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Sample records for macular pigment levels

  1. Aqueous Levels of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor and Macular Choroidal Thickness in High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yubo; He, Guanghui; Li, Zhiwei; Song, Hui; Xie, Shiyong; Han, Quanhong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the correlation between aqueous and serum levels of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and macular choroidal thickness in high myopia patients, both with and without choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods. Serum and aqueous levels of PEDF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 36 high myopia patients (36 eyes) with no CNV (non-CNV group), 14 high myopia patients (14 eyes) with CNV (CNV group), and 42 nonmyopia patients (42 eyes) (control group). Macular choroidal thickness was measured by enhanced-depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Results. Aqueous levels of PEDF were significantly higher in CNV group compared with non-CNV (P < 0.001) and control (P < 0.001) groups. Macular choroidal thicknesses were significantly decreased in the non-CNV and CNV groups compared with the control (P < 0.001) group. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.012) was found between the CNV and non-CNV groups. There was a positive correlation between aqueous PEDF and macular choroidal thickness in the non-CNV group (P = 0.005), but no correlation with the CNV group. No correlation between serum PEDF and macular choroidal thickness was detected in the three groups. Conclusion. Variations in aqueous PEDF levels coincide with changes in macular choroidal thickness in high myopia patients with no CNV, while no such relationship exists in high myopia patients with CNV. PMID:26491554

  2. Imaging system to assess objectively the optical density of the macular pigment in vivo

    E-print Network

    Dainty, Chris

    Imaging system to assess objectively the optical density of the macular pigment in vivo Andrew O in combination with various hardware and software tools to assess objectively the macular pigment (MP) optical.52.006201 1. Introduction A. Overview of the Macular Pigment Investigation of the macular pigment (MP

  3. Measurement of macular pigment optical density in a healthy chinese population sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macular pigment may protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by its capability to absorb blue light and scavenge free radicals. Current information on human macular pigment density has been largely from studies on Caucasians populations. The purpose of this study was to assess macular ...

  4. Central retinal thickness is positively correlated with macular pigment optical density

    E-print Network

    Central retinal thickness is positively correlated with macular pigment optical density S pigment (MP) has been suggested to have a protective role in age-related macular degeneration by reducing was to investigate the relationship between central retinal thickness and macular pigment optical density in a group

  5. Color Matching in Diabetes: Optical Density of the Crystalline Lens and Macular Pigments

    E-print Network

    Morland, Antony

    Color Matching in Diabetes: Optical Density of the Crystalline Lens and Macular Pigments Nigel lens and macular pigments in a group of patients with diabetes mellitus and compare the results to extrafoveal color match gives the optical density of the macular pigment. Thirty-four diabetic patients and 34

  6. In vivo imaging of retinal pigment epithelium cells in age related macular degeneration

    E-print Network

    In vivo imaging of retinal pigment epithelium cells in age related macular degeneration Ethan A-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work, we improve Morgan's method by accounting for chromatic pigment epithelium. A manifestation of senile macular degeneration," Arch. Ophthalmol. 93(1), 19­25 (1975

  7. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health–specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ?1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ?4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  8. Progress in Retinal and Eye Research 23 (2004) 533559 Macular pigments: their characteristics and putative role

    E-print Network

    Morland, Antony

    2004-01-01

    Progress in Retinal and Eye Research 23 (2004) 533­559 Macular pigments: their characteristics of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK Abstract The macular pigments (MP) absorb light in the blue? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 534 3. Where do the MPs come from

  9. Association of age and macular pigment optical density using dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Verônica Castro; Rosen, Richard B; Prata, Tiago Santos; Dorairaj, Syril; Spielberg, Leigh; Maia, Mauricio; Sallum, Juliana M

    2013-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence suggest that macular pigment may play a protective role against age-related macular degeneration, but the influence of age on macular pigment density levels remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between age and the normal distribution of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) values surrounding the fovea. Methods Consecutive healthy subjects with no evidence of ocular disease were enrolled in this study. After inclusion, MPOD values were measured at specific eccentricities (0.5, 1, and 2 degrees) from the foveal center using a dual-wavelength autofluorescence method employing a modified confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Whenever both eyes were eligible, one was randomly selected for analysis. The correlation between age and MPOD values was investigated using regression analysis. Results Thirty subjects (30 eyes) were included (mean age 48.6 ± 16.4 [range 23–77] years). Significant differences were found between MPOD values measured at 0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the center of the fovea (0.49 ± 0.12 density units, 0.37 ± 0.11 density units, and 0.13 ± 0.05 density units, respectively, P < 0.05). Significant correlations between age and MPOD values at 0.5 and 1 degree were found (P ? 0.02). Values measured at 2 degrees did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.06). Conclusion In healthy subjects, MPOD values were highest near the foveal center. These values appeared to increase during adulthood (peak at 45–50 years), followed by a gradual reduction after 60 years of age. PMID:23589675

  10. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  11. Staging of Macular Telangiectasia: Power-Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography and Macular Pigment Optical Density

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Eric K.; Kim, Dae Yu; Hunter, Allan A.; Pilli, Suman; Wilson, Machelle; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Park, Susanna S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Two methods were used to study the stages of macular telangiectasia (MacTel): Power-Doppler optical coherence tomography (PD-OCT), which allows imaging of the retinal circulation in three dimensions, and macular pigment optical density (MPOD), which quantifies the distribution of macular carotenoids. Methods. Among 49 patients with MacTel identified, 12 eyes (6 patients) with MacTel and 7 age-matched control eyes (7 patients) were imaged with a custom-built Fourier-domain OCT instrument to acquire PD-OCT images. MPOD was measured using heterochromatic flicker photometry in 10 eyes (5 patients) with MacTel and compared with 44 age-matched control eyes (44 patients). Clinical staging of MacTel was based on best-corrected visual acuity, fundus biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and OCT. Results. Stage 1 eyes (n = 2) had subtle punctate vascular signal confined to the inner portion of the outer plexiform layer (OPL) on PD-OCT. Stage 2 (n = 2) showed larger oblique vascular signal extending into deeper OPL. Stage 3 (n = 5) had disruption of outer retinal layers with abnormal vasculature extending into the outer nuclear layer. Stage 4 (n = 3) showed diffuse blurring of the retinal layers with vascular channels extending the full thickness of the retina. MPOD values in four eyes with stage 1 or 2 MacTel correlated well with age-matched controls. Six eyes with stage 3 or 4 MacTel had loss of MPOD especially at the fovea. Conclusions. PD-OCT shows penetration of the retinal capillaries into the deeper retinal layers in early stages of MacTel, with full thickness vascular proliferation in advanced disease. MPOD is commonly depleted but may appear normal in early stage MacTel. PMID:23716628

  12. Bimodal spatial distribution of macular pigment: evidence of a gender relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delori, François C.; Goger, Douglas G.; Keilhauer, Claudia; Salvetti, Paola; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2006-03-01

    The spatial distribution of the optical density of the human macular pigment measured by two-wavelength autofluorescence imaging exhibits in over half of the subjects an annulus of higher density superimposed on a central exponential-like distribution. This annulus is located at about 0.7° from the fovea. Women have broader distributions than men, and they are more likely to exhibit this bimodal distribution. Maxwell's spot reported by subjects matches the measured distribution of their pigment. Evidence that the shape of the foveal depression may be gender related leads us to hypothesize that differences in macular pigment distribution are related to anatomical differences in the shape of the foveal depression.

  13. Slow progression of exudative age related macular degeneration associated with hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Jeffrey; Eveleth, David; Masula, Jennifer; Temple, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Rationale:  Choroidal neovascular (CNV) lesions in younger patients are often accompanied by the appearance of a surrounding ring of pigment that is associated with disease regression or slowed disease progression. In older patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), however, hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is known to occur but has not previously been reported to be associated with CNV regression. This report describes the clinical course of a case series of AMD patients with pigment hypertrophy adjacent to CNV associated with stabilization of the CNV lesion. Methods: A retrospective analysis of exudative AMD patients seen by a single retina specialist over a 7-year period. Results: Retrospective analysis of 955 exudative AMD patients revealed pigment hypertrophy associated with CNV in 33 patients. A ring of pigment surrounded CNV in 6 of these. Three representative patients are presented to illustrate the decrease in macular edema, reduced fluorescein leakage and slowed CNV progression that was associated with a pigment ring around CNV in AMD. Pigment hypertrophy was associated with blocked fluorescein leakage and exudative AMD patients with a complete pigment ring maintained stable visual acuity, macular edema, fluorescein leakage and CNV lesion size without treatment for intervals of up to 21 months.  Conclusion:  We report slowed disease progression in AMD patients who develop pigment around CNV. The slow rate of disease progression in the AMD patient subgroup having a pigment ring is a factor to consider in determining the treatment interval for exudative AMD patients. PMID:25685325

  14. Temporal Visual Mechanisms May Mediate Compensation for Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Stringham, Nicole T; Stringham, James M

    2015-12-01

    Macular pigment (MP) is a pre-receptoral filter that is diet derived and deposited in relatively high optical density in the foveal region of the retina. Due to its yellow coloration, MP absorbs light of relatively short wavelengths, ranging from 400?nm to 520?nm. Despite the spectral and spatial nonuniformity imposed upon the sensory retina by MP, perception appears to be relatively uniform across the central visual field. MP therefore offers an opportunity to determine experimentally potential mechanisms responsible for mediating this uniformity. After assessing, in 14 subjects, MP's effects on the temporal sensitivity of both the short-wavelength- and middle-/long-wavelength-sensitive visual pathways, it appears that the visual system compensates for absorption of short-wavelength light by MP by slowing the sampling rate of short-wavelength cones and by increasing the processing speed of middle-/long-wavelength-sensitive cones. This mechanism could work via temporal summation or a temporal neural code, whereby slower response dynamics lead to amplification of relatively weak signals. PMID:26562864

  15. The distribution of unique green wavelengths and its relationship to macular pigment density.

    PubMed

    Welbourne, Lauren E; Thompson, Peter G; Wade, Alex R; Morland, Antony B

    2013-01-01

    Monochromatic unique green (UG) is more variable across the population than any other unique hue. Some researchers have reported that this broad distribution of UG settings is bimodal and that the distribution results from the superposition of two or more subpopulations. We have investigated this claim using a Wright colorimeter to measure the unique green wavelength of 58 participants and we have analyzed previous unique green literature by applying a rigorous statistical test to historical datasets. We have also explored the possibility that individual differences in macular pigment density may be responsible for the variation in unique green wavelength. Our results indicate that unique green wavelengths in our population are distributed unimodally and are correlated positively with macular pigment density; individuals with a higher density of macular pigment select longer wavelengths of light as unique green than individuals with a lower density of macular pigment. We model this effect using simulations of monochromatic unique green matching to broadband illuminations and show that matches in the region at approximately 500 nm exhibit particularly high variance both with respect to macular pigment density and also with respect to the precise shape of the broadband reference exemplar spectrum. PMID:23863508

  16. The effect of macular pigment on heterochromatic luminance contrast.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Lisa M; Hammond, Billy R

    2010-12-01

    Macular pigment (MP) selectively filters short-wave light and may improve visual performance via this mechanism. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that MP alters contrast between an object and its background, and thus alters the object's detectability. In order to test this hypothesis, participants of a variety of ages were recruited into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 50 healthy elderly subjects (M = 72.7, SD = 7.3 years). Group 2 consisted of 28 healthy younger subjects (M = 22.7, SD = 3.6 years). For all subjects, contrast thresholds were assessed in Maxwellian-view. For subjects in Group 1, a circular grating target (600 nm, 1°; not absorbed by MP) was surrounded by a 10°, 460 nm field (strongly absorbed by MP). Subjects in Group 2 were measured using identical conditions with the exception that the surround was changed to 425 nm in one condition and to a broad-band (xenon) white in another. All subjects adjusted the intensity of the surround until the target was no longer visible. Finally, for a sub-sample of subjects in Group 2, a 1° bipartite field was used and wavelength was varied on one side to minimize the appearance of the border with the 460 nm reference side, foveally and parafoveally between 420-540 nm, with 20 nm steps, using the minimally distinct border (MDB) technique. MP density was assessed psychophysically. MP density was related to the amount of energy in the surround (at 425 and 460 nm, and for broad-band white) needed to lose sight of the central target. When the MDB technique was used to measure spectral sensitivity, the differences in the two curves yielded a spectrum that closely matched MP's ex vivo spectrum. Our data suggest that MP modifies an object's contrast against a short-wave background via simple filtration. PMID:20883691

  17. Purpose. To evaluate the reliability and validity of a portable instrument for measuring macular pigment optical density.

    E-print Network

    macular pigment optical density. Methods. The instrument is small, uses light emitting diodes as light easier than eccentric fixation. Subjects with healthy eyes used the instrument to measure their pigment density in a number of eye clinics. Results. The mean pigment density in 124 eyes in 124 indi- viduals

  18. Lutein, zeaxanthin, macular pigment, and visual function in adult cystic fibrosis patients123

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Christine; Olano-Martin, Estibaliz; Gerth, Christina; Morrissey, Brian M; Cross, Carroll E; Werner, John S

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic insufficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF), even with replacement pancreatic enzyme therapy, is often associated with decreased carotenoid absorption. Because the macular pigment of the retina is largely derived from 2 carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, the decreased serum concentrations seen in CF may have consequences for ocular and retinal health Objectives Our aims were to determine plasma carotenoid concentrations, determine absorption and distribution of macular pigment, and assess retinal health and visual function in CF patients. Design In 10 adult CF patients (ages 21–47 y) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects, we measured macular pigment density in vivo, measured serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, and comprehensively assessed visual performance (including contrast sensitivity, color discrimination, and retinal function) under conditions of daylight illumination. Results Serum lutein and zeaxanthin were significantly reduced (P< 0.005) in CF patients (x?± SD:87 ± 36.1 and 27 ± 15.8 nmol/L, respectively) compared with control subjects (190 ± 72.1 and 75 ± 23.6 nmol/L, respectively). Although macular pigment optical density was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) in the CF group (0.24 ± 0.11) than in the control group (0.53 ± 0.12), no significant differences in visual function were observed. Conclusions Adults with CF have dramatically low serum and macular concentrations of carotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin), but their ocular status and visual function are surprisingly good. The clinical implications of low plasma concentrations of carotenoids in CF are yet to be clarified. PMID:15159235

  19. Autofluorescence imaging of macular pigment: influence and correction of ocular media opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Obana, Akira; Gohto, Yuko; Seto, Takahiko; Gellermann, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The healthy adult human retina contains in its macular region a high concentration of blue-light absorbing carotenoid compounds, known as macular pigment (MP). Consisting of the carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin, the MP is thought to shield the vulnerable tissue layers in the retina from light-induced damage through its function as an optical attenuator and to protect the tissue cells within its immediate vicinity through its function as a potent antioxidant. Autofluorescence imaging (AFI) is emerging as a viable optical method for MP screening of large subject populations, for tracking of MP changes over time, and for monitoring MP uptake in response to dietary supplementation. To investigate the influence of ocular media opacities on AFI-based MP measurements, in particular, the influence of lens cataracts, we conducted a clinical trial with a large subject population (93 subjects) measured before and after cataract surgery. General AFI image contrast, retinal blood vessel contrast, and presurgery lens opacity scores [Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III)] were investigated as potential predictors for image degradation. These clinical results show that lens cataracts can severely degrade the achievable pixel contrasts in the AFI images, which results in nominal MP optical density levels that are artifactually reduced. While LOCS III scores and blood vessel contrast are found to be only a weak predictor for this effect, a strong correlation exists between the reduction factor and the image contrast, which can be quantified via pixel intensity histogram parameters. Choosing the base width of the histogram, the presence or absence of ocular media opacities can be determined and, if needed, the nominal MP levels can be corrected with factors depending on the strength of the opacity.

  20. Autofluorescence imaging of macular pigment: influence and correction of ocular media opacities.

    PubMed

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Obana, Akira; Gohto, Yuko; Seto, Takahiko; Gellermann, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The healthy adult human retina contains in its macular region a high concentration of blue-light absorbing carotenoid compounds, known as macular pigment (MP). Consisting of the carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin, the MP is thought to shield the vulnerable tissue layers in the retina from lightinduced damage through its function as an optical attenuator and to protect the tissue cells within its immediate vicinity through its function as a potent antioxidant. Autofluorescence imaging (AFI) is emerging as a viable optical method for MP screening of large subject populations, for tracking of MP changes over time, and for monitoring MP uptake in response to dietary supplementation. To investigate the influence of ocular media opacities on AFI-based MP measurements, in particular, the influence of lens cataracts, we conducted a clinical trial with a large subject population (93 subjects) measured before and after cataract surgery. General AFI image contrast, retinal blood vessel contrast, and presurgery lens opacity scores [Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III)] were investigated as potential predictors for image degradation. These clinical results show that lens cataracts can severely degrade the achievable pixel contrasts in the AFI images, which results in nominal MP optical density levels that are artifactually reduced. While LOCS III scores and blood vessel contrast are found to be only a weak predictor for this effect, a strong correlation exists between the reduction factor and the image contrast, which can be quantified via pixel intensity histogram parameters. Choosing the base width of the histogram, the presence or absence of ocular media opacities can be determined and, if needed, the nominal MP levels can be corrected with factors depending on the strength of the opacity. PMID:25223707

  1. Measurement of macular pigment optical density among healthy Chinese people and patients with early-stage age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xue-Tao; Gu, Hong; Han, Xu; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Li, Xue; Yang, Xiu-Fen; Xu, Jun; Snellingen, Torkel; Liu, Xi-Pu; Wang, Ning-Li; Liu, Ning-Pu

    2015-01-01

    AIM To measure the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in healthy Chinese people and patients with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS Cross-sectional population based study. Demographic and lifestyle characteristics were ascertained by questionnaire. A food frequency questionnaire was completed for all participants. Participants underwent general physical and ophthalmic examinations and MPOD was measured by heterochromatic flicker photometry. Foveal architecture was measured by optical coherence tomography. RESULTS MPOD of 225 participants (122 healthy and 103 early AMD) was 0.48±0.18. Patients with early AMD (0.52±0.19) tended to have higher MPOD levels than healthy people (0.47±0.17), but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.06). Participants with carrot or corn oil intake every week tended to have higher levels of MPOD (P=0.002 and 0.008 respectively) while those with corn intake had relatively lower level of MPOD (P=0.01). MPOD increased with the center foveal thickness (P=0.01). CONCLUSION Our findings show that there is no statistically significant association between MPOD and early AMD in the studied population. MPOD is related to center foveal thickness and diets would influence MPOD levels. PMID:26682171

  2. Stimulus edge effects in the measurement of macular pigment using heterochromatic flicker photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smollon, William E., Jr.; Wooten, Billy R.; Hammond, Billy R.

    2015-11-01

    Heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) is the most common technique of measuring macular pigment optical density (MPOD). Some data strongly suggest that HFP samples MPOD specifically at the edge of center-fixated circular stimuli. Other data have led to the conclusion that HFP samples over the entire area of the stimulus. To resolve this disparity, MPOD was measured using HFP and a series of solid discs of varying radii (0.25 to 2.0 deg) and with thin annuli corresponding to the edge of those discs. MPOD assessed with the two methods yielded excellent correspondence and linearity: Y=0.01+0.98X, r=0.96. A second set of experiments showed that if a disc stimulus is adjusted for no-flicker (the standard procedure) and simply reduced in size, no flicker is observed despite the higher level of MPOD in the smaller area. Taken together, these results confirm that MPOD is determined at the edge of the measuring stimulus when using stimulus sizes in the range that is in dispute (up to a radius of 0.75 deg). The basis for this edge effect can be explained by quantitative differences in the spatial-temporal properties of the visual field as a function of angular distance from the fixation point.

  3. Stimulus edge effects in the measurement of macular pigment using heterochromatic flicker photometry.

    PubMed

    Smollon, William E; Wooten, Billy R; Hammond, Billy R

    2015-11-01

    Heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP) is the most common technique of measuring macular pigment optical density (MPOD). Some data strongly suggest that HFP samples MPOD specifically at the edge of center-fixated circular stimuli. Other data have led to the conclusion that HFP samples over the entire area of the stimulus. To resolve this disparity, MPOD was measured using HFP and a series of solid discs of varying radii (0.25 to 2.0 deg) and with thin annuli corresponding to the edge of those discs. MPOD assessed with the two methods yielded excellent correspondence and linearity: Y=0.01+0.98X , r=0.96. A second set of experiments showed that if a disc stimulus is adjusted for no-flicker (the standard procedure) and simply reduced in size, no flicker is observed despite the higher level of MPOD in the smaller area. Taken together, these results confirm that MPOD is determined at the edge of the measuring stimulus when using stimulus sizes in the range that is in dispute (up to a radius of 0.75 deg). The basis for this edge effect can be explained by quantitative differences in the spatial-temporal properties of the visual field as a function of angular distance from the fixation point. PMID:26562031

  4. Macular pigment and its contribution to visual performance and experience

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, James; Davison, Peter A.; Nolan, John M.; Akkali, Mukunda C.; Beatty, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    There is now a consensus, based on histological, biochemical and spectral absorption data, that the yellow colour observed at the macula lutea is a consequence of the selective accumulation of dietary xanthophylls in the central retina of the living eye. Scientific research continues to explore the function(s) of MP in the human retina, with two main hypotheses premised on its putative capacity to (1) protect the retina from (photo)-oxidative damage by means of its optical filtration and/or antioxidant properties, the so-called protective hypothesis and (2) influence the quality of visual performance by means of selective short wavelength light absorption prior to photoreceptor light capture, thereby attenuating the effects of chromatic aberration and light scatter, the so-called acuity and visibility hypotheses. The current epidemic of age-related macular degeneration has directed researchers to investigate the protective hypothesis of MP, while there has been a conspicuous lack of work designed to investigate the role of MP in visual performance. The aim of this review is to present and critically appraise the current literature germane to the contribution of MP, if any, to visual performance and experience.

  5. Grid laser photocoagulation in the treatment of serous avascular pigment epithelial detachment in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zago Filho, Luiz Alberto; Moreira, Ana Tereza Ramos; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Describe the outcomes of thermal laser photocoagulation in three cases of retinal pigment epithelium detachment associated to age-related macular degeneration. Methods: Three patients with avascular retinal pigment epithelium detachment were treated with green diode laser photocoagulation. Mild macular grid laser application, similar to the treatment of diabetic macular edema was performed after an unsuccessful intravitreal anti-angiogenic treatment. Results: After one year of the laser treatment, two cases reached anatomic resolution, with complete absorption of sub-epithelium serum fluid and improvement of the visual acuity. There was stability of the visual acuity and sub-epithelium fluid reduction, which, however, was partial in the third case. No complications related to the treatment occurred until the conclusion of this study. Conclusions: Macular photocoagulation in grid pattern produced regression of avascular serous pigment epithelium detachment associated with age-related macular degeneration in a short follow-up period. Although long term prospective studies with an increased sample are necessary, it is a method that can be applied in selected patients, with absence of sub-retinal neovascularization or sub-epithelium fibrovascular component. PMID:25494379

  6. Relationships between macular pigment optical density and cognitive function in unimpaired and mildly cognitively impaired older adults.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Lisa M; Dengler, Melissa J; Puente, Antonio; Miller, L Stephen; Hammond, Billy R

    2014-07-01

    Low carotenoid status (especially of the xanthophylls, lutein [L], and zeaxanthin [Z]) is common in older adults and has been associated with a number of degenerative diseases of the central nervous system ranging from retina (e.g., macular degeneration) to brain (e.g., Alzheimer's disease). In this study, we tested whether retinal measures of L + Z (macular pigment optical density [MPOD]), used as a surrogate for brain L + Z levels, were related to cognitive function when comparing healthy older adults with mildly cognitively impaired older adults. Twenty-four subjects with mild cognitive impairment were compared with 24 matched controls. Subjects were matched with respect to age, body mass index, ethnicity, sex, and smoking status. Degree of cognitive impairment and cognitive ability was determined via structured clinical interview. MPOD was measured psychophysically. In healthy older adults, MPOD was only related to visual-spatial and constructional abilities (p = 0.04). For subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), however, MPOD was broadly related to cognition including the composite score on the mini-mental state examination (p = 0.02), visual-spatial and constructional abilities (p = 0.04), language ability (p = 0.05), attention (p = 0.03), and the total scale on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (p = 0.03). It is possible that L/Z status may be more strongly related to cognition when individuals are considered with established onset of cognitive decline. PMID:24508218

  7. Black tongue secondary to bismuth subsalicylate: case report and review of exogenous causes of macular lingual pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R

    2009-12-01

    Macular pigmentation of the tongue can be acquired following exposure to exogenous agents. Black lingual hyperpigmentation was observed during the full body skin examination of a man with a history of recurrent metastatic malignant melanoma. His tongue spontaneously returned to its normal pink color later that day. Bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol) was suspected as the pigment-inducing agent; subsequently, re-challange with the antacid confirmed it to be the cause of his acquired, albeit transient, black tongue. The ingestion of medications, including other antacids, analgesics, antidepressants, antihypertensives and several antimicrobials has been associated with the development of acquired macular lingual pigmentation. In addition, hyperpigmentation of the tongue has been observed following the deposition of amalgam and the injection of local anesthesia or doxorubicin or interferon alpha and ribavirin. Also, inhalation of heroin and methaqualone vapors or tobacco has resulted in lingual hyperpigmentation. All of the patients with acquired macular lingual hyperpigmentation had tongues with a smooth surface without enlargement of the filiform papillae. Many of the individuals with hyperpigmented tongue had either black or dark skin color. The onset of tongue pigmentation varied from less than one day to several years after initial exposure to the associated exogenous agent. The color of the tongue usually returned to normal after the pigment-inducing agent was discontinued. PMID:20027942

  8. Attainment of polarity promotes growth factor secretion by retinal pigment epithelial cells: Relevance to age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Shozo; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Kase, Satoru; Spee, Christine; Ryan, Stephen J; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2010-01-01

    The antiangiogenic and neurotrophic growth factor, pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF), and the proangiogenic growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF), are released from retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells where they play a critical role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since RPE polarity may be altered in advanced AMD, we studied the effect of polarization of differentiated, human RPE monolayer cultures on expression and secretion of PEDF and VEGF. Polarized RPE demonstrated apical microvilli, expression of tight junction proteins, apical localization of Na/K- ATPase, and high transepithelial resistance (490 ± 17 ?•cm2). PEDF secretion was about 1000 fold greater than that for VEGF in both polarized and non-polarized cultures. Polarization of the RPE monolayer increased PEDF secretion, which was predominantly apical, by 34 fold (p<0.02) and VEGF secretion, which was predominantly basolateral, by 5.7 fold (p<0.02). Treatment of non-polarized RPE cultures with bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) had no effect on PEDF or VEGF secretion, but resulted in a dose-dependent >2-fold increase in basolateral VEGF secretion (p<0.05) in polarized cultures. Our data show that polarity is an important determinant of the level of PEDF and VEGF secretion in RPE and support the contention that loss of polarity of RPE in AMD results in marked loss of neurotrophic and vascular support for the retina potentially leading to photoreceptor loss and blindness. PMID:20228934

  9. Simple and objective method for routine detection of the macular pigment xanthophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Jentsch, Susanne; Dawczynski, Jens; Hammer, Martin; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute E. K.; Wolf, Sebastian

    2010-11-01

    A new simple method for two-dimensional determination of optical density of macular pigment xanthophyll (ODx) in clinical routine is based on a single blue-reflection fundus image. Individual different vignetting is corrected by a shading function. For its construction, nodes are automatically found in structureless image regions. The influence of stray light in elderly crystalline lenses is compensated by a correction function that depends on age. The reproducibility of parameters in a one-wavelength reflection method determined for three subjects (47, 61, and 78 years old) was: maxODx = 6.3%, meanODx = 4.6%, volume = 6%, and area = 6% already before stray-light correction. ODx was comparable in pseudophakic and in an eye with a crystalline lens of the same 11 subjects after stray-light correction. Significant correlation in ODx was found between the one-wavelength reflection method and the two-wavelength autofluorescence method for pseudophakic and cataract eyes of 19 patients suffering from dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (R2 = 0.855). In pseudophakic eyes, maxODx was significantly lower for dry AMD (n = 45) (ODx = 0.491+/-0.102 ODU) than in eyes with healthy fundus (n = 22) (ODx = 0.615+/-0.103 ODU) (p = 0.000033). Also in eyes with crystalline lens, maxODx was lower in AMD (n = 125) (ODx = 0.610+/-0.093 ODU) than in healthy subjects (n = 45) (ODx = 0.674+/-0.098 ODU) (p = 0.00019). No dependence on age was found in the pseudophakic eyes both of healthy subjects and AMD patients.

  10. Recovery of macular pigment spectrum in vivo using hyperspectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzi, Amani A.; Lee, Noah; Acton, Jennifer H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the feasibility of a novel method for hyperspectral mapping of macular pigment (MP) in vivo. Six healthy subjects were recruited for noninvasive imaging using a snapshot hyperspectral system. The three-dimensional full spatial-spectral data cube was analyzed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), wherein the data was decomposed to give spectral signatures and spatial distribution, in search for the MP absorbance spectrum. The NMF was initialized with the in vitro MP spectrum and rank 4 spectral signature decomposition was used to recover the MP spectrum and optical density in vivo. The recovered MP spectra showed two peaks in the blue spectrum, characteristic of MP, giving a detailed in vivo demonstration of these absorbance peaks. The peak MP optical densities ranged from 0.08 to 0.22 (mean 0.15+/-0.05) and became spatially negligible at diameters 1100 to 1760 ?m (4 to 6 deg) in the normal subjects. This objective method was able to exploit prior knowledge (the in vitro MP spectrum) in order to extract an accurate in vivo spectral analysis and full MP spatial profile, while separating the MP spectra from other ocular absorbers. Snapshot hyperspectral imaging in combination with advanced mathematical analysis provides a simple cost-effective approach for MP mapping in vivo.

  11. The impact of macular pigment augmentation on visual performance in normal subjects: COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Nolan, John M; Loughman, James; Akkali, Mukunda C; Stack, Jim; Scanlon, Grainne; Davison, Peter; Beatty, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether augmentation of macular pigment (MP) enhances visual performance (VP). 121 normal subjects were recruited. The active (A) group consumed 12 mg of lutein (L) and 1mg of zeaxanthin (Z) daily. MP optical density (MPOD) was assessed by customized heterochromatic flicker photometry. VP was assessed as best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), mesopic and photopic contrast sensitivity (CS), glare disability, photostress, and subjective visual function. Subjects were assessed at baseline; 3; 6; 12 months (V1, V2, V3 and V4, respectively). Central MPOD increased significantly in the A group (p < 0.05) but not in the placebo group (p > 0.05). This statistically significant increase in MPOD in the A group was not, in general, associated with a corresponding improvement in VP (p>0.05, for all variables), with the exception of a statistically significant time/treatment effect in "daily tasks comparative analysis" (p = 0.03). At V4, we report statistically significant differences in mesopic CS at 20.7 cpd, mesopic CS at 1.5 cpd under high glare conditions, and light/dark adaptation comparative analysis between the lower and the upper MP tertile groups (p < 0.05) Further study into the relationship between MP and VP is warranted, with particular attention directed towards individuals with low MP and suboptimal VP. PMID:21237188

  12. Progression of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Atrophy in Antiangiogenic Therapy of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Christopher; Wedl, Manuela; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To monitor retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy progression during antiangiogenic therapy of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over 2 years using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Design Prospective interventional case series. Methods setting: Clinical practice. study population: Thirty patients (31 eyes) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD. observation procedures: Standard intravitreal therapy (0.5 mg ranibizumab) was administered monthly during the first year and pro re nata (PRN; as-needed) during the second year. Spectral-domain (SD) OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (selectively imaging the RPE) examinations were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using a standardized protocol. RPE-related changes were evaluated using a semi-automated polarization-sensitive OCT segmentation algorithm and correlated with SD OCT and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) findings. main outcome measures: RPE response, geographic atrophy (GA) progression. Results Atrophic RPE changes included RPE thinning, RPE porosity, focal RPE atrophy, and development of GA. Early RPE loss (ie, RPE porosity, focal atrophy) increased progressively during initial monthly treatment and remained stable during subsequent PRN-based therapy. GA developed in 61% of eyes at month 24. Mean GA area increased from 0.77 mm2 at 12 months to 1.10 mm2 (standard deviation = 1.09 mm2) at 24 months. Reactive accumulation of RPE-related material at the lesion borders increased until month 3 and subsequently decreased. Conclusions Progressive RPE atrophy and GA developed in the majority of eyes. RPE migration signifies certain RPE plasticity. Polarization-sensitive OCT specifically images RPE-related changes in neovascular AMD, contrary to conventional imaging methods. Polarization-sensitive OCT allows for precisely monitoring the sequence of RPE-related morphologic changes. PMID:25769245

  13. Changes in Macular Pigment Optical Density and Serum Lutein Concentration in Japanese Subjects Taking Two Different Lutein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and serum concentration changes of lutein in Japanese subjects participating in a clinical trial in which two formulations of lutein and zeaxanthin supplements with different physiochemical properties are used. Methods Thirty-six healthy volunteers were recruited into this prospective, randomized, parallel-group, double-masked comparative study at a single institute. Two products were used, FloraGLO® (Kemin Japan) and XanMax® (Katra Phytochem). The lutein particle size and zeaxanthin concentrations differed between the formulations. The subjects consumed one of the two supplements for a duration of up to 6 months. MPOD levels were measured by resonance Raman spectrometry at baseline and once a month until the end of the study. Serum lutein concentration was measured at baseline, month 3, and month 6. The subjects were also tested for contrast sensitivity, glare sensitivity, visual acuity, and in addition had a focal electroretinogram measured. Results The mean serum lutein concentrations increased significantly after the first three months, but the mean MPOD levels in either supplement group did not show any statistically significant increase. A detailed analysis, however, revealed three response patterns in both groups for the increase of MPOD levels and serum lutein concentration, i.e. “retinal responders”, who had an increase of both MPOD levels and serum lutein concentrations (n = 13), “retinal non-responders”, who had only increased serum concentrations and no change in MPOD levels (n = 20), and “retinal and serum non-responders”, who had neither MPOD level nor plasma concentration increases (n = 3). The subjects with low MPOD levels at baseline appeared to show increased MPOD levels at the 6 month time point upon lutein supplementation (r = -0.4090, p = 0.0133). Glare sensitivity improved in retinal responders in both supplement groups, while there were no remarkable changes in contrast sensitivity. Conclusions No statistically significant differences could be detected for MPOD levels and serum lutein concentrations between the two investigated lutein supplement formulations. Responses to lutein supplementation regarding MPOD levels and serum lutein concentrations varied between subjects. Subjects with lower MPOD levels at baseline responded well to lutein supplementation. However, since the number of subjects was low, a further study with more subjects is needed to prove that subjects with low MPOD levels will benefit from lutein supplementation. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000004593 PMID:26451726

  14. Lutein and zeaxanthin: Role as macular pigment and factors that control bioavailability from egg yolks and nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanathan, Rohini

    Lutein and zeaxanthin, two oxygenated carotenoids, exclusively accumulate in the macula, protecting the underlying photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells from damaging blue radiation of sunlight. As macular pigment, lutein and zeaxanthin are also potent antioxidants protecting the vulnerable regions of retina from free radical injury. Oxidative stress and cumulative light damage play an important role in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly population. Antioxidant and lutein supplementation has been shown to decrease the risk and prevent the progression of AMD. The egg yolk is a highly bioavailable source of lutein and zeaxanthin and thus a possible contender for AMD prevention and treatment. Consumption of 2 egg yolks/d for 5 weeks was shown herein to significantly increase serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentration and clinically improve macular pigment concentrations at 0.5° retinal eccentricity in an older adult population taking cholesterol-lowering statins. Four egg yolks/d not only raised serum lutein and zeaxanthin significantly but also macular pigment densities at 0.25°, 0.5° and 1° retinal eccentricity. A positive outcome of the 2 egg yolk consumption was the significant increase in serum HDL-C with a tendency of serum LDL-C to decrease, although not significantly. Four egg yolks/d seemed to cross the threshold for dietary cholesterol tolerance as serum LDL-C tended to increase, although not significantly, despite the significant increase in serum HDL-C. There is a strong possibility that greater build up of lutein and zeaxanthin in the macula may have been observed with 2 egg yolks/d if the intervention period was longer than 5 weeks. Addition of up to 2 eggs a day to the diet is suggested to benefit an older adult population, especially those who are already taking cholesterol-lowering statins by (a) building their macular pigment and possibly protect against AMD and (b) raising serum HDL-C without an adverse affect on serum LDL-C and TC:HDL-C ratio. Increased cholesterol, lutein and zeaxanthin intake from the 2 and 4 egg yolk interventions did not decrease the absorption of other carotenoids, such as alpha-cryptoxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, tocopherols and retinol from the diet. An unexpected increase was observed in serum alpha-cryptoxanthin and gamma-tocopherol concentrations during the 4 egg yolk phase, these carotenoids are normally present in low concentrations in serum. Lipoprotein distribution of carotenoids and tocopherols was also not affected by the increased egg consumption. In the pursuit of designing a highly bioavailable matrix for lutein/zeaxanthin, similar to the egg yolk micellar matrix, nanoemulsion formulations of lutein were developed using the MicrofluidizerRTM Processor technology. Lutein nanoemulsions are O/W emulsions of lutein which have particle sizes in the nanometer range (? 200 nm). Lutein consumed orally as a nanoemulsion was shown to have significantly greater bioavailability than lutein supplement-pills in pilot-scale clinical studies described here. However, lutein nanoemulsions did not raise plasma lutein concentrations to the same extent as egg yolks in a study performed on BALB/c mice. Formation of mixed micelles in the intestinal lumen during digestion and uptake of these micelles by enterocytes are crucial steps that dictate bioavailability i.e. the proportion of ingested lutein/carotenoid that enters the blood circulation and accumulates in the peripheral tissues such as the macula. In-vitro stomach and intestinal digestion experiments showed lutein nanoemulsions have significantly greater micellarization efficiency compared to egg yolks. Nanoemulsions with a phospholipid (PL) emulsifier containing 80% phosphatidyl choline (PC) or Polysorbate 80 as the emulsifier had better ability to form micelles during the intestinal digestion phase compared to a PL emulsifier with only 45% PC content. The micellar matrix coupled with nanometer sized parti

  15. NUTRITIONAL MANIPULATION OF PRIMATE RETINA, I: EFFECTS OF LUTEIN OR ZEAXANTHIN SUPPLEMENTS ON SERUM AND MACULAR PIGMENT IN XANTHOPHYLL-FREE RHESUS MONKEYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The xanthophylls lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are the primary components of macular pigment and may protect the macula from age-related degeneration (AMD). Rhesus monkeys represent a potential animal model to study mechanisms of protection from AMD. In this study, L or Z was fed to rhesus monkeys r...

  16. Treatment of Macular Degeneration Using Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium: Preliminary Results in Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won Kyung; Park, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Jinjung; Chong, So Young; Shim, Sung Han; Del Priore, Lucian V.; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem cells hold great promise for various diseases because of their unlimited capacity for self-renewal and ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body. However, despite over 3 decades of research, there have been no reports on the safety and potential efficacy of pluripotent stem cell progeny in Asian patients with any disease. Here, we report the safety and tolerability of subretinal transplantation of human embryonic-stem-cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelium in four Asian patients: two with dry age-related macular degeneration and two with Stargardt macular dystrophy. They were followed for 1 year. There was no evidence of adverse proliferation, tumorigenicity, ectopic tissue formation, or other serious safety issues related to the transplanted cells. Visual acuity improved 9–19 letters in three patients and remained stable (+1 letter) in one patient. The results confirmed that hESC-derived cells could serve as a potentially safe new source for regenerative medicine. PMID:25937371

  17. Genetic Determinants of Macular Pigments in Women of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Kristin J.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Bernstein, Paul S.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Karki, Chitra K.; Liu, Zhe; Igo, Robert P.; Truitt, Barbara; Klein, Michael L.; Snodderly, D. Max; Blodi, Barbara A.; Gehrs, Karen M.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Wallace, Robert B.; Robinson, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Hageman, Gregory; Tinker, Lesley; Mares, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate genetic determinants of macular pigment optical density in women from the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Methods. 1585 of 2005 CAREDS participants had macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measured noninvasively using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry and blood samples genotyped for 440 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 candidate genes related to absorption, transport, binding, and cleavage of carotenoids directly, or via lipid transport. SNPs were individually tested for associations with MPOD using least-squares linear regression. Results. Twenty-one SNPs from 11 genes were associated with MPOD (P ? 0.05) after adjusting for dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin. This includes variants in or near genes related to zeaxanthin binding in the macula (GSTP1), carotenoid cleavage (BCMO1), cholesterol transport or uptake (SCARB1, ABCA1, ABCG5, and LIPC), long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status (ELOVL2, FADS1, and FADS2), and various maculopathies (ALDH3A2 and RPE65). The strongest association was for rs11645428 near BCMO1 (?A = 0.029, P = 2.2 × 10?4). Conditional modeling within genes and further adjustment for other predictors of MPOD, including waist circumference, diabetes, and dietary intake of fiber, resulted in 13 SNPs from 10 genes maintaining independent association with MPOD. Variation in these single gene polymorphisms accounted for 5% of the variability in MPOD (P = 3.5 × 10?11). Conclusions. Our results support that MPOD is a multi-factorial phenotype associated with variation in genes related to carotenoid transport, uptake, and metabolism, independent of known dietary and health influences on MPOD. PMID:23404124

  18. Resonant imaging of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Emakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.

    2002-06-01

    We have generated high spatial resolution images showing the distribution of carotenoid macular pigments in the human retina using Raman spectroscopy. A low level of macular pigments is associated with an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Using excised human eyecups and resonant excitation of the pigment molecules with narrow bandwidth blue light from a mercury arc lamp, we record Raman images originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of lutein and zeaxanthin, the carotenoids comprising human macular pigments. Our Raman images reveal significant differences among subjects, both in regard to absolute levels as well as spatial distribution within the macula. Since the light levels used to obtain these images are well below established safety limits, this technique holds promise for developing a rapid screening diagnostic in large populations at risk for vision loss from age-related macular degeneration.

  19. The Project MACULA Retinal Pigment Epithelium Grading System for Histology and Optical Coherence Tomography in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zanzottera, Emma C.; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Ach, Thomas; Smith, R. Theodore; Freund, K. Bailey; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To seek pathways of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) fate in age-related macular degeneration via a morphology grading system; provide nomenclature, visualization targets, and metrics for clinical imaging and model systems. Methods. Donor eyes with geographic atrophy (GA) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and one GA eye with previous clinical spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) imaging were processed for histology, photodocumented, and annotated at predefined locations. Retinal pigment epithelial cells contained spindle-shaped melanosomes, apposed a basal lamina or basal laminar deposit (BLamD), and exhibited recognizable morphologies. Thicknesses and unbiased estimates of frequencies were obtained. Results. In 13 GA eyes (449 locations), ‘Shedding,’ ‘Sloughed,’ and ‘Dissociated’ morphologies were abundant; 22.2% of atrophic locations had ‘Dissociated’ RPE. In 39 CNV eyes (1363 locations), 37.3% of locations with fibrovascular/fibrocellular scar had ‘Entombed’ RPE; ‘Sloughed,’ ‘Dissociated,’ and ‘Bilaminar’ morphologies were abundant. Of abnormal RPE, CNV and GA both had ?35% ‘Sloughed’/‘Intraretinal,’ with more Intraretinal in CNV (9.5% vs. 1.8%). ‘Shedding’ cells associated with granule aggregations in BLamD. The RPE layer did not thin, and BLamD remained thick, with progression. Granule-containing material consistent with three morphologies correlated to SDOCT hyperreflective foci in the previously examined GA patient. Conclusions. Retinal pigment epithelium morphology indicates multiple pathways in GA and CNV. Atrophic/scarred areas have numerous cells capable of transcribing genes and generating imaging signals. Shed granule aggregates, possibly apoptotic, are visible in SDOCT, as are ‘Dissociated’ and ‘Sloughed’ cells. The significance of RPE phenotypes is addressable in longitudinal, high-resolution imaging in clinic populations. Data can motivate future molecular phenotyping studies. PMID:25813989

  20. Comparison of Mouse and Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Gene Expression Profiles: Potential Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Anna; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bossers, Koen; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. There is currently no effective treatment available. Preclinical studies in AMD mouse models are essential to develop new therapeutics. This requires further in-depth knowledge of the similarities and differences between mouse and human RPE. Methods We performed a microarray study to identify and functionally annotate RPE specific gene expression in mouse and human RPE. We used a meticulous method to determine C57BL/6J mouse RPE signature genes, correcting for possible RNA contamination from its adjacent layers: the choroid and the photoreceptors. We compared the signature genes, gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the mouse and human RPE. Results We defined sets of mouse (64), human (171) and mouse–human interspecies (22) RPE signature genes. Not unexpectedly, our gene expression analysis and comparative functional annotation suggested that, in general, the mouse and human RPE are very similar. For example, we found similarities for general features, like “organ development” and “disorders related to neurological tissue”. However, detailed analysis of the molecular pathways and networks associated with RPE functions, suggested also multiple species-specific differences, some of which may be relevant for the development of AMD. For example, CFHR1, most likely the main complement regulator in AMD pathogenesis was highly expressed in human RPE, but almost absent in mouse RPE. Furthermore, functions assigned to mouse and human RPE expression profiles indicate (patho-) biological differences related to AMD, such as oxidative stress, Bruch’s membrane, immune-regulation and outer blood retina barrier. Conclusion These differences may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies and translational studies in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26517551

  1. Lipofuscin Redistribution and Loss Accompanied by Cytoskeletal Stress in Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Tolstik, Elen; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zarubina, Anna V.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) and melanolipofuscin (MLF) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are the principal sources of autofluorescence (AF) signals in clinical fundus–AF imaging. Few details about the subcellular distribution of AF organelles in AMD are available. We describe the impact of aging and AMD on RPE morphology revealed by the distribution of AF LF/MLF granules and actin cytoskeleton in human tissues. Methods. Thirty-five RPE-Bruch's membrane flatmounts from 35 donors were prepared (postmortem: ?4 hours). Ex vivo fundus examination at the time of accession revealed either absence of chorioretinal pathologies (10 tissues; mean age: 83.0 ± 2.6 years) or stages of AMD (25 tissues; 85.0 ± 5.8 years): early AMD, geographic atrophy, and late exudative AMD. Retinal pigment epithelium cytoskeleton was labeled with AlexaFluor647-Phalloidin. Tissues were imaged on a spinning-disk fluorescence microscope and a high-resolution structured illumination microscope. Results. Age-related macular degeneration impacts individual RPE cells by (1) lipofuscin redistribution by (i) degranulation (granule-by-granule loss) and/or (ii) aggregation and apparent shedding into the extracellular space; (2) enlarged RPE cell area and conversion from convex to irregular and sometimes concave polygons; and (3) cytoskeleton derangement including separations and breaks around subretinal deposits, thickening, and stress fibers. Conclusions. We report an extensive and systematic en face analysis of LF/MLF-AF in AMD eyes. Redistribution and loss of AF granules are among the earliest AMD changes and could reduce fundus AF signal attributable to RPE at these locations. Data can enhance the interpretation of clinical fundus–AF and provide a basis for future quantitative studies. PMID:25758814

  2. Detection of pigment epithelial detachment vascularization in age-related macular degeneration using phase-variance OCT angiography

    PubMed Central

    McClintic, Scott M; Kim, Dae Yu; Fingler, Jeff; Garcia, Susan; Zawadzki, Robert J; Morse, Lawrence S; Park, Susanna S; Fraser, Scott E; Werner, John S; Ruggiero, Jason P; Schwartz, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the use of phase-variance optical coherence tomography (PV-OCT) angiography for detection of pigment epithelial detachment (PED) vascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Patients and methods Patients with PEDs and exudative AMD were evaluated by the Retina Services at the University of California, Davis, and the University of California, San Francisco. Each subject underwent fluorescein angiography and structural optical coherence tomography (OCT). Phase-variance OCT analysis was used to create angiographic images of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. PV-OCT-generated B-scans were superimposed on structural OCT B-scans to allow easy identification of perfused vascular structures. Results Three patients with vascularized PEDs were imaged with PV-OCT, and each was found to have a vascular signal extending from the choroid into the hyperreflective substance of the PED. Two patients who had no evidence of PED vascularization on fluorescein angiography did not have vascular signals within their PEDs on PV-OCT. Conclusion Structural OCT and PV-OCT images can be combined to create composite B-scans that offer high-resolution views of the retinal tissue along with dynamic vascular visualization. This technique offers a fast, noninvasive method for detecting vascularization of PEDs in AMD and may aid in the early detection of neovascular disease. PMID:26203220

  3. Macular Pigment Optical Density and Ocular Pulse Amplitude in Subjects with Different Axial Lengths and Refractive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Czepita, Maciej; Karczewicz, Danuta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Czepita, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to: (1) investigate the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) in subjects with different axial lengths (AL) and refractive errors (RE); (2) determine if there is a correlation between MPOD and OPA; and (3) evaluate whether MPOD and OPA depend on intraocular pressure (IOP). Material/Methods This study included 140 eyes of 70 subjects – 17 men and 53 women, aged 18 to 29 years (mean: 22.5 years; SD=2.8). Every examined person underwent a thorough eye examination including: visual acuity, anterior segment and fundus examination, keratometry, auto-refractometry, and MPOD, OPA, AL, and IOP measurements. The obtained results were analyzed statistically using Statistica 10 software. P values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The following refractive errors were selected: emmetropia (34 eyes), hyperopia (18 eyes), low myopia (60 eyes), medium myopia (19 eyes), and high myopia (9 eyes). It has been established that the OPA increases with the rise in the spherical equivalents (SE) (Rs=+0.38, P<0.001), while the increase in AL correlates with the decrease of OPA (Rs=–0.40, P<0.001). The increase in IOP correlates with the rise in the OPA (Rs=+0.20, P<0.05). There were no significant correlations between IOP and SE or AL. Conclusions (1) MPOD is not correlated with the OPA in subjects with different AL and RE; (2) OPA decreases with the rise of AL; (3) OPA decreases with the fall of the SE; and (4) OPA increases with the rise in IOP. PMID:26071973

  4. Macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Peter Charbel; Gillies, Mark C.; Chew, Emily Y.; Bird, Alan C.; Heeren, Tjebo F.C.; Peto, Tunde; Holz, Frank G.; Scholl, Hendrik P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Macular telangiectasia type 2 is a bilateral disease of unknown cause with characteristic alterations of the macular capillary network and neurosensory atrophy. Its prevalence may be underestimated and has recently been shown to be as high as 0.1% in persons 40 years and older. Biomicroscopy may show reduced retinal transparency, crystalline deposits, mildly ectatic capillaries, blunted venules, retinal pigment plaques, foveal atrophy, and neovascular complexes. Fluorescein angiography shows telangiectatic capillaries predominantly temporal to the foveola in the early phase and a diffuse hyperfluorescence in the late phase. High-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) may reveal disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment–outer segment border, hyporeflective cavities at the level of the inner or outer retina, and atrophy of the retina in later stages. Macular telangiectasia type 2 shows a unique depletion of the macular pigment in the central retina and recent therapeutic trials showed that such depleted areas cannot re-accumulate lutein and zeaxanthin after oral supplementation. There have been various therapeutic approaches with limited or no efficacy. Recent clinical trials with compounds that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have established the role of VEGF in the pathophysiology of the disease, but have not shown significant efficacy, at least for the nonneovascular disease stages. Recent progress in structure–function correlation may help to develop surrogate outcome measures for future clinical trials. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge on macular telangiectasia type 2, including the epidemiology, the genetics, the clinical findings, the staging and the differential diagnosis of the disease. Findings using retinal imaging are discussed, including fluorescein angiography, OCT, adaptive optics imaging, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus autofluorescence, as are the findings using visual function testing including visual acuity and fundus-controlled microperimetry. We provide an overview of the therapeutic approaches for both non-neovascular and neovascular disease stages and provide a perspective of future directions including animal models and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:23219692

  5. Analysis of three pigment epithelium-derived factor gene polymorphisms in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Anton; Renner, Wilfried; Steinbrugger, Iris; El-Shabrawi, Yosuf; Wedrich, Andreas; Werner, Christoph; Schmut, Otto; Weger, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Exudative age-related macular degeneration (exudative AMD) is a common vision-threatening disease, with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to its development. Recently, homozygosity for the 72Met variant of the pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) Met72Thr gene polymorphism (rs1136287) was identified as a novel risk factor for exudative AMD in Chinese patients from Taiwan. The role of this polymorphism, however, has not yet been determined in a white European population. In addition, two other PEDF gene polymorphisms, ?5736T>C (rs12150053) and ?5304C>T (rs12948385), have been associated with increased risk of diabetic retinopathy, but have not yet been studied among patients with exudative AMD. The purpose of the present study was thus to investigate a hypothesized association between these PEDF polymorphisms and the presence of exudative AMD in a white European population. Methods The present case-control study comprised 269 patients with exudative AMD and 155 control subjects. Genotypes of the PEDF polymorphisms were determined by 5?-exonuclease assays (TaqMan). Results PEDF genotype and allele frequencies were not significantly different between AMD patients and control subjects. The two promoter polymorphisms, ?5736T>C (rs12150053) and ?5304C>T (rs12948385), were in complete association. Presence of the homozygous PEDF 72 Met/Met genotype was associated with a nonsignificant odds ratio of 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.67–1.49, p=0.99). Similarly, presence of the homozygous PEDF ?5736 TT genotype or ?5304 CC genotype was associated with a nonsignificant odds ratio of 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.56 - 1.75, p=0.97). Both promoter polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium with the Met72Thr (rs1136287) polymorphism (D'=0.83) and formed three common and one rare haplotype. Haplotype frequencies were similar between AMD patients and control subjects (p>0.05). Conclusions Our data suggest that none of the investigated PEDF polymorphisms is likely a major risk factor for exudative AMD in a white European population. PMID:19223990

  6. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells for macular degeneration as a drug screening platform: identification of curcumin as a protective agent for retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Yang, Der-Ming; Cheng, Yung-Hsin; Liao, Yi-Wen; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Lin, Tai-Chi; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one retinal aging process that may lead to irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but oxidative stress inducing retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells damage is perhaps responsible for the aging sequence of retina and may play an important role in macular degeneration. In this study, we have reprogrammed T cells from patients with dry type AMD into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via integration-free episomal vectors and differentiated them into RPE cells that were used as an expandable platform for investigating pathogenesis of the AMD and in-vitro drug screening. These patient-derived RPEs with the AMD-associated background (AMD-RPEs) exhibited reduced antioxidant ability, compared with normal RPE cells. Among several screened candidate drugs, curcumin caused most significant reduction of ROS in AMD-RPEs. Pre-treatment of curcumin protected these AMD-RPEs from H2O2-induced cell death and also increased the cytoprotective effect against the oxidative stress of H2O2 through the reduction of ROS levels. In addition, curcumin with its versatile activities modulated the expression of many oxidative stress-regulating genes such as PDGF, VEGF, IGFBP-2, HO1, SOD2, and GPX1. Our findings indicated that the RPE cells derived from AMD patients have decreased antioxidative defense, making RPE cells more susceptible to oxidative damage and thereby leading to AMD formation. Curcumin represented an ideal drug that can effectively restore the neuronal functions in AMD patient-derived RPE cells, rendering this drug an effective option for macular degeneration therapy and an agent against aging-associated oxidative stress. PMID:25136316

  7. Autologous transplantation of genetically modified iris pigment epithelial cells: A promising concept for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and other disorders of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, Irina; Kreppel, Florian; Welsandt, Gerhard; Luther, Thomas; Kozlowski, Jolanta; Janicki, Hanna; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2002-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause for visual impairment and blindness in the elder population. Laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy and excision of neovascular membranes have met with limited success. Submacular transplantation of autologous iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells has been proposed to replace the damaged retinal pigment epithelium following surgical removal of the membranes. We tested our hypothesis that the subretinal transplantation of genetically modified autologous IPE cells expressing biological therapeutics might be a promising strategy for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has strong antiangiogenic and neuroprotective activities in the eye. Subretinal transplantation of PEDF expressing IPE cells inhibited pathological choroidal neovascularization in rat models of laser-induced rupture of Bruch's membrane and of oxygen induced ischemic retinopathy. PEDF expressing IPE transplants also increased the survival and preserved rhodopsin expression of photoreceptor cells in the RCS rat, a model of retinal degeneration. These findings suggest a promising concept for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders.

