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Sample records for macroscopic structural analysis

  1. Multidimensional operando analysis of macroscopic structure evolution in lithium sulfur cells by X-ray radiography.

    PubMed

    Risse, S; Jafta, C J; Yang, Y; Kardjilov, N; Hilger, A; Manke, I; Ballauff, M

    2016-04-21

    Lithium sulfur cells are the most promising candidate for the post lithium-ion battery era. Their major drawback is rapid capacity fading attributed to the complex electrochemical processes during charge and discharge which are not known precisely. Here we present for the first time a multidimensional operando measurement by combining X-ray radiography with impedance spectroscopy while galvanostatically charging and discharging a lithium sulfur cell. The formation of macroscopic sulfur crystals at the end of charge can be seen directly by X-ray radiography. These crystals can be assigned to stable α-sulfur (rhombic) and metastable β-sulfur (monoclinic) by their characteristic crystal habit. These crystal structures with a length of more than 1 mm form and dissolve rapidly during cycling. Their appearance is accompanied by characteristic signals in impedance spectroscopy. Macroscopic crystals of Li2S cannot be observed in full agreement with earlier studies by operando X-ray diffraction. In addition, X-ray radiography reveals non-wetted areas on the carbon cathode. These regions grow during discharge and are reduced during charge. The area of these electrochemically inactive spots is inversely proportional to discharge capacity. PMID:27035926

  2. Equilibrium Macroscopic Structure Revisited from Spatial Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Koretaka

    2016-02-01

    In classical systems, we reexamine how macroscopic structures in equilibrium state connect with spatial constraint on the systems. For example, volume and density as the constraint for liquids in rigid box, and crystal lattice as the constraint for crystalline solids. We find that in disordered states, equilibrium macroscopic structure, depending on temperature and on multibody interactions in the system, can be well characterized by a single special microscopic structure independent of temperature and of interactions. The special microscopic structure depends only on the spatial constraint. We demonstrate the present findings providing (i) significantly efficient and systematic prediction of macroscopic structures for possible combination of constituents in multicomponent systems using first-principles calculations, and (ii) unique and accurate prediction of multibody interactions in given system from measured macroscopic structure, without performing trial-and-error simulation.

  3. Large-Scale Structure of a Network of Co-Occurring MeSH Terms: Statistical Analysis of Macroscopic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kastrin, Andrej; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Hristovski, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Concept associations can be represented by a network that consists of a set of nodes representing concepts and a set of edges representing their relationships. Complex networks exhibit some common topological features including small diameter, high degree of clustering, power-law degree distribution, and modularity. We investigated the topological properties of a network constructed from co-occurrences between MeSH descriptors in the MEDLINE database. We conducted the analysis on two networks, one constructed from all MeSH descriptors and another using only major descriptors. Network reduction was performed using the Pearson's chi-square test for independence. To characterize topological properties of the network we adopted some specific measures, including diameter, average path length, clustering coefficient, and degree distribution. For the full MeSH network the average path length was 1.95 with a diameter of three edges and clustering coefficient of 0.26. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test rejects the power law as a plausible model for degree distribution. For the major MeSH network the average path length was 2.63 edges with a diameter of seven edges and clustering coefficient of 0.15. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test failed to reject the power law as a plausible model. The power-law exponent was 5.07. In both networks it was evident that nodes with a lower degree exhibit higher clustering than those with a higher degree. After simulated attack, where we removed 10% of nodes with the highest degrees, the giant component of each of the two networks contains about 90% of all nodes. Because of small average path length and high degree of clustering the MeSH network is small-world. A power-law distribution is not a plausible model for the degree distribution. The network is highly modular, highly resistant to targeted and random attack and with minimal dissortativity. PMID:25006672

  4. Macroscopic and spectroscopic analysis of lanthanide adsorption to bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, Bryne T.; Mosselmans, J. Fred W.; Magennis, Marisa; Atkinson, Kirk D.; Tourney, Janette; Olive, Valerie; Ellam, Robert M.

    2009-06-01

    This study was designed to combine surface complexation modelling of macroscopic adsorption data with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic (XAS) measurements to identify lanthanide sorption sites on the bacterial surface. The adsorption of selected representatives for light (La and Nd), middle (Sm and Gd) and heavy (Er and Yb) lanthanides was measured as a function of pH, and biomass samples exposed to 4 mg/L lanthanide at pH 3.5 and 6 were analysed using XAS. Surface complexation modelling was consistent with the light lanthanides adsorbing to phosphate sites, whereas the adsorption of middle and heavy lanthanides could be modelled equally well by carboxyl and phosphate sites. The existence of such mixed mode coordination was confirmed by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which was also consistent with adsorption to phosphate sites at low pH, with secondary involvement of carboxyl sites at high adsorption density (high pH). Thus, the two approaches yield broadly consistent information with regard to surface site identity and lanthanide coordination environment. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis suggests that coordination to phosphate sites is monodentate at the metal/biomass ratios used. Based on the best-fitting p Ka site, we infer that the phosphate sites are located on N-acetylglucosamine phosphate, the most likely polymer on gram-negative cells with potential phosphate sites that deprotonate around neutral pH.

  5. Evaluation of soil structural changes through macroscopic and microscopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Nargish; Chélin, Marie; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Barbieux, Sophie; Bodson, Bernard; Garré, Sarah; Colinet, Gilles; Degré, Aurore

    2015-04-01

    The heterogeneity of soil structure and pore size distribution are highly influenced by external factors like tillage systems and other agricultural management practices. However, changes in soil hydrodynamic behavior are not fully understood and are still under research. Also, researchers have explained the impact of tillage practices on soil hydraulic properties related to pore size distribution, connectivity and orientation are involved but the characterization of these modifications and consequences remains a challenge. Furthermore, the relation between macroscopic measurements and microscopic investigation of the soil structure remains scarce. Recently, X-ray tomography (X- μCT) has been used in order to characterize changes in soil pore size distribution in various contexts and the method is able to link microtomography information to hydrodynamic measurement. In our study, X-μCT has been used in order to characterize changes in soil pore system. Since, tomography does not count most of the micropores, Richards' pressure plate and evaporation method was also combined to get complete range of pore size distribution. We found good match between evaporation data with X-μCT at the macropore scale and evaporation data with pressure plate method at micropore scale. X-μCT data refines retention and hydraulic curves near saturation where Richards' data alone can lead to numerous sets of fitted parameters. On the otherhand, evaporation data (Hyprop apparatus ©) provide comparable datasets with X-μCT. Combining micro and macroscopic measurements allows us to validate X-μCT information, which is otherwise not so obvious.

  6. Analysis and Enhancements of a Prolific Macroscopic Model of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fietkiewicz, Christopher; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Macroscopic models of epilepsy can deliver surprisingly realistic EEG simulations. In the present study, a prolific series of models is evaluated with regard to theoretical and computational concerns, and enhancements are developed. Specifically, we analyze three aspects of the models: (1) Using dynamical systems analysis, we demonstrate and explain the presence of direct current potentials in the simulated EEG that were previously undocumented. (2) We explain how the system was not ideally formulated for numerical integration of stochastic differential equations. A reformulated system is developed to support proper methodology. (3) We explain an unreported contradiction in the published model specification regarding the use of a mathematical reduction method. We then use the method to reduce the number of equations and further improve the computational efficiency. The intent of our critique is to enhance the evolution of macroscopic modeling of epilepsy and assist others who wish to explore this exciting class of models further. PMID:27144054

  7. Correlation of Structural and Macroscopic Properties of Starches with Their Tabletability Using the SM(2) Approach.

    PubMed

    Dave, Vivek S; Chanda, Monica; Sayles, Matt; Popielarczyk, Michael; Boyce, Heather; Bompelliwar, Sai Krishna; Bates, Simon; Morris, Ken R; Haware, Rahul V

    2015-11-01

    The effects of PURE-DENT® and SPRESS® starch properties on their compression behavior was characterized using "SM(2) " approach (structural properties, macroscopic properties, and multivariate analysis). Moisture sorption rate constants, moisture content, amylose and amylopectin degradation enthalpy, percent crystallinity, amylose-amylopectin ratio, and cross-linking degree were used to profile starch structural properties. Particle density, particle size distribution, and Heckel compression descriptors [yield pressure (YP) of plastic deformation, and elastic recovery] were used as macroscopic descriptors. The structural and macroscopic properties were correlated qualitatively [principal component analysis (PCA)] and quantitatively [standard least square regression (SLSR)] with the tablet mechanical strength (TMS). These analyses revealed that the differences correlated with amylose-amylopectin content, particle density, compression mechanisms, and TMS between the starch grades. Univariate analysis proved lacking; however, PCA identified the particle size, moisture content, percent crystallinity, amylose-amylopectin ratio, and YP of plastic deformation and elastic recovery as the main factors influencing the starch TMS. SLSR quantified the positive influence of Fourier transform infrared spectra absorbance ratio at 1022-1003 and YP of the immediate elastic recovery, and the negative contribution of amylopectin content on the TMS. Therefore, starch amylose and amylopectin content, crystallinity, and lower elastic recovery are mainly responsible for better TMS. PMID:26235472

  8. Structural characterization of macroscopic single-walled carbon nanotube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei

    In this thesis, we studied the structural properties of macroscopic materials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the form of fibers, films and suspensions. We characterized the preferred orientations in partially aligned SWNT fibers and films, combining x-ray fiber diagram and polarized Raman scattering. Our texture model consists of an aligned fraction, characterized by the angular distribution width of tube axes, plus a completely unaligned fraction. For neat fibers extruded from SWNT/superacid suspensions through a small orifice, the distribution width and the aligned fraction both improve with decreasing orifice diameter. For magnetic field-aligned SWNT films deposited from surfactant suspensions, the aligning effects of deposition and external magnetic field force in the film plane are additive, the out-of-plane mosaic being narrower than the in-plane one. SWNTs dispersed in superacid or aqueous surfactant solutions are precursors for many applications. In oleum, SWNTs can be charged and protonated by H 2SO4 molecules. X-ray scattering indicates that H2SO 4 molecules align along nanotube axes to form cylindrical shells wrapped around nanotubes. This finding establishes the validity of a long-standing important but still debated physical chemistry concept, "structured solvent shells surrounding dissolved ions". Differential scanning calorimetry confirms that the partly ordered H2SO4 molecules are a new phase, with distinct freezing/melting behavior. X-ray scattering at low temperature further shows that crystallization of the bulk-like acid surrounding the structured shells is templated by the SWNTs. The specific orientation of the acid crystallites provides solid evidence for direct protonation of SWNT. We studied the morphologies of SWNT suspensions using small-angle neutron scattering. We observed rigid rod behavior from SWNTs dispersed in water using sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate surfactant, suggesting that SWNTs exist mainly as individual tube

  9. Structured pathology reporting improves the macroscopic assessment of rectal tumour resection specimens.

    PubMed

    King, Simon; Dimech, Margaret; Johnstone, Susan

    2016-06-01

    We examined whether introduction of a structured macroscopic reporting template for rectal tumour resection specimens improved the completeness and efficiency in collecting key macroscopic data elements. Fifty free text (narrative) macroscopic reports retrieved from 2012 to 2014 were compared with 50 structured macroscopic reports from 2013 to 2015, all of which were generated at John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW. The six standard macroscopic data elements examined in this study were reported in all 50 anatomical pathology reports using a structured macroscopic reporting dictation template. Free text reports demonstrated significantly impaired data collection when recording intactness of mesorectum (p<0.001), relationship to anterior peritoneal reflection (p=0.028) and distance of tumour to the non-peritonealised circumferential margin (p<0.001). The number of words used was also significantly (p<0.001) reduced using pre-formatted structured reports compared to free text reports. The introduction of a structured reporting dictation template improves data collection and may reduce the subsequent administrative burden when macroscopically evaluating rectal resections. PMID:27114373

  10. Tough and Thermosensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/Graphene Oxide Hydrogels with Macroscopically Oriented Liquid Crystalline Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongcheng; Li, Yang; Xu, Hui; Peng, Xin; Chen, Ya-Nan; Shang, Cong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Huiliang

    2016-06-22

    Bulk graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials with macroscopically oriented GO liquid crystalline (LC) structures exhibit interesting anisotropic properties, but their facile preparations remain challenging. This work reports for the first time the facile preparation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)/GO nanocomposite hydrogels with macroscopically oriented LC structures with the assistance of a flow field induced by vacuum degassing and the in situ polymerization accelerated by GO. The hydrogel prepared with a GO concentration of 5.0 mg mL(-1) exhibits macroscopically aligned LC structures, which endow the gels with anisotropic optical, mechanical properties, and dimensional changes during the phase transition. The hydrogels show dramatically enhanced tensile mechanical properties and phase transition rates. The oriented LC structures are not damaged during the phase transition of the PNIPAM/GO hydrogels, and hence their LC behavior undergoes reversible change. Moreover, highly oriented LC structures can also be formed when the gels are elongated, even for the gels which do not have macroscopically oriented LC structures. Very impressively, the oriented LC structures in the hydrogels can be permanently maintained by drying the gel samples elongated to and then kept at a constant tensile strain. The thermosensitive nature of PNIPAM and the angle-dependent nature of the macroscopically aligned GO LC structures allow the practical applications of the PNIPAM/GO hydrogels as optical switches, soft sensors, and actuators and so on. PMID:27254730

  11. Structure and macroscopic tackiness of ultrathin pressure sensitive adhesive films.

    PubMed

    Diethert, Alexander; Körstgens, Volker; Magerl, David; Ecker, Katharina; Perlich, Jan; Roth, Stephan V; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Ultrathin layers of the statistical copolymer P(nBA-stat-MA) with a majority of n-butyl acrylate (nBA) and a minority of methyl acrylate (MA) are characterized with respect to the film morphology and the mechanical response in a probe tack test. The probed copolymer can be regarded as a model system of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). The films are prepared by spin-coating which enables an easy thickness control via the polymer concentration of the solution. The film thickness is determined with x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and white light interferometry (WLI). Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) provides detailed and statistically significant information about the film morphology. Two types of lateral structures are identified and no strong correlation of these structures with the PSA film thickness is observed. In contrast, prominent parameters of the probe tack test, such as the stress maximum and the tack energy, exhibit an exponential dependence on the film thickness. PMID:22817560

  12. No association between schizophrenia susceptibility variants and macroscopic structural brain volume variation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Huang, Liang; Wang, Jinkai; Su, Bing; Luo, Xiong-Jian

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that genetic variants for schizophrenia susceptibility might contribute to structural brain volume variations in schizophrenia patients, including total brain volume, hippocampal volume, and amygdalar volume. However, whether these schizophrenia susceptibility variants are associated with macroscopic structural brain volume (i.e., intracranial volume, total brain volume, and hippocampal volume) in healthy subjects is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the associations between 47 schizophrenia susceptibility variants (from 25 well-characterized schizophrenia susceptibility genes) and cranial volume variation in a healthy Chinese sample (N = 1,013). We also extracted the association between these 47 schizophrenia risk variants and the macroscopic structural brain volume (intracranial volume, total brain volume and hippocampal volume) in a large healthy sample of European ancestry (ENIGMA sample, N = 5,775). We identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) nominally associated with intracranial volume, total brain volume, and hippocampal volume at P < 0.05 (uncorrected). However, after Bonferroni corrections for multiple testing, no SNP showed significant association. Hence, our results do not support previous observations that schizophrenia susceptibility variants are associated with brain structure (e.g., hippocampal volume) in healthy individuals, and indicate that single schizophrenia risk variant may not contribute significantly to macroscopic brain structure (e.g., intracranial volume or hippocampal volume) variation in healthy subjects. PMID:26437209

  13. A sample cell for in situ electric-field-dependent structural characterization and macroscopic strain measurements.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad J; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Zhiyang; Khansur, Neamul H; Hinterstein, Manuel; Kimpton, Justin A; Daniels, John E

    2016-05-01

    When studying electro-mechanical materials, observing the structural changes during the actuation process is necessary for gaining a complete picture of the structure-property relationship as certain mechanisms may be meta-stable during actuation. In situ diffraction methods offer a powerful and direct means of quantifying the structural contributions to the macroscopic strain of these materials. Here, a sample cell is demonstrated capable of measuring the structural variations of electro-mechanical materials under applied electric potentials up to 10 kV. The cell is designed for use with X-ray scattering techniques in reflection geometry, while simultaneously collecting macroscopic strain data using a linear displacement sensor. The results show that the macroscopic strain measured using the cell can be directly correlated with the microscopic response of the material obtained from diffraction data. The capabilities of the cell have been successfully demonstrated at the Powder Diffraction beamline of the Australian Synchrotron and the potential implementation of this cell with laboratory X-ray diffraction instrumentation is also discussed. PMID:27140148

  14. Materials ``alchemy'': Shape-preserving chemical transformation of micro-to-macroscopic 3-D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhage, Kenneth H.

    2010-06-01

    The scalable fabrication of nano-structured materials with complex morphologies and tailorable chemistries remains a significant challenge. One strategy for such synthesis consists of the generation of a solid structure with a desired morphology (a “preform”), followed by reactive conversion of the preform into a new chemistry. Several gas/solid and liquid/solid reaction processes that are capable of such chemical conversion into new micro-to-nano-structured materials, while preserving the macroscopic-to-microscopic preform morphologies, are described in this overview. Such shape-preserving chemical transformation of one material into another could be considered a modern type of materials “alchemy.”

  15. Macroscopic Surface Structures for Polymer-metal Hybrid Joints Manufactured by Laser Based Thermal Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schricker, Klaus; Stambke, Martin; Bergmann, Jean Pierre; Bräutigam, Kevin; Henckell, Philipp

    The increasing application of hybrid structures in component design and fabrication allows to constantly enhance the realization of lightweight potentials. Laser-based joining of metals to polymers can obtaina local bonding with high load bearing capability. During the process, the polymer gets molten by the energy input of the laser beam and penetrates into the structure of the metal surface by means of a defined joining pressure. Macroscopic structures on the metal surface, produced by cutting or laser processing, are possible surface treatmentsfor achieving thepolymer-metal joints. The optimal geometry and other key parameters for the macroscopic surface structures are only partially known at present, e.g. a rising structure density causes a higher load capacity. Based on grooves and drilled holes, as referencegeometries, the depth (0.1-0.9 mm), width (0.3-1.1 mm), alignment angle, diameter (1.0mm- 1.5mm), structure density and penetration depth of the molten polymer were correlated to the separation force. The results allow an essential insight into the main effects ofmacroscopic structures on the mechanical joint properties and the material performance of the polymer during the process.

  16. Molecular-Level Understanding of Structural Changes of Organic Crystals Induced by Macroscopic Mechanical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime

    2016-03-18

    Structural changes to molecular crystals upon mechanical stimulation have attracted attention for sensing, recording, and microactuation. Comprehensive structure information is required to understand relationships between the mechanical force applied, the crystal structure, and the bulk property changes in order to develop general design concepts for mechanoresponsive compounds. Unfortunately, mechanical stimulation of organic crystals typically deteriorates their integrity, preventing detailed structure analyses by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. However, in the past three years, several interesting studies have been reported in which molecular crystals retain their integrity even after a mechanically induced crystalline structure change. These materials have allowed us to investigate how macroscopic mechanical forces affect the microscopic structures of molecular crystals by single-crystal XRD analyses. This Minireview summarizes current knowledge of mechanically induced structure changes in molecular crystals, which will facilitate research in this field. PMID:26748640

  17. Macroscopic analysis of axisymmetric functionally gradient material under thermal loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, P.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ferrari, M. )

    1994-06-01

    The axisymmetric functionally gradient materials (FGMs) subject to nonuniform temperature variations were studied with the combined use of homogenization and inhomogeneous eigenstrained media analysis. The material properties and the temperature variations were assumed to depend on the radial coordinate only. The inhomogeneous material properties of the FGM cylinder can be obtained by modulating the concentration level of spherical alumina particles in an aluminum matrix. The resulting stresses due to the temperature variation are presented for numerous distribution functions of alumina particles. It is shown that the particle distribution extensively influences the intensity and profile of the thermal stresses.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of smokeless gunpowders and macroscopic gunshot residues.

    PubMed

    López-López, María; Merk, Virginia; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-07-01

    Gunshot residues (GSR) result from the discharge of a firearm being a potential piece of evidence in criminal investigations. The macroscopic GSR particles are basically formed by burned and non-burned gunpowder. Motivated by the demand of trace analysis of these samples, in this paper, the use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was evaluated for the analysis of gunpowders and macroscopic GSR particles. Twenty-one different smokeless gunpowders were extracted with ethanol. SERS spectra were obtained from the diluted extracts using gold nanoaggregates and an excitation wavelength of 633 nm. They show mainly bands that could be assigned to the stabilizers diphenylamine and ethylcentralite present in the gunpowders. Then, macroscopic GSR particles obtained after firing two different ammunition cartridges on clothing were also measured using the same procedure. SERS allowed the detection of the particles collected with an aluminum stub from cloth targets without interferences from the adhesive carbon. The results demonstrate the great potential of SERS for the analysis of macroscopic GSR particles. Furthermore, they indicate that the grain-to-grain inhomogeneity of the gunpowders needs to be considered. Graphical Abstract SERS allows the detection of GSR particles collected with adhesive stubs from cloth targets using gold nanoaggregates and an excitation wavelength of 633 nm. PMID:27137517

  19. Macroscopic spatial analysis of pedestrian and bicycle crashes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Chowdhury; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Choi, Keechoo

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of spatial correlation using a Bayesian spatial framework to model pedestrian and bicycle crashes in Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZs). Aggregate models for pedestrian and bicycle crashes were estimated as a function of variables related to roadway characteristics, and various demographic and socio-economic factors. It was found that significant differences were present between the predictor sets for pedestrian and bicycle crashes. The Bayesian Poisson-lognormal model accounting for spatial correlation for pedestrian crashes in the TAZs of the study counties retained nine variables significantly different from zero at 95% Bayesian credible interval. These variables were - total roadway length with 35 mph posted speed limit, total number of intersections per TAZ, median household income, total number of dwelling units, log of population per square mile of a TAZ, percentage of households with non-retired workers but zero auto, percentage of households with non-retired workers and one auto, long term parking cost, and log of total number of employment in a TAZ. A separate distinct set of predictors were found for the bicycle crash model. In all cases the Bayesian models with spatial correlation performed better than the models that did not account for spatial correlation among TAZs. This finding implies that spatial correlation should be considered while modeling pedestrian and bicycle crashes at the aggregate or macro-level. PMID:22269522

  20. Characterization of the Branching Structure of the Lung from ''Macroscopic'' Pressure-Volume Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.; Alencar, A. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Hantos, Z.; Stanley, H. E.; Suki, B.

    2001-07-30

    We analyze the problem of fluid flow in a bifurcating structure containing random blockages that can be removed by fluid pressure. We introduce an asymmetric tree model and find that the predicted pressure-volume relation is connected to the distribution {Pi}(n) of the generation number n of the tree's terminal segments. We use this relation to explore the branching structure of the lung by analyzing experimental pressure-volume data from dog lungs. The {Pi}(n) extracted from the data using the model agrees well with experimental data on the branching structure. We can thus obtain information about the asymmetric structure of the lung from macroscopic, noninvasive pressure-volume measurements.

  1. The many-nucleon theory of nuclear collective structure and its macroscopic limits: an algebraic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. J.; McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear collective models introduced by Bohr, Mottelson and Rainwater, together with the Mayer-Jensen shell model, have provided the central framework for the development of nuclear physics. This paper reviews the microscopic evolution of the collective models and their underlying foundations. In particular, it is shown that the Bohr-Mottelson models have expressions as macroscopic limits of microscopic models that have precisely defined expressions in many-nucleon quantum mechanics. Understanding collective models in this way is especially useful because it enables the analysis of nuclear properties in terms of them to be revisited and reassessed in the light of their microscopic foundations.

  2. Controlled preparation and structure characterization of BiFeO{sub 3} with macroscopic shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiang; Chen, Pengfei; Zhao, Li; Yao, Weifeng; Qi, Xuemei

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We firstly explored two facile and successful techniques for BiFeO{sub 3} immobilization on silica fiber, namely, a combined impregnation method with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) templates route, and a combined solvothermal method with CNFs templates route. It is expected that such materials with direct macroscopic shapes would hold promise as highly functionalized materials for potential practical applications, especially in photocatalysis. - Highlights: • BiFeO{sub 3} with macroscopic shape was successfully obtained. • The synthetic methods used here are facile, effective, and reproducible. • Phase composition was strongly affected by calcination temperatures. • The obtained materials are promising visible-light-driven photocatalysts. - Abstract: BiFeO{sub 3} was successfully immobilized on silica fiber via two synthetic techniques (a combined impregnation method with carbon nanofibers templates route; a combined solvothermal method with carbon nanofibers templates route). The phase structure, morphology and optical absorption property of the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results confirmed that carbon nanofibers can act as effective templates for BiFeO{sub 3} immobilization on silica fiber with the applied two methods. Compared with solvent thermal method, impregnation method tends to form a relatively uniform particle size distribution and highly-crystallized phase when the calcination temperature was kept at 773 K for 5 h. It turned out the phase composition of the samples is strongly affected by the calcination temperatures for both cases. Such materials with direct macroscopic shapes would hold promise as highly functionalized materials for potential practical applications, especially in photocatalysis.

  3. Population dynamics of the modified theta model: macroscopic phase reduction and bifurcation analysis link microscopic neuronal interactions to macroscopic gamma oscillation.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Ikuhiro; Yoshida, Lui; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2014-06-01

    Gamma oscillations of the local field potential are organized by collective dynamics of numerous neurons and have many functional roles in cognition and/or attention. To mathematically and physiologically analyse relationships between individual inhibitory neurons and macroscopic oscillations, we derive a modification of the theta model, which possesses voltage-dependent dynamics with appropriate synaptic interactions. Bifurcation analysis of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) enables us to consider how synaptic interactions organize collective oscillations. We also develop the adjoint method (infinitesimal phase resetting curve) for simultaneous equations consisting of ordinary differential equations representing synaptic dynamics and a partial differential equation for determining the probability distribution of the membrane potential. This method provides a macroscopic phase response function (PRF), which gives insights into how it is modulated by external perturbation or internal changes of parameters. We investigate the effects of synaptic time constants and shunting inhibition on these gamma oscillations. The sensitivity of rising and decaying time constants is analysed in the oscillatory parameter regions; we find that these sensitivities are not largely dependent on rate of synaptic coupling but, rather, on current and noise intensity. Analyses of shunting inhibition reveal that it can affect both promotion and elimination of gamma oscillations. When the macroscopic oscillation is far from the bifurcation, shunting promotes the gamma oscillations and the PRF becomes flatter as the reversal potential of the synapse increases, indicating the insensitivity of gamma oscillations to perturbations. By contrast, when the macroscopic oscillation is near the bifurcation, shunting eliminates gamma oscillations and a stable firing state appears. More interestingly, under appropriate balance of parameters, two branches of bifurcation are found in our

  4. Shock structure and temperature overshoot in macroscopic multi-temperature model of mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarević, Damir; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Simić, Srboljub

    2014-10-01

    The paper discusses the shock structure in macroscopic multi-temperature model of gaseous mixtures, recently established within the framework of extended thermodynamics. The study is restricted to weak and moderate shocks in a binary mixture of ideal gases with negligible viscosity and heat conductivity. The model predicts the existence of temperature overshoot of heavier constituent, like more sophisticated approaches, but also puts in evidence its non-monotonic behavior not documented in other studies. This phenomenon is explained as a consequence of weak energy exchange between the constituents, either due to large mass difference, or large rarefaction of the mixture. In the range of small Mach number it is also shown that shock thickness (or equivalently, the inverse of Knudsen number) decreases with the increase of Mach number, as well as when the mixture tends to behave like a single-component gas (small mass difference and/or presence of one constituent in traces).

  5. Shock structure and temperature overshoot in macroscopic multi-temperature model of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Madjarević, Damir Simić, Srboljub; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2014-10-15

    The paper discusses the shock structure in macroscopic multi-temperature model of gaseous mixtures, recently established within the framework of extended thermodynamics. The study is restricted to weak and moderate shocks in a binary mixture of ideal gases with negligible viscosity and heat conductivity. The model predicts the existence of temperature overshoot of heavier constituent, like more sophisticated approaches, but also puts in evidence its non-monotonic behavior not documented in other studies. This phenomenon is explained as a consequence of weak energy exchange between the constituents, either due to large mass difference, or large rarefaction of the mixture. In the range of small Mach number it is also shown that shock thickness (or equivalently, the inverse of Knudsen number) decreases with the increase of Mach number, as well as when the mixture tends to behave like a single-component gas (small mass difference and/or presence of one constituent in traces)

  6. State-space based analysis and forecasting of macroscopic road safety trends in Greece.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, macroscopic road safety trends in Greece are analyzed using state-space models and data for 52 years (1960-2011). Seemingly unrelated time series equations (SUTSE) models are developed first, followed by richer latent risk time-series (LRT) models. As reliable estimates of vehicle-kilometers are not available for Greece, the number of vehicles in circulation is used as a proxy to the exposure. Alternative considered models are presented and discussed, including diagnostics for the assessment of their model quality and recommendations for further enrichment of this model. Important interventions were incorporated in the models developed (1986 financial crisis, 1991 old-car exchange scheme, 1996 new road fatality definition) and found statistically significant. Furthermore, the forecasting results using data up to 2008 were compared with final actual data (2009-2011) indicating that the models perform properly, even in unusual situations, like the current strong financial crisis in Greece. Forecasting results up to 2020 are also presented and compared with the forecasts of a model that explicitly considers the currently on-going recession. Modeling the recession, and assuming that it will end by 2013, results in more reasonable estimates of risk and vehicle-kilometers for the 2020 horizon. This research demonstrates the benefits of using advanced state-space modeling techniques for modeling macroscopic road safety trends, such as allowing the explicit modeling of interventions. The challenges associated with the application of such state-of-the-art models for macroscopic phenomena, such as traffic fatalities in a region or country, are also highlighted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that it is possible to apply such complex models using the relatively short time-series that are available in macroscopic road safety analysis. PMID:23579105

  7. Analysis of macroscopic fractures in granite in the HDR geothermal well EPS-1, Soultz-sous-Foreêts, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genter, Albert; Traineau, Hervé

    1996-07-01

    An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Foreˆts, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are grouped in two principal fractures sets striking N005 and N170 °, and dipping 70 °W and 70 °E, respectively. This average attitude is closely related to the past tectonic rifting activity of the graben during the Tertiary, and is consistent with data obtained from nearby boreholes and from neighbouring crystalline outcrops. Fractures are distributed in clusters of hydrothermally altered and fractured zones. They constitute a complex network of fault strands dominated by N-S trends, except within some of the most fractured depth intervals (1650 m, 2170 m), where an E-W-striking fracture set occurs. The geometry of the pre-existing fracture system strikes in a direction nearly parallel to the maximum horizontal stress. In this favorable situation, hydraulic injections will tend both to reactivate natural fractures at low pressures, and to create a geothermal reservoir.

  8. Flow-Induced Assembly of Colloidal Liquid Crystalline Nanosheets Toward Unidirectional Macroscopic Structures.

    PubMed

    Nono, Yoshihiro; Mouri, Emiko; Nakata, Munetaka; Nakato, Teruyuki

    2016-03-01

    Multiscale structures of anisotropic nanoparticles up to macroscopic scales are important in order to produce practical materials through nanotechnology. As an example of such structures, hierarchical organization of colloidal liquid crystals of niobium oxide nanosheets yields stripe textures observable by naked eyes. The stripes are generated by the growth of liquid crystalline domains (tactoids) and the alignment of the tactoids under an electric field and gravity applied in the directions orthogonal to each other. The nanosheets forming the tactoids are unidirectionally aligned along the flow induced by gravity, and the aligned tactoids are stretched to be connected each other to form the stripes. Time evolution of the stripes indicates that they are generated during the settlement of the nanosheets. The nanosheets are debundled with the settlement, and thus the stripes are gradually degenerated during the settlement. Larger tactoids cause faster nanosheet settlement and stripe degeneration. The electric field applied orthogonally to gravity has roles of pinning the nanosheets to slow down their settlement and retains the stripes for several hours. PMID:27455743

  9. Sub-diffuse structured light imaging provides macroscopic maps of microscopic tissue structure (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen C.

    2016-03-01

    The onset and progression of cancer introduces changes to the intra-cellular ultrastructural components and to the morphology of the extracellular matrix. While previous work has shown that localized scatter imaging is sensitive to pathology-induced differences in these aspects of tissue microstructure, wide adaptation this knowledge for surgical guidance is limited by two factors. First, the time required to image with confocal-level localization of the remission signal can be substantial. Second, localized (i.e. sub-diffuse) scatter remission intensity is influenced interchangeably by parameters that define scattering frequency and anisotropy. This similarity relationship must be carefully considered in order to obtain unique estimates of biomarkers that define either the scatter density or features that describe the distribution (e.g. shape, size, and orientation) of scatterers. This study presents a novel approach that uses structured light imaging to address both of these limitations. Monte Carlo data were used to model the reflectance intensity over a wide range of spatial frequencies, reduced scattering coefficients, absorption coefficients, and a metric of the scattering phase function that directly maps to the fractal dimension of scatter sizes. The approach is validated in tissue-simulating phantoms constructed with user-tuned scattering phase functions. The validation analysis shows that the phase function can be described in the presence of different scatter densities or background absorptions. Preliminary data from clinical tissue specimens show quantitative images of both the scatter density and the tissue fractal dimension for various tissue types and pathologies. These data represent a novel wide-field quantitative approach to mapping microscopic structural biomarkers that cannot be obtained with standard diffuse imaging. Implications for the use of this approach to assess surgical margins will be discussed.

  10. Macroscopic and histological characteristics of fluid-filled ovarian structures in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Orsolya Gabriella; Túry, Ernő; Abonyi-Tóth, Zsolt; Kastelic, John; Gábor, György

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to use macroscopic and histological features of corpora lutea with a cavity and anovulatory cystic ovarian structures, present in 90 pairs of abattoir-derived dairy cow ovaries, as the basis to clarify the nomenclature of ovarian structures. Excluding morphologically normal ovarian fol-licles (antrum < 2 cm, wall < 1 mm), there were 27 fluid-filled ovarian structures. Ovulatory structures > 16 mm in diameter were designated as Group A (cavity ≤ 10 mm and wall > 10 mm) or Group B (cavity > 10 mm and wall < 10 mm). The volume of luteal tissue was less (P < 0.05) in Group B than in Group A, whereas that of a solid corpus luteum (CL) was intermediate (least square means ± SEM: 72 ± 1.92, 11.22 ± 1.57 and 5.84 ± 1.92 cm3, respectively). There was a greater proportion (P < 0.05) of small luteal cells in Group B compared to a solid CL, whereas Group A was intermediate (58.6 ± 5.3, 37.4 ± 5.3 and 44.0 ± 4.4%, respectively). Connective tissue was thicker (P < 0.05) in Group B than in Group A (295.4 ± 46.9 vs. 153.9 ± 38.2 μm). Based on the above-mentioned characteristics and differences, Groups A and B were designated as a CL with a cavity and a cystic CL, respectively. Furthermore, there were three groups of anovulatory ovarian structures. Structures in Group C were termed persistent/anovulatory follicles (overall diameter and wall thickness ≤ 20 and 1-3 mm, respectively). Finally, Groups D and E were designated as a follicle-fibrous cyst and a follicle-luteinised cyst (based on histological structure) for anovulatory structures with an overall diameter and wall thickness of ≥ 20 and ≤ 3 mm, and ≥ 20 and ≥ 3 mm, respectively. PMID:24334085

  11. Macroscopic and histopathologic analysis of human knee menisci in aging and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, C.; Grogan, S.P.; Patil, S.; Otsuki, S.; Hasegawa, A.; Koziol, J.; Lotz, M.K.; D’Lima, D.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Meniscus lesions following trauma or associated with osteoarthritis (OA) have been described, yet meniscus aging has not been systematically analyzed. The objectives of this study were to (i) establish standardized protocols for representative macroscopic and microscopic analysis, (ii) improve existing scoring systems, and (iii) apply these techniques to a large number of human menisci. Design Medial and lateral menisci from 107 human knees were obtained and cut in two different planes (triangle/crossection and transverse/horizontal) in three separate locations (mid portion, anterior and posterior horns). All sections included vascular and avascular regions and were graded for i) surface integrity, ii) cellularity, iii) matrix/fiber organization and collagen alignment, and iv) Safranin-O staining intensity. The cartilage in all knee compartments was also scored. Results The new macroscopic and microscopic grading systems showed high inter-reader and intra-reader intraclass correlation coefficients. The major age-related changes in menisci in joints with no or minimal OA included increased Safranin-O staining intensity, decreased cell density, the appearance of acellular zones, and evidence of mucoid degeneration with some loss of collagen fiber organization. The earliest meniscus changes occurred predominantly along the inner rim. Menisci from OA joints showed severe fibrocartilaginous separation of the matrix, extensive fraying, tears and calcification. Abnormal cell arrangements included decreased cellularity, diffuse hypercellularity along with cellular hypertrophy and abnormal cell clusters. In general, the anterior horns of both medial and lateral menisci were less affected by age and OA. Conclusions New standardized protocols and new validated grading systems allowed us to conduct a more systematic evaluation of changes in aging and OA menisci at a macroscopic and microscopic level. Several meniscus abnormalities appear to be specific to aging in

  12. Theoretical study of vapor-liquid homogeneous nucleation using stability analysis of a macroscopic phase.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Calderón, Bernardo

    2012-10-14

    Stability analysis is generally used to verify that the solution to phase equilibrium calculations corresponds to a stable state (minimum of the free energy). In this work, tangent plane distance analysis for stability of macroscopic mixtures is also used for analyzing the nucleation process, reconciling thus this analysis with classical nucleation theories. In the context of the revised nucleation theory, the driving force and the nucleation work are expressed as a function of the Lagrange multiplier corresponding to the mole fraction constraint from the minimization problem of stability analysis. Using a van der Waals fluid applied to a ternary mixture, Lagrange multiplier properties are illustrated. In particular, it is shown how the Lagrange multiplier value is equal to one on the binodal and spinodal curves at the same time as the driving force of nucleation vanishes on these curves. Finally, it is shown that, on the spinodal curve, the nucleation work from the revised and generalized nucleation theories are characterized by two different local minima from stability analysis, irrespective of any interfacial tension models. PMID:23061836

  13. Expansion and growth of structure observables in a macroscopic gravity averaged universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijenayake, Tharake; Ishak, Mustapha

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the effect of averaging inhomogeneities on expansion and large-scale structure growth observables using the exact and covariant framework of macroscopic gravity (MG). It is well known that applying the Einstein's equations and spatial averaging do not commute and lead to the averaging problem and backreaction terms. For the MG formalism applied to the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric, the extra term can be encapsulated as an averaging density parameter denoted ΩA . An exact isotropic cosmological solution of MG for the flat FLRW metric is already known in the literature; we derive here an anisotropic exact solution. Using the isotropic solution, we compare the expansion history to current available data of distances to supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, cosmic microwave background last scattering surface data, and Hubble constant measurements, and find -0.05 ≤ΩA≤0.07 (at the 95% confidence level). For the flat metric case this reduces to -0.03 ≤ΩA≤0.05 . The positive part of the intervals can be rejected if a mathematical (and physical) prior is taken into account. We also find that the inclusion of this term in the fits can shift the values of the usual cosmological parameters by a few to several percents. Next, we derive an equation for the growth rate of large-scale structure in MG that includes a term due to the averaging and assess its effect on the evolution of the growth compared to that of the Lambda cold dark matter (Λ CDM ) concordance model. We find that an ΩA term of an amplitude range of [-0.04 ,-0.02 ] lead to a relative deviation of the growth from that of the Λ CDM of up to 2%-4% at late times. Thus, the shift in the growth could be of comparable amplitude to that caused by similar changes in cosmological parameters like the dark energy density parameter or its equation of state. The effect could also be comparable in amplitude to some systematic effects considered for future surveys. This

  14. Specific effects of Ca(2+) ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Björn; Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air-water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca(2+) concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy - from the ubiquitous air-water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O-H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C-H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca(2+), micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca(2+) concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes. PMID:27337699

  15. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.; Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bauer, W.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%--20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  16. A new effective macroscopic Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard formulation for immiscible fluids in porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, Markus; Pradas, Marc; Pavliotis, Grigorios; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2013-11-01

    Guided by thermodynamic and variational principles we describe mixtures of incompressible fluids in strongly perforated domains with a general class of phase field equations coupled to the Stokes equations. Important applications include subsurface flows, fuel cells, and microfluidics. Starting with a microscopic formulation for heterogenous domains (e.g. a porous medium), represented as the periodic covering of a single reference cell, we rigorously derive effective macroscopic phase field equations under the assumption of periodic flow for large Péclet numbers by the multiple scale method with drift and our recently introduced splitting strategy for Ginzburg-Landau/Cahn-Hilliard-type equations. We recover systematically diffusion-dispersion relations (including Taylor-Aris-dispersion) as for classical convection-diffusion problems. Our results provide a convenient computational framework to macroscopically track interfaces in porous media. In view of the well-known versatility of phase field models, our study proposes a promising formulation for many engineering and scientific applications such as multiphase flows in porous media and oil recovery, for instance.

  17. Laser-generated Macroscopic and Microscopic Surface Structures for the Joining of Aluminum and Thermoplastics using Friction Press Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander N.; Wirth, Franz X.; Rinck, Philipp; Zaeh, Michael F.

    Structural lightweight construction is increasingly utilized in the aerospace and automotive industry. Hybrid structures have great potential, especially with regard to load-specific component layouts. Usually, a surface pre-treatment is applied prior to joining dissimilar materials to improve bonding mechanisms such as form closure. In previous studies pulsed wave (pw) lasers were used for structuring metals. This paper presents the results of aluminum pre-treatment via a continuous wave (cw) single-mode fiber laser: macroscopic and microscopic structures were generated on the aluminum surface; the samples were joined with glass fiber reinforced polyamide using Friction Press Joining (FPJ), a method for joining metals and thermoplastic polymers in lap joint configuration. Using these new methods for surface structuring, shear strength was increased by 40% compared to previous studies with pw lasers.

  18. Macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Guo, Peng-Tao; Zhu, Zhi; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Yan; Ma, Si-Ping; Wang, Zhen-Ning; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Macroscopic serosal classification of gastric cancer has been reported in previous studies, but rarely reported about it of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to propose a macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer and to investigate clinical significance of this classification. Materials and methods: Morphologic features of colorectal cancer were analyzed according to the macroscopic serosal appearance and clinicopathologic characteristics of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Microscopic serosal structure was compared between different types under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. Results: Macroscopic serosal classification was divided into normal type, reactive type, nodular type and colloid type according to the macroscopic serosal appearance and microscopic structure. There were significant differences in tumor size, tumor gross type, histological type, histological grade, tumor necrosis, pT stage, number of nodes metastasis, lymph node metastasis ratio, pN stage, M stage and peritoneal metastasis between patients with different serosal types. Univariate analysis of prognosis revealed macroscopic serosal classification as one of factors significantly correlated with patient survival. However, multivariate analysis only revealed TNM stage significantly correlated with patient survival, while macroscopic serosal classification did not, maybe due to insufficient samples. Conclusions: Macroscopic serosal classification of colorectal cancer is preliminarily defined and divided into four types. Different macroscopic serosal types indicate different clinicopathologic features and correlate with prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer, but still cannot be proven as an independent factor. PMID:26884925

  19. Nanoscale cues regulate the structure and function of macroscopic cardiac tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Ho; Lipke, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Pilnam; Cheong, Raymond; Thompson, Susan; Delannoy, Michael; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Heart tissue possesses complex structural organization on multiple scales, from macro- to nano-, but nanoscale control of cardiac function has not been extensively analyzed. Inspired by ultrastructural analysis of the native tissue, we constructed a scalable, nanotopographically controlled model of myocardium mimicking the in vivo ventricular organization. Guided by nanoscale mechanical cues provided by the underlying hydrogel, the tissue constructs displayed anisotropic action potential propagation and contractility characteristic of the native tissue. Surprisingly, cell geometry, action potential conduction velocity, and the expression of a cell–cell coupling protein were exquisitely sensitive to differences in the substratum nanoscale features of the surrounding extracellular matrix. We propose that controlling cell–material interactions on the nanoscale can stipulate structure and function on the tissue level and yield novel insights into in vivo tissue physiology, while providing materials for tissue repair. PMID:20018748

  20. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  1. Fabrication of nanofibrous A- or B-sites substituted LaCoO{sub 3} perovskites with macroscopic structures and their catalytic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiang; Zhao, Li; Wu, Meixia; Yao, Weifeng; Qi, Meixue; Shi, Xiaoyan

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Fabrication of nanofibrous La{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) and LaMn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) perovskite-type oxides with macroscopic structures can be successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as templates. Furthermore, their application for the combustion of carbon black (CB), which is a model of particulate matter exhausted from diesel engines, was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Nanofibrous perovskites with macroscopic shapes were successfully obtained. • CNFs template method used here is facile, effective and reproducible. • This method might be applicable to other novel material fabrication. • The obtained materials show superior catalytic activity in soot combustion. - Abstract: Fabrication of nanofibrous La{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.2) and LaMn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.2, 0.5, 0.8) perovskite-type oxides with macroscopic structures can be successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as templates. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), coupled with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the template effect and formation of the perovskite-type oxides on the macroscopic substrate. It turned out that this facile method can ensure the desired single-phase perovskite-type oxides formation by controlling the corresponding metal ratio during the preparation procedure. In addition, the immobilized nanofibrous La{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (x = 0.05) and LaMn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.5) perovskite-type oxides can greatly decrease the combustion temperature of nanosized carbon black particles, which has the high potential application prospects in the treatment of diesel soot particles.

