Science.gov

Sample records for macular defects including

  1. Macular Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness in Glaucomatous Eyes with Localized Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunwei; Tatham, Andrew J.; Abe, Ricardo Y.; Hammel, Na’ama; Belghith, Akram; Weinreb, Robert N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate macular ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer (mGCIPL) thickness in glaucomatous eyes with visible localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects on stereophotographs. Methods 112 healthy and 149 glaucomatous eyes from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS) and the African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES) subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP), optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the macula and optic nerve head, and stereoscopic optic disc photography. Masked observers identified localized RNFL defects by grading of stereophotographs. Result 47 eyes had visible localized RNFL defects on stereophotographs. Eyes with visible localized RNFL defects had significantly thinner mGCIPL thickness compared to healthy eyes (68.3 ± 11.4 μm versus 79.2 ± 6.6 μm respectively, P<0.001) and similar mGCIPL thickness to glaucomatous eyes without localized RNFL defects (68.6 ± 11.2 μm, P = 1.000). The average mGCIPL thickness in eyes with RNFL defects was 14% less than similarly aged healthy controls. For 29 eyes with a visible RNFL defect in just one hemiretina (superior or inferior) mGCIPL was thinnest in the same hemiretina in 26 eyes (90%). Eyes with inferior-temporal RNFL defects also had significantly thinner inferior-temporal mGCIPL (P<0.001) and inferior mGCIPL (P = 0.030) compared to glaucomatous eyes without a visible RNFL defect. Conclusion The current study indicates that presence of a localized RNFL defect is likely to indicate significant macular damage, particularly in the region of the macular that topographically corresponds to the location of the RNFL defect. PMID:27537107

  2. Subthreshold Micropulse Photocoagulation for Persistent Macular Edema Secondary to Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion including Best-Corrected Visual Acuity Greater Than 20/40.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Keiji; Ohkoshi, Kishiko; Ohde, Sachiko; Deshpande, Gautam A; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Akira

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation (SMDLP) for persistent macular edema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) > 20/40, thirty-two patients (32 eyes) with macular edema secondary to BRVO were treated by SMDLP. After disease onset, all patients had been followed for at least 6 months prior to treatment. Baseline Snellen visual acuity was used to categorize the eyes as BCVA ≤ 20/40 (Group I) or BCVA > 20/40 (Group II). Main outcome measures were reduction in central macular thickness (CMT) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) and BCVA at 6 months. In the total subject-pool at 6 months, BCVA had not changed significantly but CMT was significantly reduced. Group I exhibited no significant change in CMT at 3 months but exhibited significant reductions at 6 and 12 months. Group II exhibited a marginally significant reduction in CMT at 3 months and a significant reduction at 6 months. In patients with persistent macular edema secondary to BRVO, SMDLP appears to control macular edema with minimal retinal damage. Our findings suggest that SMDLP is an effective treatment method for macular edema in BRVO patients with BCVA > 20/40. PMID:25276413

  3. Subthreshold Micropulse Photocoagulation for Persistent Macular Edema Secondary to Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion including Best-Corrected Visual Acuity Greater Than 20/40

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Keiji; Ohkoshi, Kishiko; Ohde, Sachiko; Deshpande, Gautam A.; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Akira

    2014-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation (SMDLP) for persistent macular edema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), including best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) > 20/40, thirty-two patients (32 eyes) with macular edema secondary to BRVO were treated by SMDLP. After disease onset, all patients had been followed for at least 6 months prior to treatment. Baseline Snellen visual acuity was used to categorize the eyes as BCVA ≤ 20/40 (Group I) or BCVA > 20/40 (Group II). Main outcome measures were reduction in central macular thickness (CMT) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) and BCVA at 6 months. In the total subject-pool at 6 months, BCVA had not changed significantly but CMT was significantly reduced. Group I exhibited no significant change in CMT at 3 months but exhibited significant reductions at 6 and 12 months. Group II exhibited a marginally significant reduction in CMT at 3 months and a significant reduction at 6 months. In patients with persistent macular edema secondary to BRVO, SMDLP appears to control macular edema with minimal retinal damage. Our findings suggest that SMDLP is an effective treatment method for macular edema in BRVO patients with BCVA > 20/40. PMID:25276413

  4. Defective Lipid Transport and Biosynthesis in Recessive and Dominant Stargardt Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molday, Robert S.; Zhang, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Stargardt disease is a common inherited macular degeneration characterized by a significant loss in central vision in the first or second decade of life, bilateral atrophic changes in the central retina associated with degeneration of photoreceptors and underlying retinal pigment epithelial cells, and the presence of yellow flecks extending from the macula. Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, the most common macular dystrophy, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding ABCA4, a photoreceptor ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Biochemical studies together with analysis of abca4 knockout mice and Stargardt patients have implicated ABCA4 as a lipid transporter that facilitates the removal of potentially toxic retinal compounds from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. An autosomal dominant form of Stargardt disease also known as Stargardt-like dystrophy is caused by mutations in a gene encoding ELOVL4, an enzyme that catalyzes the elongation of very long chain fatty acids in photoreceptors and other tissues. This review focuses on the molecular characterization of ABCA4 and ELOVL4 and their role in photoreceptor cell biology and the pathogenesis of Stargardt disease. PMID:20633576

  5. Macular Diplopia.

    PubMed

    Shippman, Sara; Cohen, Kenneth R; Heiser, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Maculopathies affect point-to-point foveal correspondence causing diplopia. The effect that the maculopathies have on the interaction of central sensory fusion and peripheral fusion are different than the usual understanding of treatment for diplopia. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of macular diplopia, describes the binocular pathology causing the diplopia, discusses the clinical evaluation, and reviews the present treatments including some newer treatment techniques. PMID:26564922

  6. Macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating ... choroid layer of blood vessels behind the retina. Macular degeneration results in the loss of central vision only.

  7. Visual field defects and changes in macular retinal ganglion cell complex thickness in eyes with intrachoroidal cavitation are similar to those in early glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Shinichi; Mizoue, Shiro; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims To examine the characteristics of visual field defects and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in eyes with intrachoroidal cavitation (ICC) and investigate the similarities between these results and glaucomatous changes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients diagnosed with ICC based on peripapillary radial cross-sectional scans performed with OCT. Visual field was measured with the Humphrey automated visual field analyzer SITA standard central 24-2 program, and macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness was measured in 9×9 mm areas on OCT. The positive rates for the Anderson criteria, site of visual field defect, and mean GCC thickness in each quadrant were compared; the association between these results and ICC location was assessed. Results Fifteen eyes from eleven patients (five males and six females; mean age, 54.6±10.7 years) were selected for investigation. ICC was detected in the inferior temporal side of the optic disc in all studied eyes. The positive rate for the Anderson criteria was 73.3% (11/15 eyes). Visual field defects were most commonly observed in the cluster that corresponded to the superior Bjerrum area (53.3%; 8/15 eyes). GCC thickness was significantly lower in the inferior side, where the ICC was located, than the superior side, where the ICC was absent (P=0.0001). GCC thinning that correlated with ICC was observed in 66.7% (10/15 eyes) of the ICC eyes. Conclusion Visual field and GCC findings on OCT in ICC eyes are extremely similar to those observed in superior visual field defect-type early glaucoma, indicating a possible difficulty in distinguishing the two conditions. PMID:27418805

  8. Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease ...

  9. Macular degeneration (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina that affects the macula in the back of the eye. ... see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  10. Macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Peter Charbel; Gillies, Mark C.; Chew, Emily Y.; Bird, Alan C.; Heeren, Tjebo F.C.; Peto, Tunde; Holz, Frank G.; Scholl, Hendrik P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Macular telangiectasia type 2 is a bilateral disease of unknown cause with characteristic alterations of the macular capillary network and neurosensory atrophy. Its prevalence may be underestimated and has recently been shown to be as high as 0.1% in persons 40 years and older. Biomicroscopy may show reduced retinal transparency, crystalline deposits, mildly ectatic capillaries, blunted venules, retinal pigment plaques, foveal atrophy, and neovascular complexes. Fluorescein angiography shows telangiectatic capillaries predominantly temporal to the foveola in the early phase and a diffuse hyperfluorescence in the late phase. High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) may reveal disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment–outer segment border, hyporeflective cavities at the level of the inner or outer retina, and atrophy of the retina in later stages. Macular telangiectasia type 2 shows a unique depletion of the macular pigment in the central retina and recent therapeutic trials showed that such depleted areas cannot re-accumulate lutein and zeaxanthin after oral supplementation. There have been various therapeutic approaches with limited or no efficacy. Recent clinical trials with compounds that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have established the role of VEGF in the pathophysiology of the disease, but have not shown significant efficacy, at least for the nonneovascular disease stages. Recent progress in structure–function correlation may help to develop surrogate outcome measures for future clinical trials. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge on macular telangiectasia type 2, including the epidemiology, the genetics, the clinical findings, the staging and the differential diagnosis of the disease. Findings using retinal imaging are discussed, including fluorescein angiography, OCT, adaptive optics imaging, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus autofluorescence, as are the findings using visual

  11. Macular telangiectasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Charbel Issa, Peter; Gillies, Mark C; Chew, Emily Y; Bird, Alan C; Heeren, Tjebo F C; Peto, Tunde; Holz, Frank G; Scholl, Hendrik P N

    2013-05-01

    Macular telangiectasia type 2 is a bilateral disease of unknown cause with characteristic alterations of the macular capillary network and neurosensory atrophy. Its prevalence may be underestimated and has recently been shown to be as high as 0.1% in persons 40 years and older. Biomicroscopy may show reduced retinal transparency, crystalline deposits, mildly ectatic capillaries, blunted venules, retinal pigment plaques, foveal atrophy, and neovascular complexes. Fluorescein angiography shows telangiectatic capillaries predominantly temporal to the foveola in the early phase and a diffuse hyperfluorescence in the late phase. High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) may reveal disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment-outer segment border, hyporeflective cavities at the level of the inner or outer retina, and atrophy of the retina in later stages. Macular telangiectasia type 2 shows a unique depletion of the macular pigment in the central retina and recent therapeutic trials showed that such depleted areas cannot re-accumulate lutein and zeaxanthin after oral supplementation. There have been various therapeutic approaches with limited or no efficacy. Recent clinical trials with compounds that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have established the role of VEGF in the pathophysiology of the disease, but have not shown significant efficacy, at least for the non-neovascular disease stages. Recent progress in structure-function correlation may help to develop surrogate outcome measures for future clinical trials. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge on macular telangiectasia type 2, including the epidemiology, the genetics, the clinical findings, the staging and the differential diagnosis of the disease. Findings using retinal imaging are discussed, including fluorescein angiography, OCT, adaptive optics imaging, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus autofluorescence, as are the findings using visual function

  12. Cystoid Macular Edema in Bietti's Crystalline Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with progressive bilateral visual decline was diagnosed to have Bietti's crystalline dystrophy (BCD). Fluorescein angiography revealed bilateral petaloid type late hyperfluorescence implicating concurrent cystoid macular edema (CME). Optical coherence tomography exhibited cystoid foveal lacunas OU. During the follow-up of six years, intraretinal crystals reduced in amount but CME persisted angiographically and tomographically. CME is among the rare macular features of BCD including subfoveal sensorial detachment, subretinal neovascular membrane, and macular hole. PMID:24949209

  13. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26518628

  14. Macular Degeneration: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalifoux, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents information on macular degeneration for professionals helping persons with this disease adjust to their visual loss. It covers types of macular degeneration, the etiology of the disease, and its treatment. Also considered are psychosocial problems and other difficulties that persons with age-related macular degeneration face.…

  15. Achondroplasia and Macular Coloboma

    PubMed Central

    Ahoor, M. H.; Amizadeh, Y.; Sorkhabi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder of enchondral ossification. It is clinically characterized by low stature, craniofacial deformity, and vertebral malformation. Associated ophthalmic features include telecanthus, exotropia, angle anomalies, and cone-rod dystrophy. A 24-year-old male presented with decreased vision bilaterally and typical achondroplasia. The best corrected visual acuity was 20/70 in both eyes. Anterior segment examination was normal. Fundus examination revealed a well-demarcated circular paramacular lesion in both eyes. As macular coloboma and achondroplasia are developmental disorders, the funduscopic examination is required in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:26692730

  16. Achondroplasia and Macular Coloboma.

    PubMed

    Ahoor, M H; Amizadeh, Y; Sorkhabi, R

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder of enchondral ossification. It is clinically characterized by low stature, craniofacial deformity, and vertebral malformation. Associated ophthalmic features include telecanthus, exotropia, angle anomalies, and cone-rod dystrophy. A 24-year-old male presented with decreased vision bilaterally and typical achondroplasia. The best corrected visual acuity was 20/70 in both eyes. Anterior segment examination was normal. Fundus examination revealed a well-demarcated circular paramacular lesion in both eyes. As macular coloboma and achondroplasia are developmental disorders, the funduscopic examination is required in patients with achondroplasia. PMID:26692730

  17. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  18. Complications of Macular Peeling.

    PubMed

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  19. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  20. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  1. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration What is AMD? Click for more information Age-related macular degeneration, ... the macula allows you to see fine detail. AMD Blurs Central Vision AMD blurs the sharp central ...

  2. Diagnosis of congenital pericardial defects, including a pathognomic sign for dangerous apical ventricular herniation, on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, I.; Judmaier, W.; Fink, C.; Lener, M.; Waldenberger, F.; Scharfetter, H.; Hammerer, I.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish criteria for the accurate diagnosis of different forms of left sided pericardial defects on magnetic resonance imaging. Early detection of a partial apical defect is essential as it is potentially fatal. DESIGN--Examination of four children with congenital pericardial defects by magnetic resonance imaging, the results being compared with the features on conventional chest radiography and echocardiography and with published data. RESULTS--Magnetic resonance imaging improved the ability to diagnose and distinguish between complete and partial left sided pericardial defects. A deep myocardial crease was visualised in a patient with apical pericardial defect, indicating the risk of a life threatening ventricular strangulation. A prominent left atrial appendage was, in contrast to many reports, not a reliable sign for partial left sided pericardial defect. CONCLUSIONS--The various forms of congenital left sided pericardial defects cannot reliably be diagnosed in plain chest radiographs or on echocardiography. Their diagnosis and the distinction between partial and complete defects, however, is of clinical importance and can be accomplished more confidently by magnetic resonance imaging. Images PMID:7662456

  3. Macular bioaccelerometers on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Cutler, L.; Vaziri, P.; Meyer, G.; Lam, T.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight offers the unique opportunity to study linear bioaccelerometers (vestibular maculas) in the virtual absence of a primary stimulus, gravitational acceleration. Combined morphological-physiological studies of maculas fixed in space and following flight should reveal macular adaptive responses to microgravity, and their time-course. Ground-based research, already begun, using computer-assisted, three-dimensional reconstructions of macular terminal fields will lead to development of computer models of functioning maculas. This research should continue in conjunction with physiological studies, including work with multichannel electrodes.

  4. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Budzinskaia, M V

    2014-01-01

    The review provides an update on the pathogenesis and new treatment modalities for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The impact of polymorphism in particular genes, including complement factor H (CFH), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2/LOC387715), and serine peptidase (HTRA1), on AMD development is discussed. Clinical presentations of different forms of exudative AMD, that is classic, occult, or more often mixed choroidal neovascularization, retinal angiomatous proliferation, and choroidal polypoidal vasculopathy, are described. Particular attention is paid to the results of recent clinical trials and safety issues around the therapy. PMID:25715554

  5. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  6. Mutations in TKT Are the Cause of a Syndrome Including Short Stature, Developmental Delay, and Congenital Heart Defects.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Lia; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Salomons, Gajja S; Roos, Birthe; Pop, Ana; Dauber, Andrew; Hwa, Vivian; Andrew, Melissa; Douglas, Jessica; Feingold, Murray; Kramer, Nancy; Saitta, Sulagna; Retterer, Kyle; Cho, Megan T; Begtrup, Amber; Monaghan, Kristin G; Wynn, Julia; Chung, Wendy K

    2016-06-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly being utilized to diagnose individuals with undiagnosed disorders. Developmental delay and short stature are common clinical indications for WES. We performed WES in three families, using proband-parent trios and two additional affected siblings. We identified a syndrome due to an autosomal-recessively inherited deficiency of transketolase, encoded by TKT, on chromosome 3p21. Our series includes three families with a total of five affected individuals, ranging in age from 4 to 25 years. Two families of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry were homozygous for an 18 base pair in-frame insertion in TKT. The third family was compound heterozygous for nonsense and missense variants in TKT. All affected individuals had short stature and were developmentally delayed. Congenital heart defects were noted in four of the five affected individuals, and there was a history of chronic diarrhea and cataracts in the older individuals with the homozygous 18 base pair insertion. Enzymatic testing confirmed significantly reduced transketolase activity. Elevated urinary excretion of erythritol, arabitol, ribitol, and pent(ul)ose-5-phosphates was detected, as well as elevated amounts of erythritol, arabitol, and ribitol in the plasma of affected individuals. Transketolase deficiency reduces NADPH synthesis and nucleic acid synthesis and cell division and could explain the problems with growth. NADPH is also critical for maintaining cerebral glutathione, which might contribute to the neurodevelopmental delays. Transketolase deficiency is one of a growing list of inborn errors of metabolism in the non-oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:27259054

  7. First-principles-based investigation of kinetic mechanism of SiC(0001) dry oxidation including defect generation and passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikov, Alexey; Knizhnik, Andrey; Safonov, Andrey; Scherbinin, Andrey; Bagatur'yants, Alexander; Potapkin, Boris; Chatterjee, Aveek; Matocha, Kevin

    2008-11-01

    The key stages of the dry oxidation of the SiC(0001) surface are analyzed based on first-principles calculations. It is found that an abrupt SiC/SiO2 interface model results in a large activation barrier of oxygen penetration to the silicon carbide, and thus the penetration is probably the rate-limiting step for the entire dry-oxidation process. The subsequent reactions of SiC oxidation after oxygen penetration are investigated, and it is found that CO release is competing with carbon dimer formation. These dimers probably are responsible for near-interface traps in the silica layer generated during SiC oxidation. The possible passivation reactions of a carbon dimer defect by active species, such as O2, NO, and H2 are investigated. It is found that an oxygen molecule can break a Si-C bond via dissociation in the triplet state and finally can produce two CO molecules from the carbon dimer defect. The NO molecule can easily break a Si-C bond of a carbon dimer defect and form cyano groups -CN, which can finally recombine to form a C2N2 molecule. This molecule can hardly diffuse in silica matrix, and it is suggested that it is further oxidized by an NO molecule to CO and N2 molecules. It is suggested that the process of passivation by O2 and NO molecules is restricted by the incorporation of these molecules in small voids near the carbon defect. Based on the calculated results, a simple kinetic mechanism of dry SiC oxidation is proposed and kinetic modeling of the oxidation process is performed. It is found that in the framework of this mechanism, the carbon defect density should weakly depend on temperature.

  8. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments.

    PubMed

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro

    2013-10-15

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition, which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation. Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema, is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries. Today, blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy. The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia, arterial tension, lipids and renal status. The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries, but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs, the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema (DME), can be valid as gold standard in many countries. The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs (ranibizumab and bevacizumab), are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME, but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies. The corticosteroids for diffuse DME, has a place in pseudophakic patients, but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients. Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients. PMID:24147200

  9. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration Diagnosis: How is AMD diagnosed? Macular Degeneration Treatment: How is AMD Treated? Macular ... macular degeneration (AMD) is a deterioration or breakdown of the eye's macula. The macula is a small area in the ...

  10. Macular microvasculature alterations in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Yu, Jian; Kong, Xiangmei; Sun, Xinghuai; Jiang, Chunhui

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate and compare macular microvasculature changes in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) to normal eyes, and to assess associations among the retinal microvasculature, neural structural damage, and visual field loss.Ninety-nine eyes (68 patients with POAG and 31 normal subjects) were enrolled in this study. Thirty-five eyes with early-stage glaucoma (EG), 33 eyes with advanced-stage glaucoma (AG), and 31 normal eyes were included. An optical coherence tomography system with a split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm was used to measure the macular capillary vessel area density and retinal thickness. Visual field testing (30-2 and 10-2 programs) was performed using a Humphrey field analyzer. Correlations between the capillary vessel area density, retinal thickness, and visual field parameters were analyzed.Compared to normal eyes, those with EG and AG had a lower macular capillary vessel area density and lesser retinal thickness (P < 0.001, all). Results of multivariate linear regression analyses showed that each standard deviation (SD) decrease in the vessel area density was associated with a 1.5% and 4.2% thinning of the full retinal thickness and inner retinal layer thickness, respectively. Each SD decrease in the vessel area density was also associated with a 12.9% decrease in the mean sensitivity and a 33.6% increase in the pattern standard deviation (P < 0.001, both). The Pearson partial regression analysis model showed that the vessel area density was most strongly associated with the inner retinal layer thickness and inferior hemimacular thickness. Furthermore, a lower vessel area density was strongly associated with a more severe hemimacular visual field defect and the corresponding hemimacular retinal thickness.The macular capillary vessel area density and retinal thickness were significantly lower in eyes with POAG than in normal eyes. A diminished macular microvasculature network is closely associated with

  11. INTRAVITREAL CORTICOSTEROIDS IN DIABETIC MACULAR EDEMA

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Clare; Loewenstein, Anat; Massin, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the relationship between kinetics, efficacy, and safety of several corticosteroid formulations for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. Methods: Reports of corticosteroid use for the treatment of diabetic macular edema were identified by a literature search, which focused on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of these agents in preclinical animal models and clinical trials. Results: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema treatment include intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide. Because of differences in solubility and bioavailability, various delivery mechanisms are used. Bioerodible delivery systems achieve higher maximum concentrations than nonbioerodible formulations. There is a relationship between visual gains and drug persistence in the intravitreal compartment. Safety effects were more complex; level of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide exposure is related to development of elevated intraocular pressure and cataract; this does not seem to be the case for dexamethasone, where two different doses showed similar mean intraocular pressure and incidence of cataract surgery. With fluocinolone acetonide, rates of intraocular pressure elevations requiring surgery seem to be dose related; rates of cataract extraction were similar regardless of dose. Conclusion: Available corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema exhibit different pharmacokinetic profiles that impact efficacy and adverse events and should be taken into account when developing individualized treatment plans. PMID:26352555

  12. Diabetic macular edema: it is more than just VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Michael A.; Kermany, Daniel S.; Waters, Jana; Jansen, Michael E.; Tyler, Lyndon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema is a serious visual complication of diabetic retinopathy. This article reviews the history of previous and current therapies, including laser therapy, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, and corticosteroids, that have been used to treat this condition. In addition, it proposes new ways to use them in combination in order to decrease treatment burden and potentially address other causes besides vascular endothelial growth factor for diabetic macular edema. PMID:27303642

  13. Intraoperative Changes in Idiopathic Macular Holes by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Atsushi; Yagou, Takaaki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Fujita, Kazuya; Oka, Miyako; Fuchizawa, Chiharu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine anatomical changes in idiopathic macular holes during surgery using handheld spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Five eyes of 5 patients who underwent surgery for the repair of idiopathic macular holes were examined. The surgery included standard 25-gauge, 3-port pars plana vitrectomy, removal of the internal limiting membrane (ILM), fluid-air exchange, and 20% sulfur hexafluoride tamponade. Intraoperative SD-OCT images of the macular holes were obtained after ILM removal and under fluid-air exchange using a handheld SD-OCT. From SD-OCT images, the macular hole base diameter (MHBD) was measured and compared. Results All macular holes were successfully closed after the primary surgery. The mean MHBD under fluid-air exchange was significantly smaller than the mean MHBD after ILM removal and the preoperative mean MHBD. In 1 eye with a stage 3 macular hole, SD-OCT images revealed that the inner edges of the macular hole touched each other under fluid-air exchange. Conclusion Fluid-air exchange significantly reduced MHBD during surgery to repair macular holes. Fluid-air exchange may be an important step for macular hole closure as it reduces the base diameter of the macular hole. PMID:21677882

  14. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction and simulations of vestibular macular neural connectivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Chimento, Thomas; Doshay, David; Cheng, Rei

    1992-01-01

    Results of computer-assisted research concerned with the three-dimensional reconstruction and simulations of vestibular macular neural connectivities are summarized. The discussion focuses on terminal/receptive fields, the question of synapses across the striola, endoplasmic reticulum and its potential role in macular information processing, and the inner epithelial plexus. Also included are preliminary results of computer simulations of nerve fiber collateral functioning, an essential step toward the three-dimensional simulation of a functioning macular neural network.

  15. Altered retinoid homeostasis catalyzed by a nicotine metabolite: Implications in macular degeneration and normal development

    PubMed Central

    Brogan, Andrew P.; Dickerson, Tobin J.; Boldt, Grant E.; Janda, Kim D.

    2005-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A) serve two distinct functions in higher animals: light absorption for vision and gene regulation for growth and development. Cigarette smoking is a contributing factor for diseases that affect vision such as age-related macular degeneration and increases the risk of birth defects; however, altered retinoid homeostasis has received little attention as a potential mechanism for smoking-associated toxicities. Herein, we demonstrate that nornicotine, a nicotine metabolite and component of cigarette smoke, catalyzes the Z-to-E alkene isomerization of unsaturated aldehydes and ketones, including retinals. Despite the recent explosion in the use of organic compounds as chemical catalysts, minimal effort has been devoted to biologically relevant organocatalysis. Our study demonstrates a system in which a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital-lowering intermediate similar to the endogenous protein rhodopsin effectively catalyzes isomerization under biologically relevant conditions. The product of retinal isomerization is all-E-retinal, which in the eye is a biosynthetic precursor to N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine, a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration. Furthermore, 9-Z- and all-E-retinal isomers are biosynthetic precursors to 9-Z- and all-E-retinoic acids, ligands that mediate specific cellular responses by binding to transcriptional regulatory proteins critical in growth and development. Strict maintenance of retinal isomer composition is essential for proper transcriptional regulation. Nornicotine-catalyzed retinal isomerization implies an underlying molecular mechanism for age-related macular degeneration, the birth defects associated with smoking, and other smoking-associated abnormalities that stem from disruption of retinoid metabolism. PMID:16014706

  16. Macular degeneration - age-related

    MedlinePlus

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD); AMD ... distorted and wavy. There may be a small dark spot in the center of your vision that ... leafy vegetables, may also decrease your risk of age-related macular degeneration. If you have wet AMD, ...

