number ρ ' of fractures per excluded volume. When numerical results such as the percolation threshold, the macroscopic permeability are plotted as functions of ρ ' they become independent of the shapes of the fractures which is a decisive simplification. Then, we show how ρ ' can be estimated from measurements performed along lines (2), planes, and galleries. It is interesting to notice that many stereological relations are actually independent of the size and shapes of fractures provided that they are convex (3); such a property adds a lot of generality to our methodology. Some tentative applications of the methodology are given and they show that the estimations are always in good agreement with the data. References (1) I.I. Bogdanov, V.V. Mourzenko, J.-F. Thovert, P.M. Adler, Effective permeability of fractured porous media in steady

  15. Macroscopic Description of Pressure-anisotropy-driven Collective Instability in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Strasburg; Ronald C. Davidson

    2000-05-30

    The macroscopic warm-fluid model developed by Lund and Davidson [Phys.Plasmas 5, 3028 (1998)] is used in the smooth-focusing approximation to investigate detailed stability properties of an intense charged particle beam with pressure anisotropy, assuming small-amplitude electrostatic pertubations about a waterbag equilibrium.

  16. The Proell Effect: A Macroscopic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauen, Kenneth M.

    2011-12-01

    Maxwell's Demon is a legitimate challenge to the Second Law of Thermodynamics when the "demon" is executed via the Proell effect. Thermal energy transfer according to the Kinetic Theory of Heat and Statistical Mechanics that takes place over distances greater than the mean free path of a gas circumvents the microscopic randomness that leads to macroscopic irreversibility. No information is required to sort the particles as no sorting occurs; the entire volume of gas undergoes the same transition. The Proell effect achieves quasi-spontaneous thermal separation without sorting by the perturbation of a heterogeneous constant volume system with displacement and regeneration. The classical analysis of the constant volume process, such as found in the Stirling Cycle, is incomplete and therefore incorrect. There are extra energy flows that classical thermo does not recognize. When a working fluid is displaced across a regenerator with a temperature gradient in a constant volume system, complimentary compression and expansion work takes place that transfers energy between the regenerator and the bulk gas volumes of the hot and cold sides of the constant volume system. Heat capacity at constant pressure applies instead of heat capacity at constant volume. The resultant increase in calculated, recyclable energy allows the Carnot Limit to be exceeded in certain cycles. Super-Carnot heat engines and heat pumps have been designed and a US patent has been awarded.

  17. Macroscopic characteristics of the praying mantis electroretinogram.

    PubMed

    Popkiewicz, Barbara; Prete, Frederick R

    2013-08-01

    We described the macroscopic characteristics of the praying mantis ERG in three species, Tenodera aridifolia sinensis, Sphodromantis lineola, and Popa spurca. In all cases, when elicited by square wave light pulses longer than 400 ms, light adapted (LA) ERGs consisted of four component waveforms: a cornea negative transient and sustained ON, a cornea negative transient OFF, and a cornea positive sustained OFF. The former two ON, and the latter OFF components were attributed to photoreceptor depolarization and repolarization, respectively. Metabolic stress via CO2 induced anoxia selectively eliminated the transient OFF (independent of its effect on the other components) suggesting the transient OFF represents activity of the lamina interneurons on which the photoreceptors synapse. Dark adapted (DA) ERGs differed from LA ERGs in that the sustained ON and OFF amplitudes were larger, and the transient ON and OFF components were absent. Increased stimulus durations increased the amplitudes and derivatives of, and decreased the latencies to the maximum amplitudes of the OFF components. Increasing stimulus intensity increased the amplitude of the sustained ON and OFF components, but not the transient OFF. These results suggest that the mantis' visual system displays increased contrast coding efficiency with increased light adaptation, and that there are differences in gain between photoreceptor and lamina interneuron responses. Finally, responses to luminance decrements as brief a 1 ms were evident in LA recordings, and were resolved at frequencies up to 60 Hz. PMID:23684801

  18. Predicting metapopulation lifetime from macroscopic network properties.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Martin

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a comparatively simple approximation formula for the mean life time of a metapopulation in a habitat network where habitat patch arrangement may be irregular and patch sizes differ. It is based on previous work on the development of an analytical approximation formula by Frank and Wissel [K. Frank, C. Wissel, A formula for the mean lifetime of metapopulations in heterogeneous landscapes, Am. Nat. 159 (2002) 530] and extends it by abstracting from individual patch locations. The mean metapopulation lifetime is expressed as a function of four macroscopic network properties: the ratio of dispersal range and network size, the ratio of range of environmental correlation and network size, and the total number and (geometric mean) size of the patches. The analysis takes into account that (ceteris paribus) patches close to the boundary of the habitat network contribute less to metapopulation survival than patches close to the centre of the network. Ignoring this fact can lead to a substantial overestimation of the mean metapopulation lifetime. Due to its numerical simplicity, the formula can be used as a conservation objective function even in complex network design problems where the number of patches to be allocated is very large. Numerical tests of the formula show that it performs very well within a wide range of network structures. PMID:19159631

  19. Multi-walled carbon nanotube length as a critical determinant of bioreactivity with primary human pulmonary alveolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Berhanu, Deborah; Misra, Superb K.; Thorley, Andrew J.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) length is suggested to critically determine their pulmonary toxicity. This stems from in vitro and in vivo rodent studies and in vitro human studies using cell lines (typically cancerous). There is little data using primary human lung cells. We addressed this knowledge gap, using highly relevant, primary human alveolar cell models exposed to precisely synthesized and thoroughly characterized MWCNTs. In this work, transformed human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells (TT1), primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cells (ATII) and alveolar macrophages (AM) were treated with increasing concentrations of MWCNTs before measuring cytotoxicity, inflammatory mediator release and MAP kinase signalling. Strikingly, we observed that short MWCNTs (~0.6 µm in length) induced significantly greater responses from the epithelial cells, whilst AM were particularly susceptible to long MWCNTs (~20 µm). These differences in the pattern of mediator release were associated with alternative profiles of JNK, p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinase signal transduction within each cell type. This study, using highly relevant target human alveolar cells and well defined and characterized MWCNTs, shows marked cellular responses to the MWCNTs that vary according to the target cell type, as well as the aspect ratio of the MWCNT. PMID:25780270

  20. State-space based analysis and forecasting of macroscopic road safety trends in Greece.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, macroscopic road safety trends in Greece are analyzed using state-space models and data for 52 years (1960-2011). Seemingly unrelated time series equations (SUTSE) models are developed first, followed by richer latent risk time-series (LRT) models. As reliable estimates of vehicle-kilometers are not available for Greece, the number of vehicles in circulation is used as a proxy to the exposure. Alternative considered models are presented and discussed, including diagnostics for the assessment of their model quality and recommendations for further enrichment of this model. Important interventions were incorporated in the models developed (1986 financial crisis, 1991 old-car exchange scheme, 1996 new road fatality definition) and found statistically significant. Furthermore, the forecasting results using data up to 2008 were compared with final actual data (2009-2011) indicating that the models perform properly, even in unusual situations, like the current strong financial crisis in Greece. Forecasting results up to 2020 are also presented and compared with the forecasts of a model that explicitly considers the currently on-going recession. Modeling the recession, and assuming that it will end by 2013, results in more reasonable estimates of risk and vehicle-kilometers for the 2020 horizon. This research demonstrates the benefits of using advanced state-space modeling techniques for modeling macroscopic road safety trends, such as allowing the explicit modeling of interventions. The challenges associated with the application of such state-of-the-art models for macroscopic phenomena, such as traffic fatalities in a region or country, are also highlighted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that it is possible to apply such complex models using the relatively short time-series that are available in macroscopic road safety analysis. PMID:23579105

  1. Estimation of the covariance matrix of macroscopic quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, László; Usenko, Vladyslav C.; Filip, Radim

    2016-05-01

    For systems analogous to a linear harmonic oscillator, the simplest way to characterize the state is by a covariance matrix containing the symmetrically ordered moments of operators analogous to position and momentum. We show that using Stokes-like detectors without direct access to either position or momentum, the estimation of the covariance matrix of a macroscopic signal is still possible using interference with a classical noisy and low-intensity reference. Such a detection technique will allow one to estimate macroscopic quantum states of electromagnetic radiation without a coherent high-intensity local oscillator. It can be directly applied to estimate the covariance matrix of macroscopically bright squeezed states of light.

  2. Macroscopic and spectroscopic analysis of lanthanide adsorption to bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Mosselmans, J. Fred W.; Magennis, Marisa; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Tourney, Janette; Olive, Valerie; Ellam, Robert M.

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to combine surface complexation modelling of macroscopic adsorption data with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) measurements to identify lanthanide sorption sites on the bacterial surface. The adsorption of selected representatives for light (La and Nd), middle (Sm and Gd) and heavy (Er and Yb) lanthanides was measured as a function of pH, and biomass samples exposed to 4 mg/L lanthanide at pH 3.5 and 6 were analysed using XAS. Surface complexation modelling was consistent with the light lanthanides adsorbing to phosphate sites, whereas the adsorption of middle and heavy lanthanides could be modelled equally well by carboxyl and phosphate sites. The existence of such mixed mode coordination was confirmed by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which was also consistent with adsorption to phosphate sites at low pH, with secondary involvement of carboxyl sites at high adsorption density (high pH). Thus, the two approaches yield broadly consistent information with regard to surface site identity and lanthanide coordination environment. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis suggests that coordination to phosphate sites is monodentate at the metal/biomass ratios used. Based on the best-fitting p Ka site, we infer that the phosphate sites are located on N-acetylglucosamine phosphate, the most likely polymer on gram-negative cells with potential phosphate sites that deprotonate around neutral pH.

  3. Macroscopic hotspots identification: A Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ni; Huang, Helai; Lee, Jaeyoung; Gao, Mingyun; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach for hotspot identification by applying the full Bayesian (FB) technique in the context of macroscopic safety analysis. Compared with the emerging Bayesian spatial and temporal approach, the Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction model contributes to a detailed understanding of differential trends through analyzing and mapping probabilities of area-specific crash trends as differing from the mean trend and highlights specific locations where crash occurrence is deteriorating or improving over time. With traffic analysis zones (TAZs) crash data collected in Florida, an empirical analysis was conducted to evaluate the following three approaches for hotspot identification: FB ranking using a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model, FB ranking using a Bayesian spatial and temporal (B-ST) model and FB ranking using a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction (B-ST-I) model. The results show that (a) the models accounting for space-time effects perform better in safety ranking than does the PLN model, and (b) the FB approach using the B-ST-I model significantly outperforms the B-ST approach in correctly identifying hotspots by explicitly accounting for the space-time variation in addition to the stable spatial/temporal patterns of crash occurrence. In practice, the B-ST-I approach plays key roles in addressing two issues: (a) how the identified hotspots have evolved over time and (b) the identification of areas that, whilst not yet hotspots, show a tendency to become hotspots. Finally, it can provide guidance to policy decision makers to efficiently improve zonal-level safety. PMID:27110645

  4. Toward Understanding Whether Interactive Surface Area Could Direct Ordered Macroscopic Supramolecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Akram, Raheel; Cheng, Mengjiao; Guo, Fengli; Iqbal, Saleem; Shi, Feng

    2016-04-19

    The mismatching phenomena are ubiquitous in complex and advanced self-assembly, such as hierarchical assembly, macroscopic supramolecular assembly, and so on. Recently, for macroscopic supramolecular assembly, the strategy of maximizing the interactive surface area was used and supposed to handle this problem; however, now there is little understanding of whether interactive surface area is the dominant factor to guide the assembly patterns. Herein by taking millimeter cylinder building blocks with different diameter/height (d/h) ratios as model systems, we have investigated the interactive-surface-area-dependent assembling behaviors in macroscopic supramolecular assembly. The results showed that the increasing d/h ratio of cylinders contributed to selectivity of face-to-face assembled pattern over face-to-side or side-to-side geometries, thus having improved the ordering degree of the assembled structures; however, the mismatching phenomena could not be totally avoided due to high colliding chances in kinetics and the thermally favorable stability of these structures. We further confirmed the above hypothesis by in situ measurements of interactive forces of building blocks with different assembled patterns. This work of macroscopic supramolecular assembly provides an in situ visible platform, which is significant to clarify the influences of interactive surface area on the assembly behaviors. PMID:27029028

  5. Anatomy of the ethmoid: CT, endoscopic, and macroscopic

    SciTech Connect

    Terrier, F.; Weber, W.; Ruefenacht, D.; Porcellini, B.

    1985-03-01

    The authors illustrate the normal CT anatomy of the ethmoid region and correlate it with the endoscopic and macroscopic anatomy to define landmarks that can be recognized on CT and during endoscopically controlled transnasal ethmoidectomy.

  6. Microscopic and Macroscopic Studies on Resistance Responses to Daylily Rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection process of Puccinia hemerocallidis, the causal agent of daylily rust, and resistance responses in eight daylily cultivars were studied macroscopically and microscopically. After germination of urediniospores, appressoria formed at the tip of germ tubes and penetrated through stomatal openi...

  7. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  8. Quantum-Mechanical Channel of Interactions between Macroscopic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, R. Sh.; Karamyana, G. G.; Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2010-05-04

    The macroscopic experimental phenomena which cannot be explained in the frames of classical concepts are described. The attempt of qualitatively understanding of observed effects based on Bohm's representation of Schroedinger equation for arbitrary system of interacting particles is presented.

  9. Transport Theoretical Studies of Some Microscopic and Macroscopic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astwood, Alden Matthew

    This dissertation is a report on theoretical transport studies of two systems of vastly different sizes. The first topic is electronic motion in quantum wires. In recent years, it has become possible to fabricate wires that are so small that quantum effects become important. The conduction properties of these wires are quite different than those of macroscopic wires. In this dissertation, we seek to understand scattering effects in quantum wires in a simple way. Some of the existing formalisms for studying transport in quantum wires are reviewed, and one such formalism is applied to calculate conductance in some simple systems. The second topic concerns animals which move in groups, such as flocking birds or schooling fish. Exact analytic calculations of the transport properties of such systems are very difficult because a flock is a system that is far from equilibrium and consists of many interacting particles. We introduce two simplified models of flocking which are amenable to analytic study. The first model consists of a set of overdamped Brownian particles that interact via spring forces. The exact solution for the probability distribution is calculated, and equations of motion for continuous coarse-grained quantities, such as the density, are obtained from the full solution. The second model consists of particles which move in one dimension at constant speed, but which change their directions at random. The flipping rates are constructed in such a way that particles tend to align their directions with each other. The model is solved exactly for one and two particles, the first two moments are obtained, and equations of motion for continuous coarse-grained quantities are written. The model cannot be solved exactly for many particles, but the first and second moments are calculated. Finally, two additional topics are briefly discussed. The first is transport in disordered lattices, and the second is a static magnetic model of flocking.

  10. Macroscopic shock plasticity of brittle material through designed void patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tailong; Yu, Yin; He, Hongliang; Li, Yongqiang; Huan, Qiang; Wu, Jiankui

    2016-03-01

    The rapid propagation and coalescence of cracks and catastrophic fractures, which occur often under shock compression, compromise a brittle material's design function and restrict its scope of practical application. The shock plasticity of brittle materials can be improved significantly by introducing and designing its microstructure, which can help reduce or delay failure. We used a lattice-spring model, which can describe elastic deformation and brittle fracture of modeled material accurately, to study the influence of void distributions (random, square, hexagonal, and triangular void patterns) on the macroscopic shock response and the mesoscopic deformation feature of brittle materials. Calculated results indicate that the void patterns dominate two inelastic deformation stages on the Hugoniot stress-strain curves (the collapse deformation stage and the slippage deformation stage). It shows that the strain localization is not strong and that the broken media are closer to a round bulk when the samples exist in random and triangular void patterns. This favors an increase in deformation during the slippage deformation stage. For the samples with square and hexagonal void patterns, the strain localization is strong and the broken media are closer to columnar bulks, which favors an increase in deformation during the collapse deformation stage.

  11. Macroscopic quantum effects in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Machida, M.

    2008-09-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) is constructed. We clarify the multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2-enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ’s.

  12. The many-nucleon theory of nuclear collective structure and its macroscopic limits: an algebraic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. J.; McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear collective models introduced by Bohr, Mottelson and Rainwater, together with the Mayer-Jensen shell model, have provided the central framework for the development of nuclear physics. This paper reviews the microscopic evolution of the collective models and their underlying foundations. In particular, it is shown that the Bohr-Mottelson models have expressions as macroscopic limits of microscopic models that have precisely defined expressions in many-nucleon quantum mechanics. Understanding collective models in this way is especially useful because it enables the analysis of nuclear properties in terms of them to be revisited and reassessed in the light of their microscopic foundations.

  13. Development of macroscopic nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutilier, Michael; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas; Karnik, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Nanoporous graphene membranes have the potential to exceed permeance and selectivity limits of existing gas separation membranes due to their atomic thickness and ability to support sub-nanometer pores for molecular sieving, while offering low resistance to flow. Gas separation by graphene nanopores has been demonstrated experimentally on micron-scale membranes, but scaling-up to larger sizes is challenging due to graphene imperfections and control of the selective nanopore size distribution. Using a model we developed for the inherent permeance of graphene, we designed a macroscopic graphene membrane predicted to be selectively permeable despite material imperfections. Micrometer-scale defects are sealed by interfacial polymerization and nanometer-scale defects are sealed by atomic layer deposition. The underlying support structure is tuned to further reduce the effects of leakage. Finally, ion bombardment followed by oxidative etching is used to create a high density of selective nanopores. SEM and TEM imaging are used to characterize the resulting membrane structure, and its performance is assessed by gas permeance and selectivity measurements. This work provides insight into gas flow through nanoporous graphene membranes and guides their future development.

  14. Study of Fission Barrier Heights of Uranium Isotopes by the Macroscopic-Microscopic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chun-Lai; Fan, Tie-Shuan

    2014-09-01

    Potential energy surfaces of uranium nuclei in the range of mass numbers 229 through 244 are investigated in the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model and the heights of static fission barriers are obtained in terms of a double-humped structure. The macroscopic part of the nuclear energy is calculated according to Lublin—Strasbourg-drop (LSD) model. Shell and pairing corrections as the microscopic part are calculated with a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential. The calculation is carried out in a five-dimensional parameter space of the generalized Lawrence shapes. In order to extract saddle points on the potential energy surface, a new algorithm which can effectively find an optimal fission path leading from the ground state to the scission point is developed. The comparison of our results with available experimental data and others' theoretical results confirms the reliability of our calculations.

  15. Dislocation Dynamics in Crystals: A Macroscopic Theory in a Fractional Laplace Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipierro, Serena; Palatucci, Giampiero; Valdinoci, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    We consider an evolution equation arising in the Peierls-Nabarro model for crystal dislocation. We study the evolution of such a dislocation function and show that, at a macroscopic scale, the dislocations have the tendency to concentrate at single points of the crystal, where the size of the slip coincides with the natural periodicity of the medium. These dislocation points evolve according to the external stress and an interior repulsive potential.

  16. Interaction between capillary flow and macroscopic silicon concentration in liquid siliconized carbon/carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Gern, F.H.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a model for the numerical simulation of liquid silicon infiltration into porous carbon/carbon preforms. Macroscopic silicon concentration has been calculated from capillary flow equations. As a result, time dependence of silicon concentration during infiltration as well as silicon distribution in the ceramic end product can be calculated. Simulation values of silicon concentration after infiltration are in good accordance with experimental measurements.

  17. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Macroscopic Cardiac Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Gavin; Balazs, Anna

    2003-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the complex interactions between electrical excitation of the myocardial tissue, the mechanical contraction of the heart muscles and cardiac fluid dynamics, three computational techniques are successfully coupled. A Gerhardt-Schuster-Tyson Cellular Automata algorithm enables the excitation kinetics of myocardial tissue to be simulated in a computationally efficient manner. The cardiac excitation spreading is then coupled with a dynamic Born Lattice Spring Model which enables the contraction of the heart muscles and their subsequent relaxation to be modelled. The velocities at the inner surfaces of the heart can then be transferred to a Lattice Boltzmann simulation of blood flow within the cardiac chambers. The interactions (and complex feedback mechanisms) between electrical excitation, mechanical deformation, and fluid flow in the heart are explored through these three-dimensional models and the regular functionality of the whole heart is visualised.

  19. [Studies on macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of Ophiocordyceps xuefengensis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhen, Lan-ping; Zhu, Ru-cai; Zhang, Shui-han; Huang, Hui-yong

    2015-07-01

    The macroscopic characteristics, tissue, caterpillar body wall and powder of Ophiocordyceps xuefengensis in different batch numbers were observed and researched by the macroscopic and microscopic identification methods. The result shows that the morphology, size, abdominal annulations of caterpillar, etc. of 0. xuefengensis are the macroscopic identification characteristics, the caterpillar body surface mycelium, body wall sculpture and crochets on abdominal legs are the microscopic identification characteristics. These characters are stable and regular discriminant features, which are proved to be the identification basis of O. xuefengensis. In addition, The characters such as crochets on abdominal legs arrange in two parallel ellipse rings, the inner crochets are long strip, and the external toes are unciform, are specific. PMID:26666033

  20. Broadband macroscopic cortical oscillations emerge from intrinsic neuronal response failures

    PubMed Central

    Goldental, Amir; Vardi, Roni; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Broadband spontaneous macroscopic neural oscillations are rhythmic cortical firing which were extensively examined during the last century, however, their possible origination is still controversial. In this work we show how macroscopic oscillations emerge in solely excitatory random networks and without topological constraints. We experimentally and theoretically show that these oscillations stem from the counterintuitive underlying mechanism—the intrinsic stochastic neuronal response failures (NRFs). These NRFs, which are characterized by short-term memory, lead to cooperation among neurons, resulting in sub- or several- Hertz macroscopic oscillations which coexist with high frequency gamma oscillations. A quantitative interplay between the statistical network properties and the emerging oscillations is supported by simulations of large networks based on single-neuron in-vitro experiments and a Langevin equation describing the network dynamics. Results call for the examination of these oscillations in the presence of inhibition and external drives. PMID:26578893

  1. Macroscopic quantumness: Theory and applications in optical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Sasaki, Masahide

    2015-02-01

    Since the early days of quantum mechanics, as illustrated by Schrödinger's Gedankenexperiment, macroscopic quantum phenomena have attracted great interest among scientists and general audience. As highlighted by the Nobel prize in Physics in 2012, the scientific community could assent that the state-of-the-art technology to measure and manipulate individual quantum systems is now available in laboratories. We believe that the next step in order is to collectively control large quantum systems even at a 'macroscopic' level. This will be an intriguing challenge, from the fundamental point of view, for testing quantum mechanics in the macroscopic limit. Furthermore, it will make another major step forward to practical implementations of quantum information technologies.

  2. Nonequilibrium electromagnetics: Local and macroscopic fields and constitutive relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Baker-Jarvis, James; Kabos, Pavel; Holloway, Christopher L.

    2004-09-01

    We study the electrodynamics of materials using a Liouville-Hamiltonian-based statistical-mechanical theory. Our goal is to develop electrodynamics from an ensemble-average viewpoint that is valid for microscopic and nonequilibrium systems at molecular to submolecular scales. This approach is not based on a Taylor series expansion of the charge density to obtain the multipoles. Instead, expressions of the molecular multipoles are used in an inverse problem to obtain the averaging statistical-density function that is used to obtain the macroscopic fields. The advantages of this method are that the averaging function is constructed in a self-consistent manner and the molecules can either be treated as point multipoles or contain more microstructure. Expressions for the local and macroscopic fields are obtained, and evolution equations for the constitutive parameters are developed. We derive equations for the local field as functions of the applied, polarization, magnetization, strain density, and macroscopic fields.

  3. Macroscopic character of composite high temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, Steven; Spivak, Boris

    The ``d-wave'' symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact, and one which identifies them as ``unconventional.'' However, in macroscopic contexts - including many potential applications (i.e. superconducting ``wires'') - the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. Here, we analyze the physics at length scales large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While XY-superconducting glass order and macroscopic d-wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances - especially when the d-wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix - the most likely order has global s-wave symmetry.

  4. The Advantages of Not Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Brezinski, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent paper entitled by K. C. Lee et al. (2011) establishes nonlocal macroscopic quantum correlations, which they term “entanglement”, under ambient conditions. Photon(s)-phonon entanglements are established within each interferometer arm. However, our analysis demonstrates, the phonon fields between arms become correlated as a result of single-photon wavepacket path indistinguishability, not true nonlocal entanglement. We also note that a coherence expansion (as opposed to decoherence) resulted from local entanglement which was not recognized. It occurred from nearly identical Raman scattering in each arm (importantly not meeting the Born and Markovian approximations). The ability to establish nonlocal macroscopic quantum correlations through path indistinguishability rather than entanglement offers the opportunity to greatly expand quantum macroscopic theory and application, even though it was not true nonlocal entanglement.

  5. Fibrous random materials: From microstructure to macroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdchi, K.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite materials, fuel cells, heat exchangers and (biological)filters. Fluid flow through these materials plays an important role in many engineering applications and processes, such as textiles and paper manufacturing or transport of (under)ground water and pollutants. While most porous materials have complex geometry, some can be seen as two-dimensional particulate/fibrous systems, in which we introduce several microscopic quantities, based on Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations, to characterize their microstructure. In particular, by analyzing the topological properties of Voronoi polygons, we observe a smooth transition from disorder to order, for increasing packing fraction. Using fully resolved finite element (FE) simulations of Newtonian, incompressible fluid flow perpendicular to the fibres, the macroscopic permeability is calculated in creeping flow regimes. The effect of fibre arrangement and local crystalline regions on the macroscopic permeability is discussed and the macroscopic property is linked to the microscopic structural quantities.

  6. Plasma expansion characteristics of ionized clouds in the ionosphere - Macroscopic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic plasma expansion model, based on a numerical solution of the type-dependent nonlinear coupled continuity and momentum equations for background O(+) ions and several released ion species, was used to examine plasma expansion characteristics of ionized clouds in the ionosphere. Information is obtained on Ba(+), Li(+), and Ba(+) - Li(+) clouds; different cloud sizes (Gaussian half widths of 0.1, 0.5, and 1 km); cloud/background ion density ratios covering two orders of magnitude; electron/ion temperature ratios of 1, 5, and 10; and several cloud-background relative velocities along B (0, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 km/sec). The macroscopic expansion features obtained were found to be in general agreement with those obtained from the small-scale numerical simulations.

  7. Typicality of Thermal Equilibrium and Thermalization in Isolated Macroscopic Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Hal

    2016-06-01

    Based on the view that thermal equilibrium should be characterized through macroscopic observations, we develop a general theory about typicality of thermal equilibrium and the approach to thermal equilibrium in macroscopic quantum systems. We first formulate the notion that a pure state in an isolated quantum system represents thermal equilibrium. Then by assuming, or proving in certain classes of nontrivial models (including that of two bodies in thermal contact), large-deviation type bounds (which we call thermodynamic bounds) for the microcanonical ensemble, we prove that to represent thermal equilibrium is a typical property for pure states in the microcanonical energy shell. We believe that the typicality, along with the empirical success of statistical mechanics, provides a sound justification of equilibrium statistical mechanics. We also establish the approach to thermal equilibrium under two different assumptions; one is that the initial state has a moderate energy distribution, and the other is the energy eigenstate thermalization hypothesis.

  8. A macroscopic relationship for preferential flow in the vadose zone: Theory and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Zhang, R.D.

    2010-02-15

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the ground surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential flow patterns observed from fields are fractals. This paper discusses a macroscopic rela-tionship for modeling preferential flow in the vadose zone. Conceptually, the flow domain can be di-vided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. The portion of the active region was found to be a power function of saturation. The validity of this macroscopic relationship is demonstrated by its consistency with field observations and the related numerical experiments.

  9. Macroscopic nucleation phenomena in continuum media with long-range interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Masamichi; Enachescu, Cristian; Miyashita, Seiji; Rikvold, Per Arne; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Varret, François

    2011-01-01

    Nucleation, commonly associated with discontinuous transformations between metastable and stable phases, is crucial in fields as diverse as atmospheric science and nanoscale electronics. Traditionally, it is considered a microscopic process (at most nano-meter), implying the formation of a microscopic nucleus of the stable phase. Here we show for the first time, that considering long-range interactions mediated by elastic distortions, nucleation can be a macroscopic process, with the size of the critical nucleus proportional to the total system size. This provides a new concept of “macroscopic barrier-crossing nucleation”. We demonstrate the effect in molecular dynamics simulations of a model spin-crossover system with two molecular states of different sizes, causing elastic distortions. PMID:22355677

  10. Macroscopic Measurement of Resonant Magnetization Tunneling in High-Spin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Maciejewski, J.; Ziolo, R.

    1996-03-01

    We report the observation of steps in the hysteresis loop of a macroscopic sample of oriented crystals of Mn_12O_12(CH_3COO)_16(H_2O)_4, a high-spin (S=10) molecule. The steps occur at regular intervals of magnetic field, every 0.46 T. The magnetic relaxation rate increases substantially when the field is tuned to a step. We interpret these effects as manifestations of thermally assisted, field-tuned resonant tunneling between quantum spin states. A simple model is presented that accounts for the observations and yields good quantitative agreement with measured values of the anisotropy barrier. We attribute the observation of quantum-mechanical phenomena on a macroscopic scale to tunneling in a large (Avogadro's) number of magnetically identical molecules.

  11. Determination of macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Bian, Xin; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to determine macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) solvent. Shear viscosity, isothermal speed of sound, and bulk viscosity result from DPD-model input parameters and can be determined only a posteriori. For this reason approximate predictions of these quantities are desirable in order to set appropriate DPD input parameters. For the purpose of deriving an improved approximate prediction we analyze the autocorrelation of shear and longitudinal modes in Fourier space of a DPD solvent for Kolmogorov flow. We propose a fitting function with nonexponential properties which gives a good approximation to these autocorrelation functions. Given this fitting function we improve significantly the capability of a priori determination of macroscopic solvent transport coefficients in comparison to previously used exponential fitting functions.