  8. Three dimensional distribution of the vitelliform lesion, photoreceptors, and retinal pigment epithelium in the macula of patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Christine N.; Abramoff, Michael D.; Mullins, Robert F.; Kinnick, Tyson R.; Lee, Kyuongmoo; Eyestone, Mari E.; Chung, Mina M.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the anatomical phenotypes of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) with spectraldomain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a large series of patients with confirmed mutations in the BEST1 gene. Methods In our retrospective observational case series, we assessed 15 patients (30 eyes) with a clinical diagnosis of vitelliform macular dystrophy who were found to have mutations in the BEST1 gene. Color fundus photographs and SD-OCT images were evaluated and compared with those of 15 age-matched controls (30 eyes). Using a validated 3-dimensional SD-OCT segmentation algorithm, we calculated the equivalent thickness of photoreceptors and the equivalent thickness of the retinal pigment epithelium for each patient. The photoreceptor equivalent thickness and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) equivalent thickness were compared in all patients, in a region of the macula outside the central lesion for patients with BVMD and outside the fovea in control patients. Paired t tests were used for statistical analysis. Results The SD-OCT findings revealed that the vitelliform lesion consists of material above the RPE and below the outer segment tips. Additionally, drusen-like deposition of sub-RPE material was notable, and several patients exhibited a sub-RPE fibrotic nodule. Patients with BVMD had a mean photoreceptor equivalent thickness of 28.3 ?m, and control patients had a mean photoreceptor equivalent thickness of 21.8 ?m, a mean difference of 6.5 ?m (P < .01), whereas the mean RPE equivalent thickness was not statistically different between patients with BVMD and control patients (P=.53). Conclusions The SD-OCT findings suggest that vitelliform material is located in the subretinal space and that BVMD is associated with diffuse photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities overlying a structurally normal RPE. Clinical Relevance: These findings provide new insight into the pathophysiology of BVMD and thus have implications for the development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22084158

  9. Protective effect of autophagy on human retinal pigment epithelial cells against lipofuscin fluorophore A2E: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Bai, Y; Huang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly. Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a crucial causative factor responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A2E, a major component of toxic lipofuscin implicated in AMD, is deposited in RPE cells with age. However, the mechanism whereby A2E may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear. We demonstrated that A2E was a danger signal of RPE cells, which induced autophagy and decreased cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Within 15?min after the treatment of RPE with 25??M A2E, the induction of autophagosome was detected by transmission electron microscopy. After continuous incubating RPE cells with A2E, intense punctate staining of LC3 and increased expression of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were identified. Meanwhile, the levels of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), interleukin (IL)1?, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, macrophage cationic peptide (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were elevated. The autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and activator rapamycin were also used to verify the effect of autophagy on RPE cells against A2E. Our results revealed that 3-MA decreased the autophagosomes and LC3 puncta induced by A2E, increased inflammation-associated protein expression including ICAM, IL1?, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, and SDF-1, and upregulated VEGFA expression. Whereas rapamycin augmented the A2E-mediated autophagy, attenuated protein expression of inflammation-associated and angiogenic factors, and blocked the Akt/mTOR pathway. Taken together, A2E induces autophagy in RPE cells at the early stage of incubation, and this autophagic response can be inhibited by 3-MA or augmented by rapamycin via the mTOR pathway. The enhancement of autophagy has a protective role in RPE cells against the adverse effects of A2E by reducing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and VEGFA. PMID:26561782

  10. Protective effect of autophagy on human retinal pigment epithelial cells against lipofuscin fluorophore A2E: implications for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Bai, Y; Huang, L; Qi, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Wu, Y; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly. Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a crucial causative factor responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A2E, a major component of toxic lipofuscin implicated in AMD, is deposited in RPE cells with age. However, the mechanism whereby A2E may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD remains unclear. We demonstrated that A2E was a danger signal of RPE cells, which induced autophagy and decreased cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Within 15?min after the treatment of RPE with 25??M A2E, the induction of autophagosome was detected by transmission electron microscopy. After continuous incubating RPE cells with A2E, intense punctate staining of LC3 and increased expression of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were identified. Meanwhile, the levels of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), interleukin (IL)1?, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, macrophage cationic peptide (MCP)-1, stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) were elevated. The autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and activator rapamycin were also used to verify the effect of autophagy on RPE cells against A2E. Our results revealed that 3-MA decreased the autophagosomes and LC3 puncta induced by A2E, increased inflammation-associated protein expression including ICAM, IL1?, IL2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-22, and SDF-1, and upregulated VEGFA expression. Whereas rapamycin augmented the A2E-mediated autophagy, attenuated protein expression of inflammation-associated and angiogenic factors, and blocked the Akt/mTOR pathway. Taken together, A2E induces autophagy in RPE cells at the early stage of incubation, and this autophagic response can be inhibited by 3-MA or augmented by rapamycin via the mTOR pathway. The enhancement of autophagy has a protective role in RPE cells against the adverse effects of A2E by reducing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and VEGFA. PMID:26561782

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Vitelliform macular dystrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... faces. Vitelliform macular dystrophy causes a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) to build up in cells underlying the ... structures in these cells that contain light-sensing pigments. It is unclear why PRPH2 mutations affect only ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Stargardt macular degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... people with Stargardt macular degeneration, a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) builds up in cells underlying the macula. ... acids ; gene ; inheritance ; inherited ; juvenile ; lipofuscin ; macula ; photoreceptor ; pigment ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; retina ; tissue ; toxic You may ...

  13. Macular auto-fluorescence is a follow-up parameter for cystoids macular edema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, XinYuan; Gong, XiaoHong; Wang, YanHong; Wang, NingLi

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if macular autofluorescence (MAF) is a valuable, non-invasive follow-up parameter for cystoid macular edema. A total of 71 eyes (71 cases) with cystoid macular edema (CME) were included in the study. Macular pigment (MP) was evaluated using HRA2 (infrared) IF and FA models. The density of MP was graded into three categories: without, partial, and normal amount of MP. A comparison was made between the baseline (before the first administration) level and at the fourth month, following three consecutive intravitreal lucentis injections every month. The morphology and distribution of MAF, and the density and distribution of MP were regarded as the main outcome measures. At the baseline visit, all eyes with CME had petaloid/irregular-shaped MAF in the macular area (100%). No MAF was detected in the control eyes (0). There was significant difference in MAF between the CME and normal groups (P=0.000). At the fourth monthly visit, normal levels of MP density without MAF was detected in 68 eyes (95.8%) with the best corrected spectacular visual acuity increasing to at least 1 line accordingly. We conclude that macular MAF can be used as a follow-up parameter for patients with CME. MP and MAF can indirectly reflect the fovea cone function. PMID:26187408

  14. Spontaneous or secondary to intravitreal injections of anti-angiogenic agents retinal pigment epithelial tears in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Pia E.; Saviano, Sandro; Zanei, Andrea; Pastore, Marco R.; Guaglione, Elvira; Mangogna, Alessandro; Tognetto, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the visual function evolution of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) according to type of occurrence [spontaneous or secondary to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection] and the topographic location of the tear after a two-year follow-up period. METHODS A total of 15 eyes of 14 patients with RPE tears in exudative AMD were analyzed retrospectively at the University Eye Clinic of Trieste. Inclusion criteria were: patient age of 50 or older with AMD and RPE tears both spontaneous occurring or post anti-VEGF treatment. Screening included: careful medical history, complete ophthalmological examination, fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICG), autofluorescence and infrared imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Patients were evaluated every month for visual acuity (VA), fundus examination and OCT. Other data reported were: presence of PED, number of injections before the tear, location of the lesion. RESULTS Mean follow-up was 24wk (SD±4wk). A total of 15 eyes were studied for RPE tear. In 6 cases (40%), the RPE tears occurred within two years of anti-VEGF injections the others occurred spontaneously. In 13 cases (86.6%), the RPE tear was associated with pigment epithelial detachment (PED). In 7 cases (46.6%), the RPE tear occurred in the central area of the retina and involved the fovea. Two lesions were found in the parafoveal region, six in the extra-macular area. In all cases visual acuity decreased at the end of the follow-up period (P<0.01) independently of the type or the topographical location of the lesion. CONCLUSION RPE tear occurs in exudative AMD as a spontaneous complication or in relation to anti-VEGF injections. Visual acuity decreased significantly and gradually in the follow-up period in all cases. No correlation was found between visual loss and the type of onset or the topographic location of the tears. PMID:25161943

  15. Automated 3-D retinal layer segmentation of macular optical coherence tomography images with serous pigment epithelial detachments.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian; Zhao, Heming; Zhu, Weifang; Xiang, Dehui; Gao, Enting; Sonka, Milan; Chen, Haoyu

    2015-02-01

    Automated retinal layer segmentation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images has been successful for normal eyes but becomes challenging for eyes with retinal diseases if the retinal morphology experiences critical changes. We propose a method to automatically segment the retinal layers in 3-D OCT data with serous retinal pigment epithelial detachments (PED), which is a prominent feature of many chorioretinal disease processes. The proposed framework consists of the following steps: fast denoising and B-scan alignment, multi-resolution graph search based surface detection, PED region detection and surface correction above the PED region. The proposed technique was evaluated on a dataset with OCT images from 20 subjects diagnosed with PED. The experimental results showed the following. 1) The overall mean unsigned border positioning error for layer segmentation is 7.87±3.36 ?m , and is comparable to the mean inter-observer variability ( 7.81±2.56 ?m). 2) The true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF) and positive predicative value (PPV) for PED volume segmentation are 87.1%, 0.37%, and 81.2%, respectively. 3) The average running time is 220 s for OCT data of 512 × 64 × 480 voxels. PMID:25265605

  16. Association between Blood Lead Levels and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Sik; Lee, Seung Bum; Jee, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between blood lead levels and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study included 4,933 subjects aged over 40 years who participated in the 2008–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and for whom fundus photographs were available. All participants underwent a standardized interview, evaluation of blood lead concentration, and a comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis. All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system. Results Mean blood lead levels were 3.15 ?g/dL in men and 2.27 ?g/dL in women (P < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03–3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06–3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile. In men, however, blood lead level was not significantly associated with AMD. Conclusions Blood lead levels were higher in men, but were only associated with AMD in women. Increased levels of blood lead may be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD development in women. PMID:26252225

  17. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Orban, Tivadar; Johnson, William M; Dong, Zhiqian; Maeda, Tadao; Maeda, Akiko; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mieyal, John J; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes adult-onset blindness. There are 2 forms of this progressive disease: wet and dry. Currently there is no cure for AMD, but several treatment options have started to emerge making early detection critical for therapeutic success. Analysis of the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice that display light-induced retinal degeneration indicates that 11-cis-retinal and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels were significantly decreased as compared with the eyes of control dark-adapted C57BL/6J mice. In addition, exposure to intense light correlated with higher levels of prostaglandin G2 in the eyes of Abca4(-/-)Rdh8(-/-) mice. Intense light exposure also lowered DHA levels in the eyes of wild-type C57BL/6J mice without discernible retinal degeneration. Analysis of human serum from patients with AMD recapitulated these dysregulated DHA levels and revealed dysregulation of arachidonic acid (AA) levels as well (?32% increase in patients with AMD compared with average levels in healthy individuals). From these observations, we then built a statistical model that included levels of DHA and AA from human serum. This model had a 74% probability of correctly identifying patients with AMD from controls. Addition of a genetic analysis for one of the most prevalent amino acid substitutions in the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 gene linked to AMD, Ala(69)?Ser, did not improve the statistical model. Thus, we have characterized a reliable method with the potential to detect AMD without a genetic component, paving the way for a larger-scale clinical evaluation. Our studies on mouse models along with the analysis of human serum suggest that our small molecule-based model may serve as an effective tool to estimate the risk of developing AMD.-Orban, T., Johnson, W. M., Dong, Z., Maeda, T., Maeda, A., Sakai, T., Tsuneoka, H., Mieyal, J. J., Palczewski, K. Serum levels of lipid metabolites in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26187344

  18. Endothelin-1 and Nitric Oxide Levels in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Totan, Y?ksel; Koca, Cemile; Erdurmu?, Mesut; Keskin, U?urcan; Yi?ito?lu, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: In this study, ET-1 levels, as well as nitrite plus nitrate concentrations as an indicator of plasma NO level, were measured in the plasma of 20 subjects with exudative AMD and compared with 20 healthy age and sex matched controls. Results: Mean plasma ET-1 level was significantly higher in exudative AMD patients as compared to control subjects (0.35 ± 0.06 fmol/ml versus 0.17 ± 0.03 fmol/ml, P = 0.015). Patients with exudative AMD also showed significantly lower mean plasma levels of nitrite plus nitrate as compared to the controls (58.9 ± 2.7 µmol/l versus 82.6 ± 5.9 µmol/l, P = 0.001). Conclusion: Increased concentrations of ET-1 and reduced levels of NO in the plasma may suggest an imbalance between vasoconstrictor and vasodilator agents, respectively, as a reflection of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AMD. These findings may also imply the role of vasoconstriction in exudative AMD. PMID:26425317

  19. Transferrin receptor levels and polymorphism of its gene in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wysokinski, Daniel; Danisz, Katarzyna; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Dorecka, Mariola; Romaniuk, Dorota; Robaszkiewicz, Jacek; Szaflik, Marta; Szaflik, Jerzy; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jacek P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of age related macular degeneration (AMD) risk with some aspects of iron homeostasis: iron concentration in serum, level of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and transferrin receptor (TFRC) genetic variability. Four hundred and ninety one AMD patients and 171 controls were enrolled in the study. Restriction fragment length polymorphism PCR was employed to genotype polymorphisms of the TFRC gene, and colorimetric assays were used to determine the level of iron and sTfR. Multiple logistic regression was applied for all genotype/allele-related analyses and the ANOVA test for iron and sTfR serum level comparison. We found that the genotypes and alleles of the c.-253G > A polymorphism of the TFRC gene were associated with AMD risk and this association was modulated by smoking status, AMD family history, living environment (rural/urban), body mass index and age. The levels of sTfR was higher in AMD patients than controls, whereas concentrations of iron did not differ in these two groups. No association was found between AMD occurrence and the p.Gly142Ser polymorphism of the TRFC gene. The results obtained suggest that transferrin receptor and variability of its gene may influence AMD risk. PMID:25915522

  20. Macular changes resulting from papilloedema.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A T; Sanders, M D

    1980-01-01

    Six cases are presented with macular changes in association with papilloedema; 4 suffered permanent visual loss. The present paper emphasises this previously infrequent finding and discusses the haemodynamic and mechanical factors responsible. The macular changes consisted of haemorrhages situated in front, within, or behind the retina, and occasionally the results of neovascular membrane formation produced secondary visual loss. Changes in the pigment epithelium were seen in 3 cases associated with choroidal folds. Macular stars rarely produce visual loss. Recognition of these changes is important in the assessment of the visual loss in papilloedema. Images PMID:7387954

  1. Macular degeneration

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... at the center of the field of vision. Macular degeneration results from a partial breakdown of the insulating ... choroid layer of blood vessels behind the retina. Macular degeneration results in the loss of central vision only.

  2. Pegaptanib sodium as maintenance therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: the LEVEL study

    PubMed Central

    Tolentino, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Aim To assess the efficacy of pegaptanib as maintenance therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NV-AMD) patients after induction therapy. Methods A phase IV, prospective, open-label, uncontrolled exploratory study including subjects with subfoveal NV-AMD who had had one to three induction treatments 30–120?days before entry and showed investigator-determined clinical/anatomical NV-AMD improvement. Lesions in the study eye were: any subtype, 12 or fewer disc areas; postinduction centre point thickness (CPT) 275??m or less or thinning of 100??m or more (optical coherence tomography); visual acuity (VA) 20/20–20/400. Intravitreal pegaptanib 0.3?mg was administered as maintenance every 6?weeks for 48?weeks with follow-up to week 54. Booster treatment additional unscheduled treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration, was allowed in the study eye at the investigators' discretion for clinical deterioration. Results Of 568 enrolled subjects, 86% completed 1?year of pegaptanib. Mean VA improvement during induction (49.6 to 65.5 letters) was well preserved (54-week mean 61.8 letters). Mean CPT was relatively stable during maintenance (20??m increase during the study). Fifty per cent did not receive unscheduled booster treatment to week 54; 46% did have one such booster (mean 147?days after maintenance initiation). Conclusions An induction-maintenance strategy, using non-selective then selective vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, could be considered for NV-AMD. This approach may have particular relevance for patients with systemic comorbidities who require long-term anti-VEGF therapy for NV-AMD. PMID:20472746

  3. Macular lutein and zeaxanthin are related to brain lutein and zeaxanthin in primates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The xanthophyll pigments lutein and zeaxanthin cross the blood-retina barrier to preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the neural retina. There they form macular pigment, protecting the retina from blue light damage and oxidative stress. Lutein and zeaxanthin also accumulate in brain t...

  4. Determination of N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) levels in central and peripheral areas of human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Adler, Leopold; Boyer, Nicholas P; Anderson, David M; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Schey, Kevin L; Hanneken, Anne; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2015-10-28

    The bis-retinoid N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) is one of the major components of lipofuscin, a fluorescent material that accumulates with age in the lysosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the human eye. Lipofuscin, as well as A2E, exhibit a range of cytotoxic properties, which are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases of the retina such as Age-related Macular Degeneration. Consistent with such a pathogenic role, high levels of lipofuscin fluorescence are found in the central area of the human RPE, and decline toward the periphery. Recent reports have however suggested a surprising incongruence between the distributions of lipofuscin and A2E in the human RPE, with A2E levels being lowest in the central area and increasing toward the periphery. To appraise such a possibility, we have quantified the levels of A2E in the central and peripheral RPE areas of 10 eyes from 6 human donors (ages 75-91 years) with HPLC and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The levels of A2E in the central area were on average 3-6 times lower than in peripheral areas of the same eye. Furthermore, continuous accumulation of selected ions (CASI) imaging mass spectrometry showed the presence of A2E in the central RPE, and at lower intensities than in the periphery. We have therefore corroborated that in human RPE the levels of A2E are lower in the central area compared to the periphery. We conclude that the levels of A2E cannot by themselves provide an explanation for the higher lipofuscin fluorescence found in the central area of the human RPE. PMID:26323192

  5. Macular grid photocoagulation. An experimental study on the primate retina

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.J.; Finkelstein, D.; Quigley, H.A.; Green, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the effect of macular grid photocoagulation on the retinal vessels, retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid of normal cynomolgus monkeys. Argon blue-green laser photocoagulation, similar to that employed for treating macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion, resulted in a decreased retinal capillary area at both one and five months after treatment. The photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium between laser lesions were altered at three days after treatment, but their appearance returned to normal by five months. The significance of these findings is discussed with regard to resolution of macular edema and improvement in vision following grid photocoagulation.

  6. Treatment for Macular Telangiectasia Type 2.

    PubMed

    Charbel Issa, Peter; Kupitz, Elke H; Heeren, Tjebo F C; Holz, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    Macular telangiectasia (MacTel) type 2 is a bilateral disease of unknown cause with localized retinal degeneration and characteristic changes of the retinal vasculature. Funduscopic findings include reduced retinal transparency, crystalline deposits, ectatic capillaries, blunted venules, retinal pigment plaques, foveal atrophy and neovascular complexes. Leakage of telangiectatic macular capillaries is a characteristic finding on fluorescein angiography, and neurosensory atrophy may be present on optical coherence tomography images. Furthermore, there is a specific depletion of macular pigment in the central retina. Depending on the development of neovascular membranes, a nonproliferative and a proliferative (neovascular) disease stage may be distinguished. To date, there is no evidence for an effective treatment of nonproliferative MacTel type 2. Patients with proliferative MacTel type 2 and hence decreasing visual function may benefit from intravitreal application of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. Early treatment and a small size of the neovascular membrane might be predictive factors for visual function outcome. PMID:26501828

  7. Macular degeneration (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina that affects the macula in the back of the eye. ... see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more ...

  8. Macular Diplopia.

    PubMed

    Shippman, Sara; Cohen, Kenneth R; Heiser, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Maculopathies affect point-to-point foveal correspondence causing diplopia. The effect that the maculopathies have on the interaction of central sensory fusion and peripheral fusion are different than the usual understanding of treatment for diplopia. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of macular diplopia, describes the binocular pathology causing the diplopia, discusses the clinical evaluation, and reviews the present treatments including some newer treatment techniques. PMID:26564922

  9. Adhesive protein-free synthetic hydrogels for retinal pigment epithelium cell culture with low ROS level.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong Mei; Liu, Zhen Qi; Feng, Zhi Hui; Xu, Feng; Liu, Jian Kang

    2014-07-01

    Engineering of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell monolayer with low level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is important for regenerative RPE-based therapies. However, it is still challenging to culture RPE monolayer with low ROS level on soft substrates in vitro. To address this, we developed cytocompatible hydrogels to culture human RPE cell monolayer for future use in regenerative RPE-based therapies. The cell adhesion, proliferation, monolayer formation, morphology, survival, and ROS level of human ARPE-19 cells cultured on the surfaces of negatively charged poly (2-acrylamido-2-methyl propane sulfonic sodium) (PNaAMPS) and neutral poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAAm) hydrogels with different stiffness were investigated. The importance of hydrogel stiffness on the cell function was firstly highlighted on the base of determined optimal Young's modulus for cultivation of RPE cell monolayer with relatively low ROS level. The construction of RPE cell monolayer with low ROS level on the PNaAMPS hydrogel may hold great potential as promising candidates for transplantation of RPE cell monolayer-hydrogel construct into the subretinal space to repair retinal functions. PMID:23913900

  10. Omega-3 Supplementation Combined With Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Lowers Vitreal Levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    REZENDE, FLAVIO A.; LAPALME, ERIC; QIAN, CYNTHIA X.; SMITH, LOIS E.; SANGIOVANNI, JOHN PAUL; SAPIEHA, PRZEMYSLAW

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the influence of omega-3 supplementation on vitreous vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) levels in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) receiving intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, open-label, single-center, clinical trial, consecutive interventional case series. METHODS The study included 3 cohorts with wet AMD and a control group with epiretinal membrane or macular hole. Twenty wet AMD patients being treated with anti-VEGF were randomized to daily supplementation of antioxidants, zinc, and carotenoids with omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; group 1, n = 10) or without omega-3 fatty acids (group 2, n = 10). They were compared with an anti-VEGF treatment-naïve wet AMD group (group 3, n = 10) and an epiretinal membrane or macular hole group (group 4, n = 10). Primary outcome was vitreal VEGF-A levels (at the time of anti-VEGF injection). Secondary outcomes were plasma VEGF-A and central foveal thickness. Patients with new submacular hemorrhage or any other treatment within 3 months were excluded. Final analyses included 9, 6, 7, and 8 patients in groups 1 through 4, respectively. RESULTS Patients receiving omega-3s (group 1) had significantly lower levels of vitreal VEGF-A (141.11 ± 61.89 pg/mL) when compared with group 2 (626.09 ± 279.27 pg/mL; P = .036) and group 3 (735.48 ± 216.43 pg/mL; P = .013), but similar levels to group 4 (235.81 ± 33.99 pg/mL; P=.215). All groups showed similar values for plasma VEGF-A and central foveal thickness measurements. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that omega-3 supplementation combined with anti-VEGF treatment is associated with decreased vitreal VEGF-A levels in wet AMD patients. PMID:25089351

  11. Skin pigmentation, sun exposure and vitamin D levels in children of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesised that light skin pigmentation has arisen to ensure adequate levels of vitamin D as human populations moved out of Africa and into higher latitudes. Vitamin D, which is primarily obtained through exposure to sunlight (specifically ultraviolet radiation B (UVR-B)), has been inversely associated with several complex diseases. Greater sun exposure, on the other hand, is a well-known cause of skin cancer. The potential of UVR to be beneficial for some health outcomes but detrimental for others has prompted a public health debate on how to balance the positive and negative consequences of sun exposure. In this study we aimed to determine the validity of the evolutionary hypothesis linking lighter skin with higher vitamin D concentrations in a European population. Additionally, we aimed to examine the influence of pigmentation on personal behaviour towards sunlight exposure and the effects of this behaviour on vitamin D. Methods We combined genetic variants strongly associated with skin colour, tanning or freckling to create genetic scores for each of these phenotypes. We examined the association of the scores with pigmentary traits, sun exposure and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels among children of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, N?=?661 to 5649). Results We found that fairer-skinned children, i.e. those with higher pigmentation score values, had higher levels of 25(OH)D (0.6 nmol/l; 95% CI 0.2, 1.0; per unit increase in skin colour score; N?=?5649). These children also used more protection against the damaging effects of UVR. Conclusions In this population taking protective measures against sunburn and skin cancer does not seem to remove the positive effect that having a less pigmented skin has on vitamin D production. Our findings require further replication as skin pigmentation showed only a small effect on circulating 25(OH)D. PMID:24924479

  12. Macular Degeneration: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalifoux, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    This article presents information on macular degeneration for professionals helping persons with this disease adjust to their visual loss. It covers types of macular degeneration, the etiology of the disease, and its treatment. Also considered are psychosocial problems and other difficulties that persons with age-related macular degeneration face.…

  13. Age-related macular degeneration: a complementopathy?

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Aize; Berendschot, Tos T J M

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive eye disease affecting many elderly individuals. It has a multifactorial pathogenesis and is associated with numerous environmental (e.g. smoking, light and nutrition) and genetic risk factors. A breakthrough in the mechanisms causing AMD is emerging; the involvement of the alternative pathway of the complement system appears to play a pivotal role. This has led to the statement that AMD is a disease caused by a hyperactive complement system, allowing the term 'complementopathy' to define it more precisely. Abundant evidence includes: the identification of drusen components as activators of complement, immunohistochemical data showing the presence of many species of the complement system in the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch's membrane-choroidocapillary region of AMD eyes, a strong association of AMD with certain genetic complement protein variants, raised complement levels in blood from AMD patients and the preliminary successful treatments of geographic atrophy with complement factor D (FD) inhibitors. FD is the rate-limiting enzyme of the alternative complement pathway, and is produced by adipose tissue. Recent findings suggest that nutrition may play a role in controlling the level of FD in the circulation. Addressing modifiable risk factors such as smoking and nutrition may thus offer opportunities for the prevention of AMD. PMID:26159686

  14. SCOTOMAS OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION DETECTED AND

    E-print Network

    Arizona, University of

    SCOTOMAS OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION DETECTED AND CHARACTERIZED BY MEANS OF A NOVEL THREE with large soft confluent drusen with retinal pigment epithelium mottling, there is a risk for conversion With several treat- ment possibilities for neovascular AMD, early detection and diagnosis may improve treatment

  15. [Age-related macular degeneration - biology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Klettner, Alexa

    2015-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause for legal blindness of the elderly in the industrialized world and due to the demographic changes of the Western societies the prevalence is expected to increase strongly. The late forms of this disease are differentiated into geographic atrophy and exsudative (wet) AMD, where vessels grow from the choroid into the retina. On a biological level, the most important structure ofAMD pathogenesis in the photoreceptor/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid complex. The interaction of the components of this structure enables the photoreceptors to function. Age-related alterations of this complex play an important role in the development of AMD. The exact triggers for AMD onset, however, are not known. There are no available therapies for the early forms of AMD or for geographic atrophy. However, the exsudative form can be treated by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The currently available therapeutics (ranibizumab, aflibercept, bevacizumab) show good results in the clinic, however, in order to uphold the therapeutic effect they have to be regularly injected into the vitreous body. The inhibitors differ on a molecular level as well as on a biological level concerning their interaction with retinal pigment epithelial cells. PMID:26364363

  16. Macular Vitelliform Lesion in Desferrioxamine-Related Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Genead, Mohamed A.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Anastasakis, Anastasios; Lindeman, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a macular vitelliform lesion associated with desferrioxamine treatment. Methods Ocular, electrophysiological, psychophysical, perimetric, fluorescein angiographic, fundus autofluorescence, and spectral-domain OCT examinations were obtained on a 45-year old Caucasian woman with thalassemia major treated with blood transfusions and desferrioxamine. Results The patient was observed to have a vitelliform macular lesion in the right eye with a hypopigmented macular lesion and retinal pigment mottling in the left. At the most recent follow-up visit, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/70 in the right eye and 20/25 in left. Full-field electroretinogram (ERG) testing showed normal cone and rod responses. Mild localized elevations of rod psychophysical thresholds were found. Conclusion A vitelliform macular lesion can develop in patients treated with desferrioxamine. Some such patients may not show diffuse photoreceptor cell functional loss as determined by electrophysiological testing. PMID:20532952

  17. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  18. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Judith C; van Soest, Simone; Swagemakers, Sigrid MA; Essing, Anke HW; Verkerk, Annemieke JMH; van der Spek, Peter J; Gorgels, Theo GMF; Bergen, Arthur AB

    2009-01-01

    Background To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy human donor eyes (aged 63–78 years) were laser dissected and used for 22k microarray studies (Agilent technologies). Data were analyzed with Rosetta Resolver, the web tool DAVID and Ingenuity software. Results In total, we identified 19,746 array entries with significant expression in the RPE. Gene expression was analyzed according to expression levels, interindividual variability and functionality. A group of highly (n = 2,194) expressed RPE genes showed an overrepresentation of genes of the oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis and ribosome pathways. In the group of moderately expressed genes (n = 8,776) genes of the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and aminosugars metabolism were overrepresented. As expected, the top 10 percent (n = 2,194) of genes with the highest interindividual differences in expression showed functional overrepresentation of the complement cascade, essential in inflammation in age-related macular degeneration, and other signaling pathways. Surprisingly, this same category also includes the genes involved in Bruch's membrane (BM) composition. Among the top 10 percent of genes with low interindividual differences, there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in local glycosaminoglycan turnover. Conclusion Our study expands current knowledge of the RPE transcriptome by assigning new genes, and adding data about expression level and interindividual variation. Functional annotation suggests that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, and is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. Our data sheds new light on the molecular composition of BM, adjacent to the RPE, and is useful for candidate retinal disease gene identification or gene dose-dependent therapeutic studies. PMID:19379482

  19. Association Study of Mannose-Binding Lectin Levels and Genetic Variants in Lectin Pathway Proteins with Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Osthoff, Michael; Dean, Melinda M.; Baird, Paul N.; Richardson, Andrea J.; Daniell, Mark; Guymer, Robyn H.; Eisen, Damon P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the complement system is thought to be activated by chronic oxidative damage with genetic variants identified in the alternative pathway as susceptibility factors. However, the involvement of the lectin pathway of complement, a key mediator of oxidative damage, is controversial. This study investigated whether mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and genetic variants in lectin pathway proteins, are associated with the predisposition to and severity of AMD. Methods MBL levels and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MBL2 and the ficolin-2 (FCN2) gene were determined in 109 patients with AMD and 109 age- and sex-matched controls. Results MBL expression levels were equally distributed in both cases (early and late AMD) and controls (p>0.05). However, there was a trend towards higher median MBL levels in cases with late AMD compared to cases with early AMD (1.0 vs. 0.4 ?g/ml, p = 0.09) and MBL deficiency (<0.5 ?g/ml) was encountered less frequently in the late AMD group (35% vs 56%, p = 0.03). FCN2 and MBL2 allele frequencies were similarly distributed in early and late AMD cases compared with controls (p>0.05 for all analyses) as were MBL2 genotypes. Similarly, there was no significant difference in allele frequencies in any SNPs in either the MBL2 or FCN2 gene in cases with early vs. late AMD. Conclusions SNPs of lectin pathway proteins investigated in this study were not associated with AMD or AMD severity. However, MBL levels deserve further study in a larger cohort of early vs. late AMD patients to elucidate any real effect on AMD severity. PMID:26207622

  20. Dependence of Photosynthetic Capacity, Photosynthetic Pigment Allocation, and Carbon Storage on Nitrogen Levels in Foliage of Aspen Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Sullivan, Joseph H.; Papagno, Andrea J.

    2000-01-01

    The role of foliar nitrogen (N) in the seasonal dynamics and vertical canopy distribution of photosynthetic pigments, photosynthetic capacity, and carbon (C) storage was investigated in boreal broadleaved species. The study was conducted at two different aged stands (60 y and 15 y) in 1994 and 1996 in Saskatchewan, Canada as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). Foliage in upper and lower strata was examined for aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and its associated hazelnut shrub (Corylus americana Walt.). We determined that C accumulation, expressed as dry mass per unit leaf area (mg C cm (exp -2)), was linearly dependent on N content (approximately 0.3- 3.5 mg N cm (exp -2))(r (exp 2) = 0.93, n=383, P less than 0.001) when eleven foliage groups were defined according to species, site, and developmental stage. C assembly was greatest in the upper aspen strata of both sites (seasonal average, 40.1 plus or minus 0.6 mg C cm (exp -2)), intermediate in the lower aspen strata (32.7 plus or minus 0.6), and considerably lower, and similar, in the hazelnut shrub layers (23.7 plus or minus 0.6) and in expanding aspen leaves (23.8 plus or minus 0.5); the lowest C assembly per unit N occurred in the two youngest, emerging leaf groups (17.1 plus or minus 0.6). Other relationships among physiological and biochemical variables were typically non-linear and were confounded by inclusion of the three groups of young (i.e., emerging or expanding) leaves, unless these were separately identified. Net C uptake, measured as photosynthetic capacity (A (sub max), micromole CO2 m (exp -2) s (exp -1)), was greater in aspen throughout the season, and optimal in mid-summer at a C:N ratio of approximately 18 (approximately 2.3 %N). When young leaves were excluded and logarithms of both variables were used, A (sub max) was approximately linearly dependent on N (mg N cm (exp-2) (r (exp 2) = 0.85, n= 193, P less than 0.001), attributed to incorporation of N into photosynthetic complexes and enzymes. In mature leaves, differences in pigment content vs. N among canopy strata were accentuated when N was expressed per unit leaf area (Mg cm (exp -2)) . However, the simplest log-linear relationship between a pigment variable and N was obtained for a ratio describing the relative allocation of photosynthetic pigment to Chl a (Chl a/[Chl b + carotenoids], microgram cm (exp -2)/ microgram cm-2) vs. %N (r (exp 2) = 0.90, n=343, P less than 0.001). Attainment of comparable A (sub max) Chl a content and relative Chl a allocation per unit N (mg cm (exp -2)) was achieved at different foliar N levels per canopy group: the lowest N requirement was for hazelnut leaves in the lowest, shaded stratum at the older, closed canopy site; the highest N requirement was in aspen leaves of the upper-most stratum at the younger, more open canopy site. These results highlight the differences in physiological responses between young and fully expanded leaves and show that sustaining those foliar constituents and processes important to C balance may require higher foliar N levels in leaves of establishing vs. mature aspen stands. There may be implications for remote-sensing assessments made for carbon balance in springtime, or over a landscape mosaic comprised of different aged stands.

  1. Association of gene polymorphism with serum levels of inflammatory and angiogenic factors in Pakistani patients with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambreen, Fareeha; Ismail, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the association of serum levels of inflammatory mediators and angiogenic factors with genetic polymorphism in Pakistani age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. Methods This was a cross-sectional and case-control study that included 90 AMD patients diagnosed through slit-lamp examination, fundoscopy, and ocular coherence tomography. For reference and comparison purposes, 100 healthy age-matched subjects (controls) were also recruited. IL-6, IL-8, VEGF, and CRP levels were estimated in the serum samples of patients and control subjects. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism, single nucleotide polymorphisms were studied in IL-6 (rs1800795, rs1800796, rs1800797), IL-8 (rs4073, rs2227306, rs2227543), VEGF (rs3025039, rs699947), and CRP genes (rs1205, rs1130864). Since the data were obtained from a sample population, the Box–Cox transformation algorithm was applied to reduce heterogeneity of error. Multivariate analyses of variance (M-ANOVA) were applied on the transformed data to investigate the association of serum levels of IL-6, IL-8, VEGF, and CRP with AMD. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared through ?2 tests applying Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. The serum concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8, VEGF, and CRP between homozygotes and heterozygotes were compared through one-way ANOVA. Significance level was p<0.05. Results Compared to control subjects, serum IL-6 (p<0.0001), IL-8 (p<0.0001), VEGF (p<0.0001), and CRP (p<0.0001) levels were significantly elevated in the AMD patients. For rs1800795, patients with the GG genotype showed significantly raised levels of IL-6 compared to those with GC and CC genotypes (p<0.0001). Serum IL-8 levels were significantly higher in patients with the GG genotype compared to the GC and CC genotypes for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2227543 (p<0.002). Similarly, significantly higher VEGF levels were detected for genotype TT for rs3025039 SNP (p<0.038). However, no significant alteration in serum CRP levels was detected in hetero- or homozygotes for rs1205 and rs1130864 SNPs. Conclusions Serum IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF levels are substantially increased in AMD, and the levels coincide with polymorphism in the respective gene. No such relationship appears to exist with regard to SNPs of CRP. PMID:26330749

  2. A multidisciplinary study of the extracutaneous pigment system of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.). A possible relationship between kidney disease and dopa oxidase activity level.

    PubMed

    Arciuli, Marcella; Brunetti, Adalberto; Fiocco, Daniela; Zacchino, Valentina; Centoducati, Gerardo; Aloi, Antonio; Tommasi, Raffaele; Santeramo, Arcangela; De Nitto, Emanuele; Gallone, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases and breeding conditions can influence fish health status. Furthermore it is well known that human and animal health are strongly correlated. In lower vertebrates melano-macrophage centres, clusters of pigment-containing cells forming the extracutaneous pigment system, are widespread in the stroma of the haemopoietic tissue, mainly in kidney and spleen. In fishes, melano-macrophage centres play an important role in the immune response against antigenic stimulants and pathogens. Hence, they are employed as biomarker of fish health status. We have investigated this cell system in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) following the enzyme activities involved in melanin biosynthesis. We have found a possible relationship between kidney disease of farmed fishes and dopa oxidase activity level, suggesting it as an indicator of kidney disease. Moreover variations of dopa oxidase activity in extracutaneous pigment system have been observed with respect to environmental temperature. At last, for the first time, using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (Femto-TA), we pointed out that pigment-containing cells of fish kidney tissue present melanin pigments. PMID:25449383

  3. Aging, age-related macular degeneration, and the response-to-retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Mark

    Keywords: Age-related macular degeneration Retinal pigment epithelium Bruch's membrane Drusen Basal retina is the accumulation of histochemically detectable neutral lipid in normal Bruch's membrane (Br pigment epithelium (RPE). It occurs in the same compartment as drusen and basal linear deposit

  4. Rare genetic variants in the CFI gene are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration and commonly result in reduced serum factor I levels.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, David; Yu, Yi; Schramm, Elizabeth C; Triebwasser, Michael; Wagner, Erin K; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Daly, Mark J; Atkinson, John P; Seddon, Johanna M

    2015-07-01

    To assess a potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we sequenced the complement factor I gene (CFI) in 2266 individuals with AMD and 1400 without, identifying 231 individuals with rare genetic variants. We evaluated the functional impact by measuring circulating serum factor I (FI) protein levels in individuals with and without rare CFI variants. The burden of very rare (frequency <1/1000) variants in CFI was strongly associated with disease (P = 1.1 × 10(-8)). In addition, we examined eight coding variants with counts ?5 and saw evidence for association with AMD in three variants. Individuals with advanced AMD carrying a rare CFI variant had lower mean FI compared with non-AMD subjects carrying a variant (P < 0.001). Further new evidence that FI levels drive AMD risk comes from analyses showing individuals with a CFI rare variant and low FI were more likely to have advanced AMD (P = 5.6 × 10(-5)). Controlling for covariates, low FI increased the risk of advanced AMD among those with a variant compared with individuals without advanced AMD with a rare CFI variant (OR 13.6, P = 1.6 × 10(-4)), and also compared with control individuals without a rare CFI variant (OR 19.0, P = 1.1 × 10(-5)). Thus, low FI levels are strongly associated with rare CFI variants and AMD. Enhancing FI activity may be therapeutic and measuring FI provides a screening tool for identifying patients who are most likely to benefit from complement inhibitory therapy. PMID:25788521

  5. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  6. A level-set method for pathology segmentation in fluorescein angiograms and en face retinal images of patients with age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Fatimah; Ansari, Rashid; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-03-01

    The visibility and continuity of the inner segment outer segment (ISOS) junction layer of the photoreceptors on spectral domain optical coherence tomography images is known to be related to visual acuity in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Automatic detection and segmentation of lesions and pathologies in retinal images is crucial for the screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of patients with retinal diseases. One of the challenges of using the classical level-set algorithms for segmentation involves the placement of the initial contour. Manually defining the contour or randomly placing it in the image may lead to segmentation of erroneous structures. It is important to be able to automatically define the contour by using information provided by image features. We explored a level-set method which is based on the classical Chan-Vese model and which utilizes image feature information for automatic contour placement for the segmentation of pathologies in fluorescein angiograms and en face retinal images of the ISOS layer. This was accomplished by exploiting a priori knowledge of the shape and intensity distribution allowing the use of projection profiles to detect the presence of pathologies that are characterized by intensity differences with surrounding areas in retinal images. We first tested our method by applying it to fluorescein angiograms. We then applied our method to en face retinal images of patients with AMD. The experimental results included demonstrate that the proposed method provided a quick and improved outcome as compared to the classical Chan-Vese method in which the initial contour is randomly placed, thus indicating the potential to provide a more accurate and detailed view of changes in pathologies due to disease progression and treatment.

  7. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes ?-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  8. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes ?-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  9. [Pseudophakic cystoid macular oedema].

    PubMed

    Bertelmann, T; Witteborn, M; Mennel, S

    2012-08-01

    Pseudophakic cystoid macular oedema is still a relevant clinical disease entity although major progress in modern cataract surgery has been made within the last decades. The relevance is attributed to the large number of cases that are performed each year. Even after uneventful surgery, a pseudophakic cystoid macular oedema can develop and may lead to severe and lasting visual impairments. In respect to the pathophysiology, four consecutive steps have to be considered: (i) surgical procedure-related induction and release of various inflammation mediators into the anterior chamber; (ii) removal of the physiological lens barrier between the anterior and posterior segments of the eye, leading consecutively to an increase in diffusion rate in either direction; (iii) local action of the inflammation mediators towards the macular area; and (iv) increased vitreoretinal traction due to the anteriorly oriented drive of the vitreous. To prevent the development of a pseudophakic cystoid macular oedema, systemic and ocular pathologies should be treated consequently prior to surgery. Furthermore, an individual risk profile of each patient needs to be evaluated to define the best pre- and postsurgical medical treatment. A less traumatic surgical approach can help to prevent macular oedema development additionally. The diagnosis is made by performing biomicroscopy, fluorescence angiography and optical coherence tomography as well as by evaluating the patients' major complaints. Standard operation procedures or recommended guidelines by the specialised eye associations to prevent and treat pseudophakic cystoid macular oedema are not available up to date. A synopsis of recommendations in the literature suggests a step-wise treatment regimen, including topical medical treatment on the one hand and a surgical approach on the other hand as well as a combination of both, if needed. Topical medical treatment options include the use of non-steroidal, corticosteroid and/or carbonic anhydrase inhibitor eye drops. Surgical interventions include pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:22422145

  10. Diabetic Macular Edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Conceição; Pires, Isabel; Cunha-Vaz, José

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT), a noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method, was introduced in 1995 for imaging macular diseases. In diabetic macular edema (DME), OCT scans show hyporeflectivity, due to intraretinal and/or subretinal fluid accumulation, related to inner and/or outer blood-retinal barrier breakdown. OCT tomograms may also reveal the presence of hard exudates, as hyperreflective spots with a shadow, in the outer retinal layers, among others. In conclusion, OCT is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool in DME, helpful both in the diagnosis and follow-up procedure.

  11. American Macular Degeneration Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recipes, and eye health tips. AMD Treatment and Management Helpful Free Materials Take part in the IMRF Study Thrive You can thrive with Macular Degeneration! Witness how artists, actors, and others with AMD live full lives. AMDF Vision and Art Project Ed Asner Video Clip An Inspiring Her-story ...

  12. Low-level night-time light therapy for age-related macular degeneration (ALight): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. The only treatments currently available, such as ranibizumab injections, are for neovascular AMD, which accounts for only 10 to 15% of people with the condition. Hypoxia has been implicated as one of the primary causes of AMD, and is most acute at night when the retina is most metabolically active. By increasing light levels at night, the metabolic requirements of the retina and hence the hypoxia will be considerably reduced. This trial seeks to determine whether wearing a light mask that emits a dim, green light during the night can prevent the progression of early AMD. Methods/design ALight is a Phase I/IIa, multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Sixty participants (55 to 88 years old) with early AMD in one eye and neovascular AMD (nAMD) in the fellow eye will be recruited from nAMD clinics. They will be randomized (in the ratio 1:1), either to receive the intervention or to be in the untreated control group, stratified according to risk of disease progression. An additional 40 participants with healthy retinal appearance, or early AMD only, will be recruited for a baseline cross-sectional analysis. The intervention is an eye mask that emits a dim green light to illuminate the retina through closed eyelids at night. This is designed to reduce the metabolic activity of the retina, thereby reducing the potential risk of hypoxia. Participants will wear the mask every night for 12 months. Ophthalmologists carrying out monthly assessments will be masked to the treatment group, but participants will be aware of their treatment group. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of people who show disease progression during the trial period in the eye with early AMD. A co-primary outcome measure is the rate of retinal adaptation. As this is a trial of a CE-marked device for an off-label indication, a further main aim of this trial is to assess safety of the mask in the cohort of participants with AMD. Trial registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Register: ISRCTN82148651 PMID:24965385

  13. Aging Is Not a Disease: Distinguishing Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photoreceptors are steadily lost, Bruch's membrane thickens, the choroid thins, and hard drusen may form in the periphery. In AMD, many of these changes are exacerbated in addition to the development of disease-specific factors such as soft macular drusen. Para-inflammation, which can be thought of as an intermediate between basal and robust levels of inflammation, develops within the retina in an attempt to maintain ocular homeostasis, reflected by increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 coupled with shifts in macrophage plasticity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the anti-inflammatory M2 polarization. In AMD, imbalances in the M1 and M2 populations together with activation of retinal microglia are observed and potentially contribute to tissue degeneration. Nonetheless, the retina persists in a state of chronic inflammation and increased expression of certain cytokines and inflammasomes is observed. Since not everyone develops AMD, the vital question to ask is how the body establishes a balance between normal age-related changes and the pathological phenotypes in AMD. PMID:23933169

  14. Investigating a C1QTNF5 mutation associated with macular degeneration 

    E-print Network

    Slingsby, Fern

    2009-01-01

    C1QTNF5 is a 25kDa short chain collagen of unknown function which is mutated in late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD). L-ORMD is an autosomal dominant disease characterised by sub-retinal pigment epithelial ...

  15. Pleiotropy in the melanocortin system: expression levels of this system are associated with melanogenesis and pigmentation in the tawny owl (Strix aluco).

    PubMed

    Emaresi, Guillaume; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse; Bize, Pierre; Richter, Hannes; Simon, Celine; Roulin, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    The adaptive function of melanin-based coloration is a long-standing debate. A recent genetic model suggested that pleiotropy could account for covariations between pigmentation, behaviour, morphology, physiology and life history traits. We explored whether the expression levels of genes belonging to the melanocortin system (MC1R, POMC, PC1/3, PC2 and the antagonist ASIP), which have many pleiotropic effects, are associated with melanogenesis (through variation in the expression of the genes MITF, SLC7A11, TYR, TYRP1) and in turn melanin-based coloration. We considered the tawny owl (Strix aluco) because individuals vary continuously from light to dark reddish, and thus, colour variation is likely to stem from differences in the levels of gene expression. We measured gene expression in feather bases collected in nestlings at the time of melanin production. As expected, the melanocortin system was associated with the expression of melanogenic genes and pigmentation. Offspring of darker reddish fathers expressed PC1/3 to lower levels but tended to express PC2 to higher levels. The convertase enzyme PC1/3 cleaves the POMC prohormone to obtain ACTH, while the convertase enzyme PC2 cleaves ACTH to produce ?-melanin-stimulating hormone (?-MSH). ACTH regulates glucocorticoids, hormones that modulate stress responses, while ?-MSH induces eumelanogenesis. We therefore conclude that the melanocortin system, through the convertase enzymes PC1/3 and PC2, may account for part of the interindividual variation in melanin-based coloration in nestling tawny owls. Pleiotropy may thus account for the covariation between phenotypic traits involved in social interactions (here pigmentation) and life history, morphology, behaviour and physiology. PMID:24033481

  16. Immune function is related to adult carotenoid and bile pigment levels, but not to dietary carotenoid access during development, in female mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; McGraw, Kevin J

    2013-07-15

    Immune function can be modulated by multiple physiological factors, including nutrition and reproductive state. Because these factors can vary throughout an individual's lifetime as a result of environmental conditions (affecting nutrition) or life-history stage (e.g. entering the adult reproduction stage), we must carefully examine the degree to which developmental versus adult conditions shape performance of the immune system. We investigated how variation in dietary access to carotenoid pigments - a class of molecules with immunostimulatory properties that females deposit into egg yolks - during three different developmental time points affected adult immunological and reproductive traits in female mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). In males and females of other avian species, carotenoid access during development affects carotenoid assimilation ability, adult sexual ornamentation and immune function, while carotenoid access during adulthood can increase immune response and reproductive investment (e.g. egg-laying capacity, biliverdin deposition in eggshells). We failed to detect effects of developmental carotenoid supplementation on adult immune function [phytohemagglutinin-induced cutaneous immune response, antibody production in response to the novel antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), or oxidative burst, assessed by changes in circulating nitric oxide levels], carotenoid-pigmented beak coloration, ovarian development, circulating carotenoid levels or concentration of bile pigments in the gall bladder. However, we did uncover positive relationships between circulating carotenoid levels during adulthood and KLH-specific antibody production, and a negative relationship between biliverdin concentration in bile and KLH-specific antibody production. These results are consistent with the view that adult physiological parameters better predict current immune function than do developmental conditions, and highlight a possible, previously unstudied relationship between biliverdin and immune system performance. PMID:23531827

  17. Age-related macular degeneration and the aging eye

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Rita; Harris, Alon; Kheradiya, Nisha S; Winston, Diana M; Ciulla, Thomas A; Wirostko, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an ocular disease that causes damage to the retinal macula, mostly in the elderly. Normal aging processes can lead to structural and blood flow changes that can predispose patients to AMD, although advanced age does not inevitably cause AMD. In this review, we describe changes that occur in the macular structure, such as the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch’s membrane, with advancing age and in AMD. The role of genetics in AMD and age-related changes in ocular blood flow that may play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD are also discussed. Understanding the pathophysiology of AMD development can help guide future research to further comprehend this disease and to develop better treatments to prevent its irreversible central vision loss in the elderly. PMID:18982917

  18. Macular hole formation, progression, and surgical repair: case series of serial optical coherence tomography and time lapse morphing video study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To use a new medium to dynamically visualize serial optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans in order to illustrate and elucidate the pathogenesis of idiopathic macular hole formation, progression, and surgical closure. Case Presentations Two patients at the onset of symptoms with early stage macular holes and one patient following repair were followed with serial OCTs. Images centered at the fovea and at the same orientation were digitally exported and morphed into an Audiovisual Interleaving (avi) movie format. Morphing videos from serial OCTs allowed the OCTs to be viewed dynamically. The videos supported anterior-posterior vitreofoveal traction as the initial event in macular hole formation. Progression of the macular hole occurred with increased cystic thickening of the fovea without evidence of further vitreofoveal traction. During cyst formation, the macular hole enlarged as the edges of the hole became elevated from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with an increase in subretinal fluid. Surgical repair of a macular hole revealed initial closure of the macular hole with subsequent reabsorption of the sub-retinal fluid and restoration of the foveal contour. Conclusions Morphing videos from serial OCTs are a useful tool and helped illustrate and support anterior-posterior vitreofoveal traction with subsequent retinal hydration as the pathogenesis of idiopathic macular holes. PMID:20849638

  19. Expression of human complement factor H prevents age-related macular degeneration-like retina damage and kidney abnormalities in aged Cfh knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh(-/-)) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh(-/-) mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub-retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  20. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh?/?) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh?/? mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  1. Quantitative Fundus Autofluorescence in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: RPE Lipofuscin is not Increased in Non-Lesion Areas of Retina.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Janet R; Duncker, Tobias; Woods, Russell; Delori, François C

    2016-01-01

    Since the lipofuscin of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy, we quantified fundus autofluorescence (quantitative fundus autofluorescence, qAF) as an indirect measure of RPE lipofuscin levels. Mean non-lesion qAF was found to be within normal limits for age. By spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) vitelliform lesions presented as fluid-filled subretinal detachments containing reflective material. We discuss photoreceptor outer segment debris as the source of the intense fluorescence of these lesions and loss of anion channel functioning as an explanation for the bullous photoreceptor-RPE detachment. Unexplained is the propensity of the disease for central retina. PMID:26427423

  2. Interleukin-1? Level Is Increased in Vitreous of Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (nAMD) and Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy (PCV)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wankun; Shi, Xuan; Li, Fangting; Yang, Fei; Sun, Yaoyao; Huang, Lvzhen; Li, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the expression of pro-interleukin-1? (pro-IL-1?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) in the vitreous body of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration(nAMD), polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), retinal vein occlusion (RVO) or Eales’ disease to further elucidate the role of IL-1? and inflammation in the pathogenesis of neovascular retinal disease. Design Prospective clinical laboratory investigation study. Methods All patients enrolled had vitreous hemorrhage due to nAMD, PCV, PDR, RVO or Eales’ disease that required vitrectomy. Patients were excluded for any history of active intraocular inflammation, or other ophthalmic surgery besides vitrectomy. Control samples were obtained from patients with idiopathic macular epiretinal membrane. A total of fifty vitreous samples were collected from patient during vitrectomy. Pro-IL-1? and IL-1? expression were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results were analyzed statistically using nonparametric tests. Results Expression of pro-IL-1? protein was increased by 2.83-fold and 9.19-fold in PCV and nAMD vitreous samples relative to control, respectively. Expression of IL-? protein was increased by 10-fold and 4.83-fold in PCV and nAMD vitreous samples relative to control, respectively. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that expression of pro-IL-1? and IL-1? proteins is higher in PCV and nAMD. The roles of pro-IL-1? and IL-1? as inflammatory mediators in the development of PCV and nAMD may be associated with photoreceptor degeneration and neovascularization which necessitates further study. PMID:25978536

  3. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  4. [Diagnostic Criteria for Atrophic Age-related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kanji; Shiraga, Fumio; Ishida, Susumu; Kamei, Motohiro; Yanagi, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic criteria for dry age-related macular degeneration is described. Criteria include visual acuity, fundscopic findings, diagnostic image findings, exclusion criteria and classification of severity grades. Essential findings to make diagnosis as "geographic atrophy" are, 1) at least 250 ?m in diameter, 2) round/oval/cluster-like or geographic in shape, 3) sharp delineation, 4) hypopigmentation or depigmentation in retinal pigment epithelium, 5) choroidal vessels are more visible than in surrounding area. Severity grades were classified as mild, medium and severe by relation of geographic atrophy to the fovea and attendant findings. PMID:26571627

  5. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Advances in Management and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in older populations in industrialized nations. AMD is a late-onset deterioration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium in the central retina caused by various environmental and genetic factors. Great strides in our understanding of AMD pathogenesis have been made in the past several decades, which have translated into revolutionary therapeutic agents in recent years. In this review, we describe the clinical and pathologic features of AMD and present an overview of current diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:26239130

  6. Sunlight Exposure, Pigmentation, and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Barbara E. K.; Howard, Kerri P.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Meyers, Kristin J.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Klein, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Examine potential effects of sunlight exposure, hair color, eye color, and selected gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on incidence of AMD. Methods. Subjects participated in up to five examinations over a 20-year period. Eye color, self-reported hair color as a teenager, and sunlight exposure were ascertained at the baseline examination. Presence and severity of AMD and its lesions were determined via fundus photographs. Genetic data were available on a subset of participants. The SNPs CFH Y402H rs1061170 and ARMS2 A69S rs10490924 were used to analyze genetic risk of AMD; OCA2 rs4778241 and HERC2 rs12913832 represented genetic determinants of eye color. Results. Incidence of early AMD was higher in blond/red-haired persons compared with brown/black-haired persons (hazard ratio [HR] 1.25, P = 0.02) and in persons with high sun exposure in their thirties (HR 1.41, P = 0.02). However, neither was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Eye (HR 1.36, P = 0.006) and hair color (HR 1.42, P = 0.003) were associated with incidence of any retinal pigmentary abnormalities (RPAs). Both remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Neither presence of alleles for light-colored eyes nor those associated with high risk of late AMD altered the association of eye or hair color with early AMD. None of the characteristics studied were significantly associated with late AMD. Conclusions. Modest associations of eye color, hair color, and HERC2 genotype with any RPAs were found. Genes for AMD did not affect these associations. Eye color phenotype was more strongly associated with outcomes than HERC2 or OCA2 genotype. PMID:25125603

  7. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  8. High glucose-induced barrier impairment of human retinal pigment epithelium is ameliorated by treatment with Goji berry extracts through modulation of cAMP levels.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Barbara; Capuzzo, Antonio; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelium cells were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying blood-retinal barrier disruption under conditions of chronic hyperglycemia. The treatment with 25 mM glucose caused a rapid drop in the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), which was reversed by the addition of either a methanolic extract from Goji (Lycium barbarum L.) berries or its main component, taurine. Intracellular cAMP levels increased concurrently with the high glucose-induced TEER decrease, and were correlated to an increased activity of the cytosolic isoform of the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. The treatment with plant extract or taurine restored control levels. Data are discussed in view of a possible prevention approach for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24345371

  9. Ziv-aflibercept in macular disease

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Al-Ghadban, Sara I; Yunis, Muhammad H; El-Sabban, Marwan E

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Aflibercept is an approved therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular oedema (DME). In vitro and in vivo studies did not detect toxicity to the retinal pigment epithelium cells using the approved cancer protein, ziv-aflibercept. Our purpose is to determine if ziv-aflibercept can be used in AMD and DME without ocular toxicity, to test the stability of ziv-aflibercept, and to do a cost analysis. Methods Prospectively, consecutive patients with AMD or DME and poor vision underwent one intravitreal injection of 0.05?mL of fresh filtered ziv-aflibercept (1.25?mg). Monitoring of best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular inflammation, cataract progression, and retinal structure by spectral domain optical coherence tomography was done at 1?day and 1?week after injection. Ziv-aflibercept activity over 4?weeks was measured by capturing vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA. Results There were no signs of retinal toxicity, intraocular inflammation or change in lens status in four eyes with AMD and two eyes with DME. Visual acuity improved (p=0.05) and central foveal thickness decreased in all patients (p=0.05). Ziv-aflibercept had no loss of anti-VEGF activity when kept at 4°C in polycarbonate syringes over 4?weeks. Similar to bevacizumab, compounded ziv-aflibercept would yield a tremendous saving compared with aflibercept or ranibizumab. Conclusions Off-label use of ziv-aflibercept improves visual acuity without ocular toxicity and may offer a cheaper alternative to the same molecule aflibercept. Trial registration number NCT02173873. PMID:25677668

  10. L-cone pigment genes expressed in normal colour vision.

    PubMed

    Sjoberg, S A; Neitz, M; Balding, S D; Neitz, J

    1998-11-01

    To directly test the hypothesis that only two pigment genes are expressed from the X-chromosome array, we examined expressed M and L pigment gene sequences from > 100 male eye donors. In this sample, there were eight men who expressed high levels of more than one L pigment gene in addition to M pigment genes. The fact that these eyes expressed both L and M pigment genes at significant levels suggests they were from men with normal colour vision. We reject the hypothesis that only two pigment genes from one X-chromosome array can be expressed. PMID:9893828

  11. Multimodality imaging in macular telangiectasia 2: A clue to its pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lihteh

    2015-01-01

    Macular telangiectasia type 2 also known as idiopathic perifoveal telangiectasia and juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis type 2A is an acquired bilateral neurodegenerative macular disease that manifests itself during the fifth or sixth decades of life. It is characterized by minimal dilatation of the parafoveal capillaries with graying of the retinal area involved, a lack of lipid exudation, right-angled retinal venules, refractile deposits in the superficial retina, hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium, foveal atrophy, and subretinal neovascularization (SRNV). Our understanding of the disease has paralleled advances in multimodality imaging of the fundus. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images typically demonstrate the presence of intraretinal hyporeflective spaces that are usually not related to retinal thickening or fluorescein leakage. The typical fluorescein angiographic (FA) finding is a deep intraretinal hyperfluorescent staining in the temporal parafoveal area. With time, the staining may involve the whole parafoveal area but does not extend to the center of the fovea. Long-term prognosis for central vision is poor, because of the development of SRNV or macular atrophy. Its pathogenesis remains unclear but multimodality imaging with FA, spectral domain OCT, adaptive optics, confocal blue reflectance and short wave fundus autofluorescence implicate Müller cells and macular pigment. Currently, there is no known treatment for this condition. PMID:26139799

  12. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Guidelines Home Remedies for Simple Eye Problems Medical Marijuana for Glaucoma Pregnancy Preventing Eye Injuries Smokers Sports ... treatment for dry macular degeneration , some people may benefit from a vitamin therapy regimen for dry macular ...