  17. Emerging Pharmacotherapies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Javey, Golnaz; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains an important cause of visual loss in patients with diabetes mellitus. Although photocoagulation and intensive control of systemic metabolic factors have been reported to achieve improved outcomes in large randomized clinical trials (RCTs), some patients with DME continue to lose vision despite treatment. Pharmacotherapies for DME include locally and systemically administered agents. We review several agents that have been studied for the treatment of DME. PMID:22474425

  18. The Association Between Subretinal Drusenoid Deposits in Older Adults in Normal Macular Health and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Neely, David; Zarubina, Anna; Clark, Mark; Zhang, Yuhua; Curcio, Christine A.; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDD) have been associated with the progression to late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To determine whether SDD in eyes in normal macular health increases risk for early AMD, this study examined the association between presence of SDD at baseline in a cohort of older adults in normal macular health and incident AMD 3 years later. Methods Subjects enrolled in the Alabama Study on Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ALSTAR) were assessed for the presence of SDD using color fundus photos, infrared reflectance and fundus autofluorescence images, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography volumes. The study sample included 799 eyes from 455 participants in normal macular health per grading of color fundus photographs using the 9-step Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) classification system. Age-related macular degeneration was defined as eyes having an AREDS grade ≥2 at the 3-year follow-up. Results Twenty-five percent of participants had SDD in one or both eyes at baseline. At follow-up visit, 11.9% of eyes in the sample developed AMD. Compared to eyes without SDD, those with SDD were 2.24 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–3.70) times more likely to have AMD at follow-up. After adjusting for age, C-reactive protein quartile, and family history of AMD, the association persisted. Conclusions Results suggest that SDD in older eyes with normal macular health as defined by the AREDS scale is a risk factor for the development of early AMD. Older adults in seemingly normal macular health yet having SDD may warrant closer clinical monitoring for the possible onset of early AMD. PMID:26906160

  19. Prediction of spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Weiqi; Zheng, Kangken; Peng, Kun; Xia, Honghe; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that some traumatic macular holes can close spontaneously. However, knowledge about the types of macular hole that can close spontaneously is limited. In this retrospective study, we investigated patients with traumatic macular hole who were followed-up for at least 6 months without any surgical intervention. Clinical data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images were compared between groups with and without macular hole closure. Overall, 27 eyes were included. Spontaneous closure of macular hole was observed in 10 (37.0%) eyes. The holes with spontaneous closure had smaller minimum diameter (244.9 ± 114.4 vs. 523.9 ± 320.0 μm, p = 0.007) and less intraretinal cysts (10% vs. 76.5%, p = 0.001) compared to the holes that did not close spontaneously. The area under the curve of receiver operative characteristic was 0.812 and 0.832 for minimum diameter of macular hole and presence of intraretinal cysts respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the presence of intraretinal cysts was an independent predictive factor for closure of macular holes. The group with spontaneous macular hole closure had a high chance of visual improvement. Our study suggests that the absence of intraretinal cysts on SD-OCT can predict spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. PMID:26196460

  20. Early features in acute macular neuroretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Shah, Anish N; Richardson, Theresa; O'Sullivan, Eoin; Eleftheriadis, Haralabos

    2014-06-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMNR) is a rare disorder characterised by acute onset of unilateral or bilateral visual impairment associated with reddish-brown wedge-shaped outer macular lesions. It is more frequently reported in young females and though the pathophysiology remains unclear, factors reported in association with its onset include post-viral illness and vasoconstrictor use. We report a case of AMNR in an 18-year old female patient presenting with a 2-day history of acute painless blurring of central vision bilaterally, following 1 month of preceding flu-like illness. For 1 week prior to presentation, the patient had taken large doses of oral preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride. In addition to demonstrating characteristic optical coherence tomography findings seen in AMNR, we illustrate some rarely seen acute ophthalmoscopic features. Based on associations from this case, we add further insight into the pathophysiology of this condition which remains poorly understood. PMID:24037593

  1. Macular changes resulting from papilloedema.

    PubMed

    Morris, A T; Sanders, M D

    1980-03-01

    Six cases are presented with macular changes in association with papilloedema; 4 suffered permanent visual loss. The present paper emphasises this previously infrequent finding and discusses the haemodynamic and mechanical factors responsible. The macular changes consisted of haemorrhages situated in front, within, or behind the retina, and occasionally the results of neovascular membrane formation produced secondary visual loss. Changes in the pigment epithelium were seen in 3 cases associated with choroidal folds. Macular stars rarely produce visual loss. Recognition of these changes is important in the assessment of the visual loss in papilloedema. PMID:7387954

  2. Macular Bioaccelerometers on Earth and in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Cutler, L.; Meyer, G.; Vazin, P.; Lam, T.

    1991-01-01

    Space flight offers the opportunity to study linear bioaccelerometers (vestibular maculas) in the virtual absence of a primary stimulus, gravitational acceleration. Macular research in space is particularly important to NASA because the bioaccelerometers are proving to be weighted neural networks in which information is distributed for parallel processing. Neural networks are plastic and highly adaptive to new environments. Combined morphological-physiological studies of maculas fixed in space and following flight should reveal macular adaptive responses to microgravity, and their time-course. Ground-based research, already begun, using computer-assisted, 3-dimensional reconstruction of macular terminal fields will lead to development of computer models of functioning maculas. This research should continue in conjunction with physiological studies, including work with multichannel electrodes. The results of such a combined effort could usher in a new era in understanding vestibular function on Earth and in space. They can also provide a rational basis for counter-measures to space motion sickness, which may prove troublesome as space voyager encounter new gravitational fields on planets, or must re-adapt to 1 g upon return to earth.

  3. One year follow up of macular translocation with 360 degree retinotomy in patients with age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Meguid, A; Lappas, A; Hartmann, K; Auer, F; Schrage, N; Thumann, G; Kirchhof, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the benefits of macular translocation with 360 degree retinotomy in patients with exudative age related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods: A consecutive interventional case series was performed on patients who underwent macular translocation between June 1997 and January 2000 at the department of ophthalmology, University of Aachen, Germany. A retrospective pilot study was set up with a minimum follow up of 12 months in 39 consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation secondary to ARMD. The surgical technique included pars plana vitrectomy, induction of retinal detachment, 360 degree retinotomy, removal of the choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVM), macular translocation, peripheral laser retinopexy, and silicone oil endotamponade. Results: 18 patients showed predominantly occult CNVM, six patients had predominantly classic CNVM, and 15 showed subretinal haemorrhage. At the 12 month follow up 13 patients (33%) showed an improvement in visual acuity of more than three lines (logMAR scale), 18 patients (46%) retained stable visual acuity with a change of equal or less than three lines (logMAR scale), and eight patients (21%) showed a decrease in visual acuity of more than three lines (logMAR scale). Recurrence of CNVM was observed in three (8%) eyes at 5–11 months postoperatively. Other complications included proliferative vitreoretinopathy with retinal detachment (n=10), peripheral epiretinal membranes (n=9), macular pucker (n=2), corneal decompensation (n=2), and hypotony (n=11). 18 patients (46%) complained about persistent diplopia. Conclusion: Macular translocation surgery is able to maintain or improve distant vision in the majority of patients with exudative ARMD. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy and diplopia are the two major complications. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing macular translocation with observation for patients with the occult form of exudative ARMD may be justified. PMID:12714406

  4. [The German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU) for evaluation of surgical treatment for cartilage defects: experience after six months including first demographic data].

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, P; Schweigler, K; Grotejohann, B; Maurer, J; Angele, P; Aurich, M; Becher, C; Fay, J; Feil, R; Fickert, S; Fritz, J; Hoburg, A; Kreuz, P; Kolombe, T; Laskowski, J; Lützner, J; Marlovits, S; Müller, P E; Niethammer, T; Pietschmann, M; Ruhnau, K; Spahn, G; Tischer, T; Zinser, W; Albrecht, D

    2015-02-01

    The German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU) has been introduced in October 2013 and aims on the evaluation of patients who underwent cartilage repair for symptomatic cartilage defects. It represents a nation-wide cohort study which has been introduced by the working group "Tissue Regeneration" of the Germany Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology and is technically based upon a web-based remote data entry (RDE) system. The present article describes first experiences with the registry including patient and treatment characteristics. Between October 2013 and April 2014, a total of 230 patients who had undergone surgical cartilage repair for symptomatic full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee has been included in the German Cartilage Registry from 23 cartilage repair centres. Mean age was 37.11 years (SD 13.61) and mean defect size was 3.68 cm(2) (SD 0.23). Since the introduction of the KnorpelRegister DGOU the total number of registered patients has increased steadily up to the most recent figure of 72 patients within one month. Patients were treated mainly according to the recommended therapies. The highest percentage in therapy is represented by the bone marrow stimulation techniques (55.02 %) as well as by the autologous chondrocyte transplantation (34.92 %). Unlike the patient collective in the majority of prospective randomised controlled trials, the patient population within the registry shows a high proportion of patients with accompanying pathologies, with an age of more than 50 years at the time of treatment and with unfavourably assessed accompanying pathologies such as an affection of the opposite cartilage surface or a previously resected meniscus. In summary, the technical platform and forms of documentation of the KnorpelRegister DGOU have proved to be very promising within the first six months. Unlike data from other clinical trials, the previous analysis of the patients' data and therapies reflects successfully the actual

  5. Macular protection with IOLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Per G.; Lofgren, Stefan; Ayala, Marcelo; Dong, Xiuqin; Kakar, Manoj; Mody, Vino; Meyer, Linda; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf

    2004-07-01

    The clinical outcome within one month after phacoemulsification cataract extraction with implantation of the blue-blocking SN60AT IOL was examined prospectively and compared to a retrospectively examined material of implantations of the equivalent SA30AL without blue-blocker. There was no difference in best corrected visual acuity gain between the two lenses. In addition, the subjective color perception was examined for with a questionnaire after the first implantation of blue-blocking IOL and after the second implantation of blue-blocking IOL. Only one patient noted a changed color perception. There are thus strong theoretical reasons to block blue light in IOLs and no short term clinical inconvenience. But, it remains to be proven in long term follow up studies that the blue-blocking IOL protects against macular degeneration.

  6. Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Gundogan, Fatih C.; Yolcu, Umit; Akay, Fahrettin; Ilhan, Abdullah; Ozge, Gokhan; Uzun, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME), one the most prevalent causes of visual loss in industrialized countries, may be diagnosed at any stage of diabetic retinopathy. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of DME have become straightforward with recent developments in fundus imaging, such as optical coherence tomography. Laser photocoagulation, intravitreal injections, and pars plana vitrectomy surgery are the current treatment modalities; however, the positive effects of currently available intravitreally injected agents are temporary. At this point, further treatment choices are needed for a permanent effect. Sources of data selection: The articles published between 1985-2015 years on major databases were searched and most appropriate 40 papers were used to write this review article. PMID:27182271

  7. [Truss-induced macular amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Abels, C; Karrer, S; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R M

    2001-10-01

    A 80-year-old male presented with a long time history of a localized red-brown macule with superficial lichenification and slight scaling in the right groin. An earlier skin biopsy revealed the presence of amyloid deposits. The patient therefore had a complete internal checkup including a rectal biopsy for exclusion of systemic amyloidosis. However, the laboratory data did not reveal any specific abnormalities including immunoglobulins and Bence-Jones protein. The rectal biopsy was also nonspecific. After skin examination, a rebiopsy was performed at our department showing acanthosis and spongiosis of the epidermis with parakeratosis. A homogenous eosinophilic deposit was present in the upper dermis and stained positive with thioflavine. At the second visit the patient wore a truss for a right inguinal hernia, perfectly matching the area of the skin lesion. Thus, the diagnosis of a localized macular amyloidosis was confirmed very likely due to permanent local friction. The classification of localized cutaneous amyloidoses should include local trauma as a cause to avoid unnecessary and exhausting internal checkups to exclude systemic involvement. PMID:11715396

  8. Macular Degeneration - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Macular Degeneration URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Macular Degeneration - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  9. Effect of selective laser trabeculoplasty on macular thickness

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Mustafa; Durukan, Irfan; Koban, Yaran; Ceran, Basak Bastanci; Ayar, Orhan; Ekinci, Metin; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on macular thickness change. Methods Forty eyes of 40 consecutive patients with uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma with medical treatment were included in this prospective study. SLT was performed to the inferior 180°, and macular thickness was measured. Data were collected before SLT, and 1 week and 1 month after SLT. Macular thickness evaluation was performed in five quadrants, the central 1 mm quadrant (fovea = F), the nasal 3 mm quadrant surrounding F (NQ), temporal quadrant, superior quadrant (SQ), and inferior quadrant (IQ). The preoperative and postoperative thicknesses were compared. Results There was an increase in macular thickness in the NQ, IQ, and SQ on the first week after SLT compared to preoperative measurements. On the other hand, there was no significant increase in the F and temporal quadrant. On the first month after SLT, thickness in the NQ, IQ, and SQ was back to preoperative measurements, and there was no significant change between the preoperative measurements in any quadrant. Conclusion There was no significant increase in macular thickness shortly after SLT in our study. PMID:26719665

  10. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26292978

  11. In vivo micropathology of Best macular dystrophy with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pianta, Michael J; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sunness, Janet S; Li, Yuanyuan; Campochiaro, Betsy A; Campochiaro, Peter A; Zack, Donald J; Stone, Edwin M; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2003-02-01

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD) is an autosomal dominant retinopathy caused by mutations in the VMD2 gene that encodes a chloride channel in the basolateral membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). BMD patients were studied using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to understand the disease process in the macula leading to vision loss. BMD patients (ages 5-61), representing four families with known VMD2 mutations, were included. OCT scans were recorded in the central retina and longitudinal reflectivity profiles were analysed. The central retina in BMD showed different OCT abnormalities at or near the level of the highly reflective deep retinal band termed the outer retina-choroid complex (ORCC). Two types of ORCC change were noted to occur either separately or together: (1) splitting with or without intervening hyporeflective areas; and (2) elevation. Longitudinal study of a BMD patient indicated that such abnormalities were dynamic and changed in type and degree with time. The pathogenetic sequence in BMD may begin with defective fluid transport across the RPE secondary to the channelopathy in the basolateral membrane. In the macula, this leads to an abnormal interface with adjacent structures at both apical and basal surfaces of the RPE. The disease process results in detachments of the neurosensory retina, such as in central serous chorioretinopathy, and sub-RPE pathology resembling some stages of age-related macular degeneration, with eventual loss of photoreceptors, inner retina and central vision. PMID:12565808

  12. Idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Masaomi; Shibata, Tomohiro; Gunji, Hisato; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a few cases with idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear have been reported, the mechanism remains unknown and a standard treatment has yet to be determined. Objective To report the outcome for a patient with idiopathic horseshoe-like macular tear who underwent vitreous surgery. Case report A 65-year-old man with no previous injury or ophthalmic disease presented with abnormal vision in his left eye. Best-corrected visual acuity was 0.8 in the right and 0.3 in the left, and the relative afferent pupillary defect was negative. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a horseshoe-like tear on the temporal side of the macula in the left eye. The tear size was 0.75 disc diameters (DD). Optical coherence tomography showed that the focal retinal detachment reached the fovea. A few days after the first visit, there was no longer adhesion of the flap of the tear to the retina and the tear size had increased to 1.5 DD. The patient underwent vitreous surgery similar to large macular hole surgery, with the tear closure repaired using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique with 20% SF6 gas tamponade. Although the tear decreased to 0.5 DD after the surgery, complete closure of the tear was not achieved. Conclusion While cases with horseshoe-like macular tear following trauma and branch retinal vein occlusion have been reported, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported idiopathic case. In the present case, there was expansion of the tear until the patient actually underwent surgery. If vertical vitreous traction indeed plays a role in horseshoe-like macular tears, this will need to be taken into consideration at the time of the vitreous surgery in these types of cases.

  13. Juvenile-Onset Macular Degeneration and Allied Disorders

    PubMed Central

    North, Victoria; Gelman, Rony; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    While age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of central vision loss among the elderly, many inherited diseases that present earlier in life share features of AMD. These diseases of juvenile-onset macular degeneration include Stargardt disease, Best disease, retinitis pigmentosa, X-linked retinoschisis, and other allied disorders. In particular, they can be accompanied by the appearance of drusen, geographic atrophy, macular hyperpigmentation, choroidal neovascularization, and disciform scarring just as in AMD, and often may be confused for the adult form of the disease. Diagnosis based on funduscopic findings alone can be challenging. However, the use of diagnostic studies such as electroretinography, electrooculography, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence in conjunction with genetic testing can lead to an accurate diagnosis. PMID:24732760

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans par2.1/mtssb-1 is essential for mitochondrial DNA replication and its defect causes comprehensive transcriptional alterations including a hypoxia response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Tomoko; Mori, Chihiro; Takanami, Takako; Sasagawa, Yohei; Saito, Rumiko; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerase {gamma} and mtSSB are key components of the mtDNA replication machinery. To study the biological influences of defects in mtDNA replication, we used RNAi to deplete the gene for a putative mtSSB, par2.1, in Caenorhabditis elegans. In previous systematic RNAi screens, downregulation of this gene has not caused any clearly defective phenotypes. Here, we continuously fed a dsRNA targeting par2.1 to C. elegans over generations. Seventy-nine percent of F1 progeny produced 60-72 h after feeding grew to adulthood but were completely sterile, with an arrest of germline cell proliferation. Analyses of mtDNA copy number and cell cytology indicated that the sterile hermaphrodites had fewer mitochondria. These results indicated that par2.1 essentially functions for germline cell proliferation through mtDNA replication; we therefore termed it mtssb-1. Comprehensive transcriptional alterations including hypoxia response induction dependent on and independent of hif-1 function, occurred by RNAi depletion of mtssb-1. Treatment with ethidium bromide, which impairs mtDNA replication and transcription, caused similar transcriptional alterations. In addition, the frequency of apoptosis in the germline cells was reduced in fertile progeny with a partial RNAi effect. These suggest that RNAi depletion of C. elegans mtssb-1 is useful as a model system of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Use of antivascular endothelial growth factor for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rushmia; Tang, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic macular edema (DME) is one of the manifestations of diabetic retinopathy leading to loss of central vision and visual acuity. It manifests itself with swelling around the central part of the retina, the area responsible for sharp vision. Current treatment includes laser therapy and intravitreal steroids with preventative measures including diabetes control. No one treatment has guaranteed control of diabetic macular edema which leads to deteriorating visual acuity, function and quality of life in patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be a critical stimulus in the pathogenesis of macular edema secondary to diabetes.1 Antiangiogenic therapy encompassed treatment with anti-VEGF which inhibits VEGF-driven neovascularization hence macular edema leading to decreased visual acuity. Objective For this review, we evaluated the effectiveness of intravitreal anti-VEGF in treating DME. Data sources We identified five trials (n = 525) using electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials [Central], Medline®, and Excerpta Medica Database [EMBASE®]) in October 2008, supplemented by hand searching of reference lists, review articles, and conference abstracts. Methods We included all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating any form of intravitreal anti-VEGF for treating DME. The main outcome factor was change in best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness. One author assessed eligibility, methodological quality, and extracted data. Meta analysis was performed when appropriate. Results We included three trials of adequate methodological quality in our meta-analysis. Patients treated with anti-VEGF showed improvement in visual acuity of −0.17 (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.23, −0.10) and central macular thickness −84.69 (95% CI: −117.09, −52.30). Patients treated with combined anti-VEGF and intravitreal triamcinolone showed improvement of visual acuity of −0.19 (95% CI:

  16. Imaging polarimetry of macular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masahiro; Elsner, Ann E.; Petrig, Benno L.; VanNasdale, Dean A.; Zhao, Yanming; Iwasaki, Takuya

    2008-02-01

    Polarization properties of the human eye have long been used to study the tissues of the human retina, as well as to improve retinal imaging, and several new technologies using polarized light are in use or under development. 1-8 The most typical polarimetry technique in ophthalmology clinic is a scanning laser polarimetry for the glaucoma diagnosis. 1,2 In the original conceptualization, the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer is estimated using the birefringent component of light returning from the ocular fundus. More recently, customized software to analyze data from scanning laser polarimetry was developed to investigate the polarization properties of the macular disease. 5-8 In this study, we analyzed macular disease with imaging polarimetry, which provides a method for the noninvasive assessment of macular disease.

  17. Ear defects.

    PubMed

    Shonka, David C; Park, Stephen S

    2009-08-01

    The projection and exposure of the auricle make it particularly susceptible to actinic injury and thus to cutaneous malignancies. Auricular reconstruction is challenging because of its unique surface anatomy and undulating topography. This article organizes auricular defects into different categories based on anatomic location and extent of tissue loss, including skin-only defects, small composite defects, full-thickness defects involving or sparing the upper third of the ear, and total auricular loss. The authors share an algorithm for repair of the array of auricular defects. PMID:19698921

  18. Progressive Macular Hypomelanosis in Korean Patients: A Clinicopathologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seon Wook; Hong, Soon Kwon; Kim, Sang Hyun; Park, Jeong Hoon; Seo, Jong Keun; Sung, Ho Suk

    2009-01-01

    Background Progressive macular hypomelanosis is characterized by ill-defined, non-scaly, hypopigmented macules primarily on the trunk of the body. Although numerous cases of progressive macular hypomelanosis have been reported, there have been no clinicopathologic studies of progressive macular hypomelanosis in Korean patients. Objective In this study we examined the clinical characteristics, histologic findings, and treatment methods for progressive macular hypomelanosis in a Korean population. Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 20 patients presented to the Department of Dermatology at Busan Paik Hospital with acquired, non-scaly, confluent, hypopigmented macules on the trunk, and with no history of inflammation or infection. The medical records, clinical photographs, and pathologic findings for each patient were examined. Results The patients included 5 men and 15 women. The mean age of onset was 21.05±3.47 years. The back was the most common site of involvement. All KOH examinations were negative. A Wood's lamp examination showed hypopigmented lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin. A microscopic examination showed a reduction in the number of melanin granules in the lesions compared with the adjacent normal skin, although S-100 immunohistochemical staining did not reveal significant differences in the number of melanocytes. Among the 20 patients, 7 received topical drug therapy, 6 were treated with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, 4 received oral minocycline, and 3 did not receive any treatment. Conclusion Most of the patients with progressive macular hypomelanosis had asymptomatic ill-defined, non-scaly, and symmetric hypopigmented macules, especially on the back and abdomen. Histologically, the number of melanocytes did not differ significantly between the hypopigmented macules and the normal perilesional skin. No effective treatment is known for progressive macular hypomelanosis; however, narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy may be a useful

  19. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  20. Macular posterior pigmentary incontinence: its relation to macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Westermark, P; Ridderström, E; Vahlquist, A

    1996-07-01

    Patients with clinical features of dorsal macular amyloidosis but without subepidermal amyloid deposits were followed for 2-11 years. The clinical appearance was fairly stable during this period of time, with little tendency of healing. Only 2 of the patients developed typical macular amyloidosis during the follow-up. It is concluded that a condition strongly resembling macular amyloidosis but without amyloid is an entity, and the designation "macular posterior pigmentary incontinence" is proposed. The relationship between macular posterior pigmentary incontinence and the two conditions macular amyloidosis and notalgia paresthetica is discussed. PMID:8869690

  1. Mutations in cardiac T-box factor gene TBX20 are associated with diverse cardiac pathologies, including defects of septation and valvulogenesis and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Edwin P; Sunde, Margaret; Costa, Mauro W; Rankin, Scott A; Wolstein, Orit; Castro, M Leticia; Butler, Tanya L; Hyun, Changbaig; Guo, Guanglan; Otway, Robyn; Mackay, Joel P; Waddell, Leigh B; Cole, Andrew D; Hayward, Christopher; Keogh, Anne; Macdonald, Peter; Griffiths, Lyn; Fatkin, Diane; Sholler, Gary F; Zorn, Aaron M; Feneley, Michael P; Winlaw, David S; Harvey, Richard P

    2007-08-01

    The T-box family transcription factor gene TBX20 acts in a conserved regulatory network, guiding heart formation and patterning in diverse species. Mouse Tbx20 is expressed in cardiac progenitor cells, differentiating cardiomyocytes, and developing valvular tissue, and its deletion or RNA interference-mediated knockdown is catastrophic for heart development. TBX20 interacts physically, functionally, and genetically with other cardiac transcription factors, including NKX2-5, GATA4, and TBX5, mutations of which cause congenital heart disease (CHD). Here, we report nonsense (Q195X) and missense (I152M) germline mutations within the T-box DNA-binding domain of human TBX20 that were associated with a family history of CHD and a complex spectrum of developmental anomalies, including defects in septation, chamber growth, and valvulogenesis. Biophysical characterization of wild-type and mutant proteins indicated how the missense mutation disrupts the structure and function of the TBX20 T-box. Dilated cardiomyopathy was a feature of the TBX20 mutant phenotype in humans and mice, suggesting that mutations in developmental transcription factors can provide a sensitized template for adult-onset heart disease. Our findings are the first to link TBX20 mutations to human pathology. They provide insights into how mutation of different genes in an interactive regulatory circuit lead to diverse clinical phenotypes, with implications for diagnosis, genetic screening, and patient follow-up. PMID:17668378

  2. Role of OCT in the diagnosis and management of macular edema from uveitis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Rebecca S; Skondra, Dimitra; Papaliodis, George; Sobrin, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Uveitis is a potentially visually threatening disease accounting for 10% of vision loss in the developed world. The most common cause of vision loss in patients with uveitis has been shown to be macular edema (ME). The early detection and management of ME is critical to preserve vision in these patients. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a valuable tool in the management of many ocular diseases. The use of OCT has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of macular edema from a wide variety of ophthalmological diseases, including uveitis. In this review, we evaluate the role of OCT in the diagnosis and management of uveitic macular edema. PMID:23163282

  3. Technology needs for tomorrow's treatment and diagnosis of macular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubrane, Gisèle

    2008-02-01

    Retinal imaging is the basis of macular disease's diagnosis. Currently available technologies in clinical practice are fluorescein and indocyanin green (ICG) angiographies, in addition to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is an in vivo "histology-like" cross-sectional images of the retina. Recent developments in the field of OCT imaging include Spectral-Domain OCT. However OCT remains a static view of the macula with no direct link with dynamic observation obtained by angiographies. Adaptative optics is an encouraging perspective for fundus analysis in the future, and could be linked to OCT or angiographies. Treatments of macular disease have exploded these past few years. Pharmacologic inhibition of angiogenesis represents a novel approach in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization in eyes with age-related macular degeneration. The major action explored is the direct inhibition of the protein VEGF with antibody-like products. New anti-VEGF drugs are in development aiming at the VEGF receptors or synthesis of VEGF. But various components of the neovascular cascade, including growth factor expression, extracellular matrix modulation, integrin inhibition represent potential targets for modulation with drugs. Intra-vitreal injections are nowadays the main route of administration for these new treatments but they are potentially responsible of side effects such as endophtalmitis. Development of other routes of treatment would require new formulation of used drugs. The improvement of retinal imaging leads to a better understanding of macular disease mechanisms and will help to develop new routes and targets of treatment.