  12. Determination of macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics solvent.

    PubMed

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Bian, Xin; Adams, Nikolaus A

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to determine macroscopic transport coefficients of a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) solvent. Shear viscosity, isothermal speed of sound, and bulk viscosity result from DPD-model input parameters and can be determined only a posteriori. For this reason approximate predictions of these quantities are desirable in order to set appropriate DPD input parameters. For the purpose of deriving an improved approximate prediction we analyze the autocorrelation of shear and longitudinal modes in Fourier space of a DPD solvent for Kolmogorov flow. We propose a fitting function with nonexponential properties which gives a good approximation to these autocorrelation functions. Given this fitting function we improve significantly the capability of a priori determination of macroscopic solvent transport coefficients in comparison to previously used exponential fitting functions. PMID:26871186

  13. Scaling of macroscopic superpositions close to a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Tahereh; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that in a quantum phase transition (QPT), entanglement remains short ranged [Osterloh et al., Nature (London) 416, 608 (2005), 10.1038/416608a]. We ask if there is a quantum property entailing the whole system which diverges near this point. Using the recently proposed measures of quantum macroscopicity, we show that near a quantum critical point, it is the effective size of macroscopic superposition between the two symmetry breaking states which grows to the scale of system size, and its derivative with respect to the coupling shows both singular behavior and scaling properties.

  14. Robust Gaussian entanglement with a macroscopic oscillator at thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Radim; Kupčík, Vojtěch

    2013-06-01

    We propose a feasible Gaussian version of the Schrödinger-cat state. We consider it as a robust Gaussian state of an oscillator prepared in a low-energy Gaussian quantum state entangled with another oscillator which was initially in a quantum state at thermal equilibrium with an arbitrary large energy (macroscopic oscillator). To generate it, we suggest two-mode squeezing as the best candidate. We test that the Gaussian version of the Schrödinger-cat state can be also used to remotely prepare a squeezed state of the macroscopic oscillator.

  15. Quantum correlation for two-qubit systems interacting with macroscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mei-Wen; Liu, Yan; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Lan

    2016-07-01

    We consider two particles of spin-[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] interacting with two one-dimensional N-spin arrays, respectively, which is an exactly solvable model. In this model, the one-dimensional N-spin arrays can be regarded as a macroscopic medium if we consider the number N of spins being large enough. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of entanglement and quantum discord of the spins of two particles in the case of two particles passing through the macroscopic mediums synchronously and out-sync. In both case, we can obtain that the entanglement decreases monotonically with time and may suffer a sudden death in the evolution. Different from the entanglement dynamics, quantum discord first remains unchanged during a period of time and decreases later, which can be described as the sudden transition between classical and quantum decoherence. We also observe that the entanglement and quantum discord decay to zero in the case of enough large N, which can be understood that the interaction with the macroscopic medium can destroy the quantum correlation of a two-qubit system.

  16. Regimes of gas transport through macroscopic areas of multi-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutilier, Michael; Karnik, Rohit; Sun, Chengzhen; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Nanoporous graphene membranes have the potential to surpass the permeance and selectivity limits of current gas separation membranes. Recent experiments and simulations on individual graphene nanopores have demonstrated that molecule-size-selective nanopores can be created and used to separate components of a gas mixture. However, micrometer-scale tears and nanometer-scale intrinsic defects, inherently present in macroscopic areas of graphene, can severely limit the gas separation performance of graphene membranes of practical size. In this study, we measure the inherent permeance of macroscopic, multi-layer graphene membranes to various gases. A model for the transport of gases through these membranes is developed and shown to accurately explain the measured flow rates. The results quantify the separate contributions of tears and intrinsic defects to the inherent permeance of macroscopic areas of multi-layer graphene. The model is then extended to graphene membranes with engineered selective nanopores to optimize design parameters for defect-tolerant gas separation membranes. This work was supported in part by the MIT Energy Initiative and in part by a NSERC PGS-D3 Fellowship.

  17. The squirt-flow mechanism: Macroscopic description

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorkin, J.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R.; Nur, A. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-03-01

    The authors introduce a poroelasticity model that incorporates the two most important mechanisms of solid/fluid interaction in rocks: the Biot mechanism and the squirt-flow mechanism. This combined Biot/squirt (BISQ) model relates compressional velocity and attenuation to the elastic constants of the drained skeleton and of the solid phase, porosity, permeability, saturation, fluid viscosity and compressiblity, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. Squirt-flow length is a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency, fluid viscosity, or compressibility and is determined experimentally. The authors find that the viscoelastic response of many sandstones is dominated by the squirt-flow component of the BISQ mechanism and that the viscoelastic properties of these rocks can be expressed through a single dimensionless parameter [omega]R[sup 2]/[kappa], where [omega] is angular frequency, R is the characteristic squirt-flow length, and [kappa] is hydraulic diffusivity. The Biot mechanism alone does not give an adequate explanation of the observed velocity dispersion and attenuation, and the viscoelastic behavior of many sandstones.

  18. Emergence of macroscopic directed motion in populations of motile colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Desreumaux, Nicolas; Dauchot, Olivier; Bartolo, Denis

    2013-11-01

    From the formation of animal flocks to the emergence of coordinated motion in bacterial swarms, populations of motile organisms at all scales display coherent collective motion. This consistent behaviour strongly contrasts with the difference in communication abilities between the individuals. On the basis of this universal feature, it has been proposed that alignment rules at the individual level could solely account for the emergence of unidirectional motion at the group level. This hypothesis has been supported by agent-based simulations. However, more complex collective behaviours have been systematically found in experiments, including the formation of vortices, fluctuating swarms, clustering and swirling. All these (living and man-made) model systems (bacteria, biofilaments and molecular motors, shaken grains and reactive colloids) predominantly rely on actual collisions to generate collective motion. As a result, the potential local alignment rules are entangled with more complex, and often unknown, interactions. The large-scale behaviour of the populations therefore strongly depends on these uncontrolled microscopic couplings, which are extremely challenging to measure and describe theoretically. Here we report that dilute populations of millions of colloidal rolling particles self-organize to achieve coherent motion in a unique direction, with very few density and velocity fluctuations. Quantitatively identifying the microscopic interactions between the rollers allows a theoretical description of this polar-liquid state. Comparison of the theory with experiment suggests that hydrodynamic interactions promote the emergence of collective motion either in the form of a single macroscopic `flock', at low densities, or in that of a homogenous polar phase, at higher densities. Furthermore, hydrodynamics protects the polar-liquid state from the giant density fluctuations that were hitherto considered the hallmark of populations of self-propelled particles. Our

  19. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A.; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  20. Probing deformed commutators with macroscopic harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bawaj, Mateusz; Biancofiore, Ciro; Bonaldi, Michele; Bonfigli, Federica; Borrielli, Antonio; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Marconi, Lorenzo; Marino, Francesco; Natali, Riccardo; Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A; Serra, Enrico; Vitali, David; Marin, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A minimal observable length is a common feature of theories that aim to merge quantum physics and gravity. Quantum mechanically, this concept is associated with a nonzero minimal uncertainty in position measurements, which is encoded in deformed commutation relations. In spite of increasing theoretical interest, the subject suffers from the complete lack of dedicated experiments and bounds to the deformation parameters have just been extrapolated from indirect measurements. As recently proposed, low-energy mechanical oscillators could allow to reveal the effect of a modified commutator. Here we analyze the free evolution of high-quality factor micro- and nano-oscillators, spanning a wide range of masses around the Planck mass mP (≈ 22 μg). The direct check against a model of deformed dynamics substantially lowers the previous limits on the parameters quantifying the commutator deformation. PMID:26088965

  1. Cation diffusion in the interlayer space of swelling clay minerals - A combined macroscopic and microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Prêt, Dimitri; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the diffusion process of calcium cations confined in the interlayer space of 5 mm disks of vermiculite swelling clay minerals during the Na-for-Ca exchange process. Diffusion experiments were performed at four NaCl salinities (3 × 10-3, 5 × 10-2, 0.1 and 1 M) of the exchanger solution. A macroscopic analysis of the diffusion process based on the aqueous calcium concentrations released in the solution and on Ca-profiles obtained in the solid was performed using a pore diffusion model that has been classically used in the literature. The results obtained at the macroscopic scale showed that the apparent diffusion coefficients describing both aqueous and profiles data for Ca depend on the diffusion time and salinity of the aqueous reservoir. Such variations suggested that interlayer diffusion was driven by (1) the gradient of the sorbed species in the interlayer, which depends on the diffusion time due to the ion exchange equilibrium; and (2) the discontinuity, due to Donnan equilibrium, existing at the limit between the "internal disk border" and the "external disk border" in contact with the aqueous reservoir. Then, a set of molecular and Brownian dynamics simulations was used to (1) assess such interpretations and (2) quantitatively predict aqueous and profile data obtained at the macroscopic scale. For an aqueous reservoir with high salinity (1 M NaCl), a good agreement was obtained between the macroscopic data and the predictions obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations, confirming the role played by the gradient of the interlayer species that is suggested at the macroscopic scale and which is at the basis of the "surface diffusion models" published in literature. In addition, for aqueous reservoirs with lower salinity (5 × 10-2 M), the results obtained by Brownian dynamics simulations and normalized to the exchange rate measured at infinite time showed that the diffusion properties of the species in the aqueous reservoir cannot be

  2. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of polarization in the hydrogenbonded chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomchuk, P. M.; Krasnoholovets, V. V.

    1997-10-01

    The probability of macroscopic quantum tunneling of polarization in a finite H-bonded chain is treated theoretically with regard to the influence of chain anisotropy. It is shown that the anisotropy stipulated by different microscopical effects plays a major role in the tunneling rate of polarization.

  3. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Toshio; Che, Dock-Chil; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Palazzetti, Federico; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-12-31

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed.

  4. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  5. A Macroscopic Analogue of the Nuclear Pairing Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    A macroscopic system involving permanent magnets is used as an analogue to nucleons in a nucleus to illustrate the significance of the pairing interaction. This illustrates that the view of the total nuclear energy based only on the nucleon occupancy of the energy levels can yield erroneous results and it is only when the pairing interaction is…

  6. Animal bite of penis in a neonate and macroscopic repair

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Pankaj; Mukherjee, Partha P.; Ghosh, Tapan J.; Shukla, Ram M.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswanath

    2011-01-01

    We are reporting a newborn male who had injury of the penis probably due to rat bite. The baby was brought to the hospital within 3 h of the injury. The urethra was completely transected. Macroscopic repair was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 2 weeks. The patient is doing well 3 months after the operation. PMID:22121319

  7. Implementing the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm with macroscopic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, Henry; Byrnes, Tim

    2016-05-01

    Quantum computing implementations under consideration today typically deal with systems with microscopic degrees of freedom such as photons, ions, cold atoms, and superconducting circuits. The quantum information is stored typically in low-dimensional Hilbert spaces such as qubits, as quantum effects are strongest in such systems. It has, however, been demonstrated that quantum effects can be observed in mesoscopic and macroscopic systems, such as nanomechanical systems and gas ensembles. While few-qubit quantum information demonstrations have been performed with such macroscopic systems, a quantum algorithm showing exponential speedup over classical algorithms is yet to be shown. Here, we show that the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm can be implemented with macroscopic ensembles. The encoding that we use avoids the detrimental effects of decoherence that normally plagues macroscopic implementations. We discuss two mapping procedures which can be chosen depending upon the constraints of the oracle and the experiment. Both methods have an exponential speedup over the classical case, and only require control of the ensembles at the level of the total spin of the ensembles. It is shown that both approaches reproduce the qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, and are robust under decoherence.

  8. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. PMID:27389477

  9. Macroscopic switches constructed through host-guest chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Ma, Junkai; Tian, Demei; Li, Haibing

    2016-03-28

    Molecular switch systems, having been extensively studied in the solution phase, have the ability to perform with good controllability and rapid-responsiveness, making them ideally suited for the design of molecular devices for drug delivery, and information or sensing functions. Inspired by a wide range of objects with visual changes, like Mimosa pudica towards external stimuli, in order to understand molecular switches well, they must be interfaced with the macroscopic world so that they can be directly realized by visual detectable changes even observed by the naked eye. This can be critical for fabricating intelligent microfluidics and laboratory-on-chip devices, that may have wide applications in the fields of biology and materials science. But to realize this objective, especially for fabricating macroscopic surface switches, unveiling host-guest weak interactions to achieve visual phenomena is still the greatest thrill. Thankfully, surface contact angles provide us with a wonderful method to further investigate the microscopic origin of the macroscopic changes. Therefore, interfacial modification becomes a paramount process. Macrocyclic compounds, encompassing an innovative concept to deal with reversible noncovalent interactions between macrocyclic hosts and suitable guests, are good candidates for surface functionalization. In this feature article, we discuss recent developments in macroscopic contact angle switches formed by different macrocyclic hosts and highlight the properties of these new functional surfaces and their potential applications. PMID:26905834

  10. Macroscopicity and classicality of quantum fluctuations in de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, S.

    1988-08-01

    On the basis of the non-probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics, the authors define ''macroscopicity'' and ''classicality'' of quantum fluctuations as closely related but separate concepts. Then these properties are examined in quantum states (wave functions) of matter fields in de Sitter spacetime.

  11. Basic Characteristics of a Macroscopic Measure for Detecting Abnormal Changes in a Multiagent System

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Multiagent application systems must deal with various changes in both the system and the system environment at runtime. Generally, such changes have undesirable negative effects on the system. To manage and control the system, it is important to observe and detect negative effects using an appropriate observation function of the system’s behavior. This paper focuses on the design of this function and proposes a new macroscopic measure with which to observe behavioral characteristics of a runtime multiagent system. The proposed measure is designed as the variance of fluctuation of a macroscopic activity factor of the whole system, based on theoretical analysis of the macroscopic behavioral model of a multiagent system. Experiments are conducted to investigate basic characteristics of the proposed measure, using a test bed system. The results of experiments show that the proposed measure reacts quickly and increases drastically in response to abnormal changes in the system. Hence, the proposed measure is considered a measure that can be used to detect undesirable changes in a multiagent system. PMID:25897499

  12. Enhanced plasticity in a bulk amorphous matrix composite: macroscopic and microscopic viewpoint studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Chul . E-mail: jclee001@korea.ac.kr; Kim, Yu-Chan; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2005-01-03

    We developed the (Cu{sub 60}Zr{sub 30}Ti{sub 10}){sub 0.95}Ta{sub 5} amorphous matrix composite, which is a Cu-based bulk amorphous composite reinforced with a micron-sized Ta-rich crystalline phase. The composite demonstrated an ultimate strength of 2332 MPa with a dramatically enhanced fracture strain of 15.3%. Macroscopic observation of the fractured (Cu{sub 60}Zr{sub 30}Ti{sub 10}){sub 0.95}Ta{sub 5} amorphous composite using scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of multiple shear bands along with numerous secondary shear bands, which spread from the primary shear bands. On the other hand, microscopic observation of the fractured composite using transmission electron microscopy showed that the cracks propagate through the amorphous matrix in a jagged manner. The observed macroscopic and microscopic behaviors, involving shear band formation and crack propagation, are believed to be responsible for the enhanced plasticity. Finite element calculations using the Mohr-Coulomb model of hydrostatic pressure dependent materials were conducted, in order to gain a better understanding of various aspects of the macroscopic deformation behavior, such as the interaction of the shear bands with the crystalline particles, the initiation site of the shear bands, and the formation of multiple shear bands, while the microscopic deformation behavior was explained based on the formation of nanocrystallites that had precipitated under quasistatic compression.

  13. Analytic solution of relaxation in a system with exponential transition probabilities. III. Macroscopic disequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forst, Wendell

    1984-03-01

    The exponential transition probability, in the version that permits an analytical solution of the relaxation problem, is used to compute a number of macroscopic (bulk) observables for a model system based on multiphoton excitation of SF6 coupled to a rare-gas heat bath. Two extreme cases are considered: Initial excitation as a delta function, or as a Poisson distribution. It turns out that regardless of initial conditions, all macroscopic observables are functions of time, including the relaxation time, so that the system does not undergo simple exponential decay. This is because the first moment of the exponential transition probability does not satisfy the linear ``sum rule.'' The exponential transition probability causes the overall (or bulk) average of energy transferred (<<ΔE>>) to be constrained to a maximum which is independent of the nature and level of initial excitation, thus producing a bottleneck in the macroscopic relaxation process when excitation is sufficiently high. The consequence is that the initially more highly excited system takes longer to reach steady state, with a relaxation time that is initially nearly proportional to initial excitation and which decreases as the system approaches steady state. It is only in the immediate vicinity of steady state that simple exponential relaxation takes place, with the shortest relaxation time. Several consequences of this, particularly the population distribution as a function of time, are illustrated and discussed.

  14. First-principles based calculation of the macroscopic α/β interface in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhu, Lvqi; Shao, Shouqi; Jiang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    The macroscopic α/β interface in titanium and titanium alloys consists of a ledge interface (112)β/(01-10)α and a side interface (11-1)β/(2-1-10)α in a zig-zag arrangement. Here, we report a first-principles study for predicting the atomic structure and the formation energy of the α/β-Ti interface. Both component interfaces were calculated using supercell models within a restrictive relaxation approach, with various staking sequences and high-symmetry parallel translations being considered. The ledge interface energy was predicted as 0.098 J/m2 and the side interface energy as 0.811 J/m2. By projecting the zig-zag interface area onto the macroscopic broad face, the macroscopic α/β interface energy was estimated to be as low as ˜0.12 J/m2, which, however, is almost double the ad hoc value used in previous phase-field simulations.

  15. A tract-specific framework for white matter morphometry combining macroscopic and microscopic tract features

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Awatea, Suyash P; Das, Sandhitsu R; Woo, John H; Melhem, Elias R; Gee, James C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging plays a key role in our understanding of white matter both in normal populations and in populations with brain disorders. Existing techniques focus primarily on using diffusivity-based quantities derived from diffusion tensor as surrogate measures of microstructural tissue properties of white matter. In this paper, we describe a novel tract-specific framework that enables the examination of white matter morphometry at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales. The framework leverages the skeleton-based modeling of sheet-like white matter fasciculi using the continuous medial representation, which gives a natural definition of thickness and supports its comparison across subjects. The thickness measure provides a macroscopic characterization of white matter fasciculi that complements existing analysis of microstructural features. The utility of the framework is demonstrated in quantifying white matter atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. We show that, compared to using microscopic features alone, combining the macroscopic and microscopic features gives a more complete characterization of the disease. PMID:20547469

  16. A gimbal-mounted pressurization chamber for macroscopic and microscopic assessment of ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Joseph T; Yan, Dongmei; Rader, Jacob H; Utzinger, Urs; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2011-09-01

    The biomechanical model of glaucoma considers intraocular pressure-related stress and resultant strain on load bearing connective tissues of the optic nerve and surrounding peripapillary sclera as one major causative influence that effects cellular, vascular, and axonal components of the optic nerve. By this reasoning, the quantification of variations in the microstructural architecture and macromechanical response of scleral shells in glaucomatous compared to healthy populations provides an insight into any variations that exist between patient populations. While scleral shells have been tested mechanically in planar and pressure-inflation scenarios the link between the macroscopic biomechanical response and the underlying microstructure has not been determined to date. A potential roadblock to determining how the microstructure changes based on pressure is the ability to mount the spherical scleral shells in a method that does not induce unwanted stresses to the samples (for instance, in the flattening of the spherical specimens), and then capturing macroscopic and microscopic changes under pressure. Often what is done is a macroscopic test followed by sample fixation and then imaging to determine microstructural organization. We introduce a novel device and method, which allows spherical samples to be pressurized and macroscopic and microstructural behavior quantified on fully hydrated ocular specimens. The samples are pressurized and a series of markers on the surface of the sclera imaged from several different perspectives and reconstructed between pressure points to allow for mapping of nonhomogenous strain. Pictures are taken from different perspectives through the use of mounting the pressurization scheme in a gimbal that allows for positioning the sample in several different spherical coordinate system configurations. This ability to move the sclera in space about the center of the globe, coupled with an upright multiphoton microscope, allows for

  17. Pore-Scale Simulation of Intragranular Diffusion: Effects of Incomplete Mixing on Macroscopic Manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-07-01

    Diffusive mass transfer into and out of intragranular micropores ("intragranular diffusion") plays an important role in the large-scale transport of some groundwater contaminants. We are interested in understanding the combined effect of pore-scale advection and intragranular diffusion on solute transport at the effective porous medium scale. To study this problem, we have developed a three-dimensional pore-scale model of fluid flow and solute transport that incorporates diffusion into and out of intragranular pore spaces. Our model is based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method, which represents fluid and solid phases by a mesh-free particle discretization. In the pore spaces, fluid flow is simulated by discretizing the Navier-Stokes equations using the SPH approach. Solute transport is represented by advection, diffusion within the fluid phase, and diffusion between the fluid and solid phases. Our model is implemented on large-scale parallel computing hardware, allowing us to simulate millions of computational particles and represent fully three-dimensional systems of pores and grains with arbitrarily complex physical geometry. We have used this model system to perform numerical experiments using various model porous media systems, which allows us to draw comparisons between macroscopic measures computed from the pore-scale simulations (such as breakthrough curves) and those predicted by macroscopic formulations that assume complete mixing over the representative volume. In this paper we present results of 3D simulations of pore-scale flow and transport, including cases with and without intragranular diffusion, in two model porous media, one with randomly-packed uniform spherical grains and a second with randomly-packed spheres drawn from a binary grain size distribution. Breakthrough curves were computed from the 3D simulations at various transport distances. Comparable breakthrough curves were computed using 1D macroscopic models with

  18. Macroscopic control parameter for avalanche models for bursty transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Rowlands, G.; Watkins, N. W.

    2009-01-15

    Similarity analysis is used to identify the control parameter R{sub A} for the subset of avalanching systems that can exhibit self-organized criticality (SOC). This parameter expresses the ratio of driving to dissipation. The transition to SOC, when the number of excited degrees of freedom is maximal, is found to occur when R{sub A}{yields}0. This is in the opposite sense to (Kolmogorov) turbulence, thus identifying a deep distinction between turbulence and SOC and suggesting an observable property that could distinguish them. A corollary of this similarity analysis is that SOC phenomenology, that is, power law scaling of avalanches, can persist for finite R{sub A} with the same R{sub A}{yields}0 exponent if the system supports a sufficiently large range of lengthscales, necessary for SOC to be a candidate for physical (R{sub A} finite) systems.

  19. Screen-imaging guidance using a modified portable video macroscope for middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingbao; Luo, Junli; Liu, Yun; Chen, Guolong; Liu, Song; Ruan, Qiangjin; Deng, Xunding; Wang, Dianchun; Fan, Quanshui; Pan, Xinghua

    2012-04-25

    The use of operating microscopes is limited by the focal length. Surgeons using these instruments cannot simultaneously view and access the surgical field and must choose one or the other. The longer focal length (more than 1 000 mm) of an operating telescope permits a position away from the operating field, above the surgeon and out of the field of view. This gives the telescope an advantage over an operating microscope. We developed a telescopic system using screen-imaging guidance and a modified portable video macroscope constructed from a Computar MLH-10 × macro lens, a DFK-21AU04 USB CCD Camera and a Dell laptop computer as monitor screen. This system was used to establish a middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats. Results showed that magnification of the modified portable video macroscope was appropriate (5-20 ×) even though the Computar MLH-10 × macro lens was placed 800 mm away from the operating field rather than at the specified working distance of 152.4 mm with a zoom of 1-40 ×. The screen-imaging telescopic technique was clear, life-like, stereoscopic and matched the actual operation. Screen-imaging guidance led to an accurate, smooth, minimally invasive and comparatively easy surgical procedure. Success rate of the model establishment evaluated by neurological function using the modified neurological score system was 74.07%. There was no significant difference in model establishment time, sensorimotor deficit and infarct volume percentage. Our findings indicate that the telescopic lens is effective in the screen surgical operation mode referred to as "long distance observation and short distance operation" and that screen-imaging guidance using an modified portable video macroscope can be utilized for the establishment of a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and micro-neurosurgery. PMID:25722675

  20. Nonclassicality tests and entanglement witnesses for macroscopic mechanical superposition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittsovich, Oleg; Moroder, Tobias; Asadian, Ali; Gühne, Otfried; Rabl, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We describe a set of measurement protocols for performing nonclassicality tests and the verification of entangled superposition states of macroscopic continuous variable systems, such as nanomechanical resonators. Following earlier works, we first consider a setup where a two-level system is used to indirectly probe the motion of the mechanical system via Ramsey measurements and discuss the application of this method for detecting nonclassical mechanical states. We then show that the generalization of this technique to multiple resonator modes allows the conditioned preparation and the detection of entangled mechanical superposition states. The proposed measurement protocols can be implemented in various qubit-resonator systems that are currently under experimental investigation and find applications in future tests of quantum mechanics at a macroscopic scale.

  1. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (∼10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure. PMID:26416086

  2. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (~10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure.

  3. Macroscopically Separated Gaps in Dimer Coverings of Aztec Rectangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciucu, Mihai

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we determine the interaction of diagonal defect clusters in regions of an Aztec rectangle that scale to arbitrary points on its symmetry axis (in earlier work we treated the case when this point was the center of the scaled Aztec rectangle). We use the resulting formulas to determine the asymptotics of the correlation of defects that are macroscopically separated from one another and feel the influence of the boundary. In several of the treated situations this seems not to be accomplishable by previous methods. Our applications include the case of two long neutral strings, which turn out to interact by an analog of the Casimir force, two families of neutral doublets that turn out to interact completely independently of one another, a neutral doublet and a very long neutral string, a general collection of macroscopically separated monomer and separation defects, and the case of long strings consisting of consecutive monomers.

  4. Macroscopic view of light pressure on a continuous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, M. V.; Kondratov, A. V.

    2013-07-01

    The ambiguity of the macroscopic description of light pressure on a continuous medium originates from the uncertainty of dividing the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetically excited matter into a material and field parts or, equivalently, the total acting force into pressure and deformation terms. We show that, although there exists a continuum of formally correct formulations, one can adopt the appropriate form of the macroscopic field stress tensor that allows a unified description of pressure during elementary light-matter interactions, such as reflection, refraction, absorption, and nonlinear conversion. The derived simple expressions for the pressure force are compatible with the polariton momentum ℏk. The corresponding relation for the electromagnetic momentum density generalizes Rytov's definition for right-handed and left-handed frequency dispersive media.

  5. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  6. Probabilistic Metrology Attains Macroscopic Cloning of Quantum Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendra, B.; Calsamiglia, J.; Muñoz-Tapia, R.; Bagan, E.; Chiribella, G.

    2014-12-01

    It has recently been shown that probabilistic protocols based on postselection boost the performances of the replication of quantum clocks and phase estimation. Here we demonstrate that the improvements in these two tasks have to match exactly in the macroscopic limit where the number of clones grows to infinity, preserving the equivalence between asymptotic cloning and state estimation for arbitrary values of the success probability. Remarkably, the cloning fidelity depends critically on the number of rationally independent eigenvalues of the clock Hamiltonian. We also prove that probabilistic metrology can simulate cloning in the macroscopic limit for arbitrary sets of states when the performance of the simulation is measured by testing small groups of clones.

  7. Macroscopic description of complex adaptive networks coevolving with dynamic node states.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F; Heitzig, Jobst; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    In many real-world complex systems, the time evolution of the network's structure and the dynamic state of its nodes are closely entangled. Here we study opinion formation and imitation on an adaptive complex network which is dependent on the individual dynamic state of each node and vice versa to model the coevolution of renewable resources with the dynamics of harvesting agents on a social network. The adaptive voter model is coupled to a set of identical logistic growth models and we mainly find that, in such systems, the rate of interactions between nodes as well as the adaptive rewiring probability are crucial parameters for controlling the sustainability of the system's equilibrium state. We derive a macroscopic description of the system in terms of ordinary differential equations which provides a general framework to model and quantify the influence of single node dynamics on the macroscopic state of the network. The thus obtained framework is applicable to many fields of study, such as epidemic spreading, opinion formation, or socioecological modeling. PMID:26066206

  8. Structural characterization of macroscopic single-walled carbon nanotube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei

    In this thesis, we studied the structural properties of macroscopic materials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the form of fibers, films and suspensions. We characterized the preferred orientations in partially aligned SWNT fibers and films, combining x-ray fiber diagram and polarized Raman scattering. Our texture model consists of an aligned fraction, characterized by the angular distribution width of tube axes, plus a completely unaligned fraction. For neat fibers extruded from SWNT/superacid suspensions through a small orifice, the distribution width and the aligned fraction both improve with decreasing orifice diameter. For magnetic field-aligned SWNT films deposited from surfactant suspensions, the aligning effects of deposition and external magnetic field force in the film plane are additive, the out-of-plane mosaic being narrower than the in-plane one. SWNTs dispersed in superacid or aqueous surfactant solutions are precursors for many applications. In oleum, SWNTs can be charged and protonated by H 2SO4 molecules. X-ray scattering indicates that H2SO 4 molecules align along nanotube axes to form cylindrical shells wrapped around nanotubes. This finding establishes the validity of a long-standing important but still debated physical chemistry concept, "structured solvent shells surrounding dissolved ions". Differential scanning calorimetry confirms that the partly ordered H2SO4 molecules are a new phase, with distinct freezing/melting behavior. X-ray scattering at low temperature further shows that crystallization of the bulk-like acid surrounding the structured shells is templated by the SWNTs. The specific orientation of the acid crystallites provides solid evidence for direct protonation of SWNT. We studied the morphologies of SWNT suspensions using small-angle neutron scattering. We observed rigid rod behavior from SWNTs dispersed in water using sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate surfactant, suggesting that SWNTs exist mainly as individual tube

  9. Macroscopic superposition of ultracold atoms with orbital degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-March, M. A.; Carr, L. D.; Dounas-Frazer, D. R.

    2011-04-15

    We introduce higher dimensions into the problem of Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential, taking into account orbital angular momentum. We completely characterize the eigenstates of this system, delineating new regimes via both analytical high-order perturbation theory and numerical exact diagonalization. Among these regimes are mixed Josephson- and Fock-like behavior, crossings in both excited and ground states, and shadows of macroscopic superposition states.