  2. Osteoarthritic cartilage lesions in the bovine patellar groove: a macroscopic, histological and immunohistological analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinola, T; Sukura, A; Virkki, L M; Sillat, T; Lekszycki, T; Konttinen, Y T

    2014-04-01

    A high percentage of osteoarthritis (OA)-like patellar groove lesions in the stifle joint in calcium-deficient bulls has been recently reported. The prevalence of these lesions in bulls deficient in or supplemented with calcium was compared to findings in culled and healthy bulls to determine whether they represent normal anatomical variations, developmental anomalies or OA. It was hypothesized that the patellar groove lesions may represent OA. Distal cartilage samples from 160 femurs were analysed using a macroscopic Société Française d'Arthroscopie (SFA) OA grading system. Samples representing different SFA grades were subjected to Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histological and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) immunohistological OA grading. For a qualitative analysis three OA samples were immunostained for interleukin (IL)-1β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and collagenase-produced COL2-3/4M neoepitopes. Patellar groove lesions were found in 48% of the femurs and were highest in calcium-deficient animals (71%, P<0.001). All three different grading systems disclosed OA in culled bulls, but no focal areas of cartilage necrosis. OARSI and HMGB1 grades were fairly concordant (Spearman's ρ=0.95, P<0.001; Cohen's κ=0.23, P<0.005), both with a slight disparity with the SFA grade (ρ=0.80 and 0.87, P<0.01; κ=0.36 and 0.46, P<0.001). IL-1β, MMP-13 and COL2-3/4M staining patterns were compatible with OA. The study showed that patellar groove lesions are common in bulls. In all SFA, OARSI and HMGB1 graded samples the lesions clearly demonstrated OA and showed OA-typical pathophysiology. Arthroscopic SFA grading showed similar changes in calcium-deficient and calcium-supplemented bulls, but in the absence of a time course study and histological data the primary nature of these lesions could not be established with certainty. PMID:24581814

  3. Electronic-structure study of an edge dislocation in Aluminum and the role of macroscopic deformations on its energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Mrinal; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Gavini, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    We employed a real-space formulation of orbital-free density functional theory using finite-element basis to study the defect-core and energetics of an edge dislocation in Aluminum. Our study shows that the core-size of a perfect edge dislocation is around ten times the magnitude of the Burgers vector. This finding is contrary to the widely accepted notion that continuum descriptions of dislocation energetics are accurate beyond ∼1-3 Burgers vector from the dislocation line. Consistent with prior electronic-structure studies, we find that the perfect edge dislocation dissociates into two Shockley partials with a partial separation distance of 12.8 Å. Interestingly, our study revealed a significant influence of macroscopic deformations on the core-energy of Shockley partials. We show that this dependence of the core-energy on macroscopic deformations results in an additional force on dislocations, beyond the Peach-Koehler force, that is proportional to strain gradients. Further, we demonstrate that this force from core-effects can be significant and can play an important role in governing the dislocation behavior in regions of inhomogeneous deformations.

  4. Correlation between hierarchical structure of crystal networks and macroscopic performance of mesoscopic soft materials and engineering principles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Naibo; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2015-11-01

    This review examines how the concepts and ideas of crystallization can be extended further and applied to the field of mesoscopic soft materials. It concerns the structural characteristics vs. the macroscopic performance, and the formation mechanism of crystal networks. Although this subject can be discussed in a broad sense across the area of mesoscopic soft materials, our main focus is on supramolecular materials, spider and silkworm silks, and biominerals. First, the occurrence of a hierarchical structure, i.e. crystal network and domain network structures, will facilitate the formation kinetics of mesoscopic phases and boost up the macroscopic performance of materials in some cases (i.e. spider silk fibres). Second, the structure and performance of materials can be correlated in some way by the four factors: topology, correlation length, symmetry/ordering, and strength of association of crystal networks. Moreover, four different kinetic paths of crystal network formation are identified, namely, one-step process of assembly, two-step process of assembly, mixed mode of assembly and foreign molecule mediated assembly. Based on the basic mechanisms of crystal nucleation and growth, the formation of crystal networks, such as crystallographic mismatch (or noncrystallographic) branching (tip branching and fibre side branching) and fibre/polymeric side merging, are reviewed. This facilitates the rational design and construction of crystal networks in supramolecular materials. In this context, the (re-)construction of a hierarchical crystal network structure can be implemented by thermal, precipitate, chemical, and sonication stimuli. As another important class of soft materials, the unusual mechanical performance of spider and silkworm silk fibres are reviewed in comparison with the regenerated silk protein derivatives. It follows that the considerably larger breaking stress and unusual breaking strain of spider silk fibres vs. silkworm silk fibres can be interpreted

  5. Constraints from Cosmological Data on Expansion and Growth of Structure Observables in a Macroscopic Gravity Averaged Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak-Boushaki, Mustapha B.; Wijenayake, Tharake

    2016-06-01

    We report recent results from investigating the effect of averaging inhomogeneities on cosmological distances and large-scale structure growth observables using the exact and covariant framework of Macroscopic Gravity (MG) averaging. For the MG formalism applied to the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric, this gives an extra dynamical term encapsulated as an averaging density parameter denoted ΩA. We analyze constraints on this parameter and its correlations with other cosmological parameters from using the CMB (Planck), distances to supernovae, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Hubble constant measurements, and the CFHTLenS and other recent data. We compare the amplitude of this effect to other systematic effects considered for future high precision surveys.

  6. Characterizing Crystalline-Vitreous Structures: From Atomically Resolved Silica to Macroscopic Bubble Rafts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, Kristen M.; Schlexer, Philomena; Bu¨chner, Christin; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    A two-part experiment using bubble rafts to analyze amorphous structures is presented. In the first part, the distinctions between crystalline and vitreous structures are examined. In the second part, the interface between crystalline and amorphous regions is considered. Bubble rafts are easy to produce and provide excellent analogy to recent…

  7. Particle Shape Effect on Macroscopic Behaviour of Underground Structures: Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarf, Krzysztof; Combe, Gael; Villard, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical performance of underground flexible structures such as buried pipes or culverts made of plastics depend not only on the properties of the structure, but also on the material surrounding it. Flexible drains can deflect by 30% with the joints staying tight, or even invert. Large deformations of the structure are difficult to model in the framework of Finite Element Method, but straightforward in Discrete Element Methods. Moreover, Discrete Element approach is able to provide information about the grain-grain and grain-structure interactions at the microscale. This paper presents numerical and experimental investigations of flexible buried pipe behaviour with focus placed on load transfer above the buried structure. Numerical modeling was able to reproduce the experimental results. Load repartition was observed, being affected by a number of factors such as particle shape, pipe friction and pipe stiffness.

  8. Particulate nature of blood determines macroscopic rheology: a 2-D lattice Boltzmann analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenghai; Munn, Lance L

    2005-03-01

    Historically, predicting macroscopic blood flow characteristics such as viscosity has been an empirical process due to the difficulty in rigorously including the particulate nature of blood in a mathematical representation of blood rheology. Using a two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann approach, we have simulated the flow of red blood cells in a blood vessel to estimate flow resistance at various hematocrits and vessel diameters. By including white blood cells (WBCs) in the flow, we also calculate the increase in resistance due to white cell rolling and adhesion. The model considers the blood as a suspension of particles in plasma, accounting for cell-cell and cell-wall interactions to predict macroscopic blood rheology. The model is able to reproduce the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect, i.e., the increase in relative apparent viscosity as tube size increases, and the Fahraeus effect, i.e., tube hematocrit is lower than discharge hematocrit. In addition, the model allows direct assessment of the effect of WBCs on blood flow in the microvasculature, reproducing the dramatic increases in flow resistance as WBCs enter short capillary segments. This powerful and flexible model can be used to predict blood flow properties in any vessel geometry and with any blood composition. PMID:15613630

  9. Hydrogels with cylindrically symmetric structure at macroscopic scale by self-assembly of semi-rigid polyion complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zi Liang; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Liang, Songmiao; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Gong, Jian Ping

    2010-07-28

    A hydrogel with cylindrically symmetric structure at macroscopic scale has been developed by polymerization of a cationic monomer in the presence of a small amount of semi-rigid polyanion poly(2,2'-disulfonyl-4,4'-benzidine terephthalamide) (PBDT) in a cylinder glass tube. The polyion complex radially aligns in the outer region of the synthesized cylinder gel. On the other hand, it orients in concentric and axial directions in the inner region. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of such millimeter-scale ordered structure developed in a polymeric hydrogel. We elucidate that homeotropic alignment on the glass wall is energetically favorable for the semi-rigid polyion complex, resulting in the radial orientation in the outer region. In the inner region, the oriented structures result from the monomer difffusion (due to the heterogeneous polymerization) that induces PBDT orientation perpendicular to the diffusion direction. The structured gels showing sensitive response of birefringence to external force are expected to find applications in optical sensors. PMID:20590113

  10. Supercoiling as a Physical Process Providing Formation of Macroscopic Anisometric Supramolecular Structures.

    PubMed

    Skoblin, A A; Stovbun, S V

    2015-09-01

    Solutions of chiral and achiral trifluoroacetyl amino alcohols (TFAAA) contain anisometric structures with a diameter <1 nm and length ~7 nm. In homochiral solutions and xerogels, chiral TFAAA form strings with a diameter of ~30-100 nm and length more than ~1 μ, and achiral TFAAA condensate into isometric granule with diameter of ~1 μ. We conclude that molecular chirality determines helicity of strings within tens of nanometers or more. Stabilization of supramolecular structure of strings is presumably achieved via their supercoiling. PMID:26459482

  11. Small angle x-ray diffraction through living muscle links the lattice structure to macroscopic material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis; Irving, Tom; Sponberg, Simon

    Muscle is a unique hierarchical material composed of millions of molecular motors arranged on filaments in a regular lattice structure. The macroscopic, material behavior of muscle can be characterized by its workloop, a periodically activated force-length curve. Muscle is capable of operating as a spring, motor, brake, or strut, defined by its workloop. We are interested in the multiscale physics of muscle that drive its ``energetic versatility'' - the ability of muscle to alter its function. Here we introduce a system of two muscles from the cockroach whose workloops are not explained by our current understanding of the determinants of workloop function (the classic force-length, force-velocity, and twitch response). Differences in material behavior may arise from structural differences in the muscle's active lattice. Using the BIOCat beam at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne NL, we tested for differences in the two muscles' lattice structure. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed a difference of 4-8

  12. Designing ‘Smart’ Particles for the Assembly of Complex Macroscopic Structures**

    PubMed Central

    Barg, S.; Bell, R.; Weaver, J.; Walter, C.; Goyos, L.; Saiz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Surface functionalization with a branched copolymer surfactant is used to create responsive inorganic particles that can self-assemble in complex structures. The assembly process is triggered by a pH switch that reversibly activates multiple hydrogen bonds between ceramic particles and soft templates. PMID:23780923

  13. Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Effect of Molecular Surface Structure on Macroscopic Wetting Properties.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Emil; Hedberg, Jonas; Larsson, Per A; Wågberg, Lars; Johnson, C Magnus

    2015-04-21

    Adsorption of a single layer of molecules on a surface, or even a reorientation of already present molecules, can significantly affect the surface properties of a material. In this study, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) has been used to study the change in molecular structure at the solid-air interface following thermal curing of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid). Significant changes in the VSF spectra were observed after curing. These changes were accompanied by a distinct increase in the static water contact angle, showing how the properties of the layer-by-layer molecular structure are controlled not just by the polyelectrolyte in the outermost layer but ultimately by the orientation of the chemical constituents in the outermost layers. PMID:25859709

  14. Structure, Mechanics, and Transport in Block Copolymer-Nanoparticle Composites at the Macroscopic and Nanometer Lengthscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Vicki Alice

    2013-08-01

    Pluronic triblock copolymers self-assemble in water to form thermoreversible soft solids that comprise of periodically spaced micelles. The interstitial spacings of these micellar crystals are on the order of tens of nanometers, and have been used to template comparably sized nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameters (Dh) ranging from 4-7 nm. Here, nanoparticle diffusivity is studied and modeled in these self-assembling block copolymers across a range of polymer concentrations. Transport in the disordered micellar solution is described as diffusion through a polymer solution, while diffusive behavior in the structured micellar phase is modeled as an activated hopping process. The effects of protein loading, shear alignment, particle type, and block copolymer composition on particle transport are also examined, and they affect particle diffusivity to varying degrees. Block copolymer architecture influences the micellar structure and dimensions, which in turn affects protein templating and protein aggregation behavior. The overall micellar dimensions are smaller in block copolymers with shorter block lengths, and efforts to template particles which are larger than the interstitial spacings result in changes to the block copolymer structure and mechanics. It is possible, however, for block copolymers to accommodate a limited amount of particles which are larger than the estimated micellar interstitial site. When examining protein aggregation behavior in block copolymers with varying PEO chain lengths, striking differences in aggregation behavior are observed as well. Ultimately, this work underscores the interplay between the structure, mechanics, and transport behavior in nanoparticle-block copolymer composites, and this knowledge can be applied towards the design of self-assembling nanoscale materials.

  15. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, M; Di Tommaso, D; Du, Z; de Leeuw, N H

    2012-11-21

    Calcite-water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Firstly, we employ classical Molecular Dynamics simulations of calcite surfaces containing an etch pit and a growth terrace, to show that the local environment in water around structurally different surface sites is distinct. In addition to observing the expected formation of more calcium-water interactions and hydrogen-bonds at lower-coordinated sites, we also observed subtle differences in hydrogen bonding around acute versus obtuse edges and corners. We subsequently used this information to refine the protonation constants for the calcite surface sites, according to the Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation (CD-MUSIC) approach. The subtle differences in hydrogen bonding translate into markedly different charging behaviour versus pH, in particular for acute versus obtuse corner sites. The results show quantitatively that calcite surface reactivity is directly related to surface topography. The information obtained in this study is not only crucial for the improvement of existing macroscopic surface models of the reactivity of calcite towards contaminants, but also improves our atomic-level understanding of mineral-water interactions. PMID:23042085

  16. Peripheral nerve: from the microscopic functional unit of the axon to the biomechanically loaded macroscopic structure.

    PubMed

    Topp, Kimberly S; Boyd, Benjamin S

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are composed of motor and sensory axons, associated ensheathing Schwann cells, and organized layers of connective tissues that are in continuity with the tissues of the central nervous system. Nerve fiber anatomy facilitates conduction of electrical impulses to convey information over a distance, and the length of these polarized cells necessitates regulated axonal transport of organelles and structural proteins for normal cell function. Nerve connective tissues serve a protective function as the limb is subjected to the stresses of myriad limb positions and postures. Thus, the tissues are uniquely arranged to control the local nerve fiber environment and modulate physical stresses. In this brief review, we describe the microscopic anatomy and physiology of peripheral nerve and the biomechanical properties that enable nerve to withstand the physical stresses of everyday life. PMID:22133662

  17. Preservation of primary structures and organic matter in Pleistocene spring carbonates, Western Desert, Egypt: Relationship to macroscopic texture and age.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, E.; Smith, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Spring-deposited carbonates (tufas) along the flanks of the Libyan Escarpment in Dakhleh and Kharga Oasis record relatively humid conditions which prevailed in the Egyptian Sahara periodically throughout the Pleistocene. Previous work, particularly Nicoll et al.(1999), has suggested the Western Desert tufas, though certainly displaying evidence of secondary cementation by sparry calcite, aggrading neomorphism, etc. do in many instances preserve primary features, particularly organosedimentary lamination, and a clotted microbial texture. In order to facilitate field-based selection of suitable, unaltered samples for geochemical analysis, we undertook a petrographic examination of tufa samples in order to determine whether certain macroscopic features (e.g., color, porosity, presence of detrital iron oxides, preservation of visible plant casts) could be quantitatively correlated to the degree of diagenesis present in thin sections as indicated by percent calcite spar. We also determined total organic content through peroxide digestion, as younger samples (determined by U-series dating and by geomorphic context) qualitatively appeared to contain both more casts of botanical remains, and better defined microbial textures. Older and more altered tufas also generally had heavier (less organically-influenced) carbon isotopic signatures, further suggesting a relationship between diagenesis, organic content, and age. Petrographic analysis included descriptions of sample texture, spatial relationship of textural elements (e.g., pores, plant casts, detrital material), and frequency of biological inclusions or casts. Point counts were performed to estimate sample mineralogy and porosity. Tufas are predominantly micritic calcite, with little (generally <2%) sparry calcite. Porosity may be as great as 46%. Most samples examined displayed some evidence of primary (generally microbial) textures. The expected relationship between porosity and diagenetic alteration, however, was not

  18. Macroscopic and microscopic analysis of the tongue of the common opossum (Didelphis marsupialis).

    PubMed

    Mançanares, Celina A F; Santos, Amilton C; Piemonte, Maria V; Vasconcelos, Bruno G; Carvalho, Ana F; Miglino, Maria A; Ambrósio, Carlos E; Assis Neto, Antônio C

    2012-10-01

    We performed a macroscopic and microscopic study of the tongues of common opossums, Didelphis marsupialis, from South America. We studied two males and two females. We collected morphometric data on the tongue with precision calipers. For the light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses, we fixed tissue fragments in 10% formaldehyde and 2.5% glutaraldehyde, respectively. The opossum tongues averaged 5.87 ± 0.20 cm in length, 3.27 ± 0.15 cm in width at the lingual body, and 3.82 ± 0.15 cm in width at the root. The mean thickness of the lingual body was 1.8 ± 0.1 cm, and the thickness of the root was 3.82 ± 0.15 cm. Sharp filiform papillae were scattered across the entire tongue; conical filiform papillae occurred on the lingual body and tongue tip; fungiform papillae were scattered among the filiform papillae on the lingual body and tongue tip; and there were three vallate papillae at the root of the tongue. We found two strands of papillary projections in the tongue root. Despite the low variability observed in the lingual papillae, the morphological data obtained in this study may be related to the opossum's diverse food habits and the extensive geographic distribution of the species throughout America. PMID:22581756

  19. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) female tubular reproductive organs in relation to ovarian structures.

    PubMed

    Axnér, E; Holm, D; Gavier-Widén, D; Söderberg, A; Bergqvist, A S

    2015-09-15

    Although monitoring wild animals in the field is essential for estimations of population size and development, there are pitfalls associated with field monitoring. In addition, some detailed data about reproductive physiology can be difficult to obtain in wild live animals. Studying reproductive organs from the Eurasian lynx killed at hunting or found dead could be used as a valuable addition to other field data. We evaluated reproductive organs from 39 Eurasian lynx females (Lynx lynx) killed in Sweden during the hunting seasons in 2009, 2010, and 2011. According to notes on ovarian structures, the animals were categorized as being in one of four different reproductive stages: juvenile (n = 10), follicular stage (n = 8), luteal stage (n = 11), and anestrus (n = 10). Corpora lutea were classified as fresh CL from the present season or as luteal bodies from previous cycles. Microscopic evaluations were blindly coded while the outer measurements of the vagina and uterus were taken at the time of organ retrieval. The width of the endometrium, myometrium, outer width of the uterine horns, and the diameter of the vagina differed significantly with the reproductive stage (P < 0.001) and were largest in the follicular and luteal phases. The number of endometrial glands evaluated blindly coded on a subjective scale was significantly associated with the reproductive stage (P < 0.0001) and was significantly higher in the luteal phase than that in any other reproductive stages (P < 0.05). Cornification of the vaginal epithelium was only observed in females in the follicular stage or in females with signs of a recent ovulation. In conclusion, both macroscopic and histologic measurements are useful for a correct classification of the reproductive stage when evaluating reproductive organs in the Eurasian lynx killed during the hunting season. Routine evaluation of reproductive organs has a potential to be a useful additional tool to field studies of live lynx to monitor their

  20. Mechanism of charge recombination in meso-structured organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells: A macroscopic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wenchao; Yao, Yao Wu, Chang-Qin

    2015-04-21

    In the currently popular organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells, the slowness of the charge recombination processes is found to be a key factor for contributing to their high efficiencies and high open circuit voltages, but the underlying recombination mechanism remains unclear. In this work, we investigate the bimolecular recombination (BR) and the trap-assisted monomolecular recombination (MR) in meso-structured perovskite solar cells under steady state working condition, and try to reveal their roles on determining the device performance. Some interfacial effects such as the injection barriers at the selective contacts are examined as well. Based on the macroscopic device modeling, the recombination resistance-voltage (R{sub rec}−V) and the current density-voltage (J–V) curves are calculated to characterize the recombination mechanism and describe the device performance, respectively. Through comparison with the impedance spectroscopy extracted R{sub rec} data, it is found that under the typical BR reduction factor and deep trap densities observed in experiments, the MR dominates the charge recombination in the low voltage regime, while the BR dominates in the high voltage regime. The short circuit current and the fill factor could be reduced by the significant MR but the open circuit voltage is generally determined by the BR. The different electron injection barriers at the contact can change the BR rate and induce different patterns for the R{sub rec}–V characteristics. For the perovskites of increased band gaps, the R{sub rec}'s are significantly enhanced, corresponding to the high open circuit voltages. Finally, it is revealed that the reduced effective charge mobility due to the transport in electron and hole transporting material makes the R{sub rec} decrease slowly with the increasing voltage, which leads to increased open circuit voltage.

  1. Mechanism of charge recombination in meso-structured organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells: A macroscopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Yao, Yao; Wu, Chang-Qin

    2015-04-01

    In the currently popular organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells, the slowness of the charge recombination processes is found to be a key factor for contributing to their high efficiencies and high open circuit voltages, but the underlying recombination mechanism remains unclear. In this work, we investigate the bimolecular recombination (BR) and the trap-assisted monomolecular recombination (MR) in meso-structured perovskite solar cells under steady state working condition, and try to reveal their roles on determining the device performance. Some interfacial effects such as the injection barriers at the selective contacts are examined as well. Based on the macroscopic device modeling, the recombination resistance-voltage (Rrec-V) and the current density-voltage (J-V) curves are calculated to characterize the recombination mechanism and describe the device performance, respectively. Through comparison with the impedance spectroscopy extracted Rrec data, it is found that under the typical BR reduction factor and deep trap densities observed in experiments, the MR dominates the charge recombination in the low voltage regime, while the BR dominates in the high voltage regime. The short circuit current and the fill factor could be reduced by the significant MR but the open circuit voltage is generally determined by the BR. The different electron injection barriers at the contact can change the BR rate and induce different patterns for the Rrec-V characteristics. For the perovskites of increased band gaps, the Rrec's are significantly enhanced, corresponding to the high open circuit voltages. Finally, it is revealed that the reduced effective charge mobility due to the transport in electron and hole transporting material makes the Rrec decrease slowly with the increasing voltage, which leads to increased open circuit voltage.

  2. Hierarchically structured, hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel matrices via the covalent integration of microgels into macroscopic networks$

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amit K.; Malik, Manisha S.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to develop biomimetic hydrogel matrices that not only exhibit structural hierarchy and mechanical integrity, but also present biological cues in a controlled fashion. To this end, photocrosslinkable, hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) were synthesized via an inverse emulsion crosslinking process followed by chemical modification with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). HA modified with GMA (HA-GMA) was employed as the soluble macromer. Macroscopic hydrogels containing covalently integrated hydrogel particles (HA-c-HGP) were prepared by radical polymerization of HA-GMA in the presence of crosslinkable HGPs. The covalent linkages between the hydrogel particles and the secondary HA matrix resulted in the formation of a diffuse, fibrilar interface around the particles. Compared to the traditional bulk gels synthesized by photocrosslinking of HA-GMA, these hydrogels exhibited a reduced sol fraction and a lower equilibrium swelling ratio. When tested under uniaxial compression, the HA-c-HGP gels were more pliable than the HA-p-HGP gels and fractured at higher strain than the HA-GMA gels. Primary bovine chondrocytes were photoencapsulated in the HA matrices with minimal cell damage. The 3D microenvironment created by HA-GMA and HA HGPs not only maintained the chondrocyte phenotype but also fostered the production of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. To further improve the biological activities of the HA-c-HGP gels, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was loaded into the immobilized HGPs. BMP-2 was released from the HA-c-HGP gels in a controlled manner with reduced initial burst over prolonged periods of time. The HA-c-HGP gels are promising candidates for use as bioactive matrices for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:20936090

  3. Benefit-Cost Analysis of Drug Abuse Prevention Programs: A Macroscopic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sehwan; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Determines the overall strategy for initiating benefit-cost analysis (BCA) in relation to drug abuse prevention programs, followed by definitions of BCA and cost-effectiveness analysis. Determines the most likely population benefit-cost efficiency ratio of 15:1, indicating that there is a $15 savings on every dollar spent on drug abuse education.…

  4. Fast Analysis of Complete Macroscopic Gunshot Residues on Substrates Using Raman Imaging.

    PubMed

    López-López, María; Fernández de la Ossa, María Ángeles; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a viable technique for the organic analysis of gunshot residues (GSRs), offering additional information to the well-established analysis using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). In this article, a Raman imaging system with an electron-multiplying coupled-charged device (EMCCD) camera was used to analyze complete GSR particles from both conventional and nontoxic ammunition fired at different cloth targets. The same cloths were then stained with blood to mimic real evidence and measured. The direct analysis using Raman imaging of the GSR particles collected with the stubs used for SEM-EDX analysis (the frequent method used for GSR collection) was evaluated. Multivariate curve-resolution and chemical-mapping methods were applied to the spectroscopic data to identify and highlight the signal corresponding to the GSR particles and differentiate them from the substrates. It was confirmed that both measurement approaches (on the targets and the stubs) could be used for the identification of GSR particles, even under unfavorable conditions such as the presence of blood. The results obtained demonstrate the huge potential of Raman imaging for the fast analysis of complete GSR particles and prove its complementary usefulness in the analysis of the stubs used by the well-established SEM-EDX technique. PMID:26036696

  5. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  6. Using Denatured Egg White as a Macroscopic Model for Teaching Protein Structure and Introducing Protein Synthesis for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2007-12-01

    The success of teaching molecular and atomic phenomena depends on the didactical strategy and the media selection adopted, in consideration of the level of abstraction of the subject to be taught and the students' capability to deal with abstract operations. Dale's cone of experience was employed to plan three 50-minute classes to discuss protein denaturation from a chemical point of view. Only low abstraction level activities were selected: (i) two demonstrations showing the denaturation of albumin by heating and by changing the solvent, (ii) the assembly of a macroscopic model representing the protein molecule, and (iii) a role-play for simulating glucagon synthesis. A student-centered approach and collaborative learning were used throughout the classes. The use of macroscopic models is a powerful didactical strategy to represent molecular and atomic events. They can convert microscopic entities into touchable objects, reducing the abstraction level required to discuss chemistry with high school students. Thus, interesting topics involving molecules and their behavior can take place efficiently when mediated by concrete experiences.

  7. An Analysis of Indonesian and Japanese Students' Understandings of Macroscopic and Submicroscopic Levels of Representing Matter and Its Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahayu, Sri; Kita, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated Indonesian and Japanese students' understandings of macroscopic and submicroscopic levels of representing matter and its changes and the difficulties they have with these concepts. A multiple-choice questionnaire was constructed and delivered to 447 Indonesian and 446 Japanese public senior high school students. The data…

  8. High thermal neutron flux effects on structural and macroscopic properties of alkali-borosilicate glasses used as neutron guide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffy, R.; Peuget, S.; Schweins, R.; Beaucour, J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The behaviour of four alkali-borosilicate glasses under homogeneous thermal neutron irradiation has been studied. These materials are used for the manufacturing of neutron guides which are installed in most facilities as devices to transport neutrons from intense sources such as nuclear reactors or spallation sources up to scientific instruments. Several experimental techniques such as Raman, NMR, SANS and STEM have been employed in order to understand the rather different macroscopic behaviour under irradiation of materials that belong to a same glass family. The results have shown that the remarkable glass shrinking observed for neutron doses below 0.5 ·1018 n/cm2 critically depends upon the presence of domains where silicate and borate network do not mix.

  9. Pore-scale dispersion: Bridging the gap between microscopic pore structure and the emerging macroscopic transport behavior.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel W; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-07-01

    We devise an efficient methodology to provide a universal statistical description of advection-dominated dispersion (Péclet→∞) in natural porous media including carbonates. First, we investigate the dispersion of tracer particles by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The transverse dispersion is found to be essentially determined by the tortuosity and it approaches a Fickian limit within a dozen characteristic scales. Longitudinal dispersion was found to be Fickian in the limit for bead packs and superdiffusive for all other natural media inspected. We demonstrate that the Lagrangian velocity correlation length is a quantity that characterizes the spatial variability for transport. Finally, a statistical transport model is presented that sheds light on the connection between pore-scale characteristics and the resulting macroscopic transport behavior. Our computationally efficient model accurately reproduces the transport behavior in longitudinal direction and approaches the Fickian limit in transverse direction. PMID:27575217

  10. Pore-scale dispersion: Bridging the gap between microscopic pore structure and the emerging macroscopic transport behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-07-01

    We devise an efficient methodology to provide a universal statistical description of advection-dominated dispersion (Péclet→∞ ) in natural porous media including carbonates. First, we investigate the dispersion of tracer particles by direct numerical simulation (DNS). The transverse dispersion is found to be essentially determined by the tortuosity and it approaches a Fickian limit within a dozen characteristic scales. Longitudinal dispersion was found to be Fickian in the limit for bead packs and superdiffusive for all other natural media inspected. We demonstrate that the Lagrangian velocity correlation length is a quantity that characterizes the spatial variability for transport. Finally, a statistical transport model is presented that sheds light on the connection between pore-scale characteristics and the resulting macroscopic transport behavior. Our computationally efficient model accurately reproduces the transport behavior in longitudinal direction and approaches the Fickian limit in transverse direction.

  11. Ancient sedimentary structures in the <3.7 Ga Gillespie Lake Member, Mars, that resemble macroscopic morphology, spatial associations, and temporal succession in terrestrial microbialites.

    PubMed

    Noffke, Nora

    2015-02-01

    Sandstone beds of the <3.7 Ga Gillespie Lake Member on Mars have been interpreted as evidence of an ancient playa lake environment. On Earth, such environments have been sites of colonization by microbial mats from the early Archean to the present time. Terrestrial microbial mats in playa lake environments form microbialites known as microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS). On Mars, three lithofacies of the Gillespie Lake Member sandstone display centimeter- to meter-scale structures similar in macroscopic morphology to terrestrial MISS that include "erosional remnants and pockets," "mat chips," "roll-ups," "desiccation cracks," and "gas domes." The microbially induced sedimentary-like structures identified in Curiosity rover mission images do not have a random distribution. Rather, they were found to be arranged in spatial associations and temporal successions that indicate they changed over time. On Earth, if such MISS occurred with this type of spatial association and temporal succession, they would be interpreted as having recorded the growth of a microbially dominated ecosystem that thrived in pools that later dried completely: erosional pockets, mat chips, and roll-ups resulted from water eroding an ancient microbial mat-covered sedimentary surface; during the course of subsequent water recess, channels would have cut deep into the microbial mats, leaving erosional remnants behind; desiccation cracks and gas domes would have occurred during a final period of subaerial exposure of the microbial mats. In this paper, the similarities of the macroscopic morphologies, spatial associations, and temporal succession of sedimentary structures on Mars to MISS preserved on Earth has led to the following hypothesis: The sedimentary structures in the <3.7 Ga Gillespie Lake Member on Mars are ancient MISS produced by interactions between microbial mats and their environment. Proposed here is a strategy for detecting, identifying, confirming, and differentiating

  12. Macroscopic and microscopic spatially-resolved analysis of food contaminants and constituents using laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Michel W F; van Beek, Teris A

    2014-11-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) does not require very flat surfaces, high-precision sample preparation, or the addition of matrix. Because of these features, LAESI-MSI may be the method of choice for spatially-resolved food analysis. In this work, LAESI time-of-flight MSI was investigated for macroscopic and microscopic imaging of pesticides, mycotoxins, and plant metabolites on rose leaves, orange and lemon fruit, ergot bodies, cherry tomatoes, and maize kernels. Accurate mass ion-map data were acquired at sampling locations with an x-y center-to-center distance of 0.2-1.0 mm and were superimposed onto co-registered optical images. The spatially-resolved ion maps of pesticides on rose leaves suggest co-application of registered and banned pesticides. Ion maps of the fungicide imazalil reveal that this compound is only localized on the peel of citrus fruit. However, according to three-dimensional LAESI-MSI the penetration depth of imazalil into the peel has significant local variation. Ion maps of different plant alkaloids on ergot bodies from rye reveal co-localization in accordance with expectations. The feasibility of using untargeted MSI for food analysis was revealed by ion maps of plant metabolites in cherry tomatoes and maize-kernel slices. For tomatoes, traveling-wave ion mobility (TWIM) was used to discriminate between different lycoperoside glycoalkaloid isomers; for maize quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) was successfully used to elucidate the structure of a localized unknown. It is envisaged that LAESI-MSI will contribute to future research in food science, agriforensics, and plant metabolomics. PMID:24961635

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and thermal activation in a small mesa structured Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, H.; Ota, K.; Hamada, K.; Takemura, R.; Ohmaki, M.; Maeda, A.; Suzuki, M.

    2009-03-01

    A nanometer-thick small mesa consiting of only two or three Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) is studied through the switching current distribution measurements down to 0.4 K. Experimental results clearly show that the first switching events from the zero-voltage state for 1 K < T < 4 K are successfully described by a conventional thermal activation (TA) theory for a single Josephson junction, and that they become independent of temperature below T* ~ 0.7 K. We observe the microwave-induced peak in the switching distribution at 0.4 K, which is induced by the microwave irradiation at 55 GHz. These results strongly suggest that the system crossovers to macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) regime below T*, which is as high as the previously reported value for a stacked IJJs with several tens of junctions, in contrast to the recent result on a similar mesa-structured surface IJJ.

  14. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  15. Buckling of regular, chiral and hierarchical honeycombs under a general macroscopic stress state

    PubMed Central

    Haghpanah, Babak; Papadopoulos, Jim; Mousanezhad, Davood; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    An approach to obtain analytical closed-form expressions for the macroscopic ‘buckling strength’ of various two-dimensional cellular structures is presented. The method is based on classical beam-column end-moment behaviour expressed in a matrix form. It is applied to sample honeycombs with square, triangular and hexagonal unit cells to determine their buckling strength under a general macroscopic in-plane stress state. The results were verified using finite-element Eigenvalue analysis. PMID:25002823

  16. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures.

  17. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures. PMID:26892169

  18. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures. PMID:26892169

  19. Rank distributions: a panoramic macroscopic outlook.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions-top-down, bottom-up, and global-and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails. PMID:24580176

  20. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  1. Comparative study of macroscopic quantum tunneling in Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions with different device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, K.; Hamada, K.; Takemura, R.; Ohmaki, M.; Machi, T.; Tanabe, K.; Suzuki, M.; Maeda, A.; Kitano, H.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) for two device structures. One is a small mesa, which is a few nanometers thick with only two or three IJJs, and the other is a stack of a few hundred IJJs in a narrow bridge structure. The experimental results regarding the switching-current distribution for the first switch from the zero-voltage state were in good agreement with the conventional theory for a single Josephson junction, indicating that the crossover temperature from thermal activation to the MQT regime for the former device structure was similar to that for the latter device structure. Together with the observation of multiphoton transitions between quantized energy levels in the MQT regime, these results strongly suggest that the observed MQT behavior is intrinsic to a single IJJ in high- Tc cuprates and is independent of the device structure. The switching-current distribution for the second switch from the first resistive state, which was carefully distinguished from the first switch, was also compared with respect to the two device structures. In spite of the differences between the heat transfer environments, the second switch exhibited a similar temperature-independent behavior for both devices up to a much higher temperature than the crossover temperature for the first switch. We argue that this cannot be explained in terms of self-heating caused by dissipative currents after the first switch. As possible candidates for this phenomenon, the MQT process for the second switch and the effective increase in the electronic temperature due to the quasiparticle injection are discussed.

  2. Structure of a two-dimensional crystal in a Langmuir monolayer: grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and macroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, C.; Gallet, F.; Graner, F.; Goldmann, M.; Peterson, I.; Renault, A.

    1994-06-01

    Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction is performed on a Langmuir monolayer made of pure fluorescent NBD-stearic acid, spread at the free surface of water. It shows several intense narrow peaks in the solid phase, at the same wavevectors as the brightest peaks observed earlier by electron diffraction, for a monolayer transferred onto an amorphous polymer substrate. Thus the solid phase has the same crystalline structure on water and on solid substrate. The relative peak intensities are comparable in both experiments, and in the proposed model for the molecular structure. This model also accounts for the very large anisotropy of the crystalline phase and its optical properties. This phase could be ferroelectric, as previously assumed in order to explain the elongated shape of the crystals. Une monocouche de Langmuir, composée d'acide NBD-stéarique fluorescent pur, déposée à la surface libre de l'eau, est analysée par diffraction de rayons X sous incidence rasante. On détecte plusieurs pics étroits et intenses dans la phase solide, aux mêmes vecteurs d'onde que les pics les plus brillants précédemment observés par diffraction électronique, pour une monocouche transférée sur un substrat de polymère amorphe. La phase solide a donc la même structure cristalline sur l'eau et sur substrat solide. Les intensités relatives des pics sont comparables dans les deux expériences, ainsi que dans le modèle proposé pour la structure moléculaire. Ce modèle rend également compte de l'anisotropie très importante de la phase cristalline et de ses propriétés optiques. Il pourrait s'agir d'une phase ferroélectrique, comme cela avait été précédemment supposé pour expliquer la forme allongée des cristaux.

  3. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Masataka

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  4. Microscopic and macroscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.; De Groot, A.J.; Pierce, T.G. |

    1993-06-01

    Atomistic Molecular Dynamics and Lagrangian Continuum Mechanics can be very similarly adapted to massively-parallel computers. Millions of degrees of freedom can be treated. The two complementary approaches, microscopic and macroscopic, are being applied to increasingly realistic flows of fluids and solids. The two approaches can also be combined in a hybrid simulation scheme. Hybrids combine the fundamental constitutive advantage of atoms with the size advantage of the continuum picture.

  5. Sorption of trivalent lanthanides and actinides onto montmorillonite: Macroscopic, thermodynamic and structural evidence for ternary hydroxo and carbonato surface complexes on multiple sorption sites.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M Marques; Scheinost, A C; Baeyens, B

    2016-08-01

    The credibility of long-term safety assessments of radioactive waste repositories may be greatly enhanced by a molecular level understanding of the sorption processes onto individual minerals present in the near- and far-fields. In this study we couple macroscopic sorption experiments to surface complexation modelling and spectroscopic investigations, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopies (TRLFS), to elucidate the uptake mechanism of trivalent lanthanides and actinides (Ln/An(III)) by montmorillonite in the absence and presence of dissolved carbonate. Based on the experimental sorption isotherms for the carbonate-free system, the previously developed 2 site protolysis non electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) model needed to be complemented with an additional surface complexation reaction onto weak sites. The fitting of sorption isotherms in the presence of carbonate required refinement of the previously published model by reducing the strong site capacity and by adding the formation of Ln/An(III)-carbonato complexes both on strong and weak sites. EXAFS spectra of selected Am samples and TRLFS spectra of selected Cm samples corroborate the model assumptions by showing the existence of different surface complexation sites and evidencing the formation of Ln/An(III) carbonate surface complexes. In the absence of carbonate and at low loadings, Ln/An(III) form strong inner-sphere complexes through binding to three Al(O,OH)6 octahedra, most likely by occupying vacant sites in the octahedral layers of montmorillonite, which are exposed on {010} and {110} edge faces. At higher loadings, Ln/An(III) binds to only one Al octahedron, forming a weaker, edge-sharing surface complex. In the presence of carbonate, we identified a ternary mono- or dicarbonato Ln/An(III) complex binding directly to one Al(O,OH)6 octahedron, revealing that type-A ternary complexes form with the one

  6. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  7. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  8. Analysis of Geological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neville J.; Cosgrove, John W.

    1990-08-01

    A knowledge of structural geology is fundamental to understanding the processes by which the earth's crust has evolved. It is a subject of fundamental importance to students of geology, experienced field geologists and academic researchers as well as to petroleum and mining engineers. In contrast to many structural textbooks which dwell upon geometrical descriptions of geological structures, this book emphasises mechanical principles and the way in which they can be used to understand how and why a wide range of geological structures develop. Structures on all scales are considered but the emphasis of the book is on those that can be seen on the scale of hand specimen or outcrop. Drawing on their considerable teaching experience the authors present a coherent and lucid analysis of geological structures which will be welcomed by a wide variety of earth scientists.

  9. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  10. Macroscopic dynamics of polar nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut R; Pleiner, Harald; Ziebert, Falko

    2006-08-01

    We present the macroscopic equations for polar nematic liquid crystals. We consider the case where one has both, the usual nematic director, n[over ] , characterizing quadrupolar order as well as the macroscopic polarization, P , representing polar order, but where their directions coincide and are rigidly coupled. In this case one has to choose P as the independent macroscopic variable. Such equations are expected to be relevant in connection with nematic phases with unusual properties found recently in compounds composed of banana-shaped molecules. Among the effects predicted, which are absent in conventional nematic liquid crystals showing only quadrupolar order, are pyro-electricity and its analogs for density and for concentration in mixtures as well as a flow alignment behavior, which is more complex than in usual low molecular weight nematics. We also discuss the formation of defect structures expected in such systems. PMID:17025458

  11. 'Quasi-Mixture' Descriptors for QSPR Analysis of Molecular Macroscopic Properties. The Critical Properties of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Mokshyna, E; Nedostup, V I; Polishchuk, P G; Kuzmin, V E

    2014-10-01

    Rational approach towards the QSAR/QSPR modeling requires the descriptors to be computationally efficient, yet physically and chemically meaningful. On the basis of existing simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) the novel 'quasi-mixture' descriptors were developed in order to accomplish the goal of characterization molecules on 2D level (i.e. without explicit generation of 3D structure and exhaustive conformational search) with account for potential intermolecular interactions. The critical properties of organic compounds were chosen as target properties for the estimation of descriptors' efficacy because of their well-known physical nature, rigorously estimated experimental errors and large quantity of experimental data. Among described properties are critical temperature, pressure and volume. Obtained models have high statistical characteristics, therefore showing the efficacy of suggested 'quasi-mixture' approach. Moreover, 'quasi-mixture' approach, as a branch of the SiRMS, allows to interpret results in terms of simple basic molecular properties. The obtained picture of influences corresponds to the accepted theoretical views. PMID:27485300

  12. Local Realism of Macroscopic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Paterek, T.; Kay, A.; Kurzyński, P.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2011-08-01

    We identify conditions under which correlations resulting from quantum measurements performed on macroscopic systems (systems composed of a number of particles of the order of the Avogadro number) can be described by local realism. We argue that the emergence of local realism at the macroscopic level is caused by an interplay between the monogamous nature of quantum correlations and the fact that macroscopic measurements do not reveal properties of individual particles.

  13. An Analysis of the Macroscopic Tensile Behavior of a Nonlinear Nylon Reinforced Elastomeric Composite System Using MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assaad, Mahmoud; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A special class of composite laminates composed of soft rubbery matrices and stiff reinforcements made of steel wires or synthetic fibers is examined, where each constituent behaves in a nonlinear fashion even in the small strain domain. Composite laminates made of piles stacked at alternating small orientation angles with respect to the applied axial strain are primarily dominated by the nonlinear behavior of the reinforcing fibers. However; composites with large ply orientations or those perpendicular to the loading axis, will approximate the behavior of the matrix phase and respond in even a more complex fashion for arbitrarily stacked piles. The geometric nonlinearity due to small cord rotations during loading was deemed here to have a second order effect and consequently dropped from any consideration. The user subroutine USRMAT within the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), was utilized to introduce the constituent material nonlinear behavior. Stress-strain behavior at the macro level was experimentally generated for single and multi ply composites comprised of continuous Nylon-66 reinforcements embedded in a carbon black loaded rubbery matrix. Comparisons between the predicted macro composite behavior and experimental results are excellent when material nonlinearity is included in the analysis. In this paper, a brief review of GMC is provided, along with a description of the nonlinear behavior of the constituents and associated constituent constitutive relations, and the improved macro (or composite) behavior predictions are documented and illustrated.

  14. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  15. COI Structural Analysis Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the structural analysis of the Next Generation Space Telescope Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD) developed by Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) in support of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) project. The mirror was submitted to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for cryogenic testing and evaluation. Once at MSFC, the mirror was lowered to approximately 40 K and the optical surface distortions were measured. Alongside this experiment, an analytical model was developed and used to compare to the test results. A NASTRAN finite element model was provided by COI and a thermal model was developed from it. Using the thermal model, steady state nodal temperatures were calculated based on the predicted environment of the large cryogenic test chamber at MSFC. This temperature distribution was applied in the structural analysis to solve for the deflections of the optical surface. Finally, these deflections were submitted for optical analysis and comparison to the interferometer test data.

  16. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  17. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  18. The structure and function of the helical heart and its buttress wrapping. IV. Concepts of dynamic function from the normal macroscopic helical structure.