  4. Interventions for the treatment of uveitic macular edema: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rushmia; Sykakis, Evripidis; Lightman, Susan; Fraser-Bell, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background Uveitic macular edema is the major cause of reduced vision in eyes with uveitis. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions in the treatment of uveitic macular edema. Search strategy Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and Embase. There were no language or data restrictions in the search for trials. The databases were last searched on December 1, 2011. Reference lists of included trials were searched. Archives of Ophthalmology, Ophthalmology, Retina, the British Journal of Ophthalmology, and the New England Journal of Medicine were searched for clinical trials and reviews. Selection criteria Participants of any age and sex with any type of uveitic macular edema were included. Early, chronic, refractory, or secondary uveitic macular edema were included. We included trials that compared any interventions of any dose and duration, including comparison with another treatment, sham treatment, or no treatment. Data collection and analysis Best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome data including adverse effects were collected. Conclusion More results from randomized controlled trials with long follow-up periods are needed for interventions for uveitic macular edema to assist in determining the overall long-term benefit of different treatments. The only intervention with sufficiently robust randomized controlled trials for a meta-analysis was acetazolamide, which was shown to be ineffective in improving vision in eyes with uveitic macular edema, and is clinically now rarely used. Interventions showing promise in this disease include dexamethasone implants, immunomodulatory drugs and anti-vascular endothelial growth-factor agents. When macular edema has become refractory after multiple interventions, pars plana vitrectomy could be considered. The disease pathophysiology is uncertain and the course of disease unpredictable. As there are no clear guidelines from

  5. [Glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration intricacy].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2008-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness among the elderly in Western nations. Age is also a well-known and well-evidenced risk factor for glaucoma. With increasing longevity and the rising prevalence of older people around the world, more and more patients will have glaucoma and AMD. Clinical evaluation of these patients still poses problems for clinicians. It is very important to order the right tests at the right time to distinguish glaucomatous defects from those caused by retinal lesions, because appropriate therapy has a beneficial effect on slowing or halting damage. PMID:18957915

  6. Macular thickness and macular volume measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Nepalese eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Amrit; Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Shrestha, Jyoti Baba

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To record the normative values for macular thickness and macular volume in normal Nepalese eyes. Methods In all, 126 eyes of 63 emmetropic subjects (mean age: 21.17±6.76 years; range: 10–37 years) were assessed for macular thickness and macular volume, using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography over 6×6 mm2 in the posterior pole. A fast macular thickness protocol was employed. Statistics such as the mean, median, standard deviation, percentiles, and range were used, while a P-value was set at 0.05 to test significance. Results Average macular thickness and total macular volume were larger in males compared to females. With each year of increasing age, these variables decreased by 0.556 μm and 0.0156 mm3 for average macular thickness and total macular volume, respectively. The macular thickness was greatest in the inner superior section and lowest at the center of the fovea. The volume was greatest in the outer nasal section and thinnest in the fovea. The central subfield thickness (r=−0.243, P=0.055) and foveal volume (r=0.216, P=0.09) did not correlate with age. Conclusion Males and females differ significantly with regard to macular thickness and macular volume measurements. Reports by other studies that the increase in axial length reduced thickness and volume, were negated by this study which found a positive correlation among axial length, thickness, and volume. PMID:27041990

  7. Quantitative analysis of macular contraction in idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to quantify the displacement of macular capillaries using infrared fundus photographs and image processing software (ImageJ) in patients with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) who have undergone vitrectomy and to analyze the correlation between vessel displacement and retinal thickness. Methods This prospective study included 16 patients who underwent vitrectomy for idiopathic ERM. Ophthalmic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed before and 3 months after surgery. The length of radial vessel segment included in each area (VLA) and the length from the foveola to the vessel branching point (FBL) depending on the superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal areas of the macula were measured using infrared fundus images and image processing software (ImageJ). Preoperative and postoperative parameters were compared and correlations between VLA, FBL, macular thickness, and visual acuity were assessed. Results The VLA of superior, inferior, and temporal areas showed a significant postoperative reduction. VLA differences showed a positive correlation with differences in macular thickness, which corresponded to the superior, inferior, and temporal areas; however, no correlation was observed in the nasal area. The FBL of the superior and inferior areas was significantly increased postoperatively. A positive correlation was observed between FBL differences and macular thickness differences in the superior area. Postoperative change in VLA and FBL did not show a significant correlation with postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and BCVA differences. Conclusions Infrared fundus photographs and image processing software can be useful for quantifying progressive changes in retinal surface distortion after surgical removal of ERM. Macular edema and vascular distortion showed significant improvement after surgery. Furthermore, a correlation was observed between topographic and tomographic changes. PMID:24735324

  8. Scanning laser tomography Z profile signal width as an objective index of macular retinal thickening

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, C.; Flanagan, J.; Turner, G.; McLeod, D.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—(i) To evaluate the relation between retinal thickness and the Z profile signal width of a scanning laser tomographer in selected patients exhibiting clinically manifest and circumscribed macular retinal thickening; (ii) to compare the Z profile signal width values of a group of age similar normal subjects with those of the patients with macular retinal thickening; and (iii) to present the methodology underlying the Z profile signal width derivation.
METHODS—Three patients with the following conditions were selected: widespread diabetic macular oedema; localised diabetic macular oedema; and macular hole. The patients were selected because they exhibited clinically manifest and circumscribed macular retinal thickening. Patients underwent fundus photography and a clinical examination which included fundus biomicroscopy. Fourteen age similar normal subjects were also assessed. The Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) was utilised to acquire seven topographic images of each macula. Z profile signal width data were analysed using custom software. Signal width was measured at 50% of the maximum intensity.
RESULTS—For each patient with macular retinal thickening, Z profile signal width analysis (after normalisation to reduce the influence of variation in reflectance intensity between successive images) revealed a significant (p<0.0001) localised increase of signal width which agreed with the HRT topographic analysis of retinal height, and also the clinical assessment of retinal thickness. The mean normalised Z profile signal width for the normal subjects (assessed over the whole image) ranged from 0.278 (SD 0.039) to 0.444 (0.063); these values compared with those obtained from patients in areas of macular retinal thickening of 0.761 (0.224) to 0.953 (0.194). Z profile signal width test-retest data for the patient with localised diabetic macular oedema were plus or minus 0.159 which compared with a mean signal width value of 0.761.

  9. Laser therapy and macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchini, Ugo; Virgili, Gianni; Giansanti, Fabrizio; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Cappelli, Stefania

    2001-10-01

    Among macular diseases, choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is one of the most common causes of visual loss, especially in the form associated with age-related macular degeneration and pathologic myopia. Research on these diseases has recently evaluated new treatment modalities that use laser light differently; among these, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced in the clinical practice, allowing us to expand the possibility of reducing visual loss in patients affected by CNV. With PDT, a photosensitizer (verteporfin, VisudyneTM) is injected intravenously, and it selectively binds to new vessels; low-power laser light exposure then activates the drug, leading to oxidative damage of the endothelium and new vessels thrombosis. Yet, other therapies, such as transpupillary termotherapy, or the use of photocoagulation to cause feeder-vessel occlusion, could proof effective, but they need further investigation.

  10. Nutritional supplements for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    2006-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the commonest cause of blindness in developed countries and the third most common worldwide. Each year in the UK, around 17,000 people become blind or partially sighted as a result of this condition, and its prevalence is likely to increase with an ageing population. Laser therapy and rarely surgery, can slow disease progression in a minority of patients but is unlikely to restore lost vision. A wide range of nutritional supplements are now on sale with promotional claims that they improve eye health. While some specialists recommend their use to patients with advanced disease, these supplements are also increasingly promoted to people with early or no signs of disease. Consequently, GPs come under pressure from patients to recommend, or even prescribe, a nutritional supplement. Here we examine the evidence for nutritional supplements in the management of age-related macular degeneration and consider which, if any, can be recommended. PMID:16550811

  11. Self-Reported Health Experiences of Children Living with Congenital Heart Defects: Including Patient-Reported Outcomes in a National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tadic, Valerija; Hogan, Ailbhe; Bull, Catherine; Rahi, Jugnoo Sangeeta; Dezateux, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding children’s views about living with congenital heart defects (CHDs) is fundamental to supporting their successful participation in daily life, school and peer relationships. As an adjunct to a health and quality of life outcomes questionnaire, we asked school-age children who survived infant heart procedures to describe their experiences of living with CHDs. Methods In a UK-wide cohort study, children aged 10 to 14 years with CHDs self-completed postal questionnaires that included an open question about having a ‘heart problem’. We compared the characteristics of children with more and less severe cardiac diagnoses and, through collaborative inductive content analysis, investigated the subjective experiences and coping strategies described by children in both clinical severity groups. Results Text and/or drawings were returned by 436 children (246 boys [56%], mean age 12.1 years [SD 1.0; range 10–14]); 313 had less severe (LS) and 123 more severe (MS) cardiac diagnoses. At the most recent hospital visit, a higher proportion of the MS group were underweight (more than two standard deviations below the mean for age) or cyanosed (underweight: MS 20.0%, LS 9.9%; cyanosed: MS 26.2%, LS 3.5%). Children in the MS group described concerns about social isolation and feeling ‘different’, whereas children with less severe diagnoses often characterised their CHD as ‘not a big thing’. Some coping strategies were common to both severity groups, including managing health information to avoid social exclusion, however only children in the LS group considered their CHD ‘in the past’ or experienced a sense of survivorship. Conclusions Children’s reported experiences were not dependent on their cardiac diagnosis, although there were clear qualitative differences by clinical severity group. Children’s concerns emphasised social participation and our findings imply a need to shift the clinical focus from monitoring cardiac function to

  12. Evidence-based review of diabetic macular edema management: Consensus statement on Indian treatment guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Das, Taraprasad; Aurora, Ajay; Chhablani, Jay; Giridhar, Anantharaman; Kumar, Atul; Raman, Rajiv; Nagpal, Manish; Narayanan, Raja; Natarajan, Sundaram; Ramasamay, Kim; Tyagi, Mudit; Verma, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to review the current evidence and design a diabetic macular edema (DME) management guideline specific for India. The published DME guidelines from different organizations and publications were weighed against the practice trends in India. This included the recently approved drugs. DME management consisted of control of diabetes and other associated systemic conditions, such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and specific therapy to reduce macular edema. Quantification of macular edema is precisely made with the optical coherence tomography and treatment options include retinal laser, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and implantable dexamethasone. Specific use of these modalities depends on the presenting vision and extent of macular involvement. Invariable eyes with center-involving macular edema benefit from intravitreal anti-VEGF or dexamethasone implant therapy, and eyes with macular edema not involving the macula center benefit from retinal laser. The results are illustrated with adequate case studies and frequently asked questions. This guideline prepared on the current published evidence is meant as a guideline for the treating physicians. PMID:26953019

  13. Chromatic multifocal pupillometer for objective perimetry in patients with macular degeneration (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Ben-Ner, Daniel; Mahajna, Mohamad; Chibel, Ron; Sher, Ifat

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To objectively assess visual field (VF) defects and retinal cell function in healthy subjects and patients with macular degeneration using a chromatic multifocal pupillometer. Methods: A multifocal chromatic pupillometer (MCP) was used to record pupillary responses (PR) of 17 healthy subjects and 5 Best Vitelliform macular dystrophy patients. Blue and red light stimuli (peak 485nm and 620nm, respectively) were presented at light intensities of 400 and 1000 cd/m2, respectively at 76 different points in a 16.2 degree VF. The PR of patients were compared with their findings on Humphrey's 24-2 perimetry, optical coherence tomography and the PR obtained from healthy subjects. Results: Patients demonstrated reduced percentage of pupillary contraction and slower maximal contraction velocity, more than two standard errors (SE) away from the mean of healthy subjects in response to red light in majority of VF locations. In response to blue light, the percentage of pupillary contraction was lower (by over two SE) compared with normal controls only in central locations. The latency of maximal contraction velocity was shorter in patients compared with healthy subjects in response to both colors. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the advantage of using MCP-based objective VF to assess central scotoma in macular degeneration. Our finding also suggests that chromatic perimetry may differentiate between PR mediated by cones and rods, and can specifically detect defects in macular cones. Different parameters of PR such as latency of maximal contraction velocity may shed light on the pathophysiology of different blinding diseases.

  14. [Epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Brandl, C; Stark, K J; Wintergerst, M; Heinemann, M; Heid, I M; Finger, R P

    2016-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of blindness in industrialized societies. Population-based epidemiological investigations generate important data on prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and future trends. This review summarizes the most important epidemiological studies on AMD with a focus on their transferability to Germany including existing evidence for the main risk factors for AMD development and progression. Future tasks, such as the standardization of grading systems and the use of recent retinal imaging technology in epidemiological studies are discussed. In Germany, epidemiological data on AMD are scarce. However, the need for epidemiological research in ophthalmology is currently being addressed by several recently started population-based studies. PMID:27541733

  15. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  16. VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY IN NEOVASCULAR VERSUS NONNEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Itty, Sujit; Day, Shelley; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Stinnett, Sandra S.; Vajzovic, Lejla M.; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NVAMD) with patients with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration and control patients. Methods Medical records of all patients diagnosed with age-related macular degeneration and tested for serum 25OHD level at a single medical center were reviewed. Control patients were selected from patients diagnosed with pseudophakia but without age-related macular degeneration. The lowest 25OHD level available for each patient was recorded. Results Two hundred sixteen patients with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration, 146 with NVAMD, and 100 non–age-related macular degeneration control patients were included. The levels of 25OHD (mean ± SD) were significantly lower in NVAMD patients (26.1 ± 14.4 ng/mL) versus nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (31.5 ± 18.2 ng/mL, P = 0.003) and control (29.4 ± 10.1 ng/mL, P = 0.049) patients. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (<30 ng/mL 25OHD), deficiency (<20 ng/mL), and severe deficiency (<10 ng/mL) were highest in the NVAMD group. The highest quintile of 25OHD was associated with a 0.35 (95% confidence interval, 0.18– 0.68) odds ratio for NVAMD. Conclusion This is the largest study to compare 25OHD levels in patients with the different clinical forms of age-related macular degeneration. Mean 25OHD levels were lower and vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent in NVAMD patients. These associations suggest that further research is necessary regarding vitamin D deficiency as a potentially modifiable risk factor for the development of NVAMD. PMID:24946100

  17. Association of Diabetic Macular Nonperfusion With Outer Retinal Disruption on Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scarinci, Fabio; Jampol, Lee M.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Diabetic macular nonperfusion leads to decreased perifoveal capillary blood flow, which in turn causes chronic ischemia of the retinal tissue. Using point-to-point correlation between spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and nonperfusion on fluorescein angiography, we observed that retinal capillary nonperfusion is associated with photoreceptor compromise on OCT. This study highlights a new concept of a possible contribution of the retinal deep capillary plexus to photoreceptor compromise in diabetic retinopathy in the absence of diabetic macular edema. OBJECTIVE To report outer retinal structural changes associated with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and/or capillary nonperfusion in the macular area of diabetic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective observational cross-sectional study in 9 patients who were diagnosed as having diabetic retinopathy without diabetic macular edema and underwent fluorescein angiography and SD-OCT for diabetic retinopathy from July 8, 2014, to December 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic referral center. This analysis was conducted between December 2, 2014, and January 31, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outer retinal changes on SD-OCT in areas of macular ischemia. RESULTS The study included 13 eyes of 9 diabetic patients (4 men and 5 women aged 34–58 years) with a mean duration of diabetes mellitus of 14.5 years. Nine eyes showed outer retinal disruption revealed by SD-OCT that colocalized to areas of enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and macular capillary nonperfusion. Four fellow eyes with normal foveal avascular zones did not show any retinal changes on SD-OCT. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Macular ischemia in diabetic patients can be associated with photoreceptor compromise. The presence of disruption of the photoreceptors on OCT in diabetic patients can be a manifestation of underlying capillary nonperfusion in eyes without diabetic macular edema. Ischemia at the deep

  18. Arginine-Restricted Therapy Resistant Bilateral Macular Edema Associated with Gyrate Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Doguizi, Sibel; Sekeroglu, Mehmet Ali; Anayol, Mustafa Alpaslan; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Gyrate atrophy is a rare genetical metabolic disorder affecting vision. Here, we report a 9-year-old boy with gyrate atrophy associated with bilateral macular edema at the time of diagnosis and the effect of long term metabolic control on macular edema. Case Presentation. A 9-year-old boy presented with a complaint of low visual acuity (best corrected visual acuity: 20/80 in both eyes, refractive error: −12.00 D). Dilated fundus examination revealed multiple bilateral, sharply defined, and scalloped chorioretinal atrophy areas in the midperipheral and peripheral zone. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral cystoid macular edema in both eyes. Serum ornithine level was high (622 μmol/L). An arginine-restricted diet reduced serum ornithine level (55 μmol/L). However, visual findings including macular edema remained unchanged in 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion. Arginine-restricted diet did not improve macular edema in our patient with gyrate atrophy. A more comprehensive understanding of the underlying factors for macular edema will lead to the development of effective therapies. PMID:26770854

  19. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  20. MACULAR COLOBOMA IN A CHILD WITH USHER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Mazhar; Mukhtar, Ahsan; Khan, Saim

    2015-01-01

    Macular coloboma is a rare entity and its concomitance with Usher syndrome is described here. A 14 years male child was studied in detail along with other family members. He underwent two complete ophthalmologic examinations (4-years follow-up), including visual assessment, orthoptic evaluation, colour vision test, visual fields, corneal topography, Optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography. Detailed ophthalmic examination was also conducted on other asymptomatic members of the same family. Patient had sensorineural deafness, poor visual acuity, and progressive visual field impairment in both eyes, bilaterally presenting macular coloboma and atypical retinitis pigmentosa pattern. The other investigated relatives did not show any specific and/or significant ocular disorder. This concurrence represents no genetic pattern and is observed in sporadic cases. PMID:26411142

  1. [Age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Garcia Layana, A

    1998-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the occidental world. Patients suffering this process have an important reduction on their quality of life being handicapped to read, to write, to recognise faces of their friends, or even to watch the television. One of the main problems of that disease is the absence of an effective treatment able to revert the process. Laser treatment is only useful in a limited number of patients, and even in these cases recurrent lesions are frequent. These facts and the progressive ageing of our society establish the ARMD as one of the biggest aim of medical investigations for the next century, and currently is focus of attention in the most industrialised countries. One of the most promising pieces of research is focused in the investigation of the risk factors associated with the age-related macular degeneration, in order to achieve a prophylactic treatment avoiding its appearance. Diet elements such as fat ingestion or reduced antioxidant intakes are being investigated as some of these factors, what open a new possibility for a prophylactic treatment. Finally, research is looking for new therapeutic modalities such as selective radiotherapy in order to improve or maintain the vision of these patients. PMID:10420956

  2. Iron deficiency anemia presenting with macular star.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Bhakti P; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Pawar, Neelam; Ramakrishnan, Rengappa; Shelke, Vijaysai

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of 16-year-old girl who presented with sudden painless decreased vision in her right eye of 5 days' duration. Anterior segment examination in both eyes showed conjunctival pallor. Results of ophthalmoscopic examination and optical coherence tomography were consistent with macular preretinal hemorrhage in both eyes with macular star in the left eye. Hematologic investigation disclosed severe iron deficiency anaemia. After 2 months, with oral substitution therapy with ferrous ascorbate and improved iron levels, the patient's visual acuity improved and macular preretinal hemorrhage resolved in both eyes. PMID:26486041

  3. Advances in the management of macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current management of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be divided into two categories: first, anti-vasoendothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection for wet macular degeneration; second, anti-oxidant vitamins for dry macular degeneration. New therapies are being developed for both of these diseases using novel technologies and different modes of administration. The hope is that some of these therapies will achieve significant improvement to current management and prevent future loss of vision in this devastating eye condition. PMID:24860651

  4. An updated review of long-term outcomes from randomized controlled trials in approved pharmaceuticals for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Kang; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Su, Pei-Yuan; Chang, Pei-Yao

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a major sight-threatening cause in diabetic patients. We review the long-term outcome of four approved pharmacotherapy for treating DME, including intravitreal injections of corticosteroids (dexamethasone implants and fluocinolone acetonide inserts) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (ranibizumab and aflibercept). They all show superior ability to improve vision and reduce macular thickness, comparing with sham injections or macular focal/grid laser treatment. Anti-VEGF agents result in low incidence of severe ocular or systemic adverse effects, but glaucoma and cataract should be aware after intravitreal corticosteroids. Prompt treatment with these agents can lead to a better outcome PMID:27215008

  5. A Multiscale Model of Cardiovascular System Including an Immersed Whole Heart in the Cases of Normal and Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD).

    PubMed

    Lee, Wanho; Jung, Eunok

    2015-07-01

    A mathematical and computational model combining the heart and circulatory system has been developed to understand the hemodynamics of circulation under normal conditions and ventricular septal defect (VSD). The immersed boundary method has been introduced to describe the interaction between the moving two-dimensional heart and intracardiac blood flow. The whole-heart model is governed by the Navier-Stokes system; this system is combined with a multi-compartment model of circulation using pressure-flow relations and the linearity of the discretized Navier-Stokes system. We investigate the velocity field, flowmeters, and pressure-volume loop in both normal and VSD cases. Simulation results show qualitatively good agreements with others found in the literature. This model, combining the heart and circulation, is useful for understanding the complex, hemodynamic mechanisms involved in normal circulation and cardiac diseases. PMID:26223734

  6. Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap For Large Traumatic Macular Holes.

    PubMed

    Abou Shousha, Mohsen Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of inverted internal limiting membrane flap as a treatment option for large traumatic macular holes.This is a prospective noncomparative study in which 12 eyes with large traumatic macular holes (basal diameter of 1300-2800 μm) since 3 to 6 months were subjected to standard 23-gauge vitrectomy with removal of the posterior hyaloid, brilliant blue G (BBG)-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling in a circular fashion keeping it attached to the edge of the hole to create a flap. At the end of the surgery, air fluid exchange was done with inversion of the internal limiting membrane flap inside the macular hole using the soft tipped cannula and sulfur hexafluoride 20% as tamponade. The main follow-up measures are the best corrected visual acuity and the optical coherence tomography for 6 to 9 months.All the included eyes had a closed hole from the first week postoperative and along the follow-up period (6-9 months). The best corrected visual acuity improved from 20/2000 to 20/200 with a median of 20/400 preoperatively to 20/400 to 20/50 with a median of 20/100 at the end of follow-up period.Inverted internal limiting membrane flap is a good adjuvant to standard vitrectomy in the management of large traumatic macular holes that led to the 100% closure rate and improvement of best corrected visual acuity. PMID:26817894

  7. Genetics Home Reference: vitelliform macular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... faces. Vitelliform macular dystrophy causes a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) to build up in cells underlying the ... structures in these cells that contain light-sensing pigments. It is unclear why PRPH2 mutations affect only ...

  8. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal. PMID:869758

  9. Comparison of intravitreal bevacizumab with macular photocoagulation for treatment of diabetic macular edema: a systemic review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhi; Shen, Hong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    AIM To further evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) versus macular photocoagulation (MPC) in treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME) by Meta-analysis. METHODS Pertinent publications were identified through systemic searches of PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to 30 November, 2013. Changes in central macular thickness (CMT) in µm and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in logMAR equivalents were extracted at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24mo after initial treatment, and a Meta-analysis was carried out to compare results between groups receiving IVB and MPC. RESULTS Five randomized controlled trial (RCTs) and one high-quality comparative study were identified and included. Our Meta-analysis revealed that both IVB and MPC resulted in the improvements of CMT and BCVA in eyes with DME at 1mo after initial treatment, with IVB being significantly superior to MPC (P=0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The improvements of both measure outcomes at 3, 6, 12 and 24mo after treatment did not vary significantly between the IVB groups and MPC groups (CMT at 3mo, P=0.85; at 6mo, P=0.29; at 12mo, P=0.56; at 24mo, P=0.71; BCVA at 3mo, P=0.31; at 6mo, P= 0.30; at 12mo, P=0.23; at 24mo, P=0.52). However, the number of observed adverse events was low in all studies. CONCLUSION Current evidence shows IVB treatment trends to be more effective in improvements of macular edema and vision in eyes with DME at an earlier follow up (1mo) compared with MPC. At other time, both interventions have comparable efficacy without statistical significances. PMID:25540764

  10. INTRAVITREAL DICLOFENAC VERSUS INTRAVITREAL TRIAMCINOLONE FOR THE TREATMENT OF UVEITIC CYSTOID MACULAR EDEMA.

    PubMed

    Soheilian, Masoud; Eskandari, Armen; Ramezani, Alireza; Rabbanikhah, Zahra; Esmaeilpour, Nasim F; Soheilian, Roham

    2013-04-11

    PURPOSE:: To compare the effect of intravitreal diclofenac (IVD) versus intravitreal triamcinolone (IVT) on refractory uveitic cystoid macular edema. METHODS:: In this pilot, randomized, clinical trial, 15 eyes were randomly assigned to IVD group, patients (8 eyes) who received a single intravitreal injection of diclofenac (500 μg/0.1 mL), and IVT group (7 eyes) patients who received a single intravitreal injection of triamcinolone (2 mg). Change in best-corrected visual acuity in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution at Week 36 was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes included changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 12 weeks and 24 weeks, central macular thickness, macular leakage, and potential injection-related complications. RESULTS:: In the IVD group, BCVA was more than the baseline values in 4 eyes at 36 weeks; however, within-group analysis disclosed no statistically significant changes in the mean BCVA in this group. Nonetheless, in the IVT group, mean BCVA improved significantly at 12, 24, but not at 36 weeks compared with the baseline values. It was 0.86 ± 0.37 at baseline and 0.63 ± 0.48, 0.62 ± 0.42, and 0.43 ± 0.49 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution at 12, 24, and 36 weeks, respectively. Mean central macular thickness diminished also significantly only in the IVT group. Nevertheless, comparing the mean BCVA and central macular thickness changes, macular leakage, and the occurrence of any injection-related complications, no significant difference was observed between the groups at any of the follow-up visits. CONCLUSION:: This pilot study demonstrated the superiority of IVT over IVD in the treatment of refractory uveitic cystoid macular edema regarding both functional and anatomical outcomes. Further studies are warranted to confirm potential benefit of IVD observed in this study. PMID:23584700

  11. Advanced image processing for optical coherence tomographic angiography of macular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jie; Pechauer, Alex D.; Hwang, Thomas S.; Gao, Simon S.; Liu, Liang; Liu, Li; Bailey, Steven T.; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of advanced image processing for three dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomographic (OCT) angiography of macular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR). A fast automated retinal layers segmentation algorithm using directional graph search was introduced to separates 3D flow data into different layers in the presence of pathologies. Intelligent manual correction methods are also systematically addressed which can be done rapidly on a single frame and then automatically propagated to full 3D volume with accuracy better than 1 pixel. Methods to visualize and analyze the abnormalities including retinal and choroidal neovascularization, retinal ischemia, and macular edema were presented to facilitate the clinical use of OCT angiography. PMID:26713185

  12. Macular findings on optical coherence tomography in cat-scratch disease neuroretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Habot-Wilner, Z; Zur, D; Goldstein, M; Goldenberg, D; Shulman, S; Kesler, A; Giladi, M; Neudorfer, M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the macular findings on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with cat-scratch disease (CSD) neuroretinitis. Methods Medical records of all patients diagnosed with CSD neuroretinitis at the Tel Aviv Medical Center between April 2006 and May 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent Stratus OCT macular examination. Results Eight eyes of seven patients with confirmed CSD neuroretinitis, (mean age 33±9.9 years, range 6–48 years) were included in the study. All patients presented clinically with optic nerve swelling and macular edema or macular exudates. OCT demonstrated flattening of the foveal contour, thickening of the neurosensory retina, and accumulation of subretinal fluid (SRF) in all studied eyes. Retinal exudates appeared as multiple hyper-reflective foci in the outer plexiform layer. The average central macular thickness was 460 μm (range 170–906 μm) and the average maximal retinal thickness was 613 μm (range 387–1103 μm), at presentation. The macula appeared normal on repeated exams during follow-up. Conclusion Similar OCT findings were demonstrated in patients with CSD neuroretinitis. SRF was found in all eyes, although was not visible on clinical examination or fluorescein angiography. OCT may be used as an adjunct imaging tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CSD neuroretinitis. PMID:21660065

  13. Macular morphology and response to ranibizumab treatment in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dervenis, Nikolaos; Younis, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess whether specific characteristics of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) affect structural and functional outcomes and number of injections needed in ranibizumab (0.05 mL of 10 mg/mL Lucentis solution)-treated wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. Patients and methods This retrospective case series included 62 newly diagnosed wet AMD patients treated with three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections followed by monthly follow-up and pro re nata retreatment. The presence of dome-shaped pigment epithelial detachment (PED), disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and subretinal and intraretinal fluid was associated with changes in Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, central macular thickness (CMT), and number of injections needed during the 6-month follow-up. Results The presence of PED was associated with lower values of CMT at presentation (399 μm [±132 μm] vs 310 μm [±51 μm], P=0.005). The presence of RPE disruption was associated with worse visual acuity in month 6 (0.36 [±0.22] vs 0.61 [0.45], P=0.027) and fewer injections (4.23 [±0.92] vs 3.55 [±0.60], P=0.007). The presence of intraretinal fluid at presentation was associated with worse visual acuity outcomes in month 4 (P=0.045) but not in month 6. Conclusion The dome-shaped PED was associated with lower CMT at presentation, but it did not affect response to treatment. RPE disruption was associated with worse functional outcomes with fewer injections. Intraretinal fluid at presentation may suggest delayed response to treatment. Individualized SD-OCT analysis could lead to individualized approach to wet AMD patients. SD-OCT can offer imaging biomarkers to assess the prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment in AMD patients. PMID:27366051

  14. Birth Defects Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosomal disorder or heart defect in the baby. Second Trimester Screening Second trimester screening tests are completed between weeks 15 ... look for certain birth defects in the baby. Second trimester screening tests include a maternal serum screen ...