  13. Systemic and Ocular Long Pentraxin 3 in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Munthe-Fog, Lea; Bastrup-Birk, Simone; Reese-Petersen, Alexander Lynge; Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Garred, Peter; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been associated with both systemic and ocular alterations of the immune system. In particular dysfunction of complement factor H (CFH), a soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of the complement system, has been implicated in AMD pathogenesis. One of the ligands for CFH is long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), which is produced locally in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). To test the hypothesis that PTX3 is relevant to retinal immunohomeostasis and may be associated with AMD pathogenesis, we measured plasma PTX3 protein concentration and analyzed the RPE/choroid PTX3 gene expression in patients with AMD. To measure the ability of RPE cells to secrete PTX3 in vitro, polarized ARPE-19 cells were treated with activated T cells or cytokines (interferon (IFN)-gamma and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) from the basolateral side; then PTX3 protein concentration in supernatants and PTX3 gene expression in tissue lysates were quantified. Plasma levels of PTX3 were generally low and did not significantly differ between patients and controls (P=0.307). No statistically significant difference was observed between dry and exudative AMD nor was there any correlation with hsCRP or CFH genotype. The gene expression of PTX3 increased in RPE/choroid with age (P=0.0098 macular; P=0.003 extramacular), but did not differ between aged controls and AMD patients. In vitro, ARPE-19 cells increased expression of the PTX3 gene as well PTX3 apical secretions after stimulation with TNF-alpha or activated T cells (P<0.01). These findings indicate that PTX3 expressed in the eye cannot be detected systemically and systemic PTX3 may have little or no impact on disease progression, but our findings do not exclude that locally produced PTX3 produced in the posterior segment of the eye may be part of the AMD immunopathogenesis. PMID:26176960

  14. Apolipoprotein E promotes subretinal mononuclear phagocyte survival and chronic inflammation in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Olivier; Calippe, Bertrand; Lavalette, Sophie; Hu, Shulong J; Raoul, William; Dominguez, Elisa; Housset, Michael; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Combadiere, Christophe; Guillonneau, Xavier; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) expresses immunosuppressive signals such as FAS ligand (FASL), which prevents the accumulation of leukocytes in the subretinal space. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a breakdown of the subretinal immunosuppressive environment and chronic accumulation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs). We show that subretinal MPs in AMD patients accumulate on the RPE and express high levels of APOE. MPs of Cx3cr1?/? mice that develop MP accumulation on the RPE, photoreceptor degeneration, and increased choroidal neovascularization similarly express high levels of APOE. ApoE deletion in Cx3cr1?/? mice prevents pathogenic age- and stress-induced subretinal MP accumulation. We demonstrate that increased APOE levels induce IL-6 in MPs via the activation of the TLR2-CD14-dependent innate immunity receptor cluster. IL-6 in turn represses RPE FasL expression and prolongs subretinal MP survival. This mechanism may account, in part, for the MP accumulation observed in Cx3cr1?/? mice. Our results underline the inflammatory role of APOE in sterile inflammation in the immunosuppressive subretinal space. They provide rationale for the implication of IL-6 in AMD and open avenues toward therapies inhibiting pathogenic chronic inflammation in late AMD. PMID:25604058

  15. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  16. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  17. Intrachoroidal Neovascularization in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schwesinger, Catherine; Yee, Charles; Rohan, Richard M.; Joussen, Antonia M.; Fernandez, Antonio; Meyer, Tobias N.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Ma, Joseph J. K.; Redmond, T. Michael; Liu, Suyan; Adamis, Anthony P.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is a frequent and poorly treatable cause of vision loss in elderly Caucasians. This choroidal neovascularization has been associated with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In current animal models choroidal neovascularization is induced by subretinal injection of growth factors or vectors encoding growth factors such as VEGF, or by disruption of the Bruch’s membrane/retinal pigment epithelium complex with laser treatment. We wished to establish a transgenic murine model of age-related macular degeneration, in which the overexpression of VEGF by the retinal pigment epithelium induces choroidal neovascularization. A construct consisting of a tissue-specific murine retinal pigment epithelium promoter (RPE65 promoter) coupled to murine VEGF164 cDNA with a rabbit ?-globin-3? UTR was introduced into the genome of albino mice. Transgene mRNA was expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium at all ages peaking at 4 months. The expression of VEGF protein was increased in both the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. An increase of intravascular adherent leukocytes and vessel leakage was observed. Histopathology revealed intrachoroidal neovascularization that did not penetrate through an intact Bruch’s membrane. These results support the hypothesis that additional insults to the integrity of Bruch’s membrane are required to induce growth of choroidal vessels into the subretinal space as seen in age-related macular degeneration. This model may be useful to screen for inhibitors of choroidal vessel growth. PMID:11238064

  18. [Age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support. PMID:21618758

  19. Physics of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon

    2009-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. In this talk I will discuss a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in AMD [K.I. Mazzitello, C.M. Arizmendi, Fereydoon Family, H. E. Grossniklaus, Physical Review E (2009)]. I will also present an overview of our theoretical and computational efforts in modeling some other aspects of the physics of AMD, including CNV and the breakdown of Bruch's membrane [Ongoing collaboration with Abbas Shirinifard and James A. Glazier, Biocomplexity Institute and Department of Physics, Indiana University, Y. Jiang, Los Alamos, and Hans E. Grossniklaus, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University].

  20. Statistical physics of age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). The RPE is a phagocytic system that is essential for renewal of photoreceptors (rods and cones). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin in the aging RPE. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the RPE the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  1. Iron upregulates melanogenesis in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wolkow, Natalie; Li, Yafeng; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Song, Ying; Alekseev, Oleg; Iacovelli, Jared; Song, Delu; Lee, Jennifer C; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of our studies was to examine the relationship between iron and melanogenesis in retinal pigment epithelial cells, as prior observations had suggested that iron may promote melanogenesis. This relationship has potential clinical importance, as both iron overload and hyperpigmentation are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Human fetal retinal pigment epithelial cells and ARPE-19 cells were treated with iron in the form of ferric ammonium citrate, after which quantitative RT-PCR and electron microscopy were performed. Melanogenesis genes tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein 1, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome 3, premelanosome protein and dopachrome tautomerase were upregulated, as was the melanogenesis-controlling transcription factor, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Iron-treated cells had increased pigmentation and melanosome number. Multiple transcription factors upstream of MITF were upregulated by iron. PMID:25277027

  2. The etiology and molecular genetics of human pigmentation disorders.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Laura L; Pavan, William J

    2013-01-01

    Pigmentation, defined as the placement of pigment in skin, hair, and eyes for coloration, is distinctive because the location, amount, and type of pigmentation provides a visual manifestation of genetic heterogeneity in pathways regulating the pigment-producing cells, melanocytes. The scope of this genetic heterogeneity in humans ranges from normal to pathological pigmentation phenotypes. Clinically, normal human pigmentation encompasses a variety of skin and hair color as well as punctate pigmentation such as melanocytic nevi (moles) or ephelides (freckles), while abnormal human pigmentation exhibits markedly reduced or increased pigment levels, known as hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, respectively. Elucidation of the molecular genetics underlying pigmentation has revealed genes important for melanocyte development and function. Furthermore, many pigmentation disorders show additional defects in cells other than melanocytes, and identification of the genetic insults in these disorders has revealed pleiotropic genes, where a single gene is required for various functions in different cell types. Thus, unravelling the genetics of easily visualized pigmentation disorders has identified molecular similarities between melanocytes and less visible cell types/tissues, arising from a common developmental origin and/or shared genetic regulatory pathways. Herein we discuss notable human pigmentation disorders and their associated genetic alterations, focusing on the fact that the developmental genetics of pigmentation abnormalities are instructive for understanding normal pathways governing development and function of melanocytes. PMID:23799582

  3. VEGF-A and the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marneros, Alexander G

    2016-01-01

    The pathomechanisms that lead to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are only partially understood. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been shown to be activated in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in eyes with AMD. However, it is not known whether inflammasome activation is a cause or consequence of pathologic changes in AMD. A roadblock to defining the role of inflammasome activation and pathways that regulate it for AMD has been the lack of a mouse model that forms AMD-like pathologies in an age-dependent manner in which the role of the inflammasome can be investigated using genetic studies. We have recently identified such a mouse model, in which increased VEGF-A levels result in early degenerative changes of the RPE, followed by cardinal features of both nonexudative and neovascular AMD. Importantly, higher VEGF-A levels lead to increased oxidative damage and a sub-retinal inflammatory infiltrate that are associated with NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the RPE. Targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibited AMD-like pathologies in these mice. These findings suggest that inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome or pathways that regulate it may provide novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of both forms of AMD. PMID:26427397

  4. Pigmented Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Mota, Amanda Nascimento Cavalleiro de Macedo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Alves, Maria de Fatima Guimarães Scotelaro; Tarazona, Mónica Jidid Mateus

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented Bowen's disease is rare, though more prevalent in men. It presents as a well-delineated plaque in areas unexposed to sun. There are reports of association with seborrheic keratosis, solar lentigo or exuberant pigmentation of genital and intertriginous regions. A specific dermoscopy finding is the presence of brown or gray dots in regular arrangement and coiled or dotted vessels. Thus, we aim to raise awareness of the diagnosis of pigmented Bowen's disease in pigmented lesions. PMID:25184929

  5. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  6. Overview of plant pigments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  7. Diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-07-01

    A variety of treatment options are available for the treatment of diabetic macular edema. They include laser photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids, and vitrectomy with or without release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of the physiological mechanisms of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and thereby decreases leakage of plasma proteins from capillaries into the tissue. In addition, vitrectomy allows faster clearance of cytokines, such as VEGF, from the retina into the vitreous cavity. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and corticosteroids reduce the effect of VEGF on capillary permeability. Starling's law explains vasogenic edema, which is controlled by osmotic and hydrostatic gradients between vessel and tissue. It explains how VEGF-induced vascular permeability causes plasma protein to leak into the tissue interstitial space, thus decreasing the osmotic pressure gradient between vessel and tissue, resulting in water accumulation, i.e. edema. This is reversed by reducing VEGF production, which is achieved with laser treatment; or by removing VEGF with antibodies or vitrectomy; or by reducing the permeability effect with steroids. At the same time, Starling's law takes into account hemodynamic changes that affect the hydrostatic gradient. High arterial blood pressure and hypoxic vasodilatation increase the hydrostatic pressure in the microcirculation, which increases water flux from vessel to tissue and induce edema. Treatment of arterial hypertension or reversal of retinal hypoxia with laser reverses this pathophysiology and reduces edema. Newton's third law explains, that vitreoretinal traction decreases hydrostatic tissue pressure in the retina, increases the pressure gradient between vessel and tissue, and stimulates water fluxes from vessel into tissue, leading to edema. Release of vitreoretinal traction reverses this mechanism and reduces edema. PMID:23960851

  8. Alterations of retinal pigment epithelium cause AMD-like retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats

    PubMed Central

    Markovets, Anton M.; Saprunova, Valeriya B.; Zhdankina, Anna A.; Fursova, Anzhella Zh.; Bakeeva, Lora E.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the world, remains poorly understood. This makes it necessary to create animal models for studying AMD pathogenesis and to design new therapeutic approaches. Here we showed that retinopathy in OXYS rats is similar to human AMD according to clinical signs, morphology, and vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) genes expression. Clinical signs of retinopathy OXYS rats manifest by the age 3 months against the background of significantly reduced expression level of VEGF and PEDF genes due to the decline of the amount of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and alteration of choroidal microcirculation. The disruption in OXYS rats' retina starts at the age of 20 days and appears as reduce the area of RPE cells but does not affect their ultrastructure. Ultrastructural pathological alterations of RPE as well as develop forms of retinopathy are observed in OXYS rats from age 12 months and manifested as excessive accumulation of lipofuscin in RPE regions adjacent to the rod cells, whirling extentions of the basement membrane into the cytoplasm. These data suggest that primary cellular degenerative alterations in the RPE cells secondarily lead to choriocapillaris atrophy and results in complete loss of photoreceptor cells in the OXYS rats' retina by the age of 24 months. PMID:21191149

  9. Retinoprotective Effects of Bilberry Anthocyanins via Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanisms in a Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration Model in Pigmented Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping; Huang, Fenghong

    2015-01-01

    Excessive visible light exposure can induce damage to retinal cells and contribute to the development or progression of age-related macular degeneration. In this study we created a model of phototoxicity in pigmented rabbits. Furthermore, we investigated the protective effect of bilberry anthocyanin extract (BAE, Table A1) and explored the possible mechanisms of action in this model. The model of light-induced retinal damage was established by the pigmented rabbits exposed to light at 18,000 lx for 2 h, and they were sacrificed on day 7. After administration of BAE at dosages of 250 and 500 mg/kg/day, retinal dysfunction was significantly inhibited in terms of electroretinograms, and the decreased thicknesses of retinal outer nuclear layer and lengths of the outer segments of the photoreceptor cells were suppressed in rabbits with retinal degeneration. BAE attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3). The extract increased the levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, as well as the total antioxidant capacity, but decreased the malondialdehyde level in the retinal cells. BAE inhibited the light-induced elevation in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and angiogenic parameters (IL-1? and VEGF). Results showed that visible light-induced retinal degeneration model in pigmented rabbits was successfully established and BAE exhibited protective effects by increasing the antioxidant defense mechanisms, suppressing lipid peroxidation and proinflammatory cytokines, and inhibiting retinal cells apoptosis. PMID:26694327

  10. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Christopher B; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch's membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh(+/-) mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh(+/-) mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh(-/-) animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch's membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch's membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD. PMID:25991857

  11. [Therapeutic approach in persistent diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Br?ni?teanu, Daniel; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema has been initially reserved to cases unresponsive to conventional laser photocoagulation according to ETDRS criteria. While knowledge about pathophysiology of macular edema evolved and new drugs became available, the terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema expanded to include resistance to most current therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review medical and surgical options in the treatment of such difficult cases according to literature data and personal experience. PMID:26120654

  12. Molecular pathology of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Patel, Mrinali; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD remain largely unclear, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is thought to exist. AMD pathology is characterized by degeneration involving the retinal photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane, as well as, in some cases, alterations in choroidal capillaries. Recent research on the genetic and molecular underpinnings of AMD brings to light several basic molecular pathways and pathophysiological processes that might mediate AMD risk, progression, and/or response to therapy. This review summarizes, in detail, the molecular pathological findings in both humans and animal models, including genetic variations in CFH, CX3CR1, and ARMS2/HtrA1, as well as the role of numerous molecules implicated in inflammation, apoptosis, cholesterol trafficking, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:19026761

  13. Heat treatment of retinal pigment epithelium induces production of elastic lamina components and antiangiogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Sekiyama, Eiichi; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Yoneda, Kazuhito; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakao, Shintaro; Walshe, Tony E.; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Miller, Joan W.; Kinoshita, Shigeru; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. In advanced AMD, new vessels from choriocapillaris (CC) invade through the Bruch's membrane (BrM) into the retina, forming choroidal neovascularization (CNV). BrM, an elastic lamina that is located between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and CC, is thought to act as a physical and functional barrier against CNV. The BrM of patients with early AMD are characterized by decreased levels of antiangiogenic factors, including endostatin, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), as well as by degeneration of the elastic layer. Motivated by a previous report that heat increases elastin expression in human skin, we examined the effect of heat on human ARPE-19 cell production of BrM components. Heat treatment stimulated the production of BrM components, including TSP-1, PEDF, and tropoelastin in vitro and increased the antiangiogenic activity of RPE measured in a mouse corneal pocket assay. The effect of heat on experimental CNV was investigated by pretreating the retina with heat via infrared diode laser prior to the induction of CNV. Heat treatment blocked the development of experimental CNV in vivo. These findings suggest that heat treatment may restore BrM integrity and barrier function against new vessel growth.—Sekiyama, E., Saint-Geniez, M., Yoneda, K., Hisatomi, T., Nakao, S., Walshe, T. E., Maruyama, K., Hafezi-Moghadam, A., Miller, J. W., Kinoshita, S., D'Amore, P. A. Heat treatment of retinal pigment epithelium induces production of elastic lamina components and anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:22067481

  14. Differential Accumulation and Pigmenting Ability of Dietary Carotenoids in Colorful Finches

    E-print Network

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    484 Differential Accumulation and Pigmenting Ability of Dietary Carotenoids in Colorful Finches carotenoid pigmentation that they use to attract mates. Colorful carotenoid pigments are acquired from sources, it is possible that these pigments are accumulated at different levels in the body and may play

  15. Macular hole surgery following accidental laser injury with a military rangefinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custis, Peter H.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Zwick, Harry; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Regillo, Carl D.

    1996-04-01

    An active duty marine corps service member had bilateral full thickness macular holes induced following accidental Q-switched laser exposure from a hand held Neodymium range finder (ANGVS-5). The right eye had a large hole nasal to the fovea, while the left eye had a much smaller hole closer to the fovea centralis. Over the 18 months following the injury, the left eye demonstrated mild progressive degradation in visual function, but retained 20/20 final visual acuity. In contrast, the hole in the right eye increased in size, developed a localized retinal detachment with cystic changes in the fovea, and had atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium. Within 6 months after injury, acuity declined to 20/100. Macular hole surgery was performed with a goal of sealing the edges of the hole in order to allow resolution of the localized detachment and cystic changes in the fovea. In spite of surgical techniques that are generally successful in the treatment of macular holes associated with other etiologies, the fundus findings remained unchanged and visual acuity declined to 20/400. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of macular hole surgery for this condition.

  16. Laser therapy and macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchini, Ugo; Virgili, Gianni; Giansanti, Fabrizio; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Cappelli, Stefania

    2001-10-01

    Among macular diseases, choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is one of the most common causes of visual loss, especially in the form associated with age-related macular degeneration and pathologic myopia. Research on these diseases has recently evaluated new treatment modalities that use laser light differently; among these, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced in the clinical practice, allowing us to expand the possibility of reducing visual loss in patients affected by CNV. With PDT, a photosensitizer (verteporfin, VisudyneTM) is injected intravenously, and it selectively binds to new vessels; low-power laser light exposure then activates the drug, leading to oxidative damage of the endothelium and new vessels thrombosis. Yet, other therapies, such as transpupillary termotherapy, or the use of photocoagulation to cause feeder-vessel occlusion, could proof effective, but they need further investigation.

  17. Pigment gene expression in protan color vision defects.

    PubMed

    Balding, S D; Sjoberg, S A; Neitz, J; Neitz, M

    1998-11-01

    We screened 150 male eye donors and identified four who did not have or express L pigment genes, consistent with each of them having a congenital protan color vision defect. One donor was identified as a protanope because he had and expressed a single X-chromosome photopigment gene that encoded an M pigment. Three were categorized as protanomalous because each expressed significant levels of genes specifying two spectrally different M pigments. The first gene in each of the protanomalous arrays was expressed the most and encoded an M pigment that differed in amino acid sequence from M pigments in color normal men. PMID:9893849

  18. Transcriptional regulation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 by tumor necrosis factor and its relationship with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Zhu, Danhong; He, Shikun; Spee, Christine; Ryan, Stephen J.; Hinton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) may be involved in the molecular switch that determines which late form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) an individual develops. BMP4 expression is high in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in late, dry AMD patients, while BMP4 expression is low in the wet form of the disease, characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Here, we sought to determine the mechanism by which BMP4 is down-regulated in CNV. BMP4 expression was decreased within laser-induced CNV lesions in mice at a time when tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression was high (7 d postlaser) and was reexpressed in RPE when TNF levels declined (14 d postlaser). We found that TNF, an important angiogenic stimulus, significantly down-regulates BMP4 expression in cultured human fetal RPE cells, ARPE-19 cells, and RPE cells in murine posterior eye cup explants. We identified two specificity protein 1 (Sp1) binding sites in the BMP4 promoter that are required for basal expression of BMP4 and its down-regulation by TNF. Through c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, TNF modulates Sp1 phosphorylation, thus decreasing its affinity to the BMP4 promoter. The down-regulation of BMP4 expression by TNF in CNV and mechanisms established might be useful for defining novel targets for AMD therapy.—Xu, J., Zhu, D., He, S., Spee, C., Ryan, S. J., Hinton, D. R. Transcriptional regulation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 by tumor necrosis factor and its relationship with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21411747

  19. Hyperactivation of retina by light in mice leads to photoreceptor cell death mediated by VEGF and retinal pigment epithelium permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cachafeiro, M; Bemelmans, A-P; Samardzija, M; Afanasieva, T; Pournaras, J-A; Grimm, C; Kostic, C; Philippe, S; Wenzel, A; Arsenijevic, Y

    2013-01-01

    Light toxicity is suspected to enhance certain retinal degenerative processes such as age-related macular degeneration. Death of photoreceptors can be induced by their exposure to the visible light, and although cellular processes within photoreceptors have been characterized extensively, the role of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in this model is less well understood. We demonstrate that exposition to intense light causes the immediate breakdown of the outer blood–retinal barrier (BRB). In a molecular level, we observed the slackening of adherens junctions tying up the RPE and massive leakage of albumin into the neural retina. Retinal pigment epithelial cells normally secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at their basolateral side; light damage in contrast leads to VEGF increase on the apical side – that is, in the neuroretina. Blocking VEGF, by means of lentiviral gene transfer to express an anti-VEGF antibody in RPE cells, inhibits outer BRB breakdown and retinal degeneration, as illustrated by functional, behavioral and morphometric analysis. Our data show that exposure to high levels of visible light induces hyperpermeability of the RPE, likely involving VEGF signaling. The resulting retinal edema contributes to irreversible damage to photoreceptors. These data suggest that anti-VEGF compounds are of therapeutic interest when the outer BRB is altered by retinal stresses. PMID:23990021

  20. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  1. Plasma Protein Pentosidine and Carboxymethyllysine, Biomarkers for Age-related Macular Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jiaqian; Yuan, Xianglin; Gu, Jiayin; Yue, Xiuzhen; Gu, Xiaorong; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Crabb, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe vision loss in the elderly; early identification of AMD risk could help slow or prevent disease progression. Toward the discovery of AMD biomarkers, we quantified plasma protein N?-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine from 58 AMD and 32 control donors. CML and pentosidine are advanced glycation end products that are abundant in Bruch membrane, the extracellular matrix separating the retinal pigment epithelium from the blood-bearing choriocapillaris. We measured CML and pentosidine by LC-MS/MS and LC-fluorometry, respectively, and found higher mean levels of CML (?54%) and pentosidine (?64%) in AMD (p < 0.0001) relative to normal controls. Plasma protein fructosyl-lysine, a marker of early glycation, was found by amino acid analysis to be in equal amounts in control and non-diabetic AMD donors, supporting an association between AMD and increased levels of CML and pentosidine independent of other diseases like diabetes. Carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP), an oxidative modification from docosahexaenoate-containing lipids and also abundant in AMD Bruch membrane, was elevated ?86% in the AMD cohort, but autoantibody titers to CEP, CML, and pentosidine were not significantly increased. Compellingly higher mean levels of CML and pentosidine were present in AMD plasma protein over a broad age range. Receiver operating curves indicate that CML, CEP adducts, and pentosidine alone discriminated between AMD and control subjects with 78, 79, and 88% accuracy, respectively, whereas CML in combination with pentosidine provided ?89% accuracy, and CEP plus pentosidine provided ?92% accuracy. Pentosidine levels appeared slightly altered in AMD patients with hypertension and cardiovascular disease, indicating further studies are warranted. Overall this study supports the potential utility of plasma protein CML and pentosidine as biomarkers for assessing AMD risk and susceptibility, particularly in combination with CEP adducts and with concurrent analyses of fructosyl-lysine to detect confounding factors. PMID:19435712

  2. Nrf2 signaling modulates cigarette smoke-induced complement activation in retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kondo, Naoshi; Cano, Marisol; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Yoshida, Takeshi; Barnett, Bradley P; Biswal, Shyam; Handa, James T

    2014-05-01

    Whereas cigarette smoking (CS) and dysregulated complement are thought to play central roles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), their exact roles are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if CS activates complement and if the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2 modulates this response. In AMD specimens, Nrf2 immunolabeling was strong in the cytoplasm, with scattered nuclear labeling of macular retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells that appeared normal, but was decreased and without nuclear labeling in dysmorphic cells overlying drusen, a hallmark AMD lesion. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation in RPE cells with increased antioxidant and complement gene expression. Whereas CFH protein was not altered by CSE, the cell membrane regulator proteins CD46, CD55, and CD59 were decreased, and C3a and C3b, but not iC3b, were increased compared to controls. C5b-9 was increased by CSE, but at sublytic levels, only after addition of normal human serum. Nrf2 knockdown enhanced the increase in C3a and C3b from CSE, but not iC3b, C5a, or C5b-9. CSE also increased IL-1b expression and secretion after C3a generation and was reduced by a C3aR antagonist. In contrast, the Nrf2 activator CDDO-Im restored complement gene expression in RPE cells exposed to CSE. We provide evidence of altered Nrf2 in human AMD and that CSE induces a proinflammatory environment specifically by generating C3a and C3b, and Nrf2 deficiency magnifies this specific complement response. PMID:24440594

  3. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein kinase C activity, has shown positive results in the prevention of diabetic retinopathy progression, and the resolution of DME. Combination therapy has been investigated, and may prove to be quite effective in the management of both DME and AMD-associated CNV, although ongoing and future studies will be crucial to treatment optimization for each condition. PMID:17628122

  4. Gene therapy in age related macular degeneration and hereditary macular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Kati; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    In ophthalmology, administration of the therapeutic agent can be difficult due to the tight barriers in the eye. Multiple injections may be needed to allow the therapeutic agent to reach adequate levels in retina and choroidea which may increase the risk of complications including endophthalmitis, cataract and haemorrhages. Optimal methods for the delivery of therapeutic agents to the posterior segments of the eye have not yet been developed. Gene therapy offers an alternative where the therapeutic protein or proteins can be induced in the target tissue for a prolonged period of time after a single injection. The eye is a promising target for gene therapy due to its small size and tissue boundaries preventing leakage of the therapeutic material to other tissues or systemic circulation. However, most of the work in ocular gene therapy is still at the preclinical phase; only three vectors have reached phase 1/2 clinical trials. This review summarizes basic principles and current status of gene therapy in age related macular degeneration and hereditary macular disorders. PMID:22652660

  5. Skin pigmentation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A

    2001-10-01

    The highest incidences of cancer are found in the skin, but endogenous pigmentation is associated with markedly reduced risk. Agents that enhance skin pigmentation have the potential to reduce both photodamage and skin cancer incidence. The purpose of this review is to evaluate agents that have the potential to increase skin pigmentation. These include topically applied substances that simulate natural pigmentation: dihydroxyacetone and melanins; and substances that stimulate the natural pigmentation process: psoralens with UVA (PUVA), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), L-tyrosine, L-Dopa, lysosomotropic agents, diacylglycerols, thymidine dinucleotides, DNA fragments, melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) analogs, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), nitric oxide donors, and bicyclic monoterpene (BMT) diols. These agents are compared with regards to efficacy when administered to melanoma cells, normal human epidermal melanocytes, animal skin, and human skin. In addition, mechanisms of action are reviewed since these may reveal issues related to both efficacy and safety. Both dihydroxyacetone and topically applied melanins are presently available to the consumer, and both of these have been shown to provide some photoprotection. Of the pigmentation stimulators, only PUVA and MSH analogs have been tested extensively on humans, but there are concerns about the safety and side effects of both. At least some of the remaining pigmentation stimulators under development have the potential to safely induce a photoprotective tan. PMID:11684462

  6. INTRODUCTION Ommochrome pigments are a class of pigments that is

    E-print Network

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    780 INTRODUCTION Ommochrome pigments are a class of pigments that is widespread in insects of tryptophan metabolism (e.g. Han et al., 2007; Kato et al., 2006). The eye pigmentation pathway of Drosophila; Mackenzie et al., 2000). Ommochrome pigments are the main chromogenic class in the pathway from tryptophan

  7. Clinical characteristics and current treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Ivana K

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial degeneration of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium. The societal impact is significant, with more than 2 million individuals in the United States alone affected by advanced stages of AMD. Recent progress in our understanding of this complex disease and parallel developments in therapeutics and imaging have translated into new management paradigms in recent years. However, there are many unanswered questions, and diagnostic and prognostic precision and treatment outcomes can still be improved. In this article, we discuss the clinical features of AMD, provide correlations with modern imaging and histopathology, and present an overview of treatment strategies. PMID:25280900

  8. Pigmented lens striae.

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, G. D.; Tripathi, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The clinical features of pigmented lens striae were studied biomicroscopically in seven patients. The lenses of three of these, obtained by cataract surgery, were examined by electron microscopy to determine the structure of the striae. We concluded that the striae are not formed by remnants of tunica vasculosa lentis, as earlier workers believed, but consist of fine fibrils of zonular bundles entrapping pigment granules of uveal origin. Images PMID:1276118

  9. Advances in the management of macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current management of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be divided into two categories: first, anti-vasoendothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection for wet macular degeneration; second, anti-oxidant vitamins for dry macular degeneration. New therapies are being developed for both of these diseases using novel technologies and different modes of administration. The hope is that some of these therapies will achieve significant improvement to current management and prevent future loss of vision in this devastating eye condition. PMID:24860651

  10. Inflammatory Cytokines Induce Expression of Chemokines by Human Retinal Cells: Role in Chemokine Receptor Mediated Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N.; Kommineni, Vijay K.; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Nagineni, Krishnasai K.; Hooks, John J.; Detrick, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine reeptor-3 (CCR-3) was shown to be associated with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a vision threatening retinal disease that affects the aging population world-wide. Retinal pigment epithelium and choroid in the posterior part of the retina are the key tissues targeted in the pathogenesis of CNV in AMD. We used human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) and choroidal fibroblast (HCHF) cells, prepared from aged adult human donor eyes, to evaluate the expression of major CCR-3 ligands, CCL-5, CCL -7, CCL-11,CCL-24 and CCL-26. Microarray analysis of gene expression in HRPE cells treated with inflammatory cytokine mix (ICM= IFN-?+TNF-?+IL-1?) revealed 75 and 23-fold increase in CCL-5 and CCL-7 respectively, but not CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. Chemokine secretion studies of the production of CCL5 and CCL7 by HRPE corroborated with the gene expression analysis data. When the HRPE cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent manner. Similar to the gene expression data, the ICM did not enhance HRPE production of CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. CCL-11 and CCL-26 were increased with IL-4 treatment and this HRPE production was augmented in the presence of TNF-? and IL1?. When HCHF cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent fashion. IL-4 induced low levels of CCL-11 and CCL-26 in HCHF and this production was significantly enhanced by TNF-?. Under these conditions, neither HRPE nor HCHF were demonstrated to produce CCL-24. These data demonstrate that chronic inflammation triggers CCL-5 and CCL-7 release by HRPE and HCHF and the subsequent interactions with CCR3 may participate in pathologic processes in AMD. PMID:26618046

  11. Cold exposure down-regulates zebrafish pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kulkeaw, Kasem; Ishitani, Tohru; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Ivanovski, Ognen; Nakagawa, Midori; Mizuochi, Chiyo; Horio, Yuka; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2011-04-01

    Vertebrates use adaptive mechanisms when exposed to physiologic stresses. However, the mechanisms of pigmentation regulation in response to physiologic stresses largely remain unclear. To address this issue, we developed a novel pigmentation model in adult zebrafish using coldwater exposure (cold zebrafish). When zebrafish were maintained at 17 °C, the pigmentation of their pigment stripes was reduced compared with zebrafish at 26.5 °C (normal zebrafish). In cold zebrafish, gene expression levels of tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase, which encode enzymes involved in melanogenesis, were down-regulated, suggesting that either down-regulation of melanin synthesis occurred or the number of melanophores decreased. Both regular and electron microscopic observation of zebrafish skin showed that the number of melanophores decreased, whereas aggregation of melanosomes was not changed in cold zebrafish compared with normal zebrafish. Taken together, we here show that cold exposure down-regulated adult zebrafish pigmentation through decreasing the number of melanophores and propose that the cold zebrafish model is a powerful tool for pigmentation research. PMID:21392186

  12. A paradigm shift in imaging biomarkers in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Waldstein, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has undergone substantial break-throughs in diagnostic as well as therapeutic respect, with optical coherence tomography (OCT) allowing to identify disease morphology in great detail, and intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy providing unprecedented benefit. However, these two paths have yet not been combined in an optimal way, real-world outcomes are inferior to expectations, and disease management is largely inefficient in the real-world setting. This dilemma can be solved by identification of valid biomarkers relevant for visual function, disease activity and prognosis, which can provide solid guidance for therapeutic management on an individual level as well as on the population base. Qualitative and quantitative morphological features obtained by advanced OCT provide novel insight into exudative and degenerative stages of neovascular AMD. However, conclusions from structure/function correlations evolve differently from previous paradigms. While central retinal thickness was used as biomarker for guiding retreatment management in clinical trials and practice, fluid localization in different compartments offers superior prognostic value: Intraretinal cystoid fluid has a negative impact on visual acuity and is considered as degenerative when persisting through the initial therapeutic interval. Subretinal fluid is associated with superior visual benefit and a lower rate of progression towards geographic atrophy. Detachment of the retinal pigment epithelium was identified as most pathognomonic biomarker, often irresponsive to therapy and responsible for visual decline during a pro-re-nata regimen. Alterations of neurosensory tissue are usually associated with irreversible loss of functional elements and a negative prognosis. Novel OCT technologies offer crucial insight into corresponding changes at the level of the photoreceptor - retinal pigment epithelial - choriocapillary unit, identifying the biological limits of therapeutic interventions. To optimally benefit from high-resolution multi-modal imaging, an integrated analysis of all functional and structural features is required involving reliable automated algorithms and computational data analyses. Using innovative analysis methods, retinal biomarkers can be used to provide efficient personalized therapy for the individual patient, predictive disease- and population-based models for large-scale management and identifying promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26307399

  13. Pharmacological Modulation of Photoreceptor Outer Segment Degradation in a Human iPS Cell Model of Inherited Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruchira; Kuai, David; Guziewicz, Karina E; Meyer, Jackelyn; Wilson, Molly; Lu, Jianfeng; Smith, Molly; Clark, Eric; Verhoeven, Amelia; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Gamm, David M

    2015-11-01

    Degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is essential for vision, and studies have implicated altered POS processing in the pathogenesis of some retinal degenerative diseases. Consistent with this concept, a recently established hiPSC-RPE model of inherited macular degeneration, Best disease (BD), displayed reduced rates of POS breakdown. Herein we utilized this model to determine (i) if disturbances in protein degradation pathways are associated with delayed POS digestion and (ii) whether such defect(s) can be pharmacologically targeted. We found that BD hiPSC-RPE cultures possessed increased protein oxidation, decreased free-ubiquitin levels, and altered rates of exosome secretion, consistent with altered POS processing. Application of valproic acid (VPA) with or without rapamycin increased rates of POS degradation in our model, whereas application of bafilomycin-A1 decreased such rates. Importantly, the negative effect of bafilomycin-A1 could be fully reversed by VPA. The utility of hiPSC-RPE for VPA testing was further evident following examination of its efficacy and metabolism in a complementary canine disease model. Our findings suggest that disturbances in protein degradation pathways contribute to the POS processing defect observed in BD hiPSC-RPE, which can be manipulated pharmacologically. These results have therapeutic implications for BD and perhaps other maculopathies. PMID:26300224

  14. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    PubMed

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of substantial benefit in people with age-related macular degeneration. Prescription filters are one of the most beneficial visual aids that people with macular degeneration. In principle, one aims both at reducing short-wavelength light to reduce glare and at identifying light with specific wavelengths (colours) preferred by the patient for viewing. In both instances, such interventions result in apparent improved contrast sensitivity and better visual acuity. Although specific tests are performed to determine the best colour, tint, lens material, and type of frame for the patient's need, no scientific protocol has been developed so far to assist in prescribing tinted or selective transmission lenses . Magnifying optical lenses are available in a wide range of dioptric powers and are made from materials that correct for weight (plastic), thickness (high index), spherical aberrations (aspherical), and variable light intensities (photochromatic). These lenses can be used as loose lenses, mounted on optical frames, or used with a wide variety of attachments. As the dioptric power of plus lenses increases, the viewing distance of the target decreases, hence their usefulness mainly for tasks requiring near resolution acuity, like reading. Magnification can also be achieved with the use of telescopic devices that are built of two or more plus and (or) minus (minifying) optical lenses. Normal resolution acuity levels can be achieved with these devices for all viewing distances. Therefore, all telescopic devices are useful only for stationary patient tasks that do not require mobility and orientation. Electronic magnification has the great advantage over plus lenses of producing an acuity reserve enabling reading skills for almost all levels of visual acuity. The additional benefit provided is preservation of binocularity, even at high levels of visual disparity between the two eyes. Vision rehabilitation can help patients to maximize their remaining vision and adapt to activities of daily living. The support of the patient's social network is critical to patient's well-bei

  15. Posturing after macular hole surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Aman; Charteris, David G; Yorston, David

    2011-01-01

    Since the first reports on surgical repair of macular holes, postoperative face-down posturing (FDP) has been part of the management regime. However, prone positioning is unpleasant for patients, and has adverse effects. Over the last decade some vitreoretinal surgeons have reduced the duration of FDP, or even abandoned it altogether. There have been few non-randomised, and even fewer randomised trials addressing this controversy. With high success rates for macular hole surgery and multiple different surgical strategies such as internal limiting membrane peeling, combining macular hole and cataract surgery, and different durations of gas tamponade, analysing the effects of individual factors is difficult. This paper discusses the mechanisms of surgical repair as well as the role of postoperative FDP, and reviews the studies that have attempted to determine its effect on the success of macular hole surgery. PMID:21778774

  16. Parkinson's Drug Shows Promise Against Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155695.html Parkinson's Drug Shows Promise Against Macular Degeneration But more ... THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A common Parkinson's disease medication might hold potential for preventing or ...

  17. Fuzzy logic for identifying pigments studied by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Pablo Manuel; Ferré, Joan; Ruisánchez, Itziar; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S

    2004-07-01

    Fuzzy logic and linguistic variables are used for the automatic interpretation of Raman spectra obtained from pigments found in cultural heritage art objects. Featured bands are extracted from a Raman spectrum of a reference pigment and the methodology for constructing the library is illustrated. An unknown spectrum is then interpreted automatically and a process for identifying the corresponding pigment is described. A reference library consisting of 32 pigments was built and the effectiveness of the algorithm was tested by the Raman spectroscopic analysis of 10 pigments that are known to have been extensively used in Byzantine hagiography. Binary mixtures of these pigments were also tested. The algorithm's level of identification was good even though extra peaks, noise, and background signals were encountered in the spectra. PMID:15282052

  18. [Physical activity benefits patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Subhi, Yousif; Munch, Inger Christine; Singh, Amardeep; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2014-09-01

    We have reviewed studies investigating the effect of physical activity on prevention of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), progression to late AMD, and risk modulation of morbidity and mortality in patients with AMD. Regular physical activity may lower risk of developing early AMD and progression of early AMD to late AMD at a level comparable with smoking cessation or dietary supplements. Studies suggest that AMD itself is associated with physical inactivity which can result in higher morbidity levels. Patients with AMD may benefit from physical activity counselling at all stages of the disease. PMID:25294030

  19. [Physical activity benefits patients with age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Subhi, Yousif; Munch, Inger Christine; Singh, Amardeep; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-08-17

    We have reviewed studies investigating the effect of physical activity on prevention of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), progression to late AMD, and risk modulation of morbidity and mortality in patients with AMD. Regular physical activity may lower risk of developing early AMD and progression of early AMD to late AMD at a level comparable with smoking cessation or dietary supplements. Studies suggest that AMD itself is associated with physical inactivity which can result in higher morbidity levels. Patients with AMD may benefit from physical activity counselling at all stages of the disease. PMID:26561660

  20. Submacular hemorrhage in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: A synthesis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stanescu-Segall, Dinu; Balta, Florian; Jackson, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Large submacular hemorrhage, an uncommon manifestation of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, may also occur with idiopathic polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. Submacular hemorrhage damages photoreceptors owing to iron toxicity, fibrin meshwork contraction, and reduced nutrient flux, with subsequent macular scarring. Clinical and experimental studies support prompt treatment, as tissue damage can occur within 24 hours. Without treatment the natural history is poor, with a mean final visual acuity (VA) of 20/1600. Reported treatments include retinal pigment epithelial patch, macular translocation, pneumatic displacement, intravitreal or subretinal tissue plasminogen activator, intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs, and combinations thereof. In the absence of comparative studies, we combined eligible studies to assess the VA change before and after each treatment option. The greatest improvement occurred after combined pars plana vitrectomy, subretinal tissue plasminogen activator, intravitreal gas, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment, with VA improving from 20/1000 to 20/400. The best final VA occurred using combined intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator, gas, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy, with VA improving from 20/200 to 20/100. Both treatments had an acceptable safety profile, but most studies were small, and larger randomized controlled trials are needed to determine both safety and efficacy. PMID:26212151

  1. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Christopher B.; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh+/? and Cfh?/? mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch’s membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh+/? and Cfh?/? mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh+/? mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh+/? mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh?/? animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch’s membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch’s membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD. PMID:25991857

  2. The stereotypical molecular cascade in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: the role of dynamic reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Kent, D

    2015-11-01

    This review summarises our current understanding of the molecular basis of subretinal neovascularisation (SRNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The term neovascular AMD (NVAMD) is derived from the dominant early clinical features of haemorrhage, fluid, and lipid in the subretinal space (SRS) and the historical role of fluorescein angiography in detecting the presence of NV tissue. However, at the cellular level, SRNV resembles an aberrant but stereotypical tissue repair response that incorporates both an early inflammatory phase and a late fibrotic phase in addition to the neovascular (NV) component that dominates the early clinical presentation. This review will seek not only to highlight the important molecules involved in each of these components but to demonstrate that the development of SRNV has its origins in the earliest events in non-NV AMD pathogenesis. Current evidence suggests that this early-stage pathogenesis is characterised by complement-mediated immune dysregulation, leading to a state of chronic inflammation in the retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane/choriocapillaris complex. These initial events can be seamlessly and inextricably linked to late-stage development of SRNV in AMD by the process of dynamic reciprocity (DyR), the ongoing bidirectional communication between cells, and their surrounding matrix. Moreover, this correlation between disease onset and eventual outcome is reflected in the temporal and spatial correlation between chronic inflammation, NV, and fibrosis within the reparative microenvironment of the SRS. In summary, the downstream consequences of the earliest dysfunctional molecular events in AMD can result in the late-stage entity we recognize clinically as SRNV and is characterized by a spectrum of predictable, related, and stereotypical processes referred to as DyR. PMID:26228288

  3. Age-related macular degeneration and changes in the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Ma?gorzata; Strza?ka-Mrozik, Barbara; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Mazurek, Urszula; Romaniuk, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of permanent, irreversible, central blindness (scotoma in the central visual field that makes reading and writing impossible, stereoscopic vision, recognition of colors and details) in patients over the age of 50 years in European and North America countries, and an important role is attributed to disorders in the regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The main aim of this article is to present the crucial processes that occur on the level of Bruch’s membrane, with special consideration of the metalloproteinase substrates, metalloproteinase, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). A comprehensive review of the literature was performed through MEDLINE and PubMed searches, covering the years 2005–2012, using the following keywords: AMD, extracellular matrix, metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, Bruch’s membrane, collagen, elastin. In the pathogenesis of AMD, a significant role is played by collagen type I and type IV; elastin; fibulin-3, -5, and -6; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, MMP-14, and MMP-1; and TIMP-3. Other important mechanisms include: ARMS2 and HTR1 proteins, the complement system, the urokinase plasminogen activator system, and pro-renin receptor activation. Continuous rebuilding of the extracellular matrix occurs in both early and advanced AMD, simultaneously with the dysfunction of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and endothelial cells. The pathological degradation or accumulation of ECM structural components are caused by impairment or hyperactivity of specific MMPs/TIMPs complexes, and is also endangered by the influence of other mechanisms connected with both genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24938626

  4. Pigmented epidermal cysts.

    PubMed

    Shet, T; Desai, S

    2001-10-01

    There are few reports documenting the presence of melanin or melanocytes in epidermal cysts. One hundred and twenty five epidermal cysts from Indian patients were analyzed for the presence of melanin pigment and their sites were noted. A Masson's Fontana stain and immunohistochemistry for S-100 protein and HMB 45 was performed for localization of melanin and melanocytes within the epidermal cysts. Seventy-nine (63%) of the epidermal cysts showed presence of melanin pigment or melanocytes to a variable extent. Melanin was not present in epidermal cysts occurring along lines of fusion of skin folds during embryonogenesis (e.g., ventral midline, inner canthus, nose, upper lip and in the distal most parts like leg and foot and also scrotum). Ten of the 79 epidermal cysts showed extensive accumulation of melanin pigment and infiltration with melanophages in the cyst wall. Four of these patients gave history of trauma and the follow-up was uneventful in two of them. Pigmentation of epidermal cysts thus follows a definite anatomic pattern and is dependent on the natural skin color. Large amount of pigment accumulation within epidermal cysts occurs after cyst rupture and is not associated with hemochromatosis as was believed in the past. PMID:11801783

  5. Pegaptanib for wet macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, Frederick W

    2005-11-01

    Pegaptanib sodium injection (Macugen, Eyetech Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer, New York, NY, USA) is a relatively new medication intended to treat the so-called wet (neovascular ) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This form of AMD is characterized by the growth of unwanted new blood vessels into the macula (angiogenesis). The aqueous solution containing pegaptanib is injected into the vitreous of the eye, where it binds to the 165 amino acid isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secreted protein that is thought to play a major role in the pathologic angiogenesis that occurs in wet AMD. Neovascular AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss in people over age 60 in the United States and other industrialized countries (1). Pegaptanib acts as a selective VEGF antagonist through its molecular structure as an aptamer, a pegylated modified oligonucleotide that adopts a three-dimensional configuration, enabling it to bind to extracellular VEGF (Fig. 1). Aptamers are macromolecules composed of chemically synthesized single-stranded nucleic acids (either RNA or DNA) that bind with a high degree of selectivity and affinity when exposed to target proteins. Pegaptanib binds VEGF165, and bound VEGF165 is not able to bind to the VEGF receptor, thereby negating its ability to cause angiogenesis and vascular permeability. Other aptamers exist, as do other forms of treatment for AMD. To date, however, no treatment for AMD has allowed for better vision after treatment, with most surgical treatments leading to almost immediate loss of some vision in the expectation of preventing more severe loss. Research in the field of macular degeneration is advancing rapidly, and treatment with an aptamer such as pegaptanib is a viable option despite the possibility of adverse events. PMID:16395411

  6. An Improved Method for Extraction and Separation of Photosynthetic Pigments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Nobuyasu; Kanaizuka, Yasuhiro; Sudarmi, Rini; Yokohama, Yasutsugu

    2003-01-01

    The method for extracting and separating hydrophobic photosynthetic pigments proposed by Katayama "et al." ("Japanese Journal of Phycology," 42, 71-77, 1994) has been improved to introduce it to student laboratories at the senior high school level. Silica gel powder was used for removing water from fresh materials prior to extracting pigments by a…

  7. Enzymatic Degradation of A2E, a Retinal Pigment Epithelial Lipofuscin Bisretinoid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yalin; Zhou, Jilin; Fishkin, Nathan; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2014-01-01

    Some forms of blinding macular disease are associated with excessive accumulation of bisretinoid lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye. This material is refractory to lysosomal enzyme degradation. In addition to gene and drug-based therapies, treatments that reverse the accumulation of bisretinoid would be beneficial. Thus, we have examined the feasibility of degrading the bisretinoids by delivery of exogenous enzyme. As proof of principle we report that horseradish peroxidase (HRP) can cleave the RPE bisretinoid A2E. In both cell-free and cell-based assays, A2E levels were decreased in the presence of HRP. HRP-associated cleavage products were detected by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and the structures of the aldehyde-bearing cleavage products were elucidated by 18O-labeling and 1H NMR spectroscopy and by recording UV-vis absorbance spectra. These findings indicate that RPE bisretinoids such as A2E can be degraded by appropriate enzyme activities. PMID:21166406

  8. Controlling Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size Influences Growth Factor Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Vargis, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Cristen B; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function that occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. Up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.

  9. Biology of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.

    1981-01-01

    The many factors involved in the normal pigmentation of human skin are highly complex involving anatomic, biochemical, and genetic aspects of melanocytes in the skin and the influence of UV light and various hormones on the melanocytes. It is probably more than just coincidence that the melanocytes, which are of neurogenic origin, are so responsive to several trophic hormones produced in the brain. Understanding of the various factors involved in the normal pigmentary process is crucial to explaining the many alterations and anomalies in human pigmentation.