    PubMed

    Buckberg, G D; Clemente, C; Cox, J L; Coghlan, H C; Castella, M; Torrent-Guasp, F; Gharib, M

    2001-10-01

    Torrent-Guasp's model of the helical heart is presented, which includes the cardiac muscular structures that produce 2 simple loops and that start at the pulmonary artery and end in the aorta. These components include a horizontal basal loop that surrounds the right and left ventricles, changes direction through a spiral fold in the ventricular band to cause a ventricular helix produced by now obliquely oriented fibers, forming a descending and ascending segment of the apical loop with an apical vortex. These anatomic concepts are successively activated to produce a sequence of narrowing by the basal loop, shortening by the descending segment, lengthening by the ascending segment, and widening in the cardiac cycle that causes ventricular ejection to empty and suction to fill. The factors responsible for internal torsional movements for cardiac output and suction are defined, together with mechanisms responsible for electromechanical activity produced during sequential changes in contraction and relaxation properties. These interactions of mechanical structure and function are defined in relation to pressure-related cardiac events observed from aortic, left ventricular, and left atrial recordings. PMID:11807733

  19. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  20. Structured Data in Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.; Hopkins, Stewart

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computer data structures in finite-element structural analysis programs. A number of data structure types that have been shown to be useful in such programs are introduced and described. A simple finite-element model is used to demonstrate how the given set of data structure types naturally lend themselves to developing software for the model. Different methods of implementing data structures in the context of a program are discussed.

  1. Solvable Quantum Macroscopic Motions and Decoherence Mechanisms in Quantum Mechanics on Nonstandard Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Tsunehiro

    1996-01-01

    Quantum macroscopic motions are investigated in the scheme consisting of N-number of harmonic oscillators in terms of ultra-power representations of nonstandard analysis. Decoherence is derived from the large internal degrees of freedom of macroscopic matters.

  2. Continuous Feedback and Macroscopic Coherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, Paolo; Vitali, David

    1996-01-01

    We show that a model, recently introduced for quantum nondemolition measurements of a quantum observable, can be adapted to obtain a measurement scheme which is able to slow down the destruction of macroscopic coherence due to the measurement apparatus.

  3. Macroscopic constraints on string unification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.R.

    1989-03-01

    The comparison of sting theory with experiment requires a huge extrapolation from the microscopic distances, of order of the Planck length, up to the macroscopic laboratory distances. The quantum effects give rise to large corrections to the macroscopic predictions of sting unification. I discus the model-independent constraints on the gravitational sector of string theory due to the inevitable existence of universal Fradkin-Tseytlin dilatons. 9 refs.

  4. RNA Microarray Analysis of Macroscopically Normal Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Partial Medial Meniscectomy: Potential Prediction of the Risk for Developing Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Linda J.; Zhang, Bo; Wright, Rick W.; Brophy, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (i) To provide baseline knowledge of gene expression in macroscopically normal articular cartilage, (ii) to test the hypothesis that age, body-mass-index (BMI), and sex are associated with cartilage RNA transcriptome, and (iii) to predict individuals at potential risk for developing “pre-osteoarthritis” (OA) based on screening of genetic risk-alleles associated with OA and gene transcripts differentially expressed between normal and OA cartilage. Design Healthy-appearing cartilage was obtained from the medial femoral notch of 12 knees with a meniscus tear undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Cartilage had no radiographic, magnetic-resonance-imaging or arthroscopic evidence for degeneration. RNA was subjected to Affymetrix microarrays followed by validation of selected transcripts by microfluidic digital polymerase-chain-reaction. The underlying biological processes were explored computationally. Transcriptome-wide gene expression was probed for association with known OA genetic risk-alleles assembled from published literature and for comparison with gene transcripts differentially expressed between healthy and OA cartilage from other studies. Results We generated a list of 27,641 gene transcripts in healthy cartilage. Several gene transcripts representing numerous biological processes were correlated with age and BMI and differentially expressed by sex. Based on disease-specific Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, gene transcripts associated with aging were enriched for bone/cartilage disease while the gene expression profile associated with BMI was enriched for growth-plate calcification and OA. When segregated by genetic risk-alleles, two clusters of study patients emerged, one cluster containing transcripts predicted by risk studies. When segregated by OA-associated gene transcripts, three clusters of study patients emerged, one of which is remarkably similar to gene expression pattern in OA. Conclusions Our study provides a list of gene

  5. Predicting metapopulation lifetime from macroscopic network properties.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Martin

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a comparatively simple approximation formula for the mean life time of a metapopulation in a habitat network where habitat patch arrangement may be irregular and patch sizes differ. It is based on previous work on the development of an analytical approximation formula by Frank and Wissel [K. Frank, C. Wissel, A formula for the mean lifetime of metapopulations in heterogeneous landscapes, Am. Nat. 159 (2002) 530] and extends it by abstracting from individual patch locations. The mean metapopulation lifetime is expressed as a function of four macroscopic network properties: the ratio of dispersal range and network size, the ratio of range of environmental correlation and network size, and the total number and (geometric mean) size of the patches. The analysis takes into account that (ceteris paribus) patches close to the boundary of the habitat network contribute less to metapopulation survival than patches close to the centre of the network. Ignoring this fact can lead to a substantial overestimation of the mean metapopulation lifetime. Due to its numerical simplicity, the formula can be used as a conservation objective function even in complex network design problems where the number of patches to be allocated is very large. Numerical tests of the formula show that it performs very well within a wide range of network structures. PMID:19159631

  6. Structural Analysis of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity. PMID:20195371

  7. Microtomography of macroscopic snow samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzl, M.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, D.; Steiner, S.; Heggli, M.

    2010-12-01

    During the last 10 years X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) has proved to be the first successful method to measure the true three-dimensional (3-D) structure of snow on the ground. Micro-CT is used to reconstruct 3-D microstructures as a source for numerical simulations, to conduct long-term observations of metamorphism or the behavior of snow under stress and to derive macroscopic parameters describing the microstructure of snow like specific surface area or density. However, micro-CT was confined to small samples with a typically evaluated size of 5 x 5 x 5 mm3. One reason for the small size was the limited computational power, the other the sample preparation. Based on the replica method for 3-D micro-CT samples introduced by Heggli et al. (2009), we are now able to visualize snow samples up to 70 mm height, and about 10 mm diameter, with a resolution of 10 μm. Because inclusion of small air bubbles during the casting process can not be avoided, we make two scans, one before and one after sublimation, the two scans are then registered and subtracted. After image segmentation and morphological image processing the replica can be analysed in the same way as direct snow measurements. Based on such samples, we imaged highly fragile snow samples, like new snow, buried surface hoar and other weak layers. The samples show a fascinating new image of how complex snow layers are. Most samples show strong density gradients within a structurally similar layer. We think that this technique will improve our understanding of snow metamorphism and snow properties. Heggli, M.; Frei, E.; Schneebeli, M., 2009: Instruments and Methods. Snow Replica method for three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic imaging. J. Glaciol. 55, 192: 631-639.

  8. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  9. General quantitative analysis of stress partitioning and boundary conditions in undrained biphasic porous media via a purely macroscopic and purely variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpieri, Roberto; Travascio, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In poroelasticity, the effective stress law relates the external stress applied to the medium to the macroscopic strain of the solid phase and the interstitial pressure of the fluid saturating the mixture. Such relationship has been formerly introduced by Terzaghi in form of a principle. To date, no poroelastic theory is capable of recovering a stress partitioning law in agreement with Terzaghi's postulated one in the absence of ad hoc constitutive assumptions on the medium. We recently proposed a variational macroscopic continuum description of two-phase poroelasticity to derive a general biphasic formulation at finite deformations, termed variational macroscopic theory of porous media (VMTPM). Such approach proceeds from the inclusion of the intrinsic volumetric strain among the kinematic descriptors aside to macroscopic displacements, and as a variational theory, uses the Hamilton least-action principle as the unique primitive concept of mechanics invoked to derive momentum balance equations. In a previous related work it was shown that, for the subclass of undrained problems, VMTPM predicts that stress is partitioned in the two phases in strict compliance with Terzaghi's law, irrespective of the microstructural and constitutive features of a given medium. In the present contribution, we further develop the linearized framework of VMTPM to arrive at a general operative formula that allows the quantitative determination of stress partitioning in a jacketed test over a generic isotropic biphasic specimen. This formula is quantitative and general, in that it relates the partial phase stresses to the externally applied stress as function of partitioning coefficients that are all derived by strictly following a purely variational and purely macroscopic approach, and in the absence of any specific hypothesis on the microstructural or constitutive features of a given medium. To achieve this result, the stiffness coefficients of the theory are derived by using

  10. Macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Moller, P.

    1995-07-01

    We discuss recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models, including the 1992 finite-range droplet model, the 1992 extended- Thomas-Fermi Strutinsky-integral model, and the 1994 Thomas-Fermi model, with particular emphasis on how well they extrapolate to new regions of nuclei. We also address what recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models are teaching us about such physically relevant issues as the nuclear curvature energy, a new congruence energy arising from a greater-than-average overlap of neutron and proton wave functions, the nuclear incompressibility coefficient, and the coulomb redistribution energy arising from a central density depression. We conclude with a brief discussion of the recently discovered rock of metastable superheavy nuclei near {sup 272}110 that had been correctly predicted by macroscopic-microscopic models, along with a possible new tack for reaching an island near {sup 290}110 beyond our present horizon.

  11. Macroscopic Models of Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. After giving a description of the basic physical phenomena to be modelled, we begin by formulating a sharp -interface free-boundary model for the destruction of superconductivity by an applied magnetic field, under isothermal and anisothermal conditions, which takes the form of a vectorial Stefan model similar to the classical scalar Stefan model of solid/liquid phase transitions and identical in certain two-dimensional situations. This model is found sometimes to have instabilities similar to those of the classical Stefan model. We then describe the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, in which the sharp interface is 'smoothed out' by the introduction of an order parameter, representing the number density of superconducting electrons. By performing a formal asymptotic analysis of this model as various parameters in it tend to zero we find that the leading order solution does indeed satisfy the vectorial Stefan model. However, at the next order we find the emergence of terms analogous to those of 'surface tension' and 'kinetic undercooling' in the scalar Stefan model. Moreover, the 'surface energy' of a normal/superconducting interface is found to take both positive and negative values, defining Type I and Type II superconductors respectively. We discuss the response of superconductors to external influences by considering the nucleation of superconductivity with decreasing magnetic field and with decreasing temperature respectively, and find there to be a pitchfork bifurcation to a superconducting state which is subcritical for Type I superconductors and supercritical for Type II superconductors. We also examine the effects of boundaries on the nucleation field, and describe in more detail the nature of the superconducting solution in Type II superconductors--the so-called 'mixed state'. Finally, we present some open questions concerning both the modelling and analysis of

  12. Macroscopic aspects of the Unruh effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Detlev; Verch, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Macroscopic concepts pertaining to the Unruh effect are elaborated and used to clarify its physical manifestations. Based on a description of the motion of accelerated, spatially extended laboratories in Minkowski space in terms of Poincaré transformations, it is shown that, from a macroscopic perspective, an accelerated observer will not register with his measuring instruments any global thermal effects of acceleration in the inertial (Minkowskian) vacuum state. As is explained, this result is not in conflict with the well-known fact that microscopic probes used as thermometers respond non-trivially to acceleration if coupled to the vacuum. But this response cannot be interpreted as the effect of some exchange of thermal energy with a gas surrounding the observer; in fact, it is induced by the measuring process itself. It is also shown that genuine equilibrium states in a uniformly accelerated laboratory cannot be spatially homogeneous. In particular, these states coincide with the homogeneous inertial vacuum at sufficiently large distances from the horizon of the observer and consequently have the same (zero) temperature there. The analysis is carried out in the theory of a free massless scalar field; however the conclusion that the Unruh effect is not of a macroscopic thermal origin is generally valid.

  13. Pathways toward understanding Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B. L.; Subaşi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena refer to quantum features in objects of 'large' sizes, systems with many components or degrees of freedom, organized in some ways where they can be identified as macroscopic objects. This emerging field is ushered in by several categories of definitive experiments in superconductivity, electromechanical systems, Bose-Einstein condensates and others. Yet this new field which is rich in open issues at the foundation of quantum and statistical physics remains little explored theoretically (with the important exception of the work of A J Leggett [1], while touched upon or implied by several groups of authors represented in this conference. Our attitude differs in that we believe in the full validity of quantum mechanics stretching from the testable micro to meso scales, with no need for the introduction of new laws of physics.) This talk summarizes our thoughts in attempting a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of quantum macroscopic phenomena, with the goal of ultimately revealing or building a viable theoretical framework. Three major themes discussed in three intended essays are the large N expansion [2], the correlation hierarchy [3] and quantum entanglement [4]. We give a sketch of the first two themes and then discuss several key issues in the consideration of macro and quantum, namely, a) recognition that there exist many levels of structure in a composite body and only by judicious choice of an appropriate set of collective variables can one give the best description of the dynamics of a specific level of structure. Capturing the quantum features of a macroscopic object is greatly facilitated by the existence and functioning of these collective variables; b) quantum entanglement, an exclusively quantum feature [5], is known to persist to high temperatures [6] and large scales [7] under certain conditions, and may actually decrease with increased connectivity in a quantum network [8]. We use entanglement as a

  14. Finite element analysis of the macro fiber composite actuator: macroscopic elastic and piezoelectric properties and active control thereof by means of negative capacitance shunt circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Kateřina; Mokrý, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The finite element method (FEM) model of a piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) is presented. Using a specially developed numerical model, the complete set of macroscopic values of elastic compliance and piezoelectric tensors is computed. These values are useful in numerical FEM simulations of more complex systems such as noise and vibration suppression devices or active acoustic metamaterials, where the MFC actuator can be approximated by a plate-like uniform piezoelectric material. Using this approach, a great reduction of the FEM model complexity can be achieved. The computed numerical macroscopic values of the MFC actuator are compared with MFC manufacturer's data and with data obtained using different computational methods. A demonstration of active tuning of effective elastic constants of the piezoelectric MFC actuator by means of a shunt electric circuit is presented. The effective material constants are computed using the FEM model developed. The effect of the shunt circuit capacitance on the effective anisotropic Young's moduli is analyzed in detail. A method for finding the proper shunt circuit adjustment that yields the maximum values of the MFC actuator Young's modulus is shown. Possible applications to noise and vibration suppression are discussed.

  15. Temporal bone fracture under lateral impact: biomechanical and macroscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Montava, Marion; Masson, Catherine; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Mancini, Julien; Soussan, Jerome; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2016-03-01

    This work was conducted to study biomechanical properties and macroscopic analysis of petrous fracture by lateral impact. Seven embalmed intact human cadaver heads were tested to failure using an electrohydraulic testing device. Dynamic loading was done at 2 m/s on temporal region with maximal deflection to 12 mm. Anthropometric and pathological data were determined by pretest and posttest computed tomography images, macroscopic evaluation, and anatomical dissection. Biomechanical data were obtained. Results indicated the head to have nonlinear structural response. The overall mean values of failure forces, deflections, stiffness, occipital, and frontal peak acceleration were 7.1 kN (±1.1), 9.1 mm (±1.8), 1.3 kN/mm (±0.4), 90.5 g (±22.5), and 65.4 g (±16), respectively. The seven lateral impacts caused fractures, temporal fractures in six cases. We observed very strong homogeneity for the biomechanical and pathological results between different trials in our study and between data from various experiments and our study. No statistical correlation was found between anthropometric, biomechanical, and pathological data. These data will assist in the development and validation of finite element models of head injury. PMID:26036776

  16. CODSTRAN - Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRucture ANalysis) a NASA Lewis Center computer program for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures when subjected to service loads is presented. Organization, capabilities and present status are discussed. Organizational aspects include executive, input, output, analysis and composite mechanics modules. Capabilities include: durability assessment of large structures and complex structural parts from composites, structural response due to static, cyclic, transient impact and thermal loads, and criteria for static, cyclic, and dynamic fracture. At the present state of development some of CODSTRAN's analysis capabilities include composite mechanics, static failures, and lamination residual stresses. An application in which CODSTRAN is used to predict the defect growth in a flat specimen, with a center through-slit under tension is studied. When completed, CODSTRAN will account for geometry and material nonlinearities, environmental effects as well as static, cyclic and dynamic fracture.

  17. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  18. Macroscopic Fault Structure of the 1911 Mw8.1 Chon Kemin Earthquake (Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan) from Combined Seismic Imaging, Palaeo-Seismological Investigations and Historial Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, C. A.; Sonnemann, T.; Landgraf, A.; Ryberg, T.; Kulikova, G.; Krueger, F.; Dzhumabaeva, A.; Abdrakhmatov, K.; Abdybachaev, U.; Orunbaev, S.; Rosenwinkel, S.; Sharshebaev, A.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes in low-strain regions and their driving forces are still sparsely studied and understood, and constitute serious first-order research questions. Data acquisition concerning paleo-earthquakes, related hazards, and tectonic activity beyond historical records plays an important role. Such information can be obtained with tools from tectonic geomorphology, geophysics, historic seismicity, and paleo-seismology that should span a variety of time and length scales. The Chon-Kemin Valley in the northern Tien Shan (Kyrgyzstan) is a small, intermontane basin of unknown origin framed by a network of active faults. In the year 1911, the Chon-Kemin earthquake (Mw=8.1) activated fault structures of about 200 km length which also ruptured the surface along the Chon-Kemin Valley and caused numerous landslides and rock avalanches of up to several tens of millions of cubic meters in volume. The Chon-Kemin earthquake was one of a series of strong seismic events that affected the northern Tien Shan between 1885 and 1938. A seismic survey across the Chon-Kemin Valley was conducted to investigate the subsurface velocity structure of the valley and its surrounding faults. Tomographic inversion techniques were applied to first-arrival traveltimes of refracted P waves, and the seismic data were screened for reflection signatures. Additionally, the region was analyzed through paleo-seismological trenching. Tomographic and reflection images identified a shallow basin structure bounded by a set of thrust faults in the south only which - in part - correlate with the surface trace of the rupture. The deformation seems to be distributed in time and space across several sub-parallel fault strands. Synthesis of historical (analog) recordings of this earthquake provide new insights into the source mechanisms and processes.

  19. Reduced Gyral Window and Corpus Callosum Size in Autism: Possible Macroscopic Correlates of a Minicolumnopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman; Mott, Meghan; Mannheim, Glenn; Hassan, Hossam; Fahmi, Rachid; Giedd, Jay; Rumsey, Judith M.; Switala, Andrew E.; Farag, Aly

    2009-01-01

    Minicolumnar changes that generalize throughout a significant portion of the cortex have macroscopic structural correlates that may be visualized with modern structural neuroimaging techniques. In magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of fourteen autistic patients and 28 controls, the present study found macroscopic morphological correlates to recent…

  20. Experimental study of germanium adsorption on goethite and germanium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide: X-ray absorption fine structure and macroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Pokrovski, G. S.; Schott, J.; Galy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Adsorption of germanium on goethite was studied at 25 °C in batch reactors as a function of pH (1-12), germanium concentration in solution (10 -7 to 0.002 M) and solid/solution ratio (1.8-17 g/L). The maximal surface site density determined via Ge adsorption experiments at pH from 6 to 10 is equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 μmol/m 2. The percentage of adsorbed Ge increases with pH at pH < 9, reaches a maximum at pH ˜ 9 and slightly decreases when pH is further increased to 11. These results allowed generation of a 2-p K Surface Complexation Model (SCM) which implies a constant capacitance of the electric double layer and postulates the presence of two Ge complexes, >FeO-Ge(OH)30 and >FeO-GeO(OH)2-, at the goethite-solution interface. Coprecipitation of Ge with iron oxy(hydr)oxides formed during Fe(II) oxidation by atmospheric oxygen or by Fe(III) hydrolysis in neutral solutions led to high Ge incorporations in solid with maximal Ge/Fe molar ratio close to 0.5. The molar Ge/Fe ratio in precipitated solid is proportional to that in the initial solution according to the equation (Ge/Fe) solid = k × (Ge/Fe) solution with 0.7 ⩽ k ⩽ 1.0. The structure of adsorbed and coprecipitated Ge complexes was further characterized using XAFS spectroscopy. In agreement with previous data on oxyanions adsorption on goethite, bi-dentate bi-nuclear surface complexes composed of tetrahedrally coordinated Ge attached to the corners of two adjacent Fe octahedra represent the dominant contribution to the EXAFS signal. Coprecipitated samples with Ge/Fe molar ratios >0.1, and samples not aged in solution (<1 day) having intermediate Ge/Fe ratios (0.01-0.1) show 4 ± 0.3 oxygen atoms at 1.76 ± 0.01 Å around Ge. Samples less concentrated in Ge (0.001 < Ge/Fe < 0.10) and aged longer times in solution (up to 280 days) exhibit a splitting of the first atomic shell with Ge in both tetrahedral ( R = 1.77 ± 0.02 Å) and octahedral ( R = 1.92 ± 0.03 Å) coordination with oxygen. In these samples

  1. Making Macroscopic Assemblies of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; Colbert, Daniel T.; Smith, Ken A.; Walters, Deron A.; Casavant, Michael J.; Qin, Xiaochuan; Yakobson, Boris; Hauge, Robert H.; Saini, Rajesh Kumar; Chiung, Wan-Ting; Huffman, Charles B.

    2005-01-01

    A method of aligning and assembling single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to fabricate macroscopic structures has been invented. The method entails suspending SWNTs in a fluid, orienting the SWNTs by use of a magnetic and/or electric field, and then removing the aligned SWNTs from suspension in such a way as to assemble them while maintaining the alignment. SWNTs are essentially tubular extensions of fullerene molecules. It is desirable to assemble aligned SWNTs into macroscopic structures because the common alignment of the SWNTs in such a structure makes it possible to exploit, on a macroscopic scale, the unique mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties that individual oriented SWNTs exhibit at the molecular level. Because of their small size and high electrical conductivity, carbon nanotubes, and especially SWNTs, are useful for making electrical connectors in integrated circuits. Carbon nanotubes can be used as antennas at optical frequencies, and as probes in scanning tunneling microscopes, atomic-force microscopes, and the like. Carbon nanotubes can be used with or instead of carbon black in tires. Carbon nanotubes are useful as supports for catalysts. Ropes of SWNTs are metallic and, as such, are potentially useful in some applications in which electrical conductors are needed - for example, they could be used as additives in formulating electrically conductive paints. Finally, macroscopic assemblies of aligned SWNTs can serve as templates for the growth of more and larger structures of the same type. The great variety of tubular fullerene molecules and of the structures that could be formed by assembling them in various ways precludes a complete description of the present method within the limits of this article. It must suffice to present a typical example of the use of one of many possible variants of the method to form a membrane comprising SWNTs aligned substantially parallel to each other in the membrane plane. The apparatus used in this variant

  2. Macroscopic dynamics of cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchón, S. A.; Condat, C. A.

    2007-04-01

    Macroscopic modeling is used to describe various aspects of cancer growth. A recently proposed “dysnamical exponent” hypothesis is critically examined in the context of the angiogenic development. It is also shown that the emergence of necroses facilitates the growth of avascular tumors; the model yields an excellent fit to available experimental data, allowing for the determination of growth parameters. Finally, the global effects of an applied antitumoral immunotherapy are investigated. It is shown that, in the long run, the application of a therapeutical course leads to bigger tumors by weakening the intraspecific competition between surviving viable cancer cells. The strength of this model lies in its simplicity and in the amount of information that can be gleaned using only very general ideas.

  3. CODSTRAN: Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is an integrated computer program being developed for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures subjected to service loads and environments. CODSTRAN is briefly described with respect to organization, capabilities and present status. Application of CODSTRAN current capability to a flat composite laminate with a center slit which was subjected to axial tension loading predicted defect growth which is in good agreement with C-scan ultrasonic test records.

  4. Fibrous random materials: From microstructure to macroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdchi, K.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    Fibrous porous materials are involved in a wide range of applications including composite materials, fuel cells, heat exchangers and (biological)filters. Fluid flow through these materials plays an important role in many engineering applications and processes, such as textiles and paper manufacturing or transport of (under)ground water and pollutants. While most porous materials have complex geometry, some can be seen as two-dimensional particulate/fibrous systems, in which we introduce several microscopic quantities, based on Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations, to characterize their microstructure. In particular, by analyzing the topological properties of Voronoi polygons, we observe a smooth transition from disorder to order, for increasing packing fraction. Using fully resolved finite element (FE) simulations of Newtonian, incompressible fluid flow perpendicular to the fibres, the macroscopic permeability is calculated in creeping flow regimes. The effect of fibre arrangement and local crystalline regions on the macroscopic permeability is discussed and the macroscopic property is linked to the microscopic structural quantities.

  5. The Advantages of Not Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Brezinski, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent paper entitled by K. C. Lee et al. (2011) establishes nonlocal macroscopic quantum correlations, which they term “entanglement”, under ambient conditions. Photon(s)-phonon entanglements are established within each interferometer arm. However, our analysis demonstrates, the phonon fields between arms become correlated as a result of single-photon wavepacket path indistinguishability, not true nonlocal entanglement. We also note that a coherence expansion (as opposed to decoherence) resulted from local entanglement which was not recognized. It occurred from nearly identical Raman scattering in each arm (importantly not meeting the Born and Markovian approximations). The ability to establish nonlocal macroscopic quantum correlations through path indistinguishability rather than entanglement offers the opportunity to greatly expand quantum macroscopic theory and application, even though it was not true nonlocal entanglement.

  6. Structural analysis of aligned RNAs.

    PubMed

    Voss, Björn

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is growing very fast and it is mainly the structure which is the common characteristic property shared by members of the same class. For correct characterization of such classes it is therefore of great importance to analyse the structural features in great detail. In this manuscript I present RNAlishapes which combines various secondary structure analysis methods, such as suboptimal folding and shape abstraction, with a comparative approach known as RNA alignment folding. RNAlishapes makes use of an extended thermodynamic model and covariance scoring, which allows to reward covariation of paired bases. Applying the algorithm to a set of bacterial trp-operon leaders using shape abstraction it was able to identify the two alternating conformations of this attenuator. Besides providing in-depth analysis methods for aligned RNAs, the tool also shows a fairly well prediction accuracy. Therefore, RNAlishapes provides the community with a powerful tool for structural analysis of classes of RNAs and is also a reasonable method for consensus structure prediction based on sequence alignments. RNAlishapes is available for online use and download at http://rna.cyanolab.de. PMID:17020924

  7. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  8. Structural Analysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an applied method of assessing and manipulating environmental factors influencing student behavior. The assessment procedure is called structural analysis (SA) and can be a part of a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) process or a stand-alone set of procedures for teachers to use in their classrooms.…

  9. Structural Analysis and Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Collier Research and Development Corporation received a one-of-a-kind computer code for designing exotic hypersonic aircraft called ST-SIZE in the first ever Langley Research Center software copyright license agreement. Collier transformed the NASA computer code into a commercial software package called HyperSizer, which integrates with other Finite Element Modeling and Finite Analysis private-sector structural analysis program. ST-SIZE was chiefly conceived as a means to improve and speed the structural design of a future aerospace plane for Langley Hypersonic Vehicles Office. Including the NASA computer code into HyperSizer has enabled the company to also apply the software to applications other than aerospace, including improved design and construction for offices, marine structures, cargo containers, commercial and military aircraft, rail cars, and a host of everyday consumer products.

  10. Sagnac interferometry as a probe to the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ran; Gong Xuefei; Pei Shouyong; Luo Ziren; Lau, Y. K.

    2010-09-15

    Single photon Sagnac interferometry as a probe to macroscopic quantum mechanics is considered at the theoretical level. For a freely moving macroscopic quantum mirror susceptible to radiation pressure force inside a Sagnac interferometer, a careful analysis of the input-output relation reveals that the particle spectrum readout at the bright and dark ports encode information concerning the noncommutativity of position and momentum of the macroscopic mirror. A feasible experimental scheme to probe the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror is outlined to explore the possible frontier between classical and quantum regimes. In the Appendix, the case of Michelson interferometry as a feasible probe is also sketched.

  11. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  12. Structural analysis of vibroacoustical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromov, A. P.; Myasnikov, L. L.; Myasnikova, Y. N.; Finagin, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The method of automatic identification of acoustical signals, by means of the segmentation was used to investigate noises and vibrations in machines and mechanisms, for cybernetic diagnostics. The structural analysis consists of presentation of a noise or vibroacoustical signal as a sequence of segments, determined by the time quantization, in which each segment is characterized by specific spectral characteristics. The structural spectrum is plotted as a histogram of the segments, also as a relation of the probability density of appearance of a segment to the segment type. It is assumed that the conditions of ergodic processes are maintained.

  13. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  14. Structured functional principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Greven, Sonja

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  15. Uncertainty Analysis of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-phase approach and a computational procedure are presented for predicting the variability in the nonlinear response of composite structures associated with variations in the geometric and material parameters of the structure. In the first phase, hierarchical sensitivity analysis is used to identify the major parameters, which have the most effect on the response quantities of interest. In the second phase, the major parameters are taken to be fuzzy parameters, and a fuzzy set analysis is used to determine the range of variation of the response, associated with preselected variations in the major parameters. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example of a cylindrical panel with four T-shaped stiffeners and a circular cutout.

  16. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  17. Grid Stiffened Structure Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Grid Stiffened Analysis Tool contract is contract performed by Boeing under NASA purchase order H30249D. The contract calls for a "best effort" study comprised of two tasks: (1) Create documentation for a composite grid-stiffened structure analysis tool, in the form of a Microsoft EXCEL spread sheet, that was developed by originally at Stanford University and later further developed by the Air Force, and (2) Write a program that functions as a NASTRAN pre-processor to generate an FEM code for grid-stiffened structure. In performing this contract, Task 1 was given higher priority because it enables NASA to make efficient use of a unique tool they already have; Task 2 was proposed by Boeing because it also would be beneficial to the analysis of composite grid-stiffened structures, specifically in generating models for preliminary design studies. The contract is now complete, this package includes copies of the user's documentation for Task 1 and a CD ROM & diskette with an electronic copy of the user's documentation and an updated version of the "GRID 99" spreadsheet.

  18. Probabilistic methods for structural response analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Burnside, O. H.; Cruse, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses current work to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods for integration with a specially developed probabilistic finite element code. The goal is to establish distribution functions for the structural responses of stochastic structures under uncertain loadings. Several probabilistic analysis methods are proposed covering efficient structural probabilistic analysis methods, correlated random variables, and response of linear system under stationary random loading.

  19. Anisotropic dynamics of water ultra-confined in macroscopically oriented channels of single-crystal beryl: A multi-frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Mamontov, Eugene; Ishai, Paul ben; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2013-01-01

    The properties of fluids can be significantly altered by the geometry of their confining environments. While there has been significant work on the properties of such confined fluids, the properties of fluids under ultraconfinement, environments where, at least in one plane, the dimensions of the confining environment are similar to that of the confined molecule, have not been investigated. This paper investigates the dynamic properties of water in beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), the structure of which contains approximately 5-A-diam channels parallel to the c axis. Three techniques, inelastic neutron scattering, quasielastic neutron scattering, and dielectric spectroscopy, have been used to quantify these properties over a dynamic range covering approximately 16 orders of magnitude. Because beryl can be obtained in large single crystals we were able to quantify directional variations, perpendicular and parallel to the channel directions, in the dynamics of the confined fluid. These are significantly anisotropic and, somewhat counterintuitively, show that vibrations parallel to the c-axis channels are significantly more hindered than those perpendicular to the channels. The effective potential for vibrations in the c direction is harder than the potential in directions perpendicular to it. There is evidence of single-file diffusion of water molecules along the channels at higher temperatures, but below 150 K this diffusion is strongly suppressed. No such suppression, however, has been observed in the channel-perpendicular direction. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra include an intramolecular stretching O-H peak at 465 meV. As this is nearly coincident with that known for free water molecules and approximately 30 meV higher than that in liquid water or ice, this suggests that there is no hydrogen bonding constraining vibrations between the channel water and the beryl structure. However, dielectric spectroscopic measurements at higher temperatures and lower frequencies

  20. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  1. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  2. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the start up and take off portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the start up transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because of the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable, and also because the cyclic elastic viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies. One element of the structures program is developing improved time varying thermal mechanical load models for the entire engine mission cycle from start up to shutdown. Another major part of the program is the development of new and improved nonlinear 3-D finite elements and associated structural analysis programs, including the development of temporal elements with time dependent properties to account for creep effects in the materials and components.

  3. Strain-induced macroscopic magnetic anisotropy from smectic liquid-crystalline elastomer-maghemite nanoparticle hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Haberl, Johannes M; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mihut, Adriana M; Dietsch, Hervé; Hirt, Ann M; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-06-21

    We combine tensile strength analysis and X-ray scattering experiments to establish a detailed understanding of the microstructural coupling between liquid-crystalline elastomer (LCE) networks and embedded magnetic core-shell ellipsoidal nanoparticles (NPs). We study the structural and magnetic re-organization at different deformations and NP loadings, and the associated shape and magnetic memory features. In the quantitative analysis of a stretching process, the effect of the incorporated NPs on the smectic LCE is found to be prominent during the reorientation of the smectic domains and the softening of the nanocomposite. Under deformation, the soft response of the nanocomposite material allows the organization of the nanoparticles to yield a permanent macroscopically anisotropic magnetic material. Independent of the particle loading, the shape-memory properties and the smectic phase of the LCEs are preserved. Detailed studies on the magnetic properties demonstrate that the collective ensemble of individual particles is responsible for the macroscopic magnetic features of the nanocomposite. PMID:23677459

  4. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-05-07

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions.

  6. Collective Phenomena in Macroscopic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2007-08-01

    A hypothesis of the magnetostatic turbulence and its implications of astrophysics / D.D. Ryutov and B.A. Remingtonn-- Coherent structures and turbulence in electron plasmas / M. Rome ... [et al.] -- Self-organization of non-linear vortices in plasma lens for ion-beam-focusing in crossed radial electrical and longitudinal magnetic fields / V. Maslov, I. Onishchenko and A. Goncharov -- Collective processes at kinetic levels in dusty plasmas / P.K. Shukla and B. Eliasson -- Magnetic field generation in anisotropic relativistic plasma regimes / F. Pegoraro, F. Califano and D. del Sarto -- Generation and observation of coherent, long-lived structures in a laser-plasma channel / T. V. Liseykina ... [et al.] -- Theoretical resolution of magnetic reconnection in high energy plasmas / B. Coppi -- The power of being flat: conformal invariance in two-dimensional turbulence / A. Celani -- Stochastic resonance: from climate to biology / R. Benzi -- Energy-enstrophy theory for coupled fluid/rotating sphere system-exact solutions for super-rotations / C. C. Lim -- Thermophoretic convection of silica nanoparticles / A. Vailati ... [et al.] -- Fluctuations and pattern formation in fluids with competing interactions / A. Imperio, D. Pini and L. Reatto -- Alternatives and paradoxes in rotational and gravitational instabilities / J.P. Goedbloed -- Poynting jets and MHD winds from rapidly rotating magnetized stars / R.V.E. Lovelace, M.M. Romanova, G.V. Ustyugova and A.V. Koldoba -- Turbulence and transport in astrophysical accretion disks / J.M. Stone -- Gravitational instabilities in gaseous discs and the formation of supermassive Black Hole seeds at high redshifts / G. Lodato -- Fine Structure and Dynamics of Sunspot Penumbra / M. Ryutova, T. Berger and A. Title -- Phase Mixing in Mond / L. Ciotti, C. Nipoti and P. Londrillo -- MHD simulations of jet acceleration: the role of disk resistivity / G. Bodo ... [et al.] -- Hamiltonian structure of a collisionless reconnection model valid

  7. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (∼10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure. PMID:26416086

  8. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (~10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure.

  9. Progress in thermostructural analysis of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Mahaney, J.; Pandey, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element space structures research focused on the interdisciplinary problems of heating, thermal, and structural analysis is discussed. Slender member shadowing effects, and cable stiffened structures are described.

  10. Macroscopic quantum phenomena from the large N perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. H.; Hu, B. L.; Subaşi, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena (MQP) is a relatively new research venue, with exciting ongoing experiments and bright prospects, yet with surprisingly little theoretical activity. What makes MQP intellectually stimulating is because it is counterpoised against the traditional view that macroscopic means classical. This simplistic and hitherto rarely challenged view need be scrutinized anew, perhaps with much of the conventional wisdoms repealed. In this series of papers we report on a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of MQP, with the hope of constructing a viable theoretical framework for this new endeavour. The three major themes discussed in these three essays are the large N expansion, the correlation hierarchy and quantum entanglement for systems of 'large' sizes, with many components or degrees of freedom. In this paper we use different theories in a variety of contexts to examine the conditions or criteria whereby a macroscopic quantum system may take on classical attributes, and, more interestingly, that it keeps some of its quantum features. The theories we consider here are, the O(N) quantum mechanical model, semiclassical stochastic gravity and gauge / string theories; the contexts include that of a 'quantum roll' in inflationary cosmology, entropy generation in quantum Vlasov equation for plasmas, the leading order and next-to-leading order large N behaviour, and hydrodynamic / thermodynamic limits. The criteria for classicality in our consideration include the use of uncertainty relations, the correlation between classical canonical variables, randomization of quantum phase, environment-induced decoherence, decoherent history of hydrodynamic variables, etc. All this exercise is to ask only one simple question: Is it really so surprising that quantum features can appear in macroscopic objects? By examining different representative systems where detailed theoretical analysis has been carried out, we find that there is no a priori

  11. Macroscopic properties of fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean Francois, T.; Adler, P.; Bogdanov, I.; Mourzenko, V.

    2006-12-01

    There are two basic problems to be addressed. The first one is to solve precisely the partial differential equations which govern the phenomena which occur in these media and which are of interest in a large number of applications. The second one is to define a methodology in order to be able to estimate the macroscopic properties of real media by using quantities which are easily measurable on the field. Two major steps are needed for the numerical solution (1). First, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh of the fractures and of the porous matrix located in between is constructed; second, the governing partial equations are discretized and solved, in a finite volume formulation. A brief overview of the various problems which have been addressed so far, will be given: single and two phase flows, unsteady flows around a well, dispersion of an active and a passive solute, mechanical properties. This set of codes enabled us to cope with the second basic problem. Our approach is based on the systematic use of the excluded volume of fractures (which will be defined). The number of fractures per unit volume can be replaced by the number ρ ' of fractures per excluded volume. When numerical results such as the percolation threshold, the macroscopic permeability are plotted as functions of ρ ' they become independent of the shapes of the fractures which is a decisive simplification. Then, we show how ρ ' can be estimated from measurements performed along lines (2), planes, and galleries. It is interesting to notice that many stereological relations are actually independent of the size and shapes of fractures provided that they are convex (3); such a property adds a lot of generality to our methodology. Some tentative applications of the methodology are given and they show that the estimations are always in good agreement with the data. References (1) I.I. Bogdanov, V.V. Mourzenko, J.-F. Thovert, P.M. Adler, Effective permeability of fractured porous media in steady

  12. The macroscopic delamination of thin films from elastic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Dominic; Bico, José; Boudaoud, Arezki; Roman, Benoit; Reis, Pedro M.

    2009-01-01

    The wrinkling and delamination of stiff thin films adhered to a polymer substrate have important applications in “flexible electronics.” The resulting periodic structures, when used for circuitry, have remarkable mechanical properties because stretching or twisting of the substrate is mostly accommodated through bending of the film, which minimizes fatigue or fracture. To date, applications in this context have used substrate patterning to create an anisotropic substrate-film adhesion energy, thereby producing a controlled array of delamination “blisters.” However, even in the absence of such patterning, blisters appear spontaneously, with a characteristic size. Here, we perform well-controlled experiments at macroscopic scales to study what sets the dimensions of these blisters in terms of the material properties and explain our results by using a combination of scaling and analytical methods. Besides pointing to a method for determining the interfacial toughness, our analysis suggests a number of design guidelines for the thin films used in flexible electronic applications. Crucially, we show that, to avoid the possibility that delamination may cause fatigue damage, the thin film thickness must be greater than a critical value, which we determine. PMID:19556551

  13. The Proell Effect: A Macroscopic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauen, Kenneth M.

    2011-12-01

    Maxwell's Demon is a legitimate challenge to the Second Law of Thermodynamics when the "demon" is executed via the Proell effect. Thermal energy transfer according to the Kinetic Theory of Heat and Statistical Mechanics that takes place over distances greater than the mean free path of a gas circumvents the microscopic randomness that leads to macroscopic irreversibility. No information is required to sort the particles as no sorting occurs; the entire volume of gas undergoes the same transition. The Proell effect achieves quasi-spontaneous thermal separation without sorting by the perturbation of a heterogeneous constant volume system with displacement and regeneration. The classical analysis of the constant volume process, such as found in the Stirling Cycle, is incomplete and therefore incorrect. There are extra energy flows that classical thermo does not recognize. When a working fluid is displaced across a regenerator with a temperature gradient in a constant volume system, complimentary compression and expansion work takes place that transfers energy between the regenerator and the bulk gas volumes of the hot and cold sides of the constant volume system. Heat capacity at constant pressure applies instead of heat capacity at constant volume. The resultant increase in calculated, recyclable energy allows the Carnot Limit to be exceeded in certain cycles. Super-Carnot heat engines and heat pumps have been designed and a US patent has been awarded.

  14. Examining brain microstructure using structure tensor analysis of histological sections.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Frank, Joseph A

    2012-10-15

    The mammalian central nervous system has a tremendous structural complexity, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is unique in its ability to extract microstructural tissue properties at a macroscopic scale. However, despite its widespread use and applications in clinical and research settings, accurate validation of DTI has notoriously lagged the advances in image acquisition and analysis. In this report, we demonstrate an approach to visualize and quantify the microscopic features of histological sections on multiple length scales using techniques derived from image texture analysis. Structure tensor (ST) analysis was applied to fluorescence microscopy images of rat brain sections to visualize and quantify tissue microstructure. Images were digitally color-coded based on the local orientation in the pixelwise ST implementation, which allowed direct visualization of white matter complexity at the microscopic level. A piecewise ST algorithm was also employed to quantify anisotropy and orientation at a resolution comparable to that typically acquired with DTI. Anisotropy measured with ST analysis of stained histological sections was highly correlated with anisotropy measured by ex vivo DTI of the same brains (R(2)=0.92). Furthermore, angular histograms, or Fiber Orientation Distributions (FODs), were computed to mimic similar measures derived from high angular resolution diffusion imaging methods. The FODs for each pixel were fit to a mixture of von Mises distributions to identify putative regions of multiple fiber populations (i.e. crossing fibers). Despite its current application to two-dimensional microscopy, the ST analysis is a novel approach to visualize and quantify microstructure in the central nervous system in both health and disease, and advances the available set of tools for validating DTI and other diffusion MRI techniques. PMID:22759994

  15. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  16. Macroscopic entanglement of many-magnon states

    SciTech Connect

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Akira; Sugita, Ayumu

    2005-03-01

    We study macroscopic entanglement of various pure states of a one-dimensional N-spin system with N>>1. Here, a quantum state is said to be macroscopically entangled if it is a superposition of macroscopically distinct states. To judge whether such superposition is hidden in a general state, we use an essentially unique index p: A pure state is macroscopically entangled if p=2, whereas it may be entangled but not macroscopically if p<2. This index is directly related to fundamental stabilities of many-body states. We calculate the index p for various states in which magnons are excited with various densities and wave numbers. We find macroscopically entangled states (p=2) as well as states with p=1. The former states are unstable in the sense that they are unstable against some local measurements. On the other hand, the latter states are stable in the senses that they are stable against any local measurements and that their decoherence rates never exceed O(N) in any weak classical noises. For comparison, we also calculate the von Neumann entropy S{sub N/2}(N) of a subsystem composed of N/2 spins as a measure of bipartite entanglement. We find that S{sub N/2}(N) of some states with p=1 is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum value N/2. On the other hand, S{sub N/2}(N) of the macroscopically entangled states with p=2 is as small as O(log N)<

  17. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures is a major activity at Lewis Research Center. Recent activities have focused on extending the methods to include the combined uncertainties in several factors on structural response. This paper briefly describes recent progress on composite load spectra models, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic strength degradation modeling. Progress is described in terms of fundamental concepts, computer code development, and representative numerical results.

  18. Probabilistic structural analysis methods development for SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of probabilistic structural analysis methods is a major part of the SSME Structural Durability Program and consists of three program elements: composite load spectra, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic structural analysis applications. Recent progress includes: (1) the effects of the uncertainties of several factors on the HPFP blade temperature pressure and torque, (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function of structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties on primitive structural variables, and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results obtained demonstrate that the structural durability of critical SSME components can be probabilistically evaluated.

  19. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  20. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures at Lewis Research Center is presented. Three elements of the research program are: (1) composite load spectra methodology; (2) probabilistic structural analysis methodology; and (3) probabilistic structural analysis application. Recent progress includes: (1) quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFT) turbine blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the space shuttle main engine (SSME); (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability of hot engine structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic/reliability framework.

  1. Macroscopic response and directional disorder dynamics in chemically substituted ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parravicini, Jacopo; DelRe, Eugenio; Agranat, Aharon J.; Parravicini, Gianbattista

    2016-03-01

    Using temperature-resolved dielectric spectroscopy in the range 25-320 K we investigate the macroscopic response, phase symmetry, and order/disorder states in bulk ferroelectric K1-yLiyTa1-xNbx (KLTN). Four long-range symmetry phases are identified with their relative transitions. Directional analysis of the order/disorder states using Fröhlich entropy indicates global symmetry breaking along the growth axis and an anisotropic dipolar effective thermodynamic behavior, which ranges from disordered to ordered at the same temperature for different directions in the sample. Results indicate that the macroscopic polarization, driven by nanosized polar regions, follows a microscopic perovskite eight-sites lattice model.

  2. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial.

  3. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial. PMID:24870613

  4. Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M. R.; Sussman, B. J.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; England, D.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  5. Macroscopic effects in attosecond pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchon, T.; Hauri, C. P.; Varjú, K.; Mansten, E.; Swoboda, M.; López-Martens, R.; L'Huillier, A.

    2008-02-01

    We examine how the generation and propagation of high-order harmonics in a partly ionized gas medium affect their strength and synchronization. The temporal properties of the resulting attosecond pulses generated in long gas targets can be significantly influenced by macroscopic effects, in particular by the intensity in the medium and the degree of ionization which control the dispersion. Under some conditions, the use of gas targets longer than the absorption length can lead to the generation of compressed attosecond pulses. We show these macroscopic effects experimentally, using a 6 mm-long argon-filled gas cell as the generating medium.