  15. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  16. Role of aflibercept for macular edema following branch retinal vein occlusion: comparison of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Oellers, Patrick; Grewal, Dilraj S; Fekrat, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    For years, the standard of care for branch-retinal-vein-occlusion-associated macular edema was initial observation followed by grid-pattern laser photocoagulation for persistent edema. Newer pharmacologic options have revolutionized the management of branch-retinal-vein-occlusion-associated macular edema, and the visual outcomes of these eyes are better than ever. However, a variety of available treatment options including intravitreal corticosteroids and intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents have established novel challenges with regard to appropriate drug selection. This review summarizes the available clinical studies with special emphasis on the comparison of intravitreal aflibercept with ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and steroid agents. PMID:27022238

  17. Diabetic macular edema: New promising therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Hanan N Al; Masaud, Jluwi S; Ghazi, Nicola G

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema is rapidly evolving. The era of laser therapy is being quickly replaced by an era of pharmacotherapy. Several pharmacotherapies have been recently developed for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic macular edema. Several intravitreal injections or sustained delivery devices have undergone phase 3 testing while others are currently being evaluated. The results of clinical trials have shown the superiority of some of these agents to laser therapy. However, with the availability of several of these newer agents, it may be difficult to individualize treatment options especially those patients respond differently to various therapies. As such, more effort is still needed in order to determine the best treatment regimen for a given patient. In this article, we briefly summarize the major new therapeutic additions for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising therapies. PMID:24379924

  18. Macular degeneration in an arc welder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun A; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yi, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Il Gon; Chae, Chang-Ho; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2007-04-01

    A male welder who had been working in an industrial machine plant for more than 20 years experienced acute intense pain in his left eye with continuous lacrimation while performing arc welding in 1997. Later in 1997, at the age of 39 yr, macular edema was found in his left eye. He was diagnosed with macular degeneration (MD) of the left eye in 2002, and with right eye MD in 2004. Radiation in the visible and near infrared (IR) spectra penetrates the eye and is absorbed by the retina, possibly causing thermal or photochemical damage. Such retinal damage may be permanent and, therefore, sight-threatening. The young age and history of an acute painful eye injury are not consistent with age related macular degeneration (AMD) but rather is likely maculopathy caused by welding arc exposure. PMID:17485886

  19. [Diagnostic Criteria for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kanji; Shiraga, Fumio; Ishida, Susumu; Kamei, Motohiro; Yanagi, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic criteria for dry age-related macular degeneration is described. Criteria include visual acuity, fundscopic findings, diagnostic image findings, exclusion criteria and classification of severity grades. Essential findings to make diagnosis as "geographic atrophy" are, 1) at least 250 μm in diameter, 2) round/oval/cluster-like or geographic in shape, 3) sharp delineation, 4) hypopigmentation or depigmentation in retinal pigment epithelium, 5) choroidal vessels are more visible than in surrounding area. Severity grades were classified as mild, medium and severe by relation of geographic atrophy to the fovea and attendant findings. PMID:26571627

  20. Inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique for very large macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Khodani, Mitali; Bansal, Pooja; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the anatomical and visual outcome of idiopathic macular holes greater than 1000 µm using the inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique. METHODS This retrospective case series included 5 eyes of 5 patients with idiopathic macular hole with base diameter greater than 1000 µm who underwent inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique along with standard 23G pars plans vitrectomy with posterior hyaloid detachment and fluid gas exchange with 12%-14% perfluoropropane (C3F8). Preoperative and postoperative visual acuity and spectral domain optical coherence tomography images were evaluated. The main outcome measures were visual outcome and macular hole closure. RESULTS Mean age was 63.2±8.4y with all 5 subjects being females. Mean duration of symptoms was 11±14mo with a mean postoperative follow up of 13.2±13mo. The mean base diameter of the macular holes was 1420±84.8 µm (1280-1480 µm). Type 1 closure was achieved in four out of five patients, while one patient had type 2 closure using the inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM) flap technique. Median baseline BCVA was 0.79 logMAR (Snellen's equivalent 20/120) and median final BCVA 0.6 logMAR (Snellen's equivalent 20/80) with mean visual improvement of approximately three lines improvement. No complications related to surgical procedure were noted. CONCLUSION The inverted internal limiting membrane flap technique may be promising for very large macular holes with high rate of macular closure and good visual outcome. PMID:27588280

  1. Perinatal Exposure to Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Triggers Profound Defects in T Cell Differentiation and Function in Fetal and Postnatal Stages of Life, Including Decreased Responsiveness to HIV Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Catherine; Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    Marijuana abuse is very prominent among pregnant women. Although marijuana cannabinoids have been shown to exert immunosuppression in adults, virtually nothing is known about the effects of marijuana use during pregnancy on the developing immune system of the fetus and during postnatal life. We noted that murine fetal thymus expressed high levels of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Moreover, perinatal exposure to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) had a profound effect on the fetus as evidenced by a decrease in thymic cellularity on gestational days 16, 17, and 18 and postgestational day 1 and marked alterations in T cell subpopulations. These outcomes were reversed by CB1/CB2 antagonists, suggesting that THC-mediated these effects through cannabinoid receptors. Thymic atrophy induced in the fetus correlated with caspase-dependent apoptosis in thymocytes. Thymic atrophy was the result of direct action of THC and not based on maternal factors inasmuch as THC was able to induce T cell apoptosis in vitro in fetal thymic organ cultures. It is noteworthy that perinatal exposure to THC also had a profound effect on the immune response during postnatal life. Peripheral T cells from such mice showed decreased proliferative response to T cell mitogen as well as both T cell and antibody response to HIV-1 p17/p24/gp120 antigens. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that perinatal exposure to THC triggers profound T cell dysfunction, thereby suggesting that the offspring of marijuana abusers who have been exposed to THC in utero may be at a higher risk of exhibiting immune dysfunction and contracting infectious diseases including HIV. PMID:21831965

  2. Semilocal defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. )

    1992-11-15

    I analyze the interplay of gauge and global symmetries in the theory of topological defects. In a two-dimensional model in which both gauge symmetries and {ital exact} global symmetries are spontaneously broken, stable vortices may fail to exist even though magnetic flux is topologically conserved. Following Vachaspati and Achucarro, I formulate the condition that must be satisfied by the pattern of symmetry breakdown for finite-energy configurations to exist in which the conserved magnetic flux is spread out instead of confined to a localized vortex. If this condition is met, vortices are always unstable at sufficiently weak gauge coupling. I also describe the properties of defects in models with an accidental'' symmetry that is partially broken by gauge-boson exchange. In some cases, the spontaneously broken accidental symmetry is not restored inside the core of the defect. Then the structure of the defect can be analyzed using an effective field theory; the details of the physics responsible for the spontaneous symmetry breakdown need not be considered. Examples include domain walls and vortices that are classically unstable, but are stabilized by loop corrections, and magnetic monopoles that have an unusual core structure. Finally, I examine the general theory of the electroweak strings'' that were recently discussed by Vachaspati. These arise only in models with gauge-boson mixing,'' and can always end on magnetic monopoles. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  3. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant in the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U; Bandello, Francesco; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) resembles a chronic, low-grade inflammatory reaction, and is characterized by blood–retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and retinal capillary leakage. Corticosteroids are of therapeutic benefit because of their anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and BRB-stabilizing properties. Delivery modes include periocular and intravitreal (via pars plana) injection. To offset the short intravitreal half-life of corticosteroid solutions (~3 hours) and the need for frequent intravitreal injections, sustained-release intravitreal corticosteroid implants have been developed. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant provides retinal drug delivery for ≤6 months and recently has been approved for use in the treatment of DME. Pooled findings (n=1,048) from two large-scale, randomized Phase III trials indicated that dexamethasone intravitreal implant (0.35 mg and 0.7 mg) administered at ≥6-month intervals produced sustained improvements in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and macular edema. Significantly more patients showed a ≥15-letter gain in BCVA at 3 years with dexamethasone intravitreal implant 0.35 mg and 0.7 mg than with sham injection (18.4% and 22.2% vs 12.0%). Anatomical assessments showed rapid and sustained reductions in macular edema and slowing of retinopathy progression. Phase II study findings suggest that dexamethasone intravitreal implant is effective in focal, cystoid, and diffuse DME, in vitrectomized eyes, and in combination with laser therapy. Ocular complications of dexamethasone intravitreal implant in Phase III trials included cataract-related events (66.0% in phakic patients), intraocular pressure elevation ≥25 mmHg (29.7%), conjunctival hemorrhage (23.5%), vitreous hemorrhage (10.0%), macular fibrosis (8.3%), conjunctival hyperemia (7.2%), eye pain (6.1%), vitreous detachment (5.8%), and dry eye (5.8%); injection-related complications (eg, retinal tear/detachment, vitreous loss, endophthalmitis) were infrequent (<2

  4. Assessment of Macular Function during Vitrectomy: New Approach Using Intraoperative Focal Macular Electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a new technique to record focal macular electroretinograms (FMERGs) during vitrectomy to assess macular function. Methods Intraoperative FMERGs (iFMERGs) were recorded in ten patients (10 eyes) who undergo vitrectomy. iFMERGs were elicited by focal macular stimulation. The stimulus light was directed to the macular area through a 25 gauge (25G) glass fiber optic bundle. Background light was delivered through a dual chandelier-type light fiber probe. Focal macular responses elicited with combinations of stimulus and background luminances were analyzed. Results A stimulus luminance that was approximately 1.75 log units brighter than the background light was able to elicit focal macular responses that were not contaminated by stray light responses. Thus, a stimulus luminance of 160 cd/m2 delivered on a background of 3 cd/m2 elicited iFMEGs from only the stimulated area. This combination of stimulus and background luminances did not elicit a response when the stimulus was projected onto the optic nerve head. The iFMERGs elicited by a 10° stimulus with a duration of 100 ms and an interstimulus interval of 150 ms consisted of an a-, b-, and d-waves, the oscillatory potentials, and the photopic negative response (PhNR). Conclusions Focal ERGs with all components can be recorded from the macula and other retinal areas during vitreous surgery. This new technique will allow surgeons to assess the function of focal areas of the retina intraoperatively. PMID:26658489

  5. Enhanced vitreous imaging optical coherence tomography in primary macular holes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Nagaoka, Taiji; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current pilot study is to investigate the efficacy of a novel enhanced vitreous imaging (EVI) in primary macular holes (MHs) using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Thirty-four eyes of 32 consecutive patients with a MH were examined in one time cross-sectional study. The vitreomacular interface was assessed using SD-OCT with conventional and EVI technique. Twenty-three of the 34 eyes did not show a Weiss ring, and in 22 of those, we observed a MH with an open roof or operculum and a detached posterior vitreous cortex with conventional vitreous imaging. Using EVI-OCT, we visualized the reflection of the posterior vitreous with a vitreopapillary attachment. One of the 23 eyes without a Weiss ring had a central round retinal defect without an operculum, and the conventional SD-OCT showed an empty vitreous, suggesting a complete posterior vitreous detachment. However, the EVI-OCT revealed the reflection of the posterior vitreous, and the cortex appeared to still be completely attached. In all the 23 eyes without a Weiss ring, EVI-OCT detected the reflection of the posterior vitreous and vitreopapillary attachment. In all 11 eyes with a Weiss ring (stage 4 hole), EVI-OCT showed an optically empty space in the posterior vitreous cavity without a vitreopapillary attachment. EVI-OCT may be a new reliable method for preoperative evaluations to determine the presence or absence of a complete posterior vitreous detachment in macular diseases with an indistinct Weiss ring. PMID:26349565

  6. The Intravitreal Autologous Platelet Concentrate Injection as an Adjunct of Vitrectomy for the Treatment of Refractory Macular Holes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Macular Hole With High Myopia (Spherical Equivalent ≤ -6.0 Diopters) or,; Large Size Macular Hole (Diameter > 600 Microns) or; Recurred or Failed Macular Hole From Previous Surgery; or Chronic Macular Hole (Symptom Duration > 6 Months)

  7. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety, and considers directions for future research. PMID:20046818

  8. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Stargardt macular degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Free article on PubMed Central Walia S, Fishman GA. Natural history of phenotypic changes in Stargardt macular ... 23, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with ...

  10. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  11. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  12. Macular Amyloidosis and Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Yalda; Tayyebi Meibodi, Naser; Meshkat, Zahra; Nazeri, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Background. Amyloidosis is extracellular precipitation of eosinophilic hyaline material of self-origin with special staining features and fibrillar ultrastructure. Macular amyloidosis is limited to the skin, and several factors have been proposed for its pathogenesis. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in this lesion suggests that this virus can play a role in pathogenesis of this disease. Objective. EBV DNA detection was done on 30 skin samples with a diagnosis of macular amyloidosis and 31 healthy skin samples in the margin of removed melanocytic nevi by using PCR. Results. In patients positive for beta-globin gene in PCR, BLLF1 gene of EBV virus was positive in 23 patients (8 patients in case and 15 patients in the control group). There was no significant difference in presence of EBV DNA between macular amyloidosis (3.8%) and control (23.8%) groups (P = 0.08). Conclusion. The findings of this study showed that EBV is not involved in pathogenesis of macular amyloidosis. PMID:26981113

  13. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Birth Defects: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What are birth defects? Birth defects are structural or functional abnormalities present ...

  14. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  15. Optimal management of idiopathic macular holes

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Haifa A; Masri, Ibrahim; Steel, David H

    2016-01-01

    This review evaluates the current surgical options for the management of idiopathic macular holes (IMHs), including vitrectomy, ocriplasmin (OCP), and expansile gas use, and discusses key background information to inform the choice of treatment. An evidence-based approach to selecting the best treatment option for the individual patient based on IMH characteristics and patient-specific factors is suggested. For holes without vitreomacular attachment (VMA), vitrectomy is the only option with three key surgical variables: whether to peel the inner limiting membrane (ILM), the type of tamponade agent to be used, and the requirement for postoperative face-down posturing. There is a general consensus that ILM peeling improves primary anatomical hole closure rate; however, in small holes (<250 µm), it is uncertain whether peeling is always required. It has been increasingly recognized that long-acting gas and face-down positioning are not always necessary in patients with small- and medium-sized holes, but large (>400 µm) and chronic holes (>1-year history) are usually treated with long-acting gas and posturing. Several studies on posturing and gas choice were carried out in combination with ILM peeling, which may also influence the gas and posturing requirement. Combined phacovitrectomy appears to offer more rapid visual recovery without affecting the long-term outcomes of vitrectomy for IMH. OCP is licensed for use in patients with small- or medium-sized holes and VMA. A greater success rate in using OCP has been reported in smaller holes, but further predictive factors for its success are needed to refine its use. It is important to counsel patients realistically regarding the rates of success with intravitreal OCP and its potential complications. Expansile gas can be considered as a further option in small holes with VMA; however, larger studies are required to provide guidance on its use. PMID:26834454

  16. Macular function and morphology after peeling of idiopathic epiretinal membrane with and without the assistance of indocyanine green

    PubMed Central

    Hillenkamp, J; Saikia, P; Gora, F; Sachs, H G; Lohmann, C P; Roider, J; Bäumler, W; Gabel, V-P

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate macular function and morphology after surgical removal of idiopathic epiretinal membrane (IEM) with and without assistance of indocyanine green (ICG). Methods: A retrospective study as a consecutive case series, of 39 patients with IEM. 39 patients, 23 female, 16 male, mean age 67 years, underwent standard three port pars plana vitrectomy with removal of epiretinal membrane. Two groups of patients were consecutively operated: in 20 patients ICG 0.1% in glucose 5% was used to stain the epiretinal membrane. 19 patients underwent the identical procedure but without use of ICG. Postoperative follow up was 1–92 months (mean 15.5 months). Functional outcome was assessed with subjective improvement, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), Amsler grid test, 10° and 30° automated perimetry (Heidelberg visual field analyser) (HFA), and Goldmann kinetic perimetry. Macular morphology was assessed with stereoscopic biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The main outcome measures were macular function as determined by BCVA, presence of visual field defects, and metamorphopsia as determined by Amsler grid test, macular morphology as determined by slit lamp biomicroscopy, and OCT. Results: BCVA improved in 28 patients, remained unchanged in eight patients, and decreased in three patients. Improvement of BCVA was statistically significant in both groups (p = 0.003). Mean BCVA in patients operated with ICG improved from 0.33 preoperatively to 0.53 postoperatively. Mean BCVA in patients operated without ICG improved from 0.32 preoperatively to 0.54 postoperatively. Reduction of macular oedema as measured by OCT was statistically significant in both groups (p<0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative BCVA, macular oedema as measured by OCT, postoperative Amsler grid test, and subjective improvement between the two groups. The incidence of residual or recurrent epiretinal membrane was greater in the group operated

  17. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune privileged tissue due to its unique anatomical and physiological properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergo low levels of activation (para-inflammation). In many cases, this para-inflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), this para-inflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal para-inflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors and old age. Dysregulated para-inflammation (chronic inflammation) in AMD damages the blood retina barrier (BRB), resulting in the breach of retinal immune privilege leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in AMD, and explores the difference between beneficial para-inflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of AMD. PMID:26292978

  18. Macular Development in Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hemang K.; Faia, Lisa J.; Robinson, Joshua; Drenser, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report anatomic outcomes after early and confluent laser photocoagulation of the entire avascular retina, including areas in close proximity to the fovea, in patients with APROP. We aspire to demonstrate fundoscopic evidence of transverse growth and macular development following laser treatment in APROP. Methods. Retrospective review of 6 eyes with APROP that underwent confluent laser photocoagulation of the entire avascular retina. Photographic fundoscopic imaging was performed using the RetCam to compare outcomes after treatment. Results. Mean birth weight and gestational age were 704.8 g and 24.33 weeks, respectively. There were 2 females and 1 male. The average time to laser was 9.3 weeks after birth, with the mean postmenstrual age of 34 weeks. Two eyes had zone 1 and 4 eyes had posterior zone 2 disease. Three eyes developed 4A detachments, which were successfully treated. All 6 eyes experienced transverse growth, with expansion of the posterior pole and anterior displacement of the laser treatment. Conclusion. Confluent photocoagulation of the entire avascular retina, regardless of foveal proximity, should be the mainstay for treating APROP. Examination should be conducted within 5–10 days to examine areas previously hidden by neovascularization to ensure prudent therapy. Macular development involves both transverse and anterior-posterior growth. PMID:26167498

  19. Effect of change in macular birefringence imaging protocol on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness parameters using GDx VCC in eyes with macular lesions.

    PubMed

    Dada, Tanuj; Tinwala, Sana I; Dave, Vivek; Agarwal, Anand; Sharma, Reetika; Wadhwani, Meenakshi

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of two macular birefringence protocols (bow-tie retardation and irregular macular scan) using GDx VCC on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness parameters in normal eyes and eyes with macular lesions. In eyes with macular lesions, the standard protocol led to significant overestimation of RNFL thickness which was normalized using the irregular macular pattern protocol. In eyes with normal macula, absolute RNFL thickness values were higher in irregular macular pattern protocols with the difference being statistically significant for all parameters except for inferior average thickness. This has implications for monitoring glaucoma patients who develop macular lesions during the course of their follow-up. PMID:24469116

  20. Macular Thickness Measurements with Frequency Domain-OCT for Quantification of Retinal Neural Loss and its Correlation with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimerʼs Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Leonardo Provetti; Lopes, Luciana Cheker; Costa-Cunha, Luciana Virgínia Ferreira; Costa, Carolina Ferreira; Pires, Leopoldo Antônio; Almeida, Ana Laura Maciel; Monteiro, Mário Luiz Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of frequency domain optical coherence tomography (fd-OCT) to estimate retinal neural loss in eyes with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We also verified the existence of a correlation between AD-related cognitive impairment and macular and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements. Methods fd-OCT scans were obtained from 45 eyes of 24 patients with AD and 48 control eyes. Peripapillary RNFL, macular full-thickness and segmented inner macular thickness parameters were calculated. The inner macular parameters included macular retinal nerve fiber layer (mRNFL) thickness, ganglion cell layer (GCL) plus inner plexiform layer thickness (GCL+), and RNFL plus GCL+ thickness (GCL++). The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to assess cognition in all subjects. The two groups were compared and the relationship between MMSE scores and fd-OCT measurements was verified. Results Average, superior and inferior quadrant RNFL thickness parameters and all but one of the nine full-thickness macular measurements were significantly reduced in AD patients compared to controls. The segmented layers, GCL+ and GCL++ were significantly reduced in AD eyes. A significant correlation was found between most fd-OCT parameters (especially macular thickness measurements) and MMSE scores. Conclusions Most fd-OCT peripapillary RNFL and macular full-thickness and segmented inner retinal layers parameters were reduced in AD eyes compared to controls. Moreover, neuronal loss, especially as reflected in macular parameters, correlated well with cognitive impairment in AD. Our results suggest that fd-OCT could be a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the evaluation and follow-up of AD patients. PMID:27104962

  1. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  2. Photoreceptor Outer Segment on Internal Limiting Membrane after Macular Hole Surgery: Implications for Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grinton, Michael E.; Sandinha, Maria T.; Steel, David H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This report presents a case, which highlights key principles in the pathophysiology of macular holes. It has been hypothesized that anteroposterior (AP) and tangential vitreous traction on the fovea are the primary underlying factors causing macular holes [Nischal and Pearson; in Kanski and Bowling: Clinical Ophthalmology: A Systemic Approach, 2011, pp 629–631]. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has subsequently corroborated this theory in part but shown that AP vitreofoveal traction is the more common scenario [Steel and Lotery: Eye 2013;27:1–21]. Methods This study was conducted as a single case report. Results A 63-year old female presented to her optician with blurred and distorted vision in her left eye. OCT showed a macular hole with a minimum linear diameter of 370 µm, with persistent broad vitreofoveal attachment on both sides of the hole edges. The patient underwent combined left phacoemulsification and pars plana vitrectomy, internal limiting membrane (ILM) peel and gas injection. The ILM was examined by electron microscopy and showed the presence of a cone outer segment on the retinal side. Post-operative OCT at 11 weeks showed a closed hole with recovery of the foveal contour and good vision. Conclusion Our case shows the presence of a photoreceptor outer segment on the retinal side of the ILM and reinforces the importance of tangential traction in the development of some macula holes. The case highlights the theory of transmission of inner retinal forces to the photoreceptors via Müller cells and how a full thickness macular hole defect can occur in the absence of AP vitreomacular traction. PMID:26557083

  3. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health-specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  4. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health–specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  5. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  6. [Functional characteristics of macular telangiectasia type 2].