  10. Quantitatively Resolving Multivalent Interactions on Macroscopic Scale Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongzheng; Yang, Haopeng; Wang, Yuhong; Xu, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent interactions remain difficult to be characterized and consequently controlled, particularly on a macroscopic scale. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we have resolved the single-, double-, and triple- biotin—streptavidin interactions, multivalent DNA interactions and CXCL12-CXCR4 interactions, on millimetre-scale surfaces. Our results establish FIRMS as a viable method for systematic resolution and controlled formation of multivalent interactions. PMID:26864087

  11. Optical detection of the Casimir force between macroscopic objects.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Victor; Petrov, Mikhail; Bryksin, Valeriy; Petter, Juergen; Tschudi, Theo

    2006-11-01

    We report the optical detection of mechanical deformation of a macroscopic object induced by the Casimir force. An adaptive holographic interferometer based on a photorefractive BaTiO3:Co crystal was used to measure periodical nonlinear deformations of a thin pellicle caused by an oscillating Casimir force. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the first and second harmonics of the Casimir force oscillations has been obtained. PMID:17041670

  12. Macroscopic vacuum effects in an inhomogeneous and nonstationary electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'tsov, D.V.; Nikitina, N.S.

    1983-04-01

    Macroscopic effects of vacuum polarization by a strong nonuniform and nonstationary fields, which are kinematically forbidden in the case of a uniform magnetic field, are considered. Calculations are perfomed for the deflection of a light beam in the field of a magnetic dipole, for the production of photon pairs by an inclined rotator, and for doubling and modulation of the frequency in scattering of low-frequency electromagnetic waves by the magnetic field of an inclined rotator.

  13. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Caroline A; McGrew, William C

    2014-06-01

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods applied include rating food-items using a scale of abundance, estimating their percentage volume, and weighing food-items. However, verification as to whether or not composition data differ, depending on which quantification method is used during macroscopic inspection, has not been done. We analyzed feces collected from ten adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Kanyawara community in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We compare dietary composition totals obtained from using different quantification methods and ascertain if sieve mesh size influences totals calculated. Finally, this study validates findings from direct observation of feeding by the same individuals from whom the fecal samples had been collected. Contrasting diet composition totals obtained by using different quantification methods and sieve mesh sizes can influence folivory and frugivory estimates. However, our findings were based on the assumption that fibrous matter contained pith and leaf fragments only, which remains to be verified. We advocate macroscopic inspection of feces can be a valuable tool to provide a generalized overview of dietary composition for primate populations. As most populations remain unhabituated, scrutinizing and validating indirect measures are important if they are to be applied to further understand inter- and intra-species dietary variation. PMID:24482001

  14. Macroscopic character of composite high-temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Spivak, B.

    2015-11-01

    The "d -wave" symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact [J. Tsuei and J. R. Kirtley, Rev. Mod. Phys. 72, 969 (2000), 10.1103/RevModPhys.72.969 and D. J. Vanharlingen, Rev. Mod. Phys. 67, 515 (1995), 10.1103/RevModPhys.67.515], and one which identifies them as "unconventional." However, in macroscopic contexts—including many potential applications (i.e., superconducting "wires")—the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. [See, e.g., D. C. Larbalestier et al., Nat. Mater. 13, 375 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887, A. P. Malozemoff, MRS Bull. 36, 601 (2011), 10.1557/mrs.2011.160, and K. Heine et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 55, 2441 (1989), 10.1063/1.102295] Here we analyze the physics at length scales that are large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While X Y -superconducting glass order and macroscopic d -wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances—especially when the d -wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix—the most likely order has global s -wave symmetry.

  15. Solvable Quantum Macroscopic Motions and Decoherence Mechanisms in Quantum Mechanics on Nonstandard Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Tsunehiro

    1996-01-01

    Quantum macroscopic motions are investigated in the scheme consisting of N-number of harmonic oscillators in terms of ultra-power representations of nonstandard analysis. Decoherence is derived from the large internal degrees of freedom of macroscopic matters.

  16. Macroscopic order in a nematic liquid crystal: Perturbation by spontaneous director fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Hamasuna, Daichi; Hashim, Rauzah; Kasatani, Atsuhiro; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R; Sugimura, Akihiko; Timimi, Bakir A; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic alignment of the nematic director by near-orthogonal electric and magnetic fields has been investigated. The intermediate states during the relaxation process were found, with the aid of time-resolved deuterium NMR spectroscopy, to be markedly nonuniform. The macroscopic order was perturbed, although the initial and final states of the director appear to be essentially uniform. However, the initial state does have a profound influence on the uniformity of the director in the intermediate states. We have developed a fundamental model based on the effect of spontaneous director fluctuations to explain these unusual NMR observations. PMID:26172726

  17. Particulate nature of blood determines macroscopic rheology: a 2-D lattice Boltzmann analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenghai; Munn, Lance L

    2005-03-01

    Historically, predicting macroscopic blood flow characteristics such as viscosity has been an empirical process due to the difficulty in rigorously including the particulate nature of blood in a mathematical representation of blood rheology. Using a two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann approach, we have simulated the flow of red blood cells in a blood vessel to estimate flow resistance at various hematocrits and vessel diameters. By including white blood cells (WBCs) in the flow, we also calculate the increase in resistance due to white cell rolling and adhesion. The model considers the blood as a suspension of particles in plasma, accounting for cell-cell and cell-wall interactions to predict macroscopic blood rheology. The model is able to reproduce the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect, i.e., the increase in relative apparent viscosity as tube size increases, and the Fahraeus effect, i.e., tube hematocrit is lower than discharge hematocrit. In addition, the model allows direct assessment of the effect of WBCs on blood flow in the microvasculature, reproducing the dramatic increases in flow resistance as WBCs enter short capillary segments. This powerful and flexible model can be used to predict blood flow properties in any vessel geometry and with any blood composition. PMID:15613630

  18. Foreshocks and b Value: Bridging Macroscopic Observations to Source Mechanical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avlonitis, M.; Papadopoulos, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    Spring-block models, such as the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, were introduced several years ago to describe earthquake dynamics in the context of self-organized criticality. With the aim to address the dependency of the seismicity style on source's material properties, we present an analytical enrichment of a 2D OFC model. We conclude with an analytical expression which introduces, through an appropriate constitutive equation, an effective dissipation parameter a eff related analytically not only with the elastic properties of the fault plane, but also with stochastic structural heterogeneities and structural processes of the source through a gradient coefficient. Moreover, within the proposed formulation, the low b values experimentally observed in foreshock sequences can be modeled by a process of material softening in the seismogenic volume. To check our analytical findings, a cellular automaton was built-up whereas simulation results have verified the model's predictions for the evolution of b in macroscopic records.

  19. Field test and mathematical modeling of bioremediation of an oil-contaminated soil. Part 2: Mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.Y.; Xu, T.; Colapret, J.A. ); Cawley, W.A. ); Bonner, J.S. . Civil Engineering Dept.); Ernest, A.; Verramachaneni, P.B. . Environmental Engineering Dept.)

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the oxygen transfer from the air, the oil transfer from the soil, and the bio-reaction in the aqueous phase. Important parameters used in this model were obtained independently either in the laboratory or from the literature. The oil transfer rate constant, K[sub 1]a, was found to be a function of time during the remediation. The oil transfer rate controlling in this bioremediation process is confirmed again by the parameters obtained from simulation results for each plot. An example of calculation was used to illustrate the oil transfer controlling step in the bioremediation of oil contaminated soil.

  20. Experimental aspects of an investigation of macroscopic ductile failure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Hoo, M.S.; Benzley, S.E.; Priddy, T.G.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental results for the ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum are presented. Four separate shapes were tested to investigate the importance that macroscopic effective shear stress, hydrostatic stress, and plastic strain play in describing ductile failure of materials. The specimens used were: thin wall torsion tubes to create a state of pure shear, uniform hollow tubes to create a state of uniaxial stress; hour-glass shaped hollow tubes to create a state of biaxial stress; and notched round bars to create a state of triaxial stress. Two proposed ductile failure criteria are discussed in conjunction with the experimental results presented.

  1. Macroscopic approximation to relativistic kinetic theory from a nonlinear closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Ramos, J.; Calzetta, E.

    2013-02-01

    We use a macroscopic description of a system of relativistic particles based on adding a nonequilibrium tensor to the usual hydrodynamic variables. The nonequilibrium tensor is linked to relativistic kinetic theory through a nonlinear closure suggested by the entropy production principle; the evolution equation is obtained by the method of moments and together with energy-momentum conservation closes the system. Transport coefficients are chosen to reproduce second-order fluid dynamics if gradients are small. We compare the resulting formalism to exact solutions of Boltzmann’s equation in 0+1 dimensions and show that it tracks kinetic theory better than second-order fluid dynamics.

  2. Droplet morphologies on particles with macroscopic surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Stepánek, Frantisek; Rajniak, Pavol

    2006-01-31

    The equilibrium configuration of liquid droplets on the surface of macroscopically rough solid particles was determined by numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The fractional surface coverage of the particle as a function of the droplet size, equilibrium contact angle, and the particle surface roughness amplitude and correlation length has been systematically investigated. Droplet size and contact angle were found to generally have a stronger effect on surface coverage than particle surface roughness. Because of droplet coalescence, a relatively large variation in surface coverage was observed for any given total liquid volume, particularly for larger values of the equilibrium contact angle. PMID:16430249

  3. Critical behavior of a two-dimensional complex fluid: Macroscopic and mesoscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Madhumita; Datta, Alokmay

    2016-04-01

    Liquid disordered (Ld) to liquid ordered (Lo) phase transition in myristic acid [MyA, CH3(CH2) 12COOH ] Langmuir monolayers was studied macroscopically as well as mesoscopically to locate the critical point. Macroscopically, isotherms of the monolayer were obtained across the 20 ∘C-38 ∘Ctemperature (T ) range and the critical point was estimated, primarily from the vanishing of the order parameter, at ≈38 ∘C. Mesoscopically, domain morphology in the Ld-Lo coexistence regime was imaged using the technique of Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) as a function of T and the corresponding power spectral density function (PSDF) obtained. Monolayer morphology passed from stable circular domains and a sharp peak in PSDF to stable dendritic domains and a divergence of the correlation length as the critical point was approached from below. The critical point was found to be consistent at ≈38 ∘Cfrom both isotherm and BAM results. In the critical regime the scaling behavior of the transition followed the two-dimensional Ising model. Additionally, we obtained a precritical regime, over a temperature range of ≈8 ∘C below Tc, characterized by fluctuations in the order parameter at the macroscopic scale and at the mesoscopic scale characterized by unstable domains of fingering or dendritic morphology as well as proliferation of a large number of small sized domains, multiple peaks in the power spectra, and a corresponding fluctuation in the peak q values with T . Further, while comparing temperature studies on an ensemble of MyA monolayers with those on a single monolayer, the system was found to be not strictly ergodic in that the ensemble development did not strictly match with the time development in the system. In particular, the critical temperature was found to be lowered in the latter. These results clearly show that the critical behavior in fatty acid monolayer phase transitions have features of both complex and nonequilibrium systems.

  4. A macroscopic non-destructive testing system based on the cantilever-sample contact resonance.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji; Lin, Lizhi; Zhou, Xilong; Li, Yingwei; Li, Faxin

    2012-12-01

    Detecting the inside or buried defects in materials and structures is always a challenge in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). In this paper, enlightened by the operation principle of the contact resonance force microscopy or atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), we proposed a macroscopic NDT system based on contact resonance of the cantilever-sample surface to detect the local stiffness variations in materials or structures. We fabricated a piezoelectric unimorph with the dimension typically of 150 mm × 8 mm × 2 mm to act as a macroscopic cantilever, whose flexural mode vibration was driven by a wideband power amplifier together with a signal generator. The vibration signal of the macroscopic cantilever is detected by a high sensitive strain gauge bonded on the cantilever surface which is much more stable than the laser diode sensor in AFAM, thus making it very suitable for outdoor operations. Scanning is realized by a three-dimensional motorized stage with the Z axis for pressing force setting. The whole system is controlled by a LabVIEW-based homemade software. Like the AFAM, this NDT system can also work in two modes, i.e., the single-frequency mode and the resonance-tracking mode. In the latter mode, the contact stiffness at each pixel of the sample can be obtained by using the measured contact resonance frequency and a beam dynamics model. Testing results of this NDT system on a grid structure with an opaque panel show that in both modes the prefabricated defect beneath the panel can be detected and the grid structures can be clearly "seen," which indicates the validity of this NDT system. The sensitivity of this NDT system was also examined. PMID:23277996

  5. Macroscopic descriptions of rarefied gases from the elimination of fast variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellar, Paul J.

    2007-10-01

    The Boltzmann equation describing a dilute monatomic gas is equivalent to an infinite hierarchy of evolution equations for successive moments of the distribution function. The five moments giving the macroscopic mass, momentum, and energy densities are unaffected by collisions between atoms, while all other moments naturally evolve on a fast collisional time scale. We show that the macroscopic equations of Chen, Rao, and Spiegel [Phys. Lett. A 271, 87 (2000)], like the familiar Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, emerge from using a systematic procedure to eliminate the higher moments, leaving closed evolution equations for the five moments unaffected by collisions. The two equation sets differ through their treatment of contributions from the temperature to the momentum and energy fluxes. Using moment equations offers a definitive treatment of the Prandtl number problem using model collision operators, greatly reduces the labor of deriving equations for different collision operators, and clarifies the role of solvability conditions applied to the distribution function. The original Chen-Rao-Spiegel approach offers greatly improved agreement with experiments for the phase speed of ultrasound, but when corrected to match the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations at low frequencies, it then underestimates the phase speed at high frequencies. Our introduction of a translational temperature, as in the kinetic theory of polyatomic gases, motivates a distinction in the energy flux between advection of internal energy and the work done by the pressure. Exploiting this distinction yields macroscopic equations that offer further improvement in agreement with experimental data, and arise more naturally as an approximation to the infinite hierarchy of evolution equations for moments.

  6. Evaluating the macroscopic yield behaviour of trabecular bone using a nonlinear homogenisation approach.

    PubMed

    Levrero-Florencio, Francesc; Margetts, Lee; Sales, Erika; Xie, Shuqiao; Manda, Krishnagoud; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2016-08-01

    Computational homogenisation approaches using high resolution images and finite element (FE) modelling have been extensively employed to evaluate the anisotropic elastic properties of trabecular bone. The aim of this study was to extend its application to characterise the macroscopic yield behaviour of trabecular bone. Twenty trabecular bone samples were scanned using a micro-computed tomography device, converted to voxelised FE meshes and subjected to 160 load cases each (to define a homogenised multiaxial yield surface which represents several possible strain combinations). Simulations were carried out using a parallel code developed in-house. The nonlinear algorithms included both geometrical and material nonlinearities. The study found that for tension-tension and compression-compression regimes in normal strain space, the yield strains have an isotropic behaviour. However, in the tension-compression quadrants, pure shear and combined normal-shear planes, the macroscopic strain norms at yield have a relatively large variation. Also, our treatment of clockwise and counter-clockwise shears as separate loading cases showed that the differences in these two directions cannot be ignored. A quadric yield surface, used to evaluate the goodness of fit, showed that an isotropic criterion adequately represents yield in strain space though errors with orthotropic and anisotropic criteria are slightly smaller. Consequently, although the isotropic yield surface presents itself as the most suitable assumption, it may not work well for all load cases. This work provides a comprehensive assessment of material symmetries of trabecular bone at the macroscale and describes in detail its macroscopic yield and its underlying microscopic mechanics. PMID:27108348

  7. Nonlinear photomechanics of nematic networks: upscaling microscopic behaviour to macroscopic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hayoung; Choi, Joonmyung; Yun, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-02-01

    A liquid crystal network whose chromophores are functionalized by photochromic dye exhibits light-induced mechanical behaviour. As a result, the micro-scaled thermotropic traits of the network and the macroscopic phase behaviour are both influenced as light alternates the shape of the dyes. In this paper, we present an analysis of this photomechanical behaviour based on the proposed multiscale framework, which incorporates the molecular details of microstate evolution into a continuum-based understanding. The effects of trans-to-cis photoisomerization driven by actinic light irradiation are first examined using molecular dynamics simulations, and are compared against the predictions of the classical dilution model; this reveals certain characteristics of mesogenic interaction upon isomerization, followed by changes in the polymeric structure. We then upscale the thermotropic phase-related information with the aid of a nonlinear finite element analysis; macroscopic deflection with respect to the wide ranges of temperature and actinic light intensity are thereby examined, which reveals that the classical model underestimates the true deformation. This work therefore provides measures for analysing photomechanics in general by bridging the gap between the micro- and macro-scales.

  8. A Virtual Soil System to Study Macroscopic Manifestation of Pore-Scale Biogeochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fang, Y.; Shang, J.; Bailey, V. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mechanistic soil biogeochemical processes occur at the pore-scale that fundamentally control the moisture and CO2 fluxes at the soil and atmosphere interface. This presentation will present an on-going research to investigate pore-scale moisture migration and biogeochemical processes of organic carbon degradation, and their macroscopic manifestation in soils. Soil cores collected from Rattlesnake Mountain in southeastern Washington, USA, where a field experiment was conducted to investigate dynamic response of soil biogeochemistry to changing climate conditions, were used as an example for this study. The cores were examined using computerized x-ray tomography (XCT) to determine soil pore structures. The XCT imaging, together with various measurements of soil properties such as porosity, moisture content, organic carbon, biochemistry, etc are used to establish a virtual soil core with a high spatial resolution (~20um). The virtual soil system is then used to simulate soil moisture migration and organic carbon degradation, to identify important physical and biogeochemical factors controlling macroscopic moisture and CO2 fluxes in response to changing climate conditions, and to develop and evaluate pragmatic biogeochemical process models for larger scale applications. Core-scale measurements of CO2 flux and moisture change are used for development and validation of the process models.

  9. Nonlinear photomechanics of nematic networks: upscaling microscopic behaviour to macroscopic deformation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hayoung; Choi, Joonmyung; Yun, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-01-01

    A liquid crystal network whose chromophores are functionalized by photochromic dye exhibits light-induced mechanical behaviour. As a result, the micro-scaled thermotropic traits of the network and the macroscopic phase behaviour are both influenced as light alternates the shape of the dyes. In this paper, we present an analysis of this photomechanical behaviour based on the proposed multiscale framework, which incorporates the molecular details of microstate evolution into a continuum-based understanding. The effects of trans-to-cis photoisomerization driven by actinic light irradiation are first examined using molecular dynamics simulations, and are compared against the predictions of the classical dilution model; this reveals certain characteristics of mesogenic interaction upon isomerization, followed by changes in the polymeric structure. We then upscale the thermotropic phase-related information with the aid of a nonlinear finite element analysis; macroscopic deflection with respect to the wide ranges of temperature and actinic light intensity are thereby examined, which reveals that the classical model underestimates the true deformation. This work therefore provides measures for analysing photomechanics in general by bridging the gap between the micro- and macro-scales. PMID:26828417

  10. Microstructural evolution and macroscopic shrinkage in the presence of density gradients and agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peizhen

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can characterize internal density gradients. An in-situ laser dilatometry has been constructed to track dimensional change at different positions of a sample during binder removal and sintering. This combination of tools not only allows us to better understand how microscopic change affects macroscopic dimensions, but also provides guidance for a variety of ceramic processes. Non-uniform agglomerate packing and deformation provide density gradients which drive binder migration during binder removal. Simultaneously, density undergoes a slight decrease accompanied by a 1.0% loss in dimensional tolerance. This and CT difference images suggest that capillary forces generated during binder melting can change the density distribution. During sintering, nonuniformities present in the green state persist into the fired state and become exaggerated. Regions of different initial density can occupy different stages sintering. At ˜88% sintered density, CT clearly showed that open porosity follows the distribution of low density areas. Mercury porosimetry detected three distinct levels of porosity. Microstructural examination correlated the porosity level with the coordination of (i) two to three or (ii) multiple grains around pores. Microstructural packing controls both the observed macroscopic expansion at T ≤ 1000°C and the onset of shrinkage. Neck formation initiates during expansion and not exclusively during shrinkage. Inter- and intra-agglomerate expansion/shrinkage proceed simultaneously but the effective 'transmission' of particle-level behavior to the macroscopic level appears to be controlled by the initial agglomerate bonding and internal agglomerate densities. Discrete element modeling provides corroborating evidence regarding the importance of compact continuity. Following the expansion-shrinkage transition, the higher the zone density the faster the initial shrinkage. The 25% RH sample shrank more rapidly than the same zone in

  11. Adhesion of hydrogels under water by hydrogen bonding: from molecular interactions to macroscopic adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creton, Costantino

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogels are an essential part of living organisms and are widely used in biotechnologies, health care and food science. Although swelling properties, cell adhesion on gel surfaces and gel elasticity have attracted much interest, macroscopic adhesion of hydrogels on solid surfaces in aqueous environment is much less well understood. We studied systematically and in aqueous environment, the reversible adhesion by hydrogen bonding of macroscopic model hydrogels of polydimethylacrylamide (PDMA) or of polyacrylamide (PAAm) on solid surfaces functionalized with polyacrylic acid (PAA) polymer brushes. The hydrogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization and the brushes were prepared by grafting polytertbutyl acrylate chains and converting them by pyrolisis into polyacrylic acid. A new adhesion tester based on the flat punch geometry was designed and used to control the contact area, contact time, contact pressure and debonding velocity of the gels from the surface while the samples were fully immersed in water. The adhesion tests were performed at different pH and temperatures and the modulus of the gel and grafting density and molecular weight of the brushes was varied. Macroscopic adhesion results were compared with phase diagrams in dilute solution to detect molecular interactions. While the PDMA/PAA pair behaved very similarly in solution and in macroscopic adhesion tests, the PAAm/PAA pair showed an unexpectedly high adhesion level relatively to its complexation ability in dilute solution. Surprisingly, time dependent experiments showed that the kinetics of H-bond formation and breakup at interfaces was very slow resulting in adhesion energies which were very dependent on contact time up to one hour of contact. At the molecular level, neutron reflectivity showed that the equilibrium brush conformation when in contact with the gels was more extended at pH2 (H-bonds activated) than at pH9 (H-bonds deactivated) and that a certain applied pressure was

  12. Macroscopic Biological Characteristics of Individualized Therapy in Chinese Mongolian Osteopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namula, Zhao; Mei, Wang; Li, Xue-en

    Objective: Chinese Mongolian osteopathy has been passed down from ancient times and includes unique practices and favorable efficacy. In this study, we investigate the macroscopic biological characteristics of individualized Chinese Mongolian osteopathy, in order to provide new principle and methods for the treatment of bone fracture. Method: With a view to provide a vital link between nature and humans, the four stages of Chinese Mongolian osteopathy focus on the unity of the mind and body, the limbs and body organs, the body and its functions, and humans and nature. Results: We discuss the merits of individualized osteopathy in terms of the underlying concepts, and evaluate the approaches and principles of traditional medicine, as well as biomechanics. Conclusions: Individualized Mongolian osteopathy targets macroscopic biological components including dynamic reduction, natural fixation, and functional healing. Chinese Mongolian osteopathy is a natural, ecological and non-invasive osteopathy that values the link between nature and humans, including the unity of mind and body. The biological components not only serve as a foundation for Chinese Mongolian osteopathy but are also important for the future development of modern osteopathy, focusing on individualization, actualization and integration.

  13. Tribological behaviour of graphite powders at nano- and macroscopic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M.; Bistac, S.; Jradi, K.

    2007-04-01

    With its high resistance, good hardness and electrical conductibility in the basal plans, graphite is used for many years in various tribological fields such as seals, bearings or electrical motor brushes, and also for applications needing excellent lubrication and wearreducing properties. But thanks to its low density, graphite is at the moment destined for technologies which need a reducing of the weight combined with an enhancement of the efficiency, as it is the case in aeronautical industry. In this contexte, the friction and wear of natural (named graphite A) and synthetic (called graphites B and C) powders were evaluated, first at the macroscopic scale when sliding against steel counterfaces, under various applied normal loads. Scanning Electron Microscopy and AFM in tapping mode were used to observe the morphological modifications of the graphites. It is noticed that an enlargement of the applied normal load leads to an increase of the friction coefficient for graphites A and C; but for the graphite B, it seems that a ''limit'' load can induce a complete change of the tribological behaviour. At the same time, the nano-friction properties of these powders were evaluated by AFM measurements in contact mode, at different contact loads. As it was the case at the macroscopic scale, an increase of the nano-contact load induces higher friction coefficients. The determining of the friction and wear mechanisms of the graphite powders, as a function of both their intrinsic characteristics and the applied normal load, is then possible.

  14. Traffic dynamics: Its impact on the Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Victor L.; van Lint, Hans; Hoogendoorn, Serge P.

    2015-11-01

    Literature shows that-under specific conditions-the Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram (MFD) describes a crisp relationship between the average flow (production) and the average density in an entire network. The limiting condition is that traffic conditions must be homogeneous over the whole network. Recent works describe hysteresis effects: systematic deviations from the MFD as a result of loading and unloading. This article proposes a two dimensional generalization of the MFD, the so-called Generalized Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram (GMFD), which relates the average flow to both the average density and the (spatial) inhomogeneity of density. The most important contribution is that we show this is a continuous function, of which the MFD is a projection. Using the GMFD, we can describe the mentioned hysteresis patterns in the MFD. The underlying traffic phenomenon explaining the two dimensional surface described by the GMFD is that congestion concentrates (and subsequently spreads out) around the bottlenecks that oversaturate first. We call this the nucleation effect. Due to this effect, the network flow is not constant for a fixed number of vehicles as predicted by the MFD, but decreases due to local queueing and spill back processes around the congestion "nuclei". During this build up of congestion, the production hence decreases, which gives the hysteresis effects.

  15. Duality in entanglement of macroscopic states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su-Yong; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kurzyński, Paweł; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Kim, Jaewan

    2016-08-01

    We investigate duality in entanglement of a bipartite multiphoton system generated from a coherent state of light. The system can exhibit polarization entanglement if the two parts are distinguished by their parity, or parity entanglement if the parts are distinguished by polarization. It was shown in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 140404 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.140404 that this phenomenon can be exploited as a method to test indistinguishability of two particles and it was conjectured that one can also test indistinguishability of macroscopic systems. We propose a setup to test this conjecture. Contrary to the previous studies using two-particle interference effect as in the Hong-Ou- Mandel setup, our setup neither assumes that the tested state is composed of single particles nor requires that the total number of particles be fixed. Consequently, the notion of entanglement duality is shown to be compatible with a broader class of physical systems. Moreover, by observing duality in entanglement in the above system one can confirm that macroscopic systems exhibit quantum behavior. As a practical side, entanglement duality is a useful concept that enables adaptive conversion of entanglement of one degree of freedom (DOF) to that of another DOF according to varying quantum protocols.

  16. Is ergodicity a reasonable hypothesis for macroscopic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, B.; Schulman, L. S.

    2015-07-01

    In the physics literature "ergodicity" is sometimes taken to mean that a system, including a macroscopic one, visits all microscopic states in a relatively short time. However, many authors have realized that this is impossible and we provide a rigorous bound demonstrating this fact. A related concept is the "thermal distribution." This enters in an understanding of dissipation, comparing the thermal state (the Boltzmann or Gibbs distribution) to its time evolute using relative entropy. The thermal distribution is based on the microcanonical ensemble, whose equal probability assumption is another phrasing of ergodicity in a macroscopic physical context. The puzzle then is why the results of these assumptions are in agreement with experience. We suggest (as others also have) reasons for this limited agreement, but note that the foundations of statistical mechanics make much stronger assumptions, assumptions that do not have the support of either reason or experience. This article is supplemented with comments by P. Gaspard, Y. Pomeau and H. Qian and a final reply by the authors.

  17. How does Planck’s constant influence the macroscopic world?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pao-Keng

    2016-09-01

    In physics, Planck’s constant is a fundamental physical constant accounting for the energy-quantization phenomenon in the microscopic world. The value of Planck’s constant also determines in which length scale the quantum phenomenon will become conspicuous. Some students think that if Planck’s constant were to have a larger value than it has now, the quantum effect would only become observable in a world with a larger size, whereas the macroscopic world might remain almost unchanged. After reasoning from some basic physical principles and theories, we found that doubling Planck’s constant might result in a radical change on the geometric sizes and apparent colors of macroscopic objects, the solar spectrum and luminosity, the climate and gravity on Earth, as well as energy conversion between light and materials such as the efficiency of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. From the discussions in this paper, students can appreciate how Planck’s constant affects various aspects of the world in which we are living now.

  18. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  19. Macroscopic Subdivision of Silica Aerogel Collectors for Sample Return Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P

    2005-09-14

    Silica aerogel collector tiles have been employed for the collection of particles in low Earth orbit and, more recently, for the capture of cometary particles by NASA's Stardust mission. Reliable, reproducible methods for cutting these and future collector tiles from sample return missions are necessary to maximize the science output from the extremely valuable embedded particles. We present a means of macroscopic subdivision of collector tiles by generating large-scale cuts over several centimeters in silica aerogel with almost no material loss. The cut surfaces are smooth and optically clear allowing visual location of particles for analysis and extraction. This capability is complementary to the smaller-scale cutting capabilities previously described [Westphal (2004), Ishii (2005a, 2005b)] for removing individual impacts and particulate debris in tiny aerogel extractions. Macroscopic cuts enable division and storage or distribution of portions of aerogel tiles for immediate analysis of samples by certain techniques in situ or further extraction of samples suited for other methods of analysis.

  20. Evaluation of soil structural changes through macroscopic and microscopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Nargish; Chélin, Marie; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Barbieux, Sophie; Bodson, Bernard; Garré, Sarah; Colinet, Gilles; Degré, Aurore

    2015-04-01

    The heterogeneity of soil structure and pore size distribution are highly influenced by external factors like tillage systems and other agricultural management practices. However, changes in soil hydrodynamic behavior are not fully understood and are still under research. Also, researchers have explained the impact of tillage practices on soil hydraulic properties related to pore size distribution, connectivity and orientation are involved but the characterization of these modifications and consequences remains a challenge. Furthermore, the relation between macroscopic measurements and microscopic investigation of the soil structure remains scarce. Recently, X-ray tomography (X- μCT) has been used in order to characterize changes in soil pore size distribution in various contexts and the method is able to link microtomography information to hydrodynamic measurement. In our study, X-μCT has been used in order to characterize changes in soil pore system. Since, tomography does not count most of the micropores, Richards' pressure plate and evaporation method was also combined to get complete range of pore size distribution. We found good match between evaporation data with X-μCT at the macropore scale and evaporation data with pressure plate method at micropore scale. X-μCT data refines retention and hydraulic curves near saturation where Richards' data alone can lead to numerous sets of fitted parameters. On the otherhand, evaporation data (Hyprop apparatus ©) provide comparable datasets with X-μCT. Combining micro and macroscopic measurements allows us to validate X-μCT information, which is otherwise not so obvious.