  6. Macroscopic response in active nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Gandhi; John, Sajeev; Li, Er Ping

    2013-09-15

    We derive macroscopic equations of motion for the slowly varying electric field amplitude in three-dimensional active nonlinear optical nanostructures. We show that the microscopic Maxwell equations and polarization dynamics can be simplified to a macroscopic one-dimensional problem in the direction of group velocity. For a three-level active material, we derive the steady-state equations for normal mode frequency, threshold pumping, nonlinear Bloch mode amplitude, and lasing in photonic crystals. Our analytical results accurately recapture the results of exact numerical methods. PMID:24104802

  7. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    2016-04-22

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only key evidence for macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We study systematically the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. We also discuss the experimental implementation of this scheme. PMID:27152802

  8. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only key evidence for macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We study systematically the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. We also discuss the experimental implementation of this scheme.

  9. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  10. Macroscopic (and microscopic) massless modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael C.; Aniceto, Inês

    2015-05-01

    We study certain spinning strings exploring the flat directions of AdS3 ×S3 ×S3 ×S1, the massless sector cousins of su (2) and sl (2) sector spinning strings. We describe these, and their vibrational modes, using the D(2, 1 ; α) 2 algebraic curve. By exploiting a discrete symmetry of this structure which reverses the direction of motion on the spheres, and alters the masses of the fermionic modes s → κ - s, we find out how to treat the massless fermions which were previously missing from this formalism. We show that folded strings behave as a special case of circular strings, in a sense which includes their mode frequencies, and we are able to recover this fact in the worldsheet formalism. We use these frequencies to calculate one-loop corrections to the energy, with a version of the Beisert-Tseytlin resummation.

  11. Effects of Microstructure Variations on Macroscopic Terahertz Metafilm Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    O'Hara, John F.; Smirnova, Evgenya; Azad, Abul K.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Taylor, Antoinette J.

    2007-01-01

    The properties of planar, single-layer metamaterials, or metafilms, are studied by varying the structural components of the split-ring resonators used to comprise the overall medium. Measurements and simulations reveal how minor design variations in split-ring resonator structures can result in significant changes in the macroscopic properties of the metafilm. A transmission-line/circuit model is also used to clarify some of the behavior and design limitations of the metafilms. Though our results are illustrated in the terahertz frequency range, the work has broader implications, particularly with respect to filtering, modulation, and switching devices.

  12. Immobilization of WO{sub 3} or MoO{sub 3} on macroscopic silica fiber via CNFs template

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiang Zhao, Li; Han, Ruobing

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: Uniform immobilization of tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) or molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) on silica fiber was successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as template. FE-SEM coupled with XRD analysis confirmed the template effect and the existence of WO{sub 3} or MoO{sub 3} immobilized on silica fiber. It is expected that such materials with direct macroscopic shapes would hold promise as highly functionalized materials for potential practical applications, especially in photocatalysis. - Highlights: • WO{sub 3} or MoO{sub 3} with macroscopic shapes were successfully obtained. • WO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} immobilization depended on CNFs templates. • FE-SEM and XRD confirmed the structure and phase composition. - Abstract: Uniform immobilization of tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) or molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) on silica fiber was successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as template. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), coupled with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the template effect and the existence of WO{sub 3} or MoO{sub 3} immobilized on silica fiber. It is expected that such materials with direct macroscopic shapes would hold promise as highly functionalized materials for potential practical applications, especially in photocatalysis.

  13. Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Vikram K; Quinlan, Ronald; Agapov, Alexander L; Dunlap, John R; Nelson, Kimberly M; Duranty, Edward R; Sokolov, Alexei P; Bhat, Gajanan; Mays, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

  14. Structure in Teaching Theory and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, O. Roger

    A theory of structure in teaching is presented and a system of analysis introduced which allows empirical investigation of verbal behavior in the classroom. Two kinds of structure are distinguished: "static" structure, defined as stable organized clusters of knowledge, and "kinetic" structure, defined as the sequential process of building up…

  15. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  16. Nonlinear photomechanics of nematic networks: upscaling microscopic behaviour to macroscopic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hayoung; Choi, Joonmyung; Yun, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-02-01

    A liquid crystal network whose chromophores are functionalized by photochromic dye exhibits light-induced mechanical behaviour. As a result, the micro-scaled thermotropic traits of the network and the macroscopic phase behaviour are both influenced as light alternates the shape of the dyes. In this paper, we present an analysis of this photomechanical behaviour based on the proposed multiscale framework, which incorporates the molecular details of microstate evolution into a continuum-based understanding. The effects of trans-to-cis photoisomerization driven by actinic light irradiation are first examined using molecular dynamics simulations, and are compared against the predictions of the classical dilution model; this reveals certain characteristics of mesogenic interaction upon isomerization, followed by changes in the polymeric structure. We then upscale the thermotropic phase-related information with the aid of a nonlinear finite element analysis; macroscopic deflection with respect to the wide ranges of temperature and actinic light intensity are thereby examined, which reveals that the classical model underestimates the true deformation. This work therefore provides measures for analysing photomechanics in general by bridging the gap between the micro- and macro-scales.

  17. Nonlinear photomechanics of nematic networks: upscaling microscopic behaviour to macroscopic deformation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hayoung; Choi, Joonmyung; Yun, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-01-01

    A liquid crystal network whose chromophores are functionalized by photochromic dye exhibits light-induced mechanical behaviour. As a result, the micro-scaled thermotropic traits of the network and the macroscopic phase behaviour are both influenced as light alternates the shape of the dyes. In this paper, we present an analysis of this photomechanical behaviour based on the proposed multiscale framework, which incorporates the molecular details of microstate evolution into a continuum-based understanding. The effects of trans-to-cis photoisomerization driven by actinic light irradiation are first examined using molecular dynamics simulations, and are compared against the predictions of the classical dilution model; this reveals certain characteristics of mesogenic interaction upon isomerization, followed by changes in the polymeric structure. We then upscale the thermotropic phase-related information with the aid of a nonlinear finite element analysis; macroscopic deflection with respect to the wide ranges of temperature and actinic light intensity are thereby examined, which reveals that the classical model underestimates the true deformation. This work therefore provides measures for analysing photomechanics in general by bridging the gap between the micro- and macro-scales. PMID:26828417

  18. Microwave Diffraction Techniques from Macroscopic Crystal Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William Henry

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the construction of a diffractometer table and four microwave models which are built of styrofoam balls with implanted metallic reflecting spheres and designed to simulate the structures of carbon (graphite structure), sodium chloride, tin oxide, and palladium oxide. Included are samples of Bragg patterns and computer-analysis results.…

  19. Structural analysis considerations for wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Approaches to the structural analysis of wind turbine blade designs are reviewed. Specifications and materials data are discussed along with the analysis of vibrations, loads, stresses, and failure modes.

  20. Macroscopic behavior of ferrocholesteric liquid crystals and ferrocholesteric gels and elastomers.

    PubMed

    Brand, Helmut R; Fink, Alexander; Pleiner, Harald

    2015-06-01

    We study the influence of macroscopic chirality on the macroscopic properties of superparamagnetic liquid crystals and gels. Specifically we derive macroscopic dynamic equations for ferrocholesteric low molecular weight (LMW) liquid crystals and for ferrocholesteric gels and elastomers in the local description using the director field as macroscopic variable. The magnetization is treated as a macroscopic dynamic degree of freedom and its coupling to all other macroscopic variables is examined in detail. We incorporate into our dynamic analysis terms that are linear in a magnetic field giving rise to a number of cross-coupling terms not possible otherwise. A number of properties that are unique to the class of systems studied arise. As an example for a static property we find a term in the generalized energy which is linear in the electric field and quadratic in the magnetic field. We find that applying a magnetic field to a ferrocholesteric can lead to reversible electric currents, heat currents and concentration currents, which change their sign with a sign change of macroscopic chirality. As an example of a rather intriguing dissipative dynamic contribution we point out that for ferrocholesterics and for ferrocholesteric gels and elastomers in a magnetic field extensional flow leads to electric and heat currents. PMID:26123769

  1. Separation of the Microscopic and Macroscopic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zandt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the possibility of observing interference in quantum magnification experiments such as the celebrated "Schroedinger cat". Uses the possibility of observing interference for separating the realm of microscopic from macroscopic dynamics; estimates the dividing line to fall at system sizes of about 100 Daltons. (MLH)

  2. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  3. Macroscopic phase decomposition in block copolymers driven by thermooxidative reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shaobin

    Macroscopic phase separations have been observed in a commercial styrene- block-butadiene-block-styrene (SBS) triblock copolymer (Kraton 1102), an as-synthesized SBS triblock copolymer, an as-synthesized styrene-block-butadiene (SB) diblock copolymer and a commercial styrene-block-isoprene-block-styrene (SIS) triblock copolymer (Kraton 1107) at elevated temperatures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on macroscopic phase separations in neat copolymers, including block copolymers. The temporal evolution of the structure, growth dynamics, origin and mechanism of the macroscopic phase separations have been investigated. A theoretical model has been established to describe such phase separation in SB diblock copolymer and numerical simulations have been undertaken to predict the structure evolution and growth dynamics. For styrene-butadiene block copolymers, the phase transition process consists of the first and second phase separations. The origin of such phase separations is attributed to chain scission and crosslinking reactions due to thermooxidative degradation. The formation of phase separated domains is the result of separation of polystyrene-rich domains from polybutadiene-rich domains. A mechanism, termed secondary spinodal decomposition, has been proposed to explain second phase separation. It has also demonstrated that the theoretical model and numerical simulations capture the essential features of the experimental observations. Growth rate was seen to depend on phase separation as well as reaction kinetics. The universal scaling laws have been shown to be invalid in macroscopic phase separations of styrene-butadiene block copolymers. The macroscopic phase separation process is more complex in the SIS triblock copolymer. It consists of a first phase separation, phase dissolution and a second phase separation. The origin of such phase decompositions has been shown to be a progressive chain scission reaction during thermal oxidative

  4. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  5. Design sensitivity analysis of nonlinear structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardoso, J. B.; Arora, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    A unified theory is described of design sensitivity analysis of linear and nonlinear structures for shape, nonshape and material selection problems. The concepts of reference volume and adjoint structure are used to develop the unified viewpoint. A general formula for design sensitivity analysis is derived. Simple analytical linear and nonlinear examples are used to interpret various terms of the formula and demonstrate its use.

  6. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  7. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S. K.

    1991-10-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequence of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  8. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  9. Modal analysis of jointed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, D. Dane

    2012-01-01

    Structural systems are often composed of multiple components joined together at localized interfaces. Compared to a corresponding monolithic system these interfaces are designed to have little influence on the load carrying capability of the system, and the resulting change in the overall system mass and stiffness is minimal. Hence, under nominal operating conditions the mode shapes and frequencies of the dominant structural modes are relatively insensitive to the presence of the interfaces. However, the energy dissipation in such systems is strongly dependent on the joints. The microslip that occurs at each interface couples together the structural modes of the system and introduces nonlinear damping into the system, effectively altering the observed damping of the structural modes, which can then significantly alter the amplitude of the response at the resonant modal frequencies. This work develops equations of motion for a jointed structure in terms of the structural modal coordinates and implements a reduced-order description of the microslip that occurs at the interface between components. The interface is incorporated into the modal description of the system through an existing decomposition of a series-series Iwan interface model and a continuum approximation for microslip of an elastic rod. The developed framework is illustrated on several examples, including a discrete three degree-of-freedom system as well as the longitudinal deformation of a continuum beam.

  10. Fast Approximate Analysis Of Modified Antenna Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Roy

    1991-01-01

    Abbreviated algorithms developed for fast approximate analysis of effects of modifications in supporting structures upon root-mean-square (rms) path-length errors of paraboloidal-dish antennas. Involves combination of methods of structural-modification reanalysis with new extensions of correlation analysis to obtain revised rms path-length error. Full finite-element analysis, usually requires computer of substantial capacity, necessary only to obtain responses of unmodified structure to known external loads and to selected self-equilibrating "indicator" loads. Responses used in shortcut calculations, which, although theoretically "exact", simple enough to be performed on hand-held calculator. Useful in design, design-sensitivity analysis, and parametric studies.

  11. Structural analysis techniqes for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    The structural analysis of remotely sensed imagery is defined and basic techniques for implementing the process are described. Structural analysis uses knowledge of the properties of an entity, its parts and their relationships, and the relationships in which it participates at a higher level to locate and recognize objects in a visual scene. The representation of structural knowledge, the development of algorithms for using the knowledge to help analyze an image, and techniques for storage and retrieval of relational models are addressed.

  12. Interdisciplinary applications of network dynamics: From microscopic to Macroscopic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hawoong

    ``Everything touches everything.'' We are living in a connected world, which has been modeled successfully by complex networks. Ever since, network science becomes new paradigm for understanding our connected yet complex world. After investigating network structure itself, our focus naturally moved to dynamics of/on the network because our connected world is not static but dynamic. In this presentation, we will briefly review the historical development of network science and show some applications of network dynamics ranging from microscopic (metabolic engineering, PNAS, 104 13638) to macroscopic scale (price of anarchy in transportation network, Phys.Rev.Lett. 101 128701). Supported by National Research Foundation of Korea through Grant No. 2011-0028908.

  13. Multivariate crash modeling for motor vehicle and non-motorized modes at the macroscopic level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Jiang, Ximiao

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic traffic crash analyses have been conducted to incorporate traffic safety into long-term transportation planning. This study aims at developing a multivariate Poisson lognormal conditional autoregressive model at the macroscopic level for crashes by different transportation modes such as motor vehicle, bicycle, and pedestrian crashes. Many previous studies have shown the presence of common unobserved factors across different crash types. Thus, it was expected that adopting multivariate model structure would show a better modeling performance since it can capture shared unobserved features across various types. The multivariate model and univariate model were estimated based on traffic analysis zones (TAZs) and compared. It was found that the multivariate model significantly outperforms the univariate model. It is expected that the findings from this study can contribute to more reliable traffic crash modeling, especially when focusing on different modes. Also, variables that are found significant for each mode can be used to guide traffic safety policy decision makers to allocate resources more efficiently for the zones with higher risk of a particular transportation mode. PMID:25790973

  14. Probabilistic structural analysis by extremum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nafday, Avinash M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to demonstrate discrete extremum methods of structural analysis as a tool for structural system reliability evaluation. Specifically, linear and multiobjective linear programming models for analysis of rigid plastic frames under proportional and multiparametric loadings, respectively, are considered. Kinematic and static approaches for analysis form a primal-dual pair in each of these models and have a polyhedral format. Duality relations link extreme points and hyperplanes of these polyhedra and lead naturally to dual methods for system reliability evaluation.

  15. Macroscopic invisibility cloak for visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-21

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufacturing techniques. A transparent cloak made of two pieces of calcite is created. This cloak is able to conceal a macroscopic object with a maximum height of 2 mm, larger than 3500 free-space-wavelength, inside a transparent liquid environment. Its working bandwidth encompassing red, green, and blue light is also demonstrated. PMID:21405275

  16. Macroscopic Invisibility Cloak for Visible Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufacturing techniques. A transparent cloak made of two pieces of calcite is created. This cloak is able to conceal a macroscopic object with a maximum height of 2 mm, larger than 3500 free-space-wavelength, inside a transparent liquid environment. Its working bandwidth encompassing red, green, and blue light is also demonstrated.

  17. Macroscopic Quantum Superposition in Cavity Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Tian, Lin

    Quantum superposition in mechanical systems is not only a key evidence of macroscopic quantum coherence, but can also be utilized in modern quantum technology. Here we propose an efficient approach for creating macroscopically distinct mechanical superposition states in a two-mode optomechanical system. Photon hopping between the two cavity-modes is modulated sinusoidally. The modulated photon tunneling enables an ultrastrong radiation-pressure force acting on the mechanical resonator, and hence significantly increases the mechanical displacement induced by a single photon. We present systematic studies on the generation of the Yurke-Stoler-like states in the presence of system dissipations. The state generation method is general and it can be implemented with either optomechanical or electromechanical systems. The authors are supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. NSF-DMR-0956064 and the DARPA ORCHID program through AFOSR.

  18. Macroscopic invisibility cloaking of visible light

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianzhong; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Kyle; Pendry, John B.; Zhang, Shuang

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, which used to be confined to the realm of fiction, have now been turned into a scientific reality thanks to the enabling theoretical tools of transformation optics and conformal mapping. Inspired by those theoretical works, the experimental realization of electromagnetic invisibility cloaks has been reported at various electromagnetic frequencies. All the invisibility cloaks demonstrated thus far, however, have relied on nano- or micro-fabricated artificial composite materials with spatially varying electromagnetic properties, which limit the size of the cloaked region to a few wavelengths. Here, we report the first realization of a macroscopic volumetric invisibility cloak constructed from natural birefringent crystals. The cloak operates at visible frequencies and is capable of hiding, for a specific light polarization, three-dimensional objects of the scale of centimetres and millimetres. Our work opens avenues for future applications with macroscopic cloaking devices. PMID:21285954

  19. Low-noise macroscopic twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskhakov, Timur Sh.; Usenko, Vladyslav C.; Filip, Radim; Chekhova, Maria V.; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Applying a multiphoton-subtraction technique to the two-color macroscopic squeezed vacuum state of light generated via high-gain parametric down-conversion we conditionally prepare a different state of light: bright multimode low-noise twin beams. A lower noise in the sum of the photon numbers opens a possibility to encode information into this variable while keeping the nonclassical character of the state. The obtained results demonstrate up to eightfold suppression of noise in each beam while preserving and even moderately improving the nonclassical photon-number correlations between the beams. The prepared low-noise macroscopic state, containing up to 2000 photons per mode, is not among the Gaussian states achievable through nonlinear optical processes. Apart from that, we suggest a method for measuring quantum efficiency, which is based on the Fano factor measurement. The proposed technique substantially improves the usefulness of twin beams for quantum communication and metrology.

  20. Multiscale modelling of pharmaceutical powders: Macroscopic behaviour prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Jonathan; Ketterhagen, William; Elliott, James

    2013-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry uses computer models at many stages during drug development. Quantum and molecular models are used to predict the crystal structures of potential active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), whereas discrete element models are used to optimise the mechanical properties of mixtures of APIs and excipient powders. The present work combines the strengths of modelling from all of the mentioned length scales to predict the behaviour of macroscopic powder granules from first principles using the molecular and crystal structures of acetazolamide as an example API. Starting with a single molecule of acetazolamide, ab initio self-consistent field calculations were used to calculate the equilibrium gas phase structure, vibrational spectra, interaction energy with water molecules and perform potential energy scans. By using these results and following the CHARMM General Force Field parameterisation process, all of the parameters required to perform a molecular dynamics simulation were iteratively determined using the CHARMM program. Next, by using crystallographic data from literature, the monoclinic and triclinic forms of the acetazolamide crystal were simulated. Material properties like the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio, and surface energies have been calculated. These material properties are then used as input parameters in a discrete element model containing Thornton's plastic model and the JKR cohesive force to predict the behaviour of macroscopic acetazolamide powder in angle of repose tests and tabletting simulations. Similar methodologies can be employed in the future to evaluate at an early stage the performance of novel APIs and excipients for tabletting applications.

  1. Structural analysis of ultra-high speed aircraft structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenzen, K. H.; Siegel, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a hypersonic beaded skin panel were investigated under pure compression with boundary conditions similar to those found in a wing mounted condition. The primary phases of analysis reported include: (1) experimental testing of the panel to failure; (2) finite element structural analysis of the beaded panel with the computer program NASTRAN; and (3) summary of the semiclassical buckling equations for the beaded panel under purely compressive loads. A comparison of each of the analysis methods is also included.

  2. Modeling and structural analysis of honeycomb structure mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yeping

    2012-09-01

    In development of large-scale astronomical telescopes, some promising new technology and method such as honeycomb structure mirrors and silicon carbide mirrors are applied for primary mirrors. Especially in space telescopes, the mirror lightweight design is becoming the key technology and honeycomb structure mirrors are normally required more and more to reduce the cost and increase the feasibility of the telescopes system. In this paper, a parameter FEA model of a two meters honeycomb structure mirror has been built, by using the engineering analysis software ANSYS. Through this model, the structural analysis, thermal deformation analysis and the simulation active correction of low-order frequency aberration by the finite element method have been presented.

  3. Can a macroscopic gyroscope feel torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Yasskin, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    We demonstrate that for a large class of Lagrangian-based torsion theories a macroscopic gyroscope is insensitive to the torsion field: there can be no coupling of the torsion to the gyroscope's angular momentum of rotation. To detect torsion a polarized system with a net elementary particle spin is needed. These conclusions are evident from the conservation laws, which form the basis for deriving the equations of motion.

  4. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  5. Characterization of time-varying macroscopic electro-chemo-mechanical behavior of SOFC subjected to Ni-sintering in cermet microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, M.; Terada, K.; Kawada, T.; Yashiro, K.; Takahashi, K.; Takase, S.

    2015-10-01

    In order to perform stress analyses of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) under operation, we propose a characterization method of its time-varying macroscopic electro-chemo-mechanical behavior of electrodes by considering the time-varying geometries of anode microstructures due to Ni-sintering. The phase-field method is employed to simulate the micro-scale morphology change with time, from which the time-variation of the amount of triple-phase boundaries is directly predicted. Then, to evaluate the time-variation of the macroscopic oxygen ionic and electronic conductivities and the inelastic properties of the anode electrode, numerical material tests based on the homogenization method are conducted for each state of sintered microstructures. In these homogenization analyses, we also have to consider the dependencies of the properties of constituent materials on the temperature and/or the oxygen potential that is supposed to change within an operation period. To predict the oxygen potential distribution in an overall SOFC structure under long-period operation, which determines reduction-induced expansive/contractive deformation of oxide materials, an unsteady problem of macroscopic oxygen ionic and electronic conductions is solved. Using the calculated stress-free strains and the homogenized mechanical properties, both of which depend on the operational environment, we carry out the macroscopic stress analysis of the SOFC.

  6. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  7. Structural analysis consultation using artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Marcal, P. V.; Berke, L.

    1978-01-01

    The primary goal of consultation is definition of the best strategy to deal with a structural engineering analysis objective. The knowledge base to meet the need is designed to identify the type of numerical analysis, the needed modeling detail, and specific analysis data required. Decisions are constructed on the basis of the data in the knowledge base - material behavior, relations between geometry and structural behavior, measures of the importance of time and temperature changes - and user supplied specifics characteristics of the spectrum of analysis types, the relation between accuracy and model detail on the structure, its mechanical loadings, and its temperature states. Existing software demonstrated the feasibility of the approach, encompassing the 36 analysis classes spanning nonlinear, temperature affected, incremental analyses which track the behavior of structural systems.

  8. Static Nonlinear Analysis In Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, Ali

    2008-07-08

    Push-over analysis is a simple and applied approach which can be used for estimation of demand responses influenced by earthquake stimulations. The analysis is non-linear static analysis of the structure affected under increasing lateral loads and specifying the displacement--load diagram or structure capacity curve, draw the curve the base shear values and lateral deflection on the roof level of the building will be used. However, for estimation of the real behavior of the structure against earthquake, the non-linear dynamic analysis approaches and various accelerographs should be applied. Of course it should be noted that this approach especially in relation with tall buildings is complex and time consuming. In the article, the different patterns of lateral loading in push-over analysis have been compared with non-linear dynamic analysis approach so that the results represented accordingly. The researches indicated the uniformly--distributed loading is closer to real status.

  9. Macroscopic Subdivision of Silica Aerogel Collectors for Sample Return Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P

    2005-09-14

    Silica aerogel collector tiles have been employed for the collection of particles in low Earth orbit and, more recently, for the capture of cometary particles by NASA's Stardust mission. Reliable, reproducible methods for cutting these and future collector tiles from sample return missions are necessary to maximize the science output from the extremely valuable embedded particles. We present a means of macroscopic subdivision of collector tiles by generating large-scale cuts over several centimeters in silica aerogel with almost no material loss. The cut surfaces are smooth and optically clear allowing visual location of particles for analysis and extraction. This capability is complementary to the smaller-scale cutting capabilities previously described [Westphal (2004), Ishii (2005a, 2005b)] for removing individual impacts and particulate debris in tiny aerogel extractions. Macroscopic cuts enable division and storage or distribution of portions of aerogel tiles for immediate analysis of samples by certain techniques in situ or further extraction of samples suited for other methods of analysis.

  10. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue-residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein-protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  11. [Macroscopic Functional Networks of the Human Brain when Viewing and Recalling Short Videos].

    PubMed

    Verkhlyutov, V M; Sokolov, P A; Ushakov, V L; Velichkovsky, B M

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic functional network of the human brain were identified by use of the independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI while viewing and imaging/recalling stories. The networks were relatively stable in structure, but had a specific dynamics in different experimental conditions. When comparing detected networks with previously detected resting state networks it was found that they coincide on localization. We. discovered also the specificity of activating the peripheral and central parts of retinotopic projections in the visual cortex. The peripheral areas were activated during subject viewing and imaging/recalling. On the contrary, the central departments strengthened their activation when viewing and reduced activity during the imaging/recalling. PMID:26281231

  12. Constraints and restraints in crystal structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Immirzi, Attilio

    2009-01-01

    The widely used restraint-based approach to structural analysis using diffraction data is critiqued. The convenience of using rigid constraints, through the use of internal coordinates, is discussed. PMID:22477768

  13. Semantic Antinomies and Deep Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber, Ryszard

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses constructions known as semantic antinomies, that is, the paradoxical results of false presuppositions, and how they can be dealt with by means of deep structure analysis. See FL 508 186 for availability. (CLK)

  14. Micro and macroscopic investigation to quantify tillage impact on soil hydrodynamic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, E.; Roisin, C.; Plougonven, E.; Deraedt, D.; Léonard, A.; Degré, A.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, tillage simplification is an increasing practice. Many advantages are cited in the literature, such as energy saving, soil conservation etc. Agricultural management practices influence soil structure, but consequent changes in soil hydrodynamic behaviour at the field scale are still not well understood. Many studies focus only on macroscopic measurements which do not provide mechanistic explanations. Moreover, research shows divergent conclusions over structure modification. The aim of this work is to fill this gap by quantifying soil structure modification depending on tillage intensity through both macroscopic and microscopic measurements, the latter improving our comprehension of the fundamental mechanisms involved. Our experiment takes place in Gentinnes (Walloon Brabant, Belgium), on a field organized in a Latin square scheme. Since 2004, plots have been cultivated in conventional tillage (CT) or in reduced tillage (RT). The latter consists in sowing after stubble ploughing of about 10cm. The crop rotation is sugar beet followed by winter wheat. The soil is mainly composed of silt loam and can be classified as a Luvisol. Macroscopic investigations consist in establishing pF and K(h) curves and 3D soil strength profiles. At the microscale, 3D morphologic parameters are measured using X-ray microtomography. Because of the variation of working depth between management practices (10cm for RT vs. 25cm for CT), two horizons were investigated: H1 between 0-10cm and H2 between 12-25cm. 3D soil strength profiles were established thanks to a fully automated penetrometer (30° angle cone with a base area of 10mm2) which covered a 160 × 80cm2 area with 5cm spacing between neighbouring points. At each node, penetration was performed and soil strength measurements were collected every 1cm from 5 to 55cm depth. K(h) curves were provided by 20cm diameter tension-infiltrometer measurements (Eijkelkamp Agrisearch Equipment). Undisturbed soil samples were removed from

  15. Structural Dynamics and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthman, Briana L.

    2013-01-01

    This project consists of two parts, the first will be the post-flight analysis of data from a Delta IV launch vehicle, and the second will be a Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. Shock and vibration data was collected on WGS-5 (Wideband Global SATCOM- 5) which was launched on a Delta IV launch vehicle. Using CAM (CAlculation with Matrices) software, the data is to be plotted into Time History, Shock Response Spectrum, and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) curves. In this format the data is to be reviewed and compared to flight instrumentation data from previous flights of the same launch vehicle. This is done to ensure the current mission environments, such as shock, random vibration, and acoustics, are not out of family with existing flight experience. In family means the peaks on the SRS curve for WGS-5 are similar to the peaks from the previous flights and there are no major outliers. The curves from the data will then be compiled into a useful format so that is can be peer reviewed then presented before an engineering review board if required. Also, the reviewed data will be uploaded to the Engineering Review Board Information System (ERBIS) to archive. The second part of this project is conducting Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. In 2010, Merritt Island High School partnered with NASA to design, build and launch a CubeSat. The team is now called StangSat in honor of their mascot, the mustang. Over the past few years, the StangSat team has built a satellite and has now been manifested for flight on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in 2014. To prepare for the final launch, a test flight was conducted in Mojave, California. StangSat was launched on a Prospector 18D, a high altitude rocket made by Garvey Spacecraft Corporation, along with their sister satellite CP9 built by California Polytechnic University. However, StangSat was damaged during an off nominal landing and this project will give beneficial insights into what loads the CubeSat experienced during the crash

  16. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  17. Three-dimensional Sponges with Super Mechanical Stability: Harnessing True Elasticity of Individual Carbon Nanotubes in Macroscopic Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Qi, Xiaoying; Kuang, Jun; Wei, Yueguang; Zhu, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Efficient assembly of carbon nanotube (CNT) based cellular solids with appropriate structure is the key to fully realize the potential of individual nanotubes in macroscopic architecture. In this work, the macroscopic CNT sponge consisting of randomly interconnected individual carbon nanotubes was grown by CVD, exhibiting a combination of super-elasticity, high strength to weight ratio, fatigue resistance, thermo-mechanical stability and electro-mechanical stability. To deeply understand such extraordinary mechanical performance compared to that of conventional cellular materials and other nanostructured cellular architectures, a thorough study on the response of this CNT-based spongy structure to compression is conducted based on classic elastic theory. The strong inter-tube bonding between neighboring nanotubes is examined, believed to play a critical role in the reversible deformation such as bending and buckling without structural collapse under compression. Based on in-situ scanning electron microscopy observation and nanotube deformation analysis, structural evolution (completely elastic bending-buckling transition) of the carbon nanotubes sponges to deformation is proposed to clarify their mechanical properties and nonlinear electromechanical coupling behavior. PMID:26732143

  18. Three-dimensional Sponges with Super Mechanical Stability: Harnessing True Elasticity of Individual Carbon Nanotubes in Macroscopic Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Qi, Xiaoying; Kuang, Jun; Wei, Yueguang; Zhu, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Efficient assembly of carbon nanotube (CNT) based cellular solids with appropriate structure is the key to fully realize the potential of individual nanotubes in macroscopic architecture. In this work, the macroscopic CNT sponge consisting of randomly interconnected individual carbon nanotubes was grown by CVD, exhibiting a combination of super-elasticity, high strength to weight ratio, fatigue resistance, thermo-mechanical stability and electro-mechanical stability. To deeply understand such extraordinary mechanical performance compared to that of conventional cellular materials and other nanostructured cellular architectures, a thorough study on the response of this CNT-based spongy structure to compression is conducted based on classic elastic theory. The strong inter-tube bonding between neighboring nanotubes is examined, believed to play a critical role in the reversible deformation such as bending and buckling without structural collapse under compression. Based on in-situ scanning electron microscopy observation and nanotube deformation analysis, structural evolution (completely elastic bending-buckling transition) of the carbon nanotubes sponges to deformation is proposed to clarify their mechanical properties and nonlinear electromechanical coupling behavior.

  19. Three-dimensional Sponges with Super Mechanical Stability: Harnessing True Elasticity of Individual Carbon Nanotubes in Macroscopic Architectures.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Qi, Xiaoying; Kuang, Jun; Wei, Yueguang; Zhu, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Efficient assembly of carbon nanotube (CNT) based cellular solids with appropriate structure is the key to fully realize the potential of individual nanotubes in macroscopic architecture. In this work, the macroscopic CNT sponge consisting of randomly interconnected individual carbon nanotubes was grown by CVD, exhibiting a combination of super-elasticity, high strength to weight ratio, fatigue resistance, thermo-mechanical stability and electro-mechanical stability. To deeply understand such extraordinary mechanical performance compared to that of conventional cellular materials and other nanostructured cellular architectures, a thorough study on the response of this CNT-based spongy structure to compression is conducted based on classic elastic theory. The strong inter-tube bonding between neighboring nanotubes is examined, believed to play a critical role in the reversible deformation such as bending and buckling without structural collapse under compression. Based on in-situ scanning electron microscopy observation and nanotube deformation analysis, structural evolution (completely elastic bending-buckling transition) of the carbon nanotubes sponges to deformation is proposed to clarify their mechanical properties and nonlinear electromechanical coupling behavior. PMID:26732143

  20. General framework for quantum macroscopicity in terms of coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadin, Benjamin; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-02-01

    We propose a universal language to assess macroscopic quantumness in terms of coherence, with a set of conditions that should be satisfied by any measure of macroscopic coherence. We link the framework to the resource theory of asymmetry. We show that the quantum Fisher information gives a good measure of macroscopic coherence, enabling a rigorous justification of a previously proposed measure of macroscopicity. This picture lets us draw connections between different measures of macroscopicity and evaluate them; we show that another widely studied measure fails one of our criteria.

  1. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  2. Transient Macroscopic Chemistry in the DSMC Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, M. J.; Macrossan, M. N.; Abdel-Jawad, M.

    2008-12-01

    In the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a combination of statistical and deterministic procedures applied to a finite number of `simulator' particles are used to model rarefied gas-kinetic processes. Traditionally, chemical reactions are modelled using information from specific colliding particle pairs. In the Macroscopic Chemistry Method (MCM), the reactions are decoupled from the specific particle pairs selected for collisions. Information from all of the particles within a cell is used to determine a reaction rate coefficient for that cell. MCM has previously been applied to steady flow DSMC simulations. Here we show how MCM can be used to model chemical kinetics in DSMC simulations of unsteady flow. Results are compared with a collision-based chemistry procedure for two binary reactions in a 1-D unsteady shock-expansion tube simulation and during the unsteady development of 2-D flow through a cavity. For the shock tube simulation, close agreement is demonstrated between the two methods for instantaneous, ensemble-averaged profiles of temperature and species mole fractions. For the cavity flow, a high degree of thermal non-equilibrium is present and non-equilibrium reaction rate correction factors are employed in MCM. Very close agreement is demonstrated for ensemble averaged mole fraction contours predicted by the particle and macroscopic methods at three different flow-times. A comparison of the accumulated number of net reactions per cell shows that both methods compute identical numbers of reaction events. For the 2-D flow, MCM required similar CPU and memory resources to the particle chemistry method. The Macroscopic Chemistry Method is applicable to any general DSMC code using any viscosity or non-reacting collision models and any non-reacting energy exchange models. MCM can be used to implement any reaction rate formulations, whether these be from experimental or theoretical studies.

  3. Structural Analysis in a Conceptual Design Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Robinson, Jay H.; Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic aircraft designers must shape the outer mold line of the aircraft to improve multiple objectives, such as mission performance, cruise efficiency, and sonic-boom signatures. Conceptual designers have demonstrated an ability to assess these objectives for a large number of candidate designs. Other critical objectives and constraints, such as weight, fuel volume, aeroelastic effects, and structural soundness, are more difficult to address during the conceptual design process. The present research adds both static structural analysis and sizing to an existing conceptual design framework. The ultimate goal is to include structural analysis in the multidisciplinary optimization of a supersonic aircraft. Progress towards that goal is discussed and demonstrated.

  4. Hot Flow Anomaly Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hot Flow Anomaly observed on Interball-Tail on 03.14.1996 is investigated. The normal to the interplanetary current sheet interacting with bow shock was determined in assumption of tangential discontinuity. Calculated motional electric field was directed towards current sheet. The bow shock before HFA arrival to the spacecraft was quasi-perpendicular, and was quasi-parallel after HFA passage. Respectively, of the shocks, bracketing HFA, were quasi-perpendicular before HFA passage and quasi-parallel after it. With averaged velocity of plasma within the body of HFA and duration of HFA observation we determined its size in normal to the current sheet direction as ~ 2.5 RE. HFA consists of two regions separated by thin layer with different plasma characteristics. Convection of plasma within HFA, as observed along spacecraft trajectory by subtracting averaged velocity from observed velocities, show that plasma in each of two regions is moving from separating layer. It indicates that separating layer is the site of energy deposition from interaction of the solar wind with ions reflected from the shock. This is confirmed by analysis of ion velocity distributions in this layer.

  5. Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeffrey; Irish, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). A STOP analysis is a multidiscipline analysis, consisting of Structural, Thermal and Optical Performance Analyses, that is performed for all space flight instruments and satellites. This course will explain the different parts of performing this analysis. The student will learn how to effectively interact with each discipline in order to accurately obtain the system analysis results.

  6. Macroscopic optomechanical superposition via periodic qubit flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wenchao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate macroscopic superpositions of well-distinguishable coherent states in an optomechanical system via periodic qubit flipping. Our scheme does not require the single-photon strong-coupling rate of an optomechanical system. The generated mechanical superposition state can be reconstructed using mechanical quantum-state reconstruction. The proposed scheme relies on recycling of an atom, fast atomic qubit flipping, and coherent state mapping between a single-photon superposition state and an atomic superposition state. We discuss the experimental feasibility of our proposal under current technology.

  7. Compressor Has No Moving Macroscopic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Max

    1995-01-01

    Compressor containing no moving macroscopic parts functions by alternating piston and valve actions of successive beds of magnetic particles. Fabricated easily because no need for precisely fitting parts rotating or sliding on each other. Also no need for lubricant fluid contaminating fluid to be compressed. Compressor operates continuously, eliminating troublesome on/off cycling of other compressors, and decreasing consumption of energy. Phased cells push fluid from bottom to top, adding increments of pressure. Each cell contains magnetic powder particles loose when electromagnet coil deenergized, but tightly packed when coil energized.

  8. A protein structure data and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Weber, Irene; Wang, Haibin; Yang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a protein structure data and analysis system that is only used in the lab for analyzing the proprietary data. It is capable of storing public protein data, such as the data in Protein Data Bank (PDB) [1], and life scientists' proprietary data. This toolkit is targeted at life scientists who want to maintain proprietary protein structure data (may be incomplete), to search and query publicly known protein structures and to compare their structure data with others. The comparison functions can be used to find structure differences between two proteins at atom level, especially in mutant versions of proteins. The system can also be used as a tool of choosing better protein structure template in new protein's tertiary structure prediction. The system is developed in Java and the protein data is stored in a relational database (Oracle 9i). PMID:17282836

  9. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  10. Simultaneous analysis and design. [in structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization techniques are increasingly being used for performing nonlinear structural analysis. The development of element by element (EBE) preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) techniques is expected to extend this trend to linear analysis. Under these circumstances the structural design problem can be viewed as a nested optimization problem. There are computational benefits to treating this nested problem as a large single optimization problem. The response variables (such as displacements) and the structural parameters are all treated as design variables in a unified formulation which performs simultaneously the design and analysis. Two examples are used for demonstration. A seventy-two bar truss is optimized subject to linear stress constraints and a wing box structure is optimized subject to nonlinear collapse constraints. Both examples show substantial computational savings with the unified approach as compared to the traditional nested approach.

  11. Fuzzy finite element analysis of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Unyime O.; Koko, Tamunoiyala S.; Orisamolu, Irewole R.; Gallant, B. Keith

    2000-06-01

    A fuzzy finite element based approach is developed for modelling smart structures with vague or imprecise uncertainties. Fuzzy sets are used to represent the uncertainties present in the piezoelectric, mechanical, thermal, and physical properties of the smart structure. In order to facilitate efficient computation, a sensitivity analysis procedure is used to streamline the number of input fuzzy variables, and the vertex fuzzy analysis technique is then used to compute the possibility distributions of the responses of the smart structural system. The methodology has been developed within the framework of the SMARTCOM computational tool for the design/analysis of smart composite structures. The methodology developed is found to be accurate and computationally efficient for solution of practical problems.

  12. Strain-induced macroscopic magnetic anisotropy from smectic liquid-crystalline elastomer-maghemite nanoparticle hybrid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, Johannes M.; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mihut, Adriana M.; Dietsch, Hervé; Hirt, Ann M.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-05-01

    We combine tensile strength analysis and X-ray scattering experiments to establish a detailed understanding of the microstructural coupling between liquid-crystalline elastomer (LCE) networks and embedded magnetic core-shell ellipsoidal nanoparticles (NPs). We study the structural and magnetic re-organization at different deformations and NP loadings, and the associated shape and magnetic memory features. In the quantitative analysis of a stretching process, the effect of the incorporated NPs on the smectic LCE is found to be prominent during the reorientation of the smectic domains and the softening of the nanocomposite. Under deformation, the soft response of the nanocomposite material allows the organization of the nanoparticles to yield a permanent macroscopically anisotropic magnetic material. Independent of the particle loading, the shape-memory properties and the smectic phase of the LCEs are preserved. Detailed studies on the magnetic properties demonstrate that the collective ensemble of individual particles is responsible for the macroscopic magnetic features of the nanocomposite.We combine tensile strength analysis and X-ray scattering experiments to establish a detailed understanding of the microstructural coupling between liquid-crystalline elastomer (LCE) networks and embedded magnetic core-shell ellipsoidal nanoparticles (NPs). We study the structural and magnetic re-organization at different deformations and NP loadings, and the associated shape and magnetic memory features. In the quantitative analysis of a stretching process, the effect of the incorporated NPs on the smectic LCE is found to be prominent during the reorientation of the smectic domains and the softening of the nanocomposite. Under deformation, the soft response of the nanocomposite material allows the organization of the nanoparticles to yield a permanent macroscopically anisotropic magnetic material. Independent of the particle loading, the shape-memory properties and the smectic

  13. Molecular Identification of Macroscopic And Microscopic Cysts of Sarcocystis in Sheep in North Khorasan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Pejman; Salehi, Mitra; Seyedabadi, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite which can infect humans and animals. Sheep are intermediate hosts of four Sarcocystis species: Sarcocystis tenella, Sarcocystis gigantea, Sarcocystis arieticanis, and Sarcocystis medusiformis The purpose of this study was to perform a molecular identification of the macroscopic and microscopic cysts of Sarcocystis in sheep. In this investigation, the macroscopic and microscopic cysts of Sarcocystis were assessed in slaughtered sheep. The digestion method was used for bradyzoites observation in heart, liver, diaphragm and muscle samples. PCR analysis was conducted on macroscopic and microscopic cysts and also all other samples. Sequencing was performed for ten PCR products. Genotypes were identified by BLAST search and homology analysis. Macrocysts were seen in two muscle tissues. Digestion method and PCR analysis revealed positive results in all samples taken from heart, liver, diaphragm, and muscle. Genotyping of ten tissue samples proved that the genotype of macroscopic belonged to Sarcocystis gigantea and microscopic cysts to Sarcocystis tenella. Microscopic cysts are more prevalent than macroscopic cysts and they can cause enormous economic losses. PMID:24551821

  14. Static structural analysis of shell-type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, E. H.; Cappelli, A. P.; Kovalevsky, L.; Rish, F. L.; Verrette, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Shell analysis manual provides methods for determining static deflections and internal load and stress distributions in shells under various loading conditions, and methods of analyzing static instability of shell structures. Also included are methods for determining the lightest shell wall for various constructions.

  15. Probabilistic structural analysis computer code (NESSUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic structural analysis has been developed to analyze the effects of fluctuating loads, variable material properties, and uncertain analytical models especially for high performance structures such as SSME turbopump blades. The computer code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress) was developed to serve as a primary computation tool for the characterization of the probabilistic structural response due to the stochastic environments by statistical description. The code consists of three major modules NESSUS/PRE, NESSUS/FEM, and NESSUS/FPI. NESSUS/PRE is a preprocessor which decomposes the spatially correlated random variables into a set of uncorrelated random variables using a modal analysis method. NESSUS/FEM is a finite element module which provides structural sensitivities to all the random variables considered. NESSUS/FPI is Fast Probability Integration method by which a cumulative distribution function or a probability density function is calculated.

  16. A Macroscopic Realization of the Weak Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimori, Arito

    2003-01-01

    A.J.Leggett suggested in 1977 that a permanent electric dipole moment due to the parity-nonconserving electron-nucleon interaction, even though it is extremely small, could be measured in the superfluid He-3 B because the moment should be proportional to the size of the sample in this system. If this moment is observed, it will be the first example of a macroscopic realization of the weak interaction. In our planned experiments, a high electric field of up to 6 kV/cm is applied between two parallel electrodes in the He-3 sample. We expect to observe the NMR frequency of the lowest-lying spin-wave mode trapped by the liquid crystal-like texture of the B phase rotation axis in our geometry. The interaction of the electric field and the macroscopic permanent electric dipole moment, which is oriented along the rotation axis, will cause a small change in the texture and hence a small increase in the frequency of the spin wave mode. Besides the basic ideas, we present the purpose and the design of our first cell that is under construction.