    PubMed

    Heeren, T F C; Krüger, E; Holz, F G; Charbel Issa, P

    2014-09-01

    The first symptoms of macular telangiectasia type 2 usually occur between 50 and 70 years of age. Functional alterations topographically correspond to the morphological changes. Characteristic paracentral scotomata due to focal photoreceptor atrophy can be detected using microperimetry. The predominant paracentral functional loss may cause reading difficulties despite visual acuity in the range between 20/20 and 20/50. Visual acuity around 20/200 may occur once the paracentral photoreceptor atrophy extends centrally, or due to the development of a macular hole or a secondary neovascular membrane. Progression of functional loss can often only be detected by mapping scotoma size or occurrence using microperimetry, while visual acuity may remain unchanged. PMID:25204528

  7. Increased resolution macular thickness mapping by OCT.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Rui; Santos, Torcato; Cunha-Vaz, José

    2006-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) poor mapping resolution has been pointed out as the biggest disadvantage of this technique when compared to others, e.g., retinal thickness analyzer. In this work we were able to solve this problem by developing an atlas of macular thickness of the human retina into which OCT scans were thereafter registered. This atlas is used to allow registering OCT scans from the Fast Macular Protocol, thus bringing OCT scans into the atlas coordinates, therefore correcting for misfixations, while simultaneously allowing to perform OCT inter-scan registration. From this initial registration, we were able to compute a thickness map into which Fast RNFL Protocol scans were merged, thus allowing for increased OCT mapping resolution. PMID:17946646

  8. Management of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema.

    PubMed

    Guo, Suqin; Patel, Shriji; Baumrind, Ben; Johnson, Keegan; Levinsohn, Daniel; Marcus, Edward; Tannen, Brad; Roy, Monique; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Zarbin, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) is a common complication following cataract surgery. Acute PCME may resolve spontaneously, but some patients will develop chronic macular edema that affects vision and is difficult to treat. This disease was described more than 50 years ago, and there are multiple options for clinical management. We discuss mechanisms, clinical efficacy, and adverse effects of these treatment modalities. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and corticosteroids are widely used and, when combined, may have a synergistic effect. Intravitreal corticosteroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents have shown promise when topical medications either fail or have had limited effects. Randomized clinical studies evaluating anti-VEGF agents are needed to fully evaluate benefits and risks. When PCME is either refractory to medical therapy or is associated with significant vitreous involvement, pars plana vitrectomy has been shown to improve outcomes, though it is associated with additional risks. PMID:25438734

  9. Autologous platelet concentrate in surgery for macular detachment associated with congenital optic disc pit

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Jeroni; Figueroa, Marta S; Carreras, Elisa; Pujol, Patricia; Canut, Maria Isabel; Barraquer, Rafael Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the anatomical and functional results obtained with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) plus autologous platelet concentrate (APC) as a treatment for macular detachment associated with optic disc pit (ODP). Methods We performed a prospective interventional study of 19 eyes of 19 consecutive patients with posterior macular detachment due to ODP. All patients underwent PPV, posterior hyaloid peeling, fluid–air exchange, injection of 0.05 mL of APC over the ODP and 15% perfluoropropane (C3F8) endotamponade. Postoperative measures included face-up positioning for 2 hours and then avoidance of the face-up position during the ensuing 10 days. All patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography preoperatively at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months postoperatively and then annually. Outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) by logMAR, improvement of quality of vision, macular attachment, and resolution of intraretinal schisis-like separation. Results Preoperatively, the median BCVA was 0.70 (range: 0.30–1.70) and all patients showed improved visual acuity after surgery; BCVA was 0.22 (range: 0.07–0.52) at 12 months follow-up. All patients showed complete reabsorption of intraretinal fluid (median time: 3.5 months [range: 2–8 months]) and macular attachment at the end of follow-up (median: 60 months [range: 12–144 months]), with stable or improved visual acuity. No reoperations were needed and no major adverse events were recorded. Conclusion For macular detachment associated with ODP, the combination of PPV, posterior hyaloid peeling, APC, and C3F8 tamponade is a highly effective alternative technique with stable anatomical and functional results. PMID:26543348

  10. Macular edema after cataract surgery in diabetic eyes evaluated by optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yong; Song, Wen-Jun; Cai, Hong-Yuan; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess quantitative changes of the macula in diabetic eyes after cataract surgery using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to estimate the incidence of development or worsening of macular edema (ME) in diabetic eyes with or without pre-existing ME. METHODS In this prospective, observational study, 92 eyes of 60 diabetic patients who underwent cataract surgery were evaluated before surgery and 1, 3mo after surgery using OCT. Macular thickness was measured with OCT at nine macular subfields defined by the 9 zones early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS), as well as total macular volume obtained by OCT at 1, 3mo after surgery were compared with baseline features obtained before surgery. In addition, the incidence of development or worsening of ME was analyzed in diabetic eyes with or without pre-existing ME. RESULTS The central subfield mean thickness increased 21.0 µm and 25.5 µm at 1, 3mo follow-up, respectively (P<0.01). The average thickness of inner ring and outer ring increased 14.2 µm and 9.5 µm at 1mo, 18.2 µm and 12.9 µm at 3mo. Central-involved ME developed in 12 eyes at 3mo, including 4 eyes with pre-existing central-involved and 8 eyes with pre-existing non-central involved ME. Pre-existing diabetic macular edema (DME) was significantly associated with central-involved ME development (P<0.001). CONCLUSION A statistically significant increase could be detected in the central subfield as well as perifoveal and parafoveal sectors though the increase was mild. And eyes with pre-operative DME prior to cataract surgery are at higher risk for developing central-involved ME. PMID:26949615

  11. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  12. Mutations in the VMD2 gene are associated with juvenile-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) and adult vitelliform macular dystrophy but not age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Krämer, F; White, K; Pauleikhoff, D; Gehrig, A; Passmore, L; Rivera, A; Rudolph, G; Kellner, U; Andrassi, M; Lorenz, B; Rohrschneider, K; Blankenagel, A; Jurklies, B; Schilling, H; Schütt, F; Holz, F G; Weber, B H

    2000-04-01

    Recently, the VMD2 gene has been identified as the causative gene in juvenile-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease), a central retinopathy primarily characterised by an impaired function of the retinal pigment epithelium. In this study we have further characterised the spectrum of VMD2 mutations in a series of 41 unrelated Best disease patients. Furthermore we expanded our analysis to include 32 unrelated patients with adult vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD) and 200 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Both AVMD and AMD share some phenotypic features with Best disease such as abnormal subretinal accumulation of lipofuscin material, progressive geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularisation, and may be the consequence of a common pathogenic mechanism. In total, we have identified 23 distinct disease-associated mutations in Best disease and four different mutations in AVMD. Two of the mutations found in the AVMD patients were also seen in Best disease suggesting a considerable overlap in the aetiology of these two disorders. There were no mutations found in the AMD group. In addition, four frequent intragenic polymorphisms did not reveal allelic association of the VMD2 locus with AMD. These data exclude a direct role of VMD2 in the predisposition to AMD. PMID:10854112

  13. Multimodal fundus imaging in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Daniela C.; Tsang, Stephen; Calucci, Daniela; Jorge, Rodrigo; Freund, K. Bailey

    2010-01-01

    Background Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) is a rare autosomal dominant retinal disease of highly variable phenotypic expression. Interpretations of disease mechanisms based on histopathology, electrophysiology, genetic analysis, and retinal imaging are somewhat discordant in fundamental issues such as the location and extension of primary retinal changes. Herein we describe the morphological macular features in patients with BVMD undergoing simultaneous multimodal fundus imaging and compare to those of normal age-matched subjects. Methods Comparative study including seven patients with BVMD (14 eyes) and seven age-matched healthy subjects (14 eyes). All participants were submitted to complete ophthalmological examination, fundus photography, and standardized multimodal fundus imaging protocol including Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (Fd-OCT) combined with near-infrared reflectance and blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Results In two eyes in the “subclinical” stage, Fd-OCT revealed thickening of the middle highly reflective layer (HRL) localized between the photoreceptors’ inner/outer segments junction (inner-HRL) and RPE/Bruch’s membrane reflective complex (outer-HRL) throughout the macula. In one eye in the “vitelliform” stage, a homogeneous hyper-reflective material on Fd-OCT was observed between the middle-HRL and outer-HRL; this material presented increased fluorescence on FAF. The outer nuclear layer (ONL) was thinned in the central macula and subretinal fluid was not identified in these earlier disease stages. In patients of “pseudohypopyon” (two eyes), “vitelliruptive” (eight eyes) and “atrophic” (one eye) stages, Fd-OCT revealed a variety of changes in the middle- and inner-HRLs and thinning of ONL. These changes were found to be associated with the level of visual acuity observed. Thickening of the middle-HRL was observed beyond the limits of the clinically evident macular lesion in all eyes

  14. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26149505

  15. Mouse Models of Stargardt 3 Dominant Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Peter; Gorusupudi, Aruna; Bernstein, Paul S; Krizaj, David

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt type 3 macular degeneration is dependent on a dominant defect in a single gene, ELOVL4 (elongase of very long chain fatty acids 4). The encoded enzyme, ELOVL4, is required for the synthesis of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs), a rare class of > C24 lipids. In vitro expression studies suggest that mutated ELOVL4(STGD3) proteins fold improperly, resulting in ER stress and formation of cytosolic aggresomes of wild type and mutant ELOVL4. Although a number of mouse models have been developed to determine whether photoreceptor cell loss in STGD3 results from depletion of VLC-PUFAs, aggresome-dependent cell stress or a combination of these two factors, none of these models adequately recapitulates the disease phenotype in humans. Thus, the precise molecular mechanism by which ELOVL4 mutation causes photoreceptor degeneration in mice and in human patients remains to be characterized. This mini review compares and evaluates current STGD3 mouse models and determines what conclusions can be drawn from past work. PMID:26427404

  16. Evaluation of the Best disease gene in patients with age-related macular degeneration and other maculopathies.

    PubMed

    Allikmets, R; Seddon, J M; Bernstein, P S; Hutchinson, A; Atkinson, A; Sharma, S; Gerrard, B; Li, W; Metzker, M L; Wadelius, C; Caskey, C T; Dean, M; Petrukhin, K

    1999-06-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2, Best disease, MIM153700) is an early onset, autosomal, dominant macular degeneration characterized by the deposition of lipofuscin-like material within and below the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE); it is associated with degeneration of the RPE and overlying photoreceptors. Recently, we cloned the gene bestrophin, which is responsible for the disease, and identified a number of causative mutations in families with VMD2. Here, we report that the analysis of bestrophin in a collection of 259 age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients provides evidence that mutations in the Best disease gene do not play a significant role in the predisposition of individuals to AMD. However, our results suggest that, in addition to Best disease, mutations within the bestrophin gene could be responsible for other forms of maculopathy with phenotypic characteristics similar to Best disease and for other diseases not included in the VMD category. PMID:10453731

  17. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. PMID:26572116

  18. Spontaneous closure of macular hole following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Neto, Clovis Arcoverde; Pigosso, Douglas; Pacheco, Katia Delalíbera; Pereira, Viviane Oliveira; Patel, Pranav; Freitas, Luiz Guilherme; Ávila, Marcos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Ocular trauma can result in macular hole and it can lead to complete loss of central vision. We are reporting a case of traumatic macular hole associated with retinal hemorrhages and choroidal ruptures with spontaneous resolution and total vision recovery. PMID:27433039

  19. Macular amyloidosis complicating macroprolactinoma--a novel clinical association.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Deep; Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Lokesh; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Kulshreshtha, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition in the pituitary gland is a rare localised form of amyloidosis, and most commonly reported with prolactinoma. Macular amyloidosis is a rare form of localised cutaneous amyloidosis of obscure aetiology. In contrast to most localised amyloidosis, the precursor protein(s) of both macular amyloidosis and prolactinoma are unknown. A 35-year-old man with chronic headache (six years), blurring of vision (three years), and hyperpigmented macular lesion involving arms, legs, and back (two years) was diagnosed to have hyperprolactinaemia (8927 ng/mL) and secondary adrenal insufficiency. MRI revealed pituitary macroadenoma compressing the optic chiasma, encasing the right carotid artery and extending into the sphenoid sinus. A biopsy of skin from the right upper arm revealed thickened stratum corneum, acanthosis, and deposition of pale eosinophilic material in papillary dermis that gave a rose pink colour under methyl-violet and appeared congophilic with Congo red stain, which under polarised light showed green birefringence, diagnostic of macular amyloidosis. Headache, bitemporal haemianopia, and skin lesion improved following cabergoline therapy. Temporal profile of the disease characterised by symptoms of macroprolactinoma preceding onset of macular amyloidosis with resolution of symptoms of macroprolactinoma, accompanied by reductions in prolactin, and concomitant improvement in macular amyloidosis with cabergoline therapy may suggest some link between macroprolactinoma and macular amyloidosis. This report intends to highlight this novel association of macular amyloidosis and macroprolactinoma. PMID:26662655

  20. Measurement of macular pigment optical density in a healthy chinese population sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macular pigment may protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by its capability to absorb blue light and scavenge free radicals. Current information on human macular pigment density has been largely from studies on Caucasians populations. The purpose of this study was to assess macular ...

  1. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. I - Macular receptive field organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cutler, Lynn; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted, 3-dimensional reconstructions of macular receptive fields and of their linkages into a neural network have revealed new information about macular functional organization. Both type I and type II hair cells are included in the receptive fields. The fields are rounded, oblong, or elongated, but gradations between categories are common. Cell polarizations are divergent. Morphologically, each calyx of oblong and elongated fields appears to be an information processing site. Intrinsic modulation of information processing is extensive and varies with the kind of field. Each reconstructed field differs in detail from every other, suggesting that an element of randomness is introduced developmentally and contributes to endorgan adaptability.

  2. Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy is caused by a mutation in CDH3, encoding P-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, E; Bergman, R; Richard, G; Lurie, R; Shalev, S; Petronius, D; Shalata, A; Anbinder, Y; Leibu, R; Perlman, I; Cohen, N; Szargel, R

    2001-10-01

    Congenital hypotrichosis associated with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD; MIM601553) is an autosomal recessive disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by hair loss heralding progressive macular degeneration and early blindness. We used homozygosity mapping in four consanguineous families to localize the gene defective in HJMD to 16q22.1. This region contains CDH3, encoding P-cadherin, which is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and hair follicles. Mutation analysis shows in all families a common homozygous deletion in exon 8 of CDH3. These results establish the molecular etiology of HJMD and implicate for the first time a cadherin molecule in the pathogenesis of a human hair and retinal disorder. PMID:11544476

  3. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Current therapies

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Albert J; Scholl, Stefan; Kirchhof, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is now the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss among people over the age of 40 in the Western world. Its prevalence is certain to increase substantially as the population ages. Treatments currently available for the disease include laser photocoagulation, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and anti-angiogenic agents. Many studies have reported the benefits of each of these treatments, although none is without its risks. No intervention actually cures AMD, nor the neovascularization associated with it. However, its symptoms are treated with varying degrees of success. Some treatments stabilize or arrest the progress of the disease. Others have been shown to reverse some of the damage that has already been done. These treatments can even lead to visual improvement. This paper will review the major classes of drugs and therapies designed to treat this condition. PMID:19668562

  4. Targeting MAPK Signaling in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness affecting elderly people in the world. AMD is a complex multifactorial disease associated with demographic, genetics, and environmental risk factors. It is well established that oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play critical roles in the pathogenesis of AMD. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are activated by diverse extracellular stimuli, including growth factors, mitogens, hormones, cytokines, and different cellular stressors such as oxidative stress. They regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. This review addresses the novel findings from human and animal studies on the relationship of MAPK signaling with AMD. The use of specific MAPK inhibitors may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of this debilitating eye disease. PMID:27385915

  5. Cystoid macular edema in a patient with Danon disease.

    PubMed

    Mack, Heather G

    2014-12-01

    To report a patient with Danon retinopathy with cystoid macular edema treated with topical dorzolamide 2% eye drops and oral acetazolamide. A 37-year-old Caucasian man with Danon disease treated with topical and oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors participated in the study. Examinations performed before and during treatment included visual acuity (VA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and electroretinography. Following total 48 weeks of treatment, VA decreased from 20/30 OD, 20/200 OS, to 20/40 OD, CF OS. The mean central retinal thickness was unchanged from baseline 263 μm OD , 226 μm OS, after treatment 283 μm OD and 202 μm OS. In our case, carbonic anydrase inhibitors were not effective. However, a general recommendation cannot be given based on a single case. PMID:23571262

  6. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo, Michele; Missiroli, Filippo; Borgiani, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Cusumano, Andrea; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old). AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension). In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species) have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2) that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines), immune cells (macrophages), and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25478207

  7. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  8. Molecular pathology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD remain largely unclear, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is thought to exist. AMD pathology is characterized by degeneration involving the retinal photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane, as well as, in some cases, alterations in choroidal capillaries. Recent research on the genetic and molecular underpinnings of AMD brings to light several basic molecular pathways and pathophysiological processes that might mediate AMD risk, progression, and/or response to therapy. This review summarizes, in detail, the molecular pathological findings in both humans and animal models, including genetic variations in CFH, CX3CR1, and ARMS2/HtrA1, as well as the role of numerous molecules implicated in inflammation, apoptosis, cholesterol trafficking, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:19026761

  9. [Visual fixation features after treatment of exudative age macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Surguch, V K; Surnina, Z V; Sizova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Changes of visual fixation in patients with choroidal neovascularitation (CNV) associated with age macular degeneration (AMD) after bevacizumab are studied. 45 patients (45 eyes) with active CNV treated with intravitreal bevacizumab were enrolled into the study. Visual fixation was studied before and 3-6 months after treatment using original method that included fundus foto and fluorescein angiography. Fixation relative to fovea and lesion was evaluated. Foveal fixation beyond lesion was found in 9%, foveal fixation within lesion--in 47%, extrafoveal fixation beyond lesion--in 18%, extrafoveal fixation within lesion--in 26% of patients. Changes of fixation localization after treatment was found in 24% patients. Examination of visual fixation may be useful for prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment efficacy in patients with CNV. PMID:21721271

  10. Effect of Supplemental Lutein and Zeaxanthin on Serum, Macular Pigmentation, and Visual Performance in Patients with Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang-Mu; Dou, Hong-Liang; Huang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Xian-Rong; Zou, Zhi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the 2-year effect of multiple doses of lutein/zeaxanthin on serum, macular pigmentation, and visual performance on patients with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods. In this randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled trial, 112 early AMD patients randomly received either 10 mg lutein, 20 mg lutein, a combination of lutein (10 mg) and zeaxanthin (10 mg), or placebo daily for 2 years. Serum concentration of lutein/zeaxanthin, macular pigment optical density (MPOD), visual functions including best-spectacle corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity (CS), flash recovery time (FRT), and vision-related quality of life (VFQ25) was quantified. Results. Serum lutein concentration and MPOD significantly increased in all the active treatment groups. Supplementation with 20 mg lutein was the most effective in increasing MPOD and CS at 3 cycles/degree for the first 48 weeks. However, they both significantly increased to the same peak value following supplementation with either 10 mg or 20 mg lutein during the intervention. No statistical changes of BCVA or FRT were observed during the trial. Conclusions. Long-term lutein supplementation could increase serum lutein concentration, MPOD, and visual sensitivities of early AMD patients. 10 mg lutein daily might be an advisable long-term dosage for early AMD treatment. PMID:25815324

  11. Macular laser photocoagulation with or without intravitreal triamcinolone pretreatment for diabetic macular edema: a result from five randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhi; Shen, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess possible benefits of intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) injection as pretreatment for macular laser photocoagulation (MLP) in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). METHODS Published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning MLP with or without IVTA pretreatment for DME were retrieved from databases CNKI, Medline, EMbase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. A Meta-analysis on eligible studies was conducted using RevMan 5.0 software. Two investigators independently assessed the quality of the trials and extracted data. Main outcome measures included the change in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), difference in central macular thickness (CMT) and adverse events reporting in particular elevated intraocular pressure within the follow-up period. The results were pooled using weight mean difference (WMD) or odds risk (OR) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). A fixed- or random-effect model was employed depending on the heterogeneity of the inclusion trials. RESULTS Finally, five independent RCTs were identified and used for comparing MLP with IVTA pretreatment (131 eyes) with MLP alone (133 eyes, control group). The overall study quality was relatively higher according to the modified Jadad scale. The Meta-analysis showed that MLP with IVTA pretreatment significantly reduced CMT at one, three and six months (P=0.002, 0.0003 and 0.04, respectively), compared with MLP alone. The IVTA pretreatment group showed statistically significant improvements in BCVA at the one-month follow up as compared with the control group (P=0.03). At three- and six-month follow up, there was a beneficial trend towards improving visual acuity in the IVTA pretreatment group without statistical significance between groups (P=0.06 and 0.20, respectively). The incidence of elevation of intraocular pressure was significantly higher in the IVTA pretreatment group than in the control group (P<0.0001). No evidence of publication bias was

  12. Value of optical coherence tomography in the detection of macular pathology before the removal of silicone oil

    PubMed Central

    Rashad, Mohammad Ahmad; Mohamed, Ahmed Abdel Aliem; Ahmed, Asmaa Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the pathological macular changes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) before the removal of silicone oil (SiO) in eyes that had undergone pars plana vitrectomy for complicated forms of retinal detachment (RD). Patients and methods Subjects included 48 patients (51 eyes) with complicated RD including proliferative vitreoretinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy, recurrent RD, penetrating trauma, uveitis, giant retinal tears, and macular holes. All the eyes had undergone SiO injection. Furthermore, all eyes had been planned for the removal of SiO 6–12 months after the primary surgery. Finally, all eyes had a fundus examination and OCT examination before the silicone oil removal. Results OCT findings indicated epiretinal membrane in 41% of the eyes, macular edema in 17%, macular detachment in 13.5%, macular thinning in 13.5%, macular holes in 10%, and subretinal membranes in 2%. Preoperative OCT was normal in only 12% of the eyes, while a clinical fundus examination was normal in 43% (P<0.001). Eyes with normal OCT had significantly better mean logMAR (0.35) than eyes with pathological changes detected through OCT (1.28; P<0.001). Surgical modifications were made during the removal of SiO in 74.5% of the eyes. Conclusion OCT detected significantly more pathological changes than a clinical fundus examination. This had an impact on both surgical step modification during the removal of SiO and predictability of visual outcome after the removal of SiO. PMID:26855558

  13. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  14. Laser-based strategies to treat diabetic macular edema: history and new promising therapies.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Gun; Kim, Eun Yeong; Roh, Young Jung

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs), laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies. PMID:25332833

  15. Laser-Based Strategies to Treat Diabetic Macular Edema: History and New Promising Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Gun; Kim, Eun Yeong; Roh, Young Jung

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. The management of DME is complex and often various treatment approaches are needed. At the present time, despite the enthusiasm for evaluating several new treatments for DME, including the intravitreal pharmacologic therapies (e.g., corticosteroids and anti-VEGF drugs), laser photocoagulation still remains the current standard in DME. The purpose of this review is to update our knowledge on laser photocoagulation for DME and describe the developments in laser systems. And we will also discuss the new laser techniques and review the latest results including benefits of combined therapy. In this paper, we briefly summarize the major laser therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising laser therapies. PMID:25332833

  16. [Analysis of factors causing peripheral visual field defects after vitreomacular surgery].

    PubMed

    Sdobnikova, S V; Kozlova, I V; Alekseenko, D S

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the study analysis of potential causes of visual field defects (VFD) after vitreomacular surgery is performed. 110 cases are enrolled in the study: 81 patient with macular hole and 29 patients with epiretinal fibrosis. Correspondence of VFD to position of irrigation port including unusual inferior-nasal position was revealed as well as VFD absence in epiretinal fibrosis operated without air pump. VFD did not appear after lowering of air pump pressure by 15-20 mmHg. The cause of VFD after vitreomacular surgery is a mechanical damage of internal retinal surface by directed air/gas jet after total fluid exchange with too high pressure in an air pump. This complication is an easily preventable iatrogenic effect and may serve as one of quality criterion for this treatment procedure. PMID:23650744

  17. Pharmacogenetics and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Brantley, Milam A

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics seeks to explain interpatient variability in response to medications by investigating genotype-phenotype correlations. There is a small but growing body of data regarding the pharmacogenetics of both nonexudative and exudative age-related macular degeneration. Most reported data concern polymorphisms in the complement factor H and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 genes. At this time, the data are not consistent and no definite conclusions may be drawn. As clinical trials data continue to accumulate, these relationships may become more apparent. PMID:22046503

  18. Short-term results of intravitreal dexamethasone implant (OZURDEX®) in treatment of recalcitrant diabetic macular edema: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Rishi, Ekta; Kuniyal, Lakshmi; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    Context: Dexamethasone Posterior-Segment Drug Delivery System is a novel, biodegradable, sustained-release drug delivery system (OZURDEX®) for treatment of macular edema following retinal vein occlusion and posterior uveitis. However, its potential role in management of diabetic macular edema has not been reported yet. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of (OZURDEX®) in patients with recalcitrant diabetic macular edema (DME). Setting and Design: A retrospective, interventional case series from a tertiary eye care center in India is presented. Inclusion criteria comprised patients presenting with recalcitrant DME, 3 or more months after one or more treatments of macular laser photocoagulation and/or intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections. Exclusion criteria included history of corticosteroid-responsive intraocular pressure (IOP) rise, cataract extraction, or other intraocular surgery within 3 months. The main outcome measure was visual acuity at 1 and 4 months after OZURDEX® injection. Secondary outcome measures included change in central macular thickness on Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and changes in IOP following intravitreal OZURDEX® implant. Of 18 eyes (17 patients) with recalcitrant diabetic macular edema that underwent OZURDEX® implant, three eyes (two patients) had follow-up of more than 3 months post-injection. Results: Mean age of patients was 56 years. Mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 16.6 years. Systemic control of DM was good as assessed by FBS/PPBS and HbA1c. The pre-operative mean central macular thickness was 744.3 μm and improved to 144 and 570 μm at months 1 and 4, respectively. Preoperative mean BCVA was 0.6 logMAR units and improved to 0.3 and 0.46 logMAR units at month 1 and 4, respectively. The mean follow-up was 4.3 months (range 4-5 months). Conclusion: OZURDEX® appears efficacious in management of recalcitrant diabetic macular edema. The results of the ongoing POSURDEX

  19. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  20. Folic acid and birth defect prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of certain birth defects. These include spina bifida, anencephaly, and some heart defects. Experts recommend women who ... Women who have had a baby with a neural tube defect may need a higher dose of folic acid. ...