  1. Friction in macroscopic thermodynamics: A kinetic point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-12-01

    To provide a solid support to a macroscopic framework developed to explicitly account for friction in thermodynamics, a kinetic description of frictional dissipation is developed. Using either a dissipative Fokker-Planck equation for Brownian motion or a Boltzmann equation with a friction-force term added, it is shown that both approaches lead to the emergence of the macroscopic thermodynamic relations that state the first and second laws with friction. The analysis is directly applied to the problem of determining the minimum amount of heating generated by memory erasure, known in computer science as Landauer's bound, and leads to a better understanding of the energetics behind the latter. A generalisation of Boltzmann's H theorem to include friction explicitly is also recovered, and the thermodynamics of granular rotators acted by a frictional torque and of radio-frequency (RF) current drive of fusion plasmas, in which collisional drag is present, are addressed as well. Various physics results are revisited employing the first and second laws with friction that have been derived from the appropriate dissipative kinetic equations, lower bounds for entropy production rates being derived both for granular rotators and for RF current drive.

  2. Inverted rank distributions: Macroscopic statistics, universality classes, and critical exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    An inverted rank distribution is an infinite sequence of positive sizes ordered in a monotone increasing fashion. Interlacing together Lorenzian and oligarchic asymptotic analyses, we establish a macroscopic classification of inverted rank distributions into five “socioeconomic” universality classes: communism, socialism, criticality, feudalism, and absolute monarchy. We further establish that: (i) communism and socialism are analogous to a “disordered phase”, feudalism and absolute monarchy are analogous to an “ordered phase”, and criticality is the “phase transition” between order and disorder; (ii) the universality classes are characterized by two critical exponents, one governing the ordered phase, and the other governing the disordered phase; (iii) communism, criticality, and absolute monarchy are characterized by sharp exponent values, and are inherently deterministic; (iv) socialism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by continuous power-law statistics; (v) feudalism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by discrete exponential statistics. The results presented in this paper yield a universal macroscopic socioeconophysical perspective of inverted rank distributions.

  3. Macroscopic, freestanding, and tubular graphene architectures fabricated via thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Suzuki, Seiya; Kato, Shuji; To, Bao Dong; Hsu, Chia Chen; Murata, Hidekazu; Rokuta, Eiji; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2015-03-24

    Manipulation of individual graphene sheets/films into specific architectures at macroscopic scales is crucially important for practical uses of graphene. We present herein a versatile and robust method based on annealing of solid carbon precursors on nickel templates and thermo-assisted removal of poly(methyl methacrylate) under low vacuum of ∼0.6 Pa for fabrication of macroscopic, freestanding, and tubular graphene (TG) architectures. Specifically, the TG architectures can be obtained as individual and woven tubes with a diameter of ∼50 μm, a wall thickness in the range of 2.1-2.9 nm, a density of ∼1.53 mg·cm(-3), a thermal stability up to 600 °C in air, an electrical conductivity of ∼1.48 × 10(6) S·m(-1), and field emission current densities on the order of 10(4) A·cm(-2) at low applied electrical fields of 0.6-0.7 V·μm(-1). These properties show great promise for applications in flexible and lightweight electronics, electron guns, or X-ray tube sources. PMID:25738973

  4. Confocal scanning beam laser microscope/macroscope: applications in fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Arthur E.; Damaskinos, Savvas; Ribes, Alfonso

    1996-03-01

    A new confocal scanning beam laser microscope/macroscope is described that combines the rapid scan of a scanning beam laser microscope with the large specimen capability of a scanning stage microscope. This instrument combines an infinity-corrected confocal scanning laser microscope with a scanning laser macroscope that uses a telecentric f*(Theta) laser scan lens to produce a confocal imaging system with a resolution of 0.25 microns at a field of view of 25 microns and 5 microns at a field of view of 75,000 microns. The frame rate is 5 seconds per frame for a 512 by 512 pixel image, and 25 seconds for a 2048 by 2048 pixel image. Applications in fluorescence are discussed that focus on two important advantages of the instrument over a confocal scanning laser microscope: an extremely wide range of magnification, and the ability to image very large specimens. Examples are presented of fluorescence and reflected-light images of high quality printing, fluorescence images of latent fingerprints, packaging foam, and confocal autofluorescence images of a cricket.

  5. Macroscopic quantum fluctuations of pulsed nanosecond optical parametric generation in periodically-poled LiNbO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Yiyi; Haus, Joseph W.; Powers, Peter

    2005-02-01

    We present simulations and experimental results for quantum-noise-initiated emission from an optical parametric generator (OPG) fabricated from periodically poled lithium niobate. The model we employ, which includes transverse coupling effects to enable off-axis phase matching, has been successfully used for describing broadband emission spectra in OPG's and optical parametric amplifiers. The emission spectra and the quantum statistics deduced from macroscopic fluctuations are compared between simulations and experiment.

  6. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone. PMID:22109098

  7. A new effective macroscopic Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard formulation for immiscible fluids in porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, Markus; Pradas, Marc; Pavliotis, Grigorios; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2013-11-01

    Guided by thermodynamic and variational principles we describe mixtures of incompressible fluids in strongly perforated domains with a general class of phase field equations coupled to the Stokes equations. Important applications include subsurface flows, fuel cells, and microfluidics. Starting with a microscopic formulation for heterogenous domains (e.g. a porous medium), represented as the periodic covering of a single reference cell, we rigorously derive effective macroscopic phase field equations under the assumption of periodic flow for large Péclet numbers by the multiple scale method with drift and our recently introduced splitting strategy for Ginzburg-Landau/Cahn-Hilliard-type equations. We recover systematically diffusion-dispersion relations (including Taylor-Aris-dispersion) as for classical convection-diffusion problems. Our results provide a convenient computational framework to macroscopically track interfaces in porous media. In view of the well-known versatility of phase field models, our study proposes a promising formulation for many engineering and scientific applications such as multiphase flows in porous media and oil recovery, for instance.

  8. Macroscopic and roentgenographic anatomy of the skull of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    He, T; Friede, H; Kiliaridis, S

    2002-01-01

    Normal macroscopic and roentgenographic features of the skull of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) were examined and described. Data were based on a sample of 100 (50 male and 50 female) adult ferrets of known body weight and age. The skull was described macroscopically according to six standard views, i.e. dorsal, lateral, ventral, caudal, cranial and midsagittal. The mandible was described separately. The roentgenographic characteristics of the ferret skull were demonstrated only in lateral and dorsoventral projections. Furthermore, the skull length and width as well as the minimum frontal width were measured, and skull indices were derived from relevant measurements. Sexual dimorphism was examined both morphologically and craniometrically. Besides the common features of a carnivore skull, the ferret skull is relatively elongated and flat with a short facial region. The skulls of adult male ferrets are about 17% longer and 22% wider than those of the females. Significant sexual dimorphism also exists regarding certain skull indices. The general features and some dimensional parameters of the adult ferret skull support the contention that the ferret would be an interesting and workable alternative animal model in craniofacial research. PMID:11831741

  9. Cholesterics of colloidal helices: predicting the macroscopic pitch from the particle shape and thermodynamic state.

    PubMed

    Dussi, Simone; Belli, Simone; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-02-21

    Building a general theoretical framework to describe the microscopic origin of macroscopic chirality in (colloidal) liquid crystals is a long-standing challenge. Here, we combine classical density functional theory with Monte Carlo calculations of virial-type coefficients to obtain the equilibrium cholesteric pitch as a function of thermodynamic state and microscopic details. Applying the theory to hard helices, we observe both right- and left-handed cholesteric phases that depend on a subtle combination of particle geometry and system density. In particular, we find that entropy alone can even lead to a (double) inversion in the cholesteric sense of twist upon changing the packing fraction. We show how the competition between single-particle properties (shape) and thermodynamics (local alignment) dictates the macroscopic chiral behavior. Moreover, by expanding our free-energy functional, we are able to assess, quantitatively, Straley's theory of weak chirality, which is used in several earlier studies. Furthermore, by extending our theory to different lyotropic and thermotropic liquid-crystal models, we analyze the effect of an additional soft interaction on the chiral behavior of the helices. Finally, we provide some guidelines for the description of more complex chiral phases, like twist-bend nematics. Our results provide new insights into the role of entropy in the microscopic origin of this state of matter. PMID:25702029

  10. Cholesterics of colloidal helices: Predicting the macroscopic pitch from the particle shape and thermodynamic state

    SciTech Connect

    Dussi, Simone Dijkstra, Marjolein; Belli, Simone; Roij, René van

    2015-02-21

    Building a general theoretical framework to describe the microscopic origin of macroscopic chirality in (colloidal) liquid crystals is a long-standing challenge. Here, we combine classical density functional theory with Monte Carlo calculations of virial-type coefficients to obtain the equilibrium cholesteric pitch as a function of thermodynamic state and microscopic details. Applying the theory to hard helices, we observe both right- and left-handed cholesteric phases that depend on a subtle combination of particle geometry and system density. In particular, we find that entropy alone can even lead to a (double) inversion in the cholesteric sense of twist upon changing the packing fraction. We show how the competition between single-particle properties (shape) and thermodynamics (local alignment) dictates the macroscopic chiral behavior. Moreover, by expanding our free-energy functional, we are able to assess, quantitatively, Straley’s theory of weak chirality, which is used in several earlier studies. Furthermore, by extending our theory to different lyotropic and thermotropic liquid-crystal models, we analyze the effect of an additional soft interaction on the chiral behavior of the helices. Finally, we provide some guidelines for the description of more complex chiral phases, like twist-bend nematics. Our results provide new insights into the role of entropy in the microscopic origin of this state of matter.

  11. Characterization of the Branching Structure of the Lung from ''Macroscopic'' Pressure-Volume Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.; Alencar, A. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Hantos, Z.; Stanley, H. E.; Suki, B.

    2001-07-30

    We analyze the problem of fluid flow in a bifurcating structure containing random blockages that can be removed by fluid pressure. We introduce an asymmetric tree model and find that the predicted pressure-volume relation is connected to the distribution {Pi}(n) of the generation number n of the tree's terminal segments. We use this relation to explore the branching structure of the lung by analyzing experimental pressure-volume data from dog lungs. The {Pi}(n) extracted from the data using the model agrees well with experimental data on the branching structure. We can thus obtain information about the asymmetric structure of the lung from macroscopic, noninvasive pressure-volume measurements.

  12. Electrical conduction in macroscopically oriented deoxyribonucleic and hyaluronic acid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnjak, Zdravko; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Filipič, Cene; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Korolev, Nikolay; Rupprecht, Allan

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the quasistatic and frequency dependent electrical conductivity below 1 MHz were carried out on wet-spun, macroscopically oriented, calf thymus deoxyribonucleic (DNA) and umbilical cord hyaluronic acid (HA) bulk samples. The frequency dependence of the electrical conductivity in the frequency range of approximately 10-3-106Hz of both materials is surprisingly rather similar. Temperature dependence of the quasistatic electrical conductivity above the low temperature saturation plateau can be well described by the activated Arrhenius law with the activation energy of ≈0.8eV for both DNA and HA. We discuss the meaning of these findings for the possible conduction mechanism in these particular charged polyelectrolytes.

  13. Dynamics of macroscopic tunneling in elongated Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, G.; Farberovich, V.; Fleurov, V.; Soffer, A.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate macroscopic tunneling from an elongated quasi-one-dimensional trap, forming a “cigar-shaped” Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Using a recently developed formalism we get the leading analytical approximation for the right-hand side of the potential wall, i.e., outside the trap, and a formalism based on Wigner functions, for the left side of the potential wall, i.e., inside the BEC. We then present accomplished results of numerical calculations, which show a “blip” in the particle density traveling with an asymptotic shock velocity, as resulted from previous works on a dotlike trap but with significant differences from the latter. Inside the BEC a pattern of a traveling dispersive shock wave is revealed. In the attractive case, we find trains of bright solitons frozen near the boundary.

  14. Macroscopic chirality of a liquid crystal from nonchiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jákli, A.; Nair, G. G.; Lee, C. K.; Sun, R.; Chien, L. C.

    2001-06-01

    The transfer of chirality from nonchiral polymer networks to the racemic B2 phase of nonchiral banana-shaped molecules is demonstrated. This corresponds to the transfer of chirality from an achiral material to another achiral material. There are two levels of chirality transfers. (a) On a microscopic level the presence of a polymer network (chiral or nonchiral) favors a chiral state over a thermodynamically stable racemic state due to the inversion symmetry breaking at the polymer-liquid crystal interfaces. (b) A macroscopically chiral (enantimerically enriched) sample can be produced if the polymer network has a helical structure, and/or contains chemically chiral groups. The chirality transfer can be locally suppressed by exposing the liquid crystal to a strong electric field treatment.

  15. Macroscopic self-reorientation of interacting two-dimensional crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, C. R.; Withers, F.; Zhu, M. J.; Cao, Y.; Yu, G.; Kozikov, A.; Ben Shalom, M.; Morozov, S. V.; van Wijk, M. M.; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.; Mishchenko, A.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems, which can be moved or rotated with nanometre precision, already find applications in such fields as radio-frequency electronics, micro-attenuators, sensors and many others. Especially interesting are those which allow fine control over the motion on the atomic scale because of self-alignment mechanisms and forces acting on the atomic level. Such machines can produce well-controlled movements as a reaction to small changes of the external parameters. Here we demonstrate that, for the system of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride, the interplay between the van der Waals and elastic energies results in graphene mechanically self-rotating towards the hexagonal boron nitride crystallographic directions. Such rotation is macroscopic (for graphene flakes of tens of micrometres the tangential movement can be on hundreds of nanometres) and can be used for reproducible manufacturing of aligned van der Waals heterostructures.

  16. Macroscopic self-reorientation of interacting two-dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Woods, C R; Withers, F; Zhu, M J; Cao, Y; Yu, G; Kozikov, A; Ben Shalom, M; Morozov, S V; van Wijk, M M; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Geim, A K; Mishchenko, A; Novoselov, K S

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems, which can be moved or rotated with nanometre precision, already find applications in such fields as radio-frequency electronics, micro-attenuators, sensors and many others. Especially interesting are those which allow fine control over the motion on the atomic scale because of self-alignment mechanisms and forces acting on the atomic level. Such machines can produce well-controlled movements as a reaction to small changes of the external parameters. Here we demonstrate that, for the system of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride, the interplay between the van der Waals and elastic energies results in graphene mechanically self-rotating towards the hexagonal boron nitride crystallographic directions. Such rotation is macroscopic (for graphene flakes of tens of micrometres the tangential movement can be on hundreds of nanometres) and can be used for reproducible manufacturing of aligned van der Waals heterostructures. PMID:26960435

  17. Macroscopic electric field inside water-filled biological nanopores.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Silvia Acosta; Bodrenko, Igor; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2016-03-23

    Multi-drug resistance bacteria are a challenging problem of contemporary medicine. This is particularly critical for Gram-negative bacteria, where antibiotics are hindered by the outer membrane to reach internal targets. Here more polar antibiotics make use of nanometric water-filled channels to permeate inside. We present in this work a computational all-atom approach, using water as a probe, for the calculation of the macroscopic electric field inside water-filled channels. The method allows one to compare not only different systems but also the same system under different conditions, such as pH and ion concentration. This provides a detailed picture of electrostatics in biological nanopores shedding more light on how the charged residues of proteins determine the electric field inside, and also how medium can tune it. These details are central to unveil the filtering mechanism behind the permeation of small polar molecules through nanometric water-filled channels. PMID:26931352

  18. On the approach to thermal equilibrium of macroscopic quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Tumulka, Roderich

    2011-03-24

    In joint work with J. L. Lebowitz, C. Mastrodonato, and N. Zanghi[2, 3, 4], we considered an isolated, macroscopic quantum system. Let H be a micro-canonical 'energy shell', i.e., a subspace of the system's Hilbert space spanned by the (finitely) many energy eigenstates with energies between E and E+{delta}E. The thermal equilibrium macro-state at energy E corresponds to a subspace H{sub eq} of H such that dimHeq/dimH is close to 1. We say that a system with state vector {psi}{epsilon}H is in thermal equilibrium if {psi} is 'close' to H{sub eq}. We argue that for 'typical' Hamiltonians, all initial state vectors {psi}{sub 0} evolve in such a way that {psi}{sub t} is in thermal equilibrium for most times t. This is closely related to von Neumann's quantum ergodic theorem of 1929.

  19. Effects of varying interfacial surface tension on macroscopic polymer lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Charlotte; White, Mason; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    We investigate macroscopic polymer lenses (0.5- to 2.5-cm diameter) fabricated by dropping hydrophobic photocurable resin onto the surface of various hydrophilic liquid surfaces. Due to the intermolecular forces along the interface between the two liquids, a lens shape is formed. We find that we can vary the lens geometry by changing the region over which the resin is allowed to spread and the surface tension of the substrate to produce lenses with theoretically determined focal lengths ranging from 5 to 25 mm. These effects are varied by changing the container width, substrate composition, and substrate temperature. We present data for five different variants, demonstrating that we can control the lens dimensions for polymer lens applications that require high surface quality.

  20. Imparting large macroscopic changes with small changes in polypeptide composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Michelle; McKinley, Gareth; Olsen, Bradley

    Block copolymers composed of polypeptides provide an excellent platform for exploring the underlying physics surrounding macroscopic associative network behavior. Previous work in our group has elucidated a difference in the mechanical properties of two nearly identical elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) endblocks. In poly(ELP)s, this substitution is known to result in tighter beta turns. These beta turns exhibit slower responses to changes in temperature within the material. Under shear, the modulus for the alanine-containing ELP triblock is almost three times higher than the glycine-containing ELP. Additionally, preliminary tensile tests show higher stress and strain at break for the alanine ELP triblock. We are able to explain the reasons for this behavior using a variety of spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering indicate differences in ordering between the alanine and glycine containing ELP materials both in shear and in stagnant flow.

  1. Photoacoustic brain imaging: from microscopic to macroscopic scales

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Human brain mapping has become one of the most exciting contemporary research areas, with major breakthroughs expected in the coming decades. Modern brain imaging techniques have allowed neuroscientists to gather a wealth of anatomic and functional information about the brain. Among these techniques, by virtue of its rich optical absorption contrast, high spatial and temporal resolutions, and deep penetration, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has attracted more and more attention, and is playing an increasingly important role in brain studies. In particular, PAT complements other brain imaging modalities by providing high-resolution functional and metabolic imaging. More importantly, PAT’s unique scalability enables scrutinizing the brain at both microscopic and macroscopic scales, using the same imaging contrast. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art PAT techniques for brain imaging, summarize representative neuroscience applications, outline the technical challenges in translating PAT to human brain imaging, and envision potential technological deliverables. PMID:25401121

  2. Macroscopic and direct light propulsion of bulk graphene material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengfei; Chang, Huicong; Wu, Yingpeng; Xiao, Peishuang; Yi, Ningbo; Lu, Yanhong; Ma, Yanfeng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-07-01

    It has been a great challenge to achieve the direct light manipulation of matter on a bulk scale. In this work the direct light propulsion of matter is observed on a macroscopic scale using a bulk graphene-based material. The unique structure and properties of graphene, and the novel morphology of the bulk three-dimensional linked graphene material make it capable not only of absorbing light at various wavelengths but also of emitting energetic electrons efficiently enough to drive the bulk material, following Newtonian mechanics. Thus, the unique photonic and electronic properties of individual graphene sheets are manifested in the response of the bulk state. These results offer an exciting opportunity to bring about bulk-scale light manipulation with the potential to realize long-sought applications in areas such as the solar sail and space transportation driven directly by sunlight.

  3. Combined macroscopic and microscopic detection of viral genes in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, A.T.; Gantz, D.; Blum, H.; Stowring, L.; Ventura, P.; Geballe, A.; Moyer, B.; Brahic, M.

    1985-01-15

    A hybridization technique has been devised for detecting and quantitating viral genes in tissues that combines macroscopic and microscopic analyses in the same section. The method is based on dual labeling virus-specific probes with /sup 125/I and /sup 35/S to generate signals that can be detected both with X-ray films and nuclear track emulsions. The regions of increased hybridization evident in the X-ray film serve as a guide to the portion of the section that warrants microscopic examination. Detection of viral RNA in tissues with Visna virus and viral DNA with hepatitis B virus are illustrated, and potential applications of this technique in virology and other disciplines are discussed.

  4. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Massarotti, D; Pal, A; Rotoli, G; Longobardi, L; Blamire, M G; Tafuri, F

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  5. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Massarotti, D.; Pal, A.; Rotoli, G.; Longobardi, L.; Blamire, M. G.; Tafuri, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  6. Dynamics of macroscopic tunneling in elongated Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Dekel, G.; Farberovich, V.; Fleurov, V.; Soffer, A.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate macroscopic tunneling from an elongated quasi-one-dimensional trap, forming a 'cigar-shaped' Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Using a recently developed formalism we get the leading analytical approximation for the right-hand side of the potential wall, i.e., outside the trap, and a formalism based on Wigner functions, for the left side of the potential wall, i.e., inside the BEC. We then present accomplished results of numerical calculations, which show a 'blip' in the particle density traveling with an asymptotic shock velocity, as resulted from previous works on a dotlike trap but with significant differences from the latter. Inside the BEC a pattern of a traveling dispersive shock wave is revealed. In the attractive case, we find trains of bright solitons frozen near the boundary.

  7. The importance of the macroscopic classification of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yasushi; Iwadate, Mineo

    2010-07-01

    The importance and prevalence of the superficial lesions in the colon and rectum caught worldwide public attention in 2008 when Soetikno and colleagues reported the prevalence of non-polypoid (flat and depressed) colorectal neoplasms in asymptomatic and symptomatic adults in North America and the public media disseminated their findings. The publication put to rest the question of whether or not the flat and depressed colorectal neoplasms exist in Western countries; flat and depressed colorectal neoplasms can be found throughout the world. In this article, the author highlights the importance of the macroscopic classification of the colorectal neoplasm and emphasizes the distinction between so-called flat lesions (IIa and IIb) and 0-IIc (superficial depressed) neoplastic colorectal lesions. PMID:20656244

  8. Experimental evidence for radiation pressure on a macroscopic dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segundo, C.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2003-09-01

    We have detected acoustic signals produced by laser pulses on a macroscopic glass slab, obtaining amplitudes, as function of the angle of incidence, denoted as Hp and Hs depending on the polarization orientations of the pulsed pumping laser, p and s, respectively. The relative behaviour of these curves is related to radiation pressure rather than pure absorption, in the same manner as predicted theoretically in the literature [A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Dover Publications, New York, 1891; Phys. Rep. 52 (1979) 133; Opt. Commun. 58 (1986) 59]. In a second experiment, based on a CW Michelson interferometer, where one of the mirrors is a glass slab pumped at the Brewster angle with the pulsed beam, we verified qualitatively the relationship observed for the Hp and Hs acoustic experimental data.

  9. Macroscopic self-reorientation of interacting two-dimensional crystals

    PubMed Central

    Woods, C. R.; Withers, F.; Zhu, M. J.; Cao, Y.; Yu, G.; Kozikov, A.; Ben Shalom, M.; Morozov, S. V.; van Wijk, M. M.; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.; Mishchenko, A.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems, which can be moved or rotated with nanometre precision, already find applications in such fields as radio-frequency electronics, micro-attenuators, sensors and many others. Especially interesting are those which allow fine control over the motion on the atomic scale because of self-alignment mechanisms and forces acting on the atomic level. Such machines can produce well-controlled movements as a reaction to small changes of the external parameters. Here we demonstrate that, for the system of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride, the interplay between the van der Waals and elastic energies results in graphene mechanically self-rotating towards the hexagonal boron nitride crystallographic directions. Such rotation is macroscopic (for graphene flakes of tens of micrometres the tangential movement can be on hundreds of nanometres) and can be used for reproducible manufacturing of aligned van der Waals heterostructures. PMID:26960435

  10. The Role of Macroscopic and Microscopic Jet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, Philip E.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic jets, be they Poynting flux or kinetic flux dominated, are current driven (CD) and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven unstable. These macroscopic MHD instabilities may be responsible for some of the observed larger scale twisted jet structures and typically do not disrupt jets on less than kiloparsec scales. Here I review our understanding of the jet properties that will lead to the observed relative stability of astrophysical jets. In addition, I review the progress made on the microscopic scale plasma instabilities in shocks and velocity shears that may lead to magnetic field generation and that does lead to the particle acceleration required to produce the observed emission from radio wavelengths to TeV energies. Finally, I discuss these instabilities in the context of the jet in M87.

  11. Asymptotic behavior of macroscopic observables in generic spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka

    2016-05-01

    This work clarifies a fundamental relationship between spectral gap and ground state properties, where the spectral gap means the energy difference between the ground state and the first excited state. In short-range interacting systems, the well-known exponential clustering theorem has been derived for the ground states: the bipartite correlations decay exponentially beyond a finite localization length, which is smaller than the inverse of the spectral gap. However, in more general systems including long-range interacting systems, the problem of how to characterize universal ground state structures by reference to the spectral gap is an ongoing challenge. Recently, for such systems, another fundamental constraint dubbed local reversibility has been proved for arbitrarily gapped ground states; as a consequence, it also results in the exponential concentration of the probability distribution of macroscopic observables. In this paper, we extend this kind of asymptotic behavior to more general setups.

  12. Double-Slit Interference Pattern for a Macroscopic Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeij, Hamid Reza; Shafiee, Afshin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we solve analytically the Schrödinger equation for a macroscopic quantum oscillator as a central system coupled to two environmental micro-oscillating particles. Then, the double-slit interference patterns are investigated in two limiting cases, considering the limits of uncertainty in the position probability distribution. Moreover, we analyze the interference patterns based on a recent proposal called stochastic electrodynamics with spin. Our results show that when the quantum character of the macro-system is decreased, the diffraction pattern becomes more similar to a classical one. We also show that, depending on the size of the slits, the predictions of quantum approach could be apparently different with those of the aforementioned stochastic description.

  13. Macroscopic and microscopic observations of needle insertion into gels.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Youri R J; Jahya, Alex; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-06-01

    Needle insertion into soft tissue is one of the most common medical interventions. This study provides macroscopic and microscopic observations of needle-gel interactions. A gelatin mixture is used as a soft-tissue simulant. For the macroscopic studies, system parameters, such as insertion velocity, needle diameter, gel elasticity, needle tip shape (including bevel angle) and insertion motion profile, are varied, while the maximum insertion force and maximum needle deflection are recorded. The needle tip and gel interactions are observed using confocal microscopic images. Observations indicate that increasing the insertion velocity and needle diameter results in larger insertion forces and smaller needle deflections. Varying the needle bevel angle from 8 degrees to 82 degrees results in the insertion force increasing monotonically, while the needle deflection does not. These variations are due to the coupling between gel rupture and tip compression interactions, which are observed during microscopic studies. Increasing the gel elasticity results in larger insertion forces and needle deflections. Varying the tip shapes demonstrates that bevel-tipped needles produce the largest deflection, but insertion force does not vary among the tested tip shapes. Insertion with different motion profiles are performed. Results show that adding I Hz rotational motion during linear insertion decreases the needle deflection. Increasing the rotational motion from I Hz to 5 Hz decreases the insertion force, while the needle deflection remains the same. A high-velocity (250 mm/s and 300 mm/s) tapping during insertion yields no significant decrease in needle deflection and a slight increase in insertion force. PMID:22783760

  14. Macroscopic dynamics near the isotropic{endash}smectic-A phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, Helmut R.; Mukherjee, Prabir K.; Pleiner, Harald

    2001-06-01

    The hydrodynamic theory for the smectic-A phase and the isotropic phase is generalized to the macroscopic dynamics in the vicinity of the isotropic{endash}smectic-A phase transition. The macroscopic dynamic equations are presented on the isotropic side as well as on the smectic-A side of the phase transition, incorporating the effect of an external electric field. Specific experiments to test some of the effects contained in the macroscopic dynamic equations are suggested.

  15. Dietary folate protects against the development of macroscopic colonic neoplasia in a dose responsive manner in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y I; Salomon, R N; Graeme-Cook, F; Choi, S W; Smith, D E; Dallal, G E; Mason, J B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Diminished folate status is associated with enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis. This study investigated the potential chemopreventive role of dietary folate in the dimethylhydrazine colorectal cancer model. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing either 0, 2 (daily dietary requirement), 8 or 40 mg folate/kg diet for 20 weeks. After five weeks of diet, rats were injected with dimethyl-hydrazine (44 mg/kg) weekly for 15 weeks. Fifteen weeks after the first injection of dimethylhydrazine, all rats were killed. Folate status was determined, and the entire colorectum from each rat was analysed for macroscopic and microscopic neoplasms. RESULTS: Plasma and colonic folate concentrations correlated directly with dietary folate levels (p < 0.005). The incidence of microscopic neoplasms was similar among the four groups. However, the incidence and the average number of macroscopic tumours per rat decreased progressively with increasing dietary folate levels up to 8 mg/kg diet (p < 0.05). In the strongly procarcinogenic milieu used in this study, folate supplementation at 20 times the basal requirement was associated with rates of macroscopic tumour development that were intermediate, and not statistically distinct, from rates observed at either 0 or 8 mg/kg diet. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that in this rat model, (a) increasing dietary folate up to four times the basal requirement leads to a progressive reduction in the evolution of macroscopic neoplasms from microscopic foci; and (b) folate supplementation beyond four times the requirement does not convey further benefit. PMID:9014775

  16. Sagnac interferometry as a probe to the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ran; Gong Xuefei; Pei Shouyong; Luo Ziren; Lau, Y. K.