  10. [Hemosiderin pigmentation in Sezáry's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M; Löffler, H

    1976-10-01

    A 75 year old woman suffering from Sezary syndrome with edemas and excessive pigmentations is presented. In previous observations, pigmentation was caused by melanosis. In our patient it is caused by hemosiderosis. The origin of the pigmentation by a purpura-pigmentosa-progressiva-like mechanism or by the tumor disease itself is discussed. PMID:136428

  11. Reorganization of Visual Processing in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    E-print Network

    Peli, Eli

    Reorganization of Visual Processing in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Depends on Foveal Loss with central vision loss due to macular degeneration (MD) view stimuli in the periphery, most of them activate of bottom-up input to ``foveal'' cortex owing to macular degeneration (MD), the deprived region of cortex

  12. Identifying Age-related Macular Degeneration In Volumetric Retinal Images

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Identifying Age-related Macular Degeneration In Volumetric Retinal Images Abdulrahman Albarrak a Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a retina disorder, which is currently on the increase. Age-related Macular Degeneration(AMD) is one of these disorders. OCT images indicate clearly different

  13. Cholesterol-mediated activation of acid sphingomyelinase disrupts autophagy in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Tan, Li Xuan; Jiang, Zhichun; Radu, Roxana A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential mechanism for clearing damaged organelles and proteins within the cell. As with neurodegenerative diseases, dysfunctional autophagy could contribute to blinding diseases such as macular degeneration. However, precisely how inefficient autophagy promotes retinal damage is unclear. In this study, we investigate innate mechanisms that modulate autophagy in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key site of insult in macular degeneration. High-speed live imaging of polarized adult primary RPE cells and data from a mouse model of early-onset macular degeneration identify a mechanism by which lipofuscin bisretinoids, visual cycle metabolites that progressively accumulate in the RPE, disrupt autophagy. We demonstrate that bisretinoids trap cholesterol and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate, an acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cofactor, within the RPE. ASMase activation increases cellular ceramide, which promotes tubulin acetylation on stabilized microtubules. Live-imaging data show that autophagosome traffic and autophagic flux are inhibited in RPE with acetylated microtubules. Drugs that remove excess cholesterol or inhibit ASMase reverse this cascade of events and restore autophagosome motility and autophagic flux in the RPE. Because accumulation of lipofuscin bisretinoids and abnormal cholesterol homeostasis are implicated in macular degeneration, our studies suggest that ASMase could be a potential therapeutic target to ensure the efficient autophagy that maintains RPE health. PMID:25378587

  14. Current therapeutic developments in atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative disorder of the central retina, is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly. The underlying mechanism of the advanced form of dry AMD, also named geographic atrophy (GA) or atrophic AMD, remains unclear. Consequently, no cure is available for dry AMD or GA. The only prevention option currently available is the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, which has been demonstrated to slow down the progression of dry AMD. This review summarises recent advances in therapy for dry AMD and GA. Building on the new understanding of the disease and recent technological breakthroughs, numerous ongoing clinical trials have the goal of meeting the need to cure AMD. Therapeutic agents are being developed to target the key features of the disease, including inhibiting the complement pathway and other inflammatory pathways, reducing oxidative stress and protecting retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, inhibiting lipofuscin and visual cycle, regenerating RPE cells from stem cells and restoring choroidal blood flow. Some of these therapeutic options, especially the stem cell-based therapy, hold great promise, which brings great hope for this devastating blinding disease. PMID:26553922

  15. Cellular models and therapies for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forest, David L.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative visual disorder that causes profound physical and psychosocial effects. Visual impairment in AMD is caused by the loss of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells and the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells that they support. There is currently no effective treatment for the most common form of this disease (dry AMD). A new approach to treating AMD involves the transplantation of RPE cells derived from either human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Multiple clinical trials are being initiated using a variety of cell therapies. Although many animal models are available for AMD research, most do not recapitulate all aspects of the disease, hampering progress. However, the use of cultured RPE cells in AMD research is well established and, indeed, some of the more recently described RPE-based models show promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms of AMD and for screening drug candidates. Here, we discuss innovative cell-culture models of AMD and emerging stem-cell-based therapies for the treatment of this vision-robbing disease. PMID:26035859

  16. [Doyne-type honeycombed macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Isp??oiu, C; Iliu?ã, C

    1995-01-01

    The case of a 52-year-old patient, who presents since his youth round areas, white to yellow, sometimes confluent, having an aspect of mosaic, in the macular, papillary and intermaculopapillary regions, is examined. In the macular region of the left eye a red macular area has an aspect of pseudohole. The visual acuity is good, with image distortion at proximity. Central little scotomas can be seen, the computerized perimetry also reveals the diminish of the visual capacity at 802 (RE) and 785 (LE). The adaptometry is slightly diminished, there is also a unsystematic dyschromatopsia at pseudo-iso-chromatic tables. Angiographically there is a hyperfluorescence with overlaps on the ophthalmoscopical yellow-white areas. The lesions are interpreted as Doyne degenerescence, due to mucopolyzaharide deposits in the cuticular layer of Bruch membrane. The particularity of the case consist of a good conservation of visual function, compared to ophthalmoscopic lesions. PMID:7654678

  17. Diabetic macular edema: New promising therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Hanan N Al; Masaud, Jluwi S; Ghazi, Nicola G

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic macular edema is rapidly evolving. The era of laser therapy is being quickly replaced by an era of pharmacotherapy. Several pharmacotherapies have been recently developed for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic macular edema. Several intravitreal injections or sustained delivery devices have undergone phase 3 testing while others are currently being evaluated. The results of clinical trials have shown the superiority of some of these agents to laser therapy. However, with the availability of several of these newer agents, it may be difficult to individualize treatment options especially those patients respond differently to various therapies. As such, more effort is still needed in order to determine the best treatment regimen for a given patient. In this article, we briefly summarize the major new therapeutic additions for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising therapies. PMID:24379924

  18. Analysis of animal models of macular edema.

    PubMed

    Bellhorn, R W

    1984-05-01

    Various models of macular edema have been studied; however, frank development of a prototypical cystoid macular edema has not been observed. In humans, cystoid edema is frequently observed in association with other disturbances of the retina. Thus, a basic drawback of the animal models may be that an otherwise healthy retina is capable of resolving the experimentally produced edema, thereby preventing chronic cystoid maculopathy. A review of macular edema models and of experimental retinal and brain edema investigations suggests that blood-retinal (blood-brain) barrier permeability abnormalities need to be accompanied by ineffective edema resolving mechanisms for the production of a chronic edema. Intraglial uptake of extravasated serum proteins has been hypothesized to be an edema-resolving mechanism in brain edema. As such, the hypothesis that the Müller cell may be important to edema resolution appears attractive. Future animal model studies should include methodologies whereby edema resolution mechanisms are impaired. PMID:6379949

  19. Basis for enhanced barrier function of pigmented skin.

    PubMed

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan L; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P; Silva, Kathleen A; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S; Wei, Maria L; Feingold, Kenneth R; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M

    2014-09-01

    Humans with darkly pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison with humans with lightly pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly pigmented levels. In SKH1 (nonpigmented) versus SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J versus SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that colocalizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate reacidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, ?-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly pigmented human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison with lightly pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression. PMID:24732399

  20. Confirmation of linkage of Best`s macular dystrophy to 11q13, and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mansergh, F.C.; Kenna, P.F.; Farrar, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    Best`s macular dystrophy, also known as vitelliform macular degeneration, is an autosomal dominant, early onset form of macular degeneration. The disease is characterized by a roughly circular deposit of lipofuscin beneath the pigment epithelium of the retinal macula. Linkage studies were performed in two families, one Irish and one German, segregating typical Best`s macular dystrophy. In the Irish family (BTMD1), linkage analysis mapped the disease causing gene to chromosome 11q13, in a 10 cM region between the microsatellite markers PYGM and D11S871. Both markers showed different recombinants with the disease phenotype. This is a region that has previously shown linkage in families affected with Best`s macular dystrophy. Lod scores of 9.63, 9.12, 6.92, and 6.83 at zero recombination, were obtained with markers D11S1344, D11S1361, D11S1357 and D11S903, respectively. This data places the disease locus definitvely within the region between PYGM and D11S871. Linkage has been significantly excluded in this region in the German family (FamE), thereby providing evidence for genetic heterogeneity in this disease. The retinal specific gene, rod outer membrane protein 1 (ROM1), which maps to this region, has been screened for mutations in family BTMD1 by SSCPE analysis and by direct sequencing. Some of the promoter region, the three exons, and both introns have been sequenced; however, no mutations were found. It is likely that a gene other than ROM1 within this region may be responsible for causing the disease phenotype.

  1. An unusual presentation of macular amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Melo, Bárbara Lima Araújo; Costa, Igor Santos; Goes, Clara de Assis Martins; Tigre, Celina Aguiar Frota; André, Nara Frota

    2011-01-01

    Macular amyloidosis is a form of cutaneous amyloidosis characterized by dusky-brown lesions usually located on the upper back between the shoulder blades. This report describes the case of a 45 year-old female presenting with hyperpigmented macules and lace-like, non-pruritic erythema in the sacral and cervical region as well as on both arms and legs. Histology revealed amyloid deposits in the papillary dermis which exhibited apple-green birefringence after Congo red staining. There were no systemic findings. This is a case of macular amyloidosis with an unusual presentation. The literature on the subject is also reviewed. PMID:22068763

  2. Full quantum dynamics of the electronic coupling between photosynthetic pigments

    E-print Network

    Oviedo, María Belén

    2015-01-01

    From studying the time evolution of the single electron density matrix within a density functional tight-binding formalism we study in a fully atomistic picture the electronic excitation transfer between two photosynthetic pigments in real time. This time-dependent quantum dynamics is based on fully atomistic structural models of the photosynthetic pigment. We analyze the dependence of the electronic excitation transfer with distance and orientation between photosynthetic pigments. We compare the results obtained from full quantum dynamics with analytical ones, based on a two level system model were the interaction between the pigments is dipolar. We observed that even when the distance of the photosynthetic pigment is about $30$ \\AA\\ the deviation of the dipolarity is of about $15$ percent.

  3. Pigmentation and behavior: potential association through pleiotropic genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aya

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of pigmentation variation within and among Drosophila species is largely attributed to genes in melanin biosynthesis pathway, which involves dopamine metabolism. Most of the genetic changes underlying pigmentation variations reported to date are changes at the expression levels of the structural genes in the pathway. Within D. melanogaster, changes in cis-regulatory regions of a gene, ebony, are responsible for the naturally occurring variation of the body pigmentation intensity. This gene is also known to be expressed in glia, and many visual and behavioral abnormalities of its mutants have been reported. This implies that the gene has pleiotropic functions in the nervous systems. In this review, current knowledge on pigmentation variation and melanin biosynthesis pathway are summarized, with some focus on pleiotropic features of ebony and other genes in the pathway. A potential association between pigmentation and behavior through such pleiotropic genes is discussed in light of cis-regulatory structure and pleiotropic mutations. PMID:24025245

  4. Small molecule mediated proliferation of primary retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Jonathan G.; Elliott, Jimmy; Deshmukh, Vishal; de Lichtervelde, Lorenzo; Shen, Weijun; Tremblay, Matthew S.; Peters, Eric C.; Cho, Charles Y.; Lu, Bin; Girman, Sergej; Wang, Shaomei; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells form a monolayer adjacent to the retina and play a critical role in the visual light cycle. Degeneration of RPE cells results in retinal disorders such as age-related macular degeneration. Cell transplant strategies have potential therapeutic value for such disorders; however, risks associated with and an inadequate supply of donor cells limit their therapeutic success. The identification of factors that proliferate RPE cells ex vivo could provide a renewable source of cells for transplantation. Here we report that a small molecule (WS3) can reversibly proliferate primary RPE cells isolated from fetal and adult human donors. Following withdrawal of WS3, RPE cells differentiate into a functional monolayer, as exhibited by their expression of mature RPE genes and phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Furthermore, chemically expanded RPE cells preserve vision when transplanted into dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a well-established model of retinal degeneration. PMID:23621521

  5. Dissecting pigment architecture of individual photosynthetic antenna complexes in solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Moerner, W E

    2015-11-10

    Oligomerization plays a critical role in shaping the light-harvesting properties of many photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but a detailed understanding of this process at the level of individual pigments is still lacking. To study the effects of oligomerization, we designed a single-molecule approach to probe the photophysical properties of individual pigment sites as a function of protein assembly state. Our method, based on the principles of anti-Brownian electrokinetic trapping of single fluorescent proteins, step-wise photobleaching, and multiparameter spectroscopy, allows pigment-specific spectroscopic information on single multipigment antennae to be recorded in a nonperturbative aqueous environment with unprecedented detail. We focus on the monomer-to-trimer transformation of allophycocyanin (APC), an important antenna protein in cyanobacteria. Our data reveal that the two chemically identical pigments in APC have different roles. One (?) is the functional pigment that red-shifts its spectral properties upon trimer formation, whereas the other (?) is a "protective" pigment that persistently quenches the excited state of ? in the prefunctional, monomer state of the protein. These results show how subtleties in pigment organization give rise to functionally important aspects of energy transfer and photoprotection in antenna complexes. The method developed here should find immediate application in understanding the emergent properties of other natural and artificial light-harvesting systems. PMID:26438850

  6. Age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Lily K; Eaton, Angie

    2013-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after age 50 years. It is a multifactorial disease involving a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, metabolic, and functional factors. Besides smoking, hypertension, obesity, and certain dietary habits, a growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and the immune system may play a key role in the development of the disease. AMD may progress from the early form to the intermediate form and then to the advanced form, where two subtypes exist: the nonneovascular (dry) type and the neovascular (wet) type. The results from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study have shown that for the nonneovascular type of AMD, supplementation with high-dose antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and ?-carotene) and zinc is recommended for those with the intermediate form of AMD in one or both eyes or with advanced AMD or vision loss due to AMD in one eye. As for the neovascular type of the advanced AMD, the current standard of therapy is intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. In addition, lifestyle and dietary modifications including improved physical activity, reduced daily sodium intake, and reduced intake of solid fats, added sugars, cholesterol, and refined grain foods are recommended. To date, no study has demonstrated that AMD can be cured or effectively prevented. Clearly, more research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiology as well as to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this devastating disease. PMID:23580402

  7. Can Novel Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Be Developed by Better Understanding of Sorsby’s Fundus Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gourier, Hanae C. Y.; Chong, N. Victor

    2015-01-01

    Sorsby’s Fundus Dystrophy (SFD) is a rare autosomal dominant maculopathy that shares many clinical features with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). It is caused by a mutation in a single gene, TIMP-3, which accumulates in Bruch’s membrane (BM). BM thickening and TIMP-3 accumulation can also be found in AMD. From our understanding of the pathophysiology of SFD we hypothesize that BM thickening could be responsible for making the elastic layer vulnerable to invasion by choriocapillaris, thereby leading to choroidal neovascularization in some cases of AMD, whilst in others it could deprive the retinal pigment epithelium of its blood supply, thereby causing geographic atrophy. PMID:26239453

  8. Cutaneous symptoms such as acneform eruption and pigmentation are closely associated with blood levels of 2,3,4,7,8-penta-chlorodibenzofurans in Yusho patients, using data mining analysis

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Tomoaki; Matsumoto, Shinya; Akahane, Manabu; Kanagawa, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Soichi; Tajima, Bunichi; Matsuya, Shiro; Uchi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Satoko; Furue, Masutaka

    2009-01-01

    Background Yusho an intoxication caused by oral dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls occurred in 1968. Patients suffered from various systemic symptoms, including general fatigue, nausea, muscular and articular pain, acneform eruptions, black comedones, cutaneous and oral pigmentation, and increased eye discharge. The major causative factor was the contamination of rice oil with 2,3,4,7,8-penta-chlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF). Recent technical advances have allowed us to measure blood levels of PeCDF. However, there is little information on which symptoms and laboratory data are directly associated with PeCDF levels. Methods Yusho patients underwent annual medical check-ups from 2001 to 2003. Blood PeCDF levels were correlated with the presence or absence of symptoms in medical, hematological, dermatological, dental and ophthalmological examinations. This study analyzed all combinations by using the association analysis. This is the most suitable method to evaluate all combinations of the data comprehensively. This method was used to determine the rate of patients with high PeCDF level in the population with each symptom, and to extract combinations of three symptoms which were strongly associated with high PeCDF level. Results and Conclusion The rate of the patients with high PeCDF level was high in populations with high uric acid, black comedones (face), second highest quartile of age, or high urea nitrogen. The combination of three symptoms associated with the highest rate of patients with high PeCDF level was "high uric acid, female sexuality, and history of acneform eruptions", followed by "history of Yusho in and after 1968, high cholesterol level, and subjective symptoms." This analysis newly suggested that PeCDF concentration may be associated with history of dermatological symptoms, high uric acid, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. PMID:19284523

  9. Scotopic Microperimetry in the Early Diagnosis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recent clinical studies have shown that, in some degenerative retinal diseases, like age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the sensitivity of the rods decreases more rapidly than the sensitivity of the cones. The aim of this study was to evaluate if there is a correlation between the presence of hard drusen at the macular level and the rod damage responsible for the reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity in subjects at risk for AMD. Methods. The authors selected 24 subjects (14 men and 10 women) with an average age of 67.25?±?5.7 years. Macular hard drusen were present in 50% of the subjects at the fundus oculi exam. The researchers evaluated the retinal sensitivity to light in mesopic and scotopic conditions of each subject with an MP-1 scotopic microperimeter (MP-1S). Results. In subjects with hard drusen in the fundus oculi examination, there was a statistically significant reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity, while the mesopic retinal sensitivity was not compromised. Conclusion. This study revealed how the presence of hard drusen at the macular level is associated with a reduction in scotopic retinal sensitivity compared to a control group of healthy subjects. Retinal functionality in a scotopic setting examined with MP-1S could be useful in early diagnosis of AMD. PMID:25548774

  10. Assessment of Macular Function during Vitrectomy: New Approach Using Intraoperative Focal Macular Electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Harue; Mizota, Atsushi; Miyake, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a new technique to record focal macular electroretinograms (FMERGs) during vitrectomy to assess macular function. Methods Intraoperative FMERGs (iFMERGs) were recorded in ten patients (10 eyes) who undergo vitrectomy. iFMERGs were elicited by focal macular stimulation. The stimulus light was directed to the macular area through a 25 gauge (25G) glass fiber optic bundle. Background light was delivered through a dual chandelier-type light fiber probe. Focal macular responses elicited with combinations of stimulus and background luminances were analyzed. Results A stimulus luminance that was approximately 1.75 log units brighter than the background light was able to elicit focal macular responses that were not contaminated by stray light responses. Thus, a stimulus luminance of 160 cd/m2 delivered on a background of 3 cd/m2 elicited iFMEGs from only the stimulated area. This combination of stimulus and background luminances did not elicit a response when the stimulus was projected onto the optic nerve head. The iFMERGs elicited by a 10° stimulus with a duration of 100 ms and an interstimulus interval of 150 ms consisted of an a-, b-, and d-waves, the oscillatory potentials, and the photopic negative response (PhNR). Conclusions Focal ERGs with all components can be recorded from the macula and other retinal areas during vitreous surgery. This new technique will allow surgeons to assess the function of focal areas of the retina intraoperatively. PMID:26658489

  11. Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, or Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relative efficacy and safety of intravitreous aflibercept, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab in the treatment of diabetic macular edema are unknown. METHODS At 89 clinical sites, we randomly assigned 660 adults (mean age, 61±10 years) with diabetic macular edema involving the macular center to receive intravitreous aflibercept at a dose of 2.0 mg (224 participants), bevacizumab at a dose of 1.25 mg (218 participants), or ranibizumab at a dose of 0.3 mg (218 participants). The study drugs were administered as often as every 4 weeks, according to a protocol-specified algorithm. The primary outcome was the mean change in visual acuity at 1 year. RESULTS From baseline to 1 year, the mean visual-acuity letter score (range, 0 to 100, with higher scores indicating better visual acuity; a score of 85 is approximately 20/20) improved by 13.3 with aflibercept, by 9.7 with bevacizumab, and by 11.2 with ranibizumab. Although the improvement was greater with aflibercept than with the other two drugs (P<0.001 for aflibercept vs. bevacizumab and P = 0.03 for aflibercept vs. ranibizumab), it was not clinically meaningful, because the difference was driven by the eyes with worse visual acuity at baseline (P<0.001 for interaction). When the initial visual-acuity letter score was 78 to 69 (equivalent to approximately 20/32 to 20/40) (51% of participants), the mean improvement was 8.0 with aflibercept, 7.5 with bevacizumab, and 8.3 with ranibizumab (P>0.50 for each pairwise comparison). When the initial letter score was less than 69 (approximately 20/50 or worse), the mean improvement was 18.9 with aflibercept, 11.8 with bevacizumab, and 14.2 with ranibizumab (P<0.001 for aflibercept vs. bevacizumab, P = 0.003 for aflibercept vs. ranibizumab, and P = 0.21 for ranibizumab vs. bevacizumab). There were no significant differences among the study groups in the rates of serious adverse events (P = 0.40), hospitalization (P = 0.51), death (P = 0.72), or major cardiovascular events (P = 0.56). CONCLUSIONS Intravitreous aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab improved vision in eyes with center-involved diabetic macular edema, but the relative effect depended on baseline visual acuity. When the initial visual-acuity loss was mild, there were no apparent differences, on average, among study groups. At worse levels of initial visual acuity, aflibercept was more effective at improving vision. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01627249.) PMID:25692915

  12. Lamellar macular hole after intravitreal ocriplasmin injection.

    PubMed

    Chod, Ross Bronson; Goodrich, Clifford; Saxena, Sandeep; Akduman, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Intravitreal ocriplasmin was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to achieve medical vitreolysis in the setting of vitreomacular adhesion (VMA). We report a case of a 76-year-old woman who developed a lamellar macular hole following treatment with intravitreal ocriplasmin injection for VMA. A pathophysiological mechanism to explain this previously unreported complication of ocriplasmin injection is proposed. PMID:25576512

  13. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  14. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  15. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    E-print Network

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-01-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstr...

  16. Carotenoid Derived Aldehydes - Induced Oxidative Stress Causes Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalariya, Nilesh M.; Ramana, Kota V.; Srivastava, Satish K.; van Kuijk, Frederik J.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids have been advocated as potential therapeutic agents in treating age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In ocular tissues carotenoids may undergo oxidation and form carotenoid-derived aldehydes (CDA), which would be toxic to tissues. We have investigated the cytotoxic effects of CDA from ?–carotene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). The serum-starved ARPE-19 cells were treated with CDA without or with antioxidant, N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) and cell viability, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, nuclear chromatin condensation as well as fragmentation, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and activation of transcription factors NF- ?B and AP-1 were determined. We observed a dose and time-dependent decline in cell viability upon incubation of ARPE-19 cells with CDA. The CDA treatment also leads to elevation in ROS levels in a dose-dependent manner. Upon CDA treatment a significant number of apoptotic cells were observed. Also early apoptotic changes in ARPE-19 cells induced by CDA were associated with change in MMP. Increased nuclear chromatin condensation and fragmentation were also observed in cells treated with CDA. The cytotoxicity of CDA in ARPE-19 cells was significantly ameliorated by antioxidant, NAC. Furthermore, CDA induced the activation of NF-?B and AP-1 which was significantly inhibited by NAC. Thus our results demonstrate that CDA could increase the oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells by elevating ROS levels that would cause imbalance in cellular redox status which could lead to cell death. This would suggest that high carotenoid supplementation for treatment of AMD should be used cautiously. PMID:17977529

  17. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  18. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  19. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25310406

  20. Segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium by polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Baumann, Bernhard; Michels, Stephan; Geitzenauer, Wolfgang; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2008-02-01

    We report on a new method for segmenting the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) images of the human retina. Contrary to previous segmentation algorithms that were based on variations of backscattered intensity between individual layers, our method uses an intrinsic tissue property of the RPE: its depolarizing, or polarization scrambling effect on backscattered light. By using a state of the art spectral domain PS-OCT instrument, we demonstrate the method in healthy eyes and in eyes of patients with age related macular degeneration.

  1. Outcomes of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling with brilliant blue in macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Sanisoglu, Huseyin; Sevim, Mehmet Sahin; Aktas, Betul; Sevim, Semra; Nohutcu, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The evaluation of anatomic and visual outcomes in macular hole cases treated with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, brilliant blue (BB), and 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Materials and methods: Fifty eyes of 48 patients who presented between July 2007 and December 2009 with the diagnosis of stage 2, 3, or 4 macular holes according to Gass Classification who had undergone PPV and ILM peeling were included in this study. Pre- and postoperative macular examinations were assessed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. 23 G sutureless PPV and ILM peeling with BB was performed on all patients. Results: The mean age of patients was 63.34 ± 9.6 years. Stage 2 macular hole was determined in 17 eyes (34%), stage 3 in 24 eyes (48%), and stage 4 in 9 eyes (18%). The mean follow-up time was 13.6 ± 1.09 months. Anatomic closure was detected in 46/50 eyes (92%), whereas, in four cases, macular hole persisted and a second operation was not required due to subretinal fluid drainage. At follow-up after 2 months, persistant macular hole was detected in one case and it was closed with reoperation. At 12 months, an increase in visual acuity in 41 eyes was observed, while it remained at the same level in six eyes. In three eyes visual acuity decreased. There was a postoperative statistically significant increase in visual acuity in stage 2 and 3 cases (P < 0.05), however, no increase in visual acuity in stage 4 cases was observed. Conclusion: PPV and ILM peeling in stage 2, 3, and 4 macular hole cases provide successful anatomic outcomes, however, in delayed cases, due to photoreceptor loss, it has no effect on functional recovery. BB, used for clarity of ILM, may be beneficial due to its low retinal toxicity. PMID:21887101

  2. Photooxidative damage in retinal pigment epithelial cells via GRP78 and the protective role of grape skin polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Sun, Tao; Jiang, Yun; Wu, Lijiang; Cai, Xiangzhong; Sun, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiangjun

    2014-12-01

    Blue light induced oxidative damage and ER stress are related to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism of blue light-induced damage remained obscure. The objective of this work is to assess the photooxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) and oxidation-induced changes in expression of ER stress associated apoptotic proteins, and investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effects of grape skin extracts. To mimic lipofuscin-mediated photooxidation in vivo, ARPE-19 cells that accumulated A2E, one of lipofuscin fluorophores, were used as a model system to investigate the mechanism of photooxidative damage and the protective effects of grape skin polyphenols. Exposure of A2E containing ARPE-19 cells to blue light resulted in significant apoptosis and increases in levels of GRP78, CHOP, p-JNK, Bax, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3, indicating that photooxidative damage to RPE cells is mediated by the ER-stress-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Cells in which GRP78 had been knocked down with shRNA were more vulnerable to photooxidative damage. Pre-treatment of blue-light-exposed A2E containing ARPE-19 cells, with grape skin extracts, inhibited apoptosis, in a dose dependent manner. Knockdown GRP78 blocked the protective effect of grape skin extracts. PMID:25447759

  3. Role of Unfolded Protein Response Dysregulation in Oxidative Injury of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Cano, Marisol; Wang, Joshua J.; Li, Jingming; Huang, Chuangxin; Yu, Qiang; Herbert, Terence P.; Handa, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of legal blindness in the elderly, is associated with genetic and environmental risk factors, such as cigarette smoking. Recent evidence shows that cigarette smoke (CS) that contains high levels of potent oxidants preferably targets retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) leading to oxidative damage and apoptosis; however, the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in CS-related RPE apoptosis. Results: ER stress and proapoptotic gene C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were induced in the RPE/choroid complex from mice exposed to CS for 2 weeks and in human RPE cells treated with hydroquinone, a potent oxidant found at high concentrations in CS. Suppressing ER stress or inhibiting CHOP activation by pharmacological chaperones or genetic approaches attenuated hydroquinone-induced RPE cell apoptosis. In contrast to enhanced CHOP activation, protein level of active X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), a major regulator of the adaptive UPR, was reduced in hydroquinone-treated cells. Conditional knockout of XBP1 gene in the RPE resulted in caspase-12 activation, increased CHOP expression, and decreased antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2. Furthermore, XBP1-deficient RPE cells are more sensitive to oxidative damage induced by hydroquinone or NaIO3, a CS-unrelated chemical oxidant. Conversely, overexpressing XBP1 protected RPE cells and attenuated oxidative stress-induced RPE apoptosis. Innovation and Conclusion: These findings provide strong evidence suggesting an important role of ER stress and the UPR in CS-related oxidative injury of RPE cells. Thus, the modulation of the UPR signaling may provide a promising target for the treatment of AMD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2091–2106. PMID:24053669

  4. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food...CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed,...

  5. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food...CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity . (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed,...

  6. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food...CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity . (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed,...

  7. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food...CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity . (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed,...

  8. Effect of Amaranthus Pigments on Quality Characteristics of Pork Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cunliu; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Hui; Chen, Conggui

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the possibility of substituting Amaranthus pigments for nitrates in the of manufacture pork sausage. Five treatments of pork sausages (5% fat) with two levels of sodium nitrite (0 and 0.015%), or three levels (0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%) of pigments extracted from red Amaranthus were produced. The addition of Amaranthus pigments resulted in the significant increase of a* values, sensory color, flavor and overall acceptance scores, but the significant reduction of b* values, TBA values and VBN values (p<0.05). Based mainly on the results of overall acceptance during 29 d storage, it could be concluded that Amaranthus pigments showed a potential as nitrite alternative for pork sausage manufacture. PMID:25049507

  9. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khanani, Arshad M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters), central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) were measured. Results Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF), five had intraretinal fluid (IRF), four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA) was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing. Conclusion This study adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26229424

  10. Histamine H4 receptor as a new therapeutic target for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Hiroki; Ye, Fuxiang; Ijima, Ryo; Kachi, Shu; Kato, Seiichi; Nagaya, Masatoshi; Higuchi, Akiko; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The present treatment for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not sufficient. Hence, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of reducing histamine H4 receptor expression on CNV in mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH H4 receptor expression was examined in CNVs from patients with AMD. In mice, laser photocoagulation was performed in the retina to induce experimental CNV (laser CNV). Protein and mRNA expression levels were determined and CNV volume measured in wild-type and Hrh4-/- mice with laser CNV. The effects of JNJ7777120, an H4 receptor antagonist, administered intravitreously, on CNV volume and pathological vessel leakage were determined in mice with laser CNV and controls. Fundus imaging, retinal histology and electroretinography were performed on eyes injected with JNJ7777120 to evaluate retinal toxicity. KEY RESULTS Human H4 receptors were only confirmed in CNV samples from AMD patients and not in the other subretinal tissues. Mouse H4 receptors were expressed in retinal pigment epithelium only after inducing laser CNV in wild-type mice, and were co-localized with the macrophage marker F4/80. Laser CNV volume was reduced in Hrh4-/- mice compared with that in wild-type mice, and JNJ7777120 suppressed laser-induced CNV volume and pathological CNV leakage in wild-type mice. Also eyes injected with JNJ7777120 did not show retinal degeneration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS H4 receptors are expressed in macrophages that accumulate around CNVs. Suppressing H4 receptor expression prevented the pathological vessel leakage without showing retinal toxicity, indicating that the H4 receptor has potential as a novel therapeutic target in AMD. PMID:24787705

  11. Sustained supplementation and monitored response with differing carotenoid formulations in early age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akuffo, K O; Nolan, J M; Howard, A N; Moran, R; Stack, J; Klein, R; Klein, B E; Meuer, S M; Sabour-Pickett, S; Thurnham, D I; Beatty, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the impact of sustained supplementation using different macular carotenoid formulations on macular pigment (MP) and visual function in early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Patients and methods Sixty-seven subjects with early AMD were randomly assigned to: Group 1 (20?mg per day lutein (L), 0.86?mg per day zeaxanthin (Z); Ultra Lutein), Group 2 (10?mg per day meso-zeaxanthin (MZ), 10?mg per day L, 2?mg per day Z; Macushield; Macuhealth), Group 3 (17?mg per day MZ, 3?mg per day L, 2?mg per day Z). MP was measured using customised heterochromatic flicker photometry and visual function was assessed by measuring contrast sensitivity (CS) and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). AMD was graded using the Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System (AREDS 11-step severity scale). Results At 3 years, a significant increase in MP from baseline was observed in all groups at each eccentricity (P<0.05), except at 1.75° in Group 1 (P=0.160). Between 24 and 36 months, significant increases in MP at each eccentricity were seen in Group 3 (P<0.05 for all), and at 0.50° in Group 2 (P<0.05), whereas no significant increases were seen in Group 1 (P>0.05 for all). At 36 months, compared with baseline, the following significant improvements (P<0.05) in CS were observed: Group 2—1.2, 6, and 9.6 cycles per degree (c.p.d.); Group 1—15.15?c.p.d.; and Group 3—6, 9.6, and 15.15?c.p.d. No significant changes in BCVA, or progression to advanced AMD, were observed. Conclusion In early AMD, MP can be augmented with a variety of supplements, although the inclusion of MZ may confer benefits in terms of panprofile augmentation and in terms of CS enhancement. PMID:25976647

  12. Nonphotosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Cockell, Charles S; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. PMID:25941875

  13. [Differential diagnosis of pigmented tumors].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1979-05-10

    Some frequent diagnostic problems and the most important clinical and histologic criteria in differential diagnosis of malignant melanomas, benign pigment cell nevi, melanotic epithelial neoplastic lesions and frequent haemosiderotic tumors are delineated in a condensed survey. Considering the variety of diagnostic errors, one should never treat respectively destroy pigmented tumors of the skin without histologic investigation. PMID:218872

  14. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  15. Fundus autofluorescence imaging in age-related macular degeneration and geographic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Cousins, Scott W

    2010-01-01

    The traditional method for documenting and quantifying geographic atrophy (GA) is color photography. This method has been shown to be reproducible in several clinical trials, including the Age-related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and the natural progression of GA studies by Sunness et al. (AREDS No. 6, Am J Ophthalmol 132(5):668-681, 2001; Sunness et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 40(8):1761-1769, 1999). Nevertheless, it can be difficult to distinguish between dead/nonfunctioning retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), living but depigmented RPE (RPE often release melanin granules upon injury), and yellowish coloration caused by large drusen or calcified regressed drusen. Two imaging technologies that seem promising are fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and spectral domain (high resolution) optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Here we provide an overview of FAF imaging in the setting of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and GA. PMID:20238040

  16. Estrogen signalling in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Machali?ska, Anna; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial eye disease that is associated with aging, family history, smoking, obesity, cataract surgery, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and unhealthy diet. Gender has commonly been classified as a weak or inconsistent risk factor for AMD. This disease is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris, which secondarily lead to damage and death of photoreceptor cells and central visual loss. Pathogenesis of AMD involves constant oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and increased accumulation of lipofuscin and drusen. Estrogen has both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity and it regulates signaling pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review, we discuss potential cellular signaling targets of estrogen in retinal cells and AMD pathology. PMID:24911983

  17. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  18. Challenges in the Development of Therapy for Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cynthia X; Sun, Aixu; Yu, Ying; Liu, Qianyong; Tan, Yue-Qing; Tachibana, Isamu; Zeng, Hong; Wei, Ji-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial progressive degenerative disease of the retinal photoreceptors, pigmented epithelium and Bruch's membrane/choroid in central retina, causes visual impairment in millions of elderly people worldwide. The only available therapy for this disease is the over-the-counter (OTC) multi-vitamins plus macular xanthophyll (lutein/zeaxanthin) which attempts to block the damages of oxidative stress and ionizing blue light. Therefore development of dry AMD prescribed treatment is a pressing unmet medical need. However, this effort is currently hindered by many challenges, including an incomplete understanding of the mechanism of pathogenesis that leads to uncertain targets, confounded by not yet validated preclinical models and the difficulty to deliver the drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. Additionally, with slow disease progression and a less than ideal endpoint measurement method, clinical trials are necessarily large, lengthy and expensive. Increased commitment to research and development is an essential foundation for dealing with these problems. Innovations in clinical trials with novel endpoints, nontraditional study designs and the use of surrogate diseases might shorten the study time, reduce the patient sample size and consequently lower the budget for the development of the new therapies for the dry AMD. PMID:26427400

  19. Investigating Mitochondria as a Target for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Terluk, Marcia R.; Kapphahn, Rebecca J.; Soukup, Lauren M.; Gong, Hwee; Gallardo, Christopher; Montezuma, Sandra R.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. Although the pathological mechanisms have not been definitively elucidated, evidence suggests a key role for mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction. The current study used our unique collection of human retinal samples graded for the donor's stage of AMD to address fundamental questions about mtDNA damage in the retina. To evaluate the distribution of mtDNA damage in the diseased retina, damage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neural retina from individual donors were compared. To directly test a long-held belief that the macula is selectively damaged with AMD, RPE mtDNA damage was measured in the macula and peripheral sections from individual donors. Small segments of the entire mt genome were examined to determine whether specific regions are preferentially damaged. Our results show that mtDNA damage is limited to the RPE, equivalent mtDNA damage is found in the macular and peripheral RPE, and sites of damage are localized to regions of the mt genome that may impact mt function. These results provide a scientific basis for targeting the RPE mitochondria with therapies that protect and enhance mt function as a strategy for combating AMD. PMID:25948278

  20. Stem cell-based therapies for age-related macular degeneration: current status and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yalin; Zhao, Manli; Su, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness both in developed and developing countries. During the past decades, the managements of neovascular AMD (wet AMD) have dramatically progressed. However, still no effective treatment for non-neovascular AMD (dry AMD) which was characterized by geographic macular atrophy. Recent advances in stem cell sciences have demonstrated that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells can be generated from several types of stem cells (including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, et al) by cell co-culturing or defined factors. Additionally, studies also showed that visual function could be recovered by transplantation of these cells into subretinal space in vivo. Moreover, the United States Food and Drug Administration already approved several clinical trials to evaluate the efficiencies of stem cell based cell transplantation for dry AMD patients. Till now, a few patients enrolled in these studies achieved promising outcomes. This review will summarize recent advances in stem cell based RPE differentiation, transplantation, and the preliminary results of clinical trials. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed. PMID:25550892

  1. Early features in acute macular neuroretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anurag; Shah, Anish N; Richardson, Theresa; O'Sullivan, Eoin; Eleftheriadis, Haralabos

    2014-06-01

    Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMNR) is a rare disorder characterised by acute onset of unilateral or bilateral visual impairment associated with reddish-brown wedge-shaped outer macular lesions. It is more frequently reported in young females and though the pathophysiology remains unclear, factors reported in association with its onset include post-viral illness and vasoconstrictor use. We report a case of AMNR in an 18-year old female patient presenting with a 2-day history of acute painless blurring of central vision bilaterally, following 1 month of preceding flu-like illness. For 1 week prior to presentation, the patient had taken large doses of oral preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride. In addition to demonstrating characteristic optical coherence tomography findings seen in AMNR, we illustrate some rarely seen acute ophthalmoscopic features. Based on associations from this case, we add further insight into the pathophysiology of this condition which remains poorly understood. PMID:24037593

  2. Increased resolution macular thickness mapping by OCT.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Rui; Santos, Torcato; Cunha-Vaz, José

    2006-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) poor mapping resolution has been pointed out as the biggest disadvantage of this technique when compared to others, e.g., retinal thickness analyzer. In this work we were able to solve this problem by developing an atlas of macular thickness of the human retina into which OCT scans were thereafter registered. This atlas is used to allow registering OCT scans from the Fast Macular Protocol, thus bringing OCT scans into the atlas coordinates, therefore correcting for misfixations, while simultaneously allowing to perform OCT inter-scan registration. From this initial registration, we were able to compute a thickness map into which Fast RNFL Protocol scans were merged, thus allowing for increased OCT mapping resolution. PMID:17946646

  3. Progressive macular hypomelanosis among Egyptian patients: a clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Khaled; Ahmed, El-Shahat Farag; Abdelgawad, Mamdouh Morsy; El-Kamel, Mohammed Fawzy

    2011-01-01

    Background: Progressive macular hypomelanosis (PMH) is a disease of unclear etiology. Propionbacterium acnes (P. acnes) was claimed to be an etiological factor. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to document the clinicopathological features of PMH in Egyptian patients and to evaluate the therapeutic outcome. Methods: Patients with clinical features of PMH were recruited. Wood’s lamp examination, skin scrapings for fungi, and skin biopsy specimens were obtained. Biopsies were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, PAS, Fontana-Masson, and S100 protein. Patients received either narrow-band UVB (nbUVB) or nbUVB plus daily topical clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide gel 5% (bcUVB). The period of active treatment was 14 weeks followed by a follow-up period of 24 weeks. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included. Microscopic evaluation of skin biopsy specimens showed no significant differences between lesional and normal skin. Fontana-Masson stained sections showed overall reduction of melanin granules in the basal layer of lesional skin only and S100 staining did not detect significant differences in the number of melanocytes in lesional and normal skin. Nearly complete repigmentation was reported in 10 patients treated with bcUVB compared to 9 patients treated with nbUVb with no significant differences between both groups after 14 weeks. Only 2 patients in each group retained the pigmentation and the remaining patients returned to the baseline color before treatment. Conclusions: This study documented the clinicopathological features of PMH among Egyptians. No permanently effective treatment is available. Further studies are needed to prove or disprove the pathogenic role of P. acnes in PMH. PMID:24396712

  4. Natural pigments and sacred art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The iconographer uses earthly creations to create divine images: "Thine own of Thine own we offer unto Thee." (Byzantine Liturgy). Thus, by combining geology with art and religion, I can render homage to God through His creation by using minerals of the Planet Earth, as natural pigments in painting His image.

  5. Emerging Pharmacotherapies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Javey, Golnaz; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains an important cause of visual loss in patients with diabetes mellitus. Although photocoagulation and intensive control of systemic metabolic factors have been reported to achieve improved outcomes in large randomized clinical trials (RCTs), some patients with DME continue to lose vision despite treatment. Pharmacotherapies for DME include locally and systemically administered agents. We review several agents that have been studied for the treatment of DME. PMID:22474425

  6. Mapping of Photosynthetic Pigments in Spanish Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Martinez, R.; Domínguez-Gómez, J.-A.; de Hoyos, C.; Ruiz-Verdú, A.

    2004-05-01

    We present the preliminary results of the first stage of the project AO-594, which comprises the development and calibration of algorithms for photosynthetic pigment mapping in Spanish reservoirs. In the years 2001-2002, an extensive field campaign was made in 36 reservoirs and lakes in order to obtain a database of Rrs spectra (400-1000 nm), photosynthetic pigments concentration and phytoplankton composition. The sampled water bodies cover a wide range of environmental conditions, trophic levels and phytoplankton communities. As a first approach in algorithm development, we have explored the relationships between ratios of MERIS bands and pigment concentrations through simple linear regression analysis. The bands have been selected based on the spectral properties of each pigment and a peak analysis of the Rrs spectra. For chlorophyll a, we have found a very good linear relationship (R2 =0.919) using the ratio between bands 9 and 7. Similar results are found using band 8 instead of 7. In any case, the model derived for the whole range of concentrations (0-500 mg m3 ) fails for low values (<15 mg m-3 ). Possible solutions include the use of - non-linear models or the use of two different models depending on the ratio values. For cyanobacteria detection, the ratio between bands 9 and 6 (the later centred at 620 nm) shows a good correlation (R2 =0.723) with phycocyanin concentration measured fluorometrically, and better (R2 =0.945) with zeaxanthin measured using HPLC. The correlation of other indicator pigments with MERIS band ratios is less strong, but is still possible to develop algorithms accurate enough for bloom monitoring. We also discuss the problems found with the L2 MERIS reflectance imagery that we have tried to use for model calibration. We present the results of the study carried on six reservoirs in northeastern Spain. In a date coincident with a MERIS image (June 19th, 2003) we have collected pigment concentration and reflectance data measured from a boat and 10 m resolution imagery for the 15 MERIS bands acquired with an airborne CASI-2 sensor. This three-level data has allowed us to calculate a new set of reflectance MERIS bands from the L1B imagery and compare them with the L2 imagery. The comparison could be useful for modifying the current atmospheric correction algorithms applied for L2 data generation, which we have observed that frequently fail in inland waters.

  7. Relative Pigment Composition and Remote Sensing Reflectance of Caribbean Shallow-Water Corals

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Pérez, Juan L.; Guild, Liane S.; Armstrong, Roy A.; Corredor, Jorge; Zuluaga-Montero, Anabella; Polanco, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Reef corals typically contain a number of pigments, mostly due to their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic dinoflagellates. These pigments usually vary in presence and concentration and influence the spectral characteristics of corals. We studied the variations in pigment composition among seven Caribbean shallow-water Scleractinian corals by means of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis to further resolve the discrimination of corals. We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments. Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified. A Principal Components Analysis and a Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed the separation of coral species based on pigment composition. All the corals were collected under the same physical environmental conditions. This suggests that pigment in the coral’s symbionts might be more genetically-determined than influenced by prevailing physical conditions of the reef. We further investigated the use of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) as a tool for estimating the total pigment concentration of reef corals. Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5–98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health. PMID:26619210

  8. Relative Pigment Composition and Remote Sensing Reflectance of Caribbean Shallow-Water Corals.

    PubMed

    Torres-Pérez, Juan L; Guild, Liane S; Armstrong, Roy A; Corredor, Jorge; Zuluaga-Montero, Anabella; Polanco, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Reef corals typically contain a number of pigments, mostly due to their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic dinoflagellates. These pigments usually vary in presence and concentration and influence the spectral characteristics of corals. We studied the variations in pigment composition among seven Caribbean shallow-water Scleractinian corals by means of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis to further resolve the discrimination of corals. We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments. Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified. A Principal Components Analysis and a Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed the separation of coral species based on pigment composition. All the corals were collected under the same physical environmental conditions. This suggests that pigment in the coral's symbionts might be more genetically-determined than influenced by prevailing physical conditions of the reef. We further investigated the use of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) as a tool for estimating the total pigment concentration of reef corals. Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5-98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health. PMID:26619210

  9. Macular Bioaccelerometers on Earth and in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Cutler, L.; Meyer, G.; Vazin, P.; Lam, T.

    1991-01-01

    Space flight offers the opportunity to study linear bioaccelerometers (vestibular maculas) in the virtual absence of a primary stimulus, gravitational acceleration. Macular research in space is particularly important to NASA because the bioaccelerometers are proving to be weighted neural networks in which information is distributed for parallel processing. Neural networks are plastic and highly adaptive to new environments. Combined morphological-physiological studies of maculas fixed in space and following flight should reveal macular adaptive responses to microgravity, and their time-course. Ground-based research, already begun, using computer-assisted, 3-dimensional reconstruction of macular terminal fields will lead to development of computer models of functioning maculas. This research should continue in conjunction with physiological studies, including work with multichannel electrodes. The results of such a combined effort could usher in a new era in understanding vestibular function on Earth and in space. They can also provide a rational basis for counter-measures to space motion sickness, which may prove troublesome as space voyager encounter new gravitational fields on planets, or must re-adapt to 1 g upon return to earth.

  10. Effects of ambient and elevated CO2 on growth, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidants, and secondary metabolites of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G Don. grown under three different soil N levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aradhana; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2015-03-01

    Catharanthus roseus L. plants were grown under ambient (375?±?30 ppm) and elevated (560?±?25 ppm) concentrations of atmospheric CO2 at different rates of N supply (without supplemental N, 0 kg N ha(-1); recommended N, 50 kg N ha(-1); and double recommended N, 100 kg N ha(-1)) in open top chambers under field condition. Elevated CO2 significantly increased photosynthetic pigments, photosynthetic efficiency, and organic carbon content in leaves at recommended (RN) and double recommended N (DRN), while significantly decreased total nitrogen content in without supplemental N (WSN). Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were declined, while glutathione reductase, peroxidase, and phenylalanine-ammonia lyase were stimulated under elevated CO2. However, the responses of the above enzymes were modified with different rates of N supply. Elevated CO2 significantly reduced superoxide production rate, hydrogen peroxide, and malondialdehyde contents in RN and DRN. Compared with ambient, total alkaloids content increased maximally at recommended level of N, while total phenolics in WSN under elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 stimulated growth of plants by increasing plant height and numbers of branches and leaves, and the magnitude of increment were maximum in DRN. The study suggests that elevated CO2 has positively affected plants by increasing growth and alkaloids production and reducing the level of oxidative stress. However, the positive effects of elevated CO2 were comparatively lesser in plants grown under limited N availability than in moderate and higher N availability. Furthermore, the excess N supply in DRN has stimulated the growth but not the alkaloids production under elevated CO2. PMID:25304238

  11. Human skin pigmentation as an adaptation to UV radiation

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Nina G.; Chaplin, George

    2010-01-01

    Human skin pigmentation is the product of two clines produced by natural selection to adjust levels of constitutive pigmentation to levels of UV radiation (UVR). One cline was generated by high UVR near the equator and led to the evolution of dark, photoprotective, eumelanin-rich pigmentation. The other was produced by the requirement for UVB photons to sustain cutaneous photosynthesis of vitamin D3 in low-UVB environments, and resulted in the evolution of depigmented skin. As hominins dispersed outside of the tropics, they experienced different intensities and seasonal mixtures of UVA and UVB. Extreme UVA throughout the year and two equinoctial peaks of UVB prevail within the tropics. Under these conditions, the primary selective pressure was to protect folate by maintaining dark pigmentation. Photolysis of folate and its main serum form of 5-methylhydrofolate is caused by UVR and by reactive oxygen species generated by UVA. Competition for folate between the needs for cell division, DNA repair, and melanogenesis is severe under stressful, high-UVR conditions and is exacerbated by dietary insufficiency. Outside of tropical latitudes, UVB levels are generally low and peak only once during the year. The populations exhibiting maximally depigmented skin are those inhabiting environments with the lowest annual and summer peak levels of UVB. Development of facultative pigmentation (tanning) was important to populations settling between roughly 23° and 46° , where levels of UVB varied strongly according to season. Depigmented and tannable skin evolved numerous times in hominin evolution via independent genetic pathways under positive selection. PMID:20445093

  12. quantum mechanics position and momentum Pigment Molecules

    E-print Network

    quantum mechanics position and momentum Pigment Molecules A typical pigment molecule has a photon of wavelength at the pigment molecule. What is the largest value of such that the photon can be absorbed by an electron in the pigment molecule? When the photon is absorbed, the electron must be able

  13. Macular hole formation following thermal laser photocoagulation in a patient with choroidal neovascular membrane and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Reza; Reddy, Shantan; Peiretti, Enrico; Slakter, Jason S

    2006-01-01

    A woman with age-related macular degeneration and an extrafoveal choroidal neovascularization was treated with thermal laser photocoagulation. Three years later, an optical coherence tomography image showed a full-thickness macular hole with some contracture toward the adjacent atrophic laser scar, suggestive of some presumptive tangential forces. PMID:17017203

  14. Endothelial Cells Promote Pigmentation through Endothelin Receptor B Activation.

    PubMed

    Regazzetti, Claire; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Ghorbel, Houda Hammami; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Ambrosetti, Damien; Bahadoran, Philippe; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Mahns, Andre; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Findings of increased vascularization in melasma lesions and hyperpigmentation in acquired bilateral telangiectatic macules suggested a link between pigmentation and vascularization. Using high-magnification digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and histological examination, we showed that benign vascular lesions of the skin have restricted but significant hyperpigmentation compared with the surrounding skin. We then studied the role of microvascular endothelial cells in regulating skin pigmentation using an in vitro co-culture model using endothelial cells and melanocytes. These experiments showed that endothelin 1 released by microvascular endothelial cells induces increased melanogenesis signaling, characterized by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor phosphorylation, and increased tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase levels. Immunostaining for endothelin 1 in vascular lesions confirmed the increased expression on the basal layer of the epidermis above small vessels compared with perilesional skin. Endothelin acts through the activation of endothelin receptor B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38, to induce melanogenesis. Finally, culturing of reconstructed skin with microvascular endothelial cells led to increased skin pigmentation that could be prevented by inhibiting EDNRB. Taken together these results demonstrated the role of underlying microvascularization in skin pigmentation, a finding that could open new fields of research for regulating physiological pigmentation and for treating pigmentation disorders such as melasma. PMID:26308584

  15. The potential role of amyloid ? in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Sato, Tetsuji; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C.; Hisatomi, Toshio; Mochizuki, Manabu; Morita, Ikuo

    2005-01-01

    Drusen are extracellular deposits that lie beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and are the earliest signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recent proteome analysis demonstrated that amyloid ? (A?) deposition was specific to drusen from eyes with AMD. To work toward a molecular understanding of the development of AMD from drusen, we investigated the effect of A? on cultured human RPE cells as well as ocular findings in neprilysin gene–disrupted mice, which leads to an increased deposition A?. The results showed that A? treatment induced a marked increase in VEGF as well as a marked decrease in pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Conditioned media from A?-exposed RPE cells caused a dramatic increase in tubular formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Light microscopy of senescent neprilysin gene–disrupted mice showed an increased number of degenerated RPE cells with vacuoles. Electron microscopy revealed basal laminar and linear deposits beneath the RPE layer, but we did not observe choroidal neovascularization (CNV). The present study demonstrates that A? accumulation affects the balance between VEGF and PEDF in the RPE, and an accumulation of A? reproduces features characteristic of human AMD, such as RPE atrophy and basal deposit formation. Some other factors, such as breakdown of integrity of Bruch membrane, might be necessary to induce CNV of AMD. PMID:16167083

  16. Outcomes of chronic macular hole surgical repair

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shripaad Y; Afshar, Armin R; Kiernan, Daniel F; Hariprasad, Seenu M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report visual and anatomic outcomes of chronic macular hole surgery, with analysis of pre-operative OCT-based hole size and post-operative closure type. Settings and Design: An IRB-approved, retrospective case series of 26 eyes of 24 patients who underwent surgery for stage 3 or 4 idiopathic chronic macular holes at a tertiary care referral center. Statistical Analysis: Student's t-test. Results: Nineteen of 26 eyes (73%) had visual improvement after surgery on most recent exam. Twenty-one of 26 eyes (81%) achieved anatomic closure; 16 of 26 eyes (62%) achieved type 1, and five of 26 eyes (19%) achieved type 2 closure. Post-operative LogMAR VA for type 1 closure holes (0.49) was significantly greater than for type 2 closure and open holes (1.26, P < 0.003 and 1.10, P < 0.005, respectively), despite similar pre-operative VA (P = 0.51 and 0.68, respectively). Mean pre-operative hole diameter for eyes with type 1 closure, type 2 closure, and holes that remained open were 554, 929, and 1205 microns, respectively. Mean pre-operative hole diameter was significantly larger in eyes that remained open as compared to eyes with type 1 closure (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Vitrectomy to repair chronic macular holes can improve vision and achieve long-term closure. Holes of greater than 3.4 years duration were associated with a greater incidence of remaining open and type 2 closure. Larger holes (mean diameter of 1205 microns) were more likely to remain open after repair. PMID:25116773

  17. [Pharmacological treatment for diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Masanori; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic macular edema(DME) is a major cause of vision loss and has a remarkable impact on the quality of life of diabetic patients. New pharmacological approaches based on the use of intravitreal drugs, such as corticosteroids and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, have recently been developed for the treatment of DME. Even though laser therapy has been the standard treatment for DME, the results of several clinical trials have shown the superiority of some of these new agents to laser therapy. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the currently available new pharmacological treatments for DME in Japan. PMID:25812378

  18. Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven R; Gardner, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema result from chronic damage to the neurovascular structures of the retina. The pathophysiology of retinal damage remains uncertain but includes metabolic and neuroinflammatory insults. These mechanisms are addressed by intensive metabolic control of the systemic disease and by the use of ocular anti-inflammatory agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and corticosteroids. Improved understanding of the ocular and systemic mechanisms that underlie diabetic retinopathy will lead to improved means to diagnose and treat retinopathy and better maintain vision. PMID:26501152

  19. The Relationship of Central Foveal Thickness to Urinary Iodine Concentration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients with or without Cystoid Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Michael A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Harper, Shyana; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Hart, Lois; Rosner, Bernard; Berson, Eliot L.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Current treatments for cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa are not always effective, may lead to adverse side effects, and may not restore loss of visual acuity. The present research lays the rationale for evaluating whether an iodine supplement could reduce cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa. Objective To determine whether central foveal thickness in the presence of cystoid macular edema is related to dietary iodine intake inferred from urinary iodine concentration in non-smoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Institutional referral center. Participants Non-smoking adult patients with retinitis pigmentosa (n = 212, ages 18 to 69 years) with a visual acuity ? 20/200 in at least one eye. Main outcome measure The relationship of log central foveal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography to urinary iodine concentration measured from multiple spot samples and represented as a 3-level classification variable (< 100 ?g/L, 100 ?g/L - 199 ?g/L, and ? 200 ?g/L), assigning greater weight to patients with more reliable urinary iodine concentration estimates. Results Analyses were limited to 199 patients after excluding 11 patients who failed to return urine samples for measuring urinary iodine concentration and 2 outliers for urinary iodine concentration. Thirty-six percent of these patients had cystoid macular edema in one or both eyes. Although log central foveal thickness was inversely related to urinary iodine concentration based on all patients (p = 0.02), regression of log central foveal thickness on urinary iodine concentration separately for patients with and without cystoid macular edema showed a strong inverse significant relationship for the former group (p < 0.001) and no significant relationship for the latter group as tested (p = 0.66). In contrast, we found no significant association between cystoid macular edema prevalence and urinary iodine concentration based on the entire sample as tested. Conclusions and Relevance A higher urinary iodine concentration in non-smoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa was significantly associated with less central foveal swelling in eyes with cystoid macular edema. Additional study is required to determine whether an iodine supplement can limit or reduce the extent of cystoid macular edema in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:24993773

  20. A non-linear irreversible thermodynamic perspective on organic pigment proliferation and biological evolution

    E-print Network

    Michaelian, Karo

    2013-01-01

    The most important thermodynamic work performed by life today is the dissipation of the solar photon flux into heat through organic pigments in water. From this thermodynamic perspective, biological evolution is thus just the dispersal of organic pigments and water throughout Earth's surface, while adjusting the gases of Earth's atmosphere to allow the most intense part of the solar spectrum to penetrate the atmosphere and reach the surface to be intercepted by these pigments. The covalent bonding of atoms in organic pigments provides excited levels compatible with the energies of these photons. Internal conversion through vibrational relaxation to the ground state of these excited molecules when in water leads to rapid dissipation of the solar photons into heat, and this is the major source of entropy production on Earth. A non-linear irreversible thermodynamic analysis shows that the proliferation of organic pigments on Earth is a direct consequence of the pigments catalytic properties in dissipating the so...