  1. The Role of the Immune Response in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Whitcup, Scott M.; Atkinson, John P.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Dick, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries; with the aging population, the negative health impacts and costs of the disease will increase dramatically over the next decade. Although the exact cause of AMD is unknown, genetic studies have implicated the complement system as well as other immune responses in disease pathogenesis and severity. Furthermore, histologic studies have shown the presence of macrophages, lymphocytes, and mast cells, as well as fibroblasts, in both atrophic lesions and with retinal neovascularization. This review summarizes discussions from the fifth annual conference of the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Initiative for Macular Research by the Inflammation and Immune Response Task Force. These deliberations focused on the role of inflammatory immune responses, including complement, inflammasomes, adaptive immune responses, and para-inflammation, unanswered questions and studies to address these questions, and potential immune-related therapeutic targets for AMD. PMID:23762772

  2. Clinicopathologic findings in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Small, Kent W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the clinical and histopathologic features of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). Methods Two eyes were obtained postmortem from a patient with BVMD. The patient’s clinical information was reviewed. Series sections of the globes were performed and sequentially stained with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff or Masson trichrome. A section of the left macula was submitted for electron microscopic processing. Histopathologic findings were reconstructed in a scaled two-dimensional map and compared with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Results The macular lesion of the right eye was identified as a well-demarcated region with pigment, elevated submacular yellow material and subretinal fluid. This corresponded histopathologically to a well-circumscribed area of RPE hyperplasia, accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE, deposition of granular material in the photoreceptors, macrophages and drusen. The left eye displayed a 1 disc diameter chorioretinal scar with surrounding shallow fluid and submacular pigment. This corresponded to RPE changes and a fibrocellular proliferation in the choriocapillaris. Conclusion Histopathologic mapping revealed retinal edema, RPE abnormalities, drusen and a chorioretinal scar in BVMD that correlated with the fundus, FFA, FAF and OCT findings. PMID:21136072

  3. Idiopathic vitreomacular traction and macular hole: a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Steel, D H W; Lotery, A J

    2013-01-01

    Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common phenomenon in the aging eye. However, this may be complicated by persistent symptomatic vitreomacular adhesions that exert tractional forces on the macula (vitreomacular traction; VMT). VMT itself may be associated with epiretinal membrane formation and the development of idiopathic macular holes (IMH). Such pathologies may cause visual disturbances, including metamorphopsia, photopsia, blurred vision, and decreased visual acuity, which impact an individual's quality of life. Technologies such as optical coherence tomography allow an increasingly more accurate visualisation of the macular anatomy, including quantification of macular hole characteristics, and this facilitates treatment decision-making. Pars plana vitrectomy remains the primary treatment option for many patients with VMT or IMH; for the latter, peeling of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) of the retina has shown improved outcomes when compared with no ILM peeling. The development of narrow-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy systems has improved the rate of visual recovery following surgery. Ocriplasmin, by degrading laminin and fibronectin at the vitreoretinal interface, may allow induction of PVD in a non-invasive manner. Indeed, clinical studies have supported its use as an alternative to surgery in certain patient populations. However, further research is still needed with respect to greater understanding of the pathophysiology underlying the development of VMT and IMH. PMID:24108069

  4. Bilateral macular injury from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Dirani, Ali; Chelala, Elias; Fadlallah, Ali; Antonios, Rafic; Cherfan, George

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who had a bilateral macular injury after playing with a green laser pointer for a duration of 1 minute. Clinical examination revealed a decrease in visual acuity and macular injury in both eyes, and imaging investigations revealed a bilateral macular lesion due to exposure to the laser pointer. At 3 months' follow up, visual function had improved but remained partially impaired. This case emphasizes the importance of cautious and appropriate use of laser pointer devices because of the potential vision-threatening hazards induced by mishandling of these devices. PMID:24204114

  5. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull's leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  6. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull’s leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  7. Vestibular dysfunction, altered macular structure and trait localization in A/J inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Lever, Teresa E; Pierce, Jessica; Zhao, Xing; Bergstrom, David; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang; Jones, Timothy A; Jones, Sherri M

    2015-04-01

    A/J mice develop progressive hearing loss that begins before 1 month of age and is attributed to cochlear hair cell degeneration. Screening tests indicated that this strain also develops early onset vestibular dysfunction and has otoconial deficits. The purpose of this study was to characterize the vestibular dysfunction and macular structural pathology over the lifespan of A/J mice. Vestibular function was measured using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). Macular structural pathology was evaluated using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Individually, vestibular functional deficits in mice ranged from mild to profound. On average, A/J mice had significantly reduced vestibular sensitivity (elevated VsEP response thresholds and smaller amplitudes), whereas VsEP onset latency was prolonged compared to age-matched controls (C57BL/6). A limited age-related vestibular functional loss was also present. Structural analysis identified marked age-independent otoconial abnormalities in concert with some stereociliary bundle defects. Macular epithelia were incompletely covered by otoconial membranes with significantly reduced opacity and often contained abnormally large or giant otoconia as well as normal-appearing otoconia. Elevated expression of key otoconins (i.e., otoconin 90, otolin and keratin sulfate proteoglycan) ruled out the possibility of reduced levels contributing to otoconial dysgenesis. The phenotype of A/J was partially replicated in a consomic mouse strain (C57BL/6J-Chr 17(A/J)/NaJ), thus indicating that Chr 17(A/J) contained a trait locus for a new gene variant responsible to some extent for the A/J vestibular phenotype. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified additional epistatic influences associated with chromosomes 1, 4, 9 and X. Results indicate that the A/J phenotype represents a complex trait, and the A/J mouse strain presents a new model for the

  8. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  9. Macular Ganglion Cell Analysis Determined by Cirrus HD Optical Coherence Tomography for Early Detecting Chiasmal Compression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Shin, Sun Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the performance of macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (mGCIPL) measurement with Cirrus high-definition (HD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) for early detection of optic chiasmal compression. Methods Forty-six eyes of 46 patients with optic chiasmal compression caused by a pituitary adenoma (PA group), 31 eyes of 31 patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG group), and 32 eyes of 32 normal participants (control group) were enrolled. The PA group was subdivided into two subgroups, which comprised patients with temporal visual field (VF) defects (perimetric PA group, 34 eyes) and without VF defect (preperimetric PA group, 12 eyes). The mGCIPL thickness and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness were measured using Cirrus HD-OCT. We calculated the number of patients who had an abnormal GCA sector map, defined as at least one yellow or red sector. Results Eyes in the perimetric PA group had significantly decreased mGCIPL thickness in all sectors. Eyes in the preperimetric PA group had significantly thinner mGCIPL in the superior, superonasal, inferonasal, and inferior sectors than eyes in control group, but no changes in cpRNFL parameters were observed. The mGCIPL thickness in inferonasal area showed the greatest AUC value (0.965), followed by the superonasal area (0.958) for discriminating preperimetric PA group from the control group. A higher reduction rate of mGCIPL thickness was noted in the nasal sector compared to other sectors, which was irrespective of temporal visual field defects. The mGCIPL thickness maps showed superonasal (P = 0.003) and inferonasal thinning in the PA group (P = 0.003), while inferotemporal thinning was revealed in the NTG group (P = 0.001). Conclusions Macular GCIPL thickness parameters obtained with the Cirrus HD-OCT were useful in early detection of chiasmal compression and differentiating from NTG by characteristic nasal mGCIPL thinning. PMID:27049647

  10. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... with birth defects may need surgery or other medical treatments. Today, doctors can diagnose many birth defects in the womb. This enables them to treat or even correct some problems before the baby is born. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  11. Relationship between Retinal Layer Thickness and the Visual Field in Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Jennifer H.; Smith, R. Theodore; Hood, Donald C.; Greenstein, Vivienne C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify and compare the structural and functional changes in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and microperimetry. Methods. Twenty-one eyes of 21 subjects with early AMD were examined. MP-1 10-2 visual fields (VFs) and SD-OCT line and detail volume scans were acquired. The thicknesses of the outer segment (OS; distance between inner segment ellipsoid band and upper retinal pigment epithelium [RPE] border) and RPE layers and elevation of the RPE from Bruch's membrane were measured using a computer-aided manual segmentation technique. Thickness values were compared with those for 15 controls, and values at locations with VF total deviation defects were compared with values at nondefect locations at equivalent eccentricities. Results. Sixteen of 21 eyes with AMD had VF defects. Compared with controls, line scans showed significant thinning of the OS layer (P = 0.006) and thickening and elevation of the RPE (P = 0.037, P = 0.002). The OS layer was significantly thinner in locations with VF defects compared with locations without defects (P = 0.003). There was a negligible difference between the retinal layer thickness values of the 5 eyes without VF defects and the values of normal controls. Conclusions. In early AMD, when VF defects were present, there was significant thinning of the OS layer and thickening and elevation of the RPE. OS layer thinning was significantly associated with decreased visual sensitivity, consistent with known photoreceptor loss in early AMD. For AMD subjects without VF defects, thickness values were normal. The results highlight the clinical utility of both SD-OCT retinal layer quantification and VF testing in early AMD. PMID:23074210

  12. Myopic Macular Retinoschisis in Teenagers: Clinical Characteristics and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuan-Bin; You, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Lin-Yan; Chen, Pei-Qing; Yao, Ke; Xue, An-Quan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of myopic macular retinoschisis (MRS) in teenagers with high myopia, six male (9 eyes) and 3 female (4 eyes) teenagers with typical MRS identified from chart review were evaluated. All cases underwent complete ophthalmic examinations including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), indirect ophthalmoscopy, colour fundus photography, B-type ultrasonography, axial length measurement, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The average age was 17.8 ± 1.5 years, average refractive error was -17.04 ± 3.04D, average BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.61, and average axial length was 30.42 ± 1.71 mm. Myopic macular degenerative changes (MDC) by colour fundus photographs revealed Ohno-Matsui Category 1 in 4 eyes, and Category 2 in 9 eyes. Posterior staphyloma was found in 9 eyes. SD-OCT showed outer MRS in all 13 eyes, internal limiting membrane detachment in 7 eyes, vascular microfolds in 2 eyes, and inner MRS in 1 eye. No premacular structures such as macular epiretinal membrane or partially detached posterior hyaloids were found. Our results showed that MRS rarely occurred in highly myopic teenagers, and was not accompanied by premacular structures, severe MDC, or even obvious posterior staphyloma. This finding indicates that posterior scleral expansion is probably the main cause of MRS. PMID:27294332

  13. Microperimetric changes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, P; Mushtaq, F; Osmond, C; Amoaku, W

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the value of microperimetry in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration previously treated with ranibizumab and now in the maintenance phase of therapy. Methods A total of 21 eyes (14 patients) were included. Microperimetry was performed using the Macular Integrity Assessment Device on at least three occasions for each eye. Intravitreal ranibizumab was administered if visual acuity (VA) or optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed signs of active disease. Results Five eyes showed no change in VA or OCT findings, and required no intravitreal injections. In these eyes, mean threshold sensitivity (TS) decreased by 13% (paired t-test, P=0.05) during the study period, but fixation stability (FS) was unchanged. In all, 16 eyes showed signs of disease activity, and therefore required ranibizumab injections during the study. In these eyes, VA, central retinal thickness (CRT), FS, and TS remained unchanged during follow-up. Peak TS was noted when CRT was 210 μm; above or below 210 μm, there was a gradual reduction in TS. Conclusion This study has provided novel information on the relationship between macular sensitivity, CRT, and VA in the maintenance phase of ranibizumab therapy. Patients with stable VA and CRT may still have deteriorating retinal sensitivity. This is usually a late manifestation and may indicate subclinical CNV activity. PMID:22322998

  14. Perspective on the role of Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) in the management of diabetic macular oedema

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Hemal; Gillies, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular oedema (DMO) is the most common cause of visual loss in the working age population. Intravitreal therapy has superseded macular laser as the first-line treatment for the management of centre-involving DMO in most patients. As well as the proven efficacy of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents, phase II and III clinical trials of Ozurdex intravitreal dexamethasone implants for DMO have also demonstrated a mean increase in visual acuity and corresponding mean reduction in central macular thickness, particularly in pseudophakic eyes. Because of the risk of visual loss from cataract, glaucoma and intraocular infection with the use of intravitreal steroids, Ozurdex tends to be reserved for use in patients unresponsive to anti-VEGF therapy for centre-involving DMO. Situations where Ozurdex may be considered a first-line treatment option for eyes with centre-involving DMO include pseudophakia, impending cataract surgery, or in the context of a recent arterial thromboembolic event. Because of their stable pharmacokinetics, Ozurdex slow-release implants may also be considered in vitrectomized eyes. PMID:26336592

  15. Three-Month Outcome of Ziv-Aflibercept for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Marashi, Ameen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Is to show the 3-month efficacy and safety of treatment diabetic macular edema treated with intravitreal ziv-aflibercept as studies have shown that Ziv-aflibercept does not cause retinal pigment epithelial toxicity and to study it cost effectiveness. Methods Ten eyes in eight patients diagnosed with central diabetic macular edema were enrolled for three consecutive intravitreal injection of ziv-aflibercept 1.25 mg every 4 weeks, a complete exam including BCVA and CRT at baseline and 12 weeks with evaluation of ocular and systemic complications. Results Improvement of best corrected visual acuity was clinically significant from baseline LogMAR 0.77 and 0.35 at 12 weeks and statistically significant (P<0.05) along with reduction of central retinal thickness from 562,4 μm and 317.7 μm at 12 weeks follow up (P<0.05) with no signs of ocular nor systemic complications. Conclusion Ziv aflibercept is a safe and effective in diabetic macular edema treatment for 12 weeks follow up with cost effectiveness especially in countries where aflibercept is not available. PMID:27347566

  16. Efficacy and safety of topical difluprednate in persistent diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savleen; Yangzes, Sonam; Singh, Swati; Sachdev, Nishant

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of treatment of diabetic macular edema (persistent type) with difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion 0.05 % (off label use). 20 patients with persistent diabetic macular edema were enrolled. In all subjects, more than 4 months had passed since prior treatment. All patients were treated with difluprednate ophthalmic emulsion 0.05 % three times daily for 3 months. At the end of 3 months the visual acuity had increased by two lines to a mean value of 0.61 ± 0.18 on logMAR from a baseline value of 0.885 ± 0.20 and the central retinal thickness had decreased from 423 ± 72.04 microns to 345 ± 68.7 microns. Hence, there was a total of 18.4 % decrease in retinal thickness on difluprednate. Major side effects included raised intraocular pressure in 20 %. Difluprednate is a potent and strong steroid which causes a rapid decrease in persistent diabetic macular edema. However, the potential side effect of raised intraocular pressure limits its use as an adjuvant therapy in non-steroid responders. PMID:26296375

  17. Myopic Macular Retinoschisis in Teenagers: Clinical Characteristics and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chuan-bin; You, Yong-sheng; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Lin-yan; Chen, Pei-qing; Yao, Ke; Xue, An-quan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of myopic macular retinoschisis (MRS) in teenagers with high myopia, six male (9 eyes) and 3 female (4 eyes) teenagers with typical MRS identified from chart review were evaluated. All cases underwent complete ophthalmic examinations including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), indirect ophthalmoscopy, colour fundus photography, B-type ultrasonography, axial length measurement, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The average age was 17.8 ± 1.5 years, average refractive error was −17.04 ± 3.04D, average BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.61, and average axial length was 30.42 ± 1.71 mm. Myopic macular degenerative changes (MDC) by colour fundus photographs revealed Ohno-Matsui Category 1 in 4 eyes, and Category 2 in 9 eyes. Posterior staphyloma was found in 9 eyes. SD-OCT showed outer MRS in all 13 eyes, internal limiting membrane detachment in 7 eyes, vascular microfolds in 2 eyes, and inner MRS in 1 eye. No premacular structures such as macular epiretinal membrane or partially detached posterior hyaloids were found. Our results showed that MRS rarely occurred in highly myopic teenagers, and was not accompanied by premacular structures, severe MDC, or even obvious posterior staphyloma. This finding indicates that posterior scleral expansion is probably the main cause of MRS. PMID:27294332

  18. Laser-induced macular holes demonstrate impaired choroidal perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeremiah, Jr.; Allen, Ronald D.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    Choroidal perfusion was evaluated following the creation of a laser induced macular hole in a nonhuman primate model. Two Rhesus monkeys underwent macular exposures delivered by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The lesions were evaluated with fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green (ICG) angiography . Each lesion produced vitreous hemorrhage and progressed to a full thickness macular hole. ICG angiography revealed no perfusion of the choriocapillaris beneath the lesion centers. Histopathologic evaluation showed replacement of the choriocapillaris with fibroblasts and connective tissue. Nd:YAG, laser-induced macular holes result in long term impairment of choroidal perfusion at the base of the hole due to choroidal scarring and obliteration of the choriocapillaris.

  19. A Model of Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Stanton, J. Brett; Yocom, John; Bakall, Benjamin; Schiavone, Marc T.; Wadelius, Claes; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The VMD2 gene, mutated in Best macular dystrophy (BMD) encodes bestrophin, a 68-kDa basolateral plasma membrane protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. BMD is characterized by a depressed light peak (LP) in the electro-oculogram. Bestrophin is thought to be the Cl channel that generates the LP. The goal was to generate an animal model of BMD and to determine the effects of bestrophin overexpression on the RPE-generated components of the ERG. METHODS Bestrophin or bestrophin mutants (W93C or R218C) were overexpressed in the RPE of rats by injection of replication-defective adenovirus. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ERG recordings were used to study subsequent effects. RESULTS Bestrophin was confined to the basolateral plasma membrane of the RPE. Neither wild-type (wt) nor mutant bestrophin affected the a- or b-waves of the ERG. Wt bestrophin, however, increased the c-wave and fast oscillation (FO), but not the LP. In contrast, both mutants had little or no effect on the c-wave and FO, but did reduce LP amplitude. LP amplitudes across a range of stimuli were not altered by wt bestrophin, though the luminance response function was desensitized. LP response functions were unaffected by bestrophin R218C but were significantly altered by bestrophin W93C. CONCLUSIONS A model of BMD was developed in the present study. Because overexpression of wt bestrophin shifted luminance response but did not alter the range of LP response amplitudes, the authors conclude that the rate-limiting step for generating LP amplitude occurs before activation of bestrophin or that bestrophin does not directly generate the LP conductance. PMID:15452084

  20. If Your Child Has a Heart Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... septal defect , atrial septal defect , atrioventricular canal, and patent ductus arteriosus). Or the congestion could be the ... for Congenital Heart Defects Many heart abnormalities (including patent ductus arteriosus , ventricular septal defect , truncus arteriosus, atrioventricular ...

  1. Macular carotenoids and age-related maculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Eamonn; Neelam, Kumari; Nolan, John; Au Eong, Kah-Guan; Beatty, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    Lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are concentrated at the macula, where they are collectively known as macular pigment (MP), and where they are believed to play a major role in protecting retinal tissues against oxidative stress. Whilst the exact pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy (ARM) remains unknown, the disruption of cellular processes by oxidative stress may play an important role. Manipulation of dietary intake of L and Z has been shown to augment MP, thereby raising hopes that dietary supplementation with these carotenoids might prevent, delay, or modify the course of ARM. This article discusses the scientific rationale supporting the hypothesis that L and Z are protective against ARM, and presents the recent evidence germane to this theory. PMID:17160199

  2. Novel imaging techniques for diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Lobo, C; Bernardes, R; Faria de Abreu, J R; Cunha-Vaz, J G

    1999-01-01

    Retinal edema should be defined as any increase of water of the retinal tissue resulting in an increase in its volume. It may be of cytotoxic or vasogenic origin. Development of vasogenic macular edema is dependent on a series of factors such as blood pressure, blood-retinal barrier permeability, retinal cell damage, retinal tissue osmotic pressure and retinal tissue compliance. Objective measurements of retinal thickness are now possible using the Retinal Thickness Analyser. Localised measurements of blood-retinal barrier permeability may also be obtained using the Retinal Leakage Analyser, a modified confocal scanning laser fluorometer, while obtaining simultaneously angiographic images of the choroid and retina. These new imaging techniques show that cytotoxic and vasogenic retinal edema may occur independently in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. These findings offer new perspectives for designing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:10896349

  3. Lipofuscin accumulation, abnormal electrophysiology, and photoreceptor degeneration in mutant ELOVL4 transgenic mice: a model for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Karan, G; Lillo, C; Yang, Z; Cameron, D J; Locke, K G; Zhao, Y; Thirumalaichary, S; Li, C; Birch, D G; Vollmer-Snarr, H R; Williams, D S; Zhang, K

    2005-03-15

    Macular degeneration is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the central retina. An autosomal dominant form of Stargardt macular degeneration (STGD) is caused by mutations in ELOVL4, which is predicted to encode an enzyme involved in the elongation of long-chain fatty acids. We generated transgenic mice expressing a mutant form of human ELOVL4 that causes STGD. In these mice, we show that accumulation by the RPE of undigested phagosomes and lipofuscin, including the fluorophore, 2-[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetraenyl]-1-(2-hyydroxyethyl)-4-[4-methyl-6-(2,6,6,-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium (A2E) is followed by RPE atrophy. Subsequently, photoreceptor degeneration occurs in the central retina in a pattern closely resembling that of human STGD and age-related macular degeneration. The ELOVL4 transgenic mice thus provide a good model for both STGD and dry age-related macular degeneration, and represent a valuable tool for studies on therapeutic intervention in these forms of blindness. PMID:15749821

  4. Effect of Hemodialysis on Retinal Thickness in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy, with and without Macular Edema, Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Azem, Nur; Spierer, Oriel; Shaked, Meital; Neudorfer, Meira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Effects of hemodialysis (HD) treatment on retinal thickness and macular edema are unclear. Objective. To evaluate changes in retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR), with and without diabetic macular edema (DME), undergoing HD. Methods. Nonrandomized prospective study. Forty eyes of DR patients with ESRD treated with HD were divided into two groups: patients with macular edema and patients without macular edema. Both eyes were analyzed. Patients underwent an ophthalmic examination including OCT measurements of retinal thickness, blood albumin and hemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure, and body weight, 30 minutes before and after HD. Results. We found no significant effects of HD on retinal thickness among patients both with and without DME. The former showed a trend towards reduction in retinal thickness in foveal area following HD, while the latter showed an increase. There was no correlation between retinal thickness and mean blood pressure, weight, kinetic model value—Kt/V, glycemic hemoglobin, or albumin levels before and after HD. Conclusions. HD has no significant effect on retinal thickness among patients with or without DME. Further studies on larger cohorts and repeated OCT examinations are needed to confirm the preliminary findings in this study. PMID:25298889

  5. Effect of Hemodialysis on Retinal Thickness in Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy, with and without Macular Edema, Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Azem, Nur; Spierer, Oriel; Shaked, Meital; Neudorfer, Meira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Effects of hemodialysis (HD) treatment on retinal thickness and macular edema are unclear. Objective. To evaluate changes in retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR), with and without diabetic macular edema (DME), undergoing HD. Methods. Nonrandomized prospective study. Forty eyes of DR patients with ESRD treated with HD were divided into two groups: patients with macular edema and patients without macular edema. Both eyes were analyzed. Patients underwent an ophthalmic examination including OCT measurements of retinal thickness, blood albumin and hemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure, and body weight, 30 minutes before and after HD. Results. We found no significant effects of HD on retinal thickness among patients both with and without DME. The former showed a trend towards reduction in retinal thickness in foveal area following HD, while the latter showed an increase. There was no correlation between retinal thickness and mean blood pressure, weight, kinetic model value-Kt/V, glycemic hemoglobin, or albumin levels before and after HD. Conclusions. HD has no significant effect on retinal thickness among patients with or without DME. Further studies on larger cohorts and repeated OCT examinations are needed to confirm the preliminary findings in this study. PMID:25298889

  6. Ziv-aflibercept in macular disease

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Al-Ghadban, Sara I; Yunis, Muhammad H; El-Sabban, Marwan E

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Aflibercept is an approved therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular oedema (DME). In vitro and in vivo studies did not detect toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium cells using the approved cancer protein, ziv-aflibercept. Our purpose is to determine if ziv-aflibercept can be used in AMD and DME without ocular toxicity, to test the stability of ziv-aflibercept, and to do a cost analysis. Methods Prospectively, consecutive patients with AMD or DME and poor vision underwent one intravitreal injection of 0.05 mL of fresh filtered ziv-aflibercept (1.25 mg). Monitoring of best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular inflammation, cataract progression, and retinal structure by spectral domain optical coherence tomography was done at 1 day and 1 week after injection. Ziv-aflibercept activity over 4 weeks was measured by capturing vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA. Results There were no signs of retinal toxicity, intraocular inflammation or change in lens status in four eyes with AMD and two eyes with DME. Visual acuity improved (p=0.05) and central foveal thickness decreased in all patients (p=0.05). Ziv-aflibercept had no loss of anti-VEGF activity when kept at 4°C in polycarbonate syringes over 4 weeks. Similar to bevacizumab, compounded ziv-aflibercept would yield a tremendous saving compared with aflibercept or ranibizumab. Conclusions Off-label use of ziv-aflibercept improves visual acuity without ocular toxicity and may offer a cheaper alternative to the same molecule aflibercept. Trial registration number NCT02173873. PMID:25677668

  7. Diabetic Macular Edema: Options for Adjunct Therapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Pilar; Abadia, Beatriz; Ferreras, Antonio; Ruiz-Moreno, Oscar; Verdes, Guayente; Pablo, Luis E

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease that affects 387 million people worldwide. Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a common complication of DM, is the main cause of blindness in the active population. Diabetic macular edema (DME) may occur at any stage of DR, and is characterized by vascular hyperpermeability accompanied by hard exudates within the macula. Medical and surgical therapies have dramatically reduced the progression of DR, and timely intervention can reduce the risk of severe vision loss by more than 90 %. In 2012, intravitreal ranibizumab became the first antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agent approved for DME and, since then, many reports of the use of ranibizumab for DME have been promising. Randomized, prospective, multicenter clinical trials-most notably, RESOLVE, READ-2, RISE/RIDE, RESTORE, DRCR.net protocol I, and RETAIN-reported improvements in best-corrected visual acuity and decreased central retinal thickness as measured with optical coherence tomography in patients with DME. Similar treatment benefits have also been noted in clinical trials evaluating intravitreal aflibercept and bevacizumab (DAVINCI, VISTA/VIVID, and BOLT) and more recently DRCR.net protocol T. Intravitreal steroids (dexamethasone intravitreal implant and fluocinolone acetonide), particularly in refractory cases, also play a significant role in the management of DME (MEAD/CHAMPLAIN and FAMOUS/FAME studies). In summary, over the last 5 years, blocking VEGF and inflammation has been shown to improve visual outcomes in patients with macular edema due to DM, revolutionizing the treatment of center-involved DME and establishing a new standard of care. PMID:26242766

  8. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography of eyes with idiopathic epiretinal membrane: correlation between macular morphology and visual function

    PubMed Central

    Pilli, S; Lim, P; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Werner, J S; Park, S S

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the macular morphological changes associated with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) using high-resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT), as they correlate with visual acuity and microperimetry (MP-1). Methods In all, 24 eyes (19 subjects) with iERM were imaged prospectively using FD-OCT with axial resolution of 4.5 μm and transverse resolution of 10 to 15 μm. MP-1 and Stratus OCT were carried out in a subset of eyes. Results The mean log of the minimum angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.18±0.16 (range: −0.08 to 0.48, Snellen equivalent 20/15−1 to 20/60). ERM was visualized in all 24 eyes with FD-OCT and in 17 eyes (85%) of 20 eyes imaged with Stratus OCT. Although BCVA correlated with macular thickening in the central 1 mm sub-field of the Stratus ETDRS (P=0.0005) and macular volume (central 3 mm area) on FD-OCT (P<0.0001), macular thickening on thickness map and volume correlated poorly with decrease in macular sensitivity on MP-1 (P=0.16). On FD-OCT, foveal morphological changes correlated best with decrease in BCVA, the strongest being central foveal thickness (P<0.0001). Other significant changes included blurring of the foveal inner segment–outer segment (IS–OS) junction and/or Verhoeff's membrane, vitreal displacement of foveal outer nuclear layer and foveal detachment (P<0.05). Foveal IS–OS junction disruption was seen in 25% of eyes on Stratus OCT but in none of the eyes on FD-OCT. Conclusion FD-OCT allowed improved visualization of ERM and associated foveal morphological changes that correlated best with BCVA. Macular thickening correlated weakly with decreased macular function as assessed by MP-1. PMID:21436847

  9. The utility of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Stringham, J M; Hammond, B R; Nolan, J M; Wooten, B R; Mammen, A; Smollon, W; Snodderly, D M

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and validity of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in patients with intermediate stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The measurement procedure was optimized to accommodate individual differences in temporal vision related to age, disease, or other factors. The validity criteria were based on the similarity of the spectral absorption curves to ex vivo curves of lutein and zeaxanthin and the similarity of spatial density profiles to those measured in subjects without retinal disease. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profiles were measured with an LED-based macular densitometer; spectral absorption curves were measured with a 3-channel Maxwellian view system including a monochromator. All patients were characterized via clinical exams and all but 2 subjects from whom data were obtained had masked grading of color fundus photographs using the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Most of the patients were in AREDS category 2 (27%) or 3 (57%). Patients with visual acuity as poor as 20/80 were included, and could perform the task as long as they could see the stimulus. Eighty-one percent of the patients screened were able to perform the cHFP task, and data were obtained from 30 AMD patients. Spatial profiles of MPOD were measured in 19 subjects who could see the stimulus at all tested loci. These profiles were highly similar to those that have been measured with HFP in subjects without retinal disease. The average shape of the spectral absorption curves for the AMD subjects corresponded well to an ex vivo template. These data support both the utility and validity of the cHFP method for measuring MPOD in subjects with intermediate stages of AMD. The ability to measure the retinal response to nutritional intervention is of practical importance for monitoring patients being supplemented with lutein and

  10. Macular edema-like change and pseudopapilledema in a case of Scheie syndrome.

    PubMed

    Usui, T; Shirakashi, M; Takagi, M; Abe, H; Iwata, K

    1991-09-01

    We reported a case of Scheie syndrome in which diffuse fine corneal deposits, pigmentary retinal degeneration, pseudopapilledema, and macular edema-like change were observed bilaterally. This is the first report describing macular change in Scheie syndrome. PMID:1836802

  11. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... macular degeneration Three studies point to same risk gene for age-related macular degeneration NIH-funded research ... in Nature Genetics have converged on the same gene as a rare, but powerful risk factor for ...