    2010-09-15

    Single photon Sagnac interferometry as a probe to macroscopic quantum mechanics is considered at the theoretical level. For a freely moving macroscopic quantum mirror susceptible to radiation pressure force inside a Sagnac interferometer, a careful analysis of the input-output relation reveals that the particle spectrum readout at the bright and dark ports encode information concerning the noncommutativity of position and momentum of the macroscopic mirror. A feasible experimental scheme to probe the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror is outlined to explore the possible frontier between classical and quantum regimes. In the Appendix, the case of Michelson interferometry as a feasible probe is also sketched.

  17. A Poisson Random Field Framework Bridges Micro- To Macroscopic Scales In Microbial Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazarian, L.; Safwat, A.; Shuster, W.; Samorodnitsky, G.; Whiteaker, T. L.; Maidment, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding microbial fate and transport in surface water and making accurate predictions is a formidable task. Evidence from experimental and observational studies unequivocally points to temporal and spatial variability in microbial distributions with significant correlation structure; and to the critical role of processes at the microscopic level. The temporal and spatial variability in microbial distributions arises from inherently random environmental factors and processes. Many cannot be described accurately using deterministic methods, necessitating a stochastic approach to microbial modeling. At the same time, microbial tracking studies identified significant spatial and temporal correlations in microbial distributions in streams, and highlighted the necessity of including microbial interactions with sediments, settling and re-suspension in models of microbial transport. Such understanding must be gained from microscopic, particle-scale research, because microdynamic interactions ultimately give rise to phenomena on higher scales. The challenge then is to be able to describe microbial behavior in probabilistic terms to take care of random drivers, while incorporating processes on microscopic scale and bridging the gap to macroscopic entities like concentrations that are used in watershed management. We have derived a stochastic modeling paradigm that bridges microscopic processes to macroscopic manifestation of microbial behavior in time and space, where the Markov behavior of individual microbes collectively translates into a non-homogeneous Poisson random field that describes microbial population dynamics. The Poisson framework is applied to a mixed-use watershed and implemented within ArcGIS, which makes a wealth of geographic, topologic, soil and other information, as well as data from national and regional datasets, instantly available. Probabilities of exceeding microbial safety thresholds are then obtained at any point in time and space in the

  18. Microscopic origin and macroscopic implications of lane formation in mixtures of oppositely driven particles.

    PubMed

    Klymko, Katherine; Geissler, Phillip L; Whitelam, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal particles of two types, driven in opposite directions, can segregate into lanes [Vissers et al., Soft Matter 7, 2352 (2011)1744-683X10.1039/c0sm01343a]. This phenomenon can be reproduced by two-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations of model particles [Dzubiella et al., Phys. Rev. E 65, 021402 (2002)1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.021402]. Here we use computer simulation to assess the generality of lane formation with respect to variation of particle type and dynamical protocol. We find that laning results from rectification of diffusion on the scale of a particle diameter: oppositely driven particles must, in the time taken to encounter each other in the direction of the drive, diffuse in the perpendicular direction by about one particle diameter. This geometric constraint implies that the diffusion constant of a particle, in the presence of those of the opposite type, grows approximately linearly with the Péclet number, a prediction confirmed by our numerics over a range of model parameters. Such environment-dependent diffusion is statistically similar to an effective interparticle attraction; consistent with this observation, we find that oppositely driven nonattractive colloids display features characteristic of the simplest model system possessing both interparticle attractions and persistent motion, the driven Ising lattice gas [Katz, Leibowitz, and Spohn, J. Stat. Phys. 34, 497 (1984)JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/BF01018556]. These features include long-ranged correlations in the disordered regime, a critical regime characterized by a change in slope of the particle current with the Péclet number, and fluctuations that grow with system size. By analogy, we suggest that lane formation in the driven colloid system is a phase transition in the macroscopic limit, but that macroscopic phase separation would not occur in finite time upon starting from disordered initial conditions. PMID:27627361

  19. Macroscopic response of particle-reinforced elastomers subjected to prescribed torques or rotations on the particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboni, Morteza H.; Ponte Castañeda, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Particle-reinforced rubbers are composite materials consisting of randomly distributed, stiff fibers/particles in a soft elastomeric material. Since the particles are stiff compared to the embedding rubber, their deformation can be ignored for all practical purposes. However, due to the softness of the rubber, they can undergo rigid body translations and rotations. Constitutive models accounting for the effect of such particle motions on the macroscopic response under prescribed deformations on the boundary have been developed recently. But, in some applications (e.g., magneto-active elastomers), the particles may experience additional torques as a consequence of an externally applied (magnetic) field, which, in turn, can affect the overall rotation of the particles in the rubber, and therefore also the macroscopic response of the composite. This paper is concerned with the development of constitutive models for particle-reinforced elastomers, which are designed to account for externally applied torques on the internally distributed particles, in addition to the externally applied deformation on the boundary of the composite. For this purpose, we propose a new variational framework involving suitably prescribed eigenstresses on the particles. For simplicity, the framework is applied to an elastomer reinforced by aligned, rigid, cylindrical fibers of elliptical cross section, which can undergo finite rotations in the context of a finite-deformation, plane strain problem for the composite. In particular, expressions are derived for the average in-plane rotation of the fibers as a function of the torques that are applied on them, both under vanishing and prescribed strain on the boundary. The results of this work will make possible the development of improved constitutive models for magneto-active elastomers, and other types of smart composite materials that are susceptible to externally applied torques.

  20. On the formation of a macroscopically flat phospholipid membrane on a hydrosol substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, A. M.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Volkov, Yu. O.

    2015-10-01

    The dependence of the structure of a phospholipid layer (DSPC and SOPC) adsorbed on a hydrosol substrate on the concentration of NaOH in a solution of 5-nm silica particles has been studied by X-ray reflectrometry with the use of synchrotron radiation. Profiles of the electron density (polarizability) have been reconstructed from the experimental data within a model-independent approach. According to these profiles, the thickness of the lipid film can vary from a monolayer (~35 Å) to several bilayers (~450 Å). At the volume concentration of NaOH of ~0.5 mol/L, the film on the hydrosol surface is a macroscopically flat phospholipid membrane (bilayer) with a thickness of ~60 Å and with areas of (45 ± 2) and (49 ± 3) Å2 per DSPC and SOPC molecule, respectively.

  1. Spontaneous Assembly of a Self-Complementary Oligopeptide to Form a Stable Macroscopic Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuguang; Holmes, Todd; Lockshin, Curtis; Rich, Alexander

    1993-04-01

    A 16-residue peptide [(Ala-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala-Lys-Ala-Lys)_2] has a characteristic β-sheet circular dichroism spectrum in water. Upon the addition of salt, the peptide spontaneously assembles to form a macroscopic membrane. The membrane does not dissolve in heat or in acidic or alkaline solutions, nor does it dissolve upon addition of guanidine hydrochloride, SDS/urea, or a variety of proteolytic enzymes. Scanning EM reveals a network of interwoven filaments ≈10-20 nm in diameter. An important component of the stability is probably due to formation of complementary ionic bonds between glutamic and lysine side chains. This phenomenon may be a model for studying the insoluble peptides found in certain neurological disorders. It may also have implications for biomaterials and origin-of-life research.

  2. Theory of the stationary macroscopic quantum behavior of inductively coupled superconducting weak links

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, G.; Luebbig, H.

    1982-04-01

    A theory of the stationary response of a flux-controlled superconducting weak link is presented in the framework of reversible thermodynamics. The superconducting loop containing the weak line (SQUID): considered as a ''black box'': can be characterized by a nonlinear inductance L/sub s/ which uniquely describes the constitutive properties of the macroscopic quantum system. The influence of the temperature-dependent (nonsinusoidal) current-phase relation (CPR) on L/sub s/ and on the stability of the SQUID when operated in th nonhysteretic mode is analyzed taking into account the full nonlinearity of the CPR. The model presented enables a rigorous circuit analysis, even in the case of a nonlinear flux transformer.

  3. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems. PMID:26804770

  4. Emergence of fluctuating traveling front solutions in macroscopic theory of noisy invasion fronts.

    PubMed

    Meerson, Baruch; Vilenkin, Arkady; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    The position of an invasion front, propagating into an unstable state, fluctuates because of the shot noise coming from the discreteness of reacting particles and stochastic character of the reactions and diffusion. A recent macroscopic theory [Meerson and Sasorov, Phys. Rev. E 84, 030101(R) (2011)] yields the probability of observing, during a long time, an unusually slow front. The theory is formulated as an effective Hamiltonian mechanics which operates with the density field and the conjugate "momentum" field. Further, the theory assumes that the most probable density field history of an unusually slow front represents, up to small corrections, a traveling front solution of the Hamilton equations. Here we verify this assumption by solving the Hamilton equations numerically for models belonging to the directed percolation universality class. PMID:23410293

  5. Gravitational bar detectors set limits to Planck-scale physics on macroscopic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Bonaldi, Michele; Cerdonio, Massimo; Conti, Livia; Falferi, Paolo; Mezzena, Renato; Ortolan, Antonello; Prodi, Giovanni A.; Taffarello, Luca; Vedovato, Gabriele; Vinante, Andrea; Zendri, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Different approaches to quantum gravity, such as string theory and loop quantum gravity, as well as doubly special relativity and gedanken experiments in black-hole physics, all indicate the existence of a minimal measurable length of the order of the Planck length, . This observation has motivated the proposal of generalized uncertainty relations, which imply changes in the energy spectrum of quantum systems. As a consequence, quantum gravitational effects could be revealed by experiments able to test deviations from standard quantum mechanics, such as those recently proposed on macroscopic mechanical oscillators. Here we exploit the sub-millikelvin cooling of the normal modes of the ton-scale gravitational wave detector AURIGA, to place an upper limit for possible Planck-scale modifications on the ground-state energy of an oscillator. Our analysis calls for the development of a satisfactory treatment of multi-particle states in the framework of quantum gravity models.

  6. Spontaneous assembly of a self-complementary oligopeptide to form a stable macroscopic membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, S.; Holmes, T.; Lockshin, C.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    A 16-residue peptide [(Ala-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala-Lys-Ala-Lys)2] has a characteristic beta-sheet circular dichroism spectrum in water. Upon the addition of salt, the peptide spontaneously assembles to form a macroscopic membrane. The membrane does not dissolve in heat or in acidic or alkaline solutions, nor does it dissolve upon addition of guanidine hydrochloride, SDS/urea, or a variety of proteolytic enzymes. Scanning EM reveals a network of interwoven filaments approximately 10-20 nm in diameter. An important component of the stability is probably due to formation of complementary ionic bonds between glutamic and lysine side chains. This phenomenon may be a model for studying the insoluble peptides found in certain neurological disorders. It may also have implications for biomaterials and origin-of-life research.

  7. Sine-Gordon modulation solutions: application to macroscopic friction, regular and slow earthquakes and fault dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum; Bambakidis, Gust

    2014-05-01

    The Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model and its continuum approximation, the sine-Gordon (SG) equation, are widely used for modeling various phenomena. In many practical applications the wave-train solution, which includes many solitons, is required. In such cases the system of Whitham's modulation equations, superimposed on the SG equation, provides such a solution. Here we consider several applications which use the SG modulation solutions [1-3]. Fault dynamics in the earth's crust, i.e. the nucleation and development of regular and slow earthquakes, is a complicated multidisciplinary problem which has been investigated using diverse approaches. Our approach, inspired by dislocation dynamics in crystals, is based on the FK model introduced to describe plasticity. In the model we propose, sliding occurs due to the movement of defects of a certain type (i.e. areas on the frictional surface with locally stressed material, known as a macroscopic dislocation or slip pulse) nucleated by shear stress in the presence of asperities. The spatial translation of a dislocation requires only a small fraction of the stress necessary for the uniform relative displacement of frictional surfaces. This is a fundamental distinction between our approach to macroscopic dry friction and those of others such as the Burridge-Knopoff and rate-and-state types of models. We show how this model can be applied to the qualitative and quantitative description of fault dynamics in general, and slow and regular earthquakes in particular. The three fundamental speeds of plate movement, earthquake migration, and seismic waves are shown to be connected in the FK model. The velocity of nonelastic stress propagation along faults is a function of accumulated stress. It changes from a few km/s during earthquakes to a few dozen km per day, month, or year during afterslip and inter-earthquake periods. The distribution of aftershocks in this model is consistent with both the Omori law for temporal distribution

  8. Local inhibitory plasticity tunes macroscopic brain dynamics and allows the emergence of functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Peter J; Jachs, Barbara; Clopath, Claudia; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Rich, spontaneous brain activity has been observed across a range of different temporal and spatial scales. These dynamics are thought to be important for efficient neural functioning. A range of experimental evidence suggests that these neural dynamics are maintained across a variety of different cognitive states, in response to alterations of the environment and to changes in brain configuration (e.g., across individuals, development and in many neurological disorders). This suggests that the brain has evolved mechanisms to maintain rich dynamics across a broad range of situations. Several mechanisms based around homeostatic plasticity have been proposed to explain how these dynamics emerge from networks of neurons at the microscopic scale. Here we explore how a homeostatic mechanism may operate at the macroscopic scale: in particular, focusing on how it interacts with the underlying structural network topology and how it gives rise to well-described functional connectivity networks. We use a simple mean-field model of the brain, constrained by empirical white matter structural connectivity where each region of the brain is simulated using a pool of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We show, as with the microscopic work, that homeostatic plasticity regulates network activity and allows for the emergence of rich, spontaneous dynamics across a range of brain configurations, which otherwise show a very limited range of dynamic regimes. In addition, the simulated functional connectivity of the homeostatic model better resembles empirical functional connectivity network. To accomplish this, we show how the inhibitory weights adapt over time to capture important graph theoretic properties of the underlying structural network. Therefore, this work presents suggests how inhibitory homeostatic mechanisms facilitate stable macroscopic dynamics to emerge in the brain, aiding the formation of functional connectivity networks. PMID:26348562

  9. Graphene in macroscopic order: liquid crystals and wet-spun fibers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2014-04-15

    In nanotechnology, the creation of new nanoparticles consistently feeds back into efforts to design and fabricate new macroscopic materials with specific properties. As a two-dimensional (2D) building block of new materials, graphene has received widespread attention due to its exceptional mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. But harnessing these attributes into new materials requires developing methods to assemble single-atom-thick carbon flakes into macroscopically ordered structures. Because the melt processing of carbon materials is impossible, fluid assembly is the only viable approach for meeting this challenge. But in the meantime, researchers need to solve two fundamental problems: creating orientational ordering in fluids and the subsequent phase-transformation from ordered fluids into ordered solid materials. To address these problems, this Account highlights our graphene chemistry methods that take advantage of liquid crystals to produce graphene fibers. We have successfully synthesized graphene oxide (GO) from graphite in a scalable manner. Using the size of graphite particles and post fractionation, we successfully tuned the lateral size of GO from submicron sizes to dozens of microns. Based on the rich chemistry of GO, we developed reliable methods for chemical or physical functionalization of graphene and produced a series of functionalized, highly soluble graphene derivatives that behave as single layers even at high concentrations. In the dispersive system of GO and functionalized graphenes, rich liquid crystals (LCs) formed spontaneously. Some of these liquid crystals had a conventional nematic phase with orientational order; others had a lamellar phase. Importantly, we observed a new chiral mesophase featuring a helical-lamellar structural model with frustrated disinclinations. The graphene-based LCs show ordered assembly behaviors in the fluid state of 2D colloids and lay a foundation for the design of ordered materials with optimal

  10. Optical tunneling by arbitrary macroscopic three-dimensional objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-07-01

    Electromagnetic wavefront portions grazing or nearly grazing the surface of a macroscopic particle contribute to the extinction of the incident radiation through a tunneling process similar to the scenario of barrier penetration in quantum mechanics. The aforesaid tunneling contribution, referred to as the edge effect, is critical to a correct depiction of the physical mechanism of electromagnetic extinction. Although an analytical solution for the edge effect in the case of a sphere has been reported in the literature, the counterparts for nonspherical particles remain unknown. The conventional curvature-based formalism of the edge effect breaks down in the case of faceted particles. This paper reports a method, based on the invariant imbedding principle and the Debye expansion technique, to accurately quantify the edge effect associated with an arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional object. The present method also provides a rigorous capability to facilitate the validation of various empirical approximations for electromagnetic extinction. Canonical results are presented to illustrate optical tunneling for two nonspherical geometries.

  11. Nanospheres, nanotubes, toroids, and gels with controlled macroscopic chirality.

    PubMed

    Arias, Sandra; Freire, Félix; Quiñoá, Emilio; Riguera, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of a highly dynamic poly(aryl acetylene) (poly-1) with Li(+), Na(+), and Ag(+) leads to macroscopically chiral supramolecular nanospheres, nanotubes, toroids, and gels. With Ag(+), nanospheres with M helicity and tunable sizes are generated, which complement those obtained from the same polymer with divalent cations. With Li(+) or Na(+), poly-1 yields chiral nanotubes, gels, or toroids with encapsulating properties and M helicity. Right-handed supramolecular structures can be obtained by using the enantiomeric polymer. The interaction of poly-1 with Na(+) produces nanostructures whose helicity is highly dependent on the solvation state of the cation. Therefore, structures with either of the two helicities can be prepared from the same polymer by manipulation of the cosolvent. Such chiral nanotubes, toroids, and gels have previously not been obtained from helical polymer-metal complexes. Chiral nanospheres made of poly(aryl acetylene) that were previously assembled with metal(II) species can now be obtained with metal(I) species. PMID:25209219

  12. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Andrea; De Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation. PMID:26959656

  13. Observation of quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottonen, Mikko; Partanen, Matti; Tan, Kuan Yen; Govenius, Joonas; Lake, Russell; Makela, Miika; Tanttu, Tuomo

    The emerging quantum technological devices, such as the quantum computer, call for extreme performance in thermal engineering at the nanoscale. Importantly, quantum mechanics sets a fundamental upper limit for the flow of information and heat, which is quantified by the quantum of thermal conductance. We present experimental observations of quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances extending to a meter. We achieved this striking improvement of four orders of magnitude in the distance by utilizing microwave photons travelling in superconducting transmission lines. Thus it seems that quantum-limited heat conduction has no fundamental restriction in its distance. This work lays the foundation for the integration of normal-metal components into superconducting transmission lines, and hence provides an important tool for circuit quantum electrodynamics, the basis of the emerging superconducting quantum computer. In particular, our results may lead to remote cooling of nanoelectronic devices with the help of a far-away in-situ-tunable heat sink. European Research Council (ERC) is acknowledged for funding under the Grant No. 278117 (SINGLEOUT).

  14. Quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Matti; Tan, Kuan Yen; Govenius, Joonas; Lake, Russell E.; Mäkelä, Miika K.; Tanttu, Tuomo; Möttönen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    The emerging quantum technological apparatuses, such as the quantum computer, call for extreme performance in thermal engineering. Cold distant heat sinks are needed for the quantized electric degrees of freedom owing to the increasing packaging density and heat dissipation. Importantly, quantum mechanics sets a fundamental upper limit for the flow of information and heat, which is quantified by the quantum of thermal conductance. However, the short distance between the heat-exchanging bodies in the previous experiments hinders their applicability in quantum technology. Here, we present experimental observations of quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances extending to a metre. We achieved this improvement of four orders of magnitude in the distance by utilizing microwave photons travelling in superconducting transmission lines. Thus, it seems that quantum-limited heat conduction has no fundamental distance cutoff. This work establishes the integration of normal-metal components into the framework of circuit quantum electrodynamics, which provides a basis for the superconducting quantum computer. Especially, our results facilitate remote cooling of nanoelectronic devices using faraway in situ-tunable heat sinks. Furthermore, quantum-limited heat conduction is important in contemporary thermodynamics. Here, the long distance may lead to ultimately efficient mesoscopic heat engines with promising practical applications.

  15. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhaïl; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10−3 degrees due to poor spin–photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin–photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by ±6° when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  16. The assembly of C. elegans lamins into macroscopic fibers.

    PubMed

    Zingerman-Koladko, Irena; Khayat, Maayan; Harapin, Jan; Shoseyov, Oded; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Salman, Ahmad; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Harush, Kfir

    2016-10-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known mainly by their propensity to form viscoelastic filamentous networks within cells. In addition, IF-proteins are essential parts of various biological materials, such as horn and hagfish slime threads, which exhibit a range of mechanical properties from hard to elastic. These properties and their self-assembly nature made IF-proteins attractive building blocks for biomimetic and biological materials in diverse applications. Here we show that a type V IF-protein, the Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear lamin (Ce-lamin), is a promising building block for protein-based fibers. Electron cryo-tomography of vitrified sections enabled us to depict the higher ordered assembly of the Ce-lamin into macroscopic fibers through the creation of paracrystalline fibers, which are prominent in vitro structures of lamins. The lamin fibers respond to tensile force as other IF-protein-based fibers, i.e., hagfish slime threads, and possess unique mechanical properties that may potentially be used in certain applications. The self-assembly nature of lamin proteins into a filamentous structure, which is further assembled into a complex network, can be easily modulated. This knowledge may lead to a better understanding of the relationship in IF-proteins-based fibers and materials, between their hierarchical structures and their mechanical properties. PMID:27341289

  17. Frictionless bead packs have macroscopic friction, but no dilatancy.

    PubMed

    Peyneau, Pierre-Emmanuel; Roux, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    The statement of the title is shown by numerical simulation of homogeneously sheared assemblies of frictionless, nearly rigid beads in the quasistatic limit. Results coincide for steady flows at constant shear rate gamma[over ] in the limit of small gamma[over ] and static approaches, in which packings are equilibrated under growing deviator stresses. The internal friction angle phi , equal to 5.76 degrees +/-0.22 degrees in simple shear, is independent of average pressure P in the rigid limit and stems from the ability of stable frictionless contact networks to form stress-induced anisotropic fabrics. No enduring strain localization is observed. Dissipation at the macroscopic level results from repeated network rearrangements, similar to the effective friction of a frictionless slider on a bumpy surface. Solid fraction Phi remains equal to the random close packing value approximately 0.64 in slowly or statically sheared systems. Fluctuations of stresses and volume are observed to regress in the large system limit. Defining the inertial number as I=gamma radical m/(aP), with m the grain mass and a its diameter, both internal friction coefficient mu*=tan phi and volume 1/Phi increase as powers of I in the quasistatic limit of vanishing I , in which all mechanical properties are determined by contact network geometry. The microstructure of the sheared material is characterized with a suitable parametrization of the fabric tensor and measurements of coordination numbers. PMID:18763948

  18. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow.

    PubMed

    Mari, Andrea; De Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation. PMID:26959656

  19. Contractile cell forces deform macroscopic cantilevers and quantify biomaterial performance.

    PubMed

    Allenstein, U; Mayr, S G; Zink, M

    2015-07-01

    Cells require adhesion to survive, proliferate and migrate, as well as for wound healing and many other functions. The strength of contractile cell forces on an underlying surface is a highly relevant quantity to measure the affinity of cells to a rigid surface with and without coating. Here we show with experimental and theoretical studies that these forces create surface stresses that are sufficient to induce measurable bending of macroscopic cantilevers. Since contractile forces are linked to the formation of focal contacts, results give information on adhesion promoting qualities and allow a comparison of very diverse materials. In exemplary studies, in vitro fibroblast adhesion on the magnetic shape memory alloy Fe-Pd and on the l-lysine derived plasma-functionalized polymer PPLL was determined. We show that cells on Fe-Pd are able to induce surface stresses three times as high as on pure titanium cantilevers. A further increase was observed for PPLL, where the contractile forces are four times higher than on the titanium reference. In addition, we performed finite element simulations on the beam bending to back up the calculation of contractile forces from cantilever bending under non-homogenous surface stress. Our findings consolidate the role of contractile forces as a meaningful measure of biomaterial performance. PMID:26027952

  20. The macroscopic delamination of thin films from elastic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Dominic; Bico, José; Boudaoud, Arezki; Roman, Benoit; Reis, Pedro M.

    2009-01-01

    The wrinkling and delamination of stiff thin films adhered to a polymer substrate have important applications in “flexible electronics.” The resulting periodic structures, when used for circuitry, have remarkable mechanical properties because stretching or twisting of the substrate is mostly accommodated through bending of the film, which minimizes fatigue or fracture. To date, applications in this context have used substrate patterning to create an anisotropic substrate-film adhesion energy, thereby producing a controlled array of delamination “blisters.” However, even in the absence of such patterning, blisters appear spontaneously, with a characteristic size. Here, we perform well-controlled experiments at macroscopic scales to study what sets the dimensions of these blisters in terms of the material properties and explain our results by using a combination of scaling and analytical methods. Besides pointing to a method for determining the interfacial toughness, our analysis suggests a number of design guidelines for the thin films used in flexible electronic applications. Crucially, we show that, to avoid the possibility that delamination may cause fatigue damage, the thin film thickness must be greater than a critical value, which we determine. PMID:19556551

  1. Macroscopic Neural Oscillation during Skilled Reaching Movements in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chun Kee

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanism of skilled movements, such as reaching, has been considered to differ from that of rhythmic movement such as locomotion. It is generally thought that skilled movements are consciously controlled by the brain, while rhythmic movements are usually controlled autonomously by the spinal cord and brain stem. However, several studies in recent decades have suggested that neural networks in the spinal cord may also be involved in the generation of skilled movements. Moreover, a recent study revealed that neural activities in the motor cortex exhibit rhythmic oscillations corresponding to movement frequency during reaching movements as rhythmic movements. However, whether the oscillations are generated in the spinal cord or the cortical circuit in the motor cortex causes the oscillations is unclear. If the spinal cord is involved in the skilled movements, then similar rhythmic oscillations with time delays should be found in macroscopic neural activity. We measured whole-brain MEG signals during reaching. The MEG signals were analyzed using a dynamical analysis method. We found that rhythmic oscillations with time delays occur in all subjects during reaching movements. The results suggest that the corticospinal system is involved in the generation and control of the skilled movements as rhythmic movements. PMID:27524996

  2. Experiments testing macroscopic quantum superpositions must be slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Andrea; de Palma, Giacomo; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-03-01

    We consider a thought experiment where the preparation of a macroscopically massive or charged particle in a quantum superposition and the associated dynamics of a distant test particle apparently allow for superluminal communication. We give a solution to the paradox which is based on the following fundamental principle: any local experiment, discriminating a coherent superposition from an incoherent statistical mixture, necessarily requires a minimum time proportional to the mass (or charge) of the system. For a charged particle, we consider two examples of such experiments, and show that they are both consistent with the previous limitation. In the first, the measurement requires to accelerate the charge, that can entangle with the emitted photons. In the second, the limitation can be ascribed to the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. On the other hand, when applied to massive particles our result provides an indirect evidence for the existence of gravitational vacuum fluctuations and for the possibility of entangling a particle with quantum gravitational radiation.

  3. Connecting local active forces to macroscopic stress in elastic media.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Lenz, Martin

    2015-02-28

    In contrast with ordinary materials, living matter drives its own motion by generating active, out-of-equilibrium internal stresses. These stresses typically originate from localized active elements embedded in an elastic medium, such as molecular motors inside the cell or contractile cells in a tissue. While many large-scale phenomenological theories of such active media have been developed, a systematic understanding of the emergence of stress from the local force-generating elements is lacking. In this paper, we present a rigorous theoretical framework to study this relationship. We show that the medium's macroscopic active stress tensor is equal to the active elements' force dipole tensor per unit volume in both continuum and discrete linear homogeneous media of arbitrary geometries. This relationship is conserved on average in the presence of disorder, but can be violated in nonlinear elastic media. Such effects can lead to either a reinforcement or an attenuation of the active stresses, giving us a glimpse of the ways in which nature might harness microscopic forces to create active materials. PMID:25594831

  4. Atomistic study of macroscopic analogs to short-chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Kyle J.; Kilmer, Clayton S. G.; Corwin, Eric I.

    2015-02-01

    We use a bath of chaotic surface waves in water to mechanically and macroscopically mimic the thermal behavior of a short articulated chain with only nearest-neighbor interactions. The chaotic waves provide isotropic and random agitation to which a temperature can be ascribed, allowing the chain to passively explore its degrees of freedom in analogy to thermal motion. We track the chain in real time and infer end-to-end potentials using Boltzmann statistics. We extrapolate our results, by using Monte Carlo simulations of self-avoiding polymers, to lengths not accessible in our system. In the long-chain limit we demonstrate universal scaling of the statistical parameters of all chains in agreement with well-known predictions for self-avoiding walks. However, we find that the behavior of chains below a characteristic length scale fundamentally differs. We find that short chains have much greater compressional stiffness than would be expected. However, chains rapidly soften as length increases to meet with expected scalings.