  17. Deterministic Creation of Macroscopic Cat States

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Daniel; Twamley, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging. For this reason, the observation of such effects on larger scale systems is currently one of the most attractive goals in quantum science. Many experimental protocols have been proposed for both the creation and observation of quantum states on macroscopic scales, in particular, in the field of optomechanics. The majority of these proposals, however, rely on performing measurements, making them probabilistic. In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation. We study the prototypical optomechanical Membrane In The Middle model and show that by controlling the membrane’s opacity, and through careful choice of the optical cavity initial state, we can deterministically create and grow the spatial extent of the membrane’s position into a large cat state. It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved. PMID:26345157

  18. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  19. Assessing Macroscopic Evapotranspiration Function Response to Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharun, M.; Vervoort, R. W.; Turnbull, T.; Henry, J.; Adams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) by forests can reach up to 100% of rainfall in Australia, and is a substantial component of the water balance. Transpiration is a major part of the ET and it is well-known that transpiration depends on a combination of physiological and environmental controls. As a consequence of well-ventilated canopies of eucalypt forests and close decoupling to the atmosphere, atmospheric conditions exert a large control over transpiration. We measured a suit of environmental variables including temperature, humidity, radiation, and soil moisture concurrently with transpiration in a range of eucalypt forests. We observed that atmospheric demand (VPD) exerts the strongest control over transpiration. Experimental evidence also showed a strong dependency of the control on soil moisture abundance in the top soil layer. In many eco-hydrological models actual ET is represented with a linear transformation of potential ET based on the soil moisture condition, a so-called macroscopic approach. Such ET functions lump various soil and plant factors, are not experimentally supported and therefore quite poorly validated. Different combinations of atmospheric demand and soil moisture availability lead to diverse behaviour of the macroscopic ET function. Based on our observations in this study, we propose a novel approach that improves portray of transpiration, evaporation, drainage and hence the loss of water from the root zone. We used a modified version of the Norwegian HBV model to test our approach over a medium size catchment (150 km2) in south east Australia.

  20. Deterministic Creation of Macroscopic Cat States.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Daniel; Twamley, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Despite current technological advances, observing quantum mechanical effects outside of the nanoscopic realm is extremely challenging. For this reason, the observation of such effects on larger scale systems is currently one of the most attractive goals in quantum science. Many experimental protocols have been proposed for both the creation and observation of quantum states on macroscopic scales, in particular, in the field of optomechanics. The majority of these proposals, however, rely on performing measurements, making them probabilistic. In this work we develop a completely deterministic method of macroscopic quantum state creation. We study the prototypical optomechanical Membrane In The Middle model and show that by controlling the membrane's opacity, and through careful choice of the optical cavity initial state, we can deterministically create and grow the spatial extent of the membrane's position into a large cat state. It is found that by using a Bose-Einstein condensate as a membrane high fidelity cat states with spatial separations of up to ∼300 nm can be achieved. PMID:26345157

  1. Thermal-Structural Analysis of Sunshield Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John; Parrish, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Future large infrared space telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), will require deployable sunshields to provide passive cooling for optics and instruments. Deployable sunshield structures for such applications typically consist of multiple thin-film membrane layers supported by deployable booms. The mechanical design of the sunshield must accommodate thermal strains due to layer-to-layer temperature differences as well as potentially large in-plane temperature gradients within individual film layers. This paper describes a thermal-structural analysis for predicting the stress state in a thin-film membrane subject to both mechanical thermal loads that could aid in the mechanical design of future sunshield structures. First the temperature field predicted by a thermal analysis is mapped to a structural finite element model, and then the structural response is predicted using a nonlinear static analysis. The structural model uses membrane elements in conjunction with a tension field material model to predict the response of the thin-film membrane layer. The tension field material model accounts for no-compression behavior associated with wrinkling and slackness. This approach was used to study the problem of a single membrane layer from the NASA reference concept for the JWST sunshield. Results from the analysis show that the membrane can experience a loss of tensile preload due to the presence of an in-plane temperature gradient representative of the cold-side layer temperature distribution predicted for the reference concept JWST.

  2. Quantum correlations of lights in macroscopic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sua, Yong Meng

    This dissertation presents a detailed study in exploring quantum correlations of lights in macroscopic environments. We have explored quantum correlations of single photons, weak coherent states, and polarization-correlated/polarization-entangled photons in macroscopic environments. These included macroscopic mirrors, macroscopic photon number, spatially separated observers, noisy photons source and propagation medium with loss or disturbances. We proposed a measurement scheme for observing quantum correlations and entanglement in the spatial properties of two macroscopic mirrors using single photons spatial compass state. We explored the phase space distribution features of spatial compass states, such as chessboard pattern by using the Wigner function. The displacement and tilt correlations of the two mirrors were manifested through the propensities of the compass states. This technique can be used to extract Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations (EPR) of the two mirrors. We then formulated the discrete-like property of the propensity P b(m,n), which can be used to explore environmental perturbed quantum jumps of the EPR correlations in phase space. With single photons spatial compass state, the variances in position and momentum are much smaller than standard quantum limit when using a Gaussian TEM 00 beam. We observed intrinsic quantum correlations of weak coherent states between two parties through balanced homodyne detection. Our scheme can be used as a supplement to decoy-state BB84 protocol and differential phase-shift QKD protocol. We prepared four types of bipartite correlations +/- cos2(theta1 +/- theta 2) that shared between two parties. We also demonstrated bits correlations between two parties separated by 10 km optical fiber. The bits information will be protected by the large quantum phase fluctuation of weak coherent states, adding another physical layer of security to these protocols for quantum key distribution. Using 10 m of highly nonlinear

  3. A macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Lerman, K; Galstyan, A; Martinoli, A; Ijspeert, A

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we present a macroscopic analytical model of collaboration in a group of reactive robots. The model consists of a series of coupled differential equations that describe the dynamics of group behavior. After presenting the general model, we analyze in detail a case study of collaboration, the stick-pulling experiment, studied experimentally and in simulation by Ijspeert et al. [Autonomous Robots, 11, 149-171]. The robots' task is to pull sticks out of their holes, and it can be successfully achieved only through the collaboration of two robots. There is no explicit communication or coordination between the robots. Unlike microscopic simulations (sensor-based or using a probabilistic numerical model), in which computational time scales with the robot group size, the macroscopic model is computationally efficient, because its solutions are independent of robot group size. Analysis reproduces several qualitative conclusions of Ijspeert et al.: namely, the different dynamical regimes for different values of the ratio of robots to sticks, the existence of optimal control parameters that maximize system performance as a function of group size, and the transition from superlinear to sublinear performance as the number of robots is increased. PMID:11911788

  4. Macroscopic conductivity of free fermions in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.; Hertling, C.

    2014-05-01

    We conclude our analysis of the linear response of charge transport in lattice systems of free fermions subjected to a random potential by deriving general mathematical properties of its conductivity at the macroscopic scale. The present paper belongs to a succession of studies on Ohm and Joule's laws from a thermodynamic viewpoint starting with [1-3]. We show, in particular, the existence and finiteness of the conductivity measure μΣ for macroscopic scales. Then we prove that, similar to the conductivity measure associated to Drude's model, μΣ converges in the weak*-topology to the trivial measure in the case of perfect insulators (strong disorder, complete localization), whereas in the limit of perfect conductors (absence of disorder) it converges to an atomic measure concentrated at frequency ν = 0. However, the AC-conductivity μΣ|ℝ\\{0} does not vanish in general: We show that μΣ(ℝ\\{0}) > 0, at least for large temperatures and a certain regime of small disorder.

  5. Friction in macroscopic thermodynamics: A kinetic point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-12-01

    To provide a solid support to a macroscopic framework developed to explicitly account for friction in thermodynamics, a kinetic description of frictional dissipation is developed. Using either a dissipative Fokker-Planck equation for Brownian motion or a Boltzmann equation with a friction-force term added, it is shown that both approaches lead to the emergence of the macroscopic thermodynamic relations that state the first and second laws with friction. The analysis is directly applied to the problem of determining the minimum amount of heating generated by memory erasure, known in computer science as Landauer's bound, and leads to a better understanding of the energetics behind the latter. A generalisation of Boltzmann's H theorem to include friction explicitly is also recovered, and the thermodynamics of granular rotators acted by a frictional torque and of radio-frequency (RF) current drive of fusion plasmas, in which collisional drag is present, are addressed as well. Various physics results are revisited employing the first and second laws with friction that have been derived from the appropriate dissipative kinetic equations, lower bounds for entropy production rates being derived both for granular rotators and for RF current drive.

  6. Analysis of flexible structures under lateral impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, D. F.; Razavi, H.

    2012-07-01

    Three methods for analysis of flexible structures under lateral impact are presented. The first proposed method (Method A) consists of: (1) modifying an available deceleration on a rigid target with conservation principles to account for structural flexibility; and (2) transient nonlinear analysis of the structure with the corrected forcing function. The second proposed method (Method B) is similar to Method A in obtaining the forcing function but it solves the equations of motion of an idealized two-degree-of-freedom system instead of directly using conservation principles. The last method simply provides the maximum force in the structure using the conservation of energy and linear momentum. A coupled simulation is also performed in LS-DYNA and compared against the proposed methods. A case study is presented to illustrate the applicability of all three methods and the LS-DYNA simulation. (authors)

  7. Multiscale Analysis of Structurally-Graded Microstructures Using Molecular Dynamics, Discrete Dislocation Dynamics and Continuum Crystal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Mishin, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology is developed for structurally-graded material microstructures. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are performed at the nanoscale to determine fundamental failure mechanisms and quantify material constitutive parameters. These parameters are used to calibrate material processes at the mesoscale using discrete dislocation dynamics (DD). Different grain boundary interactions with dislocations are analyzed using DD to predict grain-size dependent stress-strain behavior. These relationships are mapped into crystal plasticity (CP) parameters to develop a computationally efficient finite element-based DD/CP model for continuum-level simulations and complete the multiscale analysis by predicting the behavior of macroscopic physical specimens. The present analysis is focused on simulating the behavior of a graded microstructure in which grain sizes are on the order of nanometers in the exterior region and transition to larger, multi-micron size in the interior domain. This microstructural configuration has been shown to offer improved mechanical properties over homogeneous coarse-grained materials by increasing yield stress while maintaining ductility. Various mesoscopic polycrystal models of structurally-graded microstructures are generated, analyzed and used as a benchmark for comparison between multiscale DD/CP model and DD predictions. A final series of simulations utilize the DD/CP analysis method exclusively to study macroscopic models that cannot be analyzed by MD or DD methods alone due to the model size.

  8. Structural analysis for a 40-story building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, L.

    1972-01-01

    NASTRAN was chosen as the principal analytical tool for structural analysis of the Illinois Center Plaza Hotel Building in Chicago, Illinois. The building is a 40-story, reinforced concrete structure utilizing a monolithic slab-column system. The displacements, member stresses, and foundation loads due to wind load, live load, and dead load were obtained through a series of NASTRAN runs. These analyses and the input technique are described.

  9. Structural analysis of FAST reflector supporting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. F.; Deng, C. G.; Li, G. Q.; He, Y. M.

    According to the deformation and movement requirements of the FAST reflector, a multi-purpose analysis, including the load-bearing behavior, deformation, construction costs of the reflector supporting structure and its model, is presented in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of steel and aluminum alloy structures are also discussed and compared through detailed design calculations under load-bearing capacity and normal working conditions.

  10. Improving transient analysis technology for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Chargin, Mladen

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic analyses are demanding of computer simulation capabilities. The modeling complexities of semi-monocoque construction, irregular geometry, high-performance materials, and high-accuracy analysis are present. At issue are the safety of the passengers and the integrity of the structure for a wide variety of flight-operating and emergency conditions. The technology which supports engineering of aircraft structures using computer simulation is examined. Available computer support is briefly described and improvement of accuracy and efficiency are recommended. Improved accuracy of simulation will lead to a more economical structure. Improved efficiency will result in lowering development time and expense.

  11. Macroscopic balance model for wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for multi-port wave rotors is described. The wave processes that effect energy exchange within the rotor passage are modeled using one-dimensional gas dynamics. Macroscopic mass and energy balances relate volume-averaged thermodynamic properties in the rotor passage control volume to the mass, momentum, and energy fluxes at the ports. Loss models account for entropy production in boundary layers and in separating flows caused by blade-blockage, incidence, and gradual opening and closing of rotor passages. The mathematical model provides a basis for predicting design-point wave rotor performance, port timing, and machine size. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with CFD calculations and three-port wave rotor experimental data. A four-port wave rotor design example is provided to demonstrate model applicability. The modeling approach is amenable to wave rotor optimization studies and rapid assessment of the trade-offs associated with integrating wave rotors into gas turbine engine systems.

  12. Macroscopic approach to the Casimir friction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, V. V.; Nesterenko, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    The general formula is derived for the vacuum friction force between two parallel perfectly flat planes bounding two material media separated by a vacuum gap and moving relative to each other with a constant velocity v. The material media are described in the framework of macroscopic electrodynamics whereas the nonzero temperature and dissipation are taken into account by making use of the Kubo formulas from non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics. The formula obtained provides a rigorous basis for calculation of the vacuum friction force within the quantum field theory methods in the condensed matter physics. The revealed v dependence of the vacuum friction force proves to be the following: for zero temperature ( T = 0) it is proportional to (v/ c)3 and for T > 0 this force is linear in v/ c.

  13. Macroscopic definition of distributed swarm morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar, Fidel; Pujol, Mar; Rizo, Ramón

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present a system that will be able to obtain microscopic assembly behaviours for a robotic swarm to achieve an assembly target (macroscopic model). It will be designed taking into consideration the essential features of a self-assembling system needed to be implemented in a real robotic swarm. This system is composed of a typology of generative languages PD0L, and an algorithm for generating individual rules to be processed by the robots. The assembly process will be performed in a distributed manner, and will be also designed to require minimal communication capabilities between robots. Both the expressive capacities of language and the rule generation algorithm will be demonstrated by evaluating their performance with a core set of test morphologies widely used in self-assembly tasks. Furthermore, we compare the assembly time and the number of messages required between a classic controller (centralised) and our distributed approach.

  14. Macroscopically local correlations can violate information causality.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel; Salles, Alejo; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    Although quantum mechanics is a very successful theory, its foundations are still a subject of intense debate. One of the main problems is that quantum mechanics is based on abstract mathematical axioms, rather than on physical principles. Quantum information theory has recently provided new ideas from which one could obtain physical axioms constraining the resulting statistics one can obtain in experiments. Information causality (IC) and macroscopic locality (ML) are two principles recently proposed to solve this problem. However, none of them were proven to define the set of correlations one can observe. In this study, we show an extension of IC and study its consequences. It is shown that the two above-mentioned principles are inequivalent: if the correlations allowed by nature were the ones satisfying ML, IC would be violated. This gives more confidence in IC as a physical principle, defining the possible correlation allowed by nature. PMID:21266986

  15. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  16. Macroscopic chirality of a liquid crystal from nonchiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jákli, A.; Nair, G. G.; Lee, C. K.; Sun, R.; Chien, L. C.

    2001-06-01

    The transfer of chirality from nonchiral polymer networks to the racemic B2 phase of nonchiral banana-shaped molecules is demonstrated. This corresponds to the transfer of chirality from an achiral material to another achiral material. There are two levels of chirality transfers. (a) On a microscopic level the presence of a polymer network (chiral or nonchiral) favors a chiral state over a thermodynamically stable racemic state due to the inversion symmetry breaking at the polymer-liquid crystal interfaces. (b) A macroscopically chiral (enantimerically enriched) sample can be produced if the polymer network has a helical structure, and/or contains chemically chiral groups. The chirality transfer can be locally suppressed by exposing the liquid crystal to a strong electric field treatment.

  17. Backreaction of cosmological perturbations in covariant macroscopic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem

    2008-09-01

    The problem of corrections to Einstein’s equations arising from averaging of inhomogeneities (backreaction) in the cosmological context has gained considerable attention recently. We present results of analyzing cosmological perturbation theory in the framework of Zalaletdinov’s fully covariant macroscopic gravity. We show that this framework can be adapted to the setting of cosmological perturbations in a manner which is free from gauge related ambiguities. We derive expressions for the backreaction which can be readily applied in any situation (not necessarily restricted to the linear perturbations considered here) where the metric can be brought to the perturbed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker form. In particular, these expressions can be employed in toy models studying nonlinear structure formation, and possibly also in N-body simulations. Additionally, we present results of example calculations which show that the backreaction remains negligible well into the matter dominated era.

  18. Macroscopic and direct light propulsion of bulk graphene material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengfei; Chang, Huicong; Wu, Yingpeng; Xiao, Peishuang; Yi, Ningbo; Lu, Yanhong; Ma, Yanfeng; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Tian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-07-01

    It has been a great challenge to achieve the direct light manipulation of matter on a bulk scale. In this work the direct light propulsion of matter is observed on a macroscopic scale using a bulk graphene-based material. The unique structure and properties of graphene, and the novel morphology of the bulk three-dimensional linked graphene material make it capable not only of absorbing light at various wavelengths but also of emitting energetic electrons efficiently enough to drive the bulk material, following Newtonian mechanics. Thus, the unique photonic and electronic properties of individual graphene sheets are manifested in the response of the bulk state. These results offer an exciting opportunity to bring about bulk-scale light manipulation with the potential to realize long-sought applications in areas such as the solar sail and space transportation driven directly by sunlight.

  19. The Role of Macroscopic and Microscopic Jet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, Philip E.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic jets, be they Poynting flux or kinetic flux dominated, are current driven (CD) and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven unstable. These macroscopic MHD instabilities may be responsible for some of the observed larger scale twisted jet structures and typically do not disrupt jets on less than kiloparsec scales. Here I review our understanding of the jet properties that will lead to the observed relative stability of astrophysical jets. In addition, I review the progress made on the microscopic scale plasma instabilities in shocks and velocity shears that may lead to magnetic field generation and that does lead to the particle acceleration required to produce the observed emission from radio wavelengths to TeV energies. Finally, I discuss these instabilities in the context of the jet in M87.

  20. Asymptotic behavior of macroscopic observables in generic spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka

    2016-05-01

    This work clarifies a fundamental relationship between spectral gap and ground state properties, where the spectral gap means the energy difference between the ground state and the first excited state. In short-range interacting systems, the well-known exponential clustering theorem has been derived for the ground states: the bipartite correlations decay exponentially beyond a finite localization length, which is smaller than the inverse of the spectral gap. However, in more general systems including long-range interacting systems, the problem of how to characterize universal ground state structures by reference to the spectral gap is an ongoing challenge. Recently, for such systems, another fundamental constraint dubbed local reversibility has been proved for arbitrarily gapped ground states; as a consequence, it also results in the exponential concentration of the probability distribution of macroscopic observables. In this paper, we extend this kind of asymptotic behavior to more general setups.

  1. Ground testing of bioconvective variables such as morphological characterizations and mechanisms which regulate macroscopic patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Adriel D.

    1992-01-01

    Conditions simulating low- and high-gravity, reveal changes in macroscopic pattern formation in selected microorganisms, but whether these structures are gravity dependent is not clear. Two theories have been identified in the fluid dynamics community which support macroscopic pattern formation. The first one is gravity dependent (fluid density models) where small concentrated regions of organisms sink unstably, and the second is gravity independent (wave reinforcement theory) where organisms align their movements in concert, such that either their swimming strokes beat in phase or their vortices entrain neighbors to follow parallel paths. Studies have shown that macroscopic pattern formation is consistent with the fluid density models for protozoa and algae and wave reinforcement hypothesis for caprine spermatozoa.

  2. Simplified method for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program was developed for predicting the stress-strain history of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a simulated plasticity hardening model. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, and different materials and plasticity models. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  3. Experimental modal analysis. [for vibrating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental modal analysis is extremely important with regard to verification of analytical models, identification of vibration and acoustic problems, and structural modification and sensitivity analysis. With the expanding access of the testing environment to computational power, the complexity of existing approaches, as well as the development of new approaches, to the estimation of modal parameters has grown tremendously. Currently, the state of the art in experimental modal analysis involves methods that can be grouped in four categories: forced normal mode excitation method, frequency response function method, damped complex exponential function method, and mathematical input-output model methods. The theoretical basis of each of these general approaches, with appropriate references, is reviewed briefly.

  4. Structural reliability analysis and seismic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Shinozuka, M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a reliability analysis method for safety evaluation of nuclear structures. By utilizing this method, it is possible to estimate the limit state probability in the lifetime of structures and to generate analytically the fragility curves for PRA studies. The earthquake ground acceleration, in this approach, is represented by a segment of stationary Gaussian process with a zero mean and a Kanai-Tajimi Spectrum. All possible seismic hazard at a site represented by a hazard curve is also taken into consideration. Furthermore, the limit state of a structure is analytically defined and the corresponding limit state surface is then established. Finally, the fragility curve is generated and the limit state probability is evaluated. In this paper, using a realistic reinforced concrete containment as an example, results of the reliability analysis of the containment subjected to dead load, live load and ground earthquake acceleration are presented and a fragility curve for PRA studies is also constructed.

  5. Turbine blade nonlinear structural and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Laflen, J. H.; Halford, G. R.; Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of advanced structural analysis and life prediction techniques was evaluated for the life assessment of a commercial air-cooled turbine blade with a history of tip cracking. Three dimensional, nonlinear finite element structural analyses were performed for the blade tip region. The computed strain-temperature history of the critical location was imposed on a uniaxial strain controlled test specimen to evaluate the validity of the structural analysis method. Experimental results indicated higher peak stresses and greater stress relaxation than the analytical predictions. Life predictions using the Strainrange Partitioning and Frequency Modified approaches predicted 1200 to 4420 cycles and 2700 cycles to crack initiation, respectively, compared to an observed life of 3000 cycles.

  6. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  7. Economic Evaluation of Computerized Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    This completed effort involved a technical and economic study of the capabilities of computer programs in the area of structural analysis. The applicability of the programs to NASA projects and to other users was studied. The applications in other industries was explored including both research and development and applied areas. The costs of several alternative analysis programs were compared. A literature search covered applicable technical literature including journals, trade publications and books. In addition to the literature search, several commercial companies that have developed computerized structural analysis programs were contacted and their technical brochures reviewed. These programs include SDRC I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, SCADA, SUPERSAP, NISA/DISPLAY, STAAD-III, MICAS, GTSTRUDL, and STARS. These programs were briefly reviewed as applicable to NASA projects.

  8. Correlation between macroscopic porosity location and liquid metal pressure in centrifugal casting technique.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, T K; Schulman, A; Nielsen, J P; Shalita, S

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic analysis of uniform cylindrical castings fabricated by the centrifugal casting technique has revealed that the macroscopic porosity is dependent on the location of the sprue attachment to the casting. This is attributed to the significant pressure gradient associated with the centrifugal casting technique. The pressure gradient results in different heat transfer rates at portions of the castings near and away from the free surface of the button. Consequently, the macroscopic porosity is invariably at portions of the casting close to the free surface of the button. In addition, some optimized sprue-reservoir combinations could be predicted and proved, based on this pressure gradient concept. PMID:7002971

  9. Hybrid methods for witnessing entanglement in a microscopic-macroscopic system

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, Nicolo; Vitelli, Chiara; Paternostro, Mauro; De Martini, Francesco; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2011-09-15

    We propose a hybrid approach to the experimental assessment of the genuine quantum features of a general system consisting of microscopic and macroscopic parts. We infer entanglement by combining dichotomic measurements on a bidimensional system and phase-space inference through the Wigner distribution associated with the macroscopic component of the state. As a benchmark, we investigate the feasibility of our proposal in a bipartite-entangled state composed of a single-photon and a multiphoton field. Our analysis shows that, under ideal conditions, maximal violation of a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt-based inequality is achievable regardless of the number of photons in the macroscopic part of the state. The difficulty in observing entanglement when losses and detection inefficiency are included can be overcome by using a hybrid entanglement witness that allows efficient correction for losses in the few-photon regime.

  10. Macroscopic vertical alignment of nanodomains in thin films of semiconductor amphiphilic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Johannes C; Liu, Feng; Lang, Andreas S; Russell, Thomas P; Thelakkat, Mukundan

    2013-07-23

    Though several techniques have been reported on the alignment of conventional block copolymers, the macroscopic vertical orientation of semiconductor block copolymer microdomains in thin films has still not been accomplished. Here, we report the control on the alignment of nanostructures in a semiconductor amphiphilic block copolymer comprising an amorphous triphenyldiamine hole conductor block and a hydrophilic poly(styrene sulfonate) segment. Three different compositions with a hole conductor content of 57, 72, and 79 wt % were synthesized using a combination of controlled reversible addition/fragmentation transfer polymerization and "click" chemistry. All polymers feature a narrow molecular weight distribution. Cryo-TEM reveals the formation of micelles in DMF solutions of the amphiphilic copolymer having nanoscopic dimensions. The micelle size correlates well with the X-ray analysis of dried bulk samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms the micellar structure in the as-cast films. Thermal annealing causes an aggregation of micelles but did not lead to morphologies known for conventional block copolymers. However, annealing in saturated DMF vapor induces a morphology transition and a vertical orientation of the microdomains which was determined by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and AFM. The morphology varies from lamella to cylinders with increasing content of the hole-conductor block. The orientation arises from the controlled evaporation of the solvent, a mechanism that is similar to that observed for conventional block copolymers. Our approach demonstrates the macroscopic vertical alignment of nanodomains in semiconductor block copolymers which is a key requirement for applications in hybrid devices. PMID:23746109

  11. Integrated Structural Analysis and Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    An integrated structural-analysis and structure-testing computer program is being developed in order to: Automate repetitive processes in testing and analysis; Accelerate pre-test analysis; Accelerate reporting of tests; Facilitate planning of tests; Improve execution of tests; Create a vibration, acoustics, and shock test database; and Integrate analysis and test data. The software package includes modules pertaining to sinusoidal and random vibration, shock and time replication, acoustics, base-driven modal survey, and mass properties and static/dynamic balance. The program is commanded by use of ActiveX controls. There is minimal need to generate command lines. Analysis or test files are selected by opening a Windows Explorer display. After selecting the desired input file, the program goes to a so-called analysis data process or test data process, depending on the type of input data. The status of the process is given by a Windows status bar, and when processing is complete, the data are reported in graphical, tubular, and matrix form.

  12. The Influence of Prior Knowledge on Viewing and Interpreting Graphics with Macroscopic and Molecular Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Michelle; Wiebe, Eric N.; Carter, Glenda

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that the use of multiple representations with macroscopic and molecular features can improve conceptual understanding; however, the influence of prior knowledge of the domain cannot be overlooked. Using eye-tracking technology and sequential analysis, this study investigated how high school students (n = 54) with…

  13. Uncertain structural dynamics of aircraft panels and fuzzy structures analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2002-11-01

    Aircraft fuselage panels, seemingly simple structures, are actually complex because of the uncertainty of the attachments of the frame stiffeners and longitudinal stringers. It is clearly important to understand the dynamics of these panels because of the subsequent radiation into the passenger cabin, even when complete information is not available for all portions of the finite-element model. Over the last few years a fuzzy structures analysis (FSA) approach has been undertaken at Penn State and NASA Langley to quantify the uncertainty in modeling aircraft panels. A new MSC.Nastran [MSC.Software Corp. (Santa Ana, CA)] Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) code was written and tested [AIAA paper 2001-1320, 42nd AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conf., Seattle, WA, 16 April 2001] and was applied to simple fuselage panel models [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2410(A) (2001)]. Recently the work has focused on understanding the dynamics of a realistic aluminum fuselage panel, typical of today's aircraft construction. This presentation will provide an overview of the research and recent results will be given for the fuselage panel. Comparison between experiments and the FSA results will be shown for different fuzzy input parameters. [Work supported by NASA Research Cooperative Agreement NCC-1-382.

  14. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  15. Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis is a focused effort within the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) program to streamline multidisciplinary analysis of aeropropulsion components and assemblies. Multidisciplinary analysis of axial-flow compressor performance has been selected for the initial focus of this project. CATS will permit more accurate compressor system analysis by enabling users to include thermal and mechanical effects as an integral part of the aerodynamic analysis of the compressor primary flowpath. Thus, critical details, such as the variation of blade tip clearances and the deformation of the flowpath geometry, can be more accurately modeled and included in the aerodynamic analyses. The benefits of this coupled analysis capability are (1) performance and stall line predictions are improved by the inclusion of tip clearances and hot geometries, (2) design alternatives can be readily analyzed, and (3) higher fidelity analysis by researchers in various disciplines is possible. The goals for this project are a 10-percent improvement in stall margin predictions and a 2:1 speed-up in multidisciplinary analysis times. Working cooperatively with Pratt & Whitney, the Lewis CATS team defined the engineering processes and identified the software products necessary for streamlining these processes. The basic approach is to integrate the aerodynamic, thermal, and structural computational analyses by using data management and Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) based data mapping. Five software products have been defined for this task: (1) a primary flowpath data mapper, (2) a two-dimensional data mapper, (3) a database interface, (4) a blade structural pre- and post-processor, and (5) a computational fluid dynamics code for aerothermal analysis of the drum rotor. Thus far (1) a cooperative agreement has been established with Pratt & Whitney, (2) a Primary Flowpath Data Mapper has been prototyped and delivered to General Electric

  16. Structural analysis of light aircraft using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. T.; Bruce, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    An application of NASTRAN to the structural analysis of light aircraft was conducted to determine the cost effectiveness. A model of the Baby Ace D model homebuilt aircraft was used. The NASTRAN model of the aircraft consists of 193 grid points connected by 352 structural members. All members are either rod or beam elements, including bending of unsymmetrical cross sections and torsion of noncircular cross sections. The aerodynamic loads applied to the aircraft were in accordance with FAA regulations governing the utility category aircraft.

  17. Music Structure Analysis from Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.; Goto, Masataka

    Music is full of structure, including sections, sequences of distinct musical textures, and the repetition of phrases or entire sections. The analysis of music audio relies upon feature vectors that convey information about music texture or pitch content. Texture generally refers to the average spectral shape and statistical fluctuation, often reflecting the set of sounding instruments, e.g., strings, vocal, or drums. Pitch content reflects melody and harmony, which is often independent of texture. Structure is found in several ways. Segment boundaries can be detected by observing marked changes in locally averaged texture.

  18. Functional network macroscopes for probing past and present Earth system dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donges, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth, as viewed from a physicist's perspective, is a dynamical system of great complexity. Functional complex networks are inferred from observational data and model runs or constructed on the basis of theoretical considerations. Representing statistical interdependencies or causal interactions between objects (e.g., Earth system subdomains, processes, or local field variables), functional complex networks are conceptually well-suited for naturally addressing some of the fundamental questions of Earth system analysis concerning, among others, major dynamical patterns, teleconnections, and feedback loops in the planetary machinery, as well as critical elements such as thresholds, bottlenecks, and switches. The first part of this talk concerns complex network theory and network-based time series analysis. Regarding complex network theory, the novel contributions include consistent frameworks for analyzing the topology of (i) general networks of interacting networks and (ii) networks with vertices of heterogeneously distributed weights, as well as (iii) an analytical theory for describing spatial networks. In the realm of time series analysis, (i) recurrence network analysis is put forward as a theoretically founded, nonlinear technique for the study of single, but possibly multivariate time series. (ii) Coupled climate networks are introduced as an exploratory tool of data analysis for quantitatively characterizing the intricate statistical interdependency structure within and between several fields of time series. The second part presents applications for detecting dynamical transitions (tipping points) in time series and studying bottlenecks in the atmosphere's general circulation structure. The analysis of paleoclimate data reveals a possible influence of large-scale shifts in Plio-Pleistocene African climate variability on events in human evolution. This presentation summarizes the contents of the dissertation titled "Functional network macroscopes for

  19. Analysis of Open TEM-Waveguide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambousky, R.; Garbe, H.

    This work belongs to a research project on the analysis and characterization of higher order modes occurring in open TEM-waveguide structures. An open TEM waveguide, derived from a conventional GTEM cell by removing the sidewalls, is investigated. The intrinsic resonances of the electromagnetic field occurring in the test volume of the waveguide are analyzed in frequency domain by computer simulation and measurement. This resonance behavior is compared to that of more simplified wire models, describing just the planar septum of the original TEM waveguide. The influence of the number of wires used in the wire model is investigated with respect to the resonant behavior. The use of wire structures is a prerequisite for application of transmission-line super theory (TLST) for further analysis.

  20. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  1. Study of galaxy structures by correlation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador-Sole, E.; Sanroma, M. )

    1989-10-01

    In a previous paper the authors presented a new method that makes it possible to infer the surface number density profile of galaxies in groups and clusters. This method is based on the correlation analysis of galaxy positions in a plate and applies to radially symmetric systems with uncorrelated positions of their particles. Here it is shown that, under these same assumptions, the method makes it possible to obtain the surface density profile of any additive positive property, as well as other related quantities, such as the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of galaxies. Moreover, the method can deal not only with structures that are radially symmetric but also with ones that are elliptically symmetric and axisymmetric. Finally, it is shown that the analogous method in one dimension makes it possible to obtain another important profile for the analysis of galaxy structures, namely, the line-of-sight velocity distribution. 5 refs.

  2. Combination of structural reliability and interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiping; Yang, Di; Elishakoff, Isaac

    2008-02-01

    In engineering applications, probabilistic reliability theory appears to be presently the most important method, however, in many cases precise probabilistic reliability theory cannot be considered as adequate and credible model of the real state of actual affairs. In this paper, we developed a hybrid of probabilistic and non-probabilistic reliability theory, which describes the structural uncertain parameters as interval variables when statistical data are found insufficient. By using the interval analysis, a new method for calculating the interval of the structural reliability as well as the reliability index is introduced in this paper, and the traditional probabilistic theory is incorporated with the interval analysis. Moreover, the new method preserves the useful part of the traditional probabilistic reliability theory, but removes the restriction of its strict requirement on data acquisition. Example is presented to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed theory.

  3. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  4. Cloud Macroscopic Organization: Order Emerging from Randomness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Tianle

    2011-01-01

    Clouds play a central role in many aspects of the climate system and their forms and shapes are remarkably diverse. Appropriate representation of clouds in climate models is a major challenge because cloud processes span at least eight orders of magnitude in spatial scales. Here we show that there exists order in cloud size distribution of low-level clouds, and that it follows a power-law distribution with exponent gamma close to 2. gamma is insensitive to yearly variations in environmental conditions, but has regional variations and land-ocean contrasts. More importantly, we demonstrate this self-organizing behavior of clouds emerges naturally from a complex network model with simple, physical organizing principles: random clumping and merging. We also demonstrate symmetry between clear and cloudy skies in terms of macroscopic organization because of similar fundamental underlying organizing principles. The order in the apparently complex cloud-clear field thus has its root in random local interactions. Studying cloud organization with complex network models is an attractive new approach that has wide applications in climate science. We also propose a concept of cloud statistic mechanics approach. This approach is fully complementary to deterministic models, and the two approaches provide a powerful framework to meet the challenge of representing clouds in our climate models when working in tandem.

  5. Macroscopic strings and ``quirks'' at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junhai; Luty, Markus A.

    2009-11-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model containing additional heavy particles (``quirks'') charged under a new unbroken non-abelian gauge group as well as the standard model. We assume that the quirk mass m is in the phenomenologically interesting range 100 GeV-TeV, and that the new gauge group gets strong at a scale Λ < m. In this case breaking of strings is exponentially suppressed, and quirk production results in strings that are long compared to Λ-1. The existence of these long stable strings leads to highly exotic events at colliders. For 100 eV lsimΛ <~ keV the strings are macroscopic, giving rise to events with two separated quirk tracks with measurable curvature toward each other due to the string interaction. For keV <~ Λ <~ MeV the typical strings are mesoscopic: too small to resolve in the detector, but large compared to atomic scales. In this case, the bound state appears as a single particle, but its mass is the invariant mass of a quirk pair, which has an event-by-event distribution. For MeV <~ Λ <~ m, the strings are microscopic, and the quirks annihilate promptly within the detector. For colored quirks, this can lead to hadronic fireball events with ~ 103 hadrons with energy of order GeV emitted in conjunction with hard decay products from the final annihilation.

  6. Macroscopic characteristics of the praying mantis electroretinogram.

    PubMed

    Popkiewicz, Barbara; Prete, Frederick R

    2013-08-01

    We described the macroscopic characteristics of the praying mantis ERG in three species, Tenodera aridifolia sinensis, Sphodromantis lineola, and Popa spurca. In all cases, when elicited by square wave light pulses longer than 400 ms, light adapted (LA) ERGs consisted of four component waveforms: a cornea negative transient and sustained ON, a cornea negative transient OFF, and a cornea positive sustained OFF. The former two ON, and the latter OFF components were attributed to photoreceptor depolarization and repolarization, respectively. Metabolic stress via CO2 induced anoxia selectively eliminated the transient OFF (independent of its effect on the other components) suggesting the transient OFF represents activity of the lamina interneurons on which the photoreceptors synapse. Dark adapted (DA) ERGs differed from LA ERGs in that the sustained ON and OFF amplitudes were larger, and the transient ON and OFF components were absent. Increased stimulus durations increased the amplitudes and derivatives of, and decreased the latencies to the maximum amplitudes of the OFF components. Increasing stimulus intensity increased the amplitude of the sustained ON and OFF components, but not the transient OFF. These results suggest that the mantis' visual system displays increased contrast coding efficiency with increased light adaptation, and that there are differences in gain between photoreceptor and lamina interneuron responses. Finally, responses to luminance decrements as brief a 1 ms were evident in LA recordings, and were resolved at frequencies up to 60 Hz. PMID:23684801

  7. µPIV Applied to Macroscopic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindken, Ralph; Westerweel, Jerry

    2001-11-01

    In most technological and industrial applications the flow is characterized by a high Reynolds number. Current turbulence models are not tested under high Re number flow conditions. For that purpose we plan to measure various flows at very high Re numbers in a high-pressure wind tunnel. At high pressure the turbulent scales become very small in the order of 10 to 30 µm. The subject of this talk is the development of a measuring device that is able to resolve 10 µm scales in a 0.5 x 0.5 m2 measuring section. We use a µPIV system with a working distance of 0.3 to 1.0 m. The µPIV system consists of a 200 mJ Nd:YAG laser, a 1k x 1.3k double shutter CCD-camera and a long distance microscope. The system is tested in a highly turbulent pipe flow and a turbulent jet flow. Extra effort is necessary for guiding the laser light to the measuring area and to determine high seeding quality. Particles in various sizes from 270 nm to 1.5 µm are tested. Two problems arise: Non-uniform seeding with nm-particles in a large wind tunnel and the costs for a large amount of tracer particles in a macroscopic flow. Measurements in the high-pressure wind tunnel at the DLR in Göttingen, Germany are planned.

  8. Structural analysis at aircraft conceptual design stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Reza

    In the past 50 years, computers have helped by augmenting human efforts with tremendous pace. The aircraft industry is not an exception. Aircraft industry is more than ever dependent on computing because of a high level of complexity and the increasing need for excellence to survive a highly competitive marketplace. Designers choose computers to perform almost every analysis task. But while doing so, existing effective, accurate and easy to use classical analytical methods are often forgotten, which can be very useful especially in the early phases of the aircraft design where concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions [39, 2004]. Structural analysis methods have been used by human beings since the very early civilization. Centuries before computers were invented; the pyramids were designed and constructed by Egyptians around 2000 B.C, the Parthenon was built by the Greeks, around 240 B.C, Dujiangyan was built by the Chinese. Persepolis, Hagia Sophia, Taj Mahal, Eiffel tower are only few more examples of historical buildings, bridges and monuments that were constructed before we had any advancement made in computer aided engineering. Aircraft industry is no exception either. In the first half of the 20th century, engineers used classical method and designed civil transport aircraft such as Ford Tri Motor (1926), Lockheed Vega (1927), Lockheed 9 Orion (1931), Douglas DC-3 (1935), Douglas DC-4/C-54 Skymaster (1938), Boeing 307 (1938) and Boeing 314 Clipper (1939) and managed to become airborne without difficulty. Evidencing, while advanced numerical methods such as the finite element analysis is one of the most effective structural analysis methods; classical structural analysis methods can also be as useful especially during the early phase of a fixed wing aircraft design where major decisions are made and concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions

  9. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis of nonlinear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, Nilesh

    Recent earthquakes in California have initiated improvement in current design philosophy and at present the civil engineering community is working towards development of performance-based earthquake engineering of structures. The objective of this study is to develop efficient, but accurate procedures for probabilistic analysis of nonlinear seismic behavior of structures. The proposed procedures help the near-term development of seismic-building assessments which require an estimation of seismic demand at a given intensity level. We also develop procedures to estimate the probability of exceedance of any specified nonlinear response level due to future ground motions at a specific site. This is referred as Probabilistic Seismic Demand Analysis (PSDA). The latter procedure prepares the way for the next stage development of seismic assessment that consider the uncertainties in nonlinear response and capacity. The proposed procedures require structure-specific nonlinear analyses for a relatively small set of recorded accelerograms and (site-specific or USGS-map-like) seismic hazard analyses. We have addressed some of the important issues of nonlinear seismic demand analysis, which are selection of records for structural analysis, the number of records to be used, scaling of records, etc. Initially these issues are studied through nonlinear analysis of structures for a number of magnitude-distance bins of records. Subsequently we introduce regression analysis of response results against spectral acceleration, magnitude, duration, etc., which helps to resolve these issues more systematically. We illustrate the demand-hazard calculations through two major example problems: a 5story and a 20-story SMRF building. Several simple, but quite accurate closed-form solutions have also been proposed to expedite the demand-hazard calculations. We find that vector-valued (e.g., 2-D) PSDA estimates demand hazard more accurately. This procedure, however, requires information about 2

  10. Probabilistic structural analysis methods and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Wu, Y.-T.; Dias, B.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced algorithm for simulating the probabilistic distribution of structural responses due to statistical uncertainties in loads, geometry, material properties, and boundary conditions is reported. The method effectively combines an advanced algorithm for calculating probability levels for multivariate problems (fast probability integration) together with a general-purpose finite-element code for stress, vibration, and buckling analysis. Application is made to a space propulsion system turbine blade for which the geometry and material properties are treated as random variables.

  11. Analysis of nonlinear structures via mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gieseke, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    An effective procedure for NASTRAN was developed that permits any number of substructures of any size to be synthesized for the purpose of developing normal modes of vibration of the complete structural system. The technique is extended to permit modal transient analysis of the subdivided system. This latter procedure permits the use of NASTRAN's ability to include nonlinear forces in the problem. The five-phase process is accomplished using standard NASTRAN rigid formats with problem-independent alter packages and DMAP sequences.

  12. Evaluation, analysis and prediction of geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Nicholas B.

    2012-08-01

    Balanced cross-sections claim to be better because they apply a rigorous set of rules to develop the conceptual model of the structures present in an area. Balanced cross-sections can be further improved and become more useful to understanding real physical problems by collection of additional data such as seismic reflection surveys, collection of additional stratigraphic data, or collection of rock fabric information. The additional information validates the initial model and provides details on deformation conditions and on local rock responses to the deformation. Although individual cross-sections are two dimensional, the objective of evaluation and analysis of deformed regions should be three dimensional whenever possible to recognize the challenges of the real world. Subsurface system analysis derived from the hydrologic community emphasizes conceptual model development through model verification, validation, uncertainty quantification, benchmarking and meta-analysis. Their approach includes many steps informally used by the structural geology community but in a much more explicit way. Newer geological applications of structural geology would benefit from this more rigorous approach for designing and doing performance predictions as technological needs become more socially sensitive such as for carbon storage sites, new areas of energy exploration in higher population density areas, or for nuclear waste storage facilities.

  13. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake: soil and root resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopic physically-based plant root water uptake (RWU) model, based on water-potential-gradient formulation (Vogel et al., 2013), was used to simulate the observed soil-plant-atmosphere interactions at a forest site located in a temperate humid climate of central Europe and to gain an improved insight into the mutual interplay of RWU parameters that affects the soil water distribution in the root zone. In the applied RWU model, the uptake rates are directly proportional to the potential gradient and indirectly proportional to the local soil and root resistances to water flow. The RWU algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional dual-continuum model of soil water flow based on Richards' equation. The RWU model is defined by four parameters (root length density distribution, average active root radius, radial root resistance, and the threshold value of the root xylem potential). In addition, soil resistance to water extraction by roots is related to soil hydraulic conductivity function and actual soil water content. The RWU model is capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake, in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers, and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water, contributing to more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The present study focusses on the sensitivity analysis of the combined soil water flow and RWU model responses in respect to variations of RWU model parameters. Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154.

  14. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, M. G.; Heasler, P. G.; Hoover, K. A.; Rynes, N. J.; Thiessen, R. L.; Alfaro, J. L.

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures.

  15. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A.; Rynes, N.J.; Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. ); Rynes, N.J. ); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. )

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. CARES - CERAMICS ANALYSIS AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, N. N.