  1. The marine n-3 PUFA DHA evokes cytoprotection against oxidative stress and protein misfolding by inducing autophagy and NFE2L2 in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ida; Monsen, Vivi Talstad; Pettersen, Kristine; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Misund, Kristine; Kaarniranta, Kai; Schønberg, Svanhild; Bjørkøy, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of several diseases collectively known as proteinopathies. Autophagy has a cytoprotective role in diseases associated with protein aggregates. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common neurodegenerative eye disease that evokes blindness in elderly. AMD is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and leads to loss of photoreceptor cells and central vision. The initial phase associates with accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin and extracellular deposits called drusen. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse correlation between dietary intake of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases, including AMD. However, the disease-preventive mechanism(s) mobilized by n-3 PUFAs is not completely understood. In human retinal pigment epithelial cells we find that physiologically relevant doses of the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induce a transient increase in cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels that activates the oxidative stress response regulator NFE2L2/NRF2 (nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2, like 2). Simultaneously, there is a transient increase in intracellular protein aggregates containing SQSTM1/p62 (sequestosome 1) and an increase in autophagy. Pretreatment with DHA rescues the cells from cell cycle arrest induced by misfolded proteins or oxidative stress. Cells with a downregulated oxidative stress response, or autophagy, respond with reduced cell growth and survival after DHA supplementation. These results suggest that DHA both induces endogenous antioxidants and mobilizes selective autophagy of misfolded proteins. Both mechanisms could be relevant to reduce the risk of developing aggregate-associate diseases such as AMD. PMID:26237736

  2. Exogenous pigment in Peyer's patches

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, N.A.; Crocker, P.R.; Smith, A.P.; Levison, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dark brown granular pigment was found consistently in macrophages in the deep aspect of adult Peyer's patches. Tissue sections from intestinal resections of 35 patients with a variety of pathologic diagnoses and of seven postmortem cases with no evidence of gastrointestinal disease were examined for the presence of this pigment. It was found in all patients over the age of 6 years (34 cases) but was not found in any children below that age (eight cases). Scanning electron microscopy with secondary and backscattered electron imaging and x-ray energy spectroscopy were performed on routine histologic sections. The pigmented macrophages contained aluminum and silicon, diffusely present throughout the cytoplasm, and numerous discrete foci of titanium. Pigment containing these same elements has also been found around dilated submucosal lymphatics, in mesenteric lymph nodes, and in some transmural inflammatory aggregates of Crohn's disease. The pigment probably is derived from the diet and actively taken up by Peyer's patches, which are able to incorporate inert particulate matter.

  3. Topical Application of PPADS Inhibits Complement Activation and Choroidal Neovascularization in a Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Birke, Kerstin; Lipo, Erion; Birke, Marco T.; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among the elderly. AMD patients have elevated levels of membrane attack complex (MAC) in their choroidal blood vessels and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). MAC forms pores in cell membranes. Low levels of MAC result in an elevation of cytokine release such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that promotes the formation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). High levels of MAC result in cell lysis and RPE degeneration is a hallmark of advanced AMD. The current standard of care for CNV associated with wet AMD is intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF molecules every 4 to 12 weeks. Such injections have significant side effects. Recently, it has been found that membrane pore-forming proteins such as ?-haemolysin can mediate their toxic effects through auto- and paracrine signaling and that complement-induced lysis is amplified through ATP release followed by P2X receptor activation. We hypothesized that attenuation of P2X receptor activation may lead to a reduction in MAC deposition and consequent formation of CNV. Hence, in this study we investigated topical application of the purinergic P2X antagonist Pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) as a potential treatment for AMD. We found that 4.17 µM PPADS inhibited formation of HUVEC master junctions and master segments by 74.7%. In a human complement mediated cell lysis assay, 104 µM PPADS enabled almost complete protection of Hepa1c1c7 cells from 1% normal human serum mediated cell lysis. Daily topical application of 4.17 mM PPADS for 3 days attenuated the progression of laser induced CNV in mice by 41.8% and attenuated the deposition of MAC at the site of the laser injury by 19.7%. Our data have implications for the future treatment of AMD and potentially other ocular disorders involving CNV such as angioid streaks, choroidal rupture and high myopia. PMID:24130789

  4. Bilateral coexistence of keratoconus and macular corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamdan, Ghazi; Al-Mutairi, Sultan; Al-Adwani, Eiman; Al-Mujaini, Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral coexistence of keratoconus and macular corneal dystrophy is a very rare clinical entity. Further elaboration on the possible genetic, histopathologic, pathophysiologic and biochemical correlation is required to study the nature of the condition. The authors hereby report a 21-year-old female who presented with the typical signs and topographic evidence of keratoconus in association with macular corneal dystrophy. Histopathologic evaluation from the excised corneal button after corneal transplant confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, there is only one previous report in the literature linking the association of keratoconus and macular corneal dystrophy in the same eye bilaterally. PMID:20671834

  5. Protocol optimization for enhanced production of pigments in Spirulina.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devendra; Kumar, Neeraj; Pabbi, Sunil; Walia, Suresh; Dhar, Dolly Wattal

    2013-01-01

    Spirulina has attracted special attention due to its importance as human foodstuff and natural colours with specific functional properties. These functional properties have been attributed to phycobilins, carotenoids, phenolics and unsaturated fatty acids. Present study was conducted under controlled phytotron conditions to identify the efficient strains of Spirulina in terms of pigment synthesis and to optimize their enhanced production. Methodology for enhanced production was standardized by varying specific environmental parameters (light intensity, temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, pH and NaCl level). Different strains of Spirulina depicted variability and environmental parameters showed distinct influence on pigments. Growth and pigment production was recorded to be most efficient under optimized conditions of light intensity (70 ?mol m(-2) s(-1)), temperature (30 °C), CO2 concentration (550 ppm and 750 ppm), pH (10.5) and NaCl level (2 g L(-1)). PMID:24764599

  6. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  7. Wnt5a attenuates the pathogenic effects of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells via down-regulating ?-catenin and Snail

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo-Hyun; Park, Seoyoung; Chung, Hyewon; Oh, Sangtaek

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway plays a pathogenic role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and is thus a potential target for the development of therapeutics for this disease. Here, we demonstrated that Wnt5a antagonized ?-catenin response transcription (CRT) induced with Wnt3a by promoting ?-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 and its subsequent degradation in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Wnt5a decreased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor-?(TNF-?), and nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), which was up-regulated by Wnt3a. Furthermore, Wnt5a increased E-cadherin expression and decreased cell migration by down-regulating Snail expression, thereby abrogating the Wnt3a-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human RPE cells. Our findings suggest that Wnt5a suppresses the pathogenic effects of canonical Wnt signaling in human RPE cells by promoting ?-catenin phosphorylation and degradation. Therefore, Wnt5a has significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of AMD. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 525-530] PMID:26246285

  8. Nitrite Modification of Extracellular Matrix Alters CD46 Expression and VEGF Release in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Mark A.; Cai, Hui; Bowrey, Hannah E.; Moreira, Ernesto F.; Beck Gooz, Monika; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Gong, Jie; Vought, Emma; Del Priore, Lucian V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Loss of CD46 has recently been implicated in choroidal neovascularization in mice. Herein we investigated the effect of nitrite modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as an in vitro model of “aging” and its effect on CD46 expression and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release in cocultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods ARPE-19 cells were plated onto RPE-derived ECM conditions (untreated; nitrite modified; nitrite modified followed by washing with Triton X-100; or nitrite modified followed by washing with Triton X-100 and coated with extracellular matrix ligands). Cells were cultured for 7 days and CD46 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Additionally, CD46 short interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into ARPE-19 cells, and VEGF levels were determined by ELISA. Finally, in the same ECM conditions, ARPE-19 cells were challenged with normal human serum and VEGF levels determined by ELISA. Results CD46 is expressed on the basolateral surface of ARPE-19 cells on RPE-derived ECM. Nitrite modification of ECM reduced the expression of CD46 on ARPE-19 cells by 0.5-fold (P = 0.003) and increased VEGF release in ARPE-19 cells by 1.7-fold (P < 0.001). CD46 knockdown also increased release of VEGF on the apical and basal sides of ARPE-19 cells in culture by 1.3- (P = 0.012) and 1.2-fold (P = 0.017), respectively. Conclusions Nitrite modification of the ECM decreased CD46 expression and increased the release of VEGF from ARPE-19 cells. Changes in CD46 expression may lead to changes in VEGF and play a pathologic role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26161984

  9. Phytoplankton pigment chemotaxonomy of the northeastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Stuart W.; Cummings, Denise G.; Irigoien, Xabier; Barlow, Ray G.; Fauzi, R.; Mantoura, C.

    Phytoplankton pigment distributions were studied between 62 and 37°N in the northeastern Atlantic as a component of the NERC PRIME programme. At the northern end of the transect, waters were characterised by a surface chlorophyll a (CHL a) maximum of 500- 700 ng l -1 (0- 40 m). At the southern end, surface waters were virtually devoid of nutrients ( NO3-<0.5 ?M, NH4+<50 nM), and surface CHL a concentrations were <50 ng l -1. At 37°N a well-defined deep CHL a maximum (DCM) was recorded between 60 and 100 m (˜350 ng l -1) . Highest concentrations of CHL a(1500 ?g l -1) were measured in the surface mixed layer to the south of a well-defined salinity and temperature front at 52.5°N. Overall, 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin (HEX, up to 1120 ng l -1) was the dominant accessory pigment, although zeaxanthin (ZEA) was the major accessory pigment at 37°N. Conversion of pigment data into quantitative estimates of algal class abundances indicated the composition of phytoplankton population was relatively stable in surface waters between 62 and 52.5°N: Prymnesiophytes were the most abundant class, contributing a mean of 38% of the total CHL a, while cryptophytes (20%), chlorophytes (14%) and diatoms (15%) contributed the bulk of the remaining CHL a. Together, these four classes accounted for 79-92% of the total CHL a in this section of the transect. Immediately south of the front (52-50°N), prymnesiophytes contributed approximately half of the total CHL a, while south of 50°N there was a shift to a population dominated by cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes, which together accounted for a mean of 53% of the measured total CHL a at 37°N. At 37°N the contribution of cyanobacteria to total CHL a declined significantly with depth, and the DCM was dominated by prochlorophytes, prymnesiophytes and cryptophytes. Below the DCM, chrysophytes were the most abundant class of phytoplankton, contributing 30% of the total CHL a, with prymnesiophytes, prochlorophytes and cryptophytes also making significant contributions. The contribution of prymnesiophytes to total CHL a was found to be relatively stable throughout the water column (23%, SD 3%). Although highest concentrations of divinyl chlorophyll a (dvCHL a) were recorded in the DCM, the contribution of dvCHL a to total CHL a (dvCHL a + CHL a) was only 21-26% here compared to up to 48% (mean=33±9.6%) in surface waters. The ratio of [dvCHL a]: prochlorophyte biomass increased from 10 ng ?g C -1 in the surface 40 m to 56.9 ng ?g C -1 between 50 and 100 m. This corresponded to a rise in cellular dvCHL a from 0.215 to 1.83 fg cell -1 and thus significant photo-adaptation with depth. Hence, a component of the DCM fluorescence and pigment signals is the result of increased cellular pigmentation rather than from increases in biomass alone. On the basis of inter-pigment ratios, we suggest that the DCM was dominated by an Atlantic strain of prochlorophytes, adapted to lower light levels, while the surface oligotrophic layer was composed of a mixed population of both Atlantic and a higher light adapted Mediterranean strain. Correlation studies indicated the potential of CHL a, fucoxanthin (FUC) and HEX to serve as respective proxy markers of POC and the biominerals silicate (SiO 2) and calcite (CaCO 3) in surface waters ( r=0.49-0.78, p<0.001) and in depth profiles at northern latitudes (59° N, r=0.74 -0.75, p<0.001). However, poor correlations were observed in depth profiles at the southern end of the transect.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups confer differences in risk for age-related macular degeneration: a case control study

    E-print Network

    2013-01-01

    smoking influence the risk of age-related macular degenerationsmoking and obesity [62,64]. Conclusions Age-related macular degeneration (smoking, body mass index, environmental associations with advanced age-related macular degeneration.

  11. Spectral tuning of ultraviolet cone pigments: an interhelical lock mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Mooney, Victoria L; Rivalta, Ivan; Kazmi, Manija A; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay; Sakmar, Thomas P; Yan, Elsa C Y; Batista, Victor S

    2013-12-26

    Ultraviolet (UV) cone pigments can provide insights into the molecular evolution of vertebrate vision since they are nearer to ancestral pigments than the dim-light rod photoreceptor rhodopsin. While visible-absorbing pigments contain an 11-cis retinyl chromophore with a protonated Schiff-base (PSB11), UV pigments uniquely contain an unprotonated Schiff-base (USB11). Upon F86Y mutation in model UV pigments, both the USB11 and PSB11 forms of the chromophore are found to coexist at physiological pH. The origin of this intriguing equilibrium remains to be understood at the molecular level. Here, we address this phenomenon and the role of the USB11 environment in spectral tuning by combining mutagenesis studies with spectroscopic (UV-vis) and theoretical [DFT-QM/MM (SORCI+Q//B3LYP/6-31G(d): Amber96)] analysis. We compare structural models of the wild-type (WT), F86Y, S90A and S90C mutants of Siberian hamster ultraviolet (SHUV) cone pigment to explore structural rearrangements that stabilize USB11 over PSB11. We find that the PSB11 forms upon F86Y mutation and is stabilized by an "inter-helical lock" (IHL) established by hydrogen-bonding networks between transmembrane (TM) helices TM6, TM2, and TM3 (including water w2c and amino acid residues Y265, F86Y, G117, S118, A114, and E113). The findings implicate the involvement of the IHL in constraining the displacement of TM6, an essential component of the activation of rhodopsin, in the spectral tuning of UV pigments. PMID:24295328

  12. Macular Oedema Related to Idiopathic Macular Telangiectasia Type 1 Treated with Dexamethasone Intravitreal Implant (Ozurdex)

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old female presented with visual disturbance in her right eye lasting for over 2 months. Following investigations, she was diagnosed with MacTel type 1 in the right eye. Visual symptoms were refractory to initial treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab and thereafter intravtireal triamicinolone. The patient was then treated with Ozurdex, following which central macular thickness (CMT) decreased (from 397??m to 286??m) and visual acuity deteriorated (from logMAR 0.48 to 0.59). At 14 weeks posttreatment with Ozurdex, a recurrence of cystoid macular oedema (CMO) was observed. Following a second Ozurdex, visual acuity improved (from logMAR 0.7 to 0.64) and CMT decreased (from 349??m to 279??m). An additional recurrence of CMO was observed at eighteen weeks following the second Ozurdex. Following a third Ozurdex injection visual acuity deteriorated (from logMAR 0.74 to 0.78) and CMT decreased (from 332??m to 279??m). Conclusion. Treatment of macular oedema secondary to MacTel with Ozurdex demonstrated promising anatomical outcomes. However, visual outcomes continued to gradually deteriorate. PMID:25045562

  13. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  14. The role of pigmentation in face perception

    E-print Network

    Russell, Richard (Richard P.)

    2005-01-01

    Faces each have distinct pigmentation as well as shape, which suggests that both cues may play a role in the perception of faces. However, there is a common implicit assumption that pigmentation cues are relatively ...

  15. Optimal number of pigments in photosynthetic complexes

    E-print Network

    Simon Jesenko; Marko Znidaric

    2012-09-17

    We study excitation energy transfer in a simple model of photosynthetic complex. The model, described by Lindblad equation, consists of pigments interacting via dipole-dipole interaction. Overlapping of pigments induces an on-site energy disorder, providing a mechanism for blocking the excitation transfer. Based on the average efficiency as well as robustness of random configurations of pigments, we calculate the optimal number of pigments that should be enclosed in a pigment-protein complex of a given size. The results suggest that a large fraction of pigment configurations are efficient as well as robust if the number of pigments is properly chosen. We compare optimal results of the model to the structure of pigment-protein complexes as found in nature, finding good agreement.

  16. Optimal number of pigments in photosynthetic complexes

    E-print Network

    Jesenko, Simon

    2012-01-01

    We study excitation energy transfer in a simple model of photosynthetic complex. The model, described by Lindblad equation, consists of pigments interacting via dipole-dipole interaction. Overlapping of pigments induces an on-site energy disorder, providing a mechanism for blocking the excitation transfer. Based on the average efficiency as well as robustness of random configurations of pigments, we calculate the optimal number of pigments that should be enclosed in a pigment-protein complex of a given size. The results suggest that a large fraction of pigment configurations are efficient as well as robust if the number of pigments is properly chosen. We compare optimal results of the model to the structure of pigment-protein complexes as found in nature, finding good agreement.

  17. 6 Nondestructive Estimation of Foliar Pigment

    E-print Network

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    141 6 Nondestructive Estimation of Foliar Pigment (Chlorophylls, Carotenoids, and Anthocyanins, carotenoids, and anthocyanins. The chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b are essential pigments for the conversion............................................................................................................... 143 6.2.3 Anthocyanins

  18. The mRNA expression of cytokines and their receptors in cultured iris pigment epithelial cells: a comparison with retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kociok, N; Heppekausen, H; Schraermeyer, U; Esser, P; Thumann, G; Grisanti, S; Heimann, K

    1998-08-01

    It has been suggested that human iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells isolated from iridectomized tissue could be used as autologous cells for transplantation into the subretinal space in diseases with dysfunctional retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). RPE cells synthesize a number of cytokines and their receptors which are important for its proper function. Nearly nothing is known about the capacity of IPE to synthesize cytokines or responding to them. To compare the mRNA expression of 36 cytokines or their receptors in cultured adult IPE cells and RPE cells we used semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). Included in our assay were cytokines with known expression in RPE to get a broad basis for comparing IPE cells: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2), and one of its receptor (FGFR-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and its receptor EGF-R, transforming growth factor beta(TGFbeta), and its type III receptor TGFbeta-R3, the platelet-derived growth factors and receptors (PDGF A, PDGF B, PDGF-Ralpha, PDGF-Rbeta), tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNFalpha), and two receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, insulin (INS) with receptor INS-R, insulin-like growth factors (IGF1, IGF2), and receptors (IGF1-R, IGF2-R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and two receptors (VEGF-R1 or FLT-1 and VEGF-R2 or FLK-1), the receptor for VEGF-C: VEGF-R3 or FLK-4, interleukin 6 (IL6), and its receptor (IL6-R), nerve growth factor (NGF), interleukin 1alpha(IL1alpha), and a receptor (IL1-R). In addition, cytokines or their receptors not known to be expressed in RPE were included to widen our picture of cytokine gene expression in the eye: stem cell factor (SCF), its receptor (SCF-R), low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75 (p75(NGF-R), ciliary neutrothropic factor (CNTF), and its receptor (CNTF-R), glycoprotein 130 interleukin 6 transducer (gp130 (IL6-SD), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and its receptor (LIF-R). Semi-quantitative expression data were obtained using series of fivefold dilutions of each cDNA and a fixed number of PCR cycles. The expression of RPE 65, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and beta2-microglobulin (B2MG) was used as a control for cellular origin, RNA quality and PCR conditions. With the exception of insulin and tumor necrosis factor alphaall other cytokines analysed and their receptors were expressed in both IPE and RPE cells, even though the levels varied. No qualitative or quantitative difference were observed in the mRNA expression level of 34 (94%) of the cytokines or receptors between IPE and RPE. In contrast, the mRNA expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 [VEGF-RS (FLK-1)] was lower in IPE than in RPE cells. As an increased expression of VEGF in the RPE in maculae with age-related macular disease could be involved in its pathogenesis, a decreased expression of angiogenic growth factors in IPE cells could possibly be beneficial for the therapy of age-related maculopathy if indeed other tasks of non-functional RPE cells could be performed by IPE cells. The similarity of the mRNA expression pattern in 94% of the cytokines analyzed supports the assumption that IPE cells potentially can perform functions of RPE cells in the appropriate environment. PMID:9733590

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Age-related macular degeneration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases ... Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of age-related macular degeneration? These resources address ...

  20. Quantification of macular ischaemia in sickle cell retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C M; Charles, H C; Smith, R T; Peachey, N S; Cunha-Vaz, J G; Goldberg, M F

    1987-01-01

    Macular ischaemia has a central role in the pathophysiology and prognosis of retinal macular disease. We attempted to quantitate two of its major components as follows: vascular nonperfusion, by measuring the foveal avascular zone (FAZ), using fluorescein angiography; and functional damage, using automated perimetry of the central 30 degrees. Sickle cell disease was chosen for study because it was considered a prototype for a purely ischaemic retinopathy without an exudative component. We found that the FAZ measurement was reproducible and that the patients with maculopathy had statistically larger FAZs than the normal controls (p = 0.016, Wilcoxon rank sum test). In addition, scotomas measured by visual field perimetry were significantly larger in the sickle cell patients with maculopathy than in those without maculopathy. Our results showed that angiography and perimetry of the central 30 degrees were more sensitive tests for the detection of ischaemic macular disease than visual acuity and that macular ischaemia could be quantified by their use. Images PMID:3651368

  1. Immunochemical recognition of A2E, a pigment in the lipofuscin of retinal pigment epithelial cells

    E-print Network

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Immunochemical recognition of A2E, a pigment in the lipofuscin of retinal pigment epithelial cells by Nicholas J. Turro, July 19, 2007 (sent for review May 15, 2007) The autofluorescent lipofuscin pigment A2E accumulates in retinal pigment epithelial cells with age and is particularly abundant in some retinal

  2. Macular optical coherence tomography findings and GPR143 mutations in patients with ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Vázquez, H E; Villanueva-Mendoza, C; Zenteno, J C; Villegas-Ruiz, V; Pelcastre-Luna, E; García-Aguirre, G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe macular findings using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients with ocular albinism (OA) and their carrier mothers, and to identify the frequency of GPR143 gene mutations in these patients. The study included five patients with a clinical diagnosis of OA. SD-OCT of the macular area was performed in both patients and their mothers. The anatomical characteristics of the macula and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), patterns of autofluorescence and infrared imaging were analyzed. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the complete coding sequence of GPR 143 was performed and subsequently analyzed by direct sequencing in patients and their possible carrier mothers. SD-OCT images revealed the presence of inner retinal layers in the fovea, an abnormal disposition of the Henle layer and a lack of thickening in the perifoveal area. We found increased thickness in the RPE to the outer segment and in the outer segment to the outer nuclear layer that is associated with increased visual acuity. Autofluorescence images revealed an absence of normal hipoautofluorescence in the fovea. No changes were observed in the images of their carrier mothers. Mutation screening and sequence analysis of the GPR 143 gene revealed a novel pathological mutation in two patients. Abnormalities in the macula were observed in all patients. SD-OCT is a useful tool for the assessment of patients with OA. No changes were observed in the SD-OCT of carrier mothers. Only two patients had the GPR143 gene mutation. PMID:24526317

  3. Automated diagnosis of Age-related Macular Degeneration using greyscale features from digital fundus images.

    PubMed

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Koh, Joel E W; Chandran, Vinod; Chua, Chua Kuang; Tan, Jen Hong; Lim, Choo Min; Ng, E Y K; Noronha, Kevin; Tong, Louis; Laude, Augustinus

    2014-10-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of vision loss and blindness in ageing population. Currently, there is no cure for AMD, however early detection and subsequent treatment may prevent the severe vision loss or slow the progression of the disease. AMD can be classified into two types: dry and wet AMDs. The people with macular degeneration are mostly affected by dry AMD. Early symptoms of AMD are formation of drusen and yellow pigmentation. These lesions are identified by manual inspection of fundus images by the ophthalmologists. It is a time consuming, tiresome process, and hence an automated diagnosis of AMD screening tool can aid clinicians in their diagnosis significantly. This study proposes an automated dry AMD detection system using various entropies (Shannon, Kapur, Renyi and Yager), Higher Order Spectra (HOS) bispectra features, Fractional Dimension (FD), and Gabor wavelet features extracted from greyscale fundus images. The features are ranked using t-test, Kullback-Lieber Divergence (KLD), Chernoff Bound and Bhattacharyya Distance (CBBD), Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve-based and Wilcoxon ranking methods in order to select optimum features and classified into normal and AMD classes using Naive Bayes (NB), k-Nearest Neighbour (k-NN), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), Decision Tree (DT) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using private (Kasturba Medical Hospital, Manipal, India), Automated Retinal Image Analysis (ARIA) and STructured Analysis of the Retina (STARE) datasets. The proposed system yielded the highest average classification accuracies of 90.19%, 95.07% and 95% with 42, 54 and 38 optimal ranked features using SVM classifier for private, ARIA and STARE datasets respectively. This automated AMD detection system can be used for mass fundus image screening and aid clinicians by making better use of their expertise on selected images that require further examination. PMID:25127409

  4. Evolution of Coral Pigments Recreated

    E-print Network

    Chang, Belinda

    Evolution of Coral Pigments Recreated Juan A. Ugalde,1,3 Belinda S. W. Chang,4 Mikhail V. Matz1 superfamily (2) may therefore reflect convergent evolution of mo- lecular complexity. To examine this issue star coral Montastraea cavernosa. This coral possesses several genes coding for fluorescent GFP

  5. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178...Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions...listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact...

  6. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178...Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions...listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178...Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions...listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178...Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions...listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact...

  9. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178...Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions...listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact...

  10. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  12. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  13. Modeling Pigmented Materials for Realistic Image Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Gary

    Modeling Pigmented Materials for Realistic Image Synthesis CHET S. HAASE and GARY W. MEYER University of Oregon This article discusses and applies the Kuhelka Munk theory of pigment mixing to computer]xing arc discussed and are shown to be insufficient for pigmented materials. The Kubclka Munk theory

  14. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  15. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  16. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  17. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  18. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  19. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  20. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  1. Developmental Integration of Feather Growth and Pigmentation

    E-print Network

    Badyaev, Alex

    Developmental Integration of Feather Growth and Pigmentation and its Implications for the Evolution by coordinated pigmentation of thousands of growing feathers that vary in shape and size. Although the functional, specifically, the rules that link feather growth to pigment uptake and synthesis. Here, we combine biochemical

  2. Clinicopathologic correlate of a fresh eyelid pigment implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, D.T.; Folberg, R.; Moore, K.

    1985-10-01

    An eyelid with freshly applied black eyeliner pigment was examined histologically. X-ray microanalysis of the pigment suspension from the manufacturer's vial indicated that its composition was 98% iron and 2% titanium. Transmission electron microscopic examination disclosed that particles were in the extracellular matrix; intracellular particles were not seen. By light microscopy, implant material was detected in various levels of the dermis and was found in dermal lymphatics as well as within and surrounding a hair follicle. This study suggests that systemic exposure to the implant material is possible and offers explanations for permanent eyelash loss, which the authors have seen following this procedure.

  3. The ascidian pigmented sensory organs: structures and developmental programs.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R; Racioppi, C; Pezzotti, M R; Branno, M; Locascio, A; Ristoratore, F; Spagnuolo, A

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances on ascidian pigment sensory organ development and function represent a fascinating platform to get insight on the basic programs of chordate eye formation. This review aims to summarize current knowledge, at the structural and molecular levels, on the two main building blocks of ascidian light sensory organ, i.e. pigment cells and photoreceptor cells. The unique features of these structures (e.g., simplicity and well characterized cell lineage) are indeed making it possible to dissect the developmental programs at single cell resolution and will soon provide a panel of molecular tools to be exploited for a deep developmental and comparative-evolutionary analysis. PMID:25382437

  4. Prevention of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Simon Chi Yan; Chan, Clement Wai Nang

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Although effective treatment modalities such as anti-VEGF treatment have been developed for neovascular AMD, there is still no effective treatment for geographical atrophy, and therefore the most cost-effective management of AMD is to start with prevention. This review looks at current evidence on preventive measures targeted at AMD. Modalities reviewed include (1) nutritional supplements such as the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formula, lutein and zeaxanthin, omega-3 fatty acid, and berry extracts, (2) lifestyle modifications, including smoking and body-mass-index, and (3) filtering sunlight, i.e. sunglasses and blue-blocking intraocular lenses. In summary, the only proven effective preventive measures are stopping smoking and the AREDS formula. PMID:20862519

  5. Optical coherence tomography imaging of macular oedema

    PubMed Central

    Trichonas, George; Kaiser, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Macular oedema (ME) occurs in a wide variety of pathological conditions and accounts for different degrees of vision loss. Early detection of ME is therefore critical for diagnosis and therapeutic management. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-contact, diagnostic method that uses infrared light, which allows the analysis of the retinal structure by means of high-resolution tomographic cross sections. The identification, localisation, quantification and long-term follow-up of fluid collections are the most important capabilities of OCT. Since the introduction of OCT in clinical practice, it has become an invaluable diagnostic tool and different patterns of ME have been reported. The purpose of this manuscript is to review OCT profiles of ME according to the aetiology and describe what has been reported regarding intraretinal features in vivo. PMID:24934220

  6. Thylakoid membrane biogenesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 137+. II. Cell-cycle variations in the synthesis and assembly of pigment

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Synthesis of the chlorophyll and the major carotenoid pigments and their assembly into thylakoid membrane have been studied throughout the 12-h light/12-h dark vegetative cell cycle of synchronous Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 137+ (wild-type). Pulse exposure of cells to radioactive acetate under conditions in which labeling accurately reflects lipogenesis, followed by cellular fractionation to purify thylakoid membrane, allowed direct analysis of the pigment synthesis and assembly attendant to thylakoid biogenesis. All pigments are synthesized and assembled into thylakoids continuously, but differentially, with respect to cell-cycle time. Highest synthesis and assembly rates are confined to the photoperiod (mid-to-late G1) and support chlorophyll and carotenoid accretion before M-phase. The lower levels at which these processes take place during the dark period (S, M, and early-to- mid G1) have been ascribed to pigment turnover. Within this general periodic pattern, pigment synthesis and assembly occur in a "multi- step" manner, i.e., by a temporally-ordered, stepwise integration of the various pigments into the thylakoid membrane matrix. The cell-cycle kinetics of pigment assembly at the subcellular level mirror the kinetics of pigment synthesis at the cellular level, indicating that pigment synthesis not only provides chlorophyll and carotenoid for thylakoid biogenesis but may also serve as a critical rate-determinant to pigment assembly. PMID:7096445

  7. The Minnesota Grading System Using Fundus Autofluorescence of Eye Bank Eyes: A Correlation To Age-Related Macular Degeneration (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Timothy W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To establish a grading system of eye bank eyes using fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and identify a methodology that correlates FAF to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with clinical correlation to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). Methods Two hundred sixty-two eye bank eyes were evaluated using a standardized analysis of FAF. Measurements were taken with the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO). First, high-resolution, digital, stereoscopic, color images were obtained and graded according to AREDS criteria. With the neurosensory retina removed, mean FAF values were obtained from cSLO images using software analysis that excludes areas of atrophy and other artifact, generating an FAF value from a grading template. Age and AMD grade were compared to FAF values. An internal fluorescence reference standard was tested. Results Standardization of the cSLO machine demonstrated that reliable data could be acquired after a 1-hour warm-up. Images obtained prior to 1 hour had falsely elevated levels of FAF. In this initial analysis, there was no statistical correlation of age to mean FAF. There was a statistically significant decrease in FAF from AREDS grade 1, 2 to 3, 4 (P < .0001). An internal fluorescent standard may serve as a quantitative reference. Conclusions The Minnesota Grading System (MGS) of FAF (MGS-FAF) establishes a standardized methodology for grading eye bank tissue to quantify FAF compounds in the retinal pigment epithelium and correlate these findings to the AREDS. Future studies could then correlate specific FAF to the aging process, histopathology AMD phenotypes, and other maculopathies, as well as to analyze the biochemistry of autofluorescent fluorophores. PMID:19277247

  8. Effect of curcumin on aging retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Wu, Yan; Meng, Yi-Fang; Wang, Jin-Yu; Xu, Ming; Tao, Jian-Jun; Lu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is now one of the leading causes of blindness in the elderly population. The antioxidative effects of curcumin on aging retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are still unclear. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate the effects of curcumin on aging RPE cells. A pulsed H2O2 exposure aging model was adopted. Aging RPE cells were treated with curcumin 20 µM, 40 µM, and 80 µM. Apoptosis of RPE cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. The intracellular reactive oxygen species concentration was detected using a specific probe and apoptosis-associated proteins were detected by Western blot. Expression of oxidative biomarkers, including superoxide dismutase, maleic dialdehyde, and glutathione, was detected commercially available assay kits. Compared with normal cells, lower cell viability, higher apoptosis rates, and more severe oxidation status were identified in the aging RPE cell model. Curcumin improved cell viability and decreased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Further, curcumin had a significant influence on expression of apoptosis-associated proteins and oxidative stress biomarkers. In conclusion, treatment with curcumin was able to regulate proliferation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in aging RPE cells. Accordingly, application of curcumin may be a novel strategy to protect against age-related change in AMD. PMID:26445530

  9. Lysosomes: Regulators of autophagy in the retinal pigmented epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Debasish; Valapala, Mallika; Shang, Peng; Hose, Stacey; Grebe, Rhonda; Lutty, Gerard A; Zigler, J Samuel; Kaarniranta, Kai; Handa, James T

    2016-03-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is critically important to retinal homeostasis, in part due to its very active processes of phagocytosis and autophagy. Both of these processes depend upon the normal functioning of lysosomes, organelles which must fuse with (auto)phagosomes to deliver the hydrolases that effect degradation of cargo. It has become clear that signaling through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), is very important in the regulation of lysosomal function. This signaling pathway is becoming a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), where lysosomal function is defective. In addition, our laboratory has been studying animal models in which the gene (Cryba1) for ?A3/A1-crystallin is deficient. These animals exhibit impaired lysosomal clearance in the RPE and pathological signs that are similar to some of those seen in AMD patients. The data demonstrate that ?A3/A1-crystallin localizes to lysosomes in the RPE and that it is a binding partner of V-ATPase, the proton pump that acidifies the lysosomal lumen. This suggests that ?A3/A1-crystallin may also be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in AMD. In this review, we focus on effector molecules that impact the lysosomal-autophagic pathway in RPE cells. PMID:26321509

  10. Kinetics of Lipofuscin Formation in Aging Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-03-01

    Lipofuscin is a deposit that is formed over time by aggregation and clustering of incompletely degraded membrane material in various types of cells. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat and is known to be present in age- related macular dgeneration (AMD), Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in adults. The degradation of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) through accumulation of lipsofuscin is considered a significant pathogenic factor in the development of AMD. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results with the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration.

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Souied, Eric H; Aslam, Tariq; Garcia-Layana, Alfredo; Holz, Frank G; Leys, Anita; Silva, Rufino; Delcourt, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Against a background of considerable epidemiological and other evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the negative results of the Age-Related Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) were unexpected. The possibility that the design, setting, intake or subjects of AREDS2 may not have permitted the prophylactic potential of omega-3 to be adequately demonstrated is considered. Epidemiological studies had indicated potential preventative effects of omega-3, and an earlier randomised prospective study (NAT2) showed that patients who achieved high red blood cell membrane EPA/DHA (eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid) levels were significantly protected against AMD compared with those with permanently low EPA/DHA levels. Various methodological differences between these studies are considered. NAT2 included a true placebo group, whereas control subjects in AREDS2 received a nutritional formula already found to be effective in AREDS1, but no placebo for DHA/EPA supplementation. Differences in the handling of non-compliant subjects and the formulation of the test formulations are considered. Given these considerations, and other lines of evidence from laboratory and clinical studies, closing the chapter on omega-3 in AMD prevention may be premature. PMID:26610051

  12. Nutritional Risk Factors for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Lebriz; Lechanteur, Yara T.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Kirchhof, Bernd; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of nutritional factors, serum lipids, and lipoproteins in late age-related macular degeneration (late AMD). Methods. Intake of red meat, fruit, fish, vegetables, and alcohol, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI) were ascertained questionnaire-based in 1147 late AMD cases and 1773 controls from the European Genetic Database. Serum levels of lipids and lipoproteins were determined. The relationship between nutritional factors and late AMD was assessed using logistic regression. Based on multivariate analysis, area-under-the-curve (AUC) was calculated by receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC). Results. In a multivariate analysis, besides age and smoking, obesity (odds ratio (OR): 1.44, P = 0.014) and red meat intake (daily: OR: 2.34, P = 8.22 × 10?6; 2–6x/week: OR: 1.67, P = 7.98 × 10?5) were identified as risk factors for developing late AMD. Fruit intake showed a protective effect (daily: OR: 0.52, P = 0.005; 2–6x/week: OR: 0.58, P = 0.035). Serum lipid and lipoprotein levels showed no significant association with late AMD. ROC for nutritional factors, smoking, age, and BMI revealed an AUC of 0.781. Conclusion. Red meat intake and obesity were independently associated with increased risk for late AMD, whereas fruit intake was protective. A better understanding of nutritional risk factors is necessary for the prevention of AMD. PMID:25101280

  13. Perceptual learning in patients with macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Tina; Rosengarth, Katharina; Schmalhofer, Carolin; Goldhacker, Markus; Brandl-Rühle, Sabine; Greenlee, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or hereditary macular dystrophies (JMD) rely on an efficient use of their peripheral visual field. We trained eight AMD and five JMD patients to perform a texture-discrimination task (TDT) at their preferred retinal locus (PRL) used for fixation. Six training sessions of approximately one hour duration were conducted over a period of approximately 3 weeks. Before, during and after training twelve patients and twelve age-matched controls (the data from two controls had to be discarded later) took part in three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions to assess training-related changes in the BOLD response in early visual cortex. Patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant decrease (p = 0.001) in the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the presentation of the texture target on background and the visual mask, and in a significant location specific effect of the PRL with respect to hit rate (p = 0.014). The following trends were observed: (i) improvement in Vernier acuity for an eccentric line-bisection task; (ii) positive correlation between the development of BOLD signals in early visual cortex and initial fixation stability (r = 0.531); (iii) positive correlation between the increase in task performance and initial fixation stability (r = 0.730). The first two trends were non-significant, whereas the third trend was significant at p = 0.014, Bonferroni corrected. Consequently, our exploratory study suggests that training on the TDT can enhance eccentric vision in patients with central vision loss. This enhancement is accompanied by a modest alteration in the BOLD response in early visual cortex. PMID:25368597

  14. Perceptual learning in patients with macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Plank, Tina; Rosengarth, Katharina; Schmalhofer, Carolin; Goldhacker, Markus; Brandl-Rühle, Sabine; Greenlee, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or hereditary macular dystrophies (JMD) rely on an efficient use of their peripheral visual field. We trained eight AMD and five JMD patients to perform a texture-discrimination task (TDT) at their preferred retinal locus (PRL) used for fixation. Six training sessions of approximately one hour duration were conducted over a period of approximately 3 weeks. Before, during and after training twelve patients and twelve age-matched controls (the data from two controls had to be discarded later) took part in three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions to assess training-related changes in the BOLD response in early visual cortex. Patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant decrease (p = 0.001) in the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the presentation of the texture target on background and the visual mask, and in a significant location specific effect of the PRL with respect to hit rate (p = 0.014). The following trends were observed: (i) improvement in Vernier acuity for an eccentric line-bisection task; (ii) positive correlation between the development of BOLD signals in early visual cortex and initial fixation stability (r = 0.531); (iii) positive correlation between the increase in task performance and initial fixation stability (r = 0.730). The first two trends were non-significant, whereas the third trend was significant at p = 0.014, Bonferroni corrected. Consequently, our exploratory study suggests that training on the TDT can enhance eccentric vision in patients with central vision loss. This enhancement is accompanied by a modest alteration in the BOLD response in early visual cortex. PMID:25368597

  15. Changes in spectral properties and composition of lipofuscin fluorophores from human-retinal-pigment epithelium with age and pathology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Tatiana B; Yakovleva, Marina A; Arbukhanova, Patimat M; Borzenok, Sergey A; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Popov, Igor A; Nikolaev, Evgeny N; Ostrovsky, Mikhail A

    2015-02-01

    Fundus autofluorescence mostly originates from bisretinoid fluorophores in lipofuscin granules, which accumulate in retinal-pigment-epithelium cells with age. The dynamics of accumulation, photo-oxidation, and photodegradation of bisretinoids during aging or in the presence of pathology have been insufficiently investigated. Changes in spectral properties and composition of human lipofuscin-granule fluorophores with age and pathology have now been investigated by a high-performance liquid chromatography method using spectrophotometric and fluorescent detectors connected in series. It was found that: (i) N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) fluorescence intensity is not predominant in the chloroform extract of human-cadaver-eye retinal pigment epithelium studied; bisretinoid photo-oxidation and photodegradation products have much higher fluorescent properties; (ii) the relative emission maximum in the fluorescence spectrum of suspended retinal-pigment-epithelium cells obtained from an individual human-cadaver eye without pathology is irrespective of donor age and falls within the range 575?±?15 nm; in two cadaver eyes with signs of age-related macular degeneration, emission maxima were shifted by 23-36 nm towards the shortwave region; and (iii) the ratio of bisretinoid photo-oxidation and photodegradation products to unoxidized bisretinoids in the chloroform extract of cadaver-eye retinal pigment epithelium increases with donor age, from 0.69?±?0.03 to 1.32?±?0.04. The differences in fluorescence properties between chloroform extracts obtained from cadaver eyes with and without signs of age-related macular degeneration could be used to increase the potential of fundus autofluorescence imaging as a noninvasive diagnostic method. PMID:25471291

  16. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schütze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2010-11-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures' tissue-inherent polarization properties.

  17. Segmentation and quantification of retinal lesions in age-related macular degeneration using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Bernhard; Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Sattmann, Harald; Schütze, Christopher; Schlanitz, Ferdinand; Ahlers, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2011-01-01

    We present polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for quantitative assessment of retinal pathologies in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). On the basis of the polarization scrambling characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium, novel segmentation algorithms were developed that allow one to segment pathologic features such as drusen and atrophic zones in dry AMD as well as to determine their dimensions. Results from measurements in the eyes of AMD patients prove the ability of PS-OCT for quantitative imaging based on the retinal features polarizing properties. Repeatability measurements were performed in retinas diagnosed with drusen and geographic atrophy in order to evaluate the performance of the described methods. PS-OCT appears as a promising imaging modality for three-dimensional retinal imaging and ranging with additional contrast based on the structures’ tissue-inherent polarization properties. PMID:21198152

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for Newly Diagnosed Neovascular Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Mrinalini, Tavag; Lee, Paul P.; Hutton, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the most cost-effective treatment for patients with newly diagnosed neovascular macular degeneration: monthly or as-needed bevacizumab injections, or monthly or as-needed ranibizumab injections. Design Cost effectiveness analysis Participants Hypothetical cohort of 80-year-old patients with newly-diagnosed neovascular macular degeneration. Methods Using a mathematical model with a 20-year time horizon, we compared the incremental cost-effectiveness of treating a hypothetical cohort of 80-year-old patients with newly diagnosed neovascular macular degeneration using monthly bevacizumab, as-needed bevacizumab, monthly ranibizumab, or as-needed ranibizumab. Data came from the Comparison of Age-related macular degeneration Treatment Trial (CATT), the Medicare Fee Schedule, and the medical literature. Main Outcome Measures Costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental costs per QALY gained. Results Compared with as-needed bevacizumab, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of monthly bevacizumab is $242 357/QALY. Monthly ranibizumab gains an additional 0.02 QALYs versus monthly bevacizumab at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of more than $10 million/QALY. As-needed ranibizumab was dominated by monthly bevacizumab, meaning it was more costly and less effective. In sensitivity analyses assuming a willingness to pay of $100 000/QALY, the annual risk of serious vascular events would have to be at least 2.5 times higher with bevacizumab than that observed in the CATT trial for as-needed ranibizumab to have an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of <$100 000/QALY. In another sensitivity analysis, even if every patient receiving bevacizumab experienced declining vision by one category (e.g., from 20/25–20/40 to 20/50–20/80) after 2 years but every patient receiving ranibizumab retained their vision level, as-needed ranibizumab would have an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $97 340/QALY. Conclusion Even after considering the potential for differences in risks of serious adverse events and therapeutic effectiveness, bevacizumab confers considerably greater value than ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular macular degeneration. PMID:24405740

  19. Effects of Bevacizumab on Bcl-2 Expression and Apoptosis in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sukjin; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Na Rae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of bevacizumab on expression of B-cell leukemia/lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under oxidative stress conditions. Methods RPE cells were treated with H2O2 (0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 µM) and bevacizumab at or above the doses normally used in clinical practice (0, 0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL). Cell apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. The expression of Bcl-2 mRNA was determined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Under low oxidative stress conditions (H2O2 100 µM), cell apoptosis was not significantly different at any concentration of bevacizumab, but Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased with increasing concentration of bevacizumab (0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL). Under moderate oxidative stress conditions (H2O2 200 µM), Bcl-2 mRNA expression decreased with increasing concentration of bevacizumab (0.33, 0.67, 1.33, and 2.67 mg/mL), but cell apoptosis increased only at 2.67 mg/mL of bevacizumab. Under high oxidative stress (300 µM) conditions, cell apoptosis increased at high concentrations of bevacizumab (1.33 and 2.67 mg/mL), but it did not correlate with Bcl-2 expression. Conclusions Withdrawal of vascular endothelial growth factor can lead to RPE cell apoptosis and influences the expression of anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-2 under oxidative stress conditions. Since oxidative stress levels of each patient are unknown, repeated injections of intravitreal bevacizumab, as in eyes with age-related macular degeneration, might influence RPE cell survival. PMID:26635460

  20. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose determined (0.29 mSv) is comparable to diagnostic procedures involving the head, such as an x-ray or CT scan. Thus, the computational assessment performed indicates that a previously established therapeutic dose can be delivered effectively to the macula with IRay(TM) without the potential for secondary complications.

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Red Pigment Produced by Halolactibacillus alkaliphilus MSRD1--an Isolate from Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Murugan; Renugadevi, B; Brammavidhya, S; Iyapparaj, Palanisamy; Anantharaman, Perumal

    2015-05-01

    The present study was carried out with the aim to isolate an antibacterial pigment from seaweed-associated bacterium. The bacterium was identified as Halolactibacillus alkaliphilus MSRD1 by 16S rRNA sequencing. The isolated bacterium was cultured in 50% Luria-Bertani seawater broth (LB-SWB) with 1% glycerol. The pigment was extracted with 99% ethanol and analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy at 490 nm. The candidate bacterium was optimized with various NaCl concentrations from 5 to 20%. The results inferred that the bacterium produce maximum pigment at 5% NaCl level. The candidate bacterium H. alkaliphilus MSRD1 was found to be producing the maximum pigment during the 120-h incubation. The protein content of the pigment was found to be maximum of 72% at the end of the 120-h incubation. The extracted pigment was stable up to 80 °C, pink at acidic pH (1 to 5) and orange at basic pH (8 to 12). The isolated pigment was fractionated by silica gel column chromatography. Fractionated pigment was characterized by TLC, FT-IR, and SDS-PAGE. In the antibacterial context, the pigment was highly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi with the zone of inhibition 16 and 14 mm, respectively. According to SDS-PAGE, the size of the pigment was approximately 80 kDa. The H. alkaliphilus MSRD1 has high capacity to produce the pigment with antibacterial properties. This could be effectively used in the future. PMID:25795062

  2. Tryptophan in human hair: correlation with pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bertazzo, A; Biasiolo, M; Costa, C V; Cardin de Stefani, E; Allegri, G

    2000-08-01

    The distribution of tryptophan content in human hair of various colours was evaluated, in order to study the accumulation of this amino acid, precursor of serotonin, melatonin and niacin, in hair and the influence on hair pigmentation. Pigmentation is an important factor in determining drug incorporation into hair. Results from 1211 samples of hair from healthy subjects (577 men and 634 women) show that tryptophan levels are significantly higher in males (37.83 +/- 3.45 microg/g dry hair) than in females (26.62 +/- 2.40 microg/g hair). Besides sex, age also influences the distribution of tryptophan in human hair, the highest levels being found in both sexes in the first few years of life, probably due to the influence of milk, and in aging subjects in the groups of 61-80 and > 80 years. In order to investigate the influence of hair colour, hair samples were subdivided according to colour into blond, dark blond, red, light brown, brown, black, grey and white. The hair contents of tryptophan in both sexes was higher in brown and black hair than in blond hair, but in grey and white hair concentrations were the highest, demonstrating that tryptophan accumulates among hair fibres with age. Grouping subjects by age in relation to hair colour, we observed that at ages 1-5 and 6-12 years, colour did not influence tryptophan contents, but at ages 13-19 and 20-40 years tryptophan content increased significantly from blond to brown at 13-19 years and from blond to black at 20-40 years in both sexes. Therefore, variations in tryptophan levels of human hair appear to be correlated with differences in hair colour in both sexes. Tryptophan also accumulates in hair during keratinization, as shown by the presence of high levels of this amino acid in grey and white hair. PMID:11132729

  3. Dietary antioxidants prevent age-related retinal pigment epithelium actin damage and blindness in mice lacking ?v?5 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chia-Chia; Nandrot, Emeline F.; Dun, Ying; Finnemann, Silvia C.

    2011-01-01

    In the aging human eye, oxidative damage and accumulation of pro-oxidant lysosomal lipofuscin cause functional decline of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which contributes to age-related macular degeneration. In mice with an RPE-specific phagocytosis defect due to lack of ?v?5 integrin receptors, RPE accumulation of lipofuscin suggests that the age-related blindness we previously described in this model may also result from oxidative stress. Cellular and molecular targets of oxidative stress in the eye remain poorly understood. Here we identify actin among 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) adducts formed specifically in ?5?/? RPE but not neural retina with age. HNE modification directly correlated with loss of resistance of actin to detergent extraction, suggesting cytoskeletal damage in aging RPE. Dietary enrichment with natural antioxidants grapes or marigold extract containing macular pigments lutein/zeaxanthin was sufficient to prevent HNE-adduct formation, actin solubility, lipofuscin accumulation, and age-related cone and rod photoreceptor dysfunction in ?5?/? mice. Acute generation of HNE-adducts directly destabilized actin but not tubulin cytoskeletal elements of RPE cells. These findings identify destabilization of the actin cytoskeleton as a consequence of physiological, sublethal oxidative burden of RPE cells in vivo that is associated with age-related blindness and that can be prevented by consuming an antioxidant-rich diet. PMID:22178979

  4. Selective Cone Photoreceptor Injury in Acute Macular Neuroretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Sean O.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Weinberg, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinal structural and functional abnormalities in a patient with Acute Macular Neuroretinopathy (AMN). Methods An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to image the photoreceptor mosaic and assess rod and cone structure. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to examine retinal lamination. Microperimetry was used to assess function across the macula. Results Microperimetry showed reduced function of localized areas within retinal lesions corresponding to subjective scotomas. SD-OCT imaging revealed attenuation of two outer retinal bands typically thought to reflect photoreceptor structure. AOSLO images of the photoreceptor mosaic revealed a heterogeneous presentation within these lesions. There were areas containing non-waveguiding cones and other areas of decreased cone density where the remaining rods had expanded to fill in the vacant space. Within these lesions, cone densities were shown to be significantly lower than eccentricity matched areas of normal retina, as well as accepted histological measurements. A 6-month follow up revealed no change in rod or cone structure. Conclusions Imaging of AMN using an AOSLO shows a preferential disruption of cone photoreceptor structure within the region of decreased retinal sensitivity (as measured by microperimetry). AO-based imaging tools provide a noninvasive way to assess photoreceptor structure at a level of detail that is not resolved by use of conventional SD-OCT or other clinical measures. PMID:23615345

  5. Interocular Symmetry in Macular Choroidal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Haddad, Christiane; El Chaar, Lama; Noureddin, Baha'

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report interocular differences in choroidal thickness in children using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and correlate findings with biometric data. Methods. This observational cross-sectional study included 91 (182 eyes) healthy children aged 6 to 17 years with no ocular abnormality except refractive error. After a comprehensive eye exam and axial length measurement, high definition macular scans were performed using SD-OCT. Two observers manually measured the choroidal thickness at the foveal center and at 1500?µm nasally, temporally, inferiorly, and superiorly. Interocular differences were computed; correlations with age, gender, refractive error, and axial length were performed. Results. Mean age was 10.40 ± 3.17 years; mean axial length and refractive error values were similar between fellow eyes. There was excellent correlation between the two observers' measurements. No significant interocular differences were observed at any location. There was only a trend for right eyes to have higher values in all thicknesses, except the superior thickness. Most of the choroidal thickness measurements correlated positively with spherical equivalent but not with axial length, age, or gender. Conclusion. Choroidal thickness measurements in children as performed using SD-OCT revealed a high level of interobserver agreement and consistent interocular symmetry. Values correlated positively with spherical equivalent refraction. PMID:25525509

  6. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration among the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Zarghami, Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Rajaee, Neda; Rasoulinejad, Seyed Elahe; Mikaniki, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in elderly population in the developing countries. Previous epidemiological studies revealed various potential modifiable risk factors for this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of AMD among elderly living in Babol, North of Iran. Methods: The study population of this cross-sectional study came from the Amirkola Health and Ageing Project (AHAP), the first comprehensive cohort study of the health of people aged 60 years and over in Amirkola, North of Iran. The prevalence of AMD was estimated and its risk was determined using logistic regression analysis (LRA) with regard to variables such as smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Results: Five hundred and five participants with mean age of 71.55±5.9 (ranged 60-89) years entered the study. The prevalence of AMD was 17.6%. There was a significant association between AMD and smoking (P<0.001) but no association was seen with AMD and age, level of education, history of hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Multiple LRAs revealed that smoking increased AMD by odds ratio of 5.03 (95% confidence interval 2.47-10.23 p<0.001) as compared to nonsmokers Conclusion: According to our findings, the prevalence of AMD was relatively high and smoking increased the risk of AMD in the elderly population.