  5. Quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Matti; Tan, Kuan Yen; Govenius, Joonas; Lake, Russell E.; Mäkelä, Miika K.; Tanttu, Tuomo; Möttönen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The emerging quantum technological apparatuses1, 2, such as the quantum computer3–6, call for extreme performance in thermal engineering7. Cold distant heat sinks are needed for the quantized electric degrees of freedom due to the increasing packaging density and heat dissipation. Importantly, quantum mechanics sets a fundamental upper limit for the flow of information and heat, which is quantified by the quantum of thermal conductance8–10. However, the short distance between the heat-exchanging bodies in the previous experiments11–14 hinders their applicability in quantum technology. Here, we present experimental observations of quantum-limited heat conduction over macroscopic distances extending to a metre. We achieved this improvement of four orders of magnitude in the distance by utilizing microwave photons travelling in superconducting transmission lines. Thus, it seems that quantum-limited heat conduction has no fundamental distance cutoff. This work establishes the integration of normal-metal components into the framework of circuit quantum electrodynamics15–17 which provides a basis for the superconducting quantum computer18–21. Especially, our results facilitate remote cooling of nanoelectronic devices using far-away in-situ-tunable heat sinks22, 23. Furthermore, quantum-limited heat conduction is important in contemporary thermodynamics24, 25. Here, the long distance may lead to ultimately efficient mesoscopic heat engines with promising practical applications26. PMID:27239219

  6. Increased permeability of macroscopically normal small bowel in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M; Ghoos, Y; Maes, B; Hiele, M; Geboes, K; Vantrappen, G; Rutgeerts, P

    1994-10-01

    To investigate permeability alterations of the macroscopically normal jejunum in Crohn's disease, the permeation of two probes was measured during perfusion of an isolated jejunal segment. The data were compared with the results obtained by the standard per oral test in the same patients. Test probes were PEG-400 and [51Cr]EDTA. Ten normal individuals, 12 patients with Crohn's ileitis or ileocolitis, and seven patients with isolated Crohn's colitis all with normal jejunum on x-ray series were studied. Upon perfusion of the proximal small bowel, the 3-hr [51Cr]EDTA excretion was significantly increased in ileitis patients (P = 0.023) as compared to normals. The excretion exceeded the highest value of normals in eight of 12 ileitis patients. The excretion in Crohn's colitis patients was not significantly increased (P = 0.24) and abnormal excretion was found only in one of the Crohn's colitis patients. PEG-400 permeation during perfusion did not differentiate between the groups, but five of the seven patients with isolated Crohn's colitis had PEG-400 excretion exceeding the highest value in normals. Overall, 13 of the 19 patients had increased permeation of one of the two probes through jejunal mucosa during perfusion. These data suggest that the permeability is increased in the majority of patients even in segments that seem normal on x-ray. PMID:7924738

  7. Macroscopic strain controlled ion current in an elastomeric microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Nguyen, Du; Buchsbaum, Steven; Innes, Laura; Dennin, Michael; Li, Yongxue; Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Valdevit, Lorenzo; Sun, Lizhi; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2015-05-07

    We report on the fabrication of an ultra-high aspect ratio ionically conductive single microchannel with tunable diameter from ≈ 20 μm to fully closed. The 4 mm-long channel is fabricated in a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold and its cross-sectional area is controlled by applying macroscopic compressive strain to the mold in a direction perpendicular to the channel length. We investigated the ionic conduction properties of the channel. For a wide range of compressive strain up to ≈ 0.27, the strain dependence of the resistance is monotonic and fully reversible. For strain > 0.27, ionic conduction suddenly shuts off and the system becomes hysteretic (whereby a finite strain reduction is required to reopen the channel). Upon unloading, the original behavior is retrieved. This reversible behavior is observed over 200 compression cycles. The cross-sectional area of the channel can be inferred from the ion current measurement, as confirmed by a Nano-Computed Tomography investigation. We show that the cross-sectional area decreases monotonically with the applied compressive strain in the reversible range, in qualitative agreement with linear elasticity theory. We find that the shut-off strain is affected by the spatial extent of the applied strain, which provides additional tunability. Our tunable channel is well-suited for multiple applications in micro/nano-fluidic devices.

  8. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li; Zhang, Yingxun

    2015-12-01

    Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas: Lublin-Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD) formula and Weizsäcker-Skyrme (WS*) formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞ = 230 ± 11 MeV and 235 ± 11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L = 41.6 ± 7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5 ± 9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron-proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  9. Macroscopic Neural Oscillation during Skilled Reaching Movements in Humans.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hong Gi; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanism of skilled movements, such as reaching, has been considered to differ from that of rhythmic movement such as locomotion. It is generally thought that skilled movements are consciously controlled by the brain, while rhythmic movements are usually controlled autonomously by the spinal cord and brain stem. However, several studies in recent decades have suggested that neural networks in the spinal cord may also be involved in the generation of skilled movements. Moreover, a recent study revealed that neural activities in the motor cortex exhibit rhythmic oscillations corresponding to movement frequency during reaching movements as rhythmic movements. However, whether the oscillations are generated in the spinal cord or the cortical circuit in the motor cortex causes the oscillations is unclear. If the spinal cord is involved in the skilled movements, then similar rhythmic oscillations with time delays should be found in macroscopic neural activity. We measured whole-brain MEG signals during reaching. The MEG signals were analyzed using a dynamical analysis method. We found that rhythmic oscillations with time delays occur in all subjects during reaching movements. The results suggest that the corticospinal system is involved in the generation and control of the skilled movements as rhythmic movements. PMID:27524996

  10. Assessment of the local stress state through macroscopic variables.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Robert P

    2003-05-15

    Macroscopic quantities beyond effective elastic tensors are presented that can be used to assess the local state of stress within a composite in the linear elastic regime. These are presented in a general homogenization context. It is shown that the gradient of the effective elastic property can be used to develop a lower bound on the maximum pointwise equivalent stress in the fine-scale limit. Upper bounds are more sensitive and are correlated with the distribution of states of the equivalent stress in the finescale limit. The upper bounds are given in terms of the macrostress modulation function. This function gauges the magnitude of the actual stress. For 1

  11. Bridging the macroscopic and atomistic descriptions of the electrocaloric effect.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, I; Lisenkov, S

    2012-04-20

    First-principles-based simulations are used to simulate the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)TiO(3) alloys. In analogy with experimental studies we simulate the effect directly and indirectly (via the use of Maxwell thermodynamics). Both direct and indirect simulations utilize the same atomistic framework that allows us to compare them in a systematic way and with an atomistic precision for the very first time. Such precise comparison allows us to provide a bridge between the atomistic and macroscopic descriptions of the ECE and identify the factors that may critically compromise or even destroy their equivalence. Our computational data reveal the intrinsic features of ECE in ferroelectrics with multiple ferroelectric transitions and confirm the potential of these materials to exhibit giant electrocaloric response. The coexistence of negative and positive ECE in one material as well as an unusual field-driven transition between them is predicted, explained at an atomistic level, and proposed as a potential way to enhance the electrocaloric efficiency. PMID:22680758

  12. Bridging the Macroscopic and Atomistic Descriptions of the Electrocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, I.; Lisenkov, S.

    2012-04-01

    First-principles-based simulations are used to simulate the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 alloys. In analogy with experimental studies we simulate the effect directly and indirectly (via the use of Maxwell thermodynamics). Both direct and indirect simulations utilize the same atomistic framework that allows us to compare them in a systematic way and with an atomistic precision for the very first time. Such precise comparison allows us to provide a bridge between the atomistic and macroscopic descriptions of the ECE and identify the factors that may critically compromise or even destroy their equivalence. Our computational data reveal the intrinsic features of ECE in ferroelectrics with multiple ferroelectric transitions and confirm the potential of these materials to exhibit giant electrocaloric response. The coexistence of negative and positive ECE in one material as well as an unusual field-driven transition between them is predicted, explained at an atomistic level, and proposed as a potential way to enhance the electrocaloric efficiency.

  13. Macroscopic rotation of photon polarization induced by a single spin.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Christophe; Demory, Justin; Loo, Vivien; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Glazov, Mikhaïl; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Entangling a single spin to the polarization of a single incoming photon, generated by an external source, would open new paradigms in quantum optics such as delayed-photon entanglement, deterministic logic gates or fault-tolerant quantum computing. These perspectives rely on the possibility that a single spin induces a macroscopic rotation of a photon polarization. Such polarization rotations induced by single spins were recently observed, yet limited to a few 10(-3) degrees due to poor spin-photon coupling. Here we report the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of the spin-photon interaction, using a cavity quantum electrodynamics device. A single hole spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is deterministically coupled to a micropillar cavity. The cavity-enhanced coupling between the incoming photons and the solid-state spin results in a polarization rotation by ± 6° when the spin is optically initialized in the up or down state. These results open the way towards a spin-based quantum network. PMID:25687134

  14. Atomistic study of macroscopic analogs to short-chain molecules.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kyle J; Kilmer, Clayton S G; Corwin, Eric I

    2015-02-01

    We use a bath of chaotic surface waves in water to mechanically and macroscopically mimic the thermal behavior of a short articulated chain with only nearest-neighbor interactions. The chaotic waves provide isotropic and random agitation to which a temperature can be ascribed, allowing the chain to passively explore its degrees of freedom in analogy to thermal motion. We track the chain in real time and infer end-to-end potentials using Boltzmann statistics. We extrapolate our results, by using Monte Carlo simulations of self-avoiding polymers, to lengths not accessible in our system. In the long-chain limit we demonstrate universal scaling of the statistical parameters of all chains in agreement with well-known predictions for self-avoiding walks. However, we find that the behavior of chains below a characteristic length scale fundamentally differs. We find that short chains have much greater compressional stiffness than would be expected. However, chains rapidly soften as length increases to meet with expected scalings. PMID:25768524

  15. Grasping the Second Law of Thermodynamics at University: The Consistency of Macroscopic and Microscopic Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2015-01-01

    This study concentrates on evaluating the consistency of upper-division students' use of the second law of thermodynamics at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Data were collected by means of a paper and pencil test (N = 48) focusing on the macroscopic and microscopic features of the second law concerned with heat transfer processes. The data…

  16. Reduced Gyral Window and Corpus Callosum Size in Autism: Possible Macroscopic Correlates of a Minicolumnopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Mott, Meghan; Mannheim, Glenn; Hassan, Hossam; Fahmi, Rachid; Giedd, Jay; Rumsey, Judith M.; Switala, Andrew E.; Farag, Aly

    2009-01-01

    Minicolumnar changes that generalize throughout a significant portion of the cortex have macroscopic structural correlates that may be visualized with modern structural neuroimaging techniques. In magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of fourteen autistic patients and 28 controls, the present study found macroscopic morphological correlates to recent…

  17. [Macroscopic findings of brains are helpful in differential diagnosis of neurological disorders].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathological diagnosis is essential in neurological disorders. Neurological signs and neuroimaging play a major role in clinical diagnosis. Although neuroimaging indicates the location and size of lesions, which is useful to longitudinal evaluation of edema or atrophy, pathological diagnosis is absolutely necessary to qualitative diagnosis. The first step of pathological diagnosis starts to observe macroscopic findings of brains, which reveal the distribution of lesions specific to individual disorders. Since the macroscopic abnormal findings are based on the microscopic degenerative findings, it may be no exaggeration to say that macroscopic findings enable to make neuropathological diagnosis. Accuracy of macroscopic finding is corrected or revised with microscopic findings and finally compared with neuroimaging and clinical diagnosis. Therefore it is very important and useful to learn macroscopic findings of neurological disorders. PMID:24291833

  18. Temperature-Dependent Transformation Thermotics: From Switchable Thermal Cloaks to Macroscopic Thermal Diodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Shen, Xiangying; Wu, Zuhui; Huang, Junying; Chen, Yixuan; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2015-11-01

    The macroscopic control of ubiquitous heat flow remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental theoretical method. Here, by establishing temperature-dependent transformation thermotics for treating materials whose conductivity depends on temperature, we show analytical and simulation evidence for switchable thermal cloaking and a macroscopic thermal diode based on the cloaking. The latter allows heat flow in one direction but prohibits the flow in the opposite direction, which is also confirmed by our experiments. Our results suggest that the temperature-dependent transformation thermotics could be a fundamental theoretical method for achieving macroscopic heat rectification, and it could provide guidance both for the macroscopic control of heat flow and for the design of the counterparts of switchable thermal cloaks or macroscopic thermal diodes in other fields like seismology, acoustics, electromagnetics, and matter waves. PMID:26588397

  19. Macroscopic electrostatics at the nanoscale: From ferroelectric capacitors to confined electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2012-02-01

    Complex oxides are characterized by a multitude of coupled electronic and lattice degrees of freedom, and therefore constitute an unusually rich playground for experimentalists and theoreticians alike. These microscopic variables manifest themselves in macroscopically measurable quantities such as polarization, magnetization and strain, whose mutual coupling is sought after for applications in multifunctional electronic devices. To understand the interplay of these many factors, density functional theory (DFT) has proven an invaluable tool. However, the treatment of the macroscopic electrical variables (electric fields and polarization), which are a crucial ingredient in describing the experimentally observed response properties, has traditionally been difficult within first-principles calculations. In this talk I will first review a number of recent methodological developments that removed this limitation, thus extending the scopes of first-principles theory to the simulation of realistic devices within arbitrary electrical boundary conditions. Next, I will discuss the evolution of the band offset at a metal/ferroelectric interface as a function of polarization, and its implications for the electrical properties of nanocapacitors. Finally, I will show that, depending on the polarization of the film, a problematic regime might occur where the metallic carriers populate the energy bands of the insulator, making it metallic. As the most common approximations of density functional theory are affected by a systematic underestimation of the fundamental band gap of insulators, this scenario is likely to be an artifact of the simulation. I will discuss a number of criteria to systematically identify this situation in simulations, and effective modeling strategies to describe this peculiar charge compensation mechanism.

  20. Maxwell's macroscopic equations, the energy-momentum postulates, and the Lorentz law of force.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis R

    2009-02-01

    We argue that the classical theory of electromagnetism is based on Maxwell's macroscopic equations, an energy postulate, a momentum postulate, and a generalized form of the Lorentz law of force. These seven postulates constitute the foundation of a complete and consistent theory, thus eliminating the need for actual (i.e., physical) models of polarization P and magnetization M , these being the distinguishing features of Maxwell's macroscopic equations. In the proposed formulation, P(r,t) and M(r,t) are arbitrary functions of space and time, their physical properties being embedded in the seven postulates of the theory. The postulates are self-consistent, comply with the requirements of the special theory of relativity, and satisfy the laws of conservation of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum. One advantage of the proposed formulation is that it sidesteps the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski controversy surrounding the electromagnetic momentum inside a material medium by simply "assigning" the Abraham momentum density E(r,t)xH(r,t)/c2 to the electromagnetic field. This well-defined momentum is thus taken to be universal as it does not depend on whether the field is propagating or evanescent, and whether or not the host medium is homogeneous, transparent, isotropic, dispersive, magnetic, linear, etc. In other words, the local and instantaneous momentum density is uniquely and unambiguously specified at each and every point of the material system in terms of the E and H fields residing at that point. Any variation with time of the total electromagnetic momentum of a closed system results in a force exerted on the material media within the system in accordance with the generalized Lorentz law. PMID:19391864

  1. Macroscopic electric charge separation during hypervelocity impacts: Potential implications for planetary paleomagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The production of transient magnetic fields by hypervelocity meteoroid impact has been proposed to possibly explain the presence of paleomagnetic fields in certain lunar samples as well as across broader areas of the lunar surface. In an effort to understand the lunar magnetic record, continued experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range allow characterizing magnetic fields produced by the 5 km/s impacts of 0.32-0.64 cm projectiles over a broad range of impact angles and projectile/target compositions. From such studies, another phenomenon has emerged, macroscopic electric charge separation, that may have importance for the magnetic state of solid-body surfaces. This phenomenon was observed during explosive cratering experiments, but the magnetic consequences of macroscopic electric charge separation (as opposed to plasma production) during explosion and impact cratering have not, to our knowledge, been explored before now. It is straightforward to show that magnetic field production due to this process may scale as a weakly increasing function of impactor kinetic energy, although more work is needed to precisely assess the scaling dependence. The original intent of our experiments was to assess the character of purely electrostatic signals for comparison with inferred electrostatic noise signals acquired by shielded magnetic sensors buried within particulate dolomite targets. The results demonstrated that electrostatic noise does affect the magnetic sensors but only at relatively short distances (less than 4 cm) from the impact point (our magnetic studies are generally performed at distances greater than approximately 5.5 cm). However, to assess models for magnetic field generation during impact, measurements are needed of the magnetic field as close to the impact point as possible; hence, work with an improved magnetic sensor design is in progress. In this paper, we focus on electric charge separation during hypervelocity impacts as a potential transient

  2. Detection of cancer metastasis using a novel macroscopic hyperspectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma V.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo G.; Fei, Baowei

    2012-03-01

    The proposed macroscopic optical histopathology includes a broad-band light source which is selected to illuminate the tissue glass slide of suspicious pathology, and a hyperspectral camera that captures all wavelength bands from 450 to 950 nm. The system has been trained to classify each histologic slide based on predetermined pathology with light having a wavelength within a predetermined range of wavelengths. This technology is able to capture both the spatial and spectral data of tissue. Highly metastatic human head and neck cancer cells were transplanted to nude mice. After 2- 3 weeks, the mice were euthanized and the lymph nodes and lung tissues were sent to pathology. The metastatic cancer is studied in lymph nodes and lungs. The pathological slides were imaged using the hyperspectral camera. The results of the proposed method were compared to the pathologic report. Using hyperspectral images, a library of spectral signatures for different tissues was created. The high-dimensional data were classified using a support vector machine (SVM). The spectra are extracted in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues in lymph nodes and lung tissues. The spectral dimension is used as the input of SVM. Twelve glasses are employed for training and evaluation. The leave-one-out cross-validation method is used in the study. After training, the proposed SVM method can detect the metastatic cancer in lung histologic slides with the specificity of 97.7% and the sensitivity of 92.6%, and in lymph node slides with the specificity of 98.3% and the sensitivity of 96.2%. This method may be able to help pathologists to evaluate many histologic slides in a short time.

  3. Automatic Detection of Malignant Melanoma using Macroscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Maryam; Karimian, Alireza; Moallem, Payman

    2014-01-01

    In order to distinguish between benign and malignant types of pigmented skin lesions, computerized procedures have been developed for images taken by different equipment that the most available one of them is conventional digital cameras. In this research, a new procedure to detect malignant melanoma from benign pigmented lesions using macroscopic images is presented. The images are taken by conventional digital cameras with spatial resolution higher than one megapixel and by considering no constraints and special conditions during imaging. In the proposed procedure, new methods to weaken the effect of nonuniform illumination, correction of the effect of thick hairs and large glows on the lesion and also, a new threshold-based segmentation algorithm are presented. 187 features representing asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, diameter and texture are extracted from the lesion area and after reducing the number of features using principal component analysis (PCA), lesions are determined as malignant or benign using support vector machine classifier. According to the dermatologist diagnosis, the proposed processing methods have the ability to detect lesions area with high accuracy. The evaluation measures of classification have indicated that 13 features extracted by PCA method lead to better results than all of the extracted features. These results led to an accuracy of 82.2%, sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 86.93%. The proposed method may help dermatologists to detect the malignant lesions in the primary stages due to the minimum constraints during imaging, the ease of usage by the public and nonexperts, and high accuracy in detection of the lesion type. PMID:25426432

  4. Macroscopic Carbon Nanotube-based 3D Monoliths.

    PubMed

    Du, Ran; Zhao, Qiuchen; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Jin

    2015-07-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most promising carbon allotropes with incredible diverse physicochemical properties, thereby enjoying continuous worldwide attention since their discovery about two decades ago. From the point of view of practical applications, assembling individual CNTs into macroscopic functional and high-performance materials is of paramount importance. For example, multiscaled CNT-based assemblies including 1D fibers, 2D films, and 3D monoliths have been developed. Among all of these, monolithic 3D CNT architectures with porous structures have attracted increasing interest in the last few years. In this form, theoretically all individual CNTs are well connected and fully expose their surfaces. These 3D architectures have huge specific surface areas, hierarchical pores, and interconnected conductive networks, resulting in enhanced mass/electron transport and countless accessible active sites for diverse applications (e.g. catalysis, capacitors, and sorption). More importantly, the monolithic form of 3D CNT assemblies can impart additional application potentials to materials, such as free-standing electrodes, sensors, and recyclable sorbents. However, scaling the properties of individual CNTs to 3D assemblies, improving use of the diverse, structure-dependent properties of CNTs, and increasing the performance-to-cost ratio are great unsolved challenges for their real commercialization. This review aims to provide a comprehensive introduction of this young and energetic field, i.e., CNT-based 3D monoliths, with a focus on the preparation principles, current synthetic methods, and typical applications. Opportunities and challenges in this field are also presented. PMID:25740457

  5. Daytime F layer trough observed on a macroscopic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, J.A. )

    1987-03-01

    This paper reports a new technique of observing the high-latitude ionospheric trough which defines its continuity in space and time on a macroscopic scale not previously possible. Vertical ionospheric soundings provide the observations in the midday to evening sector where the signature of the trough is found to be a bite-out' of a factor of 3-10 in the diurnal distribution of the solar produced electron density at the F layer maximum. The data base employed is that produced by the extensive array of ionospheric sounders operating at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere during the International Geophysical Year period of December 1958, hence at solar maximum. The worldwide extent, high density, simultaneity, and continuity of these measurements make possible the description of the trough for the first time as an integral, spatially continuous entity in its entire daytime extent and UT duration. The technique is demonstrated in studies of 4 days which span the range of activity for the month. On the most disturbed day the daytime trough is continuous in magnetic latitude, magnetic local time between (75{degree}, 1030) and (51{degree}, 1630) and remains nearly stationary in this frame of reference for a duration of 14.5 hours UT. A snapshot' constructed from multiple simultaneous observations on this day shows the trough to have a continuous length of 6 {times} 10{sup 3} km and an area of > 4 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2}. The trough, which is also stable for similar durations on the other 3 days, is found to rotate clockwise to earlier magnetic local time by 5.5. hours and to expand equatorward in magnetic latitude by 20{degree} as activity increases from quiet to disturbed. Activity dependence and morphology are consistent with other observations that the trough locates rapid westward convection within the dusk convection cell.

  6. Innovations in macroscopic evaluation of pancreatic specimens and radiologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Agalianos, Christos; Dervenis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a novel dissection technique of surgical specimens in different cases of pancreatic tumors and provide a radiologic pathologic correlation. In our hospital, that is a referral center for pancreatic diseases, the macroscopic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimens is performed by the pathologists using the axial slicing technique (instead of the traditional procedure with longitudinal opening of the main pancreatic and/or common bile duct and slicing along the plane defined by both ducts). The specimen is sliced in an axial plane that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the descending duodenum. The procedure results in a large number of thin slices (3–4 mm). This plane is identical to that of CT or MRI and correlation between pathology and imaging is straightforward. We studied 70 cases of suspected different solid and cystic pancreatic tumors and we correlated the tumor size and location, the structure—consistency (areas of necrosis—hemorrhage—fibrosis—inflammation), the degree of vessels’ infiltration, the size of pancreatic and common bile duct and the distance from resection margins. Missed findings by imaging or pitfalls were recorded and we tried to explain all discrepancies between radiology evaluation and the histopathological findings. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is extremely important, adding crucial information on imaging limitations and enabling quality assessment of surgical specimens. The deep knowledge of different pancreatic tumors’ consistency and way of extension helps to improve radiologists’ diagnostic accuracy and minimize the radiological-surgical mismatching, preventing patients from unnecessary surgery. PMID:27069980

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G A

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  8. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.; Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bauer, W.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%--20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  9. Macroscopic behavior of ferrocholesteric liquid crystals and ferrocholesteric gels and elastomers.

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut R; Fink, Alexander; Pleiner, Harald

    2015-06-01

    We study the influence of macroscopic chirality on the macroscopic properties of superparamagnetic liquid crystals and gels. Specifically we derive macroscopic dynamic equations for ferrocholesteric low molecular weight (LMW) liquid crystals and for ferrocholesteric gels and elastomers in the local description using the director field as macroscopic variable. The magnetization is treated as a macroscopic dynamic degree of freedom and its coupling to all other macroscopic variables is examined in detail. We incorporate into our dynamic analysis terms that are linear in a magnetic field giving rise to a number of cross-coupling terms not possible otherwise. A number of properties that are unique to the class of systems studied arise. As an example for a static property we find a term in the generalized energy which is linear in the electric field and quadratic in the magnetic field. We find that applying a magnetic field to a ferrocholesteric can lead to reversible electric currents, heat currents and concentration currents, which change their sign with a sign change of macroscopic chirality. As an example of a rather intriguing dissipative dynamic contribution we point out that for ferrocholesterics and for ferrocholesteric gels and elastomers in a magnetic field extensional flow leads to electric and heat currents. PMID:26123769

  10. Structured pathology reporting improves the macroscopic assessment of rectal tumour resection specimens.

    PubMed

    King, Simon; Dimech, Margaret; Johnstone, Susan

    2016-06-01

    We examined whether introduction of a structured macroscopic reporting template for rectal tumour resection specimens improved the completeness and efficiency in collecting key macroscopic data elements. Fifty free text (narrative) macroscopic reports retrieved from 2012 to 2014 were compared with 50 structured macroscopic reports from 2013 to 2015, all of which were generated at John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW. The six standard macroscopic data elements examined in this study were reported in all 50 anatomical pathology reports using a structured macroscopic reporting dictation template. Free text reports demonstrated significantly impaired data collection when recording intactness of mesorectum (p<0.001), relationship to anterior peritoneal reflection (p=0.028) and distance of tumour to the non-peritonealised circumferential margin (p<0.001). The number of words used was also significantly (p<0.001) reduced using pre-formatted structured reports compared to free text reports. The introduction of a structured reporting dictation template improves data collection and may reduce the subsequent administrative burden when macroscopically evaluating rectal resections. PMID:27114373

  11. Macroscopic force experienced by extended objects in granular flows over a very broad Froude-number range : Macroscopic granular force on extended object.

    PubMed

    Faug, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    This paper revisits a great number of data from previous studies about the macroscopic force experienced by either objects moving at constant speed and depth inside static granular materials or motionless objects subject to steady granular flows. It focuses on extended objects whose immersed height is equal or close to the thickness of the surrounding granular medium. A simple scaling argument allows demarcating quasi-static from speed-squared force contributions for all the data from different geometries over a very broad range of Froude number. However, a wide scatter of the data is observed in the quasi-static regime. In the first step, a mean-field model is proposed to describe the average force. Mass and momentum balances are applied to a control volume, namely the expected volume of grains disturbed by the object, which is assumed to extend across the whole width and the entire height of the granular system. This allows defining an equivalent length scale which is computed by fitting the force predicted by the model to the available force data. In the second step, a circular shape is assumed for the effective mobilized domain and the associated diameter can be directly extracted from the computed equivalent length scale. This effective diameter is found to vary linearly with both the object width and the thickness of the granular layer moving around the extended object or the immersed depth of the object. The scaling highlights the key role played by the geometry which may enhance the force in the quasi-static regime. PMID:25957179

  12. The Epileptic Thalamocortical Network is a Macroscopic Self-Sustained Oscillator: Evidence from Frequency-Locking Experiments in Rat Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, J. L. Perez; Erra, R. Guevara; Rosenblum, M.

    2015-02-01

    The rhythmic activity observed in nervous systems, in particular in epilepsies and Parkinson's disease, has often been hypothesized to originate from a macroscopic self-sustained neural oscillator. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. Here we support this viewpoint with in vivo experiments in a rodent model of absence seizures, by demonstrating frequency locking to external periodic stimuli and finding the characteristic Arnold tongue. This result has important consequences for developing methods for the control of brain activity, such as seizure cancellation.

  13. The Epileptic Thalamocortical Network is a Macroscopic Self-Sustained Oscillator: Evidence from Frequency-Locking Experiments in Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, J. L. Perez; Erra, R. Guevara; Rosenblum, M.

    2015-01-01

    The rhythmic activity observed in nervous systems, in particular in epilepsies and Parkinson's disease, has often been hypothesized to originate from a macroscopic self-sustained neural oscillator. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. Here we support this viewpoint with in vivo experiments in a rodent model of absence seizures, by demonstrating frequency locking to external periodic stimuli and finding the characteristic Arnold tongue. This result has important consequences for developing methods for the control of brain activity, such as seizure cancellation. PMID:25672543

  14. Unified Microscopic-Macroscopic Monte Carlo Simulations of Complex Organic Molecule Chemistry in Cold Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qiang; Herbst, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The recent discovery of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in the gas phase of cold cores with temperatures as cold as 10 K challenges our previous astrochemical models concerning the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs). The strong correlation between the abundances and distributions of methyl formate and dimethyl ether further shows that current astrochemical models may be missing important chemical processes in cold astronomical sources. We investigate a scenario in which COMs and the methoxy radical can be formed on dust grains via a so-called chain reaction mechanism, in a similar manner to CO2. A unified gas-grain microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo approach with both normal and interstitial sites for icy grain mantles is used to perform the chemical simulations. Reactive desorption with varying degrees of efficiency is included to enhance the nonthermal desorption of species formed on cold dust grains. In addition, varying degrees of efficiency for the surface formation of methoxy are also included. The observed abundances of a variety of organic molecules in cold cores can be reproduced in our models. The strong correlation between the abundances of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in cold cores can also be explained. Nondiffusive chemical reactions on dust grain surfaces may play a key role in the formation of some COMs.

  15. A new macroscopically anisotropic pressure dependent yield function for metal matrix composite based on strain gradient plasticity for the microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Reza; Nyvang Legarth, Brian; Niordson, Christian F.

    2013-04-01

    Metal matrix composites with long aligned elastic fibers are studied using an energetic rate independent strain gradient plasticity theory with an isotropic pressure independent yield function at the microscale. The material response is homogenized to obtain a conventional macroscopic model that exhibits anisotropic yield properties with a pressure dependence. At the microscale free energy includes both elastic strains and plastic strain gradients, and the theory demands higher order boundary conditions in terms of plastic strain or work conjugate higher order tractions. The mechanical response is investigated numerically using a unit cell model with periodic boundary conditions containing a single fiber deformed under generalized plane strain conditions. The homogenized response can be modeled by conventional plasticity with an anisotropic yield surface and a free energy depending on plastic strain in addition to the elastic strain. Hill's classical anisotropic yield criterion is extended to cover the composite such that hydrostatic pressure dependency, Bauschinger stress and size-effects are considered. It is found that depending on the fiber volume fraction, the anisotropic yield surface of the composite is inclined compared to a standard pressure independent yield surfaces. The evolution of the macroscopic yield surface is investigated by quantifying both anisotropic hardening (expansion) and kinematic hardening (translation), where the coefficients of anisotropy and the Bauschinger stress are extracted.

  16. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m−3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27225287

  17. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m-3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  18. Three-dimensional Fe3O4-graphene macroscopic composites for arsenic and arsenate removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liangqia; Ye, Peirong; Wang, Jing; Fu, Fengfu; Wu, Zujian

    2015-11-15

    3D graphene macroscopic gel synthesized via self-assembly of GO nanosheets under basic conditions at low temperature is modified with polydopamine and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The modification of polydopamine can not only strengthen the 3D graphene-based macroscopic architecture but also enhance the loadage and binding ability of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The synthesized 3D Fe3O4-graphene macroscopic composites are characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, BET, Raman and magnetic property and used as a versatile adsorbent for sub-ppm concentration of As(III) and As(V) removal from aqueous solutions. The experimental results suggest that the synthesized 3D Fe3O4-graphene macroscopic composites are promising for treating low concentration of arsenic contaminated water. PMID:26001621

  19. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 10(20) N m(-3). This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27225287

  20. Microscopic and Macroscopic Studies on the Development of Puccinia hemerocallidis in Resistance and Susceptible Daylily Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection process of Puccinia hemerocallidis, the causal agent of daylily rust, and resistance responses in eight daylily cultivars were studied macroscopically and microscopically. After germination of urediniospores, appressoria formed at the tip of germ tubes and penetrated through stomatal openi...