    1994-01-01

    The beneficial properties of structural ceramics include their high-temperature strength, light weight, hardness, and corrosion and oxidation resistance. For advanced heat engines, ceramics have demonstrated functional abilities at temperatures well beyond the operational limits of metals. This is offset by the fact that ceramic materials tend to be brittle. When a load is applied, their lack of significant plastic deformation causes the material to crack at microscopic flaws, destroying the component. CARES calculates the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings. The program uses results from a commercial structural analysis program (MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS) to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. A multiple material capability allows the finite element model reliability to be a function of many different ceramic material statistical characterizations. The reliability analysis uses element stress, temperature, area, and volume output, which are obtained from two dimensional shell and three dimensional solid isoparametric or axisymmetric finite elements. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effects of multi-axial stress states on material strength. The shear-sensitive Batdorf model requires a user-selected flaw geometry and a mixed-mode fracture criterion. Flaws intersecting the surface and imperfections embedded in the volume can be modeled. The total strain energy release rate theory is used as a mixed mode fracture criterion for co-planar crack extension. Out-of-plane crack extension criteria are approximated by a simple equation with a semi-empirical constant that can model the maximum tangential stress theory, the minimum strain energy density criterion, the maximum strain energy release rate theory, or experimental

  18. Toward Understanding Whether Interactive Surface Area Could Direct Ordered Macroscopic Supramolecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Akram, Raheel; Cheng, Mengjiao; Guo, Fengli; Iqbal, Saleem; Shi, Feng

    2016-04-19

    The mismatching phenomena are ubiquitous in complex and advanced self-assembly, such as hierarchical assembly, macroscopic supramolecular assembly, and so on. Recently, for macroscopic supramolecular assembly, the strategy of maximizing the interactive surface area was used and supposed to handle this problem; however, now there is little understanding of whether interactive surface area is the dominant factor to guide the assembly patterns. Herein by taking millimeter cylinder building blocks with different diameter/height (d/h) ratios as model systems, we have investigated the interactive-surface-area-dependent assembling behaviors in macroscopic supramolecular assembly. The results showed that the increasing d/h ratio of cylinders contributed to selectivity of face-to-face assembled pattern over face-to-side or side-to-side geometries, thus having improved the ordering degree of the assembled structures; however, the mismatching phenomena could not be totally avoided due to high colliding chances in kinetics and the thermally favorable stability of these structures. We further confirmed the above hypothesis by in situ measurements of interactive forces of building blocks with different assembled patterns. This work of macroscopic supramolecular assembly provides an in situ visible platform, which is significant to clarify the influences of interactive surface area on the assembly behaviors. PMID:27029028

  19. Analysis of waveguiding properties of VCSEL structures

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, the authors explore the feasibility of using the distributed Bragg reflector, grown on the substrate for a VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser), to provide waveguiding within the substrate. This waveguiding could serve as an interconnection among VCSELs in an array. Before determining the feasibility of waveguide interconnected VCSELs, two analysis methods are presented and evaluated for their applicability to this problem. The implementations in Mathematica of both these methods are included. Results of the analysis show that waveguiding in VCSEL structures is feasible. Some of the many possible uses of waveguide interconnected VCSELs are also briefly discussed. The tools and analysis presented in this report can be used to evaluate such system concepts and to do detailed design calculations.

  20. The assembly of C. elegans lamins into macroscopic fibers.

    PubMed

    Zingerman-Koladko, Irena; Khayat, Maayan; Harapin, Jan; Shoseyov, Oded; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Salman, Ahmad; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Harush, Kfir

    2016-10-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known mainly by their propensity to form viscoelastic filamentous networks within cells. In addition, IF-proteins are essential parts of various biological materials, such as horn and hagfish slime threads, which exhibit a range of mechanical properties from hard to elastic. These properties and their self-assembly nature made IF-proteins attractive building blocks for biomimetic and biological materials in diverse applications. Here we show that a type V IF-protein, the Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear lamin (Ce-lamin), is a promising building block for protein-based fibers. Electron cryo-tomography of vitrified sections enabled us to depict the higher ordered assembly of the Ce-lamin into macroscopic fibers through the creation of paracrystalline fibers, which are prominent in vitro structures of lamins. The lamin fibers respond to tensile force as other IF-protein-based fibers, i.e., hagfish slime threads, and possess unique mechanical properties that may potentially be used in certain applications. The self-assembly nature of lamin proteins into a filamentous structure, which is further assembled into a complex network, can be easily modulated. This knowledge may lead to a better understanding of the relationship in IF-proteins-based fibers and materials, between their hierarchical structures and their mechanical properties. PMID:27341289

  1. Structural Analysis Using Computer Based Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The stiffness of a flex hose that will be used in the umbilical arms of the Space Launch Systems mobile launcher needed to be determined in order to properly qualify ground umbilical plate behavior during vehicle separation post T-0. This data is also necessary to properly size and design the motors used to retract the umbilical arms. Therefore an experiment was created to determine the stiffness of the hose. Before the test apparatus for the experiment could be built, the structure had to be analyzed to ensure it would not fail under given loading conditions. The design model was imported into the analysis software and optimized to decrease runtime while still providing accurate restlts and allow for seamless meshing. Areas exceeding the allowable stresses in the structure were located and modified before submitting the design for fabrication. In addition, a mock up of a deep space habitat and the support frame was designed and needed to be analyzed for structural integrity under different loading conditions. The load cases were provided by the customer and were applied to the structure after optimizing the geometry. Once again, weak points in the structure were located and recommended design changes were made to the customer and the process was repeated until the load conditions were met without exceeding the allowable stresses. After the stresses met the required factors of safety the designs were released for fabrication.

  2. Probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.; Fossum, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element program is used to perform probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure. The program used in this study is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress), under development at Southwest Research Institute. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the radial stress of a thick-walled cylinder under internal pressure is computed and compared with the analytical solution. In addition, sensitivity factors showing the relative importance of the input random variables are calculated. Significant plasticity is present in this problem and has a pronounced effect on the probabilistic results. The random input variables are the material yield stress and internal pressure with Weibull and normal distributions, respectively. The results verify the ability of NESSUS to compute the CDF and sensitivity factors of a materially nonlinear structure. In addition, the ability of the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) procedure to assess the probabilistic behavior of structures which exhibit a highly nonlinear response is shown. Thus, the AMV procedure can be applied with confidence to other structures which exhibit nonlinear behavior.

  3. Simulation of cemented granular materials. II. Micromechanical description and strength mobilization at the onset of macroscopic yielding.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Nicolas; Lizcano, Arcesio; Taboada, Alfredo

    2010-07-01

    This is the second of two papers investigating the mechanical response of cemented granular materials by means of contact dynamics simulations. In this paper, a two-dimensional polydisperse sample with high void ratio is sheared in a load-controlled simple shear numerical device until the stress state of the sample reaches the yield stress. We first study the stress transmission properties of the granular material in terms of the fabric of different subsets of contacts characterized by the magnitude of their normal forces. This analysis highlights the existence of a peculiar force carrying structure in the cemented material, which is reminiscent of the bimodal stress transmission reported for cohesionless granular media. Then, the evolution of contact forces and torques is investigated trying to identify the micromechanical conditions that trigger macroscopic yielding. It is shown that global failure can be associated to the apparition of a group of particles whose contacts fulfill at least one of the local rupture conditions. In particular, these particles form a large region that percolates through the sample at the moment of failure, evidencing the relationship between macroscopic yielding and the emergence of large-scale correlations in the system. PMID:20866608

  4. Structural Analysis of Sandwich Foam Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Huo, X. Sharon

    2010-04-01

    The Sandwich Panel Technologies including Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) can be used to replace the conventional wooden-frame construction method. The main purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and SGI Venture, Inc. was to design a novel high R-value type of metal sandwich panelized technology. This CRADA project report presents design concept discussion and numerical analysis results from thermal performance study of this new building envelope system. The main objective of this work was to develop a basic concept of a new generation of wall panel technologies which will have R-value over R-20 will use thermal mass to improve energy performance in cooling dominated climates and will be 100% termite resistant. The main advantages of using sandwich panels are as follows: (1) better energy saving structural panels with high and uniform overall wall R-value across the elevation that could not be achieved in traditional walls; and (2) reducing the use of raw materials or need for virgin lumber. For better utilization of these Sandwich panels, engineers need to have a thorough understanding of the actual performance of the panels and system. Detailed analysis and study on the capacities and deformation of individual panels and its assembly have to be performed to achieve that goal. The major project activity was to conduct structural analysis of the stresses, strains, load capacities, and deformations of individual sandwich components under various load cases. The analysis simulated the actual loading conditions of the regular residential building and used actual material properties of the steel facings and foam.

  5. Network-based modular latent structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput expression data, such as gene expression and metabolomics data, exhibit modular structures. Groups of features in each module follow a latent factor model, while between modules, the latent factors are quasi-independent. Recovering the latent factors can shed light on the hidden regulation patterns of the expression. The difficulty in detecting such modules and recovering the latent factors lies in the high dimensionality of the data, and the lack of knowledge in module membership. Methods Here we describe a method based on community detection in the co-expression network. It consists of inference-based network construction, module detection, and interacting latent factor detection from modules. Results In simulations, the method outperformed projection-based modular latent factor discovery when the input signals were not Gaussian. We also demonstrate the method's value in real data analysis. Conclusions The new method nMLSA (network-based modular latent structure analysis) is effective in detecting latent structures, and is easy to extend to non-linear cases. The method is available as R code at http://web1.sph.emory.edu/users/tyu8/nMLSA/. PMID:25435002

  6. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  7. Organized Nanofibrous Scaffolds That Mimic the Macroscopic and Microscopic Architecture of the Knee Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew B.; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Söegaard, Nicole; Esterhai, John L.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The menisci are crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous tissues whose structural organization consists of dense collagen bundles that are locally aligned, but show a continuous change in macroscopic directionality. This circumferential patterning is necessary for load transmission across the knee joint and is a key design parameter for tissue engineered constructs. To address this issue, we developed a novel electrospinning method to produce scaffolds composed of circumferentially aligned (CircAl) nanofibers, quantified their structure and mechanics, and compared them to traditional linearly aligned (LinAl) scaffolds. Fibers were locally oriented in CircAl scaffolds, but their orientation varied considerably as a function of position (p<0.05). LinAl fibers did not change in orientation over a similar length scale (p>0.05). Cell seeding of CircAl scaffolds resulted in a similar cellular directionality. Mechanical analysis of CircAl scaffolds revealed significant interactions between scaffold length and region (p<0.05), where the tensile modulus near the edge of the scaffolds decreased with increasing scaffold length. No differences were detected in LinAl specimens (p>0.05). Simulation of the fiber deposition process produced “theoretical” fiber populations that matched the fiber organization and mechanical properties observed experimentally. These novel scaffolds, with spatially varying local orientation and mechanics, will enable the formation of functional anatomic meniscus constructs. PMID:23085562

  8. Structural analysis of artificial skin equivalents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Marx, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Schober, Lena

    2011-06-01

    Artificial skin equivalents ASEs based on primary fibroblasts and keratinocytes show a high batch variance in their structural and morphological characteristics. Due to biological fluctuations and variable donor age, the growth processes of 3D tissue structure show a non constant quality. Since theses ASEs are used as testing system for chemicals, pharmaceuticals or cosmetics it is of major interest to know detailed and significant characteristics about each individual ASE. Until now, the microscopic analysis process is based on the destructive preparation of histologies allowing only the characterization on a random basis. In this study we present analytical methods to characterise each individual ASE by Optical Coherence Tomography OCT in combination with image processing tools. Therefore, we developed a fully automated OCT device, that performs automatic measurements of microtiter plates MTPs holing the ASEs in a sterile environment. We developed image processing algorithms to characterize the surface structure which may function as an indicator for defects in the epidermal stratum corneum. Further, we analysed the tomographic morphological structure of the ASEs. The results show, that variances in the growth state as well different collagen formation is detectable. In combination with dynamic threshold levels, we found, that OCT is a well suited technology for automatically characterizing artificial skin equivalents and may partly substitute the preparation of histologies.

  9. Probabilistic Computational Methods in Structural Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsa, Martin; Kralik, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    Probabilistic methods are used in engineering where a computational model contains random variables. Each random variable in the probabilistic calculations contains uncertainties. Typical sources of uncertainties are properties of the material and production and/or assembly inaccuracies in the geometry or the environment where the structure should be located. The paper is focused on methods for the calculations of failure probabilities in structural failure and reliability analysis with special attention on newly developed probabilistic method: Direct Optimized Probabilistic Calculation (DOProC), which is highly efficient in terms of calculation time and the accuracy of the solution. The novelty of the proposed method lies in an optimized numerical integration that does not require any simulation technique. The algorithm has been implemented in mentioned software applications, and has been used several times in probabilistic tasks and probabilistic reliability assessments.

  10. Associated neural network independent component analysis structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keehoon; Kostrzweski, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    Detection, classification, and localization of potential security breaches in extremely high-noise environments are important for perimeter protection and threat detection both for homeland security and for military force protection. Physical Optics Corporation has developed a threat detection system to separate acoustic signatures from unknown, mixed sources embedded in extremely high-noise environments where signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) are very low. Associated neural network structures based on independent component analysis are designed to detect/separate new acoustic sources and to provide reliability information. The structures are tested through computer simulations for each critical component, including a spontaneous detection algorithm for potential threat detection without a predefined knowledge base, a fast target separation algorithm, and nonparametric methodology for quantified confidence measure. The results show that the method discussed can separate hidden acoustic sources of SNR in 5 dB noisy environments with an accuracy of 80%.

  11. Enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of poly[(R)-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate]: Formation of macroscopic granules in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Gerngross, T.U.; Martin, D.P.

    1995-07-03

    A combined chemical and enzymatic procedure has been developed to synthesize macroscopic poly[(R)-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) granules in vitro. The granules form in a matter of minutes when purified polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase from Alcaligenes eutrophus is exposed to synthetically prepared (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl coenzyme A, thereby establishing the minimal requirements for PHB granule formation. The artificial granules are spherical with diameters of up to 3 {mu}m and significantly larger than their native counterparts (0.5 {mu}m). The isolated PHB was characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, gel-permeation chromatography, and chemical analysis. The in vitro polymerization system yields PHB with a molecular mass > 10 x 10{sup 6} Da, exceeding by an order of magnitude the mass of PHAs typically extracted from microorganisms. We also demonstrate that the molecular mass of the polymer can be controlled by the initial PHA synthase concentration. Preliminary kinetic analysis of de novo granule formation confirms earlier findings of a lag time for the enzyme but suggests the involvement of an additional granule assembly step. Minimal requirements for substrate recognition were investigated. Since substrate analogs lacking the adenosine 3{prime}, 5{prime}-bisphosphate moiety of (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl coenzyme A were not accepted by the PHA synthase, we provide evidence that this structural element of the substrate is essential for catalysis. PHAs provide a range of natural, renewable, biodegradable thermoplastics with a broad range of useful material properties. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Nanospheres, nanotubes, toroids, and gels with controlled macroscopic chirality.

    PubMed

    Arias, Sandra; Freire, Félix; Quiñoá, Emilio; Riguera, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of a highly dynamic poly(aryl acetylene) (poly-1) with Li(+), Na(+), and Ag(+) leads to macroscopically chiral supramolecular nanospheres, nanotubes, toroids, and gels. With Ag(+), nanospheres with M helicity and tunable sizes are generated, which complement those obtained from the same polymer with divalent cations. With Li(+) or Na(+), poly-1 yields chiral nanotubes, gels, or toroids with encapsulating properties and M helicity. Right-handed supramolecular structures can be obtained by using the enantiomeric polymer. The interaction of poly-1 with Na(+) produces nanostructures whose helicity is highly dependent on the solvation state of the cation. Therefore, structures with either of the two helicities can be prepared from the same polymer by manipulation of the cosolvent. Such chiral nanotubes, toroids, and gels have previously not been obtained from helical polymer-metal complexes. Chiral nanospheres made of poly(aryl acetylene) that were previously assembled with metal(II) species can now be obtained with metal(I) species. PMID:25209219

  13. Development of macroscopic nanoporous graphene membranes for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutilier, Michael; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas; Karnik, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Nanoporous graphene membranes have the potential to exceed permeance and selectivity limits of existing gas separation membranes due to their atomic thickness and ability to support sub-nanometer pores for molecular sieving, while offering low resistance to flow. Gas separation by graphene nanopores has been demonstrated experimentally on micron-scale membranes, but scaling-up to larger sizes is challenging due to graphene imperfections and control of the selective nanopore size distribution. Using a model we developed for the inherent permeance of graphene, we designed a macroscopic graphene membrane predicted to be selectively permeable despite material imperfections. Micrometer-scale defects are sealed by interfacial polymerization and nanometer-scale defects are sealed by atomic layer deposition. The underlying support structure is tuned to further reduce the effects of leakage. Finally, ion bombardment followed by oxidative etching is used to create a high density of selective nanopores. SEM and TEM imaging are used to characterize the resulting membrane structure, and its performance is assessed by gas permeance and selectivity measurements. This work provides insight into gas flow through nanoporous graphene membranes and guides their future development.

  14. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of laminated elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Laminated composite plates and shells that can be used to model automobile bodies, aircraft wings and fuselages, and pressure vessels among many other were analyzed. The finite element method, a numerical technique for engineering analysis of structures, is used to model the geometry and approximate the solution. Various alternative formulations for analyzing laminated plates and shells are developed and their finite element models are tested for accuracy and economy in computation. These include the shear deformation laminate theory and degenerated 3-D elasticity theory for laminates.

  15. Forum discussion on probabilistic structural analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E.A.; Girrens, S.P.

    2000-10-01

    The use of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) has received much attention over the past several decades due in part to enhanced reliability theories, computational capabilities, and efficient algorithms. The need for this development was already present and waiting at the door step. Automotive design and manufacturing has been greatly enhanced because of PSAM and reliability methods, including reliability-based optimization. This demand was also present in the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories in support of the overarching national security responsibility of maintaining the nations nuclear stockpile in a safe and reliable state.

  16. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformations calculated under variety of loading conditions. Prediction of fatigue-crack-growth lives made with FatigueCrack-Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to initial crack configuration, FASTRAN predicts crack length and other parameters until complete break occurs. Loads are tensile or compressive and of variable or constant amplitude. FASTRAN incorporates linear-elastic fracture mechanics with modifications of load-interaction effects caused by crack closure. FASTRAN considered research tool, because of lengthy calculation times. FASTRAN written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  17. Structural reliability analysis of laminated CMC components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Palko, Joseph L.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    For laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to realize their full potential in aerospace applications, design methods and protocols are a necessity. The time independent failure response of these materials is focussed on and a reliability analysis is presented associated with the initiation of matrix cracking. A public domain computer algorithm is highlighted that was coupled with the laminate analysis of a finite element code and which serves as a design aid to analyze structural components made from laminated CMC materials. Issues relevant to the effect of the size of the component are discussed, and a parameter estimation procedure is presented. The estimation procedure allows three parameters to be calculated from a failure population that has an underlying Weibull distribution.

  18. The matrix exponential in transient structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1987-01-01

    The primary usefulness of the presented theory is in the ability to represent the effects of high frequency linear response with accuracy, without requiring very small time steps in the analysis of dynamic response. The matrix exponential contains a series approximation to the dynamic model. However, unlike the usual analysis procedure which truncates the high frequency response, the approximation in the exponential matrix solution is in the time domain. By truncating the series solution to the matrix exponential short, the solution is made inaccurate after a certain time. Yet, up to that time the solution is extremely accurate, including all high frequency effects. By taking finite time increments, the exponential matrix solution can compute the response very accurately. Use of the exponential matrix in structural dynamics is demonstrated by simulating the free vibration response of multi degree of freedom models of cantilever beams.

  19. Estimation of the covariance matrix of macroscopic quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, László; Usenko, Vladyslav C.; Filip, Radim

    2016-05-01

    For systems analogous to a linear harmonic oscillator, the simplest way to characterize the state is by a covariance matrix containing the symmetrically ordered moments of operators analogous to position and momentum. We show that using Stokes-like detectors without direct access to either position or momentum, the estimation of the covariance matrix of a macroscopic signal is still possible using interference with a classical noisy and low-intensity reference. Such a detection technique will allow one to estimate macroscopic quantum states of electromagnetic radiation without a coherent high-intensity local oscillator. It can be directly applied to estimate the covariance matrix of macroscopically bright squeezed states of light.

  20. Grasping the second law of thermodynamics at university: The consistency of macroscopic and microscopic explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, Risto; Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] This study concentrates on evaluating the consistency of upper-division students' use of the second law of thermodynamics at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Data were collected by means of a paper and pencil test (N =4 8 ) focusing on the macroscopic and microscopic features of the second law concerned with heat transfer processes. The data analysis was based on a qualitative content analysis where students' responses to the macroscopic- and microscopic-level items were categorized to provide insight into the consistency of the students' ideas; if students relied on the same idea at both levels, they ended up in the same category at both levels, and their use of the second law was consistent. The most essential finding is that a majority of students, 52%-69% depending on the physical system under evaluation, used the second law of thermodynamics consistently at macroscopic and microscopic levels; approximately 40% of the students used it correctly in terms of physics while others relied on erroneous ideas, such as the idea of conserving entropy. The most common inconsistency harbored by 10%-15% of the students (depending on the physical system under evaluation) was students' tendency to consider the number of accessible microstates to remain constant even if the entropy was stated to increase in a similar process; other inconsistencies were only seen in the answers of a few students. In order to address the observed inconsistencies, we would suggest that lecturers should utilize tasks that challenge students to evaluate phenomena at macroscopic and microscopic levels concurrently and tasks that would guide students in their search for contradictions in their thinking.

  1. Macroscopic modeling for heat and water vapor transfer in dry snow by homogenization.

    PubMed

    Calonne, Neige; Geindreau, Christian; Flin, Frédéric

    2014-11-26

    Dry snow metamorphism, involved in several topics related to cryospheric sciences, is mainly linked to heat and water vapor transfers through snow including sublimation and deposition at the ice-pore interface. In this paper, the macroscopic equivalent modeling of heat and water vapor transfers through a snow layer was derived from the physics at the pore scale using the homogenization of multiple scale expansions. The microscopic phenomena under consideration are heat conduction, vapor diffusion, sublimation, and deposition. The obtained macroscopic equivalent model is described by two coupled transient diffusion equations including a source term arising from phase change at the pore scale. By dimensional analysis, it was shown that the influence of such source terms on the overall transfers can generally not be neglected, except typically under small temperature gradients. The precision and the robustness of the proposed macroscopic modeling were illustrated through 2D numerical simulations. Finally, the effective vapor diffusion tensor arising in the macroscopic modeling was computed on 3D images of snow. The self-consistent formula offers a good estimate of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to the snow density, within an average relative error of 10%. Our results confirm recent work that the effective vapor diffusion is not enhanced in snow. PMID:25011981

  2. Challenge to macroscopic probes of quantum spacetime based on noncommutative geometry.

    PubMed

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decade, a growing number of quantum-gravity researchers has been looking for opportunities for the first ever experimental evidence of a Planck-length quantum property of spacetime. These studies are usually based on the analysis of some candidate indirect implications of spacetime quantization, such as a possible curvature of momentum space. Some recent proposals have raised hope that we might also gain direct experimental access to quantum properties of spacetime, by finding evidence of limitations to the measurability of the center-of-mass coordinates of some macroscopic bodies. However, I here observe that the arguments that originally led to speculating about spacetime quantization do not apply to the localization of the center of mass of a macroscopic body. And, I also analyze some popular formalizations of the notion of quantum spacetime, finding that when the quantization of spacetime is Planckian for the constituent particles, then for the center of mass of a composite macroscopic body the quantization of spacetime is much weaker than Planckian. These results suggest that the center-of-mass observables of macroscopic bodies should not provide good opportunities for uncovering quantum properties of spacetime. And, they also raise some conceptual challenges for theories of mechanics in quantum spacetime, in which, for example, free protons and free atoms should feel the effects of spacetime quantization differently. PMID:25166650

  3. Rhetorical structure theory and text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, William C.; Matthiessen, Christian M. I. M.; Thompson, Sandra A.

    1989-11-01

    Recent research on text generation has shown that there is a need for stronger linguistic theories that tell in detail how texts communicate. The prevailing theories are very difficult to compare, and it is also very difficult to see how they might be combined into stronger theories. To make comparison and combination a bit more approachable, we have created a book which is designed to encourage comparison. A dozen different authors or teams, all experienced in discourse research, are given exactly the same text to analyze. The text is an appeal for money by a lobbying organization in Washington, DC. It informs, stimulates and manipulates the reader in a fascinating way. The joint analysis is far more insightful than any one team's analysis alone. This paper is our contribution to the book. Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), the focus of this paper, is a way to account for the functional potential of text, its capacity to achieve the purposes of speakers and produce effects in hearers. It also shows a way to distinguish coherent texts from incoherent ones, and identifies consequences of text structure.

  4. Validation of In utero Tractography of Human Fetal Commissural and Internal Capsule Fibers with Histological Structure Tensor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Christian; Jakab, András; Brugger, Peter C.; Ricken, Gerda; Gruber, Gerlinde M.; Bettelheim, Dieter; Scharrer, Anke; Langs, Georg; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography offer the unique possibility to visualize the developing white matter macroanatomy of the human fetal brain in vivo and in utero and are currently under investigation for their potential use in the diagnosis of developmental pathologies of the human central nervous system. However, in order to establish in utero DTI as a clinical imaging tool, an independent comparison between macroscopic imaging and microscopic histology data in the same subject is needed. The present study aimed to cross-validate normal as well as abnormal in utero tractography results of commissural and internal capsule fibers in human fetal brains using postmortem histological structure tensor (ST) analysis. In utero tractography findings from two structurally unremarkable and five abnormal fetal brains were compared to the results of postmortem ST analysis applied to digitalized whole hemisphere sections of the same subjects. An approach to perform ST-based deterministic tractography in histological sections was implemented to overcome limitations in correlating in utero tractography to postmortem histology data. ST analysis and histology-based tractography of fetal brain sections enabled the direct assessment of the anisotropic organization and main fiber orientation of fetal telencephalic layers on a micro- and macroscopic scale, and validated in utero tractography results of corpus callosum and internal capsule fiber tracts. Cross-validation of abnormal in utero tractography results could be achieved in four subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and in two cases with malformations of internal capsule fibers. In addition, potential limitations of current DTI-based in utero tractography could be demonstrated in several brain regions. Combining the three-dimensional nature of DTI-based in utero tractography with the microscopic resolution provided by histological ST analysis may ultimately facilitate a more complete morphologic

  5. Validation of In utero Tractography of Human Fetal Commissural and Internal Capsule Fibers with Histological Structure Tensor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitter, Christian; Jakab, András; Brugger, Peter C; Ricken, Gerda; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Bettelheim, Dieter; Scharrer, Anke; Langs, Georg; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography offer the unique possibility to visualize the developing white matter macroanatomy of the human fetal brain in vivo and in utero and are currently under investigation for their potential use in the diagnosis of developmental pathologies of the human central nervous system. However, in order to establish in utero DTI as a clinical imaging tool, an independent comparison between macroscopic imaging and microscopic histology data in the same subject is needed. The present study aimed to cross-validate normal as well as abnormal in utero tractography results of commissural and internal capsule fibers in human fetal brains using postmortem histological structure tensor (ST) analysis. In utero tractography findings from two structurally unremarkable and five abnormal fetal brains were compared to the results of postmortem ST analysis applied to digitalized whole hemisphere sections of the same subjects. An approach to perform ST-based deterministic tractography in histological sections was implemented to overcome limitations in correlating in utero tractography to postmortem histology data. ST analysis and histology-based tractography of fetal brain sections enabled the direct assessment of the anisotropic organization and main fiber orientation of fetal telencephalic layers on a micro- and macroscopic scale, and validated in utero tractography results of corpus callosum and internal capsule fiber tracts. Cross-validation of abnormal in utero tractography results could be achieved in four subjects with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) and in two cases with malformations of internal capsule fibers. In addition, potential limitations of current DTI-based in utero tractography could be demonstrated in several brain regions. Combining the three-dimensional nature of DTI-based in utero tractography with the microscopic resolution provided by histological ST analysis may ultimately facilitate a more complete morphologic

  6. Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES). Users and programmers manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes how to use the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) computer program. The primary function of the code is to calculate the fast fracture reliability or failure probability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings, such as those found in heat engine applications. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effect of multiaxial stress states on material strength. The principle of independent action (PIA) and the Weibull normal stress averaging models are also included. Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities are estimated from four-point bend bar or unifrom uniaxial tensile specimen fracture strength data. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-square analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests, ninety percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters, and Kanofsky-Srinivasan ninety percent confidence band values are also provided. The probabilistic fast-fracture theories used in CARES, along with the input and output for CARES, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various feature of the program are also included. This manual describes the MSC/NASTRAN version of the CARES program.

  7. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  8. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional inelastic analysis methodology for the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) structural components is described. The methodology is composed of: (1) composite load spectra, (2) probabilistic structural analysis methods, (3) the probabilistic finite element theory, and (4) probabilistic structural analysis. The methodology has led to significant technical progress in several important aspects of probabilistic structural analysis. The program and accomplishments to date are summarized.

  9. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional inelastic analysis methodology for the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) structural components is described. The methodology is composed of: (1) composite load spectra, (2) probabilistic structural analysis methods, (3) the probabilistic finite element theory, and (4) probabilistic structural analysis. The methodology has led to significant technical progress in several important aspects of probabilistic structural analysis. The program and accomplishments to date are summarized.

  10. Charge radii in macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchinger, F.; Pearson, J.M.

    2005-11-01

    We show that the FRLDM model currently being used in macroscopic-microscopic fission-barrier calculations gives a rather poor agreement with measured charge radii. Considerable improvement in this respect can be made by adjusting the diffuseness parameter b.

  11. Anatomy of the ethmoid: CT, endoscopic, and macroscopic

    SciTech Connect

    Terrier, F.; Weber, W.; Ruefenacht, D.; Porcellini, B.

    1985-03-01

    The authors illustrate the normal CT anatomy of the ethmoid region and correlate it with the endoscopic and macroscopic anatomy to define landmarks that can be recognized on CT and during endoscopically controlled transnasal ethmoidectomy.

  12. Microscopic and Macroscopic Studies on Resistance Responses to Daylily Rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection process of Puccinia hemerocallidis, the causal agent of daylily rust, and resistance responses in eight daylily cultivars were studied macroscopically and microscopically. After germination of urediniospores, appressoria formed at the tip of germ tubes and penetrated through stomatal openi...

  13. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  14. Hyperspectral unmixing using macroscopic and microscopic mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Ryan; Gader, Paul; Wilson, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic mixture models and algorithms for hyperspectral unmixing are presented. Unmixing algorithms are derived from an objective function. The objective function incorporates the linear mixture model for macroscopic unmixing and a nonlinear mixture model for microscopic unmixing. The nonlinear mixture model is derived from a bidirectional reflectance distribution function for microscopic mixtures. The algorithm is designed to unmix hyperspectral images composed of macroscopic or microscopic mixtures. The mixture types and abundances at each pixel can be estimated directly from the data without prior knowledge of mixture types. Endmembers can also be estimated. Results are presented using synthetic data sets of macroscopic and microscopic mixtures and using well-known, well-characterized laboratory data sets. The unmixing accuracy of this new physics-based algorithm is compared to linear methods and to results published for other nonlinear models. The proposed method achieves the best unmixing accuracy.

  15. Quantum-Mechanical Channel of Interactions between Macroscopic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, R. Sh.; Karamyana, G. G.; Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2010-05-04

    The macroscopic experimental phenomena which cannot be explained in the frames of classical concepts are described. The attempt of qualitatively understanding of observed effects based on Bohm's representation of Schroedinger equation for arbitrary system of interacting particles is presented.

  16. Atomic-level analysis of membrane-protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in structural databases. Recently, focused consortium efforts and advances in methodology for protein production, crystallographic analysis and cryo-EM analysis have accelerated the pace of atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins. PMID:27273628

  17. Macroscopic Alignment of Cylindrical Block Polymer Thin Film via Raster Solvent Vapor Annealing with Soft Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Scott, Douglas; Epps, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    One challenge associated with the utilization of block polymer thin films in nanotechnology is the difficulty of orienting and aligning the self-assembled nanostructure on macroscopic length scales, as block polymers typically self-assemble in an isotropic manner in the absence of surface forces and external fields. In this work, macroscopic alignment of block polymer cylinders was achieved through raster solvent vapor annealing with soft shear. Spatial control over nanoscale structures was accomplished through the application of a solvent vapor delivery nozzle, poly(dimethylsiloxane) shearing pad, and motorized stage. Complex patterns such as dashes, cross-shapes, and curved structures were demonstrated along with the possibility of scale-up for industry production. The simplicity of instrumentation and the versatility of patterns possess advantages over other directed self-assembly methods that are currently available.

  18. Macroscopic quantum effects in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Machida, M.

    2008-09-01

    A macroscopic quantum theory for the capacitively-coupled intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) is constructed. We clarify the multi-junction effect for the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) to the first resistive branch. It is shown that the escape rate is greatly enhanced by the capacitive coupling between junctions. We also discuss the origin of the N2-enhancement in the escape rate observed in the uniformly switching in Bi-2212 IJJ’s.

  19. An analysis of the structure and evolution of the scientific collaboration network of computer intelligence in games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Cabrera, R.; Cotta, C.; Fernández-Leiva, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Games constitute a research domain that is attracting the interest of scientists from numerous disciplines. This is particularly true from the perspective of computational intelligence. In order to examine the growing importance of this area in the gaming domain, we present an analysis of the scientific collaboration network of researchers working on computational intelligence in games (CIG). This network has been constructed from bibliographical data obtained from the Digital Bibliography & Library Project (DBLP). We have analyzed from a temporal perspective several properties of the CIG network at the macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic levels, studying the large-scale structure, the growth mechanics, and collaboration patterns among other features. Overall, computational intelligence in games exhibits similarities with other collaboration networks such as for example a log-normal degree distribution and sub-linear preferential attachment for new authors. It also has distinctive features, e.g. the number of papers co-authored is exponentially distributed, the internal preferential attachment (new collaborations among existing authors) is linear, and fidelity rates (measured as the relative preference for publishing with previous collaborators) grow super-linearly. The macroscopic and mesoscopic evolution of the network indicates the field is very active and vibrant, but it is still at an early developmental stage. We have also analyzed communities and central nodes and how these are reflected in research topics, thus identifying active research subareas.

  20. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  1. On the Inherent Self-Excited Macroscopic Randomness of Chaotic Three-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shijun; Li, Xiaoming

    -excited macroscopic randomness (uncertainty) is inherent and unavailable. This work also implies that an universe could randomly evolve by itself into complicated structures, without any external forces. To emphasize this point, the so-called "molecule-effect" (or "nonbutterfly effect") of chaos is suggested in this paper. All of these reliable computations could deepen our understandings of chaos from physical viewpoints, and reveal a kind of origin of macroscopic randomness/uncertainty.

  2. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yen Vinokur, Marcel; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model’s accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  3. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  4. The power of light: Self-organized formation of macroscopic amounts of silica melts controlled by laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günster, J.; Oelgardt, C.; Heinrich, J. G.; Melcher, J.

    2009-01-01

    CO2 laser systems with a power output of up to 12kW continuous wave have been employed for melting high purity amorphous silica (SiO2) powders. Under the intense light irradiation, the migration of matter on the silica sample has been observed. A net mass transport results in the formation of macroscopic structures in the liquid phase. Protrusions of up to 7mm height are formed against gravitational force and surface tension. For the first time, this work reports on the self-organized formation of macroscopic structures by viscous flow of a dielectric melt driven by laser light.

  5. The power of light: Self-organized formation of macroscopic amounts of silica melts controlled by laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Guenster, J.; Oelgardt, C.; Heinrich, J. G.; Melcher, J.

    2009-01-12

    CO{sub 2} laser systems with a power output of up to 12 kW continuous wave have been employed for melting high purity amorphous silica (SiO{sub 2}) powders. Under the intense light irradiation, the migration of matter on the silica sample has been observed. A net mass transport results in the formation of macroscopic structures in the liquid phase. Protrusions of up to 7 mm height are formed against gravitational force and surface tension. For the first time, this work reports on the self-organized formation of macroscopic structures by viscous flow of a dielectric melt driven by laser light.

  6. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments are reviewed in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented. In the area of static response, current interest is focused on sensitivity to shape variation and sensitivity of nonlinear response. Two general approaches are used for computing sensitivities: differentiation of the continuum equations followed by discretization, and the reverse approach of discretization followed by differentiation. It is shown that the choice of methods has important accuracy and implementation implications. In the area of eigenproblem sensitivity, there is a great deal of interest and significant progress in sensitivity of problems with repeated eigenvalues. In addition to reviewing recent contributions in this area, the paper raises the issue of differentiability and continuity associated with the occurrence of repeated eigenvalues.

  7. Structured analysis and modeling of complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, David R.; Dalrymple, Mathieu A.

    1992-01-01

    The Aircrew Evaluation Sustained Operations Performance (AESOP) facility at Brooks AFB, Texas, combines the realism of an operational environment with the control of a research laboratory. In recent studies we collected extensive data from the Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) Weapons Directors subjected to high and low workload Defensive Counter Air Scenarios. A critical and complex task in this environment involves committing a friendly fighter against a hostile fighter. Structured Analysis and Design techniques and computer modeling systems were applied to this task as tools for analyzing subject performance and workload. This technology is being transferred to the Man-Systems Division of NASA Johnson Space Center for application to complex mission related tasks, such as manipulating the Shuttle grappler arm.

  8. Random motion analysis of flexible satellite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. C.; Das, A.

    1978-01-01

    A singular perturbation formulation is used to study the responses of a flexible satellite when random measurement errors can occur. The random variables, at different instants of time, are assumed to be uncorrelated. Procedures for obtaining maxima and minima are described, and a variation of the linear method is developed for the formal solution of the two-point boundary-value problems represented by the variational equations. Random and deterministic solutions for the structural position coordinates are studied, and an analytic algorithm for treating the force equation of motion is developed. Since the random system indicated by the variational equation will always be asymptotically unstable, any analysis of stability must be based on the deterministic system.

  9. Purification and Structural Analysis of Desmoplakin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) is an obligate component of desmosomes, where it links the desmosomal cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin assembly to intermediate filaments. DP contains a large amino-terminal domain (DPNT) that binds to the cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin complex, a central coiled-coil domain that dimerizes the molecule, and a C-terminal domain (DPCT) that binds to intermediate filaments. DPNT contains a plakin domain, comprising a set of spectrin-like repeats. DPCT contains three plakin repeat domains, each formed by 4.5 repeats of a sequence motif known as a plakin repeat that bind to intermediate filaments. Here, we review purification, biochemical characterization, and structural analysis of the DPNT plakin domain and the DPCT plakin repeat domains. PMID:26778560

  10. A macroscopic model for slightly compressible gas slip-flow in homogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseux, D.; Parada, F. J. Valdes; Tapia, J. A. Ochoa; Goyeau, B.

    2014-05-01

    The study of gas slip-flow in porous media is relevant in many applications ranging from nanotechnology to enhanced oil recovery and in any situation involving low-pressure gas-transport through structures having sufficiently small pores. In this paper, we use the method of volume averaging for deriving effective-medium equations in the framework of a slightly compressible gas flow. The result of the upscaling process is an effective-medium model subjected to time- and length-scale constraints, which are clearly identified in our derivation. At the first order in the Knudsen number, the macroscopic momentum transport equation corresponds to a Darcy-like model involving the classical intrinsic permeability tensor and a slip-flow correction tensor that is also intrinsic. It generalizes the Darcy-Klinkenberg equation for ideal gas flow, and exhibits a more complex form for dense gas. The component values of the two intrinsic tensors were computed by solving the associated closure problems on two- and three-dimensional periodic unit cells. Furthermore, the dependence of the slip-flow correction with the porosity was also verified to agree with approximate analytical results. Our predictions show a power-law relationship between the permeability and the slip-flow correction that is consistent with other works. Nevertheless, the generalization of such a relationship to any configuration requires more analysis.

  11. Assembly of tobacco mosaic virus into fibrous and macroscopic bundled arrays mediated by surface aniline polymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Z.; Bruckman, M.; Li, S.; Lee, A.; Lee, B.; Pingali, S.-V.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Wang, Q.; Univ. of South Carolina

    2007-06-05

    One-dimensional (1D) polyaniline/tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) composite nanofibers and macroscopic bundles of such fibers were generated via a self-assembly process of TMV assisted by in-situ polymerization of polyaniline on the surface of TMV. At near-neutral reaction pH, branched polyaniline formed on the surface of TMV preventing lateral association. Therefore, long 1D nanofibers were observed with high aspect ratios and excellent processibility. At a lower pH, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that initially long nanofibers were formed which resulted in bundled structures upon long-time reaction, presumably mediated by the hydrophobic interaction because of the polyaniline on the surface of TMV. In-situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study of TMV at different reaction conditions supported this mechanism. This novel strategy to assemble TMV into 1D and 3D supramolecular composites could be utilized in the fabrication of advanced materials for potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing, and biomedical engineering.

  12. Structural analysis of nucleosomal barrier to transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Volokh, Olesya; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of human and Drosophila genes are regulated at the level of transcript elongation and nucleosomes are likely targets for this regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of formation of the nucleosomal barrier to transcribing RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and nucleosome survival during/after transcription remain unknown. Here we show that both DNA–histone interactions and Pol II backtracking contribute to formation of the barrier and that nucleosome survival during transcription likely occurs through allosterically stabilized histone–histone interactions. Structural analysis indicates that after Pol II encounters the barrier, the enzyme backtracks and nucleosomal DNA recoils on the octamer, locking Pol II in the arrested state. DNA is displaced from one of the H2A/H2B dimers that remains associated with the octamer. The data reveal the importance of intranucleosomal DNA–protein and protein–protein interactions during conformational changes in the nucleosome structure on transcription. Mechanisms of nucleosomal barrier formation and nucleosome survival during transcription are proposed. PMID:26460019

  13. Macroscopic Neural Oscillation during Skilled Reaching Movements in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chun Kee

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanism of skilled movements, such as reaching, has been considered to differ from that of rhythmic movement such as locomotion. It is generally thought that skilled movements are consciously controlled by the brain, while rhythmic movements are usually controlled autonomously by the spinal cord and brain stem. However, several studies in recent decades have suggested that neural networks in the spinal cord may also be involved in the generation of skilled movements. Moreover, a recent study revealed that neural activities in the motor cortex exhibit rhythmic oscillations corresponding to movement frequency during reaching movements as rhythmic movements. However, whether the oscillations are generated in the spinal cord or the cortical circuit in the motor cortex causes the oscillations is unclear. If the spinal cord is involved in the skilled movements, then similar rhythmic oscillations with time delays should be found in macroscopic neural activity. We measured whole-brain MEG signals during reaching. The MEG signals were analyzed using a dynamical analysis method. We found that rhythmic oscillations with time delays occur in all subjects during reaching movements. The results suggest that the corticospinal system is involved in the generation and control of the skilled movements as rhythmic movements. PMID:27524996

  14. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li; Zhang, Yingxun

    2015-12-01

    Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic-microscopic mass formulas: Lublin-Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD) formula and Weizsäcker-Skyrme (WS*) formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞ = 230 ± 11 MeV and 235 ± 11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L = 41.6 ± 7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5 ± 9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron-proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  15. Macroscopic Neural Oscillation during Skilled Reaching Movements in Humans.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hong Gi; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanism of skilled movements, such as reaching, has been considered to differ from that of rhythmic movement such as locomotion. It is generally thought that skilled movements are consciously controlled by the brain, while rhythmic movements are usually controlled autonomously by the spinal cord and brain stem. However, several studies in recent decades have suggested that neural networks in the spinal cord may also be involved in the generation of skilled movements. Moreover, a recent study revealed that neural activities in the motor cortex exhibit rhythmic oscillations corresponding to movement frequency during reaching movements as rhythmic movements. However, whether the oscillations are generated in the spinal cord or the cortical circuit in the motor cortex causes the oscillations is unclear. If the spinal cord is involved in the skilled movements, then similar rhythmic oscillations with time delays should be found in macroscopic neural activity. We measured whole-brain MEG signals during reaching. The MEG signals were analyzed using a dynamical analysis method. We found that rhythmic oscillations with time delays occur in all subjects during reaching movements. The results suggest that the corticospinal system is involved in the generation and control of the skilled movements as rhythmic movements. PMID:27524996

  16. Structures and Analysis of Carotenoid Molecules.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of the usual C40 linear and symmetrical carotenoid skeleton give rise to a wide array of structures of carotenes and xanthophylls in plant tissues. These include acyclic, monocyclic and dicyclic carotenoids, along with hydroxy and epoxy xanthophylls and apocarotenoids. Carotenols can be unesterified or esterified (monoester) in one or two (diester) hydroxyl groups with fatty acids. E-Z isomerization increases the array of possible plant carotenoids even further. Screening and especially quantitative analysis are being carried out worldwide. Visible absorption spectrometry and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy have been used for the initial estimation of the total carotenoid content or the principal carotenoid content when large numbers of samples needed to be analyzed within a short time, as would be the case in breeding programs. Although inherently difficult, quantitative analysis of the individual carotenoids is essential. Knowledge of the sources of errors and means to avoid them has led to a large body of reliable quantitative compositional data on carotenoids. Reverse-phase HPLC with a photodiode array detector has been the preferred analytical technique, but UHPLC is increasingly employed. HPLC-MS has been used mainly for identification and NMR has been useful in unequivocally identifying geometric isomers. PMID:27485219

  17. A computer analysis program for interfacing thermal and structural codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A software package has been developed to transfer three-dimensional transient thermal information accurately, efficiently, and automatically from a heat transfer analysis code to a structural analysis code. The code is called three-dimensional TRansfer ANalysis Code to Interface Thermal and Structural codes, or 3D TRANCITS. TRANCITS has the capability to couple finite difference and finite element heat transfer analysis codes to linear and nonlinear finite element structural analysis codes. TRANCITS currently supports the output of SINDA and MARC heat transfer codes directly. It will also format the thermal data output directly so that it is compatible with the input requirements of the NASTRAN and MARC structural analysis codes. Other thermal and structural codes can be interfaced using the transfer module with the neutral heat transfer input file and the neutral temperature output file. The transfer module can handle different elemental mesh densities for the heat transfer analysis and the structural analysis.