  7. Cistoid macular edema as first manifestation of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Cabrillo-Estevez, Lucia; de Juan-Marcos, Lourdes; Kyriakou, Danai; Hernández-Galilea, Emiliano

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a case of cystoid macular edema (CME) as a rare first manifestation of ocular sarcoidosis after cataract surgery. A 60-year-old male developed a CME following uneventful phacoemulsification cataract extraction on his left eye. It resolved with conventional medical therapy. One year later the patient was diagnosed with bilateral CME. Oral corticosteroid therapy produced a significant regression. His medical and ocular histories were unremarkable and all tests for etiological diagnosis were negative. There were inflammation recurrences in his left eye, which were also treated with steroids. Optical coherence tomography showed complete resolution of foveal thickening without improvement in vision. Four years later, the patient presented with CME in both eyes. The laboratory tests included high angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and a gallium scan which were also consistent with sarcoidosis. Azathioprine was needed for management of ocular involvement, but it was withheld due to side-effects. At the present time, the CME is controlled with low-dose corticoids. Ocular involvement in sarcoidosis occurs in 20-50 % of patients. CME is not often the initial manifestation of the disease, but ocular sarcoidosis may present with a wide variety of ocular symptoms in all parts of the eye. Therefore, sarcoidosis should be kept in mind when evaluating a patient with ocular inflammation. PMID:24322273

  8. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  9. [Acute multifocal placoid pigment epiteliopathy].

    PubMed

    Samoil?, O; C?lug?ru, D; C?lug?ru, M

    2007-01-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy is a fairly rare disease with unknown etiology and pathogenesis, possibly a focal response to a systemic inflammatory process. We present the case of a young patient who developed bilateral placoid retinal lesions, in different stages of evolution - cicatriceal lesions of the right eye and mixed cicatriceal and active lesions of the left eye. Investigations showed old immunity to cytomegalovirus and toxoplasma. Fluorescein angiography showed the typical fluorescein pattern (hypoflurecence in early phases and hyperfluorescence in late phases). The case is unique because of the atypical findings: choroidal neovascularization in the left eye (rarely occurs in acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy but more commonly in serpiginous choroidopathy), recurrences, asymmetry between the two eyes (at the time of investigations visual acuity is markedly depressed in the right eye - 1/10 and the left macula is threatened by the choroidal neovascularization). PMID:18543673

  10. Functionalization of linen/cotton pigment prints using inorganic nano structure materials.

    PubMed

    Ibahim, N A; Eid, B M; Abd El-Aziz, E; Abou Elmaaty, T M

    2013-09-12

    The present work opens up a novel strategy for the development of new multifunctional cellulosic pigment prints. The developed process aims at modifying the solvent-free pigment printing formulations via inclusion of certain inorganic nano materials namely silver (Ag-NPs), zinc oxide (ZnO-NPs), zirconium oxide (ZrO?-NPs) or titanium dioxide (TiO?-NPs) at 20 g/kg paste followed by screen printing and microwave fixation. The imparted functional properties together with the depth of the obtained prints are governed by the type of nano additives, type of binder and the pigment colorant. The imparted antibacterial and/or UV protection properties to the pigment prints were retained with an acceptable level (>70%) of durability even after 20 washing cycles. The presence of nano materials on the surface of the obtained pigment prints was confirmed using SEM images and EDX spectra. PMID:23911482

  11. Reduced macular function in ABCA4 carriers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study retinal function and morphology in ABCA4 carriers to investigate if ABCA4 carriership is associated with any functional or morphological changes and, if so, to explore whether certain mutations may be associated with particularly severe alterations. Methods Eighteen subjects were recruited by means of being the parents of 10 teenagers/young adults with genetically confirmed ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations. The teenagers/young adults are well-known patients and have been followed in our clinic for many years. The eighteen subjects underwent careful ophthalmological examinations, including fundus photography and autofluorescence imaging, Goldmann perimetry, optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field electroretinography (ffERG), multifocal electroretinography (mERG), and ABCA4 gene sequencing. The ffERG and mERG results were compared with those of healthy controls. Results All subjects carried at least one ABCA4 mutation. Two subjects were compound heterozygous and therefore were excluded from the group-wise statistical analysis. Thirteen different ABCA4 mutations were found. C.2894 A>G (5/18) and c.768 G>T (4/18) were most common. Fourteen of 16 ABCA4 carriers demonstrated significantly altered mERG parameters (reduced amplitudes and/or delayed implicit times (ITs)) compared to normal values. In addition, the two subjects with compound heterozygous ABCA4 mutations had altered mERG parameters. A statistical comparison to the control group showed significantly reduced amplitudes and delayed ITs; p?0.003 for all mERG parameters. FfERG parameters were altered in two ABCA4 carriers and one of the subjects with compound heterozygous ABCA4 mutations (reduced amplitude and delayed IT for the 30 Hz flicker ERG). No significant alterations were found for the whole group of ABCA4 carriers compared to the ffERG control group. Fundus photographs showed subtle to extensive pigmentary changes in several ABCA4 carriers. Conclusions In this study, ABCA4 carriers demonstrated reduced macular function measured by mERG along with none to subtle and even extensive morphological retinal changes. The c.768 G>T, c.5461–10T>C, and c.319 C>T mutations were associated with the most deviant ERGs, including both significant reduction of mERG amplitudes and prolongation of mERG ITs, as well as with reduced amplitude or delayed IT for the 30 Hz flicker ffERG in a few cases. They may therefore be considered serious mutations. The c.5917delG and c.4469 G>A mutations were associated with milder or no macular alteration. Long-term follow-up of these and other ABCA4 carriers may be of importance to elucidate the role of ABCA4 mutations in age-related macular degeneration. Moreover, improved knowledge of separate ABCA4 mutations may help us to better understand their role in ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations. PMID:26261413

  12. SPECIFIC ROLE OF LYMPHATIC MARKER PODOPLANIN IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldo, S.; Garcia, M.; Zhang, H.; Chen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small transmembrane glycoprotein widely known to be a marker for lymphatic endothelial cells. In this study, we identify a novel localization of podoplanin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cellular monolayer critically involved in the visual process. Using a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing approach, we have also demonstrated, for the first time, that podoplanin depletion in human RPE cells leads to a marked reduction of cell aggregates and tight junctions. Additionally, the podoplanin-depleted cells also exhibit a significantly lower rate of proliferation. These data together indicate that podoplanin plays a crucial role in RPE cell functions. Further investigation on this factor may reveal novel mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for RPE-related eye diseases, such as proliferative retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:21226415

  13. MECHANISMS FOR COUNTERING OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DAMAGE IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; O’Mealey, Gary B.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence supports that chronic oxidative stress is a primary contributing factor to numerous retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eyes obtained postmortem from AMD patients have extensive free radical damage to the proteins, lipids, DNA, and mitochondria of their retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In addition, several mouse models of chronic oxidative stress develop many of the pathological hallmarks of AMD. However, the extent to which oxidative stress is an etiologic component versus its involvement in disease progression remains a major unanswered question. Further, whether the primary target of oxidative stress and damage is photoreceptors or RPE cells, or both, is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the major functions of RPE cells with an emphasis on the oxidative challenges these cells encounter and the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms employed to neutralize the deleterious effects that such stresses can elicit if left unchecked. PMID:22878106

  14. Author's personal copy The macular degeneration-linked C1QTNF5 (S163) mutation causes

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Author's personal copy The macular degeneration-linked C1QTNF5 (S163) mutation causes higher Keywords: L-ORMD L-ORD Age-related macular degeneration Cellular adhesion CTRP5 C1QTNF5 a b s t r a c macular degeneration (L-ORMD). Here we also found that C1QTNF5 monomers can multimerize into a bouquet

  15. Extreme retinal remodeling triggered by light damage: implications for age related macular degeneration

    E-print Network

    Marc, Robert E.

    closely mimics late-stage atrophic age relared macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Sprague-Dawley (SD late stage atrophic age-related macular degenerations, it augurs poorly for simple molecularExtreme retinal remodeling triggered by light damage: implications for age related macular

  16. Retinal Image Classification for the Screening of Age-related Macular Degeneration

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Retinal Image Classification for the Screening of Age-related Macular Degeneration Mohd Hanafi Ahmad Hijazi, Frans Coenen and Yalin Zheng Abstract Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the most-mail: yzheng@liverpool.ac.uk #12;Hijazi et al. 1 Introduction Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD

  17. Residual abilities in age-related macular degeneration to process spatial frequencies during natural scene

    E-print Network

    Alleysson, David

    Residual abilities in age-related macular degeneration to process spatial frequencies during) Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by a central vision loss. We explored-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the first cause of central vision loss in the elderly population

  18. Data Mining Techniques for The Screening of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Data Mining Techniques for The Screening of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Mohd Hanafi Ahmad, Malaysia Abstract Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the primary cause of adult blindness. Currently-graph mining 1. Introduction Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blind- ness

  19. Image Classification for Age-related Macular Degeneration Screening using Hierarchical

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Image Classification for Age-related Macular Degeneration Screening using Hierarchical Image-hijazi,c.jiang,coenen,yalin.zheng}@liverpool.ac.uk Abstract. Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the most com- mon cause of adult blindness 1 Introduction Vision loss and blindness may be caused by various factors; Age-related Macular

  20. Effect of selective laser trabeculoplasty on macular thickness

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Mustafa; Durukan, Irfan; Koban, Yaran; Ceran, Basak Bastanci; Ayar, Orhan; Ekinci, Metin; Yilmazbas, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) on macular thickness change. Methods Forty eyes of 40 consecutive patients with uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma with medical treatment were included in this prospective study. SLT was performed to the inferior 180°, and macular thickness was measured. Data were collected before SLT, and 1 week and 1 month after SLT. Macular thickness evaluation was performed in five quadrants, the central 1 mm quadrant (fovea = F), the nasal 3 mm quadrant surrounding F (NQ), temporal quadrant, superior quadrant (SQ), and inferior quadrant (IQ). The preoperative and postoperative thicknesses were compared. Results There was an increase in macular thickness in the NQ, IQ, and SQ on the first week after SLT compared to preoperative measurements. On the other hand, there was no significant increase in the F and temporal quadrant. On the first month after SLT, thickness in the NQ, IQ, and SQ was back to preoperative measurements, and there was no significant change between the preoperative measurements in any quadrant. Conclusion There was no significant increase in macular thickness shortly after SLT in our study. PMID:26719665

  1. Characteristics of Fixational Eye Movements in People With Macular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Chung, Susana T. L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Fixation stability is known to be poor for people with macular disease and has been suggested as a contributing factor for the poor visual performance of these individuals. In this study, we examined the characteristics of the different components of fixational eye movements and determined the component that plays a major role in limiting fixation stability in people with macular disease. Methods. Sixteen observers with macular disease and 14 older adults with normal vision (control observers) monocularly fixated a small cross presented using a Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope, for trials of 30 seconds. The retinal image and the position of the cross on the retina were recorded digitally. Eye movements were extracted from the recorded videos at a sampling rate of 540 Hz using a cross-correlation technique. A velocity criterion of 8°/s was used to differentiate between slow drifts and microsaccades. Results. Observers with macular disease demonstrated higher fixation instability, larger amplitudes of slow drifts and microsaccades, and lower drift velocities, when compared with older adults with normal vision. The velocity and the rate of microsaccades were comparable between the two groups of observers. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the amplitude of microsaccades, and to a smaller extent, the amplitude of slow drifts, play a major role in limiting fixation stability. Conclusions. Fixation stability in people with macular disease is primarily limited by the amplitude of microsaccades, implying that rehabilitative strategies targeted at reducing the amplitude of microsaccades should improve fixation stability, and may lead to improved visual functions. PMID:25074769

  2. Nonneovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Michels, Stephan; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of several genetic variants associated with an increased risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has led to a completely new understanding of AMD. In addition to the known modifiable risk factors, genetic risk factors may also help to assess the risk to progress to nonneovascular AMD. Recently published primary studies have indicated that genetic risk analysis may be valuable in the selection of the currently available antioxidant therapy. So far, the best evidence for preventing progression to nonneovascular AMD comes from the Age-Related Eye Disease Studies (AREDS) I and II. These studies indicate that high doses of antioxidants can reduce the risk of progression to the advanced form of the disease. However, the recent evaluation of the addition of either lutein and zeaxanthin, or x03C9;-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, or both, to the established AREDS I formulation did not significantly reduce the risk of developing advanced AMD. There is clearly a large unmet medical need for new therapeutic options for nonneovascular AMD. The modulation of the complement cascade is - despite initially disappointing outcomes obtained with blocking complement factor 5 - currently the most promising approach to the treatment of nonneovascular AMD. PMID:26502209

  3. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  4. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations. PMID:22705444

  5. New Computer Simulations of Macular Neural Functioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Doshay, D.; Linton, S.; Parnas, B.; Montgomery, K.; Chimento, T.

    1994-01-01

    We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the functional significance of the three-dimensional (3-D) organization of gravity sensors. These sensors have a prototypic architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scaled-up, 3-D versions run on a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. A semi-automated method of reconstruction of neural tissue from serial sections studied in a transmission electron microscope has been developed to eliminate tedious conventional photography. The reconstructions use a mesh as a step in generating a neural surface for visualization. Two meshes are required to model calyx surfaces. The meshes are connected and the resulting prisms represent the cytoplasm and the bounding membranes. A finite volume analysis method is employed to simulate voltage changes along the calyx in response to synapse activation on the calyx or on calyceal processes. The finite volume method insures that charge is conserved at the calyx-process junction. These and other models indicate that efferent processes act as voltage followers, and that the morphology of some afferent processes affects their functioning. In a final application, morphological information is symbolically represented in three dimensions in a computer. The possible functioning of the connectivities is tested using mathematical interpretations of physiological parameters taken from the literature. Symbolic, 3-D simulations are in progress to probe the functional significance of the connectivities. This research is expected to advance computer-based studies of macular functioning and of synaptic plasticity.

  6. Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jack; Choudhary, Maria M; Schachat, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in individuals over the age of 50 years. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the hallmark of 'wet' or 'exudative' AMD, and is responsible for approximately 90% of cases of severe vision loss due to AMD. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key component in the development and progression of wet AMD. Since the approval of ranibizumab in 2006, VEGF inhibitors have rapidly altered the treatment and standard of care for wet AMD. Ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept are now the most widely used anti-VEGF agents for the treatment of wet AMD. This chapter discusses the pharmacologic properties, pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of these medications, as well as revisits landmark clinical trials that establish these drugs as gold standards in care. While these medications have greatly and positively altered the way we treat AMD, there are still many economic and therapeutic limitations with our current therapy regimens. There continue to be advancements and innovations in exploring alternative and new treatment modalities, as well as combining existing treatment options to improve efficacy, and reduce cost and patient burden. PMID:26501146

  7. NLRP3 Inflammasome: Activation and Regulation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jiangyuan; Liu, Ruozhou Tom; Cui, Jing Z.; Matsubara, Joanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Progression of AMD is characterized by an increase in the number and size of drusen, extracellular deposits, which accumulate between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane (BM) in outer retina. The major pathways associated with its pathogenesis include oxidative stress and inflammation in the early stages of AMD. Little is known about the interactions among these mechanisms that drive the transition from early to late stages of AMD, such as geographic atrophy (GA) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV). As part of the innate immune system, inflammasome activation has been identified in RPE cells and proposed to be a causal factor for RPE dysfunction and degeneration. Here, we will first review the classic model of inflammasome activation, then discuss the potentials of AMD-related factors to activate the inflammasome in both nonocular immune cells and RPE cells, and finally introduce several novel mechanisms for regulating the inflammasome activity. PMID:25698849

  8. Treatment of cystoid macular edema with the new-generation NSAID nepafenac 0.1%

    PubMed Central

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Akduman, Levent; Clever, Joseph A; Ober, Michael; Recchia, Franco M; Mieler, William F

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of nepafenac 0.1% for cystoid macular edema (CME). Methods: This was a multicenter retrospective review of 22 CME cases (20 patients) treated with nepafenac 0.1% (six with concomitant prednisolone acetate 1%) from December 2005 to April 2008: three acute pseudophakic CME cases, 13 chronic/recalcitrant pseudophakic CME cases, and six cases of uveitic CME. Pre- and post-treatment retinal thickness and visual acuity were reported. Results: Following treatment for six weeks to six months, six eyes with uveitic CME showed a mean retinal thickness improvement of 227 ± 168.1 ?m; mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improvement was 0.36 ± 0.20 logMAR. All three cases of acute pseudophakic CME improved after four to 10 weeks of nepafenac, with a mean improvement in retinal thickness of 134 ± 111.0 ?m. BCVA improved in two patients (0.16 and 0.22 logMAR) but not in the third due to underlying retinal pigment epithelium changes. Thirteen eyes with chronic/recalcitrant pseudophakic CME demonstrated a mean improvement in retinal thickness of 178 ± 128.7 ?m after nepafenac and mean BCVA improvement of 0.33 ± 0.19 logMAR. Conclusion: The positive outcomes of these 22 eyes strongly suggest that nepafenac 0.1% is a promising drug for the treatment of CME. Additional study under randomized controlled conditions is warranted. PMID:19668559

  9. Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yalong; Zhang, Chun; Zhu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Although management of neovascular AMD (wet AMD) has dramatically progressed, there is still no effective treatment for nonneovascular AMD (dry AMD), which is characterized by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death (or dysfunction) and microenvironmental disruption in the retina. Therefore, RPE replacement and microenvironmental regulation represent viable treatments for dry AMD. Recent advances in cell biology have demonstrated that RPE cells can be easily generated from several cell types (pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or even somatic cells) by spontaneous differentiation, coculturing, defined factors or cell reprogramming, respectively. Additionally, in vivo studies also showed that the restoration of visual function could be obtained by transplanting functional RPE cells into the subretinal space of recipient. More importantly, clinical trials approved by the US government have shown promising prospects in RPE transplantation. However, key issues such as implantation techniques, immune rejection, and xeno-free techniques are still needed to be further investigated. This review will summarize recent advances in cell transplantation for dry AMD. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed. PMID:25609937

  10. Prematurely senescent ARPE-19 cells display features of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Glotin, Anne-Lise; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Brossas, Jean-Yves; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Tréton, Jacques; Zubielewicz, Anna; Toussaint, Olivier; Mascarelli, Frédéric

    2008-04-01

    The etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains poorly understood, but may be related to cumulative oxidative stress. The prime target of the disease is the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). To study the molecular mechanisms underlying RPE degeneration, we investigated whether repetitive oxidative stress induced premature senescence in RPE cells from the human ARPE-19 cell line. After exposure to 8 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BHP) for 1 h daily for 5 days, the cells showed four well-known senescence biomarkers: hypertrophy, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, growth arrest, and cell cycle arrest in G1. A specific low-density array followed by qRT-PCR validation allowed us to identify 36 senescence-associated genes differentially expressed in the prematurely senescent cells. Functional analysis demonstrated that premature senescence induced amyloid beta secretion, resistance to acute stress by tert-BHP and amyloid beta, and defects in adhesion and transepithelial permeability. Coculture assays with choroidal endothelial cells showed the proangiogenic properties of the senescent RPE cells. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress induces premature senescence in RPE cells that modifies the transcriptome and substantially alters cell processes involved in the pathophysiology of AMD. Oxidative stress-induced premature senescence may represent an in vitro model for screening therapeutics against AMD and other retinal degeneration disorders. PMID:18226607

  11. Physics of Lipofuscin Formation and Growth in Age Related Macular Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the RPE in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results to the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration. )

  12. Recent developments in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Buschini, Elisa; Fea, Antonio M; Lavia, Carlo A; Nassisi, Marco; Pignata, Giulia; Zola, Marta; Grignolo, Federico M

    2015-01-01

    Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), also called geographic atrophy, is characterized by the atrophy of outer retinal layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Dry AMD accounts for 80% of all intermediate and advanced forms of the disease. Although vision loss is mainly due to the neovascular form (75%), dry AMD remains a challenge for ophthalmologists because of the lack of effective therapies. Actual management consists of lifestyle modification, vitamin supplements, and supportive measures in the advanced stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study demonstrated a statistically significant protective effect of dietary supplementation of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, and copper) on dry AMD progression rate. It was also stated that the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, has protective effects. Other antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals (such as crocetin, curcumin, and vitamins B9, B12, and B6) are under evaluation, but the results are still uncertain. New strategies aim to 1) reduce or block drusen formation, 2) reduce or eliminate inflammation, 3) lower the accumulation of toxic by-products from the visual cycle, 4) reduce or eliminate retinal oxidative stress, 5) improve choroidal perfusion, 6) replace/repair or regenerate lost RPE cells and photoreceptors with stem cell therapy, and 7) develop a target gene therapy. PMID:25878491

  13. Recent developments in the management of dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Buschini, Elisa; Fea, Antonio M; Lavia, Carlo A; Nassisi, Marco; Pignata, Giulia; Zola, Marta; Grignolo, Federico M

    2015-01-01

    Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), also called geographic atrophy, is characterized by the atrophy of outer retinal layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Dry AMD accounts for 80% of all intermediate and advanced forms of the disease. Although vision loss is mainly due to the neovascular form (75%), dry AMD remains a challenge for ophthalmologists because of the lack of effective therapies. Actual management consists of lifestyle modification, vitamin supplements, and supportive measures in the advanced stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study demonstrated a statistically significant protective effect of dietary supplementation of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc, and copper) on dry AMD progression rate. It was also stated that the consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, has protective effects. Other antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals (such as crocetin, curcumin, and vitamins B9, B12, and B6) are under evaluation, but the results are still uncertain. New strategies aim to 1) reduce or block drusen formation, 2) reduce or eliminate inflammation, 3) lower the accumulation of toxic by-products from the visual cycle, 4) reduce or eliminate retinal oxidative stress, 5) improve choroidal perfusion, 6) replace/repair or regenerate lost RPE cells and photoreceptors with stem cell therapy, and 7) develop a target gene therapy. PMID:25878491

  14. Topiramate-induced angle closure with acute myopia, macular striae

    PubMed Central

    Natesh, S.; Rajashekhara, S. K.; Rao, A. S. D.; Shetty, B.

    2010-01-01

    Topiramate is a sulfamate-substituted monosaccharide used in the treatment of seizures, and prophylaxis of migraine. A number of ocular side-effects have been described with use of topiramate, like bilateral angle closure, acute myopia and macular striae. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) clinches the diagnosis after ruling out other causes of shallow anterior chamber. Previous studies have not demonstrated internal limiting membrane folds presenting as macular striae. We report a case of topiramate-induced acute myopia with angle closure and macular striae in a young adult. This is the first report wherein striae formation after low doses of topiramate and their resolution have been documented by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). PMID:20606870

  15. Argon Laser Photoablation for Postburn Conjunctival Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo Jong; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hyun Chul

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of an ocular burn injury from boiling water which resulted in conjunctival pigmentation, 1 week following injury. For cosmetic purposes, 2 sessions of argon laser photoablation were performed. One month after laser treatment, conjunctival pigmentation had been successfully removed and the patient was very satisfied with the results. Argon laser photoablation may be an effective way to remove postburn conjunctival pigmentation. PMID:25505917

  16. Nonphotosynthetic pigmented bacteria in a potable water treatment and distribution system.

    PubMed Central

    Reasoner, D J; Blannon, J C; Geldreich, E E; Barnick, J

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of pigmented bacteria in potable water, from raw source water through treatment to distribution water, including dead-end locations, was compared at sample sites in a large municipal water system. Media used to enumerate heterotrophic bacteria and differentiate pigmented colonies were standard method plate count (SPC), m-SPC, and R2A agars, incubated up to 7 days at 35 degrees C. The predominant pigmented bacteria at most sample locations were yellow and orange, with a small incidence of pink organisms at the flowing distribution site. Seasonal variations were seen, with the yellow and orange organisms shifting in dominance. SPC agar was the least productive medium for both heterotroph counts and pigmented bacteria differentiation. At the flowing distribution site, percentages of pigmented bacteria on SPC medium ranged from 2.3 to 9.67 times less than on m-SPC and from 2.3 to 9.86 times less than on R2A. At the same site, seasonal trends in the percentage of pigmented bacteria were the same for m-SPC and R2A media, and the highest and lowest percentages occurred in the fall and winter, respectively. At site 6, there appeared to be an inverse relationship between the yellow and orange pigmented groups, but upon analysis, this did not hold and all correlations between yellow and orange pigmented bacteria were positive. The study results indicate that pigmented bacteria could readily be detected by using plate counting media developed for heterotroph enumeration in potable waters with incubation periods of 7 days. Pigmented bacteria can be used as an additional marker for monitoring changes in water quality. High numbers of heterotrophs, including pigmented forms, were found at dead-end locations, usually in the absence of a free chlorine residual and when the water temperature was greater than 16 degrees C. The association of some pigmented bacteria with nosocomial and other infections raises concern that the organisms may have originated from the potable water supply. High levels of pigmented bacteria could pose an increased health risk to immunologically compromised individuals. Therefore, the bacterial quality of the distribution water should be controlled to prevent the development of high concentrations of heterotrophic plate count bacteria, including the pigmented forms. PMID:2729990

  17. Non-photosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, E. W.; Cockell, C. S.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms on Earth produce potentially detectable surface reflectance biosignatures due in part to the spectral location and strength of pigment absorption. However, life on Earth uses pigments for a multitude of purposes other than photosynthesis, including coping with extreme environments. Macroscopic environments exist on Earth where the surface reflectance is significantly altered by a nonphotosynthetic pigment, such as the case of hypersaline lakes and ponds (Oren et al. 1992). Here we explore the nature and potential detectability of non-photosynthetic pigments in disk-averaged planetary observations using a combination of laboratory measurements and archival reflectance spectra, along with simulated broadband photometry and spectra. The in vivo visible reflectance spectra of a cross section of pigmented microorganisms are presented to illustrate the spectral diversity of biologically produced pigments. Synthetic broadband colors are generated to show a significant spread in color space. A 1D radiative transfer model (Meadows & Crisp 1996; Crisp 1997) is used to approximate the spectra of scenarios where pigmented organisms are widespread on planets with Earth-like atmospheres. Broadband colors are revisited to show that colors due to surface reflectivity are not robust to the addition of scattering and absorption effects from the atmosphere. We consider a èbest case' plausible scenario for the detection of nonphotosynthetic pigments by using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory's 3D spectral Earth model (Robinson et al. 2011) to explore the detectability of the surface biosignature produced by pigmented halophiles that are widespread on an Earth-analog planet.

  18. Continental variation in wing pigmentation in Calopteryx damselflies is related to the presence of heterospecifics.

    PubMed

    Hassall, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Wing pigmentation in Calopteryx damselflies, caused by the deposition of melanin, is energetically expensive to produce and enhances predation risk. However, patterns of melanisation are used in species identification, greater pigmentation is an accurate signal of male immune function in at least some species, and there may be a role for pigment in thermoregulation. This study tested two potential hypotheses to explain the presence of, and variation in, this pigmentation based on these three potential benefits using 907 male specimens of Calopteryx maculata collected from 49 sites (34 discrete populations) across the geographical range of the species in North America: (i) pigmentation varies with the presence of the closely related species, Calopteryx aequabilis, and (ii) pigment increases at higher latitudes as would be expected if it enhances thermoregulatory capacity. No gradual latitudinal pattern was observed, as might be expected if pigmentation was involved in thermoregulation. However, strong variation was observed between populations that were sympatric or allopatric with C. aequabilis. This variation was characterised by dark wings through allopatry in the south of the range and then a step change to much lighter wings at the southern border of sympatry. Pigmentation then increased further north into the sympatric zone, finally returning to allopatry levels at the northern range margin. These patterns are qualitatively similar to variation in pigmentation in C. aequabilis, meaning that the data are consistent with what would be expected from convergent character displacement. Overall, the results corroborate recent research that has suggested sexual selection as a primary driver behind the evolution of wing pigmentation in this group. PMID:24949250

  19. Nutritional Modulation of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weikel, Karen A; Taylor, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30–50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects (Chiu, 2011). Preservation of vision would enhance quality of life for millions of elderly people, and alleviate the personal and public health financial burden of AMD (Frick et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2011). Observational studies indicate that maintaining adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. with 2 servings/wk of fish) or a low glycemic index diet may be particularly beneficial for early AMD and that higher levels of carotenoids may be protective, most probably, against neovascular AMD. Intervention trials are needed to better understand the full effect of these nutrients and/or combinations of nutrients on retinal health. Analyses that describe effects of a nutrient on onset and/or progress of AMD are valuable because they indicate the value of a nutrient to arrest AMD at the early stages. This comprehensive summary provides essential information about the value of nutrients with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progress of AMD and can serve as a guide until data from ongoing intervention trials are available. PMID:22503690

  20. Variability of surface pigment concentrations in the South Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Charles R.; Yoder, James A.; Blanton, J. O.; Atkinson, L. P.; Lee, T. N.

    1988-01-01

    A time sequence of surface pigment images of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), derived from the Nimbus 7 CZCS for the period between November 1978 and October 1979, was correlated with in situ observations of hydrographic parameters, fresh-water discharge, sea level, coastal winds, and currents in order to couple physical processes and the spatial and temporal variability of the surface pigment fields. A definite seasonal modulation of the surface pigment fields was found, with the concentrations in the Georgia Bight being highest in summer, and those north of Cape Romain highest in winter. This phase difference was found to be the result of variations in wind fields, Gulf Stream-shelf interactions, and fresh-water discharge patterns. At some locations (e.g., near Charleston) the alongshore band of high pigment concentrations increased in width throughout the year; at other locations (near Jacksonville), the alongsore band exhibited a minimum width in the summer and a maximum width in the fall of 1979.

  1. Social stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr.

    PubMed

    Backström, Tobias; Heynen, Martina; Brännäs, Eva; Nilsson, Jan; Winberg, Svante; Magnhagen, Carin

    2015-09-15

    Pigmentation often signals status and in general melanin-based pigmentation is indicative of aggression and stress resilience in vertebrates. This is evident in the salmonids Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) where more melanin spotted individuals are more stress resilient. However, in the salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) it seems as if it is carotenoid-based pigmentation that signals aggression and stress resilience. In our study, social stress effects on carotenoid-based spots, and behavioural and physiological stress responses were investigated. Socially stressed individuals have more spots, and behavioural stress responses were associated with spots. Some of the results concerning physiological stress responses, such as plasma cortisol levels and monoaminergic activity, are associated with spottiness. Further, the earlier proposed lateralization of spots, with left side connected to stress responsiveness and right side to aggression, is to some extent validated although not conclusively. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that more stressed charr have more carotenoid spots, and for the first time monoaminergic activity is shown to be connected with carotenoid pigmentation. PMID:25997582

  2. Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.; dell'Omo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are nowadays widely used in ophthalmology to reduce eye inflammation, pain, and cystoid macular edema associated with cataract surgery. Recently, new topical NSAIDs have been approved for topical ophthalmic use, allowing for greater drug penetration into the vitreous. Hence, new therapeutic effects can be achieved, such as reduction of exudation secondary to age-related macular degeneration or diabetic maculopathy. We provide an updated review on the clinical use of NSAIDs for retinal diseases, with a focus on the potential future applications. PMID:24227908

  3. Effects of Vitreomacular Adhesion on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eui Chun; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we review the association between vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meta-analyses have shown that eyes with neovascular AMD are twice as likely to have VMA as normal eyes. VMA in neovascular AMD may induce inflammation, macular traction, decrease in oxygenation, sequestering of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other cytokines or may directly stimulate VEGF production. VMA may also interfere with the treatment effects of anti-VEGF therapy, which is the standard treatment for neovascular AMD, and releasing VMA can improve the treatment response to anti-VEGF treatment in neovascular AMD. We also reviewed currently available methods of relieving VMA. PMID:26425354

  4. Use of antivascular endothelial growth factor for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rushmia; Tang, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic macular edema (DME) is one of the manifestations of diabetic retinopathy leading to loss of central vision and visual acuity. It manifests itself with swelling around the central part of the retina, the area responsible for sharp vision. Current treatment includes laser therapy and intravitreal steroids with preventative measures including diabetes control. No one treatment has guaranteed control of diabetic macular edema which leads to deteriorating visual acuity, function and quality of life in patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be a critical stimulus in the pathogenesis of macular edema secondary to diabetes.1 Antiangiogenic therapy encompassed treatment with anti-VEGF which inhibits VEGF-driven neovascularization hence macular edema leading to decreased visual acuity. Objective For this review, we evaluated the effectiveness of intravitreal anti-VEGF in treating DME. Data sources We identified five trials (n = 525) using electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials [Central], Medline®, and Excerpta Medica Database [EMBASE®]) in October 2008, supplemented by hand searching of reference lists, review articles, and conference abstracts. Methods We included all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating any form of intravitreal anti-VEGF for treating DME. The main outcome factor was change in best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness. One author assessed eligibility, methodological quality, and extracted data. Meta analysis was performed when appropriate. Results We included three trials of adequate methodological quality in our meta-analysis. Patients treated with anti-VEGF showed improvement in visual acuity of ?0.17 (95% confidence interval [CI]: ?0.23, ?0.10) and central macular thickness ?84.69 (95% CI: ?117.09, ?52.30). Patients treated with combined anti-VEGF and intravitreal triamcinolone showed improvement of visual acuity of ?0.19 (95% CI: ?0.27, ?0.11) and central macular thickness mean change being –111.20 (95% CI: ?148.13, ?74.28). Conclusions Anti-VEGF has been associated with an improvement in visual acuity and central macular thickness in the analysis, however trial analysis was of a short duration and further research is needed to determine long-term benefits. PMID:20535227

  5. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  6. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  7. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, J. Jill; Sorof, Jonathan; Ehrlich, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem that affects over 350 million individuals worldwide. Diabetic retinopathy (DR), which is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in working-aged adults. Diabetic macular edema (DME) is an advanced, vision-limiting complication of DR that affects nearly 30% of patients who have had diabetes for at least 20 years and is responsible for much of the vision loss due to DR. The historic standard of care for DME has been macular laser photocoagulation, which has been shown to stabilize vision and reduce the rate of further vision loss by 50%; however, macular laser leads to significant vision recovery in only 15% of treated patients. Mechanisms contributing to the microvascular damage in DR and DME include the direct toxic effects of hyperglycemia, sustained alterations in cell signaling pathways, and chronic microvascular inflammation with leukocyte-mediated injury. Chronic retinal microvascular damage results in elevation of intraocular levels of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF), a potent, diffusible, endothelial-specific mitogen that mediates many important physiologic processes, including but not limited to the development and permeability of the vasculature. The identification of VEGF as an important pathophysiologic mediator of DME suggested that anti-VEGF therapy delivered to the eye might lead to improved visual outcomes in this disease. To date, four different inhibitors of VEGF, each administered by intraocular injection, have been tested in prospective, randomized phase II or phase III clinical trials in patients with DME. The results from these trials demonstrate that treatment with anti-VEGF agents results in substantially improved visual and anatomic outcomes compared with laser photocoagulation, and avoid the ocular side effects associated with laser treatment. Thus, anti-VEGF therapy has become the preferred treatment option for the management of DME in many patients. PMID:24324855

  8. Vestibular dysfunction, altered macular structure and trait localization in A/J inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Lever, Teresa E; Pierce, Jessica; Zhao, Xing; Bergstrom, David; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang; Jones, Timothy A; Jones, Sherri M

    2015-04-01

    A/J mice develop progressive hearing loss that begins before 1 month of age and is attributed to cochlear hair cell degeneration. Screening tests indicated that this strain also develops early onset vestibular dysfunction and has otoconial deficits. The purpose of this study was to characterize the vestibular dysfunction and macular structural pathology over the lifespan of A/J mice. Vestibular function was measured using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). Macular structural pathology was evaluated using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Individually, vestibular functional deficits in mice ranged from mild to profound. On average, A/J mice had significantly reduced vestibular sensitivity (elevated VsEP response thresholds and smaller amplitudes), whereas VsEP onset latency was prolonged compared to age-matched controls (C57BL/6). A limited age-related vestibular functional loss was also present. Structural analysis identified marked age-independent otoconial abnormalities in concert with some stereociliary bundle defects. Macular epithelia were incompletely covered by otoconial membranes with significantly reduced opacity and often contained abnormally large or giant otoconia as well as normal-appearing otoconia. Elevated expression of key otoconins (i.e., otoconin 90, otolin and keratin sulfate proteoglycan) ruled out the possibility of reduced levels contributing to otoconial dysgenesis. The phenotype of A/J was partially replicated in a consomic mouse strain (C57BL/6J-Chr 17(A/J)/NaJ), thus indicating that Chr 17(A/J) contained a trait locus for a new gene variant responsible to some extent for the A/J vestibular phenotype. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified additional epistatic influences associated with chromosomes 1, 4, 9 and X. Results indicate that the A/J phenotype represents a complex trait, and the A/J mouse strain presents a new model for the study of mechanisms underlying otoconial formation and maintenance. PMID:25645995

  9. Comparison of Modified-ETDRS and Mild Macular Grid Laser Photocoagulation Strategies for Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare two laser photocoagulation techniques for treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME): modified-ETDRS direct/grid photocoagulation (mETDRS) and a, potentially milder, but potentially more extensive, mild macular grid (MMG) laser technique in which small mild burns are placed throughout the macula, whether or not edema is present, and microaneurysms are not treated directly. Methods 263 subjects (mean age 59 years) with previously untreated DME were randomly assigned to receive laser photocoagulation by mETDRS (N=162 eyes) or MMG (N=161 eyes) technique. Visual acuity, fundus photographs and OCT measurements were obtained at baseline and after 3.5, 8, and 12 months. Treatment was repeated if DME persisted. Main Outcome Measure Change in OCT measures at 12-months follow up. Results From baseline to 12 months, among eyes with baseline central subfield thickness ? 250 microns, central subfield thickening decreased by an average of 88 microns in the mETDRS group and decreased by 49 microns in the MMG group (adjusted mean difference: 33 microns, 95% confidence interval 5 to 61 microns, P=0.02). Weighted inner zone thickening by OCT decreased by 42 and 28 microns, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 14 microns, 95% confidence interval 1 to 27 microns, P=0.04), maximum retinal thickening (maximum of the central and four inner subfields) decreased by 66 and 39 microns, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 27 microns, 95% confidence interval 6 to 47 microns, P=0.01), and retinal volume decreased by 0.8 and 0.4 mm3, respectively (adjusted mean difference: 0.3 mm3, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.53 mm3, P=0.03). At 12 months, the mean change in visual acuity was 0 letters in the mETDRS group and 2 letters worse in the MMG group (adjusted mean difference: 2 letters, 95% confidence interval ?0.5 to 5 letters, P=0.10). Conclusions At 12 months after treatment, the MMG technique is less effective at reducing OCT measured retinal thickening than the more extensively evaluated current mETDRS laser photocoagulation approach. However, the visual acuity outcome with both approaches is not substantially different. Given these findings a larger long-term trial of the MMG technique is not justified. Application to Clinical Practice Modified ETDRS focal photocoagulation should continue as a standard approach for treating diabetic macular edema. PMID:17420366

  10. Measurement of retinal thickness in macular region of high myopic eyes using spectral domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ai-Ping; Wu, Xin-Yi; Wang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yan; Yu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the changes of retinal thickness in macula of high myopic eyes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). METHODS Middle-aged and young myopic patients were divided into three groups according to their refractive error/axial length: low and medium myopia group (LMMG), high myopia group (HMG) and super high myopia group (SHMG). Cirrus HD-OCT was used to evaluate total average macular thickness, central subfield thickness, inner/outer macular thickness and macular volume. The differences among experimental groups were analyzed by one-factor analysis of variance. Associations between macular thickness and refractive error/axial length were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS There was no significant difference in age among the three groups (P=0.2789). The mean refraction error in the LMMG, HMG, and SHMG groups was -2.49±1.38D, -8.53±1.95D and -13.88±1.76D, respectively (P<0.001). The central subfield thickness of three groups was 244.56±12.19µm, 254.33±11.61µm and 261.75±11.83µm, respectively, and there were statistically significance between random two groups. The total average macular thickness, inner/outer macular thickness, and macular volume decreased with increased myopia/axial length. Average foveal thickness had negative correlations with refractive error (P<0.001), and positive correlations with axial length. The inferior and temporal inner macular thickness, all the quadrants of outer ring, total average macular thickness and macular volume featured positive correlations with refractive error, and negative correlations with axial length. Average foveal thickness, superior and temporal inner macular thicknesses, and temporal outer macular thickness was lower in females compared to males. CONCLUSION With an increase in myopia degree/axial length, the average foveal thickness increased and the inner/outer macular thickness decreased. Females featured thicker average foveal thickness, and thinner macular thickness compared to males. PMID:24634877

  11. Lipids, Lipid Genes and Incident Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Three Continent Age-Related Macular Degeneration Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E.; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Lee, Kristine E.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wang, Jie Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Meta-analysis. Methods Setting Three population-based cohorts. Population 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES) and Rotterdam Study (RS). Observation Procedures Participants were followed over 20 years and examined at 5-year intervals. Hazard ratios (HRs) associated with lipid levels per standard deviation above the mean or associated with each additional risk allele for each lipid pathway gene were calculated using random-effects inverse-weighted meta-analysis models, adjusting for known AMD risk factors. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of AMD. Results The average 5-year incidences of early AMD were 8.1%, 15.1%, and 13.0% in the BDES, BMES, and RS, respectively. Substantial heterogeneity in the effect of cholesterol and lipid pathway genes on the incidence and progression of AMD was evident when the data from the three studies were combined in meta-analysis. After correction for multiple comparisons, we did not find a statistically significant association between any of the cholesterol measures, statin use, or serum lipid genes and any of the AMD outcomes in the meta-analysis. Conclusion In a meta-analysis, there were no associations of cholesterol measures, history of statin use, or lipid pathway genes to the incidence and progression of AMD. These findings add to inconsistencies in earlier reports from our studies and others showing weak associations, no associations, or inverse associations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol with AMD. PMID:24879949

  12. [Damage of macular ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Davydovskaia, M V; Tsysar', M A; Bo?ko, A N; Akopian, V S; Semenova, N S; Filonenko, I V; Fomin, A V; Gusev, E I

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) characteristics and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to investigate the associations between these parameters and clinical characteristics of patients for evaluation perspectives of using this method for monitoring of disability and neurodegenerative processes. We examined a total of 113 participants (analysis of 211 eyes), divided into three groups: 1. 48 MS patients (66 eyes) with a history of optic neuritis (ON); 2. 35 MS patients (70 eyes) without a history of ON; 3. 30 disease-free control subjects (45 eyes). The estudy included anamnesis collection, neurological examination with assessment of EDSS scores. Refracted visual acuity prior to optical coherence tomography (OCT) was tested. RTVue-100 ??? system was used to assess peripapillary RNFL thickness and macular inner parameter (protocol GCC). The strongly correlated decline of the most RNFL and GCC indices was characteristic of all groups of MS patients with and without ON compared to controls. The damage of GCC was greater in patients with ON. The inverse correlation was found between the indices studied and the level of patient's disability. The study of GCC and RNFL thickness can be used to describe and characterize the level of axonal damage in MS and for objectification of neurodegenerative process in studies on neuroprotection and neuroreparation. PMID:22677679

  13. [Imaging of pigmented villonodular synovitis].

    PubMed

    Flipo, R M; Chastanet, P; Duquesnoy, B

    1993-04-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease which is usually benign but sometimes causes wide articular destruction. Since its clinical signs and symptoms are not specific, the disease may remain undiagnosed, sometimes for long periods. The diagnosis is generally confirmed at pathology, but it can now be strongly suggested by modern imaging methods. Standard radiography may be normal, with a variety of images. Arthrography with an opaque material points to the diagnosis in only two-third of the cases. Ultrasonography is non-specific. Computed tomography may be strongly suggestive of pigmented villonodular synovitis in cases with high density synovia; when coupled with arthrography, it provides detailed information on lesions of the cartilage and on extension of the synovial process. The most sensitive and specific method is magnetic resonance imaging, the most characteristic sign being low-intensity signal areas on T1- and T2-weighted sequences, corresponding to haemosiderin-loaded nodules. Performed after standard radiography, magnetic resonance imaging is the best examination method for the diagnosis and pretherapeutic evaluation of suspected villonodular synovitis. PMID:8511094

  14. Early postoperative macular features determined by optical coherence tomography after idiopathic macular hole surgery with silicone oil tamponade.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kazuki

    2005-01-01

    The configuration of idiopathic macular holes in the early postoperative period after pars plana vitrectomy using optical coherence tomography through silicone oil was evaluated. Pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and silicone oil instillation was performed on 20 eyes. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively. Nineteen eyes (95%) achieved a closed fovea. None of them had a transit foveal contour with flat retina without closure. In the early phase of postoperative idiopathic macular hole repair, inner retinal tissue closure rather than flattening of the fovea is essential for those undergoing pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and silicone oil instillation. PMID:16238045

  15. Polarized Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Monolayers Have Higher Resistance to Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death Than Nonpolarized Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Jamie; Zhu, Danhong

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated injury to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major factor involved in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived RPE cells are currently being evaluated for their potential for cell therapy in AMD patients through subretinal injection of cells in suspension and subretinal placement as a polarized monolayer. To gain an understanding of how transplanted RPE cells will respond to the highly oxidatively stressed environment of an AMD patient eye, we compared the survival of polarized and nonpolarized RPE cultures following oxidative stress treatment. Polarized, nonpolarized/confluent, nonpolarized/subconfluent hESC-RPE cells were treated with H2O2. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling stains revealed the highest amount of cell death in subconfluent hESC-RPE cells and little cell death in polarized hESC-RPE cells with H2O2 treatment. There were higher levels of proapoptotic factors (phosphorylated p38, phosphorylated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, Bax, and cleaved caspase 3 fragments) in treated nonpolarized RPE—particularly subconfluent cells—relative to polarized cells. On the other hand, polarized RPE cells had constitutively higher levels of cell survival and antiapoptotic signaling factors such as p-Akt and Bcl-2, as well as antioxidants superoxide dismutase 1 and catalase relative to nonpolarized cells, that possibly contributed to polarized cells’ higher tolerance to oxidative stress compared with nonpolarized RPE cells. Subconfluent cells were particularly sensitive to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that implantation of polarized hESC-RPE monolayers for treating AMD patients with geographic atrophy should have better survival than injections of hESC-RPE cells in suspension. PMID:25411476

  16. Drosophila pigmentation evolution: Divergent genotypes underlying convergent phenotypes

    E-print Network

    Gruber, Jonathan

    Drosophila pigmentation evolution: Divergent genotypes underlying convergent phenotypes Patricia J. Myriad pigment patterns in the genus Drosophila offer numerous opportunities to address this question of pigmentation in selected species. Here, we ex- amine Drosophila americana and Drosophila novamexicana, inter

  17. Fabricating Translucent Materials using Continuous Pigment Mixtures (Supplemental Material)

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Henrik Wann

    Fabricating Translucent Materials using Continuous Pigment Mixtures (Supplemental Material) Marios method can predict the appearance of the replica given the local pigment parameters triplet evaluates how well our method can predict the appearance of the replica given the local pigment

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Algal pigments in Arctic lake sediments record

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Algal pigments in Arctic lake sediments record biogeochemical changes due sediment organic matter, algal pigments, and diatom assemblages are integrated to provide robust indices of paleoclimatic variability. In particular, the ratio be- tween individual carotenoid pigments (lutein

  19. ORGANIC DYES AND PIGMENTS DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research program was to compile a data base covering all the commercially significant dyes and pigments produced or imported in the United States. The Organic Dyes and Pigments Data Base (ODPDB) contains the following data elements: chemical-related data (co...

  20. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of Chlorophyll Pigments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and discussion of typical results are provided for an experiment on the thin layer chromatography of chlorophyll pigments. The experiment works well in high school, since the chemicals used are the same as those used in paper chromatography of plant pigments. (JN)

  1. Pigments, parasites and personalitiy: towards a unifying role for steroid hormones?

    PubMed

    Kittilsen, Silje; Johansen, Ida Beitnes; Braastad, Bjarne Olai; Øverli, Øyvind

    2012-01-01

    A surging interest in the evolution of consistent trait correlations has inspired research on pigment patterns as a correlate of behavioural syndromes, or "animal personalities". Associations between pigmentation, physiology and health status are less investigated as potentially conserved trait clusters. In the current study, lice counts performed on farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar naturally infected with ectoparasitic sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis showed that individual fish with high incidence of black melanin-based skin spots harboured fewer female sea lice carrying egg sacs, compared to less pigmented fish. There was no significant association between pigmentation and lice at other developmental stages, suggesting that host factors associated with melanin-based pigmentation may modify ectoparasite development to a larger degree than settlement. In a subsequent laboratory experiment a strong negative correlation between skin spots and post-stress cortisol levels was revealed, with less pigmented individuals showing a more pronounced cortisol response to acute stress. The observation that lice prevalence was strongly increased on a fraction of sexually mature male salmon which occurred among the farmed fish further supports a role for steroid hormones as mediators of reduced parasite resistance. The data presented here propose steroid hormones as a proximate cause for the association between melanin-based pigmentation and parasites. Possible fundamental and applied implications are discussed. PMID:22493685

  2. Pigments, Parasites and Personalitiy: Towards a Unifying Role for Steroid Hormones?

    PubMed Central

    Kittilsen, Silje; Johansen, Ida Beitnes; Braastad, Bjarne Olai; Øverli, Øyvind

    2012-01-01

    A surging interest in the evolution of consistent trait correlations has inspired research on pigment patterns as a correlate of behavioural syndromes, or “animal personalities”. Associations between pigmentation, physiology and health status are less investigated as potentially conserved trait clusters. In the current study, lice counts performed on farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar naturally infected with ectoparasitic sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis showed that individual fish with high incidence of black melanin-based skin spots harboured fewer female sea lice carrying egg sacs, compared to less pigmented fish. There was no significant association between pigmentation and lice at other developmental stages, suggesting that host factors associated with melanin-based pigmentation may modify ectoparasite development to a larger degree than settlement. In a subsequent laboratory experiment a strong negative correlation between skin spots and post-stress cortisol levels was revealed, with less pigmented individuals showing a more pronounced cortisol response to acute stress. The observation that lice prevalence was strongly increased on a fraction of sexually mature male salmon which occurred among the farmed fish further supports a role for steroid hormones as mediators of reduced parasite resistance. The data presented here propose steroid hormones as a proximate cause for the association between melanin-based pigmentation and parasites. Possible fundamental and applied implications are discussed. PMID:22493685

  3. Molecular and developmental contributions to divergent pigment patterns in marine and freshwater sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Anna K; Cech, Jennifer N; Peichel, Catherine L

    2012-07-01

    Pigment pattern variation across species or populations offers a tractable framework in which to investigate the evolution of development. Juvenile threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from marine and freshwater environments exhibit divergent pigment patterns that are associated with ecological differences. Juvenile marine sticklebacks have a silvery appearance, whereas sticklebacks from freshwater environments exhibit a pattern of vertical bars. We investigated both the developmental and molecular basis of this population-level variation in pigment pattern. Time course imaging during the transition from larval to juvenile stages revealed differences between marine and freshwater fish in spatial patterns of chromatophore differentiation as well as in pigment amount and dispersal. In freshwater fish, melanophores appear primarily within dark bars whereas iridophores appear within light bars. By contrast, in marine fish, these chromatophores are interspersed across the flank. In addition to spatially segregated chromatophore differentiation, pigment amount and dispersal within melanophores varies spatially across the flank of freshwater, but not marine fish. To gain insight into the molecular pathways that underlie the differences in pigment pattern development, we evaluated differential gene expression in the flanks of developing fish using high-throughput cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative PCR. We identified several genes that were differentially expressed across dark and light bars of freshwater fish, and between freshwater and marine fish. Together, these experiments begin to shed light on the process of pigment pattern evolution in sticklebacks. PMID:22765206

  4. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samir H.; Porrino, Jack A.; Green, John R.; Chew, Felix S.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation.

  5. Wavelength regulation in iodopsin, a cone pigment.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J G; Nakamura, T; Ebrey, T G; Ok, H; Konno, K; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Honig, B

    1989-01-01

    The opsin shift, the difference in wavenumber between the absorption peak of a visual pigment and the protonated Schiff base of the chromophore, represents the influence of the opsin binding site on the chromophore. The opsin shift for the chicken cone pigment iodopsin is much larger than that for rhodopsin. To understand the origin of this opsin shift and the mechanism of wavelength regulation in iodopsin, a series of synthetic 9-cis and 11-cis dehydro- and dihydro-retinals was used to regenerate iodopsin-based pigments. The opsin shifts of these pigments are quite similar to those found in bacteriorhodopsin-based artificial pigments. On the basis of these studies, a tentative model of wavelength regulation in iodopsin is proposed. PMID:2524224

  6. Analysing avian eggshell pigments with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel B; Hauber, Mark E; Hanley, Daniel; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Fraser, Sara; Gordon, Keith C

    2015-09-01

    Avian eggshells are variable in appearance, including coloration. Here, we demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy can provide accurate diagnostic information about major eggshell constituents, including the pigments biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX. Eggshells pigmented with biliverdin showed a series of pigment-diagnostic Raman peaks under 785 nm excitation. Eggshells pigmented with protoporphyrin IX showed strong emission under 1064 nm and 785 nm excitation, whereas resonance Raman spectra (351 nm excitation) showed a set of protoporphyrin IX informative peaks characteristic of protoporphyrin IX. As representative examples, we identified biliverdin in the olive green eggshells of elegant crested tinamous (Eudromia elegans) and in the blue eggshells of extinct upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus). This study encourages the wider use of Raman spectroscopy in pigment and coloration research and highlights the value of this technique for non-destructive analyses of museum eggshell specimens. PMID:26113138

  7. Anthraquinone pigments from Phoma foveata Foister

    PubMed Central

    Bick, I. R. C.; Rhee, C.