  12. Modifiable risk factors for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Guymer, Robyn H; Chong, Elaine Wei-Tinn

    2006-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in Australia and other Western countries. As there is no cure for AMD, and treatments to stop its progression have met with limited success, there is an interest in identifying modifiable risk factors to prevent or slow disease progression. To date, smoking is the only proven modifiable risk factor for AMD. Other factors under study include (i) cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, body mass index, and atherosclerosis; and (ii) dietary risk factors including fat and antioxidant intake, but so far these studies have produced conflicting results. Dietary fat in relation to AMD has recently attracted media attention. Despite very limited work supporting an association between vegetable fat and AMD, widespread publicity advocating margarine as a cause of AMD and encouraging use of butter instead has caused confusion and anxiety among sufferers of AMD and the general public, as well as concern among health professionals. The antioxidant carotenoids--lutein and zeaxanthin--found in dark green or yellow vegetables exist in high concentrations in the macula and are hypothesised to play a protective role. Of nine controlled trials of supplementation with carotenoids and other antioxidants, three suggested that various combinations of antioxidants and carotenoids were protective. While a low-fat diet rich in dark green and yellow vegetables is advocated in general, any specific recommendations regarding certain fats or antioxidant supplementation and AMD are not based on consistent findings at this stage. PMID:16646746

  13. Eye Conditions in Older Adults: Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iroku-Malize, Tochi; Kirsch, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes a progressive loss of photoreceptors in the macula. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States, and some form of AMD is thought to affect more than 9 million individuals. Risk factors include older age, smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, white race, female sex, and a family history of AMD. There are two types of advanced AMD: nonexudative (dry or geographic atrophy) and exudative (wet or neovascular). Both cause progressive central vision loss with intact peripheral vision. Nonexudative AMD accounts for 80% to 90% of all advanced cases, and more than 90% of patients with severe vision loss have exudative AMD. On ophthalmoscopic examination, early findings include drusen (ie, yellow deposits in the retina). Prominent choroidal vessels, subretinal edema, and/or hemorrhage are seen in wet AMD. Regular eye examinations, visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography are used for diagnosis and to guide management. There is no specific therapy for dry AMD, but antioxidant supplementation may be helpful. Intravitreal injection of a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Optical aids and devices can help to maximize function for patients with AMD. PMID:27348529

  14. Seven new loci associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Lars G; Chen, Wei; Schu, Matthew; Yaspan, Brian L; Yu, Yi; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zack, Donald J; Arakawa, Satoshi; Cipriani, Valentina; Ripke, Stephan; Igo, Robert P; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Sim, Xueling; Weeks, Daniel E; Guymer, Robyn H; Merriam, Joanna E; Francis, Peter J; Hannum, Gregory; Agarwal, Anita; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Audo, Isabelle; Aung, Tin; Barile, Gaetano R; Benchaboune, Mustapha; Bird, Alan C; Bishop, Paul N; Branham, Kari E; Brooks, Matthew; Brucker, Alexander J; Cade, William H; Cain, Melinda S; Campochiaro, Peter A; Chan, Chi-Chao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Emily Y; Chin, Kimberly A; Chowers, Itay; Clayton, David G; Cojocaru, Radu; Conley, Yvette P; Cornes, Belinda K; Daly, Mark J; Dhillon, Baljean; Edwards, Albert O; Evangelou, Evangelos; Fagerness, Jesen; Ferreyra, Henry A; Friedman, James S; Geirsdottir, Asbjorg; George, Ronnie J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Neel; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Harding, Simon P; Haritoglou, Christos; Heckenlively, John R; Holz, Frank G; Hughes, Guy; Ioannidis, John P A; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Joseph, Peronne; Jun, Gyungah; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Katsanis, Nicholas; N Keilhauer, Claudia; Khan, Jane C; Kim, Ivana K; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Kozak, Igor; Lee, Clara J; Lee, Kristine E; Lichtner, Peter; Lotery, Andrew J; Meitinger, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Moore, Anthony T; Morgan, Denise J; Morrison, Margaux A; Myers, Chelsea E; Naj, Adam C; Nakamura, Yusuke; Okada, Yukinori; Orlin, Anton; Ortube, M Carolina; Othman, Mohammad I; Pappas, Chris; Park, Kyu Hyung; Pauer, Gayle J T; Peachey, Neal S; Poch, Olivier; Priya, Rinki Ratna; Reynolds, Robyn; Richardson, Andrea J; Ripp, Raymond; Rudolph, Guenther; Ryu, Euijung; Sahel, José-Alain; Schaumberg, Debra A; Scholl, Hendrik P N; Schwartz, Stephen G; Scott, William K; Shahid, Humma; Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Silvestri, Giuliana; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Smith, R Theodore; Sobrin, Lucia; Souied, Eric H; Stambolian, Dwight E; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sturgill-Short, Gwen M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Truitt, Barbara J; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vijaya, Lingam; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vithana, Eranga N; Webster, Andrew R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Winkler, Thomas W; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Alan F; Zelenika, Diana; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Klein, Michael L; Hageman, Gregory S; Lathrop, G Mark; Stefansson, Kari; Allikmets, Rando; Baird, Paul N; Gorin, Michael B; Wang, Jie Jin; Klaver, Caroline C W; Seddon, Johanna M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Yates, John R W; Swaroop, Anand; Weber, Bernhard H F; Kubo, Michiaki; Deangelis, Margaret M; Léveillard, Thierry; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Haines, Jonathan L; Farrer, Lindsay A; Heid, Iris M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate the understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genome-wide association study, including >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 loci associated at P < 5 × 10(-8). These loci show enrichment for genes involved in the regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include seven loci with associations reaching P < 5 × 10(-8) for the first time, near the genes COL8A1-FILIP1L, IER3-DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9 and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNP genotypes from all loci showed similar ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  15. Diabetic macular oedema: pathophysiology, management challenges and treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Bobak; Zhu, Meidong; Hong, Thomas; Chang, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic macular oedema (DMO) is the leading cause of vision loss in patients living with diabetes. DMO results from hyperglycaemia-induced activation of pathways that lead to oxidative stress and release of cytokines, impairing the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers. Improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to DMO have led to the development of effective therapies, including vitreoretinal surgery, laser photocoagulation, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drugs and corticosteroids. Advances in imaging, including fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography, have also enhanced diagnosis and management of the condition. Despite these advances, there remain patients who do not respond completely to therapy, reflecting the complex pathophysiology of DMO. These patients may be considered treatment-resistant. In this review, we summarise the pathophysiology of DMO, as well as the available treatments and their mechanism of action. Additionally, we focus on treatment-resistant disease and review the literature on potential options for managing this complication of diabetes. PMID:27179659

  16. Age-related macular degeneration: experimental and emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This essay reviews the experimental treatments and new imaging modalities that are currently being explored by investigators to help treat patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Experimental treatments to preserve vision in patients with exudative AMD include blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), binding VEGF, and modulating the VEGF receptors. Investigators are also attempting to block signal transduction with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Experimental treatments for non-exudative AMD include agents that target inflammation, oxidative stress, and implement immune-modulation. The effectiveness of these newer pharmacologic agents has the potential to grow exponentially when used in combination with new and improved imaging modalities that can help identify disease earlier and follow treatment response more precisely. Conclusion: With a better understanding, at the genetic and molecular level, of AMD and the development of superior imaging modalities, investigators are able to offer treatment options that may offer unprecedented visual gains while reducing the need for repetitive treatments. PMID:19668561

  17. Associations Between Abnormal Rod-Mediated Dark Adaptation and Health and Functioning in Older Adults With Normal Macular Health

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; Huisingh, Carrie; Jackson, Gregory R.; Curcio, Christine A.; Szalai, Alexander J.; Dashti, Nassrin; Clark, Mark; Rookard, Kia; McCrory, Mark A.; Wright, Tyler T.; Callahan, Michael A.; Kline, Lanning B.; Witherspoon, C. Douglas; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Delayed rod-mediated dark adaptation (DA) is characteristic of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and also can be observed in some older adults in normal macular health. We examine cross-sectional associations between rod-mediated DA and risk factors for AMD in older adults in normal macular health. Methods. The sample consisted of adults aged ≥60 years old in normal macular health per grading of fundus photos using an established disease classification system. Rod-mediated DA was measured psychophysically following a photobleach using a computer-automated dark adaptometer with targets centered at 5° on the inferior vertical meridian. The speed of DA was characterized by the rod-intercept value, with abnormal DA defined as rod-intercept ≥ 12.3 minutes. We assessed several health and functional characteristics that the literature has suggested increase AMD risk (e.g., smoking, alcohol use, inflammatory markers, apolipoproteins, low luminance visual acuity, chronic medical conditions, body mass, family history). Results. Among 381 participants (mean age, 68.5 years; SD, 5.5), 78% had normal and 22% had abnormal DA, with the prevalence of abnormal DA increasing with age. After age-adjustment, abnormal DA was associated with increased odds of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), heavy use of or abstention from alcohol, high blood pressure, and drop in visual acuity under mesopic conditions. Conclusions. Despite having normal macular health according to accepted definitions of AMD presence, approximately one-quarter of older adults recruited from primary eye care clinics had abnormal DA, which was associated with known risk factors for AMD, including elevated CRP. PMID:24854857

  18. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography evaluation of postoperative cystoid macular oedema following phacoemulsification with intraoperative complication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To report the rate of cystoid macular oedema (CMO) as detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) after intraoperative complication during phacoemulsification. The secondary objectives include comparing mean macular thickness and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) between those who developed postoperative CMO against those who did not. Methods This is a prospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary hospital between July 2009 and June 2010. Serial SD-OCT and BCVA were performed at baseline, 1 week, 6 weeks and 16 weeks postoperatively. Results Single eyes from 47 subjects were analyzed; of these 16 (34%) eyes developed CMO. In the CMO group, mean macular thickness (±SD) increased sharply by 56 μm from 273 ± 24 μm at baseline to 329 ± 31 μm at 16 weeks; whereas in the non-CMO group, macular thickness showed a slight increase of 14 μm from 259 ± 21 μm to 272 ± 20 μm. In the CMO group, mean BCVA (in logarithm of minimum angle of resolution) improved modestly from 0.92 ± 0.66 to 0.66 ± 0.41 at week 16; while in the non-CMO group, mean BCVA improved markedly from 0.98 ± 0.59 to 0.21 ± 0.13. The two groups differed significantly in mean macular thickness (p < 0.001) and mean BCVA (p < 0.001) at 16 weeks. Conclusion As detection rate of CMO is high, postoperative OCT monitoring for patients with intraoperative complications allows earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24533465

  19. Temporal Macular Thinning Associated With X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faisal; Kamae, Kandon K.; Jones, Denise J.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Gregory, Martin C.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings of temporal macular thinning are important in the diagnosis and prognosis of X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS). Objectives To report OCT findings and severity of temporal macular thinning in a cohort with XLAS and to correlate these and other ocular findings with mutation genotype. Design Patients with XLAS underwent genotyping for COL4A5 mutations and complete eye examinations with retinal imaging using spectral domain OCT and fundus photography. Temporal macular thinning was calculated from OCT measurements by comparing the ratio of the retinal thickness of the temporal to the nasal subfields with a published normative database. Setting University departments of ophthalmology and nephrology. Participants Thirty-two patients from 24 families. Main Outcome and Measures Temporal thinning index calculated from spectral domain OCT scans. Results All study patients had a mutation associated with the X-linked COL4A5 gene. Eleven different mutations were identified. Eleven of 32 patients (34%) expressed the L1649R mutation. Of a total of 63 eyes with available OCT scans, 44 (70%) had severe pathological temporal macular thinning. The L1649R mutation was associated with the least amount of severe temporal macular thinning and later onset of renal failure. Conclusions and Relevance Temporal macular thinning is a prominent sign associated with XLAS, suggesting that OCT measurements are essential in the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. The L1649R mutation in the COL4A5 gene causes a relatively mild form of XLAS characterized by late-onset renal failure and less frequent, severe temporal macular thinning relative to other COL4A5 mutations. The pathological basis for the retinal abnormalities of XLAS remains to be established. PMID:23572034

  20. The use of comparative effectiveness research to inform policy decisions on the inclusion of bevacizumab for the treatment of macular diseases in Thailand’s pharmaceutical benefit package

    PubMed Central

    Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat; Leelahavarong, Pattara; Ratanapakorn, Tanapat; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing impetus to use pharmaceutical interventions, ie, ranibizumab or bevacizumab, for the treatment of particular macular diseases. This paper describes the evidence and decision-making of the National List of Essential Medicines Committee that recently announced the inclusion of bevacizumab for the treatment of macular diseases in its pharmaceutical benefit package. The findings of a systematic review and meta-analysis in this paper indicate that the intravitreal administration of bevacizumab is superior to nonpharmaceutical treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME), but inconclusive for retinal vein occlusion, given the limited evidence. The study also failed to distinguish among the differences in terms of visual acuity improvement, reduction of central macular thickness, and response to treatment between AMD and DME patients treated with bevacizumab and those treated with ranibizumab. Although bevacizumab was not licensed for AMD and DME, the committee decided to include bevacizumab in the National List of Essential Medicines. It is expected that many patients who are in need of treatment but who are unable to afford the expensive alternative drug, ranibizumab, will be able to receive this effective treatment instead and be prevented from suffering irreversible loss of vision. At the same time, this policy will help generate evidence about the real-life effectiveness and safety profiles of the drug for future policy development in Thailand and other settings. PMID:23248574

  1. Recent developments in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Frank G.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fleckenstein, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of visual loss in the elderly, with increasing prevalence due to increasing life expectancy. While the introduction of anti-VEGF therapy has improved outcomes, there are still major unmet needs and gaps in the understanding of underlying biological processes. These include early, intermediate, and atrophic disease stages. Recent studies have assessed therapeutic approaches addressing various disease-associated pathways, including complement inhibitors. Drug-delivery aspects are also relevant, as many agents have to be administered repeatedly. Herein, relevant pathogenetic factors and underlying mechanisms as well as recent and potential therapeutic approaches are reviewed. PMID:24691477

  2. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  3. Markers of lutein and zeaxanthin status in two age groups of men and women: dietary intake, serum concentrations, lipid profile and macular pigment optical density

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Lutein and zeaxanthin accumulate in retina (macular pigment). Their nutritional status can be assessed using dietary or biochemical markers and both have been associated with macular pigment optical density. We proposed to assess dietary and status markers of lutein and zeaxanthin in a group of healthy Spanish volunteers, considering the potential influence of age, gender and serum lipids to investigate the predictors of the macular pigment optical density. Methods Serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, dietary intake and macular pigment optical density were determined in 108 healthy men and women (20–35 and 45–65 years), using high-performance liquid chromatography, 3-day food records and heterochromic flicker photometry, respectively. Mann–Whitney U-test, Spearman correlation coefficient and multivariate regression analysis were used for the statistical study. Results Serum concentrations and dietary intake of lutein plus zeaxanthin (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.001, respectively) were higher in older vs younger subjects, whereas macular pigment optical density was lower (p = 0.038). The highest correlation coefficients between intake and serum were for fruit and serum lutein (ρ = 0.452, p < 0.0001) and for fruit and lutein + zeaxanthin (ρ = 0.431, p < 0.0001) in the younger group. Macular pigment optical density correlated with serum xanthophylls (ρ = 0.223, p = 0.02) and fruit and vegetable intake (ρ = 0.350, p = 0.0002), showing highest correlations when lutein and zeaxanthin were expressed in relation to serum lipids in older subjects (ρ = 0.262, p = 0.006). Multivariate regression analysis identified age and serum lutein as major predictors of macular pigment optical density (total sample), and a coefficient of determination of 29.7% for the model including lutein + zeaxathin/cholesterol + triglycerides, sex and fruit + vegetables in the older group. Conclusions The

  4. Current Therapeutic Development for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarizes recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem-cell based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  5. Functional Visual Acuity in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yohei; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Shinoda, Hajime; Uchida, Atsuro; Mochimaru, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nagai, Kanako; Sasaki, Mariko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We evaluated whether a functional visual acuity (FVA) system can detect subtle changes in central visual acuity that reflect pathological findings associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with unilateral AMD and logMAR monocular best corrected VA better than 0 in both eyes, as measured by conventional chart examination, were analyzed between November 2012 and April 2013. After measuring conventional VA, FVA, and contrast VA with best correction, routine eye examinations including spectral domain–optical coherence tomography were performed. Standard Schirmer test was performed, and corneal and lens densities were measured. Results The FVA score (p < 0.001) and visual maintenance ratio (p < 0.001) measured by the FVA system, contrast VA (p < 0. 01), and conventional VA (p < 0.01) were significantly worse in the AMD-affected eyes than in the fellow eyes. No significant differences were observed in the anterior segment conditions. Forward stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that the length of interdigitation zone disruption, as visualized by optical coherence tomography imaging, correlated with the FVA score (p < 0.01) but not with any other parameters investigated. Conclusions The FVA system detects subtle changes in best corrected VA in AMD-affected eyes and reflects interdigitation zone disruption, an anatomical change in the retina recorded by optical coherence tomography. Further studies are required to understand the value of the FVA system in detecting subtle changes in AMD. PMID:26583795

  6. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  7. Current therapeutic developments in atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarises recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem cell-based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  8. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petrarca, Robert; Jackson, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD). Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET). Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002), with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections. PMID:21311657

  9. Bilateral Macular Roth Spots as a Manifestation of Subacute Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ceglowska, Karolina; Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Kiszka, Agnieszka; Koss, Michael J; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Rejdak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of impaired vision in the right eye (OD). The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (LogMAR) was 1.1 for the right eye and 0.0 for the left eye (OS). Fundus examination revealed white-centered hemorrhages resembling Roth spots in both macular regions. The spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) showed intraretinal pseudocysts and hyperreflective deposits in the areas corresponding to the Roth spots. Conducted blood tests revealed elevated D-dimer concentration, increased total number of neutrophils, high C-reactive protein concentration, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Procalcitonin concentration, platelet count, and body temperature were within normal ranges. A blood culture was ordered and yielded Streptococcus mitis and intravenous antibiotics were started immediately. The patient started complaining of chest and left calf pain. The systemic examination revealed infective endocarditis accompanied by bicuspid aortic valve and paravalvular abscess formation. The patient underwent cardiac surgery with mechanical aortic valve implantation. After recovery, the patient's visual acuities improved fully. Control ophthalmic examination, including SD-OCT, showed no abnormalities. PMID:26839725

  10. Clinical trials on corticosteroids for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Al Dhibi, Hassan A; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is a common cause of visual impairment in diabetic patients. It is caused by an increase in the permeability of the perifoveal capillaries and a disruption of the blood retinal-barrier. The pathogenesis of DME is multifactorial. Several therapeutic modalities have been proposed for the treatment of DME. Corticosteroid treatments have emerged as an alternative therapy for persistent DME or refractory to conventional laser photocoagulation and other modalities, due to anti-inflammatory, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-proliferative effects. Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial therapeutic effect of corticosteroids with improvement to both retinal thickness and visual acuity in short-term on the treatment of DME. Peribulbar and intravitreal injections have been used to deliver steroids for DME with frequent injections due to the chronic and recurrent nature of the disease. Steroid-related side effects include elevated intraocular pressure, cataract, and injection related complications such as endophthalmitis, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal detachment particularly with intravitreal steroid injections. In order to reduce the risks, complications and frequent dosing of intravitreal steroids, intravitreal implants have been developed recently to provide sustained release of corticosteroids and reduce repeated intravitreal injections for the management of DME. PMID:24379920

  11. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  12. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Scientometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramin, Shahrokh; Soheilian, Masoud; Habibi, Gholamreza; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Gharebaghi, Reza; Heidary, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a major cause of central blindness among working aged adults across the world. Systematic research planning on any subject, including ARMD is in need of solid data regarding previous efforts in this field and to identify the gaps in the research. This study aimed to elucidate the most important trends, directions, and gap in this subject. The data extracted from the Institute for Scientific Information were used to perform a bibliometric analysis of the scientific productions (1993–2013) about ARMD. Specific parameters related to ARMD were analyzed to obtain a view of the topic’s structure, history, and document relationships. Additionally, the trends and authors in the most influential publications were analyzed. The number of articles in this field was found constantly increasing. Most highly cited articles addressed genetic epidemiology and clinical research topics in this field. During the past 3 years, there has been a trend toward biomarker research. Through performing the first scientometric survey on ARMD research, we analyzed the characteristics of papers and the trends in scientific production. We also identified some of the critical gaps in the current research efforts that would help in large-scale research strategic planning. PMID:26060829

  13. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease. PMID:23209345

  14. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  15. Updates on the Clinical Trials in Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Demirel, Sibel; Argo, Colby; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Parriott, Jacob; Sepah, Yasir Jamal; Do, Diana V.; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this era of evidence-based medicine, significant progress has been made in the field of pharmacotherapeutics for the management of diabetic macular edema (DME). A. number of landmark clinical trials have provided strong evidence of the safety and efficacy of agents such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factors for the treatment of DME. Decades of clinical research, ranging from the early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study to the present-day randomized clinical trials (RCTs) testing novel agents, have shifted the goal of therapy from preventing vision loss to ensuring a maximum visual gain. Systematic study designs have provided robust data with an attempt to optimize the treatment regimens including the choice of the agent and timing of therapy. However, due to a number of challenges in the management of DME with approved agents, further studies are needed. For the purpose of this review, an extensive database search in English language was performed to identify prospective, RCTs testing pharmacological agents for DME. In order to acquaint the reader with the most relevant data from these clinical trials, this review focuses on pharmacological agents that are currently approved or have widespread applications in the management of DME. An update on clinical trials presently underway for DME has also been provided. PMID:26957834

  16. Bilateral Macular Roth Spots as a Manifestation of Subacute Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ceglowska, Karolina; Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Kiszka, Agnieszka; Koss, Michael J.; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Rejdak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of impaired vision in the right eye (OD). The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (LogMAR) was 1.1 for the right eye and 0.0 for the left eye (OS). Fundus examination revealed white-centered hemorrhages resembling Roth spots in both macular regions. The spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) showed intraretinal pseudocysts and hyperreflective deposits in the areas corresponding to the Roth spots. Conducted blood tests revealed elevated D-dimer concentration, increased total number of neutrophils, high C-reactive protein concentration, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Procalcitonin concentration, platelet count, and body temperature were within normal ranges. A blood culture was ordered and yielded Streptococcus mitis and intravenous antibiotics were started immediately. The patient started complaining of chest and left calf pain. The systemic examination revealed infective endocarditis accompanied by bicuspid aortic valve and paravalvular abscess formation. The patient underwent cardiac surgery with mechanical aortic valve implantation. After recovery, the patient's visual acuities improved fully. Control ophthalmic examination, including SD-OCT, showed no abnormalities. PMID:26839725

  17. A novel proteotoxic stress associated mechanism for macular corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Szalai, Eszter; Smedowski, Adrian; Hegyi, Zoltán; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Wowra, Bogumil; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Módis, László; Berta, András; Wylegala, Edward; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2015-08-01

    Macular corneal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive eye disease affecting primarily the corneal stroma. Abnormal accumulation of proteoglycan aggregates has been observed intra- and extracellularly in the stromal layer. In addition to the stromal keratocytes and corneal lamellae, deposits are also present in the basal epithelial cells, endothelial cells and Descemet's membrane. Misfolding of proteins has a tendency to gather into aggregating deposits. We studied interaction of molecular chaperones and proteasomal clearance in macular dystrophy human samples and in human corneal HCE-2 epithelial cells. Seven cases of macular corneal dystrophy and four normal corneal buttons collected during corneal transplantation were examined for their expression patterns of heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62. In response to proteasome inhibition the same proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Slit-lamp examination, in vivo confocal cornea microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for morphological analyses. Heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62 were upregulated in both the basal corneal epithelial cells and the stromal keratocytes in macular corneal dystrophy samples that coincided with an increased expression of the same molecules under proteasome inhibition in the HCE-2 cells in vitro. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism that connects the molecular chaperone and proteasomal clearance system in the pathogenesis of macular corneal dystrophy. PMID:25597745

  18. Correlation between Visual Acuity, Inner Segment/Outer Segment Junction, and Cone Outer Segment Tips Line Integrity in Uveitic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Paolo; D'Ambrosio, Enzo; Iannetti, Ludovico; De Marco, Federica; La Cava, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the correlation between best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), the foveal inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction or ellipsoid portion of inner segment (EPIS/ellipsoid zone), and the cone outer segment tips (COST) line or interdigitation zone integrity in eyes with uveitic macular edema (ME). Method. A retrospective observational study involving all patients from January 2012 to December 2013 with uveitic ME was performed. All patients underwent BCVA using Snellen charts spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) examination using Spectralis OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Results. Fifty-two eyes from 45 patients were included in this study. Multivariate analysis showed a negative correlation between BCVA and the central retinal subfield thickness (CST), the cystoid pattern of edema, and the interdigitation zone interruption. Univariate logistic analysis showed a strong correlation between the ellipsoid zone and the interdigitation zone integrity. Conclusions. The ellipsoid zone defect, the interdigitation zone interruption, and the CST are correlated with poor vision. Visual acuity is also strongly affected by the cystoid pattern. The interdigitation zone integrity appears to be the most important factor in the visual prognosis of uveitic ME. PMID:26167505

  19. Spontaneous Closure of a Full-Thickness Macular Hole Associated with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy and Persistent Vitreomacular Traction

    PubMed Central

    Reinherz, Benjamin J.; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy worsens the prognosis of macular holes compared to those of idiopathic etiology. While spontaneous closure of idiopathic macular holes is a well-documented phenomenon, spontaneous closure of macular holes associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy is rare. We report a case of spontaneous closure of a macular hole associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and persistent vitreomacular traction. PMID:27099607

  20. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  1. Age-related macular degeneration: choroidal ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, D Jackson; Silverman, Ronald H; Rondeau, Mark J; Lloyd, Harriet O; Khanifar, Aziz A; Chan, R V Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to use ultrasound to non-invasively detect differences in choroidal microarchitecture possibly related to ischaemia among normal eyes and those with wet and dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Prospective case series of subjects with dry AMD, wet AMD and age-matched controls. Methods Digitised 20 MHz B-scan radiofrequency ultrasound data of the region of the macula were segmented to extract the signal from the retina and choroid. This signal was processed by a wavelet transform, and statistical modelling was applied to the wavelet coefficients to examine differences among dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate a multivariate classifier. Results In the 69 eyes of 52 patients, 18 did not have AMD, 23 had dry AMD and 28 had wet AMD. Multivariate models showed statistically significant differences between groups. Multiclass ROC analysis of the best model showed an excellent volume-under-curve of 0.892±0.17. The classifier is consistent with ischaemia in dry AMD. Conclusions Wavelet augmented ultrasound is sensitive to the organisational elements of choroidal microarchitecture relating to scatter and fluid tissue boundaries such as seen in ischaemia and inflammation, allowing statistically significant differentiation of dry, wet and non-AMD eyes. This study further supports the association of ischaemia with dry AMD and provides a rationale for treating dry AMD with pharmacological agents to increase choroidal perfusion. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00277784. PMID:23740965

  2. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  3. New Computer Simulations of Macular Neural Functioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Doshay, D.; Linton, S.; Parnas, B.; Montgomery, K.; Chimento, T.