  18. Macroscopic hotspots identification: A Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ni; Huang, Helai; Lee, Jaeyoung; Gao, Mingyun; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    This study proposes a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction approach for hotspot identification by applying the full Bayesian (FB) technique in the context of macroscopic safety analysis. Compared with the emerging Bayesian spatial and temporal approach, the Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction model contributes to a detailed understanding of differential trends through analyzing and mapping probabilities of area-specific crash trends as differing from the mean trend and highlights specific locations where crash occurrence is deteriorating or improving over time. With traffic analysis zones (TAZs) crash data collected in Florida, an empirical analysis was conducted to evaluate the following three approaches for hotspot identification: FB ranking using a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model, FB ranking using a Bayesian spatial and temporal (B-ST) model and FB ranking using a Bayesian spatio-temporal interaction (B-ST-I) model. The results show that (a) the models accounting for space-time effects perform better in safety ranking than does the PLN model, and (b) the FB approach using the B-ST-I model significantly outperforms the B-ST approach in correctly identifying hotspots by explicitly accounting for the space-time variation in addition to the stable spatial/temporal patterns of crash occurrence. In practice, the B-ST-I approach plays key roles in addressing two issues: (a) how the identified hotspots have evolved over time and (b) the identification of areas that, whilst not yet hotspots, show a tendency to become hotspots. Finally, it can provide guidance to policy decision makers to efficiently improve zonal-level safety. PMID:27110645

  19. A psychometric investigation of "macroscopic" speech measures for clinical and psychological science.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alex S; Renshaw, Tyler L; Mitchell, Kyle R; Kim, Yunjung

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of vocal expression is a critical endeavor for psychological and clinical sciences and is an increasingly popular application for computer-human interfaces. Despite this, and despite advances in the efficiency, affordability, and sophistication of vocal analytic technologies, there is considerable variability across studies regarding what aspects of vocal expression are studied. Vocal signals can be quantified in a myriad of ways, and their underlying structure, at least with respect to "macroscopic" measures from extended speech, is presently unclear. To address this issue, we evaluated the psychometric properties-notably, the structural and construct validity-of a systematically defined set of global vocal features. Our analytic strategy focused on (a) identifying redundant variables among this set, (b) employing principal components analysis (PCA) to identify nonoverlapping domains of vocal expression, (c) examining the degrees to which the vocal variables are modulated as a function of changes in speech task, and (d) evaluating the relationship between the vocal variables and cognitive (i.e., verbal fluency) and clinical (i.e., depression, anxiety, and hostility) variables. Spontaneous speech samples from 11 independent studies of young adults (>60 s in length), employing one of three different speaking tasks, were examined (N = 1,350). Confounding variables (i.e., sex, ethnicity) were statistically controlled for. The PCA identified six distinct domains of vocal expression. Collectively, vocal expression (defined in terms of these domains) was modulated as a function of speech task and was related to the cognitive and clinical variables. These findings provide empirically grounded implications for the study of vocal expression in psychological and clinical sciences. PMID:25862539

  20. Structure/load dependent vectors for linear structural dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jiangning; Nguyen, Duc T.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic solution vectors yielded by the present structure/load dependent-vectors method for large-scale linear structural dynamic analyses involving complex loadings can be used as starting vectors, so that both structure and load characteristics are encompassed by the basis vectors. The method is shown to entail fewer vectors than current alternatives for a given level of accuracy, especially in the cases of structures that have external concentrated masses. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the advantages of this dependent-vectors method relative to other reduction methods.

  1. Fe(II) uptake on natural montmorillonites. I. Macroscopic and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Daniela; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Baeyens, Bart; Dähn, Rainer; Joshi, Prachi A; Scheinost, Andreas C; Gorski, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important redox-active element that is ubiquitous in both engineered and natural environments. In this study, the retention mechanism of Fe(II) on clay minerals was investigated using macroscopic sorption experiments combined with Mössbauer and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Sorption edges and isotherms were measured under anoxic conditions on natural Fe-bearing montmorillonites (STx, SWy, and SWa) having different structural Fe contents ranging from 0.5 to 15.4 wt % and different initial Fe redox states. Batch experiments indicated that, in the case of low Fe-bearing (STx) and dithionite-reduced clays, the Fe(II) uptake follows the sorption behavior of other divalent transition metals, whereas Fe(II) sorption increased by up to 2 orders of magnitude on the unreduced, Fe(III)-rich montmorillonites (SWy and SWa). Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis revealed that nearly all the sorbed Fe(II) was oxidized to surface-bound Fe(III) and secondary Fe(III) precipitates were formed on the Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite, while sorbed Fe is predominantly present as Fe(II) on Fe-low and dithionite-reduced clays. The results provide compelling evidence that Fe(II) uptake characteristics on clay minerals are strongly correlated to the redox properties of the structural Fe(III). The improved understanding of the interfacial redox interactions between sorbed Fe(II) and clay minerals gained in this study is essential for future studies developing Fe(II) sorption models on natural montmorillonites. PMID:24930689

  2. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a ``global-local`` finite element analysis. A ``global`` analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A ``local`` layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the ``global`` analysis are used as loads to the ``local`` analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  3. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a global-local'' finite element analysis. A global'' analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A local'' layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the global'' analysis are used as loads to the local'' analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  4. Macroscopic Carbon Nanotube-based 3D Monoliths.

    PubMed

    Du, Ran; Zhao, Qiuchen; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Jin

    2015-07-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most promising carbon allotropes with incredible diverse physicochemical properties, thereby enjoying continuous worldwide attention since their discovery about two decades ago. From the point of view of practical applications, assembling individual CNTs into macroscopic functional and high-performance materials is of paramount importance. For example, multiscaled CNT-based assemblies including 1D fibers, 2D films, and 3D monoliths have been developed. Among all of these, monolithic 3D CNT architectures with porous structures have attracted increasing interest in the last few years. In this form, theoretically all individual CNTs are well connected and fully expose their surfaces. These 3D architectures have huge specific surface areas, hierarchical pores, and interconnected conductive networks, resulting in enhanced mass/electron transport and countless accessible active sites for diverse applications (e.g. catalysis, capacitors, and sorption). More importantly, the monolithic form of 3D CNT assemblies can impart additional application potentials to materials, such as free-standing electrodes, sensors, and recyclable sorbents. However, scaling the properties of individual CNTs to 3D assemblies, improving use of the diverse, structure-dependent properties of CNTs, and increasing the performance-to-cost ratio are great unsolved challenges for their real commercialization. This review aims to provide a comprehensive introduction of this young and energetic field, i.e., CNT-based 3D monoliths, with a focus on the preparation principles, current synthetic methods, and typical applications. Opportunities and challenges in this field are also presented. PMID:25740457

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barrall, G A

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  6. Bacterial Macroscopic Rope-like Fibers with Cytopathic and Adhesive Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Saldaña, Zeus; Deng, Wanyin; Castañeda, Elsa; Freer, Enrique; Tarr, Phil I.; Finlay, B. Brett; Puente, José Luis; Girón, Jorge A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a body of ultrastructural, biochemical, and genetic evidence that demonstrates the oligomerization of virulence-associated autotransporter proteins EspC or EspP produced by deadly human pathogens enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli into novel macroscopic rope-like structures (>1 cm long). The rope-like structures showed high aggregation and insolubility, stability to anionic detergents and high temperature, and binding to Congo Red and thioflavin T dyes. These are properties also exhibited by human amyloidogenic proteins. These macroscopic ropes were not observed in cultures of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli or isogenic espP or espC deletion mutants of enterohemorrhagic or enteropathogenic Escherichia coli but were produced by an Escherichia coli K-12 strain carrying a plasmid expressing espP. Purified recombinant EspP monomers were able to self-assemble into macroscopic ropes upon incubation, suggesting that no other protein was required for assembly. The ropes bound to and showed cytopathic effects on cultured epithelial cells, served as a substratum for bacterial adherence and biofilm formation, and protected bacteria from antimicrobial compounds. We hypothesize that these ropes play a biologically significant role in the survival and pathogenic scheme of these organisms. PMID:20688909

  7. Study of Fission Barrier Heights of Uranium Isotopes by the Macroscopic-Microscopic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chun-Lai; Fan, Tie-Shuan

    2014-09-01

    Potential energy surfaces of uranium nuclei in the range of mass numbers 229 through 244 are investigated in the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model and the heights of static fission barriers are obtained in terms of a double-humped structure. The macroscopic part of the nuclear energy is calculated according to Lublin—Strasbourg-drop (LSD) model. Shell and pairing corrections as the microscopic part are calculated with a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential. The calculation is carried out in a five-dimensional parameter space of the generalized Lawrence shapes. In order to extract saddle points on the potential energy surface, a new algorithm which can effectively find an optimal fission path leading from the ground state to the scission point is developed. The comparison of our results with available experimental data and others' theoretical results confirms the reliability of our calculations.

  8. Macroscopic synthesis and characterization of giant fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvan, R.; Unnikrishnan, R.; Ganapathy, S.; Pradeep, T.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal treatment of carbon soot produced by arc evaporation of nickel-filled graphite rods in 500 Torr of helium gives giant fullerenes showing characteristic IR, Raman, NMR and powder XRD signatures. Transmission electron micrographs show faceted structures with pentagonal, hexagonal and spherical shapes. The simplicity and similarity of the IR spectrum with those of smaller fullerenes suggest that the material is a form of large fullerenes. Chemical treatment of the material gives carbon onions.

  9. Extracting Macroscopic Information from Web Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of Web-based link analysis focuses on an evaluation of Ingversen's proposed external Web Impact Factor for the original use of the Web, namely the interlinking of academic research. Studies relationships between academic hyperlinks and research activities for British universities and discusses the use of search engines for Web link…

  10. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  11. Nanostructure surveys of macroscopic specimens by small-angle scattering tensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Liebi, Marianne; Georgiadis, Marios; Menzel, Andreas; Schneider, Philipp; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Bunk, Oliver; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel

    2015-11-19

    The mechanical properties of many materials are based on the macroscopic arrangement and orientation of their nanostructure. This nanostructure can be ordered over a range of length scales. In biology, the principle of hierarchical ordering is often used to maximize functionality, such as strength and robustness of the material, while minimizing weight and energy cost. Methods for nanoscale imaging provide direct visual access to the ultrastructure (nanoscale structure that is too small to be imaged using light microscopy), but the field of view is limited and does not easily allow a full correlative study of changes in the ultrastructure over a macroscopic sample. Other methods of probing ultrastructure ordering, such as small-angle scattering of X-rays or neutrons, can be applied to macroscopic samples; however, these scattering methods remain constrained to two-dimensional specimens or to isotropically oriented ultrastructures. These constraints limit the use of these methods for studying nanostructures with more complex orientation patterns, which are abundant in nature and materials science. Here, we introduce an imaging method that combines small-angle scattering with tensor tomography to probe nanoscale structures in three-dimensional macroscopic samples in a non-destructive way. We demonstrate the method by measuring the main orientation and the degree of orientation of nanoscale mineralized collagen fibrils in a human trabecula bone sample with a spatial resolution of 25 micrometres. Symmetries within the sample, such as the cylindrical symmetry commonly observed for mineralized collagen fibrils in bone, allow for tractable sampling requirements and numerical efficiency. Small-angle scattering tensor tomography is applicable to both biological and materials science specimens, and may be useful for understanding and characterizing smart or bio-inspired materials. Moreover, because the method is non-destructive, it is appropriate for in situ measurements and

  12. Structural analysis of galactoarabinan from duckweed.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Yu, Changjiang; Zhu, Ming; Cao, Yingping; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu; Ma, Yubin; Zhou, Gongke

    2015-03-01

    A highly branched galactoarabinan named DAG1 (Mw∼4.0×10(4) Da) was purified from Lemna aequinoctialis 6000 via 70% (v/v) ethanol extraction, followed by size-exclusion chromatography on Bio-Gel P2 and Superdex 75. Methylation analysis showed that DAG1 consisted of t-Araf, (1→5)-Araf, (1→2,5)-Araf, (1→3)-Galp, and (1→3,6)-Galp in a relative proportion of approximately 6:4:3:3:3, suggesting an arabinogalactan/galactoarabinan polysacchairde. With the aid of arabinan degrading enzymes, the structure of DAG1 repeating unit was further characterized by ELISA with specific monoclonal antibodies and Yariv reagent assay. Analyses indicated that the proposed repeating unit of DAG1 had a backbone composed of seven α-(1→5)-L-arabinofuranose residues where branching occurred at O-2 with either terminal arabinoses or arabinogalactan side chain. The arabinogalactan side chain was composed of six β-(1→3)-D-galactopyranose residues, half of which were ramified at O-6 with terminal arabinoses and the last galactose was terminated with arabinose. PMID:25498703

  13. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    SciTech Connect

    Haibo Cao

    2003-12-12

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches.

  14. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Huang, H.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the first year effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) the results of the selective literature survey; (2) 8-, 16-, and 20-noded isoparametric plate and shell elements; (3) large deformation structural analysis; (4) eigenanalysis; (5) anisotropic heat transfer analysis; and (6) anisotropic electromagnetic analysis.

  15. [Studies on macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of Ophiocordyceps xuefengensis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zhen, Lan-ping; Zhu, Ru-cai; Zhang, Shui-han; Huang, Hui-yong

    2015-07-01

    The macroscopic characteristics, tissue, caterpillar body wall and powder of Ophiocordyceps xuefengensis in different batch numbers were observed and researched by the macroscopic and microscopic identification methods. The result shows that the morphology, size, abdominal annulations of caterpillar, etc. of 0. xuefengensis are the macroscopic identification characteristics, the caterpillar body surface mycelium, body wall sculpture and crochets on abdominal legs are the microscopic identification characteristics. These characters are stable and regular discriminant features, which are proved to be the identification basis of O. xuefengensis. In addition, The characters such as crochets on abdominal legs arrange in two parallel ellipse rings, the inner crochets are long strip, and the external toes are unciform, are specific. PMID:26666033

  16. Broadband macroscopic cortical oscillations emerge from intrinsic neuronal response failures

    PubMed Central

    Goldental, Amir; Vardi, Roni; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Broadband spontaneous macroscopic neural oscillations are rhythmic cortical firing which were extensively examined during the last century, however, their possible origination is still controversial. In this work we show how macroscopic oscillations emerge in solely excitatory random networks and without topological constraints. We experimentally and theoretically show that these oscillations stem from the counterintuitive underlying mechanism—the intrinsic stochastic neuronal response failures (NRFs). These NRFs, which are characterized by short-term memory, lead to cooperation among neurons, resulting in sub- or several- Hertz macroscopic oscillations which coexist with high frequency gamma oscillations. A quantitative interplay between the statistical network properties and the emerging oscillations is supported by simulations of large networks based on single-neuron in-vitro experiments and a Langevin equation describing the network dynamics. Results call for the examination of these oscillations in the presence of inhibition and external drives. PMID:26578893

  17. Atomistic Simulation of the Transition from Atomistic to Macroscopic Cratering

    SciTech Connect

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai

    2008-07-11

    Using large-scale atomistic simulations, we show that the macroscopic cratering behavior emerges for projectile impacts on Au at projectile sizes between 1000 and 10 000 Au atoms at impact velocities comparable to typical meteoroid velocities. In this size regime, we detect a compression of material in Au nanoparticle impacts similar to that observed for hypervelocity macroscopic impacts. The simulated crater volumes agree with the values calculated using the macroscopic crater size scaling law, in spite of a downwards extrapolation over more than 15 orders of magnitude in terms of the impactor volume. The result demonstrates that atomistic simulations can be used as a tool to understand the strength properties of materials in cases where only continuum models have been possible before.

  18. Macroscopic quantumness: Theory and applications in optical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Sasaki, Masahide

    2015-02-01

    Since the early days of quantum mechanics, as illustrated by Schrödinger's Gedankenexperiment, macroscopic quantum phenomena have attracted great interest among scientists and general audience. As highlighted by the Nobel prize in Physics in 2012, the scientific community could assent that the state-of-the-art technology to measure and manipulate individual quantum systems is now available in laboratories. We believe that the next step in order is to collectively control large quantum systems even at a 'macroscopic' level. This will be an intriguing challenge, from the fundamental point of view, for testing quantum mechanics in the macroscopic limit. Furthermore, it will make another major step forward to practical implementations of quantum information technologies.

  19. Nonequilibrium electromagnetics: Local and macroscopic fields and constitutive relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Baker-Jarvis, James; Kabos, Pavel; Holloway, Christopher L.

    2004-09-01

    We study the electrodynamics of materials using a Liouville-Hamiltonian-based statistical-mechanical theory. Our goal is to develop electrodynamics from an ensemble-average viewpoint that is valid for microscopic and nonequilibrium systems at molecular to submolecular scales. This approach is not based on a Taylor series expansion of the charge density to obtain the multipoles. Instead, expressions of the molecular multipoles are used in an inverse problem to obtain the averaging statistical-density function that is used to obtain the macroscopic fields. The advantages of this method are that the averaging function is constructed in a self-consistent manner and the molecules can either be treated as point multipoles or contain more microstructure. Expressions for the local and macroscopic fields are obtained, and evolution equations for the constitutive parameters are developed. We derive equations for the local field as functions of the applied, polarization, magnetization, strain density, and macroscopic fields.

  20. Optimal Estimation of Ion-Channel Kinetics from Macroscopic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuhui; Yao, Jing; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Jiuping

    2012-01-01

    Markov modeling provides an effective approach for modeling ion channel kinetics. There are several search algorithms for global fitting of macroscopic or single-channel currents across different experimental conditions. Here we present a particle swarm optimization(PSO)-based approach which, when used in combination with golden section search (GSS), can fit macroscopic voltage responses with a high degree of accuracy (errors within 1%) and reasonable amount of calculation time (less than 10 hours for 20 free parameters) on a desktop computer. We also describe a method for initial value estimation of the model parameters, which appears to favor identification of global optimum and can further reduce the computational cost. The PSO-GSS algorithm is applicable for kinetic models of arbitrary topology and size and compatible with common stimulation protocols, which provides a convenient approach for establishing kinetic models at the macroscopic level. PMID:22536358

  1. Graphene chiral liquid crystals and macroscopic assembled fibres

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2011-01-01

    Chirality and liquid crystals are both widely expressed in nature and biology. Helical assembly of mesophasic molecules and colloids may produce intriguing chiral liquid crystals. To date, chiral liquid crystals of 2D colloids have not been explored. As a typical 2D colloid, graphene is now receiving unprecedented attention. However, making macroscopic graphene fibres is hindered by the poor dispersibility of graphene and by the lack of an assembly method. Here we report that soluble, chemically oxidized graphene or graphene oxide sheets can form chiral liquid crystals in a twist-grain-boundary phase-like model with simultaneous lamellar ordering and long-range helical frustrations. Aqueous graphene oxide liquid crystals were continuously spun into metres of macroscopic graphene oxide fibres; subsequent chemical reduction gave the first macroscopic neat graphene fibres with high conductivity and good mechanical performance. The flexible, strong graphene fibres were knitted into designed patterns and into directionally conductive textiles. PMID:22146390

  2. Macroscopic character of composite high temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, Steven; Spivak, Boris

    The ``d-wave'' symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact, and one which identifies them as ``unconventional.'' However, in macroscopic contexts - including many potential applications (i.e. superconducting ``wires'') - the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. Here, we analyze the physics at length scales large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While XY-superconducting glass order and macroscopic d-wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances - especially when the d-wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix - the most likely order has global s-wave symmetry.

  3. Optomechanical Magnetometry with a Macroscopic Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changqiu; Janousek, Jiri; Sheridan, Eoin; McAuslan, David L.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Lam, Ping Koy; Zhang, Yundong; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a centimeter-scale optomechanical magnetometer based on a crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonator. The large size of the resonator, with a magnetic-field integration volume of 0.45 cm3 , allows high magnetic-field sensitivity to be achieved in the hertz-to-kilohertz frequency range. A peak sensitivity of 131 pT Hz-1 /2 is reported, in a magnetically unshielded noncryogenic environment using optical power levels beneath 100 μ W . Femtotesla-range sensitivity may be possible in future devices with the further optimization of laser noise and the physical structure of the resonator, allowing applications in high-performance magnetometry.

  4. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for critical SSME propulsion components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional inelastic analysis methodology for the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) structural components is described. The methodology is composed of: (1) composite load spectra, (2) probabilistic structural analysis methods, (3) the probabilistic finite element theory, and (4) probabilistic structural analysis. The progress in the development of generic probabilistic models for various individual loads which consist of a steady state load, a periodic load, a random load, and a spike, is discussed. The capabilities of the Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress finite element code designed for probabilistic structural analysis of the SSME are examined. Variation principles for formulation probabilistic finite elements and a structural analysis for evaluating the geometric and material properties tolerances on the structural response of turbopump blades are being designed.

  5. Microscopic to Macroscopic Dynamical Models of Sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Woolley, Thomas; Pearce, Eiluned; Dunbar, Robin; Maini, Philip; Social; Evolutionary Neuroscience Research Group (Senrg) Collaboration

    To help them survive, social animals, such as humans, need to share knowledge and responsibilities with other members of the species. The larger their social network, the bigger the pool of knowledge available to them. Since time is a limited resource, a way of optimising its use is meeting amongst individuals whilst fulfilling other necessities. In this sense it is useful to know how many, and how often, early humans could meet during a given period of time whilst performing other necessary tasks, such as food gathering. Using a simplified model of these dynamics, which comprehend encounter and memory, we aim at producing a lower-bound to the number of meetings hunter-gatherers could have during a year. We compare the stochastic agent-based model to its mean-field approximation and explore some of the features necessary for the difference between low population dynamics and its continuum limit. We observe an emergent property that could have an inference in the layered structure seen in each person's social organisation. This could give some insight into hunter-gatherer's lives and the development of the social layered structure we have today. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  6. Analysis and design technology for high-speed aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Camarda, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent high-speed aircraft structures research activities at NASA Langley Research Center are described. The following topics are covered: the development of analytical and numerical solutions to global and local thermal and structural problems, experimental verification of analysis methods, identification of failure mechanisms, and the incorporation of analysis methods into design and optimization strategies. The paper describes recent NASA Langley advances in analysis and design methods, structural and thermal concepts, and test methods.

  7. Scaling of macroscopic superpositions close to a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Tahereh; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that in a quantum phase transition (QPT), entanglement remains short ranged [Osterloh et al., Nature (London) 416, 608 (2005), 10.1038/416608a]. We ask if there is a quantum property entailing the whole system which diverges near this point. Using the recently proposed measures of quantum macroscopicity, we show that near a quantum critical point, it is the effective size of macroscopic superposition between the two symmetry breaking states which grows to the scale of system size, and its derivative with respect to the coupling shows both singular behavior and scaling properties.

  8. Robust Gaussian entanglement with a macroscopic oscillator at thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Radim; Kupčík, Vojtěch

    2013-06-01

    We propose a feasible Gaussian version of the Schrödinger-cat state. We consider it as a robust Gaussian state of an oscillator prepared in a low-energy Gaussian quantum state entangled with another oscillator which was initially in a quantum state at thermal equilibrium with an arbitrary large energy (macroscopic oscillator). To generate it, we suggest two-mode squeezing as the best candidate. We test that the Gaussian version of the Schrödinger-cat state can be also used to remotely prepare a squeezed state of the macroscopic oscillator.

  9. Structural weight analysis of hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    The weights of major structural components of hypersonic, liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft are estimated and discussed. The major components are the body structure, body thermal protection system tankage and wing structure. The method of estimating body structure weight is presented in detail while the weights of the other components are estimated by methods given in referenced papers. Two nominal vehicle concepts are considered. The advanced concept employs a wing-body configuration and hot structure with a nonintegral tank, while the potential concept employs an all body configuration and cold, integral pillow tankage structure. Characteristics of these two concepts are discussed and parametric data relating their weight fractions to variations in vehicle shape and size design criteria and mission requirements, and structural arrangement are presented. Although the potential concept is shown to have a weight advantage over the advanced, it involves more design uncertainties since it is farther removed in design from existing aircraft.

  10. Automatic Detection of Malignant Melanoma using Macroscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Maryam; Karimian, Alireza; Moallem, Payman

    2014-01-01

    In order to distinguish between benign and malignant types of pigmented skin lesions, computerized procedures have been developed for images taken by different equipment that the most available one of them is conventional digital cameras. In this research, a new procedure to detect malignant melanoma from benign pigmented lesions using macroscopic images is presented. The images are taken by conventional digital cameras with spatial resolution higher than one megapixel and by considering no constraints and special conditions during imaging. In the proposed procedure, new methods to weaken the effect of nonuniform illumination, correction of the effect of thick hairs and large glows on the lesion and also, a new threshold-based segmentation algorithm are presented. 187 features representing asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, diameter and texture are extracted from the lesion area and after reducing the number of features using principal component analysis (PCA), lesions are determined as malignant or benign using support vector machine classifier. According to the dermatologist diagnosis, the proposed processing methods have the ability to detect lesions area with high accuracy. The evaluation measures of classification have indicated that 13 features extracted by PCA method lead to better results than all of the extracted features. These results led to an accuracy of 82.2%, sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 86.93%. The proposed method may help dermatologists to detect the malignant lesions in the primary stages due to the minimum constraints during imaging, the ease of usage by the public and nonexperts, and high accuracy in detection of the lesion type. PMID:25426432

  11. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  12. Macroscopic Models of Local Field Potentials and the Apparent 1/f Noise in Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Claude; Destexhe, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The power spectrum of local field potentials (LFPs) has been reported to scale as the inverse of the frequency, but the origin of this 1/f noise is at present unclear. Macroscopic measurements in cortical tissue demonstrated that electric conductivity (as well as permittivity) is frequency-dependent, while other measurements failed to evidence any dependence on frequency. In this article, we propose a model of the genesis of LFPs that accounts for the above data and contradictions. Starting from first principles (Maxwell equations), we introduce a macroscopic formalism in which macroscopic measurements are naturally incorporated, and also examine different physical causes for the frequency dependence. We suggest that ionic diffusion primes over electric field effects, and is responsible for the frequency dependence. This explains the contradictory observations, and also reproduces the 1/f power spectral structure of LFPs, as well as more complex frequency scaling. Finally, we suggest a measurement method to reveal the frequency dependence of current propagation in biological tissue, and which could be used to directly test the predictions of this formalism. PMID:19348744

  13. Macroscopical, Histological, and In Vitro Characterization of Nonosteoarthritic Versus Osteoarthritic Hip Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Badendick, Jessica; Godkin, Owen; Kohl, Benjamin; Meier, Carola; Jagielski, Michal; Huang, Zhao; Arens, Stephan; Schneider, Tobias; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) might affect chondrocyte culture characteristics and complement expression. Therefore, this study addressed the interrelation between macroscopical and microscopical structure, complement expression, and chondrocyte culture characteristics in non-OA and OA cartilage. Femoral head cartilage samples harvested from patients with femoral neck fractures (FNFs) and OA were analyzed for macroscopical alterations using an in-house scoring system, graded histologically (Mankin score), and immunolabeled for complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) and receptors. Morphology of monolayer cultured chondrocytes isolated from a subset of samples was assessed. The macroscopical score distinguished the FNF and OA cartilage samples and correlated significantly with the histological results. Chondrocyte phenotype from FNF or OA cartilage differed. Complement receptor C5aR, CRPs CD55 and CD59, and weakly receptor C3AR were detected in the investigated FNF and OA cartilage, except for CD46, which was detected in only two of the five investigated donors. The in-house score also allows inexperienced observers to distinguish non-OA and OA cartilage for experimental purposes. PMID:27158224

  14. First-principles based calculation of the macroscopic α/β interface in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhu, Lvqi; Shao, Shouqi; Jiang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    The macroscopic α/β interface in titanium and titanium alloys consists of a ledge interface (112)β/(01-10)α and a side interface (11-1)β/(2-1-10)α in a zig-zag arrangement. Here, we report a first-principles study for predicting the atomic structure and the formation energy of the α/β-Ti interface. Both component interfaces were calculated using supercell models within a restrictive relaxation approach, with various staking sequences and high-symmetry parallel translations being considered. The ledge interface energy was predicted as 0.098 J/m2 and the side interface energy as 0.811 J/m2. By projecting the zig-zag interface area onto the macroscopic broad face, the macroscopic α/β interface energy was estimated to be as low as ˜0.12 J/m2, which, however, is almost double the ad hoc value used in previous phase-field simulations.

  15. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  16. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  17. Effect of cyclical loading on the macroscopic failure behaviour of fibre reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Marder, J.; Kuesters, K.; Fischer, K.

    2014-05-01

    Fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) have become the preferred material choice for a wide range of lightweight applications. However, not only the static strength but also the strength and stiffness degradation under cyclical loading conditions have to be predicted for the efficient and reliable design of structures. The phenomenology of the macroscopic damage process of a laminate subjected to cyclical loads is commonly characterized by a first inter-fibre fracture (IFF) and a subsequent accumulation of these IFFs. Finally the laminate fails by one of the macroscopic failure modes named fibre failure (FF), inter-fibre fracture or delamination. Beside these macroscopic failure mechanisms, laminates are inherently characterized by microscopic flaws and cracks in the matrix and at the fibre matrix interface which accumulate especially in transversely loaded plies before the first macroscopic fracture occurs. In well-designed laminates the majority of the fibres are aligned with the loading direction. The fibre longitudinal compressive strength is therefore a critical value, since its inherently lower than the fibre longitudinal tensile strength. The fibre longitudinal compressive strength is influenced by a multitude of factors, such as fibre volume content, fibre and matrix material and also by the micro damage state of a ply. In this paper, the influence of the micro damage state on the fibre longitudinal compressive strength will be discussed. Experimental investigations have been performed to introduce a characteristic micro damage state into a ply by cyclical transverse preloading and quantify the effect of the preloading and the damage state on the fibre longitudinal compressive strength.

  18. Recent developments of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Torng, T.; Thacker, B.; Riha, D.; Leung, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis computer program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general purpose structural analysis methods to compute the probabilistic response and the reliability of engineering structures. Uncertainty in loading, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include nonlinear finite element and boundary element methods. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. The scope of the code has recently been expanded to include probabilistic life and fatigue prediction of structures in terms of component and system reliability and risk analysis of structures considering cost of failure. The code is currently being extended to structural reliability considering progressive crack propagation. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the new capabilities.

  19. Probabilistic structural analysis of adaptive/smart/intelligent space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated for adaptive/smart/intelligent behavior. For each behavior, the scatter (ranges) in buckling loads, vibration frequencies, and member axial forces are probabilistically determined. Sensitivities associated with uncertainties in the structure, material and load variables that describe the truss are determined for different probabilities. The relative magnitude for these sensitivities are used to identify significant truss variables that control/classify its behavior to respond as an adaptive/smart/intelligent structure. Results show that the probabilistic buckling loads and vibration frequencies increase for each truss classification, with a substantial increase for intelligent trusses. Similarly, the probabilistic member axial forces reduce for adaptive and intelligent trusses and increase for smart trusses.

  20. Probabilistic structural analysis of adaptive/smart/intelligent space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    A three-bay, space, cantilever truss is probabilistically evaluated for adaptive/smart/intelligent behavior. For each behavior, the scatter (ranges) in buckling loads, vibration frequencies, and member axial forces are probabilistically determined. Sensitivities associated with uncertainties in the structure, material and load variables that describe the truss are determined for different probabilities. The relative magnitude for these sensitivities are used to identify significant truss variables that control/classify its behavior to respond as an adaptive/smart/intelligent structure. Results show that the probabilistic buckling loads and vibration frequencies increase for each truss classification, with a substantial increase for intelligent trusses. Similarly, the probabilistic member axial forces reduce for adaptive and intelligent trusses and increase for smart trusses.

  1. APT/LEDA RFQ and support frame structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, S.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents structural analysis of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (APT/LEDA) Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator structure and its associated support frame. This work was conducted for the Department of Energy in support of the APT/LEDA. Structural analysis of the RFQ was performed to quantify stress levels and deflections due to both vacuum loading and gravity loading. This analysis also verified the proposed support scheme geometry and quantified interface loads. This analysis also determined the necessary stiffness and strength requirements of the RFQ support frame verifying the conceptual design geometry and allowing specification of individual frame elements. Complete structural analysis of the frame was completed subsequently. This report details structural analysis of the RFQ assembly with regard to gravity and vacuum loads only. Thermally induced stresses from the Radio Frequency (RF) surface resistance heating were not considered.

  2. Basic Characteristics of a Macroscopic Measure for Detecting Abnormal Changes in a Multiagent System

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Multiagent application systems must deal with various changes in both the system and the system environment at runtime. Generally, such changes have undesirable negative effects on the system. To manage and control the system, it is important to observe and detect negative effects using an appropriate observation function of the system’s behavior. This paper focuses on the design of this function and proposes a new macroscopic measure with which to observe behavioral characteristics of a runtime multiagent system. The proposed measure is designed as the variance of fluctuation of a macroscopic activity factor of the whole system, based on theoretical analysis of the macroscopic behavioral model of a multiagent system. Experiments are conducted to investigate basic characteristics of the proposed measure, using a test bed system. The results of experiments show that the proposed measure reacts quickly and increases drastically in response to abnormal changes in the system. Hence, the proposed measure is considered a measure that can be used to detect undesirable changes in a multiagent system. PMID:25897499

  3. The effect of macroscopic polarization on intrinsic and extrinsic thermal conductivities of AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedam, Vikas; Pansari, Anju; Sinha, Arvind Kumar; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The effect of macroscopic polarization on thermal conductivity of bulk wurtzite AlN has been theoretically investigated. Our results show that macroscopic polarization modifies the phonon group velocity, Debye frequency and Debye temperature of the AlN. Using revised phonon velocity and Debye temperature, various phonon scattering rates and combined scattering rate are calculated as functions of the phonon frequency at room temperature. The intrinsic and extrinsic thermal conductivities of AlN have been estimated using these modified parameters. The theoretical analysis shows that up to a certain temperature the polarization effect acts as negative effect and reduces the intrinsic and extrinsic thermal conductivities. However, after this temperature both thermal conductivities are significantly enhanced. High phonon velocity and Debye temperature are the reason of this enhancement which happens due to the polarization effect. The revised thermal conductivities at room temperature are found to be increased by more than 20% in AlN due to macroscopic polarization phenomenon. The method we have developed can be taken into account during the simulation of heat transport in optoelectronic nitride devices to minimize the self heating processes.

  4. A tract-specific framework for white matter morphometry combining macroscopic and microscopic tract features

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Awatea, Suyash P; Das, Sandhitsu R; Woo, John H; Melhem, Elias R; Gee, James C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging plays a key role in our understanding of white matter both in normal populations and in populations with brain disorders. Existing techniques focus primarily on using diffusivity-based quantities derived from diffusion tensor as surrogate measures of microstructural tissue properties of white matter. In this paper, we describe a novel tract-specific framework that enables the examination of white matter morphometry at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales. The framework leverages the skeleton-based modeling of sheet-like white matter fasciculi using the continuous medial representation, which gives a natural definition of thickness and supports its comparison across subjects. The thickness measure provides a macroscopic characterization of white matter fasciculi that complements existing analysis of microstructural features. The utility of the framework is demonstrated in quantifying white matter atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. We show that, compared to using microscopic features alone, combining the macroscopic and microscopic features gives a more complete characterization of the disease. PMID:20547469

  5. The Specific Analysis of Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roderick P.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional structural equation modeling fits a covariance structure implied by the equations of the model. This treatment of the model often gives misleading results because overall goodness of fit tests do not focus on the specific constraints implied by the model. An alternative treatment arising from Pearl's directed acyclic graph theory…

  6. Computer program performs stiffness matrix structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, R.; Batchelder, R.; Schmele, L.; Wada, B. K.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program generates the stiffness matrix for a particular type of structure from geometrical data, and performs static and normal mode analyses. It requires the structure to be modeled as a stable framework of uniform, weightless members, and joints at which loads are applied and weights are lumped.

  7. Advertising Agencies: An Analysis of Industry Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra J.

    Noting that advertising agencies have not been examined as a collective industry, this paper looks at the development and structure of the advertising agency industry. The first portion of the paper discusses the development of the agency. The remaining two sections deal with trends in and the structure of the industry including: (1) the growth of…

  8. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of polarization in the hydrogenbonded chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomchuk, P. M.; Krasnoholovets, V. V.

    1997-10-01

    The probability of macroscopic quantum tunneling of polarization in a finite H-bonded chain is treated theoretically with regard to the influence of chain anisotropy. It is shown that the anisotropy stipulated by different microscopical effects plays a major role in the tunneling rate of polarization.

  9. Stereodynamics: From elementary processes to macroscopic chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Toshio; Che, Dock-Chil; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Palazzetti, Federico; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-12-31

    This paper aims at discussing new facets on stereodynamical behaviors in chemical reactions, i.e. the effects of molecular orientation and alignment on reactive processes. Further topics on macroscopic processes involving deviations from Arrhenius behavior in the temperature dependence of chemical reactions and chirality effects in collisions are also discussed.

  10. LEAD SORPTION ON RUTHENIUM OXIDE: A MACROSCOPIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption and desorption of Pb on RuO2 xH2O were examined kinetically and thermodynamically via spectroscopic and macroscopic investigations. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to determine the sorption mechanism with regard to identity of nearest atomic neighbo...

  11. A Macroscopic Analogue of the Nuclear Pairing Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    A macroscopic system involving permanent magnets is used as an analogue to nucleons in a nucleus to illustrate the significance of the pairing interaction. This illustrates that the view of the total nuclear energy based only on the nucleon occupancy of the energy levels can yield erroneous results and it is only when the pairing interaction is…

  12. Animal bite of penis in a neonate and macroscopic repair

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Pankaj; Mukherjee, Partha P.; Ghosh, Tapan J.; Shukla, Ram M.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswanath

    2011-01-01

    We are reporting a newborn male who had injury of the penis probably due to rat bite. The baby was brought to the hospital within 3 h of the injury. The urethra was completely transected. Macroscopic repair was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 2 weeks. The patient is doing well 3 months after the operation. PMID:22121319

  13. Implementing the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm with macroscopic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, Henry; Byrnes, Tim

    2016-05-01

    Quantum computing implementations under consideration today typically deal with systems with microscopic degrees of freedom such as photons, ions, cold atoms, and superconducting circuits. The quantum information is stored typically in low-dimensional Hilbert spaces such as qubits, as quantum effects are strongest in such systems. It has, however, been demonstrated that quantum effects can be observed in mesoscopic and macroscopic systems, such as nanomechanical systems and gas ensembles. While few-qubit quantum information demonstrations have been performed with such macroscopic systems, a quantum algorithm showing exponential speedup over classical algorithms is yet to be shown. Here, we show that the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm can be implemented with macroscopic ensembles. The encoding that we use avoids the detrimental effects of decoherence that normally plagues macroscopic implementations. We discuss two mapping procedures which can be chosen depending upon the constraints of the oracle and the experiment. Both methods have an exponential speedup over the classical case, and only require control of the ensembles at the level of the total spin of the ensembles. It is shown that both approaches reproduce the qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, and are robust under decoherence.

  14. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. PMID:27389477

  15. Macroscopic switches constructed through host-guest chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Ma, Junkai; Tian, Demei; Li, Haibing

    2016-03-28

    Molecular switch systems, having been extensively studied in the solution phase, have the ability to perform with good controllability and rapid-responsiveness, making them ideally suited for the design of molecular devices for drug delivery, and information or sensing functions. Inspired by a wide range of objects with visual changes, like Mimosa pudica towards external stimuli, in order to understand molecular switches well, they must be interfaced with the macroscopic world so that they can be directly realized by visual detectable changes even observed by the naked eye. This can be critical for fabricating intelligent microfluidics and laboratory-on-chip devices, that may have wide applications in the fields of biology and materials science. But to realize this objective, especially for fabricating macroscopic surface switches, unveiling host-guest weak interactions to achieve visual phenomena is still the greatest thrill. Thankfully, surface contact angles provide us with a wonderful method to further investigate the microscopic origin of the macroscopic changes. Therefore, interfacial modification becomes a paramount process. Macrocyclic compounds, encompassing an innovative concept to deal with reversible noncovalent interactions between macrocyclic hosts and suitable guests, are good candidates for surface functionalization. In this feature article, we discuss recent developments in macroscopic contact angle switches formed by different macrocyclic hosts and highlight the properties of these new functional surfaces and their potential applications. PMID:26905834

  16. Macroscopicity and classicality of quantum fluctuations in de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, S.

    1988-08-01

    On the basis of the non-probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics, the authors define ''macroscopicity'' and ''classicality'' of quantum fluctuations as closely related but separate concepts. Then these properties are examined in quantum states (wave functions) of matter fields in de Sitter spacetime.

  17. Structural dynamics: Probabilistic structural analysis methods. Program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    A brief description is provided of the fundamental aspects of a quantification process. Progress since the last structural durability conference in 1989 is summarized. The methodology to date and that to be developed during the life of the program is presented. The uncertain factors are presented. The approach is outlined that is required to achieve component and/or system certification in the shortest possible time for affordable reliability risk. Two new elements appear in a block diagram: (1) uncertainties in human factor, and (2) uncertainties in the computer code. Research to quantify the uncertainties in the human factor was initiated and is discussed.

  18. Gecko toe and lamellar shear adhesion on macroscopic, engineered rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Henry, Amy; Lin, Hauwen; Ren, Angela; Shiuan, Kevin; Fearing, Ronald S; Full, Robert J

    2014-01-15

    The role in adhesion of the toes and lamellae - intermediate-sized structures - found on the gecko foot remains unclear. Insight into the function of these structures can lead to a more general understanding of the hierarchical nature of the gecko adhesive system, but in particular how environmental topology may relate to gecko foot morphology. We sought to discern the mechanics of the toes and lamellae by examining gecko adhesion on controlled, macroscopically rough surfaces. We used live Tokay geckos, Gekko gecko, to observe the maximum shear force a gecko foot can attain on an engineered substrate constructed with sinusoidal patterns of varying amplitudes and wavelengths in sizes similar to the dimensions of the toes and lamellae structures (0.5 to 6 mm). We found shear adhesion was significantly decreased on surfaces that had amplitudes and wavelengths approaching the lamella length and inter-lamella spacing, losing 95% of shear adhesion over the range tested. We discovered that the toes are capable of adhering to surfaces with amplitudes much larger than their dimensions even without engaging claws, maintaining 60% of shear adhesion on surfaces with amplitudes of 3 mm. Gecko adhesion can be predicted by the ratio of the lamella dimensions to surface feature dimensions. In addition to setae, remarkable macroscopic-scale features of gecko toes and lamellae that include compliance and passive conformation are necessary to maintain contact, and consequently, generate shear adhesion on macroscopically rough surfaces. Findings on the larger scale structures in the hierarchy of gecko foot function could provide the biological inspiration to drive the design of more effective and versatile synthetic fibrillar adhesives. PMID:24115057

  19. A macroscopic non-destructive testing system based on the cantilever-sample contact resonance.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji; Lin, Lizhi; Zhou, Xilong; Li, Yingwei; Li, Faxin

    2012-12-01

    Detecting the inside or buried defects in materials and structures is always a challenge in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). In this paper, enlightened by the operation principle of the contact resonance force microscopy or atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), we proposed a macroscopic NDT system based on contact resonance of the cantilever-sample surface to detect the local stiffness variations in materials or structures. We fabricated a piezoelectric unimorph with the dimension typically of 150 mm × 8 mm × 2 mm to act as a macroscopic cantilever, whose flexural mode vibration was driven by a wideband power amplifier together with a signal generator. The vibration signal of the macroscopic cantilever is detected by a high sensitive strain gauge bonded on the cantilever surface which is much more stable than the laser diode sensor in AFAM, thus making it very suitable for outdoor operations. Scanning is realized by a three-dimensional motorized stage with the Z axis for pressing force setting. The whole system is controlled by a LabVIEW-based homemade software. Like the AFAM, this NDT system can also work in two modes, i.e., the single-frequency mode and the resonance-tracking mode. In the latter mode, the contact stiffness at each pixel of the sample can be obtained by using the measured contact resonance frequency and a beam dynamics model. Testing results of this NDT system on a grid structure with an opaque panel show that in both modes the prefabricated defect beneath the panel can be detected and the grid structures can be clearly "seen," which indicates the validity of this NDT system. The sensitivity of this NDT system was also examined. PMID:23277996

  20. Reliability analysis applied to structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, P.; Payne, A. O.

    1972-01-01

    The application of reliability theory to predict, from structural fatigue test data, the risk of failure of a structure under service conditions because its load-carrying capability is progressively reduced by the extension of a fatigue crack, is considered. The procedure is applicable to both safe-life and fail-safe structures and, for a prescribed safety level, it will enable an inspection procedure to be planned or, if inspection is not feasible, it will evaluate the life to replacement. The theory has been further developed to cope with the case of structures with initial cracks, such as can occur in modern high-strength materials which are susceptible to the formation of small flaws during the production process. The method has been applied to a structure of high-strength steel and the results are compared with those obtained by the current life estimation procedures. This has shown that the conventional methods can be unconservative in certain cases, depending on the characteristics of the structure and the design operating conditions. The suitability of the probabilistic approach to the interpretation of the results from full-scale fatigue testing of aircraft structures is discussed and the assumptions involved are examined.

  1. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for space transportation propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Moore, N.; Anis, C.; Newell, J.; Nagpal, V.; Singhal, S.

    1991-01-01

    Information on probabilistic structural analysis methods for space propulsion systems is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on deterministic certification methods, probability of failure, component response analysis, stress responses for 2nd stage turbine blades, Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) structural durability, and program plans. .

  2. Digital flux-gate magnetometer structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Berkman, Rikhard

    1999-08-01

    Analogue and digital structures of the flux-gate magnetometer are compared. The main disturbing factors in digital circuit were singled out and the additional errors associated with the digital structure are estimated. The reader's attention is drawn to some specific problems associated with digital circuits - the special influence of the unbalanced voltage amplitude at the flux-gate-sensor output and ADC-DAC switching-time instabilities. The given analytical results could be useful for the designer when it is necessary to make a choice of the structural type of magnetometer.

  3. An analysis of doping modulated superlattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new method of growing doping modulated superlattice structures is discussed. This method uses organo-metallic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) with the added feature of controlled plasma in the growth regions. The main objective was to study how the growth environment affected the electronic and optical properties of the superlattice structures. Because a serious safety hazard was discovered in the growth process, no superlattice structures were fabricated and the research on this material had to be terminated. The hazard had to do with the lack of adequate means for the disposal of toxic elemental beryllium.