    1966-01-01

    1. Suitable conditions have been determined for growing the fungus Phoma foveata in culture for optimum production of pigments. 2. The pigments have been extracted and fractionated according to their solubility in aqueous bicarbonate, carbonate and alkali. 3. The carbonate- and alkali-soluble pigments have been further separated by chromatography and shown to consist of anthraquinone derivatives. 4. The alkali-soluble fraction, which comprised the bulk of the pigment, consists of pachybasin (1-hydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone; II) and chrysophanol (1,8-dihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone; III) by comparison with authentic samples. 5. The carbonate-soluble fraction contains emodin (1,6,8-trihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone; V) and a hitherto unrecorded pigment for which the name phomarin and the structure 1,6-dihydroxy-3-methylanthraquinone (IV) are put forward. 6. The identification of emodin and the structural determination of phomarin are based largely on their ultraviolet, visible, infrared, nuclear-magnetic-resonance and mass spectra. PMID:5938630

  8. Proteomic Profiling of Cigarette Smoke Induced Changes in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Merl-Pham, Juliane; Gruhn, Fabian; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition usually affecting older adults and resulting in a loss of vision in the macula, the center of the visual field. The dry form of this disease presents with atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in the detachment of the retina and loss of photoreceptors. Cigarette smoke is one main risk factor for dry AMD and increases the risk of developing the disease by three times. In order to understand the influence of cigarette smoke on retinal pigment epithelial cells, cultured human ARPE-19 cells were treated with cigarette smoke extract for 24 h. Using quantitative mass spectrometry more than 3000 proteins were identified and their respective abundances were compared between cigarette smoke-treated and untreated cells. Altogether 1932 proteins were quantified with at least two unique peptides, with 686 proteins found to be significantly differentially abundant with p > 0.05. Of these proteins the abundance of 64 proteins was at least 2-fold down-regulated after cigarette smoke treatment while 120 proteins were 2-fold up-regulated. The analysis of associated biological processes revealed an alteration of proteins involved in RNA processing and transport as well as extracellular matrix remodelling in response to cigarette smoke treatment. PMID:26427490

  9. Amyloid-beta(1-42) alters structure and function of retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bruban, Julien; Glotin, Anne-Lise; Dinet, Virginie; Chalour, Naïma; Sennlaub, Florian; Jonet, Laurent; An, Na; Faussat, Anne Marie; Mascarelli, Frédéric

    2009-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by the formation of drusen, extracellular deposits associated with atrophy of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), disturbance of the transepithelial barrier and photoreceptor death. Amyloid-beta (Abeta) is present in drusen but its role during AMD remains unknown. This study investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the oligomeric form of Abeta(1-42) - OAbeta(1-42) - on RPE and found that it reduced mitochondrial redox potential and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, but did not induce apoptosis in RPE cell cultures. It also disorganized the actin cytoskeleton and halved occludin expression, markedly decreasing attachment capacity and abolishing the selectivity of RPE cell transepithelial permeability. Antioxidant pretreatment partially reversed the effects of OAbeta(1-42) on mitochondrial redox potential and transepithelial permeability. Subretinally injected OAbeta(1-42) induced pigmentation loss and RPE hypertrophy but not RPE cell apoptosis in C57BL/6 J mice. Rapid OAbeta(1-42)-induced disorganization of cytoskeletal actin filaments was accompanied by decreased RPE expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 and of the visual cycle proteins cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein and RPE65. The number of photoreceptors decreased by half within a few days. Our study pinpoints the role of Abeta in RPE alterations and dysfunctions leading to retinal degeneration and suggests that targeting Abeta may help develop selective methods for treating diseases involving retinal degeneration, such as AMD. PMID:19239420

  10. Technology needs for tomorrow's treatment and diagnosis of macular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubrane, Gisèle

    2008-02-01

    Retinal imaging is the basis of macular disease's diagnosis. Currently available technologies in clinical practice are fluorescein and indocyanin green (ICG) angiographies, in addition to optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is an in vivo "histology-like" cross-sectional images of the retina. Recent developments in the field of OCT imaging include Spectral-Domain OCT. However OCT remains a static view of the macula with no direct link with dynamic observation obtained by angiographies. Adaptative optics is an encouraging perspective for fundus analysis in the future, and could be linked to OCT or angiographies. Treatments of macular disease have exploded these past few years. Pharmacologic inhibition of angiogenesis represents a novel approach in the treatment of choroidal neovascularization in eyes with age-related macular degeneration. The major action explored is the direct inhibition of the protein VEGF with antibody-like products. New anti-VEGF drugs are in development aiming at the VEGF receptors or synthesis of VEGF. But various components of the neovascular cascade, including growth factor expression, extracellular matrix modulation, integrin inhibition represent potential targets for modulation with drugs. Intra-vitreal injections are nowadays the main route of administration for these new treatments but they are potentially responsible of side effects such as endophtalmitis. Development of other routes of treatment would require new formulation of used drugs. The improvement of retinal imaging leads to a better understanding of macular disease mechanisms and will help to develop new routes and targets of treatment.

  11. NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTATION, CATARACTS AND AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the major causes of visual impairment and blindness in the aging population. Specific nutrients in the diet that are thought to be important in the prevention of these diseases are vitamins C and E, the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxa...

  12. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated wi...

  13. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  14. Pigment epithelium-derived factor reduces apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in a murine model of focal retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujuan; Subramanian, Preeti; Shen, Defen; Tuo, Jingsheng; Becerra, S. Patricia; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-01-01

    AMD (age-related macular degeneration) is a neurodegenerative disease causing irreversible central blindness in the elderly. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in AMD pathogenesis. PEDF (pigment epithelium-derived factor) is a potent neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory glycoprotein that protects the retinal neurons and photoreceptors against cell death caused by pathological insults. We studied the effects of PEDF on focal retinal lesions in DKO rd8 (Ccl2?/?/Cx3cr1?/? on C57BL/6N [Crb1rd8]) mice, a model for progressive, focal rd (retinal degeneration). First, we found a significant decrease in PEDF transcript expression in DKO rd8 mouse retina and RPE (retinal pigment epithelium) than WT (wild-type, C57BL/6N). Next, cultured DKO rd8 RPE cells secreted lower levels of PEDF protein in the media than WT. Then the right eyes of DKO rd8 mice were injected intravitreously with recombinant human PEDF protein (1 ?g), followed by a subconjunctival injection of PEDF (3 ?g) 4 weeks later. The untreated left eyes served as controls. The effect of PEDF was assessed by fundoscopy, ocular histopathology and A2E {[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetra-enyl]-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-[4-methyl-6(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl) 1E,3E,5E,7E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium} levels, as well as apoptotic and inflammatory molecules. The PEDF-treated eyes showed slower progression or attenuation of the focal retinal lesions, fewer and/or smaller photoreceptor and RPE degeneration, and significantly lower A2E, relative to the untreated eyes. In addition, lower expression of apoptotic and inflammatory molecules were detected in the PEDF-treated than untreated eyes. Our results establish that PEDF potently stabilizes photoreceptor degeneration via suppression of both apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. The multiple beneficial effects of PEDF represent a novel approach for potential AMD treatment. PMID:24160756

  15. Macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thinning in patients with visual field defect that respects the vertical meridian.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Choi, Jin-A; Park, Chan Kee

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the thinning patterns of the ganglion cell inner-plexiform layer (GCIPL) and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) as measured using Cirrus high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) in patients with visual field (VF) defects that respect the vertical meridian. Twenty eyes of 11 patients with VF defects that respect the vertical meridian were enrolled retrospectively. The thicknesses of the macular GCIPL and pRNFL were measured using Cirrus HD-OCT. The 5 and 1% thinning area index (TAI) was calculated as the proportion of abnormally thin sectors at the 5 and 1% probability level within the area corresponding to the affected VF. The 5 and 1% TAI were compared between the GCIPL and pRNFL measurements. The color-coded GCIPL deviation map showed a characteristic vertical thinning pattern of the GCIPL, which is also seen in the VF of patients with brain lesions. The 5 and 1% TAI were significantly higher in the GCIPL measurements than in the pRNFL measurements (all p?Macular GCIPL analysis clearly visualized a characteristic topographic pattern of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in patients with VF defects that respect the vertical meridian, unlike pRNFL measurements. Macular GCIPL measurements provide more valuable information than pRNFL measurements for detecting the loss of RGCs in patients with retrograde degeneration of the optic nerve fibers. PMID:25104464

  16. Macular Surgery Using Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Riazi-Esfahani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the use of intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for detecting anatomical changes during macular surgery. Methods: In a consecutive case series, 32 eyes of 32 patients undergoing concurrent pars plana vitrectomy and intraoperative SD-OCT for macular hole (MH), epiretinal membrane (ERM) and vitreomacular traction (VMT) were enrolled. Intraoperative changes in retinal thickness and dimensions of the macular hole were measured in patients with ERM and VMT following surgical manipulation using a hand-held SD-OCT device (iVue, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA). Results: SD-OCT images of sixteen eyes with macular hole were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. All MH dimensions remained stable during consecutive stages of surgery except for MH apex diameter, which showed a significant decrease after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling (P=0.025). Quantitative analysis of ten patients with ERM showed a significant decrease in retinal thickness after membrane removal (P=0.018) which did not remain significant until the end of the procedure (P=0.8). In three cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Quantitative analysis of five patients with VMT showed a decrease in retinal thickness during consecutive steps of the surgery, although these changes were not significant. In two cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes.

  17. Structure of plant bile pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  18. Diabetic macular edema: new concepts in patho-physiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME), a serious eye complication caused primarily by hyperglycemia, is one of the major causes of blindness. DME, which is characterized by cystic retinal thickening or lipid deposition, is prone to relapse after successful treatment. DME is a complex pathological process caused by multiple factors, including breakdown of the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers, oxidative stress, and elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor which have been demonstrated in both preclinical and clinical studies. Starling’s law theory explains many of the features of DME. Early detection and treatment of DME can prevent vision loss. Current effective interventions for DME include treatment of systemic risk factors, such as elevated blood glucose, blood pressure and dyslipidemia. Ophthalmic treatments include laser photocoagulation, surgery and intraocular pharmacotherapy. New drugs, which are given by intraocular injection, have emerged in recent years to become first line treatment for DME that affects the central macula with loss of vision. Laser photocoagulation is still the gold standard of treatment for DME which does not involve the central macular. This review outlines these new treatments with particular emphasis on the optimal timing of how they are given. PMID:24955234

  19. Risk Factors for Refractory Diabetic Macular Oedema after Sub-Tenon's Capsule Triamcinolone Acetonide Injection.

    PubMed

    Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Yuta; Nonomura, Sakiko; Arai, Miyuki; Takatsuna, Yoko; Sato, Eiju; Baba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors for a recurrence or persistence of diabetic macular oedema (DME) after a sub-Tenon's capsule triamcinolone acetonide (STTA) injection. The medical records of 124 patients (124 eyes) treated by STTA were reviewed. The age, sex, HbA1c level, best-corrected visual acuity, central macular thickness, insulin use, pioglitazone use, systemic hypertension, serous retinal detachment, proteinuria, panretinal photocoagulation, microaneurysm photocoagulation (MAPC), subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation (SMDLP), cataract surgery, and history of vitrectomy were examined by logistic regression analysis. Procedures of MAPC and SMDLP were significantly associated with DME treated with STTA (P = 0.0315, P = 0.04, resp.). However, a history of vitrectomy was found to have significantly fewer recurrences or persistent DME after STTA (P = 0.0464). In conclusion, patients who required combined MAPC or SMDLP with a STTA injection had significantly higher refractoriness to STTA, but postvitrectomy may prevent the recurrence or persistence of DME after STTA injection. PMID:26457195

  20. Risk Factors for Refractory Diabetic Macular Oedema after Sub-Tenon's Capsule Triamcinolone Acetonide Injection

    PubMed Central

    Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Yuta; Nonomura, Sakiko; Arai, Miyuki; Takatsuna, Yoko; Sato, Eiju; Baba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors for a recurrence or persistence of diabetic macular oedema (DME) after a sub-Tenon's capsule triamcinolone acetonide (STTA) injection. The medical records of 124 patients (124 eyes) treated by STTA were reviewed. The age, sex, HbA1c level, best-corrected visual acuity, central macular thickness, insulin use, pioglitazone use, systemic hypertension, serous retinal detachment, proteinuria, panretinal photocoagulation, microaneurysm photocoagulation (MAPC), subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation (SMDLP), cataract surgery, and history of vitrectomy were examined by logistic regression analysis. Procedures of MAPC and SMDLP were significantly associated with DME treated with STTA (P = 0.0315, P = 0.04, resp.). However, a history of vitrectomy was found to have significantly fewer recurrences or persistent DME after STTA (P = 0.0464). In conclusion, patients who required combined MAPC or SMDLP with a STTA injection had significantly higher refractoriness to STTA, but postvitrectomy may prevent the recurrence or persistence of DME after STTA injection. PMID:26457195

  1. bio_ehler_revised.doc High-Resolution Autofluorescence Imaging for Mapping Molecular Processes

    E-print Network

    Ehler, Martin

    macular degeneration (AMD) is a common eye disease that often leads to vision loss. High levels degeneration I. INTRODUCTION Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss) dysfunc- tion associated with AMD. Low macular pigment level has also been identified as a risk factor

  2. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1?year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-01-01

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60?years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1?year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate. PMID:24225910

  3. Molecular and pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptors in retinal pigment epithelium: role in light-adaptive

    E-print Network

    Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    Molecular and pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptors in retinal pigment epithelium: role in light-adaptive pigment movements Prasad V. Phatarpekar, Simon F. Durdan, Chad M. Copeland pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill fish. Pigment granule

  4. Study of Biological Pigments by Single Specimen Derivative Spectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jack M.

    1970-01-01

    The single specimen derivative (SSD) method provides an absolute absorption spectrum of a substance in the absence of a suitable reference. Both a reference and a measuring monochromatic beam pass through a single sample, and the specimen itself acts as its own reference. The two monochromatic beams maintain a fixed wavelength difference upon scanning, and the difference in absorbance of the two beams is determined. Thus, the resulting spectrum represents the first derivative of the conventional type absorption spectrum. Tissues and cell fractions have been examined at room and liquid N2 temperature and chromophoric molecules such as the mitochondrial cytochromes and blood pigments have been detectable in low concentrations. In the case of isolated cellular components, the observed effects of substrates and inhibitors confirm similar studies by conventional spectrophotometry. The extension of the SSD concept to the microscopic level has permitted the study of the tissue compartmentalization and function of cytochromes and other pigments within layered tissue. PMID:4392452

  5. Breaking the Covalent Bond—A Pigment Property that Contributes to Desensitization in Cones

    PubMed Central

    Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Estevez, Maureen E.; Kono, Massahiro; Goletz, Patrice W.; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Cornwall, M. Carter; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-01-01

    Summary Retinal rod and cone pigments consist of an apoprotein, opsin, covalently linked to a chromophore, 11-cis retinal. Here we demonstrate that the formation of the covalent bond between opsin and 11-cis retinal is reversible in darkness in amphibian red cones, but essentially irreversible in red rods. This dissociation, apparently a general property of cone pigments, results in a surprisingly large amount of free opsin—about 10% of total opsin—in dark-adapted red cones. We attribute this significant level of free opsin to the low concentration of intracellular free 11-cis retinal, estimated to be only a tiny fraction (~0.1 %) of the pigment content in red cones. With its constitutive transducin-stimulating activity, the free cone opsin produces an ~2-fold desensitization in red cones, equivalent to that produced by a steady light causing 500 photoisomerizations s?1. Cone pigment dissociation therefore contributes to the sensitivity difference between rods and cones. PMID:15953417

  6. Surface modification for aluminium pigment inhibition.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Philip; Palmqvist, Anders E C; Holmberg, Krister

    2006-12-21

    This review concerns surface treatment of aluminium pigments for use in water borne coatings. Aluminium pigments are commonly used in coatings to give a silvery and shiny lustre to the substrate. Such paints and inks have traditionally been solvent borne, since aluminium pigment particles react with water. For environmental and health reasons solvent borne coatings are being replaced by water borne and the aluminium pigments then need to be surface modified in order to stand exposure to water. This process is called inhibition and both organic and inorganic substances are used as inhibiting agents. The organic inhibiting agents range from low molecular weight substances, such as phenols and aromatic acids, via surfactants, in particular alkyl phosphates and other anionic amphiphiles, to high molecular weight compounds, such as polyelectrolytes. A common denominator for them all is that they contain a functional group that interacts specifically with aluminium at the surface. A particularly strong interaction is obtained if the inhibiting agent contains functional groups that form chelating complex with surface Al(III). Encapsulation of the pigment can be made by in situ polymerization at the surface of the pigment and a recent approach is to have the polymerization occur within a double layer of adsorbed surfactant. The inorganic route is dominated by coating with silica, and recent progress has been made using an alkoxide, such as tetraethoxysilane as silica precursor. Such silica coated aluminium pigments are comparable in performance to chromate inhibited pigments and thus offer a possible heavy metal-free alternative. There are obvious connections between surface modifications made to prevent the pigment to react with water and inhibition of corrosion of macroscopic aluminium surfaces. PMID:17239333

  7. Photodynamic Therapy and Intravitreal Bevacizumab with Versus without Triamcinolone for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Piri, Niloofar; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Taei, Ramin; Soheilian, Masoud; Karkhaneh, Reza; Lashay, Alireza; Golbafian, Faegheh; Yaseri, Mehdi; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of photodynamic therapy (PDT) combined with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) with versus without intravitreal triamcinolone (IVT) in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Eighty-four eyes with active CNV secondary to AMD with no prior treatment were enrolled and followed for 1-year. Eligible eyes were randomly assigned to either PDT/IVB or PDT/IVB/IVT. The main outcome measure was change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Results: Mean patient age was 71 ± 9 years. BCVA changes from baseline were statistically significant in both study arms at all follow-up intervals, however no significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding BCVA changes at week 12 (95% CI:-0.11–0.12 LogMAR) and other time points (all P > 0.6). Mixed model analysis revealed a significant effect from age (P < 0.001), pigment epithelial detachment (P = 0.009) and baseline BCVA (P < 0.001) on visual improvement. Significant central macular thickness (CMT) reduction occurred at all-time points as compared to baseline in both groups which was comparable between the study arms. There was no significant difference between the study arms in terms of retreatment rate (P = 0.1) and survival to the first repeat IVB injection (P = 0.065). Conclusion: Additional low-dose IVT to a PDT/IVB regimen for neovascular AMD provided no beneficial effects in terms BCVA or CMT, yet demonstrated a trend toward extending the injection-free period. PMID:25709773

  8. Preservation of the Photoreceptor Inner/Outer Segment Junction in Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treated by Rheohemapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Rencová, Eva; Bláha, Milan; Studni?ka, Jan; Bláha, Vladimír; Lánská, Miriam; Renc, Ond?ej; Stepanov, Alexander; Kratochvílová, V?ra; Langrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the long-term effect of rheohemapheresis (RHF) treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on photoreceptor IS/OS junction status. Methods. In our study, we followed 24 patients with dry AMD and drusenoid retinal pigment epithelium detachment (DPED) for a period of more than 2.5 years. Twelve patients (22 eyes) were treated by RHF and 12 controls (18 eyes) were randomized. The treated group underwent 8 RHF standardized procedures. We evaluated best-corrected visual acuity, IS/OS junction status (SD OCT), and macular function (multifocal electroretinography) at baseline and at 2.5-year follow-up. Results. RHF caused a decrease of whole-blood viscosity/plasma viscosity at about 15/12%. BCVA of treated patients increased insignificantly (P = 0.187) from median 74.0 letters (56.2 to 81.3 letters) to median 79.0 letters (57.3 to 83.4 letters), but it decreased significantly from 74.0 letters (25.2 to 82.6 letters) to 72.5 letters (23.4 to 83.1 letters) in the control group (P = 0.041). The mfERG responses in the region of eccentricity between 1.8° and 7° were significantly higher in treated patients (P = 0.04). Conclusions. RHF contributed to sparing of photoreceptor IS/OS junction integrity in the fovea, which is assumed to be a predictive factor for preservation of visual acuity. PMID:26351571

  9. Iron-induced Local Complement Component 3 (C3) Up-regulation via Non-canonical Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-? Signaling in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafeng; Song, Delu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Liangliang; Wolkow, Natalie; Tobias, John W; Song, Wenchao; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-05-01

    Dysregulation of iron homeostasis may be a pathogenic factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Meanwhile, the formation of complement-containing deposits under the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer is a pathognomonic feature of AMD. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which complement component 3 (C3), a central protein in the complement cascade, is up-regulated by iron in RPE cells. Modulation of TGF-? signaling, involving ERK1/2, SMAD3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-?, is responsible for iron-induced C3 expression. The differential effects of spatially distinct SMAD3 phosphorylation sites at the linker region and at the C terminus determined the up-regulation of C3. Pharmacologic inhibition of either ERK1/2 or SMAD3 phosphorylation decreased iron-induced C3 expression levels. Knockdown of SMAD3 blocked the iron-induced up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-?, a transcription factor that has been shown previously to bind the basic leucine zipper 1 domain in the C3 promoter. We show herein that mutation of this domain reduced iron-induced C3 promoter activity. In vivo studies support our in vitro finding of iron-induced C3 up-regulation. Mice with a mosaic pattern of RPE-specific iron overload demonstrated co-localization of iron-induced ferritin and C3d deposits. Humans with aceruloplasminemia causing RPE iron overload had increased RPE C3d deposition. The molecular events in the iron-C3 pathway represent therapeutic targets for AMD or other diseases exacerbated by iron-induced local complement dysregulation. PMID:25802332

  10. Exosomes released by keratinocytes modulate melanocyte pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Alessandra Lo; Delevoye, Cédric; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Guéré, Christelle; André, Nathalie; Vié, Katell; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2015-01-01

    Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), exosomes and microvesicles, which transfer proteins, lipids and RNAs to regulate recipient cell functions. Skin pigmentation relies on a tight dialogue between keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermis. Here we report that exosomes secreted by keratinocytes enhance melanin synthesis by increasing both the expression and activity of melanosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that the function of keratinocyte-derived exosomes is phototype-dependent and is modulated by ultraviolet B. In sum, this study uncovers an important physiological function for exosomes in human pigmentation and opens new avenues in our understanding of how pigmentation is regulated by intercellular communication in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:26103923

  11. Key Regulatory Role of Dermal Fibroblasts in Pigmentation as Demonstrated Using a Reconstructed Skin Model: Impact of Photo-Aging

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Christine; Cohen, Catherine; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Flouret, Virginie; Bourreau, Emilie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n?=?3) was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n?=?3) which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance) and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the hyperpigmentation that is associated with photo-aging. PMID:25490395

  12. Pigment Production from Tryptophan by an Achromobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Duerre, John A.; Buckley, Patrick J.

    1965-01-01

    Duerre, John A. (University of North Dakota, Grand Forks), and Patrick J. Buckley. Pigment production from tryptophan by an Achromobacter species. J. Bacteriol. 90:1686–1691. 1965.—A microorganism was isolated from the soil near the University of North Dakota. Biochemical and morphological characteristics indicated that this organism would best be classified as a member of the family Achromobacteraceae, genus Achromobacter, species unknown. The organism produced a red pigment when grown in a medium containing yeast extract and tryptophan. The pH optimum for pigment production was about 8.0 and the optimal temperature was 25 C. During a study of the nutritional requirements for growth and pigment production, it was found that the organism would grow and produce pigment in a medium containing tryptophan and nucleosides, but the rate of both growth and pigment formation in this medium was slower than that observed with tryptophan and yeast extract. The organism grew well in the presence of acid-hydrolyzed casein and nucleosides without producing pigment, indicating that the pigment is not necessary for growth. Resting-cell experiments definitely established tryptophan as the sole exogenous requirement for pigment production. The pigment was extracted from yeast extract-tryptophan medium with chloroform. Thin layer chromatographic analysis of the crude pigment extracted from this medium revealed the presence of two other pigments in addition to the major red pigment. One of these was a highly fluorescent orange pigment and the other a pink pigment. Only the red pigment was produced by resting cells in the presence of tryptophan alone. This pigment served as an electron acceptor when coupled with formic dehydrogenase, indicating its possible function as an oxidation-reduction pigment. The oxidized pigment had absorption peaks at 506 and 304 m?. The peak at 506 m? disappeared upon reduction with sodium sulfite. Shaking the reduced pigment in air proved to be an unsatisfactory method for returning the reduced pigment to the oxidized, colored state. PMID:5854590

  13. Age-related macular degeneration-associated variants at chromosome 10q26 do not significantly alter ARMS2 and HTRA1

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    and rs11200638 variants was detected with mRNA expression levels of ARMS2 or HTRA1 in the retina. Human changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Large and soft drusen in the macula are identified

  14. PIGMENT CELL Research Volume 25 . Number 4 . July 2012

    E-print Network

    Monteiro, Antónia

    PIGMENT CELL & MELANOMA Research Volume 25 . Number 4 . July 2012 The official journal of INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF PIGMENT CELL SOCIETIES . SOCIETY FOR MELANOMA RESEARCH www.pigment.org PKC in melanoma Diversity and convergence in animal pigmentation #12;Unraveling the thread of nature's tapestry

  15. Color me bad: microbial pigments as virulence factors

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Color me bad: microbial pigments as virulence factors George Y. Liu1 and Victor Nizet2 1 Division is the distinctive color of their colonies when propagated in the clinical laboratory. Such pigmentation comes in microbial pigment biochemistry and the genetic basis of pigment production have sometimes revealed a more

  16. BIOLOGY IN PICTURES FLOWER PIGMENTATION Colouring the snapdragon

    E-print Network

    Jackson, David

    BIOLOGY IN PICTURES FLOWER PIGMENTATION Colouring the snapdragon Pigmentation pattern, one '· ·. . : Whereas the flower buds of wild-type Antirrhinum majus show a pattern of anthocyanin pigmentation that is stongest at the base of the petal tube and in the lobes (a), there is no pigment in the petal tube

  17. Trade-Offs between Predation Risk and Growth Benefits in the Copepod Eurytemora affinis with Contrasting Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gorokhova, Elena; Lehtiniemi, Maiju; Motwani, Nisha H.

    2013-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in body pigmentation is an ecologically and evolutionary important trait; however, the pigmentation related trade-offs in marine zooplankton are poorly understood. We tested the effects of intrapopulation phenotypic variation in the pigmentation of the copepod Eurytemora affinis on predation risk, foraging, growth, metabolic activity and antioxidant capacity. Using pigmented and unpigmented specimens, we compared (1) predation and selectivity by the invertebrate predator Cercopagis pengoi, (2) feeding activity of the copepods measured as grazing rate in experiments and gut fluorescence in situ, (3) metabolic activity assayed as RNA:DNA ratio in both experimental and field-collected copepods, (4) reproductive output estimated as egg ratio in the population, and (5) total antioxidant capacity. Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) COI gene variation was analysed. The pigmented individuals were at higher predation risk as evidenced by significantly higher predation rate by C. pengoi on pigmented individuals and positive selection by the predator fed pigmented and unpigmented copepods in a mixture. However, the antioxidant capacity, RNA:DNA and egg ratio values were significantly higher in the pigmented copepods, whereas neither feeding rate nor gut fluorescence differed between the pigmented and unpigmented copepods. The phenotypic variation in pigmentation was not associated with any specific mtDNA genotype. Together, these results support the metabolic stimulation hypothesis to explain variation in E. affinis pigmentation, which translates into beneficial increase in growth via enhanced metabolism and antioxidant protective capacity, together with disadvantageous increase in predation risk. We also suggest an alternative mechanism for the metabolic stimulation via elevated antioxidant levels as a primary means of increasing metabolism without the increase in heat absorbance. The observed trade-offs are relevant to evolutionary mechanisms underlying plasticity and adaptation and have the capacity to modify strength of complex trophic interactions. PMID:23940745

  18. Relationships between pigment composition variation and reflectance for plant species from a coastal savannah in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Sanderson, Eric W.; Grossman, Yaffa; Hart, Quinn J.

    1993-01-01

    Advances in imaging spectroscopy have indicated that remotely sensed reflectance measurements of the plant canopy may be used to identify and qualify some classes of canopy biochemicals; however, the manner in which differences in biochemical compositions translate into differences is not well understood. Most frequently, multiple linear regression routines have been used to correlate narrow band reflectance values with measured biochemical concentrations. Although some success has been achieved with such methods for given data sets, the bands selected by multiple regression are not consistent between data sets, nor is it always clear what physical or biological basis underlies the correlation. To examine the relationship between biochemical concentration and leaf reflectance signal we chose to focus on the visible spectrum where the primary biochemical absorbances are due to photosynthetic pigments. Pigments provide a range of absorbance features, occur over a range of concentrations in natural samples, and are ecophysiologically important. Concentrations of chlorophyll, for example, have been strongly correlated to foliar nitrogen levels within a species and to photosynthetic capacity across many species. In addition pigments effectively absorb most of the photosynthetically active radiation between 400-700 nm, a spectral region for which silicon detectors have good signal/noise characteristics. Our strategy has been to sample a variety of naturally occurring species to measure leaf reflectance and pigment compositions. We hope to extend our understanding of pigment reflectance effects to interpret small overlapping absorbances of other biochemicals in the infrared region. For this reason, selected samples were also tested to determine total nitrogen, crude protein, cellulose, and lignin levels. Leaf reflectance spectra measured with AVIRIS bandwidths and wavelengths were compared between species and within species and for differences between seasons, for changes in the the shape of the spectra. We attempt to statistically correlate these shape changes with differences in pigment compositions. In parallel with our comparisons of pigment composition and leaf reflectance, we have modified the PROSPECT leaf reflectance model to test the contributions of pigments or pigment group concentrations. PROSPECT considers a leaf as a multi-layer dielectric plane with an uneven surface. Jacquemoud adapted the basic analysis of Allen for surface effects, a leaf thickness factor, and the absorption of water and chlorophyll (actually all pigments) and the plant matrix. Our modifications to PROSPECT in the forward direction include breaking out the pigment concentration parameter into separate components for chlorophyll a and b and a number of xanthophylls and carotenes, and introducing a shift and convolution function to model the spread and shift from their in vitro measurements to their in vivo state. Further, we have considered how the matrix elements (i.e., all biochemicals and structural effects not modeled explicity) vary with species.

  19. Diagnosis and management of facial pigmented macules.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Simonetti, Vito; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pigmented macules on the mottled chronic sun-damaged skin of the face is challenging and includes lentigo maligna (LM), pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, solar lentigo, and lichen-planus-like keratosis. Although dermatoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of the unaided eye, the accurate diagnosis and management of pigmented facial macules remains one of the most challenging scenarios in daily practice. This is related to the fact that pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, lichen-planus-like keratosis, and LM may reveal overlapping criteria, making their differential diagnosis clinically difficult. For this reason, practical rules have been introduced, which should help to minimize the risk for inappropriate diagnosis and management of LM. PMID:24314382

  20. Pleiotropic effects of pigmentation genes in horses.

    PubMed

    Bellone, R R

    2010-12-01

    Horses are valued for the beauty and variety of colouration and coat patterning. To date, eleven different genes have been characterized that contribute to the variation observed in the horse. Unfortunately, mutations involving pigmentation often lead to deleterious effects in other systems, some of which have been described in the horse. This review focuses on six such pleiotropic effects or associations with pigmentation genes. These include neurological defects (lethal white foal syndrome and lavender foal syndrome), hearing defects, eye disorders (congenital stationary night blindness and multiple congenital ocular anomalies), as well as horse-specific melanoma. The pigmentation phenotype, disorder phenotype, mode of inheritance, genetic or genomic methods utilized to identify the genes involved and, if known, the causative mutations, molecular interactions and other susceptibility loci are discussed. As our understanding of pigmentation in the horse increases, through the use of novel genomic tools, we are likely to unravel yet unknown pleiotropic effects and determine additional interactions between previously discovered loci. PMID:21070283

  1. New Directions in Phthalocyanine Pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemark, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were the following: (1) investigation of the synthesis of new phthalocyanines; (2) characterization of the new phthalocyanines synthesized; (3) investigate the properties of the newly synthesized phthalocyanines with emphasis on UV protection of plastics and coatings; and (4) utilize quantum mechanics to evaluate the structural relationships with possible properties and synthetic approaches. The proposed research targeted the synthesis of phthalocyanines containing an aromatic bridge between two phthalocyanine rings. The goal was to synthesize pigments which would protect plastics when exposed to the photodegradation effects of the sun in space. The stability and extended conjugation of the phthalocyanines offer a unique opportunity for energy absorption and numerous radiative and non-radiative energy loss mechanisms. Although the original targeted phthalocyanines were changed early in the project, several new and unique phthalocyanine compounds were prepared. The basic goals of this work were met and some unique and unexpected outcomes of the work were the result of the integral use of quantum mechanics and molecular modeling with the synthetic effort.

  2. MACULAR COLOBOMA IN A CHILD WITH USHER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Mazhar; Mukhtar, Ahsan; Khan, Saim

    2015-01-01

    Macular coloboma is a rare entity and its concomitance with Usher syndrome is described here. A 14 years male child was studied in detail along with other family members. He underwent two complete ophthalmologic examinations (4-years follow-up), including visual assessment, orthoptic evaluation, colour vision test, visual fields, corneal topography, Optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography. Detailed ophthalmic examination was also conducted on other asymptomatic members of the same family. Patient had sensorineural deafness, poor visual acuity, and progressive visual field impairment in both eyes, bilaterally presenting macular coloboma and atypical retinitis pigmentosa pattern. The other investigated relatives did not show any specific and/or significant ocular disorder. This concurrence represents no genetic pattern and is observed in sporadic cases. PMID:26411142

  3. Enhanced visualization of acute macular neuroretinopathy by Heidelberg Retina Tomography.

    PubMed

    Mirshahi, Alireza; Scharioth, Gàbor B; Klais, Christina M C; Baatz, Holger

    2006-08-01

    We report Heidelberg Retina Tomography (HRT) findings in a case of bilateral acute macular neuroretinopathy in a 22-year-old man. In addition to fundus photography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography, and visual field testing, HRT scans of the macula were performed early in the disease and at a follow up of 2 months. We found typical paracentral scotomata in visual field testing corresponding to sharply delineated, hyporeflective areas of the macula as visualized in HRT II scans. Those lesions were almost invisible on regular fundus photographs. Angiography results were unremarkable. The lesion size decreased over time. The visibility of the lesions was markedly enhanced by HRT scans, thus the diagnosis and follow up of acute macular neuroretinopathy could be facilitated by this non-invasive imaging technique. PMID:16925709

  4. Iron accumulation in Bruch's membrane and melanosomes of donor eyes with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, Antje; Yoeruek, Efdal; Eibl, Oliver; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Iron (Fe) accumulation in cytoplasmic storages of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with age has been reported to be a contributing factor to the onset and progression of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This work investigated whether iron can also be stored in specialized metal-binding melanosomes of the RPE and choroid and in age pigments of the RPE (lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin). As accumulation of debris in Bruch's membrane is an additional hallmark of AMD, the elemental composition of Bruch's membrane was also investigated. Perimacular sections of the retina-choroid complex of six eyes of AMD donors and of seven age-matched healthy controls were investigated using Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM). The melanosomes of the RPE and choroidal melanocytes of all AMD donors contained about two times higher iron mole fractions (0.06-0.07 at%) compared to the controls, which showed only minor iron mole fractions at or below the detection limit of 0.02 at%. Only melanosomes that contained iron, showed also significant lead peaks (both AMD and control about 0.08 at%). In addition, the electron-dense part of melanolipofuscin granules in the RPE accumulated iron and lead, both for control and AMD donors. Iron in lipofuscin was below the detection limit. The elastic layer of Bruch's membrane of all AMD donors also contained significantly higher iron mole fractions compared to controls (about 0.08 at% Fe), predominantly in areas that were also rich in calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), suggesting calcification. Indeed, five of the six AMD donors but only one of the seven controls showed nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite calcifications. Note that such nanocrystalline material can only be detected in EM samples without heavy metal (osmiumtetroxide, uranylacetate) staining. In conclusion, iron accumulation in melanosomal storages and within calcified Bruch's membrane is more pronounced in donors suffering from AMD compared to age-matched controls. This work underlines the common hypothesis that heavy metal homeostasis plays an important role in age-related neuropathy. PMID:26026877

  5. Zeo-pigment for traditional ceramic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, J.J.P.; Rodriguez, A.V.; Caraballo, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In the present work the possibility of using natural zeolites mixed with soluble salts for ceramic pigment elaboration (further named zeo-pigment) is studied. The mixture of zeolite with salts is thermally treated to produce the pigment, this procedure was followed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The obtained zeo-pigments were used to colour the porcelanized ceramic stoneware tiles at the experimental production. As it is known, it is possible to prepare a wide range of colours in these type of tiles by adding specific stains to the mixture of raw materials during grinding in the amount of 0.5 to 5 %, in this way any product called marbleized, mottled, granite, etc. ware is obtained. It is important to remember that when stains are added to the basic white body in order to produce one-color porcelanized ceramic stoneware, this does not involve great problems for the production. The physical properties of experimental produced ceramics, coloured by zeo-pigments, were studied according to European standard test. The present work is intended to be useful from the point of view of pollution prevention and waste minimization, regarding the utilization of soluble salts contained in some industrial wastes for the elaboration of ceramic pigments.

  6. Bacteriorhodopsin-based photochromic pigments for optical security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Norbert A.; Fischer, Thorsten; Neebe, Martin

    2002-04-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin is a two-dimensional crystalline photochromic protein which is astonishingly stable towards chemical and thermal degradation. This is one of the reasons why this is one of the very few proteins which may be used as a biological pigment in printing inks. Variants of the naturally occurring bacteriorhodopsin have been developed which show a distinguished color change even with low light intensities and without the requirement of UV-light. Several pigments with different color changes are available right now. In addition to this visual detectable feature, the photochromism, the proteins amino acid sequence can be genetically altered in order to code and identify specific production lots. For advanced applications the data storage capability of bacteriorhodopsin will be useful. Write-once-read-many (WORM) recording of digital data is accomplished by laser excitation of printed bacteriorhodopsin inks. A density of 1 MBit per square inch is currently achieved. Several application examples for this biological molecule are described where low and high level features are used in combination. Bacteriorhodopsin-based inks are a new class of optical security pigments.

  7. A local complement response by RPE causes early-stage macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L; Pierce, Eric A

    2015-10-01

    Inherited and age-related macular degenerations (AMDs) are important causes of vision loss. An early hallmark of these disorders is the formation of sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basal deposits. A role for the complement system in MDs was suggested by genetic association studies, but direct functional connections between alterations in the complement system and the pathogenesis of MD remain to be defined. We used primary RPE cells from a mouse model of inherited MD due to a p.R345W mutation in EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) to investigate the role of the RPE in early MD pathogenesis. Efemp1(R345W) RPE cells recapitulate the basal deposit formation observed in vivo by producing sub-RPE deposits in vitro. The deposits share features with basal deposits, and their formation was mediated by EFEMP1(R345W) or complement component 3a (C3a), but not by complement component 5a (C5a). Increased activation of complement appears to occur in response to an abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM), generated by the mutant EFEMP1(R345W) protein and reduced ECM turnover due to inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase 2 by EFEMP1(R345W) and C3a. Increased production of C3a also stimulated the release of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1B, which appear to have a role in deposit formation, albeit downstream of C3a. These studies provide the first direct indication that complement components produced locally by the RPE are involved in the formation of basal deposits. Furthermore, these results suggest that C3a generated by RPE is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of EFEMP1-associated MD as well as AMD. PMID:26199322

  8. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2008-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the industrialized world. In the last few decades, the mainstay of treatment for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) due to AMD has been thermal laser photocoagulation. In the last decade, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin extended treatment for more patients. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, improvement in visual acuity is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) therapy has revolutionized the treatment of AMD-related CNV. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF have both shown promising results with improvements in visual acuity with either agent. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analogue, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF agents and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering ribonucleic acid (RNA) to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Steroids, including anecortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, have shown promise in controlled trials. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived growth factor that has been administered via an adenoviral vector has shown promising initial results. In some patients ciliary neurotrophic factor is currently being studied for the inhibition of progression of geographic atrophy. Combination therapy has been investigated, and may prove to be more effective in the management of AMD-associated CNV. Ongoing and future studies will be crucial for optimizing the treatment of patients with AMD. PMID:19668729

  9. Decision support system for age-related macular degeneration using discrete wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Koh, Joel E W; Chua, Chua Kuang; Tan, Jen Hong; Chandran, Vinod; Lim, Choo Min; Noronha, Kevin; Laude, Augustinus; Tong, Louis

    2014-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects the central vision and subsequently may lead to visual loss in people over 60 years of age. There is no permanent cure for AMD, but early detection and successive treatment may improve the visual acuity. AMD is mainly classified into dry and wet type; however, dry AMD is more common in aging population. AMD is characterized by drusen, yellow pigmentation, and neovascularization. These lesions are examined through visual inspection of retinal fundus images by ophthalmologists. It is laborious, time-consuming, and resource-intensive. Hence, in this study, we have proposed an automated AMD detection system using discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and feature ranking strategies. The first four-order statistical moments (mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis), energy, entropy, and Gini index-based features are extracted from DWT coefficients. We have used five (t test, Kullback-Lieber Divergence (KLD), Chernoff Bound and Bhattacharyya Distance, receiver operating characteristics curve-based, and Wilcoxon) feature ranking strategies to identify optimal feature set. A set of supervised classifiers namely support vector machine (SVM), decision tree, [Formula: see text]-nearest neighbor ([Formula: see text]-NN), Naive Bayes, and probabilistic neural network were used to evaluate the highest performance measure using minimum number of features in classifying normal and dry AMD classes. The proposed framework obtained an average accuracy of 93.70%, sensitivity of 91.11%, and specificity of 96.30% using KLD ranking and SVM classifier. We have also formulated an AMD Risk Index using selected features to classify the normal and dry AMD classes using one number. The proposed system can be used to assist the clinicians and also for mass AMD screening programs. PMID:25112273

  10. Biallelic mutations in the autophagy regulator DRAM2 cause retinal dystrophy with early macular involvement.

    PubMed

    El-Asrag, Mohammed E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; McKibbin, Martin; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheridan, Eamonn; Waseem, Naushin; Abdelhamed, Zakia; McKeefry, Declan; Van Schil, Kristof; Poulter, James A; Johnson, Colin A; Carr, Ian M; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride; Inglehearn, Chris F; Webster, Andrew R; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2015-06-01

    Retinal dystrophies are an overlapping group of genetically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in more than 250 genes. Here we describe five families affected by an adult-onset retinal dystrophy with early macular involvement and associated central visual loss in the third or fourth decade of life. Affected individuals were found to harbor disease-causing variants in DRAM2 (DNA-damage regulated autophagy modulator protein 2). Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in a large, consanguineous British family of Pakistani origin revealed a homozygous frameshift variant (c.140delG [p.Gly47Valfs(?)3]) in nine affected family members. Sanger sequencing of DRAM2 in 322 unrelated probands with retinal dystrophy revealed one European subject with compound heterozygous DRAM2 changes (c.494G>A [p.Trp165(?)] and c.131G>A [p.Ser44Asn]). Inspection of previously generated exome sequencing data in unsolved retinal dystrophy cases identified a homozygous variant in an individual of Indian origin (c.64_66del [p.Ala22del]). Independently, a gene-based case-control association study was conducted via an exome sequencing dataset of 18 phenotypically similar case subjects and 1,917 control subjects. Using a recessive model and a binomial test for rare, presumed biallelic, variants, we found DRAM2 to be the most statistically enriched gene; one subject was a homozygote (c.362A>T [p.His121Leu]) and another a compound heterozygote (c.79T>C [p.Tyr27His] and c.217_225del [p.Val73_Tyr75del]). DRAM2 encodes a transmembrane lysosomal protein thought to play a role in the initiation of autophagy. Immunohistochemical analysis showed DRAM2 localization to photoreceptor inner segments and to the apical surface of retinal pigment epithelial cells where it might be involved in the process of photoreceptor renewal and recycling to preserve visual function. PMID:25983245

  11. Biallelic Mutations in the Autophagy Regulator DRAM2 Cause Retinal Dystrophy with Early Macular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrag, Mohammed E.; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; McKibbin, Martin; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheridan, Eamonn; Waseem, Naushin; Abdelhamed, Zakia; McKeefry, Declan; Van Schil, Kristof; Poulter, James A.; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina; Ingram, Stuart; Gillespie, Rachel; Ramsden, Simon; Manson, Forbes; Hardcastle, Alison; Michaelides, Michel; Cheetham, Michael; Arno, Gavin; Thomas, Niclas; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Moore, Tony; Nemeth, Andrea; Downes, Susan; Lise, Stefano; Lord, Emma; Johnson, Colin A.; Carr, Ian M.; Leroy, Bart P.; De Baere, Elfride; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Webster, Andrew R.; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2015-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies are an overlapping group of genetically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in more than 250 genes. Here we describe five families affected by an adult-onset retinal dystrophy with early macular involvement and associated central visual loss in the third or fourth decade of life. Affected individuals were found to harbor disease-causing variants in DRAM2 (DNA-damage regulated autophagy modulator protein 2). Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in a large, consanguineous British family of Pakistani origin revealed a homozygous frameshift variant (c.140delG [p.Gly47Valfs?3]) in nine affected family members. Sanger sequencing of DRAM2 in 322 unrelated probands with retinal dystrophy revealed one European subject with compound heterozygous DRAM2 changes (c.494G>A [p.Trp165?] and c.131G>A [p.Ser44Asn]). Inspection of previously generated exome sequencing data in unsolved retinal dystrophy cases identified a homozygous variant in an individual of Indian origin (c.64_66del [p.Ala22del]). Independently, a gene-based case-control association study was conducted via an exome sequencing dataset of 18 phenotypically similar case subjects and 1,917 control subjects. Using a recessive model and a binomial test for rare, presumed biallelic, variants, we found DRAM2 to be the most statistically enriched gene; one subject was a homozygote (c.362A>T [p.His121Leu]) and another a compound heterozygote (c.79T>C [p.Tyr27His] and c.217_225del [p.Val73_Tyr75del]). DRAM2 encodes a transmembrane lysosomal protein thought to play a role in the initiation of autophagy. Immunohistochemical analysis showed DRAM2 localization to photoreceptor inner segments and to the apical surface of retinal pigment epithelial cells where it might be involved in the process of photoreceptor renewal and recycling to preserve visual function. PMID:25983245

  12. Insights into the mechanisms of macular degeneration associated with the R172W mutation in RDS.

    PubMed

    Conley, Shannon M; Stuck, Michael W; Burnett, Justin L; Chakraborty, Dibyendu; Azadi, Seifollah; Fliesler, Steven J; Naash, Muna I

    2014-06-15

    Mutations in the photoreceptor tetraspanin gene peripherin-2/retinal degeneration slow (PRPH2/RDS) cause both rod- and cone-dominant diseases. While rod-dominant diseases, such as autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, are thought to arise due to haploinsufficiency caused by loss-of-function mutations, the mechanisms underlying PRPH2-associated cone-dominant diseases are unclear. Here we took advantage of a transgenic mouse line expressing an RDS mutant (R172W) known to cause macular degeneration (MD) in humans. To facilitate the study of cones in the heavily rod-dominant mouse retina, R172W mice were bred onto an Nrl(-/-) background (in which developing rods adopt a cone-like fate). In this model the R172W protein and the key RDS-binding partner, rod outer segment (OS) membrane protein 1 (ROM-1), were properly expressed and trafficked to cone OSs. However, the expression of R172W led to dominant defects in cone structure and function with equal effects on S- and M-cones. Furthermore, the expression of R172W in cones induced subtle alterations in RDS/ROM-1 complex assembly, specifically resulting in the formation of abnormal, large molecular weight ROM-1 complexes. Fundus imaging demonstrated that R172W mice developed severe clinical signs of disease nearly identical to those seen in human MD patients, including retinal degeneration, retinal pigment epithlium (RPE) defects and loss of the choriocapillaris. Collectively, these data identify a primary disease-causing molecular defect in cone cells and suggest that RDS-associated disease in patients may be a result of this defect coupled with secondary sequellae involving RPE and choriocapillaris cell loss. PMID:24463884

  13. Factors Associated With Persistent Subfoveal Fluid and Complete Macular Hole Closure in the PIONEER Study

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Justis P.; Itoh, Yuji; Xu, Lucy T.; Kaiser, Peter K.; Singh, Rishi P.; Srivastava, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate preoperative and intraoperative factors associated with persistent subfoveal fluid in surgically closed macular holes (MHs). Methods. This was a prospective consecutive case series of eyes undergoing surgical repair for full-thickness MH in the PIONEER study, a prospective intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT) multisurgeon single-center study. Thirty-seven eyes (36 patients) with surgically closed MH were studied. Quantitative OCT analysis was performed including intraoperative MH area, volume, ellipsoid zone to retinal pigment epithelium (EZ-RPE) height, extent of subretinal hyporeflectivity (SRHR), and the amount of postoperative subfoveal fluid. Results. Persistent subfoveal fluid was identified in 58% of eyes at 2 weeks following surgery. The mean time to two-line improvement in visual acuity was greater in eyes with persistent subfoveal fluid (P = 0.03). Final visual acuity did not correlate with the initial presence of fluid. Two intraoperative factors following internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling were associated with the formation of persistent subfoveal fluid: EZ-RPE height and SRHR width (P < 0.01). These were both negatively correlated with amount of postoperative subfoveal fluid (P = 0.028 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusions. Persistent subfoveal fluid following MH surgery is a common finding that appears to delay visual recovery but not effect final visual outcome. The incidence of persistent subfoveal fluid appears to be related to intraoperative alterations after ILM peeling in the outer retinal architecture (e.g., increased EZ-RPE height and SRHR width). This finding suggests a novel mechanism for facilitating MH closure through ILM peeling (e.g., altering photoreceptor/RPE adherence and increasing retinal mobility that allows for complete hole closure). PMID:25525173

  14. Vitamin D Status and Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Amy E.; Voland, Rick; Sondel, Sherie A.; Parekh, Niyati; Horst, Ronald L.; Wallace, Robert B.; Hageman, Gregory S.; Chappell, Rick; Blodi, Barbara A.; Klein, Michael L.; Gehrs, Karen M.; Sarto, Gloria E.; Mares, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (nmol/L) and the prevalence of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) was investigated among participants of the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study. Methods Stereoscopic fundus photographs, taken from 2001–2004, assessed AMD status. Baseline (1994–1998) serum samples were available for 25(OH)D assays in 1,313 women with complete ocular and risk factor data. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for early AMD (n=241), among 1,287 without advanced disease, were estimated with logistic regression and adjusted for age, smoking, iris pigmentation, family history of AMD, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hormone therapy use. Results In multivariate models, no significant relationship was observed between early AMD and 25(OH)D (OR for quintile 5 vs. 1=0.79, 95% CI=0.50–1.24; p for trend=0.47). A significant age interaction (p=0.0025) suggested selective mortality bias in women ?75 years: serum 25(OH)D was associated with decreased odds of early AMD in women <75 years (n=968) and increased odds in women ?75 years (n=319) (OR for quintile 5 vs. 1=0.52, 95% CI=0.29–0.91; p for trend=0.02 and 1.76, 95% CI=0.77–4.13; p for trend=0.05, respectively). Further adjustment for body mass index and recreational physical activity, predictors of 25(OH)D, attenuated the observed association in women <75 years. Additionally, among women <75 years, intake of vitamin D from foods and supplements was related to decreased odds of early AMD in multivariate models; no relationship was observed with self-reported time spent in direct sunlight. Conclusions High serum 25(OH)D concentrations may protect against early AMD in women <75 years. PMID:21482873

  15. Fucoidan Reduces Secretion and Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Reduces Angiogenesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dithmer, Michaela; Fuchs, Sabine; Shi, Yang; Schmidt, Harald; Richert, Elisabeth; Roider, Johann; Klettner, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    Fucoidan is a polysaccharide isolated from brown algae which is of current interest for anti-tumor therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of fucoidan on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), looking at physiology, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, and angiogenesis, thus investigating a potential use of fucoidan for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. For this study, human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and primary porcine RPE cells were used, as well as RPE/choroid perfusion organ cultures. The effect of fucoidan on RPE cells was investigated with methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium – assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, phagocytosis assay and a wound healing assay. VEGF expression was evaluated in immunocytochemistry and Western blot, VEGF secretion was evaluated in ELISA. The effect of fucoidan on angiogenesis was tested in a Matrigel assay using calcein-AM vital staining, evaluated by confocal laser scanning microcopy and quantitative image analysis. Fucoidan displays no toxicity and does not diminish proliferation or phagocytosis, but reduces wound healing in RPE cells. Fucoidan decreases VEGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and RPE cells. Furthermore, it diminishes VEGF expression in RPE cells even when co-applied with bevacizumab. Furthermore, fucoidan reduces RPE-supernatant- and VEGF-induced angiogenesis of peripheral endothelial cells. In conclusion, fucoidan is a non-toxic agent that reduces VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and may be of interest for further studies as a potential therapy against exudative age-related macular degeneration. PMID:24558482

  16. Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Mitigate the Effects of Complement Attack by Endocytosis of C5b-9

    PubMed Central

    Georgiannakis, Apostolos; Burgoyne, Tom; Lueck, Katharina; Futter, Clare; Greenwood, John

    2015-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death is a hallmark of age-related macular degeneration. The alternative pathway of complement activation is strongly implicated in RPE cell dysfunction and loss in age-related macular degeneration; therefore, it is critical that RPE cells use molecular strategies to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of complement attack. We show that the terminal complement complex C5b-9 assembles rapidly on the basal surface of cultured primary porcine RPE cells but disappears over 48 h without any discernable adverse effects on the cells. However, in the presence of the dynamin inhibitor dynasore, C5b-9 was almost completely retained at the cell surface, suggesting that, under normal circumstances, it is eliminated via the endocytic pathway. In support of this idea, we observed that C5b-9 colocalizes with the early endosome marker EEA1 and that, in the presence of protease inhibitors, it can be detected in lysosomes. Preventing the endocytosis of C5b-9 by RPE cells led to structural defects in mitochondrial morphology consistent with cell stress. We conclude that RPE cells use the endocytic pathway to prevent the accumulation of C5b-9 on the cell surface and that processing and destruction of C5b-9 by this route are essential for RPE cell survival. PMID:26324770

  17. Focal macular photopic negative response in patients with optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, H; Miyamoto, K; Yokota, S; Ogino, K; Yoshimura, N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate, by focal macular electroretinography (ERG), the change of photopic negative response (PhNR) in the recovery of visual function in patients with optic neuritis. Methods Focal macular ERG was recorded from nine patients with acute optic neuritis (38.6±10.2 years). The photostimulator device projected 15° visual angle spotlight onto the macula. Focal macular ERG recording was performed at the onset and at 1 month and 6 months after the onset of optic neuritis. The results were compared between each recording for seven of the patients. Results All patients decreased in the vision below 20/100 and had central scotoma. Vision improved more than 20/20 within 1 month and full-visual field recovered within 6 months after the onset in all patients. The amplitude of the a-wave, b-wave, and PhNR of focal macular ERG at the onset was significantly attenuated in eyes with optic neuritis (66.8±15.5, 65.8±17.7, and 65.2±14.4% of normal control, respectively). The amplitude of the a-wave and b-wave increased gradually after steroid pulse therapy. The increase in a-wave amplitude was significant at 6 months (P=0.046), whereas the PhNR amplitude did not show any significant change over 6 months after the onset of optic neuritis. Conclusions Our results suggest that inflammation at the onset of optic neuritis leads to functional deficits that extend to at least the inner nuclear layers of the retina, and that all but the ganglion cell layers of retina recover. PMID:21212800

  18. Subducted and Melanotic Cells in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration Are Derived From Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zanzottera, Emma C.; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Ach, Thomas; Smith, R. Theodore; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe, illustrate, and account for two cell types plausibly derived from RPE in geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) of AMD, using melanosomes, lipofuscin, and basal laminar deposit (BLamD) as anatomical markers. Methods. Human donor eyes with GA (n = 13) or CNV (n = 39) were histologically processed, photodocumented, and analyzed for frequencies of occurrence. We defined RPE as cells containing spindle-shaped melanosomes and RPE lipofuscin, internal to basal lamina or BLamD, if present, or Bruch's membrane if not, and RPE-derived cells as those plausibly derived from RPE and not attached to basal lamina or BLamD. Results. ‘Subducted’ cells contain RPE melanosomes and localize to the sub-RPE space, on Bruch's membrane. Credible transitional forms from RPE cells were seen. Grades of RPE overlying ‘Subducted’ cells were ‘Atrophic with BLamD’ (32.2% vs. 37.0% of ‘Subducted,’ for GA and CNV eyes, respectively), ‘Dissociated’ (22.0% vs. 21.7%), ‘Nonuniform’ (22.0% vs. 23.9%), and ‘Sloughed’ RPE (10.2% vs. 4.3%). Found exclusively in CNV scars, ‘Melanotic’ cells containing spherical melanosomes were adjacent to ‘Entombed’ RPE with spindle-shaped and spherical melanosomes. Of subretinal ‘Melanotic’ cells, 40.0% associated with ‘Atrophy with BLamD,’ 36.8% with ‘Atrophy without BLamD,’ and 20.6% with ‘Entombed.’ Conclusions. ‘Dissociated’ RPE within atrophic areas may be the source of ‘Subducted’ cells. ‘Entombed’ RPE within fibrovascular and fibrocellular scars may be the source of ‘Melanotic’ cells. An imaging correlate for ‘Subducted’ cells awaits discovery; ‘Melanotic’ cells appear gray-black in the CNV fundus. Results provide a basis for future molecular phenotyping studies. PMID:26024109

  19. Modular spectral imaging system for discrimination of pigments in cells and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Polerecky, Lubos; Bissett, Andrew; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Faerber, Paul; Osmers, Harald; Suci, Peter A; Stoodley, Paul; de Beer, Dirk

    2009-02-01

    Here we describe a spectral imaging system for minimally invasive identification, localization, and relative quantification of pigments in cells and microbial communities. The modularity of the system allows pigment detection on spatial scales ranging from the single-cell level to regions whose areas are several tens of square centimeters. For pigment identification in vivo absorption and/or autofluorescence spectra are used as the analytical signals. Along with the hardware, which is easy to transport and simple to assemble and allows rapid measurement, we describe newly developed software that allows highly sensitive and pigment-specific analyses of the hyperspectral data. We also propose and describe a number of applications of the system for microbial ecology, including identification of pigments in living cells and high-spatial-resolution imaging of pigments and the associated phototrophic groups in complex microbial communities, such as photosynthetic endolithic biofilms, microbial mats, and intertidal sediments. This system provides new possibilities for studying the role of spatial organization of microorganisms in the ecological functioning of complex benthic microbial communities or for noninvasively monitoring changes in the spatial organization and/or composition of a microbial community in response to changing environmental factors. PMID:19074609

  20. Carotenoid pigments and the selectivity of psittacofulvin-based coloration systems in parrots.

    PubMed

    McGraw, K J; Nogare, M C

    2004-07-01

    Carotenoid pigments are commonly used as colorants of feathers and bare parts by birds. However, parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) use a novel class of plumage pigments (called psittacofulvins) that, like carotenoids, are lipid-soluble and red, orange, or yellow in color. To begin to understand how and why parrots use these pigments and not carotenoids in their feathers, we must first describe the distribution of these two types of pigments in the diet, tissues, and fluids of these birds. Here, we studied the carotenoid content of blood in five species of parrots with red in their plumage to see if they show the physiological ability to accumulate carotenoids in the body. Although Scarlet (Ara macao) and Greenwing Macaws (Ara chloroptera) and Eclectus (Eclectus roratus), African Gray (Psittacus erithacus) and Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) Parrots all use psittacofulvins to color their feathers red, we found that they also circulated high concentrations of both dietary (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and metabolically derived (anhydrolutein, dehydrolutein) carotenoids through blood at the time of feather growth, at levels comparable to those found in many other carotenoid-colored birds. These results suggest that parrots have the potential to use carotenoids for plumage pigmentation, but preferentially avoid depositing them in feathers, which is likely under the control of the maturing feather follicle. As there is no evidence of psittacofulvins in parrot blood at the tune of feather growth, we presume that these pigments are locally synthesized by growing feathers within the follicular tissue. PMID:15253871

  1. Light absorption efficiencies of photosynthetic pigments: the dependence on spectral types of central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    For detecting life from reflection spectra on extrasolar planets, trace of photosynthesis is one of the indicators. However, it is not yet clear what kind of radiation environments is acceptable for photosynthesis. Light absorption in photosystems on the Earth occurs using limited photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophylls (Chls) and bacteriochlorophylls (BChls). Efficiencies of light absorption for the pigments were evaluated by calculating the specific molecular absorption spectra at the high accuracy-quantum mechanical level. We used realistic stellar radiation spectra such as F, G, K and M-type stars to investigate the efficiencies. We found that the efficiencies are increased with the temperature of stars, from M to F star. Photosynthetic pigments have two types of absorption bands, the Q y and Soret. In higher temperature stars like F star, contributions from the Soret region of the pigments are dominant for the efficiency. On the other hand, in lower temperature stars like M stars, the Q y band is crucial. Therefore, differences on the absorption intensity and the wavelength between the Q y and Soret band are the most important to characterize the photosynthetic pigments. Among photosynthetic pigments, Chls tend to be efficient in higher temperature stars, while BChls are efficient for M stars. Blueward of the 4000 Å break, the efficiencies of BChls are smaller than Chls in the higher temperature stars.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative composition of pigments in Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bacillariophyceae) stressed by iron.