  1. A macroscopic description of a generalized self-organized criticality system: Astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2014-02-10

    We suggest a generalized definition of self-organized criticality (SOC) systems: SOC is a critical state of a nonlinear energy dissipation system that is slowly and continuously driven toward a critical value of a system-wide instability threshold, producing scale-free, fractal-diffusive, and intermittent avalanches with power law-like size distributions. We develop here a macroscopic description of SOC systems that provides an equivalent description of the complex microscopic fine structure, in terms of fractal-diffusive transport (FD-SOC). Quantitative values for the size distributions of SOC parameters (length scales L, time scales T, waiting times Δt, fluxes F, and fluences or energies E) are derived from first principles, using the scale-free probability conjecture, N(L)dL∝L {sup –d}, for Euclidean space dimension d. We apply this model to astrophysical SOC systems, such as lunar craters, the asteroid belt, Saturn ring particles, magnetospheric substorms, radiation belt electrons, solar flares, stellar flares, pulsar glitches, soft gamma-ray repeaters, black-hole objects, blazars, and cosmic rays. The FD-SOC model predicts correctly the size distributions of 8 out of these 12 astrophysical phenomena, and indicates non-standard scaling laws and measurement biases for the others.

  2. Strongly Coupled Plasmonic Modes on Macroscopic Areas via Template-Assisted Colloidal Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present ensembles of surface-ordered nanoparticle arrangements, which are formed by template-assisted self-assembly of monodisperse, protein-coated gold nanoparticles in wrinkle templates. Centimeter-squared areas of highly regular, linear assemblies with tunable line width are fabricated and their extinction cross sections can be characterized by conventional UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy. Modeling based on electrodynamic simulations shows a clear signature of strong plasmonic coupling with an interparticle spacing of 1–2 nm. We find evidence for well-defined plasmonic modes of quasi-infinite chains, such as resonance splitting and multiple radiant modes. Beyond elementary simulations on the individual chain level, we introduce an advanced model, which considers the chain length distribution as well as disorder. The step toward macroscopic sample areas not only opens perspectives for a range of applications in sensing, plasmonic light harvesting, surface enhanced spectroscopy, and information technology but also eases the investigation of hybridization and metamaterial effects fundamentally. PMID:25347293

  3. Heterogeneous Inhibition in Macroscopic Current Responses of Four Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes by Cholesterol Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Del Hoyo-Rivera, Natalie; Quesada, Orestes; Otero-Cruz, José David; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-08-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), located in the cell membranes of neurons and muscle cells, mediates the transmission of nerve impulses across cholinergic synapses. In addition, the nAChR is also found in the electric organs of electric rays (e.g., the genus Torpedo). Cholesterol, which is a key lipid for maintaining the correct functionality of membrane proteins, has been found to alter the nAChR function. We were thus interested to probe the changes in the functionality of different nAChRs expressed in a model membrane with modified cholesterol to phospholipid ratios (C/P). In this study, we examined the effect of increasing the C/P ratio in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing the neuronal α7, α4β2, muscle-type, and Torpedo californica nAChRs in their macroscopic current responses. Using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, it was found that the neuronal α7 and Torpedo nAChRs are significantly more sensitive to small increases in C/P than the muscle-type nAChR. The peak current versus C/P profiles during enrichment display different behaviors; α7 and Torpedo nAChRs display a hyperbolic decay with two clear components, whereas muscle-type and α4β2 nAChRs display simple monophasic decays with different slopes. This study clearly illustrates that a physiologically relevant increase in membrane cholesterol concentration produces a remarkable reduction in the macroscopic current responses of the neuronal α7 and Torpedo nAChRs functionality, whereas the muscle nAChR appears to be the most resistant to cholesterol inhibition among all four nAChR subtypes. Overall, the present study demonstrates differential profiles for cholesterol inhibition among the different types of nAChR to physiological cholesterol increments in the plasmatic membrane. This is the first study to report a cross-correlation analysis of cholesterol sensitivity among different nAChR subtypes in a model membrane. PMID:27116687

  4. Macroscopic lateral heterogeneity observed in a laterally mobile immiscible mixed polyelectrolyte-neutral polymer brush.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoung; Tsouris, Vasilios; Lim, Yunho; Mustafa, Rafid; Choi, Je; Choi, Yun Hwa; Park, Hae-Woong; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Won, You-Yeon

    2014-06-01

    We studied mixed poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes. The question we attempted to answer was: when the chain grafting points are laterally mobile, how will this lateral mobility influence the structure and phase behavior of the mixed brush? Three different model mixed PEO/PDMAEMA brush systems were prepared: (1) a laterally mobile mixed brush by spreading onto the air-water interface a mixture of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PEO-PnBA) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PDMAEMA-PnBA) diblock copolymers (the specific diblock copolymers used will be denoted as PEO113-PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118-PnBA100, where the subscripts refer to the number-average degrees of polymerization of the individual blocks), (2) a mobility-restricted (inseparable) version of the above mixed brush prepared using a PEO-PnBA-PDMAEMA triblock copolymer (denoted as PEO113-PnBA89-PDMAEMA120) having respective brush molecular weights matched with those of the diblock copolymers, and (3) a different laterally mobile mixed PEO and PDMAEMA brush prepared from a PEO113-PnBA100 and PDMAEMA200-PnBA103 diblock copolymer combination, which represents a further more height-mismatched mixed brush situation than described in (1). These three mixed brush systems were investigated by surface pressure-area isotherm and X-ray (XR) reflectivity measurements. These experimental data were analyzed within the theoretical framework of a continuum self-consistent field (SCF) polymer brush model. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest that the mobile mixed brush derived using the PEO113-PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118-PnBA100 combination (i.e., mixed brush System #1) undergoes a lateral macroscopic phase separation at high chain grafting densities, whereas the more height-mismatched system (System #3) is only microscopically phase separated under comparable brush density conditions even though the lateral

  5. Macroscopic lateral heterogeneity observed in a laterally mobile immiscible mixed polyelectrolyte-neutral polymer brush

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoyoung; Tsouris, Vasilios; Lim, Yunho; Mustafa, Rafid; Choi, Je; Choi, Yun Hwa; Park, Hae-Woong; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Won, You-Yeon

    2014-07-11

    We studied mixed poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes. The question we attempted to answer was: when the chain grafting points are laterally mobile, how will this lateral mobility influence the structure and phase behavior of the mixed brush? Three different model mixed PEO/PDMAEMA brush systems were prepared: (1) a laterally mobile mixed brush by spreading onto the air–water interface a mixture of poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PEO–PnBA) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)–poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PDMAEMA–PnBA) diblock copolymers (the specific diblock copolymers used will be denoted as PEO113–PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118–PnBA100, where the subscripts refer to the number-average degrees of polymerization of the individual blocks), (2) a mobility-restricted (inseparable) version of the above mixed brush prepared using a PEO–PnBA–PDMAEMA triblock copolymer (denoted as PEO113–PnBA89–PDMAEMA120) having respective brush molecular weights matched with those of the diblock copolymers, and (3) a different laterally mobile mixed PEO and PDMAEMA brush prepared from a PEO113–PnBA100 and PDMAEMA200–PnBA103 diblock copolymer combination, which represents a further more height-mismatched mixed brush situation than described in (1). These three mixed brush systems were investigated by surface pressure–area isotherm and X-ray (XR) reflectivity measurements. These experimental data were analyzed within the theoretical framework of a continuum self-consistent field (SCF) polymer brush model. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest that the mobile mixed brush derived using the PEO113–PnBA100 and PDMAEMA118–PnBA100 combination (i.e., mixed brush System #1) undergoes a lateral macroscopic phase separation

  6. Time-dependent interactions of glibenclamide with CFTR: kinetically complex block of macroscopic currents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-R; Cui, G; Zeltwanger, S; McCarty, N A

    2004-10-01

    Blockade of the CFTR chloride channel by glibenclamide was studied in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings, macropatch recordings, and summations of single-channel currents, in order to test a kinetic model recently developed by us from single-channel experiments. Both the forward and reverse macroscopic reactions, at negative and positive membrane potential V(M), respectively, were slow in comparison to those reactions for other CFTR pore blockers such as DPC and NPPB, resulting in prominent relaxations on the order of tens of milliseconds. The rate of the reverse reaction was voltage-dependent, and dependent on the Cl(-) driving force, while that of the forward reaction was not. In inside-out macropatches, block and relief from block occurred in two distinct phases that differed in apparent affinity. The results are consistent with the presence of multiple glibenclamide binding sites in CFTR, with varying affinity and voltage dependence; they support the kinetic model and suggest experimental approaches for identification of those sites by mutagenesis. PMID:15711774

  7. Evaporative Self-Assembly of Gold Nanorods into Macroscopic 3D Plasmonic Superlattice Arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Penghui; Li, Yong; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Tang, Siying; Yu, Xue-Feng; Xiao, Shu; Wu, Zhongzhen; Xiao, Quanlan; Zhao, Yuetao; Wang, Huaiyu; Chu, Paul K

    2016-04-01

    Millimeter-scale 3D superlattice arrays composed of dense, regular, and vertically aligned gold nanorods are fabricated by evaporative self-assembly. The regular organization of the gold nanorods into a macroscopic superlattice enables the production of a plasmonic substrate with excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, as well as reliability in surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The work bridges the gap between nanoscale materials and macroscopic applications. PMID:26823278

  8. Macroscopic entanglement between a Bose Einstein condensate and a superconducting loop.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mandip

    2009-02-16

    We theoretically study macroscopic entanglement between a magnetically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate and a superconducting loop. We treat the superconducting loop in a quantum superposition of two different flux states coupling with the magnetic trap to generate macroscopic entanglement. The scheme also provides a platform to investigate interferometry with an entangled Bose Einstein condensate and to explore physics at the quantum-classical interface. PMID:19219163

  9. Buckling of regular, chiral and hierarchical honeycombs under a general macroscopic stress state

    PubMed Central

    Haghpanah, Babak; Papadopoulos, Jim; Mousanezhad, Davood; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    An approach to obtain analytical closed-form expressions for the macroscopic ‘buckling strength’ of various two-dimensional cellular structures is presented. The method is based on classical beam-column end-moment behaviour expressed in a matrix form. It is applied to sample honeycombs with square, triangular and hexagonal unit cells to determine their buckling strength under a general macroscopic in-plane stress state. The results were verified using finite-element Eigenvalue analysis. PMID:25002823

  10. Review to better understand the macroscopic subtypes and histogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Yuichi; Kawashita, Yujo; Okada, Satomi; Azuma, Takashi; Matsuo, Shigetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is macroscopically classified into three subtypes, mass-forming-type, periductal infiltrating-type, and intraductal growth-type. Each subtype should be preoperatively differentiated to perform the valid surgical resection. Recent researches have revealed the clinical, radiologic, pathobiological characteristics of each subtype. We reviewed recently published studies covering various aspects of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), focusing especially on the macroscopic subtypes and stem cell features to better understand the pathophysiology of ICC and to establish the valid therapeutic strategy. PMID:25133021

  11. Macroscopic characterization of cell electroporation in biological tissue based on electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cima, Lionel F.; Mir, Lluis M.

    2004-11-01

    A method is described to experimentally determine the temporal evolution of state variables involved in the electroporation of biological tissue, i.e., the transmembrane voltage and the macroscopic current flowing in the electropores. Indeed, the electrical parameters of the extracellular, intracellular, and unaltered membrane contributions as well as the electropores electrical characteristics can be deduced from the measurement of the tissue bioimpedance and from the variations of both the macroscopic voltage applied to the tissue and the delivered current.

  12. Exposure-time based modeling of nonlinear reactive transport in porous media subject to physical and geochemical heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Amos, Richard T; Finkel, Michael; Blowes, David W; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2016-09-01

    the two types of biomass at late times. Results obtained by mapping the exposure-time based results to the two-dimensional domain are compared with simulations based on the two-dimensional, spatially explicit advection-dispersion-reaction equation. Once quasi-steady state has been reached, we find a good agreement in terms of the chemical-compound concentrations between the two approaches inside the reactive zones, whereas the exposure-time based model is not able to capture reactions occurring in the zones with zero electron-donor release. We conclude that exposure-time models provide good approximations of nonlinear bio-reactive transport when transverse mixing is not the overall controlling process and all reactions are essentially restricted to distinct reactive zones. PMID:27343827

  13. Exposure-time based modeling of nonlinear reactive transport in porous media subject to physical and geochemical heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Amos, Richard T.; Finkel, Michael; Blowes, David W.; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2016-09-01

    the two types of biomass at late times. Results obtained by mapping the exposure-time based results to the two-dimensional domain are compared with simulations based on the two-dimensional, spatially explicit advection-dispersion-reaction equation. Once quasi-steady state has been reached, we find a good agreement in terms of the chemical-compound concentrations between the two approaches inside the reactive zones, whereas the exposure-time based model is not able to capture reactions occurring in the zones with zero electron-donor release. We conclude that exposure-time models provide good approximations of nonlinear bio-reactive transport when transverse mixing is not the overall controlling process and all reactions are essentially restricted to distinct reactive zones.

  14. Macroscopic Superlattices of CdSe Colloidal Nanocrystals: Appearance and Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Manna, L; Leon, F; Gerion, D; Saw, C; Galli, G

    2004-03-25

    distribution of sizes and shapes that always exist in NCs one more reason to prevent faceting. At the same time, formation of faceted SLs from colloidal solutions has been reported in a number of works [1, 6, 8, 11]. Two recent publications in this journal [12,13] were devoted to the case of CdSe that, for its well-known properties, can be considered as a model NC material. These publications stated that perfectly shaped hexagonal platelets obtained from a toluene solution of CdSe NCs were faceted SLs. The size of the crystals (up to 200 {micro}m) was large enough to observe them in an optical microscope, but apparently too small for the separation and characterization by macroscopic techniques. Therefore no optical characterization was presented, and the conclusion was made on the basis of TEM images of small fragments that did not show any visible faceting. It is important to say here that, despite the fact that the authors used a special triple-solvent ''controlled oversaturation technique'', formation of these hexagonal platelets is not rare in CdSe NC solutions and had been discussed previously in the connection with SL formation [1]. In our experiments with CdSe NCs, we frequently observed them to form spontaneously in relatively large number and size. Such common and easy formation of these crystals stimulated us to take a closer look at their nature. Here we present the results of our investigations, together with new attempts to obtain micron-scale SLs of CdSe NCs suitable for direct characterization by combination of electron microscopy with macroscopic techniques, such as optical polarization microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  15. Biomechanical and biophysical environment of bone from the macroscopic to the pericellular and molecular level.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li; Yang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Jian; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Bones with complicated hierarchical configuration and microstructures constitute the load-bearing system. Mechanical loading plays an essential role in maintaining bone health and regulating bone mechanical adaptation (modeling and remodeling). The whole-bone or sub-region (macroscopic) mechanical signals, including locomotion-induced loading and external actuator-generated vibration, ultrasound, oscillatory skeletal muscle stimulation, etc., give rise to sophisticated and distinct biomechanical and biophysical environments at the pericellular (microscopic) and collagen/mineral molecular (nanoscopic) levels, which are the direct stimulations that positively influence bone adaptation. While under microgravity, the stimulations decrease or even disappear, which exerts a negative influence on bone adaptation. A full understanding of the biomechanical and biophysical environment at different levels is necessary for exploring bone biomechanical properties and mechanical adaptation. In this review, the mechanical transferring theories from the macroscopic to the microscopic and nanoscopic levels are elucidated. First, detailed information of the hierarchical structures and biochemical composition of bone, which are the foundations for mechanical signal propagation, are presented. Second, the deformation feature of load-bearing bone during locomotion is clarified as a combination of bending and torsion rather than simplex bending. The bone matrix strains at microscopic and nanoscopic levels directly induced by bone deformation are critically discussed, and the strain concentration mechanism due to the complicated microstructures is highlighted. Third, the biomechanical and biophysical environments at microscopic and nanoscopic levels positively generated during bone matrix deformation or by dynamic mechanical loadings induced by external actuators, as well as those negatively affected under microgravity, are systematically discussed, including the interstitial fluid flow

  16. Connecting Macroscopic Observables and Microscopic Assembly Events in Amyloid Formation Using Coarse Grained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bieler, Noah S.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan; Vácha, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The pre-fibrillar stages of amyloid formation have been implicated in cellular toxicity, but have proved to be challenging to study directly in experiments and simulations. Rational strategies to suppress the formation of toxic amyloid oligomers require a better understanding of the mechanisms by which they are generated. We report Dynamical Monte Carlo simulations that allow us to study the early stages of amyloid formation. We use a generic, coarse-grained model of an amyloidogenic peptide that has two internal states: the first one representing the soluble random coil structure and the second one the -sheet conformation. We find that this system exhibits a propensity towards fibrillar self-assembly following the formation of a critical nucleus. Our calculations establish connections between the early nucleation events and the kinetic information available in the later stages of the aggregation process that are commonly probed in experiments. We analyze the kinetic behaviour in our simulations within the framework of the theory of classical nucleated polymerisation, and are able to connect the structural events at the early stages in amyloid growth with the resulting macroscopic observables such as the effective nucleus size. Furthermore, the free-energy landscapes that emerge from these simulations allow us to identify pertinent properties of the monomeric state that could be targeted to suppress oligomer formation. PMID:23071427

  17. Theoretical study of vapor-liquid homogeneous nucleation using stability analysis of a macroscopic phase.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Calderón, Bernardo

    2012-10-14

    Stability analysis is generally used to verify that the solution to phase equilibrium calculations corresponds to a stable state (minimum of the free energy). In this work, tangent plane distance analysis for stability of macroscopic mixtures is also used for analyzing the nucleation process, reconciling thus this analysis with classical nucleation theories. In the context of the revised nucleation theory, the driving force and the nucleation work are expressed as a function of the Lagrange multiplier corresponding to the mole fraction constraint from the minimization problem of stability analysis. Using a van der Waals fluid applied to a ternary mixture, Lagrange multiplier properties are illustrated. In particular, it is shown how the Lagrange multiplier value is equal to one on the binodal and spinodal curves at the same time as the driving force of nucleation vanishes on these curves. Finally, it is shown that, on the spinodal curve, the nucleation work from the revised and generalized nucleation theories are characterized by two different local minima from stability analysis, irrespective of any interfacial tension models. PMID:23061836

  18. Spatial self-organization of macroscopic quantum states of exciton-polaritons in acoustic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, J. V. T.; Cerda-Méndez, E. A.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V.

    2016-07-01

    Exciton-polariton systems can sustain macroscopic quantum states (MQSs) under a periodic potential modulation. In this paper, we investigate the structure of these states in acoustic square lattices by probing their wave functions in real and momentum spaces using spectral tomography. We show that the polariton MQSs, when excited by a Gaussian laser beam, self-organize in a concentric structure, consisting of a single, two-dimensional gap-soliton (GS) state surrounded by one dimensional (1D) MQSs with lower energy. The latter form at hyperbolical points of the modulated polariton dispersion. While the size of the GS tends to saturate with increasing particle density, the emission region of the surrounding 1D states increases. The existence of these MQSs in acoustic lattices is quantitatively supported by a theoretical model based on the variational solution of the Gross–Pitaevskii equation. The formation of the 1D states in a ring around the central GS is attributed to the energy gradient in this region, which reduces the overall symmetry of the lattice. The results broaden the experimental understanding of self-localized polariton states, which may prove relevant for functionalities exploiting solitonic objects.

  19. The tendon network of the fingers performs anatomical computation at a macroscopic scale.

    PubMed

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J; Yi, Jae-Woong; Brown, Daniel; McNamara, Robert V; Paul, Chandana; Lipson, Hood

    2007-06-01

    Current thinking attributes information processing for neuromuscular control exclusively to the nervous system. Our cadaveric experiments and computer simulations show, however, that the tendon network of the fingers performs logic computation to preferentially change torque production capabilities. How this tendon network propagates tension to enable manipulation has been debated since the time of Vesalius and DaVinci and remains an unanswered question. We systematically changed the proportion of tension to the tendons of the extensor digitorum versus the two dorsal interosseous muscles of two cadaver fingers and measured the tension delivered to the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints. We find that the distribution of input tensions in the tendon network itself regulates how tensions propagate to the finger joints, acting like the switching function of a logic gate that nonlinearly enables different torque production capabilities. Computer modeling reveals that the deformable structure of the tendon networks is responsible for this phenomenon; and that this switching behavior is an effective evolutionary solution permitting a rich repertoire of finger joint actuation not possible with simpler tendon paths. We conclude that the structural complexity of this tendon network, traditionally oversimplified or ignored, may in fact be critical to understanding brain-body coevolution and neuromuscular control. Moreover, this form of information processing at the macroscopic scale is a new instance of the emerging principle of nonneural "somatic logic" found to perform logic computation such as in cellular networks. PMID:17549909

  20. Macroscopic spatial analysis of pedestrian and bicycle crashes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Chowdhury; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Choi, Keechoo

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of spatial correlation using a Bayesian spatial framework to model pedestrian and bicycle crashes in Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZs). Aggregate models for pedestrian and bicycle crashes were estimated as a function of variables related to roadway characteristics, and various demographic and socio-economic factors. It was found that significant differences were present between the predictor sets for pedestrian and bicycle crashes. The Bayesian Poisson-lognormal model accounting for spatial correlation for pedestrian crashes in the TAZs of the study counties retained nine variables significantly different from zero at 95% Bayesian credible interval. These variables were - total roadway length with 35 mph posted speed limit, total number of intersections per TAZ, median household income, total number of dwelling units, log of population per square mile of a TAZ, percentage of households with non-retired workers but zero auto, percentage of households with non-retired workers and one auto, long term parking cost, and log of total number of employment in a TAZ. A separate distinct set of predictors were found for the bicycle crash model. In all cases the Bayesian models with spatial correlation performed better than the models that did not account for spatial correlation among TAZs. This finding implies that spatial correlation should be considered while modeling pedestrian and bicycle crashes at the aggregate or macro-level. PMID:22269522

  1. HYDRA: Macroscopic 3D Approach of Light Weight Ablator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, G.; Barcena, J.; Bouilly, J.-M.; Leroy, V.; Fischer, Wpp.; Massuti, T.

    2014-06-01

    The HYDRA project is an European funded program that aims at developing novel solution in term of TPS associated to a demonstration of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 4. We describe modelling activities (radiation/ablation) compared to plasma test.

  2. Characterization and Correlation of Particle-Level Interactions to the Macroscopic Rheology of Powders, Granular Slurries, and Colloidal Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Rector, David R.; Bredt, Paul R.; Buck, Edgar C.; Berg, John C.; Saez, Avelino E.

    2006-09-29

    Hanford TRU tank sludges are complex mixtures of undissolved minerals and salt solids in an aqueous phase of high ionic strength. They show complex rheological behavior resulting from interactions at the macroscopic level, such as interparticle friction between grains in the coarse fraction, as well as from interactions at the nano-scale level, such as the agglomeration of colloidal particles. An understanding of how phenomena such as interparticle friction and aggregate stability under shear will allow better control of Hanford TRU tank sludges being processed for disposal. The project described in this report had two objectives. The first was to understand the physical properties and behavior of the Hanford transuranic (TRU) tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging, and transportation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The second objective was to develop a fundamental understanding of sludge physical properties by correlating the macroscopic behavior with interactions occurring at the particle/colloidal scale. These objectives were accomplished by: 1) developing continuum models for coarse granular slurries and 2) studying the behavior of colloidal agglomerates under shear and under irradiation.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy: cylindrical symmetry from macroscopically ordered anisotropic molecules and accuracy of MRI measurements using few orientations.

    PubMed

    Wisnieff, Cynthia; Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; Wang, Shuai; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Yi

    2013-04-15

    White matter is an essential component of the central nervous system and is of major concern in neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent MRI studies have explored the unique anisotropic magnetic properties of white matter using susceptibility tensor imaging. However, these measurements are inhibited in practice by the large number of different head orientations needed to accurately reconstruct the susceptibility tensor. Adding reasonable constraints reduces the number of model parameters and can help condition the tensor reconstruction from a small number of orientations. The macroscopic magnetic susceptibility is decomposed as a sum of molecular magnetic polarizabilities, demonstrating that macroscopic order in molecular arrangement is essential to the existence of and symmetry in susceptibility anisotropy and cylindrical symmetry is a natural outcome of an ordered molecular arrangement. Noise propagation in the susceptibility tensor reconstruction is analyzed through its condition number, showing that the tensor reconstruction is highly susceptible to the distribution of acquired subject orientations and to the tensor symmetry properties, with a substantial over- or under-estimation of susceptibility anisotropy in fiber directions not favorably oriented with respect to the acquired orientations. It was found that a careful acquisition of three non-coplanar orientations and the use of cylindrical symmetry guided by diffusion tensor imaging allowed reasonable estimation of magnetic susceptibility anisotropy in certain major white matter tracts in the human brain. PMID:23296181

  4. Thermal Equilibrium of a Macroscopic Quantum System in a Pure State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Huse, David A.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Tumulka, Roderich

    2015-09-01

    We consider the notion of thermal equilibrium for an individual closed macroscopic quantum system in a pure state, i.e., described by a wave function. The macroscopic properties in thermal equilibrium of such a system, determined by its wave function, must be the same as those obtained from thermodynamics, e.g., spatial uniformity of temperature and chemical potential. When this is true we say that the system is in macroscopic thermal equilibrium (MATE). Such a system may, however, not be in microscopic thermal equilibrium (MITE). The latter requires that the reduced density matrices of small subsystems be close to those obtained from the microcanonical, equivalently the canonical, ensemble for the whole system. The distinction between MITE and MATE is particularly relevant for systems with many-body localization for which the energy eigenfuctions fail to be in MITE while necessarily most of them, but not all, are in MATE. We note, however, that for generic macroscopic systems, including those with MBL, most wave functions in an energy shell are in both MATE and MITE. For a classical macroscopic system, MATE holds for most phase points on the energy surface, but MITE fails to hold for any phase point.

  5. Macroscopic technique for the evaluation of oral tongue tumour thickness: a reliable intraoperative method.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M; Vidhyadharan, S; Puthalath, U; Veeraraghavan, R; Sukumaran, S V; Prasad, C; Iyer, S; Thankappan, K

    2016-08-01

    There is no reliable method to assess tumour thickness preoperatively or intraoperatively in cases of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a macroscopic technique to measure tumour thickness. This was a prospective study of 51 consecutive patients with T1/T2 primary SCC of the oral tongue. All patients underwent primary resection with ipsilateral neck dissection. Thickness measurements were obtained using Vernier calipers on the fresh specimen. The technique was correlated with the microscopic evaluation statistically using (1) Pearson's correlation coefficient, (2) intra-class correlation, and (3) Bland-Altman plot with 95% confidence intervals. On comparing the macroscopic technique to the microscopic evaluation, Pearson's correlation (r) was 0.915 (P<0.001). The inter-rater reliability using the intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.955. The Bland-Altman plot to test the agreement between the techniques showed the average difference between macroscopic thickness and microscopic thickness (bias) to be -0.421, with 95% limits of agreement of -3.166 and 2.82. There was a significant correlation and agreement between the macroscopic and microscopic measures of tumour thickness. The macroscopic technique could be used as a reliable tool to measure tumour thickness intraoperatively, prior to neck dissection. PMID:27034158

  6. Tough and Thermosensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Graphene Oxide Hydrogels with Macroscopically Oriented Liquid Crystalline Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongcheng; Li, Yang; Xu, Hui; Peng, Xin; Chen, Ya-Nan; Shang, Cong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Huiliang

    2016-06-22

    Bulk graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials with macroscopically oriented GO liquid crystalline (LC) structures exhibit interesting anisotropic properties, but their facile preparations remain challenging. This work reports for the first time the facile preparation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)/GO nanocomposite hydrogels with macroscopically oriented LC structures with the assistance of a flow field induced by vacuum degassing and the in situ polymerization accelerated by GO. The hydrogel prepared with a GO concentration of 5.0 mg mL(-1) exhibits macroscopically aligned LC structures, which endow the gels with anisotropic optical, mechanical properties, and dimensional changes during the phase transition. The hydrogels show dramatically enhanced tensile mechanical properties and phase transition rates. The oriented LC structures are not damaged during the phase transition of the PNIPAM/GO hydrogels, and hence their LC behavior undergoes reversible change. Moreover, highly oriented LC structures can also be formed when the gels are elongated, even for the gels which do not have macroscopically oriented LC structures. Very impressively, the oriented LC structures in the hydrogels can be permanently maintained by drying the gel samples elongated to and then kept at a constant tensile strain. The thermosensitive nature of PNIPAM and the angle-dependent nature of the macroscopically aligned GO LC structures allow the practical applications of the PNIPAM/GO hydrogels as optical switches, soft sensors, and actuators and so on. PMID:27254730

  7. Hydrodynamic description of elastic or viscoelastic composite materials: Relative strains as macroscopic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to adjust material properties to a specific need is to embed units of one substance into a matrix of another substance. Even materials that are readily tunable during operation can be generated in this way. In (visco)elastic substances, both the matrix material as well as the inclusions and/or their immediate environment can be dynamically deformed. If the typical dynamic response time of the inclusions and their surroundings approach the macroscopic response time, their deformation processes need to be included into a dynamic macroscopic characterization. Along these lines, we present a hydrodynamic description of (visco)elastic composite materials. For this purpose, additional strain variables reflect the state of the inclusions and their immediate environment. These additional strain variables in general are not set by a coarse-grained macroscopic displacement field. Apart from that, during our derivation, we also include the macroscopic variables of relative translations and relative rotations that were previously introduced in different contexts. As a central point, our approach reveals and classifies the importance of a macroscopic variable termed relative strains. We analyze two simplified minimal example geometries as an illustration.