    1994-01-01

    We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the functional significance of the three-dimensional (3-D) organization of gravity sensors. These sensors have a prototypic architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scaled-up, 3-D versions run on a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. A semi-automated method of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial sections studied in a transmission electron microscope has been developed to eliminate tedious conventional photography. The reconstructions use a mesh as a step in generating a neural surface for visualization. Two meshes are required to model calyx surfaces. The meshes are connected and the resulting prisms represent the cytoplasm and the bounding membranes. A finite volume analysis method is employed to simulate voltage changes along the calyx in response to synapse activation on the calyx or on calyceal processes. The finite volume method insures that charge is conserved at the calyx-process junction. These and other models indicate that efferent processes act as voltage followers, and that the morphology of some afferent processes affects their functioning. In a final application, morphological information is symbolically represented in three dimensions in a computer. The possible functioning of the connectivities is tested using mathematical interpretations of physiological parameters taken from the literature. Symbolic, 3-D simulations are in progress to probe the functional significance of the connectivities. This research is expected to advance computer-based studies of macular functioning and of synaptic plasticity.

  4. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  5. Bilateral choroidal excavation in best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) has recently been described as one or more localized areas of choroidal excavation on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of bilateral FCE in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). SD-OCT revealed FCE in both eyes characterized by interruption of the internal segment-outer segment junction and the presence of subretinal hyporeflective space. This is the first report describing bilateral FCE in a distinct macular disorder and specifically with VMD. Future investigations are warranted to ascertain the involvement of other macular dystrophies with atrophic evolution and the impact of FCE on the clinical course. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:e8-e10.]. PMID:24512759

  6. [Optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence in Best macular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Chebil, A; Charfi, H; Largueche, L; El Matri, L

    2016-06-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is the second most frequent hereditary maculopathy, with bilateral involvement and juvenile onset. It is clinically characterized by bilateral deposits of lipofuscin-like autofluorescent material in the subretinal space, with a typical phenotypic manifestation taking the form of a vitelliform macular lesion evolving gradually into more advanced stages. The purpose of our study was to describe fundus autofluorescence patterns and OCT findings in three patients (6 eyes) with several stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become the first imaging technique to order when confronted with a hereditary maculopathy suggesting Best disease. Fundus autofluorescence combined with OCT allow for better diagnosis and management, which are necessary for any genetic analysis. PMID:27206620

  7. Identification of the gene responsible for Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, K; Koisti, M J; Bakall, B; Li, W; Xie, G; Marknell, T; Sandgren, O; Forsman, K; Holmgren, G; Andreasson, S; Vujic, M; Bergen, A A; McGarty-Dugan, V; Figueroa, D; Austin, C P; Metzker, M L; Caskey, C T; Wadelius, C

    1998-07-01

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD), also known as vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2; OMIM 153700), is an autosomal dominant form of macular degeneration characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipofuscin within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium cells. In pursuit of the disease gene, we limited the minimum genetic region by recombination breakpoint analysis and mapped to this region a novel retina-specific gene (VMD2). Genetic mapping data, identification of five independent disease-specific mutations and expression studies provide evidence that mutations within the candidate gene are a cause of BMD. The 3' UTR of the candidate gene contains a region of antisense complementarity to the 3' UTR of the ferritin heavy-chain gene (FTH1), indicating the possibility of antisense interaction between VMD2 and FTH1 transcripts. PMID:9662395

  8. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew S; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn's disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographic (RRS) measurements of macular carotenoid levels were collected from subjects with and without a history of malabsorption syndromes. Carotenoids were extracted from serum and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subjects with malabsorption (n = 22) had 37% lower levels of macular carotenoids on average versus controls (n = 25, P < 0.001). Malabsorption was not associated with decreased serum carotenoid levels. Convincing signs of early maculopathy were not observed. We conclude that intestinal malabsorption results in lower macular carotenoid levels. PMID:19081745

  9. [Notalgia paresthetica, "posterior pigmented pruritic patch" and macular amyloidosis. Three stages of a disease].

    PubMed

    Cerroni, L; Kopera, D; Soyer, H P; Kerl, H

    1993-12-01

    We report on nine cases of notalgia paresthetica, a cutaneous condition that has rarely been described in the dermatological literature and is characterized by localized pruritus, burning and hyperesthesia and/or paresthesia on the back. Histological and immunohistochemical studies have not clarified the pathogenesis of this disease. Several factors might be involved in various cases, including increased cutaneous innervation and neuropathy. The so-called posterior pigmented pruritic patch and macular amyloidosis may be considered as progressive evolutional stages of notalgia paresthetica. PMID:8113041

  10. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF GENERALIZED MACULAR AMYLOIDOSIS IN A YOUNG ADULT

    PubMed Central

    Kudur, Mohan H; B, Sathish Pai; H, Sripathi; Prabhu, Smitha

    2008-01-01

    Macular amyloidosis is a common problem seen dermatology out-patient department. Generalized macular amyloidosis presenting with a poikilodermatous appearance is rare. In our case, an 18-year-old male presented with generalized hypopigmented macules with a poikilodermatous appearance of 10-year duration. His developmental milestones were normal with negative family history of similar complaints. Histopathology of hyperpigmented lesions revealed hyperkeratosis and acanthosis of epidermis and hypopigmented lesion showing only hyperkeratosis. Both lesions were showing the deposition of amorphous, hazy material in the tips of papillary dermis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate. Congo red staining of the amorphous material was positive for amyloid. PMID:19882037

  11. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  12. Diurnal Variations in Intraocular Pressure, Central Corneal Thickness, and Macular and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Diabetics and Normal Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Farrahi, Fereidoun; Moghaddasi, Alireza; Idani, Aida; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diurnal variations in intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness (CCT), and macular and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in diabetic patients and normal individuals. Methods: This study included 11 diabetic patients with macular edema and 11 healthy individuals. IOP, CCT, and macular and RNFL thickness were measured every 3 hours on a single day between 9 AM and 6 PM. Diurnal variations in IOP, CCT, total macular volume (TMV), central macular thickness (CMT), average macular thickness (AMT), and RNFL thickness were measured. Results: None of the parameters showed a significant absolute or relative change over the course of the day. However, the following non-significant changes were observed. In the control group, all parameters demonstrated the highest values at 9 AM. The lowest IOP, TMV and AMT occurred at 12 PM; lowest CCT and RNFL at 6 PM; and the lowest CMT at 3 PM. Diabetic subjects had the highest values of RNFL, CMT and TMV at 9 AM, and that for IOP, CCT and AMT at 6 PM. The lowest RNFL and CMT values occurred at 6 PM; lowest IOP at 12 PM; and the lowest CCT, TMV and AMT were observed at 3 PM. In the diabetic group, TMV, CMT, AMT and CCT were significantly higher and RNFL was significantly lower than the control group at all time points (all P- values < 0.05). Conclusion: While there were slight decreases in IOP, RNFL thickness and CMT during the day, these changes were not significant between 9 AM and 6 PM and probably do not affect the interpretation of measurements. PMID:27195084

  13. Comparison of Modified-ETDRS and Mild Macular Grid Laser Photocoagulation Strategies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare two laser photocoagulation techniques for treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): modified-ETDRS direct/grid photocoagulation (mETDRS) and a, potentially milder, but potentially more extensive, mild macular grid (MMG) laser technique in which small mild burns are placed throughout the macula, whether or not edema is present, and microaneurysms are not treated directly. Methods 263 subjects (mean age 59 years) with previously untreated DME were randomly assigned to receive laser photocoagulation by mETDRS (N=162 eyes) or MMG (N=161 eyes) technique. Visual acuity, fundus photographs and OCT measurements were obtained at baseline and after 3.5, 8, and 12 months. Treatment was repeated if DME persisted. Main Outcome Measure Change in OCT measures at 12-months follow up. Results From baseline to 12 months, among eyes with baseline central subfield thickness ≥ 250 microns, central subfield thickening decreased by an average of 88 microns in the mETDRS group and decreased by 49 microns in the MMG group (adjusted mean difference: 33 microns, 95% confidence interval 5 to 61 microns, P=0.02). Weighted inner zone thickening by OCT decreased by 42 and 28 microns, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 14 microns, 95% confidence interval 1 to 27 microns, P=0.04), maximum retinal thickening (maximum of the central and four inner subfields) decreased by 66 and 39 microns, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 27 microns, 95% confidence interval 6 to 47 microns, P=0.01), and retinal volume decreased by 0.8 and 0.4 mm3, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 0.3 mm3, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.53 mm3, P=0.03). At 12 months, the mean change in visual acuity was 0 letters in the mETDRS group and 2 letters worse in the MMG group (adjusted mean difference: 2 letters, 95% confidence interval −0.5 to 5 letters, P=0.10). Conclusions At 12 months after treatment, the MMG technique is less effective at reducing OCT measured retinal thickening than the

  14. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Genetics and Biology.

    PubMed

    Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), widely prevalent across the globe, is a major stakeholder among adult visual morbidity and blindness, not only in the Western world but also in Asia. Several risk factors have been identified, including critical genetic factors, which were never imagined 2 decades ago. The etiopathogenesis is emerging to demonstrate that immune and complement-related inflammation pathway members chronically exposed to environmental insults could justifiably influence disease morbidity and treatment outcomes. Approximately half a dozen physiological and biochemical cascades are disrupted in the AMD disease genesis, eventually leading to the distortion and disruption of the subretinal space, subretinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch membrane, thus setting off chaos and disorder for signs and symptoms to manifest. Approximately 3 dozen genetic factors have so far been identified, including the recent ones, through powerful genomic technologies and large robust sample sizes. The noteworthy genetic variants (common and rare) are complement factor H, complement factor H-related genes 1 to 5, C3, C9, ARMS2/HTRA1, vascular endothelial growth factor A, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2/KDR, and rare variants (show causal link) such as TIMP3, fibrillin, COL4A3, MMP19, and MMP9. Despite the enormous amount of scientific information generated over the years, diagnostic genetic or biomarker tests are still not available for clinicians to understand the natural course of the disease and its management in a patient. However, further research in the field should reduce this gap not only by aiding the clinician but also through the possibilities of clinical intervention with complement pathway-related inhibitors entering preclinical and clinical trials in the near future. PMID:27488064

  15. Treatment costs of cystoid macular edema among patients following cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schmier, Jordana K; Covert, David W; Hulme-Lowe, Carolyn K; Mullins, Anmol; Mahlis, Emmanuel M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current costs of treating cystoid macular edema (CME), a complication that can follow cataract surgery, are largely unknown. This analysis estimates the treatment costs for CME based on the recently released US Medicare data. Setting Nationally representative database. Design Retrospective analysis of the 2011 through 2013 Medicare 5% Beneficiary Encrypted Files. Methods Beneficiaries who underwent cataract surgery were identified and stratified by diagnosis of CME (cases) or no diagnosis of CME (controls) within 6 months following surgery. Claims and reimbursements for ophthalmic care were identified. Subgroup analyses explored the rates of CME in beneficiaries based on the presence of selected comorbidities and by the type of procedure (standard vs complex). Total Medicare and ophthalmic costs for cases and controls are presented. The analysis explored the effect of considering diabetic macular edema (DME) and macular edema (ME) as exclusion criteria. Results Of 78,949 beneficiaries with cataract surgery, 2.54% (n=2,003) were diagnosed with CME. One-third of beneficiaries had one or more conditions affecting retinal health (including diabetes), 4.5% of whom developed CME. The rate of CME, at 22.5%, was much higher for those patients with preoperative DME or ME. Ophthalmic charges were almost twice as high for cases compared with controls (US$10,410 vs $5,950); payments averaged 85% higher ($2,720 vs $1,470) (both P<0.0001). Conclusion Substantial costs can be associated with CME; beneficiaries whose retinas are already compromised before cataract surgery face higher risk. Cost savings could be realized with the use of therapies that reduce the risk of developing CME. Future analyses could identify whether and to what extent comorbidities influence costs. PMID:27041989

  16. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  17. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  18. Regression of diabetic macular edema after subcutaneous exenatide.

    PubMed

    Sarao, Valentina; Veritti, Daniele; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report a case of complete regression of diabetic macular edema after subcutaneous injection of exenatide in a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study is an interventional case report. Blood investigations, complete ophthalmic examinations and optical coherence tomography were performed. A 55-year-old female affected by poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with visual impairment due to macular edema in the right eye. The left eye showed mild edema without visual loss. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/80 and 20/20, respectively. The patient was encouraged to improve metabolic control, and the antidiabetic therapy was modified combining exenatide 10 μg subcutaneously twice daily to her regimen of oral metformin. The patient did not receive any ocular treatment. A complete tomographic resolution of macular edema was observed after 1 month and BCVA improved to 20/63. These findings were confirmed for the entire 6-month follow-up duration. No ocular or non-ocular adverse events were recorded. This is the first reported case of complete regression of macular edema in a diabetic patient after subcutaneous injection of exenatide. PMID:23925692

  19. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  20. Multimodal analysis of the progression of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Georges, Anouk; Massamba, Nathalie; Forte, Raimondo; Querques, Lea; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Kaplan, Josseline; Souied, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the multimodal morphological features in the different stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD) in subjects harboring mutations in the BEST1 gene, and their changes during the progression of the disease. Methods In this retrospective observational study performed between January 2007 and December 2012, 21 patients (42 eyes) with Best VMD from eight families with the BEST1 mutation were included. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) were evaluated at study entry and at last visit. Results The mean age of patients was 26.3±17.4 years. Seven new missense mutations in BEST1 were identified. Mean follow-up was 41.1±18.5 months. Mean BCVA was 0.34±0.34 LogMAR at study entry and 0.32±0.33 LogMAR at last follow-up visit (p = 0.2). The overall lesion area on FAF increased from 6.62±4.9 mm2 to 7.34±6.1 mm2 (p = 0.05). At study entry, on SD-OCT, photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid portion (ellipsoid zone, EZ) was normal in 15 eyes, disrupted in 14 eyes, and absent in 13 eyes. In two eyes, EZ changed from normal to disrupted during follow-up. Three eyes of three patients showing pseudohypopyon lesions at study entry progressed to vitelliruptive lesions at the last follow-up visit. Three eyes of three patients showing vitelliruptive lesion at study entry reverted to pseudohypopyon lesion with overall enlargement of the lesion size. Conclusions Multimodal analysis allowed documenting a continuous material accumulation and reabsorption in Best VMD progression. Blue FAF and SD-OCT could represent noninvasive imaging techniques to monitor Best VMD. PMID:24791142

  1. Progressive macular hypomelanosis among Egyptian patients: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Khaled; Ahmed, El-Shahat Farag; Abdelgawad, Mamdouh Morsy; El-Kamel, Mohammed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a disease of unclear etiology. Propionbacterium acnes (P. acnes) was claimed to be an etiological factor. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to document the clinicopathological features of PMH in Egyptian patients and to evaluate the therapeutic outcome. Methods: Patients with clinical features of PMH were recruited. Wood’s lamp examination, skin scrapings for fungi, and skin biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, PAS, Fontana-Masson, and S100 protein. Patients received either narrow-band UVB (nbUVB) or nbUVB plus daily topical clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide gel 5% (bcUVB). The period of active treatment was 14 weeks followed by a follow-up period of 24 weeks. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included. Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsy specimens showed no significant differences between lesional and normal skin. Fontana-Masson stained sections showed overall reduction of melanin granules in the basal layer of lesional skin only and S100 staining did not detect significant differences in the number of melanocytes in lesional and normal skin. Nearly complete repigmentation was reported in 10 patients treated with bcUVB compared to 9 patients treated with nbUVb with no significant differences between both groups after 14 weeks. Only 2 patients in each group retained the pigmentation and the remaining patients returned to the baseline color before treatment. Conclusions: This study documented the clinicopathological features of PMH among Egyptians. No permanently effective treatment is available. Further studies are needed to prove or disprove the pathogenic role of P. acnes in PMH. PMID:24396712

  2. Chlamydia infection status, genotype, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khandhadia, Sam; Foster, Sebastian; Cree, Angela; Griffiths, Helen; Osmond, Clive; Goverdhan, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether Chlamydia (C.) infections are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to assess if this association is influenced by the complement factor H (CFH) Y402H or the high temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) rs11200638 risk genotypes. Methods One hundred ninety-nine AMD patients with early and late forms of the disease and 100 unaffected controls, at least 50 years old were included in the study. Patients in the AMD and control groups were selected based on known CFH Y402H variant genotype status (one third homozygous CC, one third heterozygous CT, and one third wild-type TT). Plasma from all patients and controls was tested for C. pneumoniae, C. trachomatis, and C. psittaci IgG seropositivity using a micro-immunofluorescent assay to establish previous infection status. Assays were conducted blind to risk genotypes and the results analyzed using univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analysis. Results IgG seropositivity to C. pneumoniae was most prevalent (69.2%, n=207), followed by C. trachomatis (7.4%, n=22) and C. psittaci (3.3%, n=10). No association was found between each of the three Chlamydia species IgG seropositivity and AMD status or severity (early/late). There was also no significant association between Chlamydia species IgG seropositivity and AMD status or severity, in patients carrying at least one CFH Y402H risk allele (C) or HTRA1 rs11200638 risk allele (A), with univariate or logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Chlamydia infection status does not appear to be associated with AMD status or severity. The presence of CFH Y402H and HTRA1 rs11200638 risk genotypes does not alter this negative association. PMID:22259222

  3. Predicting anatomical results of surgical treatment of idiopathic macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Shpak, Alexander A.; Shkvorchenko, Dmitry O.; Sharafetdinov, Ilias Kh.; Yukhanova, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the parameters most informative in predicting the anatomical results of surgical treatment of idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (IMH). METHODS One hundred and sixty-two consecutive patients (170 eyes) after primary operation for IMH were enrolled. Outcomes were classified as anatomical success when both IMH closure and restoration of the outer retinal structure were achieved. “Prospective” group included 108 patients (115 eyes) followed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and microperimetry for 1y after surgery. Potential prognostic criteria, except microperimetry data, were tested in “retrospective” group (54 patients, 55 eyes). Prognostic value of each parameter was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Combined predictive power of the best prognostic parameters was tested with the use of linear discriminant analysis. RESULTS IMH closure was achieved in 106 eyes (92%) in the prospective group and 49 eyes (89%) in the retrospective group. Despite anatomical closure, the outer retinal structure was not restored in two eyes in the first group and in one eye in the second group. Preoperative central subfield retinal thickness demonstrated the best discriminatory capability between eyes with anatomical success and failure: area under the ROC-curve (AUC) 0.938 (95% CI: 0.881-0.995), sensitivity 64% at fixed specificity 95% (cut-off value 300 µm) in the prospective group; sensitivity 57% and specificity 90% in the retrospective group. Other continuous parameters except tractional hole index (AUC: 0.796, 95% CI: 0.591-1.000) had significantly lower AUCs (P<0.05). The best combination of the parameters, established by discriminant analysis in the prospective group, could not confirm its predictive value in the retrospective group. CONCLUSION Preoperative central subfield retinal thickness is a strong and probably the best predictor of anatomical results of IMH surgical treatment. PMID:26949645

  4. Characteristics of Fixational Eye Movements in People With Macular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Chung, Susana T. L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Fixation stability is known to be poor for people with macular disease and has been suggested as a contributing factor for the poor visual performance of these individuals. In this study, we examined the characteristics of the different components of fixational eye movements and determined the component that plays a major role in limiting fixation stability in people with macular disease. Methods. Sixteen observers with macular disease and 14 older adults with normal vision (control observers) monocularly fixated a small cross presented using a Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope, for trials of 30 seconds. The retinal image and the position of the cross on the retina were recorded digitally. Eye movements were extracted from the recorded videos at a sampling rate of 540 Hz using a cross-correlation technique. A velocity criterion of 8°/s was used to differentiate between slow drifts and microsaccades. Results. Observers with macular disease demonstrated higher fixation instability, larger amplitudes of slow drifts and microsaccades, and lower drift velocities, when compared with older adults with normal vision. The velocity and the rate of microsaccades were comparable between the two groups of observers. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the amplitude of microsaccades, and to a smaller extent, the amplitude of slow drifts, play a major role in limiting fixation stability. Conclusions. Fixation stability in people with macular disease is primarily limited by the amplitude of microsaccades, implying that rehabilitative strategies targeted at reducing the amplitude of microsaccades should improve fixation stability, and may lead to improved visual functions. PMID:25074769

  5. Macular Surgery Using Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Riazi-Esfahani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the use of intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for detecting anatomical changes during macular surgery. Methods: In a consecutive case series, 32 eyes of 32 patients undergoing concurrent pars plana vitrectomy and intraoperative SD-OCT for macular hole (MH), epiretinal membrane (ERM) and vitreomacular traction (VMT) were enrolled. Intraoperative changes in retinal thickness and dimensions of the macular hole were measured in patients with ERM and VMT following surgical manipulation using a hand-held SD-OCT device (iVue, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA). Results: SD-OCT images of sixteen eyes with macular hole were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. All MH dimensions remained stable during consecutive stages of surgery except for MH apex diameter, which showed a significant decrease after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling (P=0.025). Quantitative analysis of ten patients with ERM showed a significant decrease in retinal thickness after membrane removal (P=0.018) which did not remain significant until the end of the procedure (P=0.8). In three cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Quantitative analysis of five patients with VMT showed a decrease in retinal thickness during consecutive steps of the surgery, although these changes were not significant. In two cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes. PMID:26730318

  6. Circulating Autoantibodies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Recognize Human Macular Tissue Antigens Implicated in Autophagy, Immunomodulation, and Protection from Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Alessandro; Giorgianni, Francesco; New, David D.; Hollingsworth, T. J.; Umfress, Allison; Alhatem, Albert H.; Neeli, Indira; Lenchik, Nataliya I.; Jennings, Barbara J.; Calzada, Jorge I.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Mathews, Dennis; Diaz, Rocio I.; Harris, Tamara; Johnson, Karen C.; Charles, Steve; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Radic, Marko Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated sera from elderly subjects with and without age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for presence of autoantibodies (AAbs) against human macular antigens and characterized their identity. Methods Sera were collected from participants in the Age-Related Maculopathy Ancillary (ARMA) Study, a cross-sectional investigation ancillary to the Health ABC Study, enriched with participants from the general population. The resulting sample (mean age: 79.2±3.9 years old) included subjects with early to advanced AMD (n = 131) and controls (n = 231). Sera were tested by Western blots for immunoreactive bands against human donor macular tissue homogenates. Immunoreactive bands were identified and graded, and odds ratios (OR) calculated. Based on these findings, sera were immunoprecipitated, and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis (GE). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify the targets recognized by circulating AAbs seen on 2D-GE, followed by ELISAs with recombinant proteins to confirm LC-MS/MS results, and quantify autoreactivities. Results In AMD, 11 immunoreactive bands were significantly more frequent and 13 were significantly stronger than in controls. Nine of the more frequent bands also showed stronger reactivity. OR estimates ranged between 4.06 and 1.93, and all clearly excluded the null value. Following immunoprecipitation, 2D-GE and LC-MS/MS, five of the possible autoreactivity targets were conclusively identified: two members of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family, HSPA8 and HSPA9; another member of the HSP family, HSPB4, also known as alpha-crystallin A chain (CRYAA); Annexin A5 (ANXA5); and Protein S100-A9, also known as calgranulin B that, when complexed with S100A8, forms calprotectin. ELISA testing with recombinant proteins confirmed, on average, significantly higher reactivities against all targets in AMD samples compared to controls. Conclusions Consistent with other evidence supporting the

  7. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, B. E.; Bascom, R.; Litt, M.; McInnes, R.; Sheffield, V. C.; Stone, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, our understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, we have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. We used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:8279475

  8. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1.

    PubMed

    Nichols, B E; Bascom, R; Litt, M; McInnes, R; Sheffield, V C; Stone, E M

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, our understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, we have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. We used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. PMID:8279475

  9. Refining the locus for Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and mutation analysis of the candidate gene ROM1

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B.E.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. ); McInnes, R.; Bascom, R. ); Litt, M. )

    1994-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy (Best disease) is an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy which shares important clinical features with age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of legal blindness in the elderly. Unfortunately, understanding and treatment for this common age-related disorder is limited. Discovery of the gene which causes Best disease has the potential to increase the understanding of the pathogenesis of all types of macular degeneration, including the common age-related form. Best disease has recently been mapped to chromosome 11q13. The photoreceptor-specific protein ROM1 has also been recently mapped to this location, and the ROM1 gene is a candidate gene for Best disease. Using highly polymorphic markers, the authors have narrowed the genetic region which contains the Best disease gene to the 10-cM region between markers D11S871 and PYGM. Marker D11S956 demonstrated no recombinants with Best disease in three large families and resulted in a lod score of 18.2. In addition, a polymorphism within the ROM1 gene also demonstrated no recombinants and resulted in a lod score of 10.0 in these same three families. The authors used a combination of SSCP analysis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the ROM1 gene in 11 different unrelated patients affected with Best disease. No nucleotide changes were found in the coding sequence of any affected patient, indicating that mutations within the coding sequence are unlikely to cause Best disease. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Assessment of estimated retinal atrophy progression in Stargardt macular dystrophy using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Rupert W; Muñoz, Beatriz; Wolfson, Yulia; Sophie, Raafay; Fletcher, Emily; Bittencourt, Millena G; Scholl, Hendrik P N

    2016-01-01

    Aims To estimate disease progression based on analysis of macular volume measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients affected by Stargardt macular dystrophy (STGD1) and to evaluate the influence of software errors on these measurements. Methods 58 eyes of 29 STGD1 patients were included. Numbers and types of algorithm errors were recorded and manually corrected. In a subgroup of 36 eyes of 18 patients with at least two examinations over time, total macular volume (TMV) and volumes of all nine Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) subfields were obtained. Random effects models were used to estimate the rate of change per year for the population, and empirical Bayes slopes were used to estimate yearly decline in TMV for individual eyes. Results 6958 single B-scans from 190 macular cube scans were analysed. 2360 (33.9%) showed algorithm errors. Mean observation period for follow-up data was 15 months (range 3–40). The median (IQR) change in TMV using the empirical Bayes estimates for the individual eyes was −0.103 (−0.145, −0.059) mm3 per year. The mean (±SD) TMV was 6.321±1.000 mm3 at baseline, and rate of decline was −0.118 mm3 per year (p=0.003). Yearly mean volume change was −0.004 mm3 in the central subfield (mean baseline=0.128 mm3), −0.032 mm3 in the inner (mean baseline=1.484 mm3) and −0.079 mm3 in the outer ETDRS subfields (mean baseline=5.206 mm3). Conclusions SD-OCT measurements allow monitoring the decline in retinal volume in STGD1; however, they require significant manual correction of software errors. PMID:26568636