    PubMed

    Kosakowska, Alicja; Lewandowska, Jolanta; Sto?, Joanna; Burkiewicz, Krystyna

    2004-02-01

    The effect of Fe(III) deficiency on qualitative and quantitative changes in pigment composition in Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin was demonstrated by HPLC and AAS. Maximum content of pigments showed the diatom cells incubated at the optimum iron concentration, i.e., 10 microM. The contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c1 + c2, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and beta,beta-carotene were 109.99, 20.16, 40.39, 1.29 and 1.48 fg per cell, respectively. The results obtained showed that Fe(III) affected qualitative and quantitative pigment composition in P. tricornutum. The content of individual pigments, proportions between accompanying pigments and their ratios to chlorophyll a were important indicators of phytoplankton response to iron stress. The strong reduction in beta,beta-carotene content, several times (2-5) increase in diadinoxanthin level as compared to beta,beta-carotene, and high amount of diadinoxanthin in relation to chlorophyll a were observed in algae growing at very low Fe(III) concentrations, 0.001 and 0.01 microM. The data suggested that phytoplankton pigments could be a potential physiological marker. PMID:14977361

  3. Optical Coherence Tomographic and Visual Results at Six Months after Transitioning to Aflibercept for Patients on Prior Ranibizumab or Bevacizumab Treatment for Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clement K.; Jain, Atul; Sadda, Srinivas; Varshney, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study optical coherence tomographic (OCT) results and vision at 6 months after transition (post-Tx) from intravitreal bevacizumab and/or ranibizumab to aflibercept for treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The null hypothesis was the lack of improvements in OCT metrics and vision outcome in study eyes at 6 months after transitioning from bevacizumab or ranibizumab to aflibercept. Methods: This retrospective study assessed 6 monthly OCT (Cirrus) data after transitioning to aflibercept for eyes on prior Legacy-ranibizumab, Legacy-bevacizumab, or mixed treatment for nAMD. Outcome measures were subretinal fluid (SRF), cystoid macular edema (CME), pigment epithelial detachment (PED) heights and volumes, central 1- and 3-mm subfield, Macular Volume, and best spectacle and pinhole visual acuity (VA). A single masked investigator performed all OCT measurements. Results: One hundred eighty-nine eyes in 172 patients in Legacy-bevacizumab (95 eyes), Legacy-ranibizumab (84 eyes), or Mixed Group(10 eyes) were switched to aflibercept and followed for 6 months. Significant post-Tx reductions were noted in SRF/CME heights and volumes (all P<.001). Similar findings were noted for PED heights (122.8 ?m vs 79.4 ?m) and PED volumes (all P<.001). Post-Tx VA was better (20/43 vs 20/51, P<.001). There were no differences between Legacy-bevacizumab and Legacy-ranibizumab groups in OCT and VA changes. Post-Tx VA, SRF/CME, and PED heights and volumes were improved for Nonresponders (suboptimal response to bevacizumab/ranibizumab) (P=.001 to <.001), but not Responders (good responses to same). The only adverse event was a retinal pigment epithelial tear in one eye. Conclusions: Significant improvements in vision and OCT metrics developed in Nonresponders but not in Responders. Post-Tx VA and OCT measures were similar for eyes on prior bevacizumab or ranibizumab. Post-Tx adverse events were uncommon. PMID:25646034

  4. Melanocortin receptor 1 and black pigmentation in the Japanese ornamental carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Koi)

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Ido; Kaddar, Ethan; Velan, Ariel; David, Lior

    2013-01-01

    Colors and their patterns are fascinating phenotypes with great importance for fitness under natural conditions. For this reason and because pigmentation is associated with diseases, much research was devoted to study the genetics of pigmentation in animals. Considerable contribution to our understanding of color phenotypes was made by studies in domesticated animals that exhibit dazzling variation in color traits. Koi strains, the ornamental variants of the common carp, are a striking example for color variability that was selected by man during a very short period on an evolutionary timescale. Among several pigmentation genes, genetic variation in Melanocrtin receptor 1 was repeatedly associated with dark pigmentation phenotypes in numerous animals. In this study, we cloned Melanocrtin receptor 1 from the common carp. We found that alleles of the gene were not associated with the development of black color in Koi. However, the mRNA expression levels of the gene were higher during dark pigmentation development in larvae and in dark pigmented tissues of adult fish, suggesting that variation in the regulation of the gene is associated with black color in Koi. These regulatory differences are reflected in both the timing of the dark-pigmentation development and the different mode of inheritance of the two black patterns associated with them. Identifying the genetic basis of color and color patterns in Koi will promote the production of this valuable ornamental fish. Furthermore, given the rich variety of colors and patterns, Koi serves as a good model to unravel pigmentation genes and their phenotypic effects and by that to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of colors also in natural populations. PMID:23355846

  5. Retinal layer segmentation of macular OCT images using boundary classification.

    PubMed

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Hauser, Matthew; Sotirchos, Elias S; Calabresi, Peter A; Ying, Howard S; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be an essential imaging modality for ophthalmology and is proving to be very important in neurology. OCT enables high resolution imaging of the retina, both at the optic nerve head and the macula. Macular retinal layer thicknesses provide useful diagnostic information and have been shown to correlate well with measures of disease severity in several diseases. Since manual segmentation of these layers is time consuming and prone to bias, automatic segmentation methods are critical for full utilization of this technology. In this work, we build a random forest classifier to segment eight retinal layers in macular cube images acquired by OCT. The random forest classifier learns the boundary pixels between layers, producing an accurate probability map for each boundary, which is then processed to finalize the boundaries. Using this algorithm, we can accurately segment the entire retina contained in the macular cube to an accuracy of at least 4.3 microns for any of the nine boundaries. Experiments were carried out on both healthy and multiple sclerosis subjects, with no difference in the accuracy of our algorithm found between the groups. PMID:23847738

  6. Comparison and interchangeability of macular thickness measured with Cirrus OCT and Stratus OCT in myopic eyes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Geng; Qiu, Kun-Liang; Lu, Xue-Hui; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the difference of macular thickness measurements between stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Cirrus OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA) in the same myopic patient and to develop a conversion equation to interchange macular thickness obtained with these two OCT devices. METHODS Eighty-nine healthy Chinese adults with spherical equivalent (SE) ranging from -1.13 D to -9.63 D were recruited. The macular thickness was measured by Cirrus OCT and Stratus OCT. The correlation between macular thickness and axial length and the agreement between two OCT measurements were evaluated. A formula was generated to interchange macular thickness obtained with two OCT devices. RESULTS Average macular thickness measured with Stratus OCT (r=-0.280, P=0.008) and Cirrus OCT (r=-0.224, P=0.034) were found to be negatively correlated with axial length. No statistically significant correlation was found between axial length and central subfield macular thickness (CMT) measured with Stratus OCT (r=0.191, P=0.073) and Cirrus OCT (r=0.169, P=0.113). The mean CMT measured with Cirrus OCT was 53.63±7.94 µm thicker than with Stratus OCT. The formula CMTCirrus OCT=78.328+0.874×CMTStratus OCT was generated to interchange macular thickness obtained with two OCT devices. CONCLUSION Macular thickness measured with Cirrus OCT were thicker than with Stratus OCT in myopic eyes. A formula can be used to interchange macular thickness measured with two OCT devices in myopic eyes. Studies with different OCT devices and larger samples are warranted to enable the comparison of macular values measured with different OCT devices. PMID:26682172

  7. WASTES FROM MANUFACTURE OF DYES AND PIGMENTS. VOLUME 8. PHTHALOCYANINE DYES AND PIGMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A preliminary study of the manufacture of phthalocyanine dyes and pigments was conducted to determine if process waste streams might contain hazardous material. The study first identifies the dyes and pigments that belong to this segment of the industry, the amounts produced, and...

  8. Strategy for the Management of Macular Edema in Retinal Vein Occlusion: The European VitreoRetinal Society Macular Edema Study

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Ron A.; Parnes, Aaron J.; Bopp, Silvia; Saad Othman, Ihab; Ducournau, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of different therapies in the treatment of macular edema associated with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Design. This is a nonrandomized, multicenter collaborative study. Participants. 86 retina specialists from 29 countries provided clinical information, including choice of treatment and outcome, on 2,603 patients with macular edema including 738 cases of RVO. Methods. Reported data included the type and number of treatments performed, visual acuities, and other clinical and diagnostic findings. Main Outcome Measures. The mean increase in visual acuity and mean number of treatments performed. Results. 358 cases of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and 380 cases of branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) were included in this investigation. Taking all RVO cases together, pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling alone resulted in an improvement in vision greater than other therapies. Those treated with intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection alone showed the second greatest improvement in vision. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant alone and intravitreal triamcinolone alone both resulted in modest visual gains. Conclusions. In the treatment of macular edema in RVO, vitrectomy with ILM peeling may achieve visual improvement and may be a good option for certain cases. Anti-VEGF injection is the most effective of the nonsurgical treatments. PMID:25705695

  9. Betalain: a particular class of antioxidant pigment.

    PubMed

    El Gharras, Hasna

    2011-10-01

    We have analyzed the stability of betalains in juices prepared from Moroccan yellow cactus pears (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill.) as a function of temperature and pH. The experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 80 to 100 degrees C with juices at pH 3.5, 5 and 6.5. The degree of pigment retention decreased when the temperature increased. The degradation constant rates were determined for thermal degradation rates of pseudo-first order. The Arrhenius plot obtained for the degradation of betaxanthin from the yellow fruits was not linear. Regardless of the temperature of treatment, the lowest degradation was obtained for pH 5. When some stabilizers were tested for the protection of pigments, the results showed that ascorbic acid was a better protective agent at pH 3.5, increasing the protection by 40%. The inhibitive action of betalain pigments extracted from cactus pears towards corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid was investigated using electrochemical polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. It was found that the presence of natural pigments reduces the corrosion rate of the tested metal, especially on addition of the red pigments (97%). The inhibition efficiency increases as the pigment concentration of extracts increases. It was also found that the pigments tested act as mixed inhibitors. The inhibitive action of the extracts is discussed in term of adsorption and that such adsorption follows a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculated values of the free energy of adsorption indicated that the adsorption process is spontaneous. PMID:22164774

  10. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 73:540550, 2003 Age-Related Macular Degeneration--a Genome Scan in Extended Families

    E-print Network

    Majewski, Jacek

    Am. J. Hum. Genet. 73:540­550, 2003 540 Age-Related Macular Degeneration--a Genome Scan in Extended Genetics, Rockefeller University, New York; 2 Macular Degeneration Center, Casey Eye Institute, Department and genetic linkage analysis, to identify loci associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We

  11. Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration: Replication and clues about the role of foveal loss q

    E-print Network

    Kanwisher, Nancy

    Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration: Replication and clues about the role individuals with loss of foveal input from macular degeneration [Baker, C.I., Peli, E., Knouf, N., & Kanwisher, N. G. (2005). Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration. Journal of Neuroscience

  12. Mechanism of All-trans-retinal Toxicity with Implications for Stargardt Disease and Age-related Macular Degeneration*S

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    -related Macular Degeneration*S Received for publication,October 19, 2011, and in revised form, December 17, 2011-related macular degeneration. To sustain vision, all-trans-retinal (atRAL),2 released from light-activated visual of aberrant atRAL metabolism (15). Patients affected by retinal degeneration in age-related macular

  13. Evaluation of Potential Therapies for a Mouse Model of Human Age-Related Macular Degeneration Caused by

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Evaluation of Potential Therapies for a Mouse Model of Human Age-Related Macular Degeneration of potential therapeutics in Rdh8 / Abca4 / mice, a rodent model of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD Vis Sci. 2009;50:4917­4925) DOI:10.1167/iovs.09-3581 Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading

  14. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 74:482494, 2004 Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A High-Resolution Genome Scan

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    Am. J. Hum. Genet. 74:482­494, 2004 482 Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A High-Resolution Genome, Philadelphia Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex multifactorial disease that affects for disease-associated sequence variants. Introduction Age-related macular degeneration (AMD [MIM 603075

  15. Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration: Replication and clues about the role of foveal loss q

    E-print Network

    Peli, Eli

    Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration: Replication and clues about the role of foveal input from macular degeneration [Baker, C.I., Peli, E., Knouf, N., & Kanwisher, N. G. (2005). Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration. Journal of Neuroscience, 25(3), 614­618]. Here, we

  16. Lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation reduces photo-oxidative damage and modulates the expression of inflammation related genes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative damage and inflammation are related to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Epidemiologic studies suggest that insufficient dietary lutein and zeaxanthin intake or lower serum zeaxanthin levels are associated with increased risk for AMD. The objective of this work w...

  17. Bioavailability of lead and chromium from encapsulated pigment materials

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, T.C.; Kosson, D.S. ); Umbreit, T.H.; Meeker, R.J.; Gallo, M.A. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ ); Gray, D. )

    1991-02-01

    Bioavailability is a major factor in determining toxicity of compounds taken into a human or animal. If an ingested compound is unable to cross the wall of the gut and enter into the body, then (except in very specialized cases) its capacity to cause systemic toxicity is small. Therefore, bioavailability is an important factor in determining the true exposure level for use in risk assessment models. The results of a study of relative oral bioavailability of lead and chromium from pigment materials in both natural and encapsulated forms are reported. The levels of lead and chromium were measured in the blood after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment and after a further 2 weeks of recovery. Blood levels were used as an index of metal uptake into the body. After the recovery period, both blood levels and tissue levels in the kidneys were measured.

  18. Pigmentation in vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading Addison's pigmentation: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Agrawala, Ritesh Kumar; Sahoo, Srikanta Kumar; Choudhury, Arun Kumar; Mohanty, Binoy Kumar; Baliarsinha, Anoj Kumar

    2013-10-01

    A 35-year-female presented with generalized weakness, weight loss, and progressive pigmentation was worked up for suspicion of Addisons disease. On examination hyper pigmentation was noted on both palmar and dorsal aspect of hands involving knuckles, creases, feet, tongue, oral mucosa and gluteal region. There was no evidence of hypocortisolemia as initially suspected, and literature search revealed a possibility of vitamin B12 deficiency. She had megaloblastic anemia with a low serum vitamin B12, mostly due to poor dietary intake. Her hyper pigmentation resolved with vitamin B12 supplementation. Skin biopsy showed increased pigmentation at stratum spinosum and basal-layer. The mechanism of hyper pigmentation in vitamin B12 deficiency was due to an increase in melanin synthesis. PMID:24251178

  19. The tail pigmentation pattern of C57BL/6J mice affects nociception/pain quantification in the tail flick test

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ting; Ansonoff, Michael A.; Pintar, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The heat radiant tail flick test is commonly used to quantify nociception and pain levels. Likewise, the C57BL/6J strain of mice is frequently used in pain-related studies as transgenic mice are often backcrossed onto this background. C57BL/6J mice naturally develop non-pigmented patches of variable length on the distal part of the tail that could conceivably modify the response latency in tail flick assays. Here we find that these non-pigmented regions, in a position-independent manner, significantly increase the response latency in the heat radiant tail flick assay, but not the warm water immersion test. This finding demonstrates that the extent of pigmentation, and not other potential variables between pigmented and non-pigmented skin, affects radiant heat tail-flick latency, and should be considered in the design of pain-related studies using mice with variable tail pigmentation. PMID:18805031

  20. Investigations of biomimetic light energy harvesting pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Patten, P.G.; Donohoe, R.J.; Lindsey, J.S.; Bocian, D.F.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nature uses chlorophyll and other porphyrinic pigments to capture and transfer light energy as a preliminary step in photosynthesis. The design of synthetic assemblies of light harvesting and energy directing pigments has been explored through synthesis and characterization of porphyrin oligomers. In this project, pigment electronic and vibrational structures have been explored by electrochemistry and dynamic and static optical measurements. Transient absorption data reveal energy transfer between pigments with lifetimes on the order of 20--200 picoseconds, while Raman data reveal that the basic porphyrin core structure is unperturbed relative to the individual monomer units. These two findings, along with an extensive series of experiments on the oxidized oligomers, reveal that coupling between the pigments is fundamentally weak, but sufficient to allow facile energy transfer as the predominant excited state process. Modeling of the expected quantum yields for energy transfer within a variety of arrays was accomplished, thereby providing a tool to guide synthetic goals.

  1. Recreating a functional ancestral archosaur visual pigment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Belinda S W; Jönsson, Karolina; Kazmi, Manija A; Donoghue, Michael J; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2002-09-01

    The ancestors of the archosaurs, a major branch of the diapsid reptiles, originated more than 240 MYA near the dawn of the Triassic Period. We used maximum likelihood phylogenetic ancestral reconstruction methods and explored different models of evolution for inferring the amino acid sequence of a putative ancestral archosaur visual pigment. Three different types of maximum likelihood models were used: nucleotide-based, amino acid-based, and codon-based models. Where possible, within each type of model, likelihood ratio tests were used to determine which model best fit the data. Ancestral reconstructions of the ancestral archosaur node using the best-fitting models of each type were found to be in agreement, except for three amino acid residues at which one reconstruction differed from the other two. To determine if these ancestral pigments would be functionally active, the corresponding genes were chemically synthesized and then expressed in a mammalian cell line in tissue culture. The expressed artificial genes were all found to bind to 11-cis-retinal to yield stable photoactive pigments with lambda(max) values of about 508 nm, which is slightly redshifted relative to that of extant vertebrate pigments. The ancestral archosaur pigments also activated the retinal G protein transducin, as measured in a fluorescence assay. Our results show that ancestral genes from ancient organisms can be reconstructed de novo and tested for function using a combination of phylogenetic and biochemical methods. PMID:12200476

  2. Inadvertent polychlorinated biphenyls in commercial paint pigments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dingfei; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2010-04-15

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) that was not produced as part of the Aroclor mixtures banned in the 1980s was recently reported in air samples collected in Chicago, Philadelphia, the Arctic, and several sites around the Great Lakes. In Chicago, the congener 3,3'-dichlorobiphenyl or PCB11 was found to be the fifth most concentrated congener and ubiquitous throughout the city. The congener exhibited strong seasonal concentration trends that suggest volatilization of this compound from common outdoor surfaces. Due to these findings and also the compound's presence in waters that received waste from paint manufacturing facilities, we hypothesized that PCB11 may be present in current commercial paint. In this study we measured PCBs in paint sold on the current retail market. We tested 33 commercial paint pigments purchased from three local paint stores. The pigment samples were analyzed for all 209 PCB congeners using gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). More than 50 PCB congeners including several dioxin-like PCBs were detected, and the PCB profiles varied due to different types of pigments and different manufacturing processes. PCB congeners were detected in azo and phthalocyanine pigments which are commonly used in paint but also in inks, textiles, paper, cosmetics, leather, plastics, food and other materials. Our findings suggest several possible mechanisms for the inadvertent production of specific PCB congeners during the manufacturing of paint pigments. PMID:19957996

  3. [Treatment of diabetic macular oedema with the VEGF inhibitors ranibizumab and bevacizumab: conclusions from basic in vitro studies].

    PubMed

    Lang, G E; Lang, G K; Deissler, H L

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic macular oedema (DMO) which may occur at all stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a severe vision-threatening complication. In most cases, laser treatment does not improve visual acuity. Therefore research in ophthalmology focuses on the improvement of the prognosis of DMO patients with a drug-based DMO therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the most important therapeutic target because this growth factor also is the most potent permeability factor affecting the inner retinal barrier formed by endothelial cells (ECs). Compared to its angiogenic stimulation of proliferation and migration of ECs, effects of VEGF on permeability have not been studied in all details. In vitro investigations on the behaviour of primary or immortalised retinal endothelial cells confirmed the key role of VEGF in the regulation of the permeability of the inner retinal barrier. Despite the presence of a variety of other factors found to be elevated in DR, a VEGF-disrupted barrier can be completely restored with the VEGF-inhibiting ranibizumab (Lucentis®) and bevacizumab (Avastin®) when applied at clinically achievable concentrations. The antibody bevacizumab, but not the antibody fragment ranibizumab, accumulates in both retinal EC and pigment epithelial cells during prolonged treatment. This observation might be relevant because patients are often treated for several years and additional long-term side effects may be recognised in the future. PMID:24799173

  4. Oxidative Stress and the Nrf2 Anti-Oxidant Transcription Factor in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lambros, Mandy L; Plafker, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of acquired and irreversible blindness among elderly Americans. Most AMD patients have the dry form of the disease (dAMD) for which reliable therapies are lacking. A major obstacle to the development of effective treatments is a deficit in our understanding of what triggers dAMD onset. This is particularly the case with respect to the events that cause retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to transition from a state of health and homeostasis to one of dysfunction and atrophy. These cells provide critical support to the photoreceptors and their atrophy often precipitates photoreceptor death in dAMD. Chronic oxidative stress is a primary driver of age-dependent, RPE atrophy. Sources of this stress have been identified (e.g., cigarette smoke, photooxidized bisretinoids), but we still do not understand how these stressors damage RPE constituents or what age-dependent changes undermine the cytoprotective systems in the RPE. This review focuses on Nrf2, the master antioxidant transcription factor, and its role in the RPE during aging and dAMD onset. PMID:26427395

  5. Malattia Leventinese/Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy: Similarities to Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Potential Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D

    2016-01-01

    Fibulin-3 (F3) is a secreted, disulfide-rich glycoprotein which is expressed in a variety of tissues within the body, including the retina. An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in F3 was identified as the cause of a rare retinal dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese/Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy (ML/DHRD). ML/DHRD shares many phenotypic similarities with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most prominent feature of ML/DHRD is the development of radial or honeycomb patterns of drusen which can develop as early as adolescence. Two independent mouse models of ML/DHRD show evidence of complement activation as well as retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, strengthening the phenotypic connection with AMD. Because of its similarities with AMD, ML/DHRD is receiving increasing interest as a potential surrogate disease to study the underpinnings of AMD. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge of F3 and points toward potential therapeutic strategies which directly or indirectly target cellular dysfunction associated with R345W F3. PMID:26427406

  6. Pathway activation profiling reveals new insights into Age-related Macular Degeneration and provides avenues for therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Makarev, Evgeny; Cantor, Charles; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander; Csoka, Antonei Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in older people and is caused by loss of the central region of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Conventional methods of gene expression analysis have yielded important insights into AMD pathogenesis, but the precise molecular pathway alterations are still poorly understood. Therefore we developed a new software program, “AMD Medicine”, and discovered differential pathway activation profiles in samples of human RPE/choroid from AMD patients and controls. We identified 29 pathways in RPE-choroid AMD phenotypes: 27 pathways were activated in AMD compared to controls, and 2 pathways were activated in controls compared to AMD. In AMD, we identified a graded activation of pathways related to wound response, complement cascade, and cell survival. Also, there was downregulation of two pathways responsible for apoptosis. Furthermore, significant activation of pro-mitotic pathways is consistent with dedifferentiation and cell proliferation events, which occur early in the pathogenesis of AMD. Significantly, we discovered new global pathway activation signatures of AMD involved in the cell-based inflammatory response: IL-2, STAT3, and ERK. The ultimate aim of our research is to achieve a better understanding of signaling pathways involved in AMD pathology, which will eventually lead to better treatments. PMID:25543336

  7. Current Treatment Limitations in Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Future Approaches Based on Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Robredo, P.; Sancho, A.; Johnen, S.; Recalde, S.; Gama, N.; Thumann, G.; Groll, J.; García-Layana, A.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. With an ageing population, it is anticipated that the number of AMD cases will increase dramatically, making a solution to this debilitating disease an urgent requirement for the socioeconomic future of the European Union and worldwide. The present paper reviews the limitations of the current therapies as well as the socioeconomic impact of the AMD. There is currently no cure available for AMD, and even palliative treatments are rare. Treatment options show several side effects, are of high cost, and only treat the consequence, not the cause of the pathology. For that reason, many options involving cell therapy mainly based on retinal and iris pigment epithelium cells as well as stem cells are being tested. Moreover, tissue engineering strategies to design and manufacture scaffolds to mimic Bruch's membrane are very diverse and under investigation. Both alternative therapies are aimed to prevent and/or cure AMD and are reviewed herein. PMID:24672707

  8. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  9. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  10. Reversible Conjunctival Pigmentation Associated With Prostaglandin Use.

    PubMed

    Choi, Daniel Y; Chang, Robert T; Yegnashankaran, Krishnan; Friedman, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old Indian male with a diagnosis of ocular hypertension was started on a prostaglandin analog (PGA) in both eyes to lower intraocular pressure. Six years later, he developed progressively increasing bilateral limbal conjunctival hyperpigmentation. Travoprost was discontinued and replaced with brinzolamide and over the next year, the patient's conjunctival pigmentation improved significantly in both the eyes. This case report documents with slit-lamp photography the first case of conjunctival pigmentation associated with PGA use that has been shown to have reversal with discontinuation of the PGA. Because of the widespread use of PGAs, and the evolving nature of the conjunctival pigmentation, clinicians should be aware of this reversible condition when considering biopsy or removal of conjunctival melanocytic lesions. PMID:25967530

  11. Decreased Thickness and Integrity of the Macular Elastic Layer of Bruch’s Membrane Correspond to the Distribution of Lesions Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chong, N.H. Victor; Keonin, Jason; Luthert, Phil J.; Frennesson, Christina I.; Weingeist, David M.; Wolf, Rachel L.; Mullins, Robert F.; Hageman, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. In its severest form, choroidal neovessels breach the macular Bruch’s membrane, an extracellular matrix compartment comprised of elastin and collagen laminae, and grow into the retina. We sought to determine whether structural properties of the elastic lamina (EL) correspond to the region of the macula that is predilected toward degeneration in AMD. Morphometric assessment of the macular and extramacular regions of 121 human donor eyes, with and without AMD, revealed a statistically significant difference in both the integrity (P < 0.0001) and thickness (P < 0.0001) of the EL between the macular and extramacular regions in donors of all ages. The EL was three to six times thinner and two to five times less abundant in the macula than in the periphery. The integrity of the macular EL was significantly lower in donors with early-stage AMD (P = 0.028), active choroidal neovascularization (P = 0.020), and disciform scars (P = 0.003), as compared to unaffected, age-matched controls. EL thickness was significantly lower only in individuals with disciform scars (P = 0.008). The largest gaps in macular EL integrity were significantly larger in all categories of AMD (each P < 0.0001), as compared to controls. EL integrity, thickness, and gap length in donors with geographic atrophy did not differ from those of controls. These structural properties of the macular EL correspond spatially to the distribution of macular lesions associated with AMD and may help to explain why the macula is more susceptible to degenerative events that occur in this disease. PMID:15632016

  12. Blood stasis contributions to the perception of skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Stamatas, Georgios N; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2004-01-01

    The chromatic characteristics of skin color arise from the interactions of light (primarily absorption and scattering) with the epidermis and the dermis. The primary light absorbers in skin are hemoglobin and melanin. Most of scattering is attributed to collagen fibers and in pigmented skin to melanosomes. Traditionally skin redness is considered to arise due to locally elevated concentrations of hemoglobin, whereas skin pigmentation is attributed to melanin. In this study we attempt to understand better the contributions of these chromophores to the perceived skin color using spectral analysis of skin color reactions induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation or pressure. In the first experiment 12 individuals with skin phototypes III-IV were irradiated on the back using a solar simulator with doses ranging from 0.7 to 3 MED. The skin reactions were evaluated on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 after irradiation. Evaluations included diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and clinical assessment of the erythema and the pigment reaction. Apparent concentrations of melanin, oxy-, and deoxy-hemoglobin were calculated from the absorption spectra. In the second experiment the levels of deoxy-hemoglobin of the volar forearm of ten volunteers were selectively altered by either application of a pressure cuff or by topical application of 3% H(2)O(2). Changes in skin color appearance were documented by photography, colorimetry, and DRS. In the UV exposure experiment all reactions were dose dependent. Oxy-hemoglobin values increased to a maximum on day 1, correlating well with the clinical evaluation of erythema, and then decreased exponentially to base line. Melanin showed a significant increase on day 7 and remained relatively constant for the next 3 weeks, correlating well with the clinical evaluation of pigmentation (tanning). Deoxy-hemoglobin increased slightly on day 1 and remained elevated for the next 2 weeks. Thus, deoxy-hemoglobin correlated moderately with the clinical erythema scoring on day 1 only, while it contributes significantly to what is clinically perceived as skin tanning on days 7 and 14. Application of pressure below the diastolic level increased deoxy-hemoglobin concentration as measured by DRS. This increase corresponded to a decrease of a "pigmentation" parameter (based on the L(*)a(*)b(*) scale) in a similar fashion that has been documented for increases in melanin concentration. Topical H(2)O(2) application reduced deoxy-hemoglobin levels as measured by DRS. This reduction coincided kinetically with a visible skin blanching. Application of pressure or H(2)O(2) did not significantly alter the levels of oxy-hemoglobin or melanin. In this report we present compelling evidence that deoxy-hemoglobin significantly contributes to the skin color appearance. Blood pooling, expressed as increased deoxy-hemoglobin, can contribute to what is visually perceived as pigmentation. Furthermore, we present that measurement of its contribution to the skin color appearance can only be accomplished with DRS. PMID:15065897

  13. A dominant negative mutant of an Arabidopsis R2R3 Myb (AtMyb90) blocks flower pigment production in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A spontaneous mutation converted a hyper-pigmented (anthocyanins), CaMV-35S-pro::AtMYB90 containing, transgenic tobacco line into one displaying wild-type pigmentation in all tissues except for flower petals, which, counter-intuitively, showed anthocyanin levels dramatically below wild-type in the p...

  14. Seasonal and nonseasonal variability of satellite-derived surface pigment concentration in the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strub, P. Ted; James, Corinne; Thomas, Andrew C.; Abbott, Mark R.

    1990-07-01

    Satellite-derived pigment concentrations from the west coast time series (WCTS) are averaged into monthly mean fields over the California Current system (CCS) for the period July 1979 to June 1986. Errors caused by the scattering algorithm used in the WCTS are reduced by an empirical correction function, although winter values (November-February) remain unreliable. For the March-October period we look at both the mean seasonal development and the nonseasonal monthly anomalies of pigment concentration. These are compared with fields of alongshore wind stress, mixing power of the wind (u*3) and wind stress curl. Outside of the Southern California Bight there is a strong seasonal cycle with a spring-summer maximum, a northward progression of high pigment concentrations from California to Oregon and a double maximum off Washington (spring and summer, with a lull in between). Within the Southern California Bight, seasonality is low, with a relative minimum in late summer. Off Baja California the pattern is similar to that off northern California. In regions where previous work has been done, there is general agreement with the seasonal cycles found here. Nonseasonal variability in pigment concentration over the large-scale CCS (400 km wide) is most closely related statistically to synoptic fields of wind stress curl. Within 100 km of the coast, the strongest relations are between pigment concentration and both u*3 and alongshore wind stress. Correlations with these wind variables account for only 25% of the monthly variance in anomalous satellite-derived pigment concentrations. This is partly due to the noise in both wind and pigment data sets but also demonstrates the fact that much of the anomalous pigment variability is not a response to anomalous wind forcing on these time scales. Correlations are also low between anomalous pigment concentrations and anomalous sea level heights, which serve as a crude proxy for the strength of the alongshore current over the shelf. The largest nonseasonal anomaly in the data occurred during the 1982-1983 El Niño, which caused a large-scale decrease in pigment concentration, stronger and longer lasting in the south than in the north.

  15. Ultraviolet radiation directly induces pigment production by cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.S.; Gilchrest, B.A.

    1987-10-01

    In humans the major stimulus for cutaneous pigmentation is ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Little is known about the mechanism underlying this response, in part because of the complexity of interactions in whole epidermis. Using a recently developed culture system, human melanocytes were exposed daily to a physiologic range of UVR doses from a solar simulator. Responses were determined 24 hours after the last exposure. There was a dose-related increase in melanin content per cell and uptake of /sup 14/C-DOPA, accompanied by growth inhibition. Cells from donors of different racial origin gave proportionately similar increases in melanin, although there were approximately tenfold differences in basal values. Light and electron microscopy revealed UVR-stimulated increases in dendricity as well as melanosome number and degree of melanization, analogous to the well-recognized melanocyte changes following sun exposure of intact skin. Similar responses were seen with Cloudman S91 melanoma cells, although this murine cell line required lower UVR dosages and fewer exposures for maximal stimulation. These data establish that UVR is capable of directly stimulating melanogenesis. Because cyclic AMP elevation has been associated in some settings with increased pigment production by cultured melanocytes, preliminary experiments were conducted to see if the effects of UVR were mediated by cAMP. Both alpha-MSH and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), as positive controls, caused a fourfold increase in cAMP level in human melanocytes and/or S91 cells, but following a dose of UVR sufficient to stimulate pigment production there was no change in cAMP level up to 4 hours after exposure. Thus, it appears that the UVR-induced melanogenesis is mediated by cAMP-independent mechanisms.

  16. Green pigments of the Pompeian artists' palette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliatis, Irene; Bersani, Danilo; Campani, Elisa; Casoli, Antonella; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Mantovan, Silvia; Marino, Iari-Gabriel; Ospitali, Francesca

    2009-08-01

    Green colored samples on wall paintings and green powder from a pigment pot found in Pompeii area are investigated by micro-Raman, FT-IR and, for one sample, SEM-EDX. To obtain the green color, green earths and malachite were used, together with mixture of Egyptian blue and yellow ochre. The mineralogical identification of the green earths has been attempted through the comparison of the vibrational features, discriminating between celadonite and glauconite spectra. Traces of a modern synthetic pigment containing copper phthalocyanine were found in a fresco fragment.

  17. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia in a Red Pigment Tattoo

    PubMed Central

    Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia

    2015-01-01

    Red pigment tattoos are known to cause pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in the skin, frequently simulating squamous cell carcinoma or keratoacanthoma. Herein, the authors present two additional cases of red pigment tattoo pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in which they noted a lichenoid tissue reaction. They reviewed the previously published cases and observed a lichenoid reaction in the histopathological images similar to hypertrophic lichen planus. The authors suggest that these reactions might best be referred to as “lichenoid reaction with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia” or “hypertrophic lichen planus-like reaction.” Accordingly, recognition of an inflammatory component may allow additional treatment options. PMID:26705448

  18. Green pigments of the Pompeian artists' palette.

    PubMed

    Aliatis, Irene; Bersani, Danilo; Campani, Elisa; Casoli, Antonella; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Mantovan, Silvia; Marino, Iari-Gabriel; Ospitali, Francesca

    2009-08-01

    Green colored samples on wall paintings and green powder from a pigment pot found in Pompeii area are investigated by micro-Raman, FT-IR and, for one sample, SEM-EDX. To obtain the green color, green earths and malachite were used, together with mixture of Egyptian blue and yellow ochre. The mineralogical identification of the green earths has been attempted through the comparison of the vibrational features, discriminating between celadonite and glauconite spectra. Traces of a modern synthetic pigment containing copper phthalocyanine were found in a fresco fragment. PMID:19111503

  19. Spatial-temporal distribution of phytoplankton pigments in relation to nutrient status in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Peng; Yu, Zhigang; Deng, Chunmei; Liu, Shuxia; Zhen, Yu

    2010-10-01

    We conducted studies of phytoplankton and hydrological variables in a semi-enclosed bay in northern China to understand the spatial-temporal variability and relationship between these variables. Samples were collected during seven cruises in Jiaozhou Bay from November 2003 to October 2004, and were analyzed for temperature, nutrients and phytoplankton pigments. Pigments from eight possible phytoplankton classes (Diatoms, Dinoflagellates, Chlorophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Haptophyceae, Cryptophyceae and Caynophyceae) were detected in surface water by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phytoplankton pigment and nutrient concentrations in Jiaozhou Bay were spatially and temporally variable, and most of them were highest in the northern and eastern parts of the sampling regions in spring (May) and summer (August), close to areas of shellfish culturing, river estuaries, dense population and high industrialization, reflecting human activities. Chlorophyll a was recorded in all samples, with an annual mean concentration of 1.892 ?g L -1, and fucoxanthin was the most abundant accessory pigment, with a mean concentration of 0.791 ?g L -1. The highest concentrations of chlorophyll a (15.299 ?g L -1) and fucoxanthin (9.417 ?g L -1) were observed in May 2004 at the station close to the Qingdao Xiaogang Ferry, indicating a spring bloom of Diatoms in this area. Although chlorophyll a and other biomarker pigments showed significant correlations, none of them showed strong correlations with temperature and nutrients, suggesting an apparent de-coupling between the pigments and these hydrological variables. The nutrient composition and phytoplankton community composition of Jiaozhou Bay have changed significantly in the past several decades, reflecting the increasing nutrient concentrations and decline of phytoplankton cell abundance. The unchanged total chlorophyll a levels indicated that smaller species have filled the niche vacated by the larger species in Jiaozhou Bay, as revealed by our biomarker pigment analysis.

  20. Intravitreal pegaptanib for the treatment of ischemic diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Kiire, Christine A; Morjaria, Rupal; Rudenko, Anna; Fantato, Alexina; Smith, Lewis; Smith, Amy; Chong, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pegaptanib has been shown to be effective in treating diabetic macular edema (DME). In the original Phase II/III trial, however, patients with macular ischemia were excluded. In this study, we treated patients with ischemic DME. Methods Macular ischemia was defined as a 30% increase in the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) at 45 seconds on fundus fluorescein angiography. In addition, the participants had diffuse foveal-involving DME with a central subfield thickness (CST) of >300 ?m on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Five intravitreal pegaptanib injections were given 6 weeks apart. The final study visit was 6 weeks after the fifth injection. The primary outcome was change in the size of FAZ. Secondary outcomes were change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the change in CST. Results Thirty participants were enrolled. Three were unable to complete the full course of treatment. Their outcomes were carried forward for the first part of this analysis. There was no statistically significant change in the mean size of the FAZ from baseline to the final visit. Subclassifying participants as those with minimal/moderate ischemia (16 participants, FAZ area <1,000 pixels) and those with more severe ischemia (14 participants, FAZ area >1,000 pixels) also showed no statistically significant change in the mean area of the FAZ. On average, BCVA increased and CST decreased from baseline to the final visit, but these changes were not statistically significant. Using per protocol analysis on those participants who completed the full course of treatment, the mean BCVA increased from 49.2 to 53.9 letters (P=0.046). Conclusion In this study, intravitreal injection of pegaptanib did not significantly alter the size of the FAZ in participants with varying degrees of ischemic DME. There was, however, a significant improvement in mean BCVA in those who completed the treatment course. PMID:26715833

  1. Protein polymer nanoparticles engineered as chaperones protect against apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G; Valluripalli, Vinod; Shi, Pu; Wang, Jiawei; Lin, Yi-An; Cui, Honggang; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R; MacKay, J Andrew

    2014-10-10

    ?B-Crystallin is a protein chaperone with anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activity that is apically secreted in exosomes by polarized human retinal pigment epithelium. A 20 amino acid mini-peptide derived from residues 73-92 of ?B-crystallin protects human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative stress, a process involved in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Unfortunately, due to its small size, its development as a therapeutic requires a robust controlled release system. To achieve this goal, the ?B-crystallin peptide was re-engineered into a protein polymer nanoparticle/macromolecule with the purpose of increasing the hydrodynamic radius/molecular weight and enhancing potency via multivalency or an extended retention time. The peptide was recombinantly fused with two high molecular weight (~40kDa) protein polymers inspired by human tropoelastin. These elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) include the following: (i) a soluble peptide called S96 and (ii) a diblock copolymer called SI that assembles multivalent nanoparticles at physiological temperature. Fusion proteins, cryS96 and crySI, were found to reduce aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase and insulin, which demonstrates that ELP fusion did not diminish chaperone activity. Next their interaction with RPE cells was evaluated under oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, H2O2-induced stress dramatically enhanced cellular uptake and nuclear localization of both cryS96 and crySI ELPs. Accompanying uptake, both fusion proteins protected RPE cells from apoptosis, as indicated by reduced caspase 3 activation and TUNEL staining. This study demonstrates the in vitro feasibility of modulating the hydrodynamic radius for small peptide chaperones by seamless fusion with protein polymers; furthermore, they may have therapeutic applications in diseases associated with oxidative stress, such as AMD. PMID:24780268

  2. Pigmentation and the cutaneous response to ultraviolet radiation 

    E-print Network

    Wong, Terence Hawkin

    2009-01-01

    Variation in pigmentation of hair and skin is one of the most striking forms of human diversity. Human pigmentation and sun sensitivity is a complex trait. The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) (OMIM 15555) has been ...

  3. Pigment oligomers as natural and artificial photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Green photosynthetic bacteria contain antenna complexes known as chlorosomes. These complexes are appressed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane and function to absorb light and transfer the energy to the photochemical reaction center, where photochemical energy storage takes place. Chlorosomes differ from all other known photosynthetic antenna complexes in that the geometrical arrangement of pigments is determined primarily by pigment-pigment interactions instead of pigment-protein interactions. The bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e pigments found in chlorosomes form large oligomers with characteristic spectral properties significantly perturbed from those exhibited by monomeric pigments. Because of their close spatial interaction, the pigments are thought to be strongly coupled electronically, and many of the optical properties result from exciton interactions. This presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the chemical composition and properties of chlorosomes, the evidence for the oligomeric nature of chlorosome pigment organization and proposed structures for the oligomers, and the kinetics and mechanisms of energy transfer in chlorosomes.

  4. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  5. Future Therapies of Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Daisuke; Sawada, Yu; Abe, Sanae; Yoshitomi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly population, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after the age of 50 years. While VEGF inhibitors are promising drugs for treating patients with ocular neovascularization, there are limitations to their potential for improving vision in AMD patients. Thus, future therapies are required to have the potential to improve visual outcomes. This paper will summarize the future strategies and therapeutic targets that are aimed at enhancing the efficacy and duration of effect of antiangiogenic strategies. PMID:25802751

  6. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant in the treatment of diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U; Bandello, Francesco; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) resembles a chronic, low-grade inflammatory reaction, and is characterized by blood–retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and retinal capillary leakage. Corticosteroids are of therapeutic benefit because of their anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and BRB-stabilizing properties. Delivery modes include periocular and intravitreal (via pars plana) injection. To offset the short intravitreal half-life of corticosteroid solutions (~3 hours) and the need for frequent intravitreal injections, sustained-release intravitreal corticosteroid implants have been developed. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant provides retinal drug delivery for ?6 months and recently has been approved for use in the treatment of DME. Pooled findings (n=1,048) from two large-scale, randomized Phase III trials indicated that dexamethasone intravitreal implant (0.35 mg and 0.7 mg) administered at ?6-month intervals produced sustained improvements in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and macular edema. Significantly more patients showed a ?15-letter gain in BCVA at 3 years with dexamethasone intravitreal implant 0.35 mg and 0.7 mg than with sham injection (18.4% and 22.2% vs 12.0%). Anatomical assessments showed rapid and sustained reductions in macular edema and slowing of retinopathy progression. Phase II study findings suggest that dexamethasone intravitreal implant is effective in focal, cystoid, and diffuse DME, in vitrectomized eyes, and in combination with laser therapy. Ocular complications of dexamethasone intravitreal implant in Phase III trials included cataract-related events (66.0% in phakic patients), intraocular pressure elevation ?25 mmHg (29.7%), conjunctival hemorrhage (23.5%), vitreous hemorrhage (10.0%), macular fibrosis (8.3%), conjunctival hyperemia (7.2%), eye pain (6.1%), vitreous detachment (5.8%), and dry eye (5.8%); injection-related complications (eg, retinal tear/detachment, vitreous loss, endophthalmitis) were infrequent (<2%). Dexamethasone intravitreal implant offers a viable treatment option for DME, especially in cases that are persistent or treatment (anti-vascular endothelial growth factor/laser) refractory. PMID:26213460

  7. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  8. Intravitreal Corticosteroids in the Management of Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Harry W.; Scott, Ingrid U.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains an important worldwide cause of visual loss. Corticosteroids have a role in the treatment of some patients with advanced or recurrent DME. The best studied steroids for this indication are triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, and fluocinolone acetonide. All steroids are associated with risks of cataract and intraocular pressure elevation. In addition, intravitreal injection of any medication is associated with risks of infectious endophthalmitis, which has led to the investigation of various extended-release steroid implants. At this time, no steroid is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of DME. PMID:24224143

  9. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  10. Human pigmentation genes under environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and comparative genomics have established major loci and specific polymorphisms affecting human skin, hair and eye color. Environmental changes have had an impact on selected pigmentation genes as populations have expanded into different regions of the globe. PMID:23110848

  11. Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus resembling a pigmented neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Kar, Rakhee; Sylvia, Mary Theresa; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus and pigmented neurofibroma (PNF) are close mimics and pose a clinicopathological challenge. We present a case of pigmented hypertrichotic plaque over lumbosacral region and discuss the differential diagnosis and its clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemistry features which may aid in differentiation. We highlight the difficulties faced in differentiating neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus from pigmented neurofibroma. PMID:25657396

  12. Skin, hair, and iris pigmentation are phenotypic traits that exhibit

    E-print Network

    Schieber, Juergen

    Skin, hair, and iris pigmentation are phenotypic traits that exhibit extensive variation across the human species. The strong relationship between skin pigmentation and ultra- violet radiation (UVR) suggests a model in which global patterns of human skin pigmentation variation reflect localized adaptation

  13. Pigment chemistry: the red sweat of the hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Yoko; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Nakata, Masaya; Yoshihara, Masato; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ida, Motoyasu; Komiya, Teruyuki

    2004-05-27

    Within a few minutes of perspiration, the colourless, viscous sweat of the hippopotamus gradually turns red, and then brown as the pigment polymerizes. Here we isolate and characterize the pigments responsible for this colour reaction. The unstable red and orange pigments turn out to be non-benzenoid aromatic compounds that are unexpectedly acidic and have antibiotic as well as sunscreen activity. PMID:15164051

  14. PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES Sphedgehog Is Expressed by Pigment Cell

    E-print Network

    Ernst, Susan G.

    PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES Sphedgehog Is Expressed by Pigment Cell Precursors During Early Gastrulation the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sphh transcripts are detected first at the mesenchyme by precursor pigment cells during early and midgastrulation. NiCl2 inhibits pigment cell differentiation in sea

  15. Structural and functional characterization of enamel pigmentation M. Dumont a,

    E-print Network

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    Structural and functional characterization of enamel pigmentation in shrews M. Dumont a, , T February 2014 Available online 17 February 2014 Keywords: Pigmentation Tooth Shrew Enamel Amorphous t Pigmented tooth enamel occurs in several vertebrate clades, ranging from mammals to fish. Although an iron

  16. 21 CFR 73.350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.350 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a... pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.1350 Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a...-based pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and...

  18. 21 CFR 73.3128 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.3128 Section... pigments. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive is formed by depositing titanium or iron... pigments listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a color additive in contact lenses...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.1350 Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a...-based pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and...

  20. Pigment array sensor identifies infectious bacteria 28 April 2011

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Pigment array sensor identifies infectious bacteria 28 April 2011 Researchers led by Illinois bacteria by using an array of printed pigments as a chemical sensor. Hospitals have used blood cultures will have an aromatic 'fingerprint'. The sensor itself comprises an array of 36 cross-reactive pigment dots

  1. 21 CFR 73.1350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.1350 Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a...-based pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and...

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Quantifying the refractive index dispersion of a pigmented

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Quantifying the refractive index dispersion of a pigmented biological tissue using of transparent tissues. Here, we extend the application of this method to pigmented, absorbing biological tissues's wings, with a thickness of 2.5 mm, contain a pigment with maximal absorption at 490 nm and a peak

  3. 21 CFR 73.3128 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.3128 Section... pigments. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive is formed by depositing titanium or iron... pigments listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a color additive in contact lenses...

  4. 21 CFR 73.350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.350 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a... pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use...

  5. 21 CFR 73.3128 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.3128 Section... pigments. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive is formed by depositing titanium or iron... pigments listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a color additive in contact lenses...

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Eggshell pigmentation has no evident effects on offspring

    E-print Network

    Miksik, Ivan

    ORIGINAL PAPER Eggshell pigmentation has no evident effects on offspring viability in common penetration to the embryo. However, eggshell pigment deposition has only recently been considered as a mechanism to resist pathogen penetration into the egg. By wiping the eggshell surface, the amount of pigment

  7. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  8. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium N.V. Strunnikova December 14, 2009; Revised March 3, 2010; Accepted March 30, 2010 Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an aging-associated multifactorial disease that affects the photoreceptor-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE

  9. 21 CFR 73.3128 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.3128 Section... pigments. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive is formed by depositing titanium or iron... pigments listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a color additive in contact lenses...

  10. 21 CFR 73.350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.350 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a... pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use...

  11. Abstract.-Pigmentation, morpho-metries, head spination, fin develop-

    E-print Network

    Abstract.-Pigmentation, morpho- metries, head spination, fin develop- ment, and meristic characters.7-38.2 mm standard length) stripetail rockfish, Sebasfes saxicola. Pigment patterns were sufficiently dis. Late larval S. saxicola had areas of intense pigment along the dorsal, lateral. and ventral midlines

  12. 21 CFR 73.1350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.1350 Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a...-based pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3128 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.3128 Section... pigments. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive is formed by depositing titanium or iron... pigments listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a color additive in contact lenses...

  14. 21 CFR 73.350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.350 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a... pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use...

  15. 21 CFR 73.350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.350 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a... pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.1350 Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a...-based pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and...

  17. Pigment patterns in adult fish result from superimposition of two largely independent pigmentation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ceinos, Rosa M; Guillot, Raúl; Kelsh, Robert N; Cerdá-Reverter, José M; Rotllant, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Dorso-ventral pigment pattern differences are the most widespread pigmentary adaptations in vertebrates. In mammals, this pattern is controlled by regulating melanin chemistry in melanocytes using a protein, agouti-signalling peptide (ASIP). In fish, studies of pigment patterning have focused on stripe formation, identifying a core striping mechanism dependent upon interactions between different pigment cell types. In contrast, mechanisms driving the dorso-ventral countershading pattern have been overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that, in fact, zebrafish utilize two distinct adult pigment patterning mechanisms - an ancient dorso-ventral patterning mechanism, and a more recent striping mechanism based on cell-cell interactions; remarkably, the dorso-ventral patterning mechanism also utilizes ASIP. These two mechanisms function largely independently, with resultant patterns superimposed to give the full pattern. PMID:25469713

  18. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    PubMed Central

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ?1?mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5?mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9?mg pigment/cm2 skin. PMID:26243473

  19. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue.

    PubMed

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace-gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS-GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ?1?mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5?mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9?mg pigment/cm(2) skin. PMID:26243473

  20. DFT/TDDFT study on the photodissociation mechanism of the original monascus red and orange pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Li; Lv, Qingzhang

    2015-06-01

    The weak photostability has to some extent restricted the wide utilization of monascus pigments in food industries, and their photobleaching mechanism is unclear yet. Density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level have been performed to optimize the geometries of ground states, single and triplet excited-states of the original monascus red and orange pigments, the possible photodissociation mechanism of which is analyzed according to the calculated data. It is the break of the chromophores, conjugated ? bonds which has induced their decoloration. The photodissociation of these pigments involves three steps, excitation of the large conjugated ? system, water addition to the singlet or triplet excited-state, and Norrish type I photochemical cleavage reactions of the side chains. The former two steps are much more important steps which have led to the destruction of the chromophores and the fading of the four original monascus red and orange pigments. According to the photobleaching mechanism obtained, one could find some solutions to enhance the photostability of these monascus colorants during the food processing process and extend the shelf life of the foods added with monascus pigments.