  8. Molecular Identification of Macroscopic And Microscopic Cysts of Sarcocystis in Sheep in North Khorasan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Pejman; Salehi, Mitra; Seyedabadi, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite which can infect humans and animals. Sheep are intermediate hosts of four Sarcocystis species: Sarcocystis tenella, Sarcocystis gigantea, Sarcocystis arieticanis, and Sarcocystis medusiformis The purpose of this study was to perform a molecular identification of the macroscopic and microscopic cysts of Sarcocystis in sheep. In this investigation, the macroscopic and microscopic cysts of Sarcocystis were assessed in slaughtered sheep. The digestion method was used for bradyzoites observation in heart, liver, diaphragm and muscle samples. PCR analysis was conducted on macroscopic and microscopic cysts and also all other samples. Sequencing was performed for ten PCR products. Genotypes were identified by BLAST search and homology analysis. Macrocysts were seen in two muscle tissues. Digestion method and PCR analysis revealed positive results in all samples taken from heart, liver, diaphragm, and muscle. Genotyping of ten tissue samples proved that the genotype of macroscopic belonged to Sarcocystis gigantea and microscopic cysts to Sarcocystis tenella. Microscopic cysts are more prevalent than macroscopic cysts and they can cause enormous economic losses. PMID:24551821

  9. Pore-scale dispersion: Bridging the gap between microscopic pore structure and the emerging macroscopic transport behavior.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel W; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-07-01

    We devise an efficient methodology to provide a universal statistical description of advection-dominated dispersion (Péclet→∞) in natural porous media including carbonates. First, we investigate the dispersion of tracer particles by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The transverse dispersion is found to be essentially determined by the tortuosity and it approaches a Fickian limit within a dozen characteristic scales. Longitudinal dispersion was found to be Fickian in the limit for bead packs and superdiffusive for all other natural media inspected. We demonstrate that the Lagrangian velocity correlation length is a quantity that characterizes the spatial variability for transport. Finally, a statistical transport model is presented that sheds light on the connection between pore-scale characteristics and the resulting macroscopic transport behavior. Our computationally efficient model accurately reproduces the transport behavior in longitudinal direction and approaches the Fickian limit in transverse direction. PMID:27575217

  10. Pore-scale dispersion: Bridging the gap between microscopic pore structure and the emerging macroscopic transport behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-07-01

    We devise an efficient methodology to provide a universal statistical description of advection-dominated dispersion (Péclet→∞ ) in natural porous media including carbonates. First, we investigate the dispersion of tracer particles by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The transverse dispersion is found to be essentially determined by the tortuosity and it approaches a Fickian limit within a dozen characteristic scales. Longitudinal dispersion was found to be Fickian in the limit for bead packs and superdiffusive for all other natural media inspected. We demonstrate that the Lagrangian velocity correlation length is a quantity that characterizes the spatial variability for transport. Finally, a statistical transport model is presented that sheds light on the connection between pore-scale characteristics and the resulting macroscopic transport behavior. Our computationally efficient model accurately reproduces the transport behavior in longitudinal direction and approaches the Fickian limit in transverse direction.

  11. Transition Of Dynamic Rupture Modes And Macroscopic Source Properties In Elastic And Plastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, A. A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Mai, P. M.; Dalguer Gudiel, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic inversions of earthquakes show dominantly pulse-like behavior, i.e. the fault heals shortly after the rupture front has passed leading to short rise times. In numerical simulations with strong velocity-weakening friction, pulse-like ruptures occur under certain initial conditions. However, a complete picture of the dynamics of rupture pulses remains elusive: what controls their rupture speed and their rise time? We apply the 2D spectral element method (SEM2DPACK of Ampuero, 2008) to model spontaneous rupture under strong velocity-and-state-dependent friction in a 2D in-plane model with and without Coulomb off-fault plasticity. Depending on initial stresses and nucleation procedure, the generated ruptures approach distinct regimes of stable self-similar behavior: decaying, steady-state and growing pulse-like, crack-like and super-shear ruptures, bounded by sensitive transitional zones. The asymptotic behavior of these self-similar areas is independent of the initial parameters, unlike the transient approach to that asymptotic solution. We characterize these general rupture modes as a function of background shear stress, angle of maximum compressive initial stress and nucleation procedure in elastic and plastic media. Interestingly, the pulse-crack transition is involving a re-activation of the former healed rupture due to gradual stress build-up near the hypocenter. The introduction of off-fault inelasticity quantitatively shifts the conditions to obtain each rupture mode. Furthermore, the considerable amount of induced off-fault energy dissipation alters macroscopic source properties, e.g. leads to slower rupture velocities, lower peak slip rates and lower shear stress levels on the fault compared to the elastic case. Our simulations provide quantitative relations between off-fault energy dissipation, seismic moment rate and the speed of rupture and healing fronts. These relations provide a self-consistent theoretical framework for the study of the

  12. Macroscopic non-classical states and terahertz quantum processing in room-temperature diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sussman, B. J.; Sprague, M. R.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Bustard, P. J.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the transition between the familiar classical, macroscopic world and the quantum, microscopic one continues to be poorly understood. Expanding the regime of observable quantum behaviour to large-scale objects is therefore an exciting open problem. In macroscopic systems of interacting particles, rapid thermalization usually destroys any quantum coherence before it can be measured or used at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate quantum processing in the vibrational modes of a macroscopic diamond sample under ambient conditions. Using ultrafast Raman scattering, we create an extended, highly non-classical state in the optical phonon modes of bulk diamond. Direct measurement of phonon coherence and correlations establishes the non-classical nature of the crystal dynamics. These results show that optical phonons in diamond provide a unique opportunity for the study of large-scale quantum behaviour, and highlight the potential for diamond as a micro-photonic quantum processor capable of operating at terahertz rates.

  13. Hybrid methods for witnessing entanglement in a microscopic-macroscopic system

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, Nicolo; Vitelli, Chiara; Paternostro, Mauro; De Martini, Francesco; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2011-09-15

    We propose a hybrid approach to the experimental assessment of the genuine quantum features of a general system consisting of microscopic and macroscopic parts. We infer entanglement by combining dichotomic measurements on a bidimensional system and phase-space inference through the Wigner distribution associated with the macroscopic component of the state. As a benchmark, we investigate the feasibility of our proposal in a bipartite-entangled state composed of a single-photon and a multiphoton field. Our analysis shows that, under ideal conditions, maximal violation of a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt-based inequality is achievable regardless of the number of photons in the macroscopic part of the state. The difficulty in observing entanglement when losses and detection inefficiency are included can be overcome by using a hybrid entanglement witness that allows efficient correction for losses in the few-photon regime.

  14. Correlations between Nanoindentation Hardness and Macroscopic Mechanical Properties in DP980 Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark D.; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Sun, Xin; Matlock, David K.; Packard, Corrine; Xu, Le; Barlat, Frederic

    2014-03-01

    Multiphase advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being increasingly used in the automotive industry due to their low cost, good availability and excellent combination of strength and ductility. There is a keen interest from the automotive and steel industry for more fundamental understandings on the key microstructure features influencing the macroscopic properties, i.e., tensile properties, hole-expansion ratio and localized formability of AHSS. In this study, the micro- and macro-level properties for eight commercial DP980 steels are first characterized and quantified with various experimental methods. Correlations between macroscopic-level properties and relationships between various micro- and macro- properties for these steels are then established based on the experimental measurements. It is found that, despite their differences in their chemistry, processing parameters and sheet thickness, the eight DP980 steels do have common microstructural level properties governing their specific macroscopic properties in terms of strength, elongation and hole expansion performance.

  15. Macroscopic photocontrol of ion-transporting pathways of a nanostructured imidazolium-based photoresponsive liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Soberats, Bartolome; Uchida, Emi; Yoshio, Masafumi; Kagimoto, Junko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    The photocontrol of the macroscopic alignment of nanostructured 2D ion-transporting pathways is described. The uniplanar homogeneous alignment of the thermotropic smectic (Sm) liquid-crystalline (LC) phase has been successfully achieved via photoinduced reorientation of the azobenzene groups of the imidazolium-based LC material. The ionic layers of the Sm LC phase are macroscopically oriented perpendicular to the surface of the glass substrate. The oriented films show anisotropic ion conduction in the Sm phase. This is the first example of the macroscopic photoalignment of ion-conductive LC arrays. Reversible switching of homeotropic and homogeneous alignments has also been achieved for the LC material. These materials and the alignment methodology may be useful in the development of ion-based circuits and memory devices. PMID:24958446

  16. Complete characterization of the macroscopic deformations of periodic unimode metamaterials of rigid bars and pivots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme Walter

    2013-07-01

    A complete characterization is given of the possible macroscopic deformations of periodic non-linear affine unimode metamaterials constructed from rigid bars and pivots. The materials are affine in the sense that their macroscopic deformations can only be affine deformations: on a local level the deformation may vary from cell to cell. Unimode means that macroscopically the material can only deform along a one dimensional trajectory in the six dimensional space of invariants describing the deformation (excluding translations and rotations). We show by explicit construction that any continuous trajectory is realizable to an arbitrarily high degree of approximation provided at all points along the trajectory the geometry does not collapse to a lower dimensional one. In particular, we present two and three dimensional dilational materials having an arbitrarily large flexibility window. These are perfect auxetic materials for which a dilation is the only easy mode of deformation. They are free to dilate to arbitrarily large strain with zero bulk modulus.

  17. A macroscopic plasma Lagrangian and its application to wave interactions and resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Y. K. M.

    1974-01-01

    The derivation of a macroscopic plasma Lagrangian is considered, along with its application to the description of nonlinear three-wave interaction in a homogeneous plasma and linear resonance oscillations in a inhomogeneous plasma. One approach to obtain the Lagrangian is via the inverse problem of the calculus of variations for arbitrary first and second order quasilinear partial differential systems. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the given equations to be Euler-Lagrange equations of a Lagrangian are obtained. These conditions are then used to determine the transformations that convert some classes of non-Euler-Lagrange equations to Euler-Lagrange equation form. The Lagrangians for a linear resistive transmission line and a linear warm collisional plasma are derived as examples. Using energy considerations, the correct macroscopic plasma Lagrangian is shown to differ from the velocity-integrated low Lagrangian by a macroscopic potential energy that equals twice the particle thermal kinetic energy plus the energy lost by heat conduction.

  18. Bouncing droplets: a classroom experiment to visualize wave-particle duality on the macroscopic level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Pascal; Dietrich, Erik; Van der Veen, Jan T.; van Joolingen, Wouter R.

    2016-09-01

    This study brings a recently discovered macroscopic phenomenon with wave-particle characteristics into the classroom. The system consists of a liquid droplet levitating over a vertically shaken liquid pool. The droplets allow visualization of a wave–particle system in a directly observable way. We show how to interpret this macroscopic phenomenon and how to set up and carry out this experiment. A class of students performed single slit diffraction experiments with droplets. By scoring individual droplet trajectories students find a diffraction pattern. This pilot application in the classroom shows that students can study and discuss the wave–particle nature of the bouncing droplet experiment. The experiment therefore provides a useful opportunity to show wave–particle behavior on the macroscopic level.

  19. Universal ideal behavior and macroscopic work relation of linear irreversible stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yi-An; Qian, Hong

    2015-06-01

    We revisit the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process as the fundamental mathematical description of linear irreversible phenomena, with fluctuations, near an equilibrium. By identifying the underlying circulating dynamics in a stationary process as the natural generalization of classical conservative mechanics, a bridge between a family of OU processes with equilibrium fluctuations and thermodynamics is established through the celebrated Helmholtz theorem. The Helmholtz theorem provides an emergent macroscopic ‘equation of state’ of the entire system, which exhibits a universal ideal thermodynamic behavior. Fluctuating macroscopic quantities are studied from the stochastic thermodynamic point of view and a non-equilibrium work relation is obtained in the macroscopic picture, which may facilitate experimental study and application of the equalities due to Jarzynski, Crooks, and Hatano and Sasa.

  20. Addressing a single spin in diamond with a macroscopic dielectric microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Tobar, M. E.; Bradac, C.; Nand, N.; Volz, T.; Castelletto, S.

    2014-09-29

    We present a technique for addressing single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond over macroscopic distances using a tunable dielectric microwave cavity. We demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for a single negatively charged NV center (NV{sup –}) in a nanodiamond (ND) located directly under the macroscopic microwave cavity. By moving the cavity relative to the ND, we record the ODMR signal as a function of position, mapping out the distribution of the cavity magnetic field along one axis. In addition, we argue that our system could be used to determine the orientation of the NV{sup –} major axis in a straightforward manner.

  1. Correlation between macroscopic porosity location and liquid metal pressure in centrifugal casting technique.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, T K; Schulman, A; Nielsen, J P; Shalita, S

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic analysis of uniform cylindrical castings fabricated by the centrifugal casting technique has revealed that the macroscopic porosity is dependent on the location of the sprue attachment to the casting. This is attributed to the significant pressure gradient associated with the centrifugal casting technique. The pressure gradient results in different heat transfer rates at portions of the castings near and away from the free surface of the button. Consequently, the macroscopic porosity is invariably at portions of the casting close to the free surface of the button. In addition, some optimized sprue-reservoir combinations could be predicted and proved, based on this pressure gradient concept. PMID:7002971

  2. Concise relation of substitution energy to macroscopic deformation in a deformed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei-Lu; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Huang, Qun-Ying; Wu, Yi-Can

    2011-12-01

    An ab initio study of the effect of macroscopic deformation on energetics of twelve alloying elements in bcc Fe has been performed under three specially designed strain modes. A concise relation of the macroscopic deformation effect on the substitution energy of alloying elements with linear dependences on defect formation volume and relative volume change was found. Based on this concise relationship, the following behaviors can be predicted by comparing defect formation volumes: the strain-induced solubility change of alloying atoms and then the degree or possibility of redistribution and segregation of alloying atoms, the stability transition between monovacancy and divacancy, and self-interstitial atom reorientation under heavy loading.

  3. Departure of microscopic friction from macroscopic drag in molecular fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Fujiwara, Daiki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Friction coefficient of the Langevin equation and drag of spherical macroscopic objects in steady flow at low Reynolds numbers are usually regarded as equivalent. We show that the microscopic friction can be different from the macroscopic drag when the mass is taken into account for particles with comparable scale to the surrounding fluid molecules. We illustrate it numerically by molecular dynamics simulation of chloride ion in water. Friction variation by the atomistic mass effect beyond the Langevin regime can be of use in the drag reduction technology as well as the electro or thermophoresis.

  4. Departure of microscopic friction from macroscopic drag in molecular fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Fujiwara, Daiki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Friction coefficient of the Langevin equation and drag of spherical macroscopic objects in steady flow at low Reynolds numbers are usually regarded as equivalent. We show that the microscopic friction can be different from the macroscopic drag when the mass is taken into account for particles with comparable scale to the surrounding fluid molecules. We illustrate it numerically by molecular dynamics simulation of chloride ion in water. Friction variation by the atomistic mass effect beyond the Langevin regime can be of use in the drag reduction technology as well as the electro or thermophoresis. PMID:26957167

  5. Macroscopic Measurement of Resonant Magnetization Tunneling in High-Spin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Ziolo, R.

    1996-05-01

    We report the observation of steps at regular intervals of magnetic field in the hysteresis loop of a macroscopic sample of oriented Mn12O12(CH3COO)16(H2O)4 crystals. The magnetic relaxation rate increases substantially when the field is tuned to a step. We propose that these effects are manifestations of thermally assisted, field-tuned resonant tunneling between quantum spin states, and attribute the observation of quantum-mechanical phenomena on a macroscopic scale to tunneling in a large (Avogadro's) number of magnetically identical molecules.

  6. Macroscopic crack formation and extension in pristine and artificially aged PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    A technique has been developed to quantitatively describe macroscopic cracks, both their location and extent, in heterogeneous high explosive and mock materials. By combining such a technique with the deformation field measurement using digital image correlation (DIC), we conduct observation and measurement of the initiation, extension, and coalescence of internal cracks in the compression of Brazilian disk made of pristine and artificially aged PBX 9501 hjgh explosives. Our results conclude quantitatively that aged PBX 9501 is not only weaker but also much more brittle than the pristine one, thus is more susceptible to macroscopic cracking.

  7. Accurate numerical verification of the instanton method for macroscopic quantum tunneling: Dynamics of phase slips

    SciTech Connect

    Danshita, Ippei; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2010-09-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of supercurrents of one-dimensional Bose gases in a ring optical lattice to verify instanton methods applied to coherent macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT). We directly simulate the real-time quantum dynamics of supercurrents, where a coherent oscillation between two macroscopically distinct current states occurs due to MQT. The tunneling rate extracted from the coherent oscillation is compared with that given by the instanton method. We find that the instanton method is quantitatively accurate when the effective Planck's constant is sufficiently small. We also find phase slips associated with the oscillations.

  8. Liquid mixing driven motions of floating macroscopic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming

    2007-04-01

    Dropping miscible and low-density organic solvents into water generates translational and rotational motions of floating objects including oil droplets, polymer half spheres, and model boats. The moving speed of the boat at different loads and the force produced by solvent drops are measured. In contrast to motions driven by surface tension of monolayer, the liquid mixing driven motion can be dynamically steered without restriction and continued provided the supply is maintained and the amount of water is large enough. Such motions are the result of Marangoni instability in binary liquid-liquid systems with intentionally produced concentration gradients behind the floating objects.

  9. Linking macroscopic with microscopic neuroanatomy using synthetic neuronal populations.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Calvin J; Cuntz, Hermann; Soltesz, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    Dendritic morphology has been shown to have a dramatic impact on neuronal function. However, population features such as the inherent variability in dendritic morphology between cells belonging to the same neuronal type are often overlooked when studying computation in neural networks. While detailed models for morphology and electrophysiology exist for many types of single neurons, the role of detailed single cell morphology in the population has not been studied quantitatively or computationally. Here we use the structural context of the neural tissue in which dendritic trees exist to drive their generation in silico. We synthesize the entire population of dentate gyrus granule cells, the most numerous cell type in the hippocampus, by growing their dendritic trees within their characteristic dendritic fields bounded by the realistic structural context of (1) the granule cell layer that contains all somata and (2) the molecular layer that contains the dendritic forest. This process enables branching statistics to be linked to larger scale neuroanatomical features. We find large differences in dendritic total length and individual path length measures as a function of location in the dentate gyrus and of somatic depth in the granule cell layer. We also predict the number of unique granule cell dendrites invading a given volume in the molecular layer. This work enables the complete population-level study of morphological properties and provides a framework to develop complex and realistic neural network models. PMID:25340814

  10. Linking Macroscopic with Microscopic Neuroanatomy Using Synthetic Neuronal Populations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Calvin J.; Cuntz, Hermann; Soltesz, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic morphology has been shown to have a dramatic impact on neuronal function. However, population features such as the inherent variability in dendritic morphology between cells belonging to the same neuronal type are often overlooked when studying computation in neural networks. While detailed models for morphology and electrophysiology exist for many types of single neurons, the role of detailed single cell morphology in the population has not been studied quantitatively or computationally. Here we use the structural context of the neural tissue in which dendritic trees exist to drive their generation in silico. We synthesize the entire population of dentate gyrus granule cells, the most numerous cell type in the hippocampus, by growing their dendritic trees within their characteristic dendritic fields bounded by the realistic structural context of (1) the granule cell layer that contains all somata and (2) the molecular layer that contains the dendritic forest. This process enables branching statistics to be linked to larger scale neuroanatomical features. We find large differences in dendritic total length and individual path length measures as a function of location in the dentate gyrus and of somatic depth in the granule cell layer. We also predict the number of unique granule cell dendrites invading a given volume in the molecular layer. This work enables the complete population-level study of morphological properties and provides a framework to develop complex and realistic neural network models. PMID:25340814

  11. Particle velocity measurements with macroscopic fluorescence imaging in lymph tissue mimicking microfluidic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Ricky; Koo, Chiwan; Ton, Phuc; Han, Arum; Righetti, Raffaella; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound poroelastography can quantify structural and mechanical properties of tissues such as stiffness, compressibility, and fluid flow rate. This novel ultrasound technique is being explored to detect tissue changes associated with lymphatic disease. We have constructed a macroscopic fluorescence imaging system to validate ultrasonic fluid flow measurements and to provide high resolution imaging of microfluidic phantoms. The optical imaging system is composed of a white light source, excitation and emission filters, and a camera with a zoom lens. The field of view can be adjusted from 100 mm x 75 mm to 10 mm x 7.5 mm. The microfluidic device is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and has 9 channels, each 40 μm deep with widths ranging from 30 μm to 200 μm. A syringe pump was used to propel water containing 15 μm diameter fluorescent microspheres through the microchannels, with flow rates ranging from 0.5 μl/min to 10 μl/min. Video was captured at a rate of 25 frames/sec. The velocity of the microspheres in the microchannels was calculated using an algorithm that tracked the movement of the fluorescent microspheres. The imaging system was able to measure particle velocities ranging from 0.2 mm/sec to 10 mm/sec. The range of flow velocities of interest in lymph vessels is between 1 mm/sec to 10 mm/sec; therefore our imaging system is sufficient to measure particle velocity in phantoms modeling lymphatic flow.

  12. Functional network macroscopes for probing past and present Earth system dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth, as viewed from a physicist's perspective, is a dynamical system of great complexity. Functional complex networks are inferred from observational data and model runs or constructed on the basis of theoretical considerations. Representing statistical interdependencies or causal interactions between objects (e.g., Earth system subdomains, processes, or local field variables), functional complex networks are conceptually well-suited for naturally addressing some of the fundamental questions of Earth system analysis concerning, among others, major dynamical patterns, teleconnections, and feedback loops in the planetary machinery, as well as critical elements such as thresholds, bottlenecks, and switches. The first part of this talk concerns complex network theory and network-based time series analysis. Regarding complex network theory, the novel contributions include consistent frameworks for analyzing the topology of (i) general networks of interacting networks and (ii) networks with vertices of heterogeneously distributed weights, as well as (iii) an analytical theory for describing spatial networks. In the realm of time series analysis, (i) recurrence network analysis is put forward as a theoretically founded, nonlinear technique for the study of single, but possibly multivariate time series. (ii) Coupled climate networks are introduced as an exploratory tool of data analysis for quantitatively characterizing the intricate statistical interdependency structure within and between several fields of time series. The second part presents applications for detecting dynamical transitions (tipping points) in time series and studying bottlenecks in the atmosphere's general circulation structure. The analysis of paleoclimate data reveals a possible influence of large-scale shifts in Plio-Pleistocene African climate variability on events in human evolution. This presentation summarizes the contents of the dissertation titled "Functional network macroscopes for

  13. Fe(II) uptake on natural montmorillonites. I. Macroscopic and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Daniela; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Baeyens, Bart; Dähn, Rainer; Joshi, Prachi A; Scheinost, Andreas C; Gorski, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important redox-active element that is ubiquitous in both engineered and natural environments. In this study, the retention mechanism of Fe(II) on clay minerals was investigated using macroscopic sorption experiments combined with Mössbauer and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Sorption edges and isotherms were measured under anoxic conditions on natural Fe-bearing montmorillonites (STx, SWy, and SWa) having different structural Fe contents ranging from 0.5 to 15.4 wt % and different initial Fe redox states. Batch experiments indicated that, in the case of low Fe-bearing (STx) and dithionite-reduced clays, the Fe(II) uptake follows the sorption behavior of other divalent transition metals, whereas Fe(II) sorption increased by up to 2 orders of magnitude on the unreduced, Fe(III)-rich montmorillonites (SWy and SWa). Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis revealed that nearly all the sorbed Fe(II) was oxidized to surface-bound Fe(III) and secondary Fe(III) precipitates were formed on the Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite, while sorbed Fe is predominantly present as Fe(II) on Fe-low and dithionite-reduced clays. The results provide compelling evidence that Fe(II) uptake characteristics on clay minerals are strongly correlated to the redox properties of the structural Fe(III). The improved understanding of the interfacial redox interactions between sorbed Fe(II) and clay minerals gained in this study is essential for future studies developing Fe(II) sorption models on natural montmorillonites. PMID:24930689

  14. Memory-effect-induced macroscopic-microscopic entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Qingxia; Zhao, Xinyu; Yu, Ting

    2016-07-01

    We study optomechanical entanglement between an optical cavity field and a movable mirror coupled to a non-Markovian environment. The non-Markovian quantum-state diffusion approach and the non-Markovian master equation are shown to be useful in investigating entanglement generation between the cavity field and the movable mirror. The simple model presented in this paper demonstrates several interesting properties of optomechanical entanglement that are associated with environment memory effects. It is evident that the effective environment central frequency can be used to modulate the optomechanical entanglement. In addition, we show that the maximum entanglement may be achieved by properly choosing the effective detuning, which is significantly dependent on the strength of the memory effect of the environment.

  15. Quantum correlations of two qubits interacting with a macroscopic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Lan

    2015-04-01

    We consider two particles of spin- interacting with a one-dimensional -spin array, which is an exactly solvable model. The dynamics of entanglement and quantum discord (QD) of the spins of the two particles is investigated by regarding the 1D -spin array as the environment. It is found that although the entanglement may suffer a sudden death and a sudden birth in the evolution, it can neither be generated nor become larger than its initial value. Different from the entanglement dynamics, QD can be amplified and even be generated by the interaction between particles and the common environment. We also observe that QD decays asymptotically to zero and later experiences a rival when the average number of excitation in the 1D -spin array becomes larger in the case of nonzero inter-distance between two particles.

  16. Using explicit macroscopic feedback to determine efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; MacMartin, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Calculating efficacies of climate forcings has been a useful method of determining the importance of forcing agents relative to CO2. However, because the strength of internal feedbacks is dependent upon the climate state, efficacies are dependent upon the strengths of the applied forcings, and simulations designed to capture these efficacies have tradeoffs between simulation length and accurately capturing the steady state climate response. We propose an alternate method of determining a quantity similar to climate efficacy via adjusting the amount of forcing by feeding back the observed climate state. By balancing CO2 forcing with another climate forcing, many internal feedbacks are suppressed, which linearizes the climate response to the forcing and promotes rapid convergence of the simulation. We performed simulations in two fully coupled general circulation models of Earth's climate. Doubling the present day CO2 concentration requires a steady state solar reduction of approximately 2.5%; this answer can be obtained with a simulation of less than 30 years. With this method, the amount of solar reduction scales linearly with the logarithmic change in CO2 concentration. We explore similar calculations using other climate forcings. Because this method circumvents calculation of radiative forcing, intercomparison of values between different climate forcings is difficult and is a drawback of our method as compared to the original method of calculating efficacy. Feedback can be used to estimate the efficacy of solar reductions in models. The solar reduction that is required to maintain temperature in the presence of an instantaneous change in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is computed using feedback. The left-hand panel illustrates both the solar forcing as a function of time for offsetting 2×CO2, and the efficacy estimated as the mean solar reduction after the initial transient; extremely rapid convergence is obtained. The right-hand panel illustrates the linearity

  17. Bridging the gap between the nanostructural organization and macroscopic interfacial rheology of amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Sophia; Rühs, Patrick A; Sieber, Christine; Isa, Lucio; Fischer, Peter; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-08-26

    The interfacial behavior of proteins and protein aggregates such as fibrils influences the bulk behavior of multiphase systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, and other technological applications. Additionally, it is an important factor in some biological processes such as the accumulation of amyloid fibrils at biological membranes in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, using β-lactoglobulin fibrils as a model system, we cover a large range of characteristic measuring length scales by combining atomic force microscopy, passive probe particle tracking, tensiometry, interfacial shear, and dilatational rheology in order to correlate the intricate structure of fibril-laden interfaces with their macroscopic adsorption kinetics and viscoelasticity. A subtle change in solution pH provokes pronounced changes in interfacial properties such as alignment, entanglement, multilayer formation, and fibril fracture, which can be resolved and linked across the various length scales involved. PMID:25100189

  18. Macroscopic yielding in jammed solids is accompanied by a nonequilibrium first-order transition in particle trajectories.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Berthier, Ludovic

    2016-08-01

    We use computer simulations to analyze the yielding transition during large-amplitude oscillatory shear of a simple model for soft jammed solids. Simultaneous analysis of global mechanical response and particle-scale motion demonstrates that macroscopic yielding, revealed by a smooth crossover in mechanical properties, is accompanied by a sudden change in the particle dynamics, which evolves from nondiffusive motion to irreversible diffusion as the amplitude of the shear is increased. We provide numerical evidence that this sharp change corresponds to a nonequilibrium first-order dynamic phase transition, thus establishing the existence of a well-defined microscopic dynamic signature of the yielding transition in amorphous materials in oscillatory shear. PMID:27627368

  19. Structure and macroscopic tackiness of ultrathin pressure sensitive adhesive films.

    PubMed

    Diethert, Alexander; Körstgens, Volker; Magerl, David; Ecker, Katharina; Perlich, Jan; Roth, Stephan V; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Ultrathin layers of the statistical copolymer P(nBA-stat-MA) with a majority of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) and a minority of methyl acrylate (MA) are characterized with respect to the film morphology and the mechanical response in a probe tack test. The probed copolymer can be regarded as a model system of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). The films are prepared by spin-coating which enables an easy thickness control via the polymer concentration of the solution. The film thickness is determined with x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and white light interferometry (WLI). Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) provides detailed and statistically significant information about the film morphology. Two types of lateral structures are identified and no strong correlation of these structures with the PSA film thickness is observed. In contrast, prominent parameters of the probe tack test, such as the stress maximum and the tack energy, exhibit an exponential dependence on the film thickness. PMID:22817560

  20. Morphogenesis as a macroscopic self-organizing process.

    PubMed

    Beloussov, Lev V

    2012-09-01

    We start from reviewing different epistemological constructions used for explaining morphogenesis. Among them, we explore the explanatory power of a law-centered approach which includes top-down causation and the basic concepts of a self-organization theory. Within such a framework, we discuss the morphomechanical models based upon the presumption of feedbacks between mechanical stresses imposed onto a given embryo part from outside and those generated within the latter as a kind of active response. A number of elementary morphogenetic events demonstrating that these feedbacks are directed towards hyper-restoration (restoration with an overshoot) of the initial state of mechanical stresses are described. Moreover, we show that these reactions are bound together into the larger scale feedbacks. That permits to suggest a reconstruction of morphogenetic successions in early Metazoan development concentrated around two main archetypes distinguished by the blastopores geometry. The perspectives of applying the same approach to cell differentiation are outlined. By discussing the problem of positional information we suggest that the developmental pathway of a given embryo part depends upon its preceded deformations and the corresponding mechanical stresses rather than upon its static position at any moment of development. PMID:22609495