  4. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  5. Enabling Rapid and Robust Structural Analysis During Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Padula, Sharon L.; Li, Wu

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-year effort to add a structural analysis subprocess to a supersonic aircraft conceptual design process. The desired capabilities include parametric geometry, automatic finite element mesh generation, static and aeroelastic analysis, and structural sizing. The paper discusses implementation details of the new subprocess, captures lessons learned, and suggests future improvements. The subprocess quickly compares concepts and robustly handles large changes in wing or fuselage geometry. The subprocess can rank concepts with regard to their structural feasibility and can identify promising regions of the design space. The automated structural analysis subprocess is deemed robust and rapid enough to be included in multidisciplinary conceptual design and optimization studies.

  6. A novel CFD/structural analysis of a cross parachute

    SciTech Connect

    LaFarge, R.A.; Nelsen, J.M.; Gwinn, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    A novel CFD/structural analysis was performed to predict functionality of a cross parachute under loadings near the structural limits of the parachute. The determination of parachute functionality was based on the computed structural integrity of the canopy and suspension lines. In addition to the standard aerodynamic pressure loading on the canopy, the structural analysis considered the reduction in fabric strength due to the computed aerodynamic heating. The intent was to illustrate the feasibility of such an analysis with the commercially available software PATRAN.

  7. Cation diffusion in the interlayer space of swelling clay minerals - A combined macroscopic and microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tertre, Emmanuel; Delville, Alfred; Prêt, Dimitri; Hubert, Fabien; Ferrage, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the diffusion process of calcium cations confined in the interlayer space of 5 mm disks of vermiculite swelling clay minerals during the Na-for-Ca exchange process. Diffusion experiments were performed at four NaCl salinities (3 × 10-3, 5 × 10-2, 0.1 and 1 M) of the exchanger solution. A macroscopic analysis of the diffusion process based on the aqueous calcium concentrations released in the solution and on Ca-profiles obtained in the solid was performed using a pore diffusion model that has been classically used in the literature. The results obtained at the macroscopic scale showed that the apparent diffusion coefficients describing both aqueous and profiles data for Ca depend on the diffusion time and salinity of the aqueous reservoir. Such variations suggested that interlayer diffusion was driven by (1) the gradient of the sorbed species in the interlayer, which depends on the diffusion time due to the ion exchange equilibrium; and (2) the discontinuity, due to Donnan equilibrium, existing at the limit between the "internal disk border" and the "external disk border" in contact with the aqueous reservoir. Then, a set of molecular and Brownian dynamics simulations was used to (1) assess such interpretations and (2) quantitatively predict aqueous and profile data obtained at the macroscopic scale. For an aqueous reservoir with high salinity (1 M NaCl), a good agreement was obtained between the macroscopic data and the predictions obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations, confirming the role played by the gradient of the interlayer species that is suggested at the macroscopic scale and which is at the basis of the "surface diffusion models" published in literature. In addition, for aqueous reservoirs with lower salinity (5 × 10-2 M), the results obtained by Brownian dynamics simulations and normalized to the exchange rate measured at infinite time showed that the diffusion properties of the species in the aqueous reservoir cannot be

  8. Structures for common-cause failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Common-cause failure methodology and terminology have been reviewed and structured to provide a systematical basis for addressing and developing models and methods for quantification. The structure is based on (1) a specific set of definitions, (2) categories based on the way faults are attributable to a common cause, and (3) classes based on the time of entry and the time of elimination of the faults. The failure events are then characterized by their likelihood or frequency and the average residence time. The structure provides a basis for selecting computational models, collecting and evaluating data and assessing the importance of various failure types, and for developing effective defences against common-cause failure. The relationships of this and several other structures are described.

  9. Structural analysis of kasugamycin inhibition of translation

    PubMed Central

    Schuwirth, Barbara S; Day, J Michael; Hau, Cathy W; Janssen, Gary R; Dahlberg, Albert E; Cate, Jamie H Doudna; Vila-Sanjurjo, Antón

    2008-01-01

    The prokaryotic ribosome is an important target of antibiotic action. We determined the X-ray structure of the aminoglycoside kasugamycin (Ksg) in complex with the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome at 3.5-Å resolution. The structure reveals that the drug binds within the messenger RNA channel of the 30S subunit between the universally conserved G926 and A794 nucleotides in 16S ribosomal RNA, which are sites of Ksg resistance. To our surprise, Ksg resistance mutations do not inhibit binding of the drug to the ribosome. The present structural and biochemical results indicate that inhibition by Ksg and Ksg resistance are closely linked to the structure of the mRNA at the junction of the peptidyl-tRNA and exit-tRNA sites (P and E sites). PMID:16998486

  10. Solid Propellant Grain Structural Integrity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The structural properties of solid propellant rocket grains were studied to determine the propellant resistance to stresses. Grain geometry, thermal properties, mechanical properties, and failure modes are discussed along with design criteria and recommended practices.

  11. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-12-31

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  12. Finite element-finite difference thermal/structural analysis of large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Eskew, William F.; Rogers, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique of automated and efficient thermal-structural processing of truss structures that interfaces the finite element and finite difference method was developed. The thermal-structural analysis tasks include development of the thermal and structural math models, thermal analysis, development of an interface and data transfer between the models, and finally an evaluation of the thermal stresses and displacements in the structure. Consequently, the objective of the developed technique was to minimize the model development time, in order to assure an automatic transfer of data between the thermal and structural models as well as to minimize the computer resources needed for the analysis itself. The method and techniques described are illustrated on the thermal/structural analysis of the Space Station Freedom main truss.

  13. Condensed Antenna Structural Models for Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1985-01-01

    Condensed degree-of-freedom models are compared with large degree-of-freedom finite-element models of a representative antenna-tipping and alidade structure, for both locked and free-rotor configurations. It is shown that: (1) the effective-mass models accurately reproduce the lower-mode natural frequencies of the finite element model; (2) frequency responses for the two types of models are in agreement up to at least 16 rad/s for specific points; and (3) transient responses computed for the same points are in good agreement. It is concluded that the effective-mass model, which best represents the five lower modes of the finite-element model, is a sufficient representation of the structure for future incorporation with a total servo control structure dynamic simulation.

  14. Structural Analysis Using NX Nastran 9.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolewicz, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    NX Nastran is a powerful Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software package used to solve linear and non-linear models for structural and thermal systems. The software, which consists of both a solver and user interface, breaks down analysis into four files, each of which are important to the end results of the analysis. The software offers capabilities for a variety of types of analysis, and also contains a respectable modeling program. Over the course of ten weeks, I was trained to effectively implement NX Nastran into structural analysis and refinement for parts of two missions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the Restore mission and the Orion mission.

  15. UMAT Implementation of Coupled, Multilevel, Structural Deformation and Damage Analysis of General Hereditary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Saleeb, A. F.; Wilt, T. E.; Trowbridge, D.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been made over the years on the phenomenological representations of constitutive material behavior in the inelastic analysis and life assessment of structures composed of advanced monolithic and composite (CMC, MMC, and PMC) materials. Recently, emphasis has been placed on concurrently addressing three important and related areas of constitutive and degradation modeling; i.e. (i) mathematical formulation, (ii) algorithmic developments for the updating (integrating) of external (e.g. stress) and internal state variable, as well as (iii) parameter estimation for the characterization of the specific model. This concurrent perspective has resulted in; i) the formulation of a fully-associative viscoelastoplastic model (GVIPS), (ii) development of an efficient implicit integration and it's associative, symmetric, consistent tangent stiffness matrix algorithm for integration of the underlying rate flow/evolutionary equations, and iii) a robust, stand-alone, Constitutive Material Parameter Estimator (COMPARE) for automatically characterizing the various time-dependent, nonlinear, material models. Furthermore, to provide a robust multi-scale framework for the deformation and life analysis of structures composed of composite materials, NASA Glenn has aggressively pursued the development of a sufficiently general, accurate, and efficient micromechanics approach known as the generalized method of cells (GMC). This work has resulted in the development of MAC/GMC, a stand-alone micromechanics analysis tool that can easily and accurately design/analyze multiphase (composite) materials subjected to complex histories. MAC/GMC admits generalized, physically based, deformation and damage models for each constituent and provides "closed-form" expressions for the macroscopic composite response in terms of the properties, size, shape, distribution, and response of the individual constituents or phases that comprise the material. Consequently, MAC/GMC can

  16. Total-System Approach To Design And Analysis Of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1995-01-01

    Paper presents overview and study of, and comprehensive approach to, multidisciplinary engineering design and analysis of structures. Emphasizes issues related to design of semistatic structures in environments in which spacecraft launched, underlying concepts applicable to other structures within unique terrestrial, marine, or flight environments. Purpose of study to understand interactions among traditionally separate engineering design disciplines with view toward optimizing not only structure but also overall design process.

  17. Macroscopic manifestations of broken inversion symmetry in noncentrosymmetric superconductors with applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Masatosi; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2007-03-01

    We numerically investigate paramagnetic properties in noncentrosymmetric superconductors under applied magnetic fields, based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory including the Pauli paramagnetic effect and the Rashba interaction. When an applied field is perpendicular to the polar axis, the paramagnetic effect breaks centrosymmetry in the Meissner state and cylindrical symmetry in the vortices, as macroscopic manifestations of broken inversion symmetry in the spatial structures of the screening current and the penetrating field. The paramagnetic supercurrent exists even at the vortex center by their asymmetric properties, therefore the flux flow is spontaneously induced without applying external currents.

  18. Cognitive Diagnostic Analysis Using Hierarchically Structured Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Yu-Lan

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation proposes two modified cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs), the deterministic, inputs, noisy, "and" gate with hierarchy (DINA-H) model and the deterministic, inputs, noisy, "or" gate with hierarchy (DINO-H) model. Both models incorporate the hierarchical structures of the cognitive skills in the model estimation…

  19. Theses "Discussion" Sections: A Structural Move Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani; Khakbaz, Nafiseh

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed at finding the probable differences between the move structure of Iranian MA graduates' thesis discussion subgenres and those of their non-Iranian counterparts, on the one hand, and those of journal paper authors, on the other. It also aimed at identifying the moves that are considered obligatory, conventional, or optional…

  20. Food web structure of sandy beaches: Temporal and spatial variation using stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamino, Leandro; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2011-03-01

    The food web structure of two sandy beach ecosystems with contrasting morphodynamics (dissipative vs. reflective) was examined using stable carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotope analysis. Organic matter sources (POM: particulate organic matter; SOM: sediment organic matter) and consumers (zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and fishes) were sampled seasonally in both sandy beaches. Food webs significantly differed between beaches: even though both webs were mainly supported by POM, depleted δ 13C and δ 15N values for food sources and consumers were found in the dissipative system (following the reverse pattern in δ 13C values for consumers) for all the four seasons. Primary consumers (zooplankton and benthic invertebrates) use different organic matter sources on each beach and these differences are propagated up in the food web. The higher productivity found in the dissipative beach provided a significant amount of food for primary consumers, notably suspension feeders. Thus, the dissipative beach supported a more complex food web with more trophic links and a higher number of prey and top predators than the reflective beach. Morphodynamic factors could explain the contrasting differences in food web structure. The high degree of retention (nutrients and phytoplankton) recorded for the surf zone of the dissipative beach would result in the renewed accumulation of POM that sustains a more diverse and richer fauna than the reflective beach. Further studies directed to assess connections between the macroscopic food web, the surf-zone microbial loop and the interstitial compartment will provide a deeper understanding on the functioning of sandy beach ecosystems.

  1. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  2. Structure network analysis to gain insights into GPCR function.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Francesca; Felline, Angelo; Raimondi, Francesco; Seeber, Michele

    2016-04-15

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are allosteric proteins whose functioning fundamentals are the communication between the two poles of the helix bundle. Protein structure network (PSN) analysis is one of the graph theory-based approaches currently used to investigate the structural communication in biomolecular systems. Information on system's dynamics can be provided by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations or coarse grained elastic network models paired with normal mode analysis (ENM-NMA). The present review article describes the application of PSN analysis to uncover the structural communication in G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Strategies to highlight changes in structural communication upon misfolding, dimerization and activation are described. Focus is put on the ENM-NMA-based strategy applied to the crystallographic structures of rhodopsin in its inactive (dark) and signalling active (meta II (MII)) states, highlighting changes in structure network and centrality of the retinal chromophore in differentiating the inactive and active states of the receptor. PMID:27068978

  3. Application of structured analysis to a telerobotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dashman, Eric; Mclin, David; Harrison, F. W.; Soloway, Donald; Young, Steven

    1990-01-01

    The analysis and evaluation of a multiple arm telerobotic research and demonstration system developed by the NASA Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL) is described. Structured analysis techniques were used to develop a detailed requirements model of an existing telerobotic testbed. Performance models generated during this process were used to further evaluate the total system. A commercial CASE tool called Teamwork was used to carry out the structured analysis and development of the functional requirements model. A structured analysis and design process using the ISRL telerobotic system as a model is described. Evaluation of this system focused on the identification of bottlenecks in this implementation. The results demonstrate that the use of structured methods and analysis tools can give useful performance information early in a design cycle. This information can be used to ensure that the proposed system meets its design requirements before it is built.

  4. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  5. Advancing multiscale structural mapping of the brain through fluorescence imaging and analysis across length scales.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, L J; Guo, S M; Murugadoss, K; Bathe, M

    2016-02-01

    Brain function emerges from hierarchical neuronal structure that spans orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nanometre-scale organization of synaptic proteins to the macroscopic wiring of neuronal circuits. Because the synaptic electrochemical signal transmission that drives brain function ultimately relies on the organization of neuronal circuits, understanding brain function requires an understanding of the principles that determine hierarchical neuronal structure in living or intact organisms. Recent advances in fluorescence imaging now enable quantitative characterization of neuronal structure across length scales, ranging from single-molecule localization using super-resolution imaging to whole-brain imaging using light-sheet microscopy on cleared samples. These tools, together with correlative electron microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the nanoscopic and macroscopic scales, respectively, now facilitate our ability to probe brain structure across its full range of length scales with cellular and molecular specificity. As these imaging datasets become increasingly accessible to researchers, novel statistical and computational frameworks will play an increasing role in efforts to relate hierarchical brain structure to its function. In this perspective, we discuss several prominent experimental advances that are ushering in a new era of quantitative fluorescence-based imaging in neuroscience along with novel computational and statistical strategies that are helping to distil our understanding of complex brain structure. PMID:26855758

  6. Structure coefficients for use in stellar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnlek, Gülay; Budding, Edwin

    2012-12-01

    We present new values of the structural coefficients η j , and related quantities, for realistic models of distorted stars in close binary systems. Our procedure involves numerical integration of Radau's equation for detailed structural data and we verified our technique by referring to the 8-digit results of Brooker & Olle (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 115:101, 1955) for purely mathematical models. We provide tables of representative values of η j , and related quantities, for j=2,3,…,7 for a selection of Zero Age Stellar Main Sequence (ZAMS) stellar models taken from the EZWeb compilation of the Dept. of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. We include also some preliminary comparisons of our findings with the results of Claret and Gimenez (Astron. Astrophys. 519:A57 2010) for some observed stars.

  7. Finite-Element Modeling For Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents study of finite-element mathematical modeling as used in analyzing stresses and strains at joints between thin, shell-like components (e.g., ducts) and thicker components (e.g., flanges or engine blocks). First approach uses global/local model to evaluate system. Provides correct total response and correct representation of stresses away from any discontinuities. Second approach involves development of special transition finite elements to model transitions between shells and thicker structural components.

  8. Truncated Moment Analysis of Nucleon Structure Functions

    SciTech Connect

    A. Psaker; W. Melnitchouk; M. E. Christy; C. E. Keppel

    2007-11-16

    We employ a novel new approach using "truncated" moments, or integrals of structure functions over restricted regions of x, to study local quark-hadron duality, and the degree to which individual resonance regions are dominated by leading twists. Because truncated moments obey the same Q^2 evolution equations as the leading twist parton distributions, this approach makes possible for the first time a description of resonance region data and the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality directly from QCD.

  9. Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-29

    P-CARES 2.0.0, Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures, was developed for NRC staff use to determine the validity and accuracy of the analysis methods used by various utilities for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. P-CARES provides the capability to effectively evaluate the probabilistic seismic response using simplified soil and structural models and to quickly check the validity and/or accuracy of the SSI data received from applicants and licensees. The code ismore » organized in a modular format with the basic modules of the system performing static, seismic, and nonlinear analysis.« less

  10. Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, JIM

    2007-03-29

    P-CARES 2.0.0, Probabilistic Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures, was developed for NRC staff use to determine the validity and accuracy of the analysis methods used by various utilities for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. P-CARES provides the capability to effectively evaluate the probabilistic seismic response using simplified soil and structural models and to quickly check the validity and/or accuracy of the SSI data received from applicants and licensees. The code is organized in a modular format with the basic modules of the system performing static, seismic, and nonlinear analysis.

  11. Nonclassicality tests and entanglement witnesses for macroscopic mechanical superposition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gittsovich, Oleg; Moroder, Tobias; Asadian, Ali; Gühne, Otfried; Rabl, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We describe a set of measurement protocols for performing nonclassicality tests and the verification of entangled superposition states of macroscopic continuous variable systems, such as nanomechanical resonators. Following earlier works, we first consider a setup where a two-level system is used to indirectly probe the motion of the mechanical system via Ramsey measurements and discuss the application of this method for detecting nonclassical mechanical states. We then show that the generalization of this technique to multiple resonator modes allows the conditioned preparation and the detection of entangled mechanical superposition states. The proposed measurement protocols can be implemented in various qubit-resonator systems that are currently under experimental investigation and find applications in future tests of quantum mechanics at a macroscopic scale.

  12. Wave speeds in the macroscopic extended model for ultrarelativistic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Borghero, F.; Demontis, F.; Pennisi, S.

    2013-11-15

    Equations determining wave speeds for a model of ultrarelativistic gases are investigated. This model is already present in literature; it deals with an arbitrary number of moments and it was proposed in the context of exact macroscopic approaches in Extended Thermodynamics. We find these results: the whole system for the determination of the wave speeds can be divided into independent subsystems which are expressed by linear combinations, through scalar coefficients, of tensors all of the same order; some wave speeds, but not all of them, are expressed by square roots of rational numbers; finally, we prove that these wave speeds for the macroscopic model are the same of those furnished by the kinetic model.

  13. Macroscopically Separated Gaps in Dimer Coverings of Aztec Rectangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciucu, Mihai

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we determine the interaction of diagonal defect clusters in regions of an Aztec rectangle that scale to arbitrary points on its symmetry axis (in earlier work we treated the case when this point was the center of the scaled Aztec rectangle). We use the resulting formulas to determine the asymptotics of the correlation of defects that are macroscopically separated from one another and feel the influence of the boundary. In several of the treated situations this seems not to be accomplishable by previous methods. Our applications include the case of two long neutral strings, which turn out to interact by an analog of the Casimir force, two families of neutral doublets that turn out to interact completely independently of one another, a neutral doublet and a very long neutral string, a general collection of macroscopically separated monomer and separation defects, and the case of long strings consisting of consecutive monomers.

  14. Macroscopic Modeling of In Vivo Drug Transport in Electroporated Tissue.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Bradley; Becker, Sid

    2016-03-01

    This study develops a macroscopic model of mass transport in electroporated biological tissue in order to predict the cellular drug uptake. The change in the macroscopic mass transport coefficient is related to the increase in electrical conductivity resulting from the applied electric field. Additionally, the model considers the influences of both irreversible electroporation (IRE) and the transient resealing of the cell membrane associated with reversible electroporation. Two case studies are conducted to illustrate the applicability of this model by comparing transport associated with two electrode arrangements: side-by-side arrangement and the clamp arrangement. The results show increased drug transmission to viable cells is possible using the clamp arrangement due to the more uniform electric field. PMID:26720199

  15. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations.

    PubMed

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems. PMID:25019705

  16. Macroscopic view of light pressure on a continuous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, M. V.; Kondratov, A. V.

    2013-07-01

    The ambiguity of the macroscopic description of light pressure on a continuous medium originates from the uncertainty of dividing the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetically excited matter into a material and field parts or, equivalently, the total acting force into pressure and deformation terms. We show that, although there exists a continuum of formally correct formulations, one can adopt the appropriate form of the macroscopic field stress tensor that allows a unified description of pressure during elementary light-matter interactions, such as reflection, refraction, absorption, and nonlinear conversion. The derived simple expressions for the pressure force are compatible with the polariton momentum ℏk. The corresponding relation for the electromagnetic momentum density generalizes Rytov's definition for right-handed and left-handed frequency dispersive media.

  17. From 1D to 3D - macroscopic nanowire aerogel monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Rechberger, Felix; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying.Here we present a strategy to assemble one-dimensional nanostructures into a three-dimensional architecture with macroscopic size. With the assistance of centrifugation, we successfully gel ultrathin W18O49 nanowires with diameters of 1 to 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 into 3D networks, which are transformed into monolithic aerogels by supercritical drying. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM and TEM images, and digital photographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04429h

  18. Probabilistic Metrology Attains Macroscopic Cloning of Quantum Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendra, B.; Calsamiglia, J.; Muñoz-Tapia, R.; Bagan, E.; Chiribella, G.

    2014-12-01

    It has recently been shown that probabilistic protocols based on postselection boost the performances of the replication of quantum clocks and phase estimation. Here we demonstrate that the improvements in these two tasks have to match exactly in the macroscopic limit where the number of clones grows to infinity, preserving the equivalence between asymptotic cloning and state estimation for arbitrary values of the success probability. Remarkably, the cloning fidelity depends critically on the number of rationally independent eigenvalues of the clock Hamiltonian. We also prove that probabilistic metrology can simulate cloning in the macroscopic limit for arbitrary sets of states when the performance of the simulation is measured by testing small groups of clones.

  19. Macroscopic impacts of cloud and precipitation processes in shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Wojciech; Slawinska, Joanna; Pawlowska, Hanna; Wyszogrodzki, Andrzej

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents application of the EULAG model combined with a sophisticated double-moment warm-rain microphysics scheme to the model intercomparison case based on RICO (Rain in Cumulus over Ocean) field observations. As the simulations progress, the cloud field gradually deepens and a relatively sharp temperature and moisture inversions develop in the lower troposphere. Two contrasting aerosol environments are considered, referred to as pristine and polluted, together with two contrasting subgridscale mixing scenarios, the homogeneous and the extremely inhomogeneous mixing. Pristine and polluted environments feature mean cloud droplet concentrations around 40 and 150 mg-1, respectively, and large differences in the rain characteristics. Various measures are used to contrast evolution of macroscopic cloud field characteristics, such as the mean cloud fraction, the mean cloud width, or the height of the center of mass of the cloud field, among others. Macroscopic characteristics appear similar regardless of the aerosol characteristics or the homogeneity of the subgrid-scale mixing.

  20. Novel Synthesis and Structural Analysis of Ferrihydrite

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stacey J.; Page, Katharine; Kim, Hyunjeong; Campbell, Branton J.; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Woodfield, Brian F.

    2012-07-25

    Naturally occurring ferrihydrite is both impure and difficult to isolate, so the numerous applications and interesting properties of ferrihydrite have spurred the development of various synthetic techniques. Nearly all techniques are based on the hydrolysis of an iron salt and require careful control of temperature, pH, and concentration. In this Article, we report a new synthetic method which does not require such control and is perhaps the fastest and simplest route to synthesizing ferrhydrite. XRD, TEM, BET, and chemical purity characterizations show that the chemically pure, 2-line ferrihydrite product consists of crystallites 2-6 nm in diameter which aggregate to form mesoporous, high surface area agglomerates that are attractive candidates for the many adsorption applications of ferrihydrite. X-ray PDF data were also collected for the ferrihydrite product and refined against the hexagonal structural model recently proposed by Michel et al. These analyses suggest that ferrihydrite has a consistent, repeatable structure independent of variation in the synthetic method, water content of the sample, or particle size of the crystallites, and this structure can be adequately described by the proposed hexagonal model.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  2. Fission barriers in a macroscopic-microscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolski, A.; Pomorski, K.; Bartel, J.

    2007-02-15

    In the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model, this study investigates fission barriers in the region of actinide nuclei. A very effective four-dimensional shape parametrization for fissioning nuclei is proposed. Taking, in particular, the left-right mass asymmetric and nonaxial shapes into account is demonstrated to have a substantial effect on fission barrier heights. The influence of proton versus neutron deformation differences on the potential energy landscape of fissioning nuclei is also discussed.

  3. Fast Analytical Methods for Macroscopic Electrostatic Models in Biomolecular Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenli; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We review recent developments of fast analytical methods for macroscopic electrostatic calculations in biological applications, including the Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) and the generalized Born models for electrostatic solvation energy. The focus is on analytical approaches for hybrid solvation models, especially the image charge method for a spherical cavity, and also the generalized Born theory as an approximation to the PB model. This review places much emphasis on the mathematical details behind these methods. PMID:23745011

  4. Macroscopic superposition of ultracold atoms with orbital degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-March, M. A.; Carr, L. D.; Dounas-Frazer, D. R.

    2011-04-15

    We introduce higher dimensions into the problem of Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential, taking into account orbital angular momentum. We completely characterize the eigenstates of this system, delineating new regimes via both analytical high-order perturbation theory and numerical exact diagonalization. Among these regimes are mixed Josephson- and Fock-like behavior, crossings in both excited and ground states, and shadows of macroscopic superposition states.

  5. Quantitatively Resolving Multivalent Interactions on Macroscopic Scale Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongzheng; Yang, Haopeng; Wang, Yuhong; Xu, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent interactions remain difficult to be characterized and consequently controlled, particularly on a macroscopic scale. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we have resolved the single-, double-, and triple- biotin—streptavidin interactions, multivalent DNA interactions and CXCL12-CXCR4 interactions, on millimetre-scale surfaces. Our results establish FIRMS as a viable method for systematic resolution and controlled formation of multivalent interactions. PMID:26864087

  6. Optical detection of the Casimir force between macroscopic objects.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Victor; Petrov, Mikhail; Bryksin, Valeriy; Petter, Juergen; Tschudi, Theo

    2006-11-01

    We report the optical detection of mechanical deformation of a macroscopic object induced by the Casimir force. An adaptive holographic interferometer based on a photorefractive BaTiO3:Co crystal was used to measure periodical nonlinear deformations of a thin pellicle caused by an oscillating Casimir force. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the first and second harmonics of the Casimir force oscillations has been obtained. PMID:17041670

  7. Macroscopic vacuum effects in an inhomogeneous and nonstationary electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'tsov, D.V.; Nikitina, N.S.

    1983-04-01

    Macroscopic effects of vacuum polarization by a strong nonuniform and nonstationary fields, which are kinematically forbidden in the case of a uniform magnetic field, are considered. Calculations are perfomed for the deflection of a light beam in the field of a magnetic dipole, for the production of photon pairs by an inclined rotator, and for doubling and modulation of the frequency in scattering of low-frequency electromagnetic waves by the magnetic field of an inclined rotator.

  8. Macroscopic Segregation and Stress Corrosion Cracking in 7xxx Series Aluminum Alloy Arc Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, Tyler E.; McAllister, Donald P.; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Arc welds of Al-Zn-Mg alloy with Al-Mg filler wire have shown a preferential macroscopic segregation of Mg and Zn to the weld toes. Islands of large precipitates, which are observed in those solute-enriched weld toes, are identified as T phase (Mg32(Al,Zn)49) using diffraction pattern analysis. The location of T precipitates consistently coincides with the initiation site for stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, it is hypothesized that they induce the crack initiation due to preferential dissolution.

  9. Field-induced macroscopic barrier model for persistent photoconductivity in nanocrystalline oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun-Sik; Jeon, Sanghun

    2014-03-01

    Persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in nanocrystalline InZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) was studied using carrier fluctuation measurements and transient analysis. Low-frequency noise measurements and decay kinetics indicate that the band bending by the external field together with the ionized oxygen vacancy (Vo++) generated during the light exposure is the main cause of the PPC phenomenon. Based on these observations, a field-induced macroscopic barrier model is proposed as the origin of PPC for InZnO TFTs. In particular, this model explains that the carrier separation between e and Vo++ is induced by the external field applied to the three electrodes inside the transistor.

  10. The mirrors model: macroscopic diffusion without noise or chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiffaudel, Yann; Lefevere, Raphaël

    2016-03-01

    Before stating our main result, we first clarify through classical examples the status of the laws of macroscopic physics as laws of large numbers. We next consider the mirrors model in a finite d-dimensional domain and connected to particles reservoirs at fixed chemical potentials. The dynamics is purely deterministic and non-ergodic but takes place in a random environment. We study the macroscopic current of particles in the stationary regime. We show first that when the size of the system goes to infinity, the behaviour of the stationary current of particles is governed by the proportion of orbits crossing the system. This allows us to formulate a necessary and sufficient condition on the distribution of the set of orbits that ensures the validity of Fick’s law. Using this approach, we show that Fick’s law relating the stationary macroscopic current of particles to the concentration difference holds in three dimensions and above. The negative correlations between crossing orbits play a key role in the argument.

  11. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Caroline A; McGrew, William C

    2014-06-01

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods applied include rating food-items using a scale of abundance, estimating their percentage volume, and weighing food-items. However, verification as to whether or not composition data differ, depending on which quantification method is used during macroscopic inspection, has not been done. We analyzed feces collected from ten adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Kanyawara community in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We compare dietary composition totals obtained from using different quantification methods and ascertain if sieve mesh size influences totals calculated. Finally, this study validates findings from direct observation of feeding by the same individuals from whom the fecal samples had been collected. Contrasting diet composition totals obtained by using different quantification methods and sieve mesh sizes can influence folivory and frugivory estimates. However, our findings were based on the assumption that fibrous matter contained pith and leaf fragments only, which remains to be verified. We advocate macroscopic inspection of feces can be a valuable tool to provide a generalized overview of dietary composition for primate populations. As most populations remain unhabituated, scrutinizing and validating indirect measures are important if they are to be applied to further understand inter- and intra-species dietary variation. PMID:24482001

  12. Macroscopic character of composite high-temperature superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Spivak, B.

    2015-11-01

    The "d -wave" symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact [J. Tsuei and J. R. Kirtley, Rev. Mod. Phys. 72, 969 (2000), 10.1103/RevModPhys.72.969 and D. J. Vanharlingen, Rev. Mod. Phys. 67, 515 (1995), 10.1103/RevModPhys.67.515], and one which identifies them as "unconventional." However, in macroscopic contexts—including many potential applications (i.e., superconducting "wires")—the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. [See, e.g., D. C. Larbalestier et al., Nat. Mater. 13, 375 (2014), 10.1038/nmat3887, A. P. Malozemoff, MRS Bull. 36, 601 (2011), 10.1557/mrs.2011.160, and K. Heine et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 55, 2441 (1989), 10.1063/1.102295] Here we analyze the physics at length scales that are large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While X Y -superconducting glass order and macroscopic d -wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances—especially when the d -wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix—the most likely order has global s -wave symmetry.

  13. Modeling tumor cell migration: From microscopic to macroscopic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroulers, Christophe; Aubert, Marine; Badoual, Mathilde; Grammaticos, Basil

    2009-03-01

    It has been shown experimentally that contact interactions may influence the migration of cancer cells. Previous works have modelized this thanks to stochastic, discrete models (cellular automata) at the cell level. However, for the study of the growth of real-size tumors with several million cells, it is best to use a macroscopic model having the form of a partial differential equation (PDE) for the density of cells. The difficulty is to predict the effect, at the macroscopic scale, of contact interactions that take place at the microscopic scale. To address this, we use a multiscale approach: starting from a very simple, yet experimentally validated, microscopic model of migration with contact interactions, we derive a macroscopic model. We show that a diffusion equation arises, as is often postulated in the field of glioma modeling, but it is nonlinear because of the interactions. We give the explicit dependence of diffusivity on the cell density and on a parameter governing cell-cell interactions. We discuss in detail the conditions of validity of the approximations used in the derivation, and we compare analytic results from our PDE to numerical simulations and to some in vitro experiments. We notice that the family of microscopic models we started from includes as special cases some kinetically constrained models that were introduced for the study of the physics of glasses, supercooled liquids, and jamming systems.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H. .

    2005-07-01

    Several of the new generation nuclear power plant designs have structural configurations which are proposed to be deeply embedded. Since current seismic analysis methodologies have been applied to shallow embedded structures (e.g., ASCE 4 suggest that simple formulations may be used to model embedment effect when the depth of embedment is less than 30% of its foundation radius), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a program at the Brookhaven National Laboratory with the objective of investigating the extent to which procedures acceptable for shallow embedment depths are adequate for larger embedment depths. This paper presents the results of a study comparing the response spectra obtained from two of the more popular analysis methods for structural configurations varying from shallow embedment to complete embedment. A typical safety related structure embedded in a soil profile representative of a typical nuclear power plant site was utilized in the study and the depths of burial (DOB) considered range from 25-100% the height of the structure. Included in the paper are: (1) the description of a simplified analysis and a detailed approach for the SSI analyses of a structure with various DOB, (2) the comparison of the analysis results for the different DOBs between the two methods, and (3) the performance assessment of the analysis methodologies for SSI analyses of deeply embedded structures. The resulting assessment from this study has indicated that simplified methods may be capable of capturing the seismic response for much deeper embedded structures than would be normally allowed by the standard practice.

  15. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  16. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact.

  17. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  18. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  19. Turbine blade structural dynamic analysis. [for space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents structural dynamic analysis and test results for the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blades. Athough these blades are designed to avoid coincidence of natural frequencies with harmonic excitation forces, the complexity of the turbine hardware, its nonlinearities and lack of information regarding the forcing function have led to fatigue failures. A comparison of single-blade analysis and test modal frequencies, shapes, and stresses is given; analysis techniques to describe the forcing function, compute dynamic responses, and incorporate the nonlinearities of Coulomb-friction dampers are presented. Recommendations are made for new research to improve forcing function computations and structural damping estimates used in the analysis.

  20. Evaluation of structural integrity using integrated testing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppolino, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An integrated approach to dynamic testing and mathematical model analysis is described. The overall approach addresses four key tasks, namely, pretest planning and analysis, test data acquisition, data reduction and analysis, and test/analysis correlation and mathematical model updates. Several key software programs are employed to accomplish this task. They are a leading finite element code, a sophisticated data analysis processor and a graphical pre- and post-processor along with an advanced interface utility. Several practical structures are used to illustrate tools and concepts employed in the integrated test analysis process.

  1. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved. PMID:25823584

  2. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  3. FOXFET structure — device modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Križaj, Dejan; Bonvicini, Walter; Amon, Slavko

    1997-02-01

    A FOXFET structure for biasing AC coupled detector structures has been analyzed by a two-dimensional device simulation. For this purpose, a floating strip junction with zero current boundary condition has been applied. The floating strip voltage increase is analyzed from depletion layer spreading through three charge regions: electron accumulation surface region, hole current flow region and depleted bulk region. As a result, the floating strip potential increases approximately as the square root of the drain/backside reverse voltage. Strip potential saturation is observed for oxide charge densities larger than 5 × 10 11 cm -2 and results in a weaker gate control and oxide thickness influence. Current conduction mechanisms are critically discussed and drift-diffusion injection from the floating strip junction is proposed instead of the thermionic emission model. Strip potential increase by an additionally injected strip current is due to the effect of space-charge-limited-current (SCLC) for an injected strip current larger than approximately 10 -9 A/μm. The dynamic resistance calculated from numerically obtained strip current/voltage curves has a slope of 0.85 for a lower injected strip current ( Is<10 -10 A/ μm) and decreases to 0.6 for a larger one.

  4. Analysis of hyperfine structure in photoassociation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeman, T.

    2008-05-01

    The low Doppler width in photoassociation spectra from cold atoms makes hyperfine structure clearly visible, especially with heavier alkali atoms. Recently the focus has been on photoassociation to weakly bound dimers [1,2]. However there are also useful data on somewhat more deeply bound levels [2] for which a different coupling scheme is appropriate. Following [3], we use a F = J + I representation, and develop a transformation between this and the usual case e representation which applies at asymptotically large internuclear distance. We hope to model and assign hyperfine structure in φ = 1 states, using appropriate ground and excited state wavefunctions. To obtain eigenvalues from very large DVR matrices, we use a ``stepwise diagonalization'' procedure, which appears to be more efficient than standard sparse matrix methods. [1] E. Tiesinga et al. PRA 71, 052703 (2005); K. M. Jones et al, RMP 78, 483 (2006). [2] Data on Rb2 from J. Qi, D. Wang, Y. Huang, H. Pechkis, E. Eyler, P. Gould, W. C. Stwalley, C. C. Tsai and D.J. Heinzen; Data on RbCs from A. J. Kerman, J. M. Sage, S. Sainis and D. DeMille. [3] B. Gao, PRA 54, 2022 (1996).

  5. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  6. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of discrete structural systems: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Haftka, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for calculating sensitivity derivatives for discrete structural systems are surveyed, primarily covering literature published during the past two decades. Methods are described for calculating derivatives of static displacements and stresses, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, transient structural response, and derivatives of optimum structural designs with respect to problem parameters. The survey is focused on publications addressed to structural analysis, but also includes a number of methods developed in nonstructural fields such as electronics, controls, and physical chemistry which are directly applicable to structural problems. Most notable among the nonstructural-based methods are the adjoint variable technique from control theory, and the Green's function and FAST methods from physical chemistry.

  8. Statistical energy analysis of complex structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for estimating the structural vibration properties of complex systems in high frequency environments was investigated. The structure analyzed was the Materials Experiment Assembly, (MEA), which is a portion of the OST-2A payload for the space transportation system. Statistical energy analysis (SEA) techniques were used to model the structure and predict the structural element response to acoustic excitation. A comparison of the intial response predictions and measured acoustic test data is presented. The conclusions indicate that: the SEA predicted the response of primary structure to acoustic excitation over a wide range of frequencies; and the contribution of mechanically induced random vibration to the total MEA is not significant.

  9. Reliability analysis of structures under periodic proof tests in service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.-N.

    1976-01-01

    A reliability analysis of structures subjected to random service loads and periodic proof tests treats gust loads and maneuver loads as random processes. Crack initiation, crack propagation, and strength degradation are treated as the fatigue process. The time to fatigue crack initiation and ultimate strength are random variables. Residual strength decreases during crack propagation, so that failure rate increases with time. When a structure fails under periodic proof testing, a new structure is built and proof-tested. The probability of structural failure in service is derived from treatment of all the random variables, strength degradations, service loads, proof tests, and the renewal of failed structures. Some numerical examples are worked out.

  10. Seismic Response Analysis and Design of Structure with Base Isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, Peter

    2010-05-21

    The paper reports the study on seismic response and energy distribution of a multi-story civil structure. The nonlinear analysis used the 2003 Bam earthquake acceleration record as the excitation input to the structural model. The displacement response was analyzed in time domain and in frequency domain. The displacement and its derivatives result energy components. The energy distribution in each story provides useful information for the structural upgrade with help of added devices. The objective is the structural displacement response minimization. The application of the structural seismic response research is presented in base-isolation example.

  11. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  12. Development of advanced structural analysis methodologies for predicting widespread fatigue damage in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA is developing a 'tool box' that includes a number of advanced structural analysis computer codes which, taken together, represent the comprehensive fracture mechanics capability required to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage. These structural analysis tools have complementary and specialized capabilities ranging from a finite-element-based stress-analysis code for two- and three-dimensional built-up structures with cracks to a fatigue and fracture analysis code that uses stress-intensity factors and material-property data found in 'look-up' tables or from equations. NASA is conducting critical experiments necessary to verify the predictive capabilities of the codes, and these tests represent a first step in the technology-validation and industry-acceptance processes. NASA has established cooperative programs with aircraft manufacturers to facilitate the comprehensive transfer of this technology by making these advanced structural analysis codes available to industry.

  13. RBS analysis of heteroepitaxial layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagmeyer, R.

    1992-05-01

    Rutherford backscattering and channeling of energetic ions is applied to III-V semiconductor epitaxial systems. Grazing incidence RBS is employed to observed in-depth profiles of chemical composition, especially the well width Lz, of AlGaAs/GaAs and InGaAs/InP single quantum well (SQW) structures. In case of highly lattice-mismatched materials, RBS/channeling analyses reveal the pseudomorphic or relaxed state of the corresponding crystal lattices. Some new aspects in determining the elastic strain and in locating the misfit dislocation array in InGaAs/GaAs single heterostructures and superlattices are discussed. Finally, attention is drawn to the "internal" lattice distortion in epilayers of pseudobinary alloys, and the high sensibility of dechanneling to the intrinsic atomic displacements is demonstrated.

  14. Pore structure analysis of American coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, D.P.; Smith, D.M.; Stermer, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The pore structure of 19 American coals, representing a wide range of rank and geographic origin, has been studied via gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry, helium displacement and NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Nitrogen adsorption at 77 K was used to determine surface area in the pore range of r/sub p/ > approx. = 1nm and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K was used to obtain the total surface area. Porosimetry results were complicated by inter-particle void filling, surface roughness/porosity and sample compression. By employing a range of particle sizes, information concerning the relative magnitude of these mechanisms was ascertained as a function of pressure. Spin-lattice relaxation measurements of water contained in saturated coal were used to find pore size distributions over a broad range of T/sub 1/, the spin-lattice relaxation time. Good qualitative agreement was obtained between these measurements and gas adsorption/condensation results. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Microfabricated structures for integrated DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, M A; Mastrangelo, C H; Sammarco, T S; Man, F P; Webster, J R; Johnsons, B N; Foerster, B; Jones, D; Fields, Y; Kaiser, A R; Burke, D T

    1996-01-01

    Photolithographic micromachining of silicon is a candidate technology for the construction of high-throughput DNA analysis devices. However, the development of complex silicon microfabricated systems has been hindered in part by the lack of a simple, versatile pumping method for integrating individual components. Here we describe a surface-tension-based pump able to move discrete nanoliter drops through enclosed channels using only local heating. This thermocapillary pump can accurately mix, measure, and divide drops by simple electronic control. In addition, we have constructed thermal-cycling chambers, gel electrophoresis channels, and radiolabeled DNA detectors that are compatible with the fabrication of thermocapillary pump channels. Since all of the components are made by conventional photolithographic techniques, they can be assembled into more complex integrated systems. The combination of pump and components into self-contained miniaturized devices may provide significant improvements in DNA analysis speed, portability, and cost. The potential of microfabricated systems lies in the low unit cost of silicon-based construction and in the efficient sample handling afforded by component integration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643614

  16. Sensitivity Analysis for Coupled Aero-structural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunta, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for calculating gradients of aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for an aeroelastic aircraft model. This method uses the Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) to account for the aero-structural coupling, and a reduced-order modal analysis approach to condense the coupling bandwidth between the aerodynamic and structural models. Parallel computing is applied to reduce the computational expense of the numerous high fidelity aerodynamic analyses needed for the coupled aero-structural system. Good agreement is obtained between aerodynamic force and moment gradients computed with the GSE/modal analysis approach and the same quantities computed using brute-force, computationally expensive, finite difference approximations. A comparison between the computational expense of the GSE/modal analysis method and a pure finite difference approach is presented. These results show that the GSE/modal analysis approach is the more computationally efficient technique if sensitivity analysis is to be performed for two or more aircraft design parameters.

  17. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for select space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Cruse, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project developed at the Southwest Research Institute integrates state-of-the-art structural analysis techniques with probability theory for the design and analysis of complex large-scale engineering structures. An advanced efficient software system (NESSUS) capable of performing complex probabilistic analysis has been developed. NESSUS contains a number of software components to perform probabilistic analysis of structures. These components include: an expert system, a probabilistic finite element code, a probabilistic boundary element code and a fast probability integrator. The NESSUS software system is shown. An expert system is included to capture and utilize PSAM knowledge and experience. NESSUS/EXPERT is an interactive menu-driven expert system that provides information to assist in the use of the probabilistic finite element code NESSUS/FEM and the fast probability integrator (FPI). The expert system menu structure is summarized. The NESSUS system contains a state-of-the-art nonlinear probabilistic finite element code, NESSUS/FEM, to determine the structural response and sensitivities. A broad range of analysis capabilities and an extensive element library is present.

  18. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  19. A Family Structure Approach to the Analysis of Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuby, Richard G.

    A typological approach to the analysis of poverty, based on selected characteristics of family structure, is suggested since the family unit is a concrete or actual structure in society, and much of the research and many of the action programs of the war on poverty have implicitly invoked some concept of the family. The typology of family…

  20. An expert system for integrated structural analysis and design optimization for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    The results of a research study on the development of an expert system for integrated structural analysis and design optimization is presented. An Object Representation Language (ORL) was developed first in conjunction with a rule-based system. This ORL/AI shell was then used to develop expert systems to provide assistance with a variety of structural analysis and design optimization tasks, in conjunction with procedural modules for finite element structural analysis and design optimization. The main goal of the research study was to provide expertise, judgment, and reasoning capabilities in the aerospace structural design process. This will allow engineers performing structural analysis and design, even without extensive experience in the field, to develop error-free, efficient and reliable structural designs very rapidly and cost-effectively. This would not only improve the productivity of design engineers and analysts, but also significantly reduce time to completion of structural design. An extensive literature survey in the field of structural analysis, design optimization, artificial intelligence, and database management systems and their application to the structural design process was first performed. A feasibility study was then performed, and the architecture and the conceptual design for the integrated 'intelligent' structural analysis and design optimization software was then developed. An Object Representation Language (ORL), in conjunction with a rule-based system, was then developed using C++. Such an approach would improve the expressiveness for knowledge representation (especially for structural analysis and design applications), provide ability to build very large and practical expert systems, and provide an efficient way for storing knowledge. Functional specifications for the expert systems were then developed. The ORL/AI shell was then used to develop a variety of modules of expert systems for a variety of modeling, finite element analysis, and