Sample records for madagascar enquette epidemiologique

  1. Madagascar 2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Olsen

    2010-02-23

    You will follow the directions of your teacher as you move through these different maps. Here is a link to the explanation of the project for teachers: Madagascar explanation You should have two copies of this map: Blank madagascar map to complete the exercise. Here's how you add a document from MyUEN to your IA project: Using UEN to link to a document from the IA Watch this movie about Madagascar. Think about where on this ...

  2. Madagascar 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brooke Robertshaw

    2010-02-17

    You will follow the directions of your teacher as you move through these different maps. Here is a link to the explanation of the project for teachers: Madagascar Explanation 1 You should have two copies of this map: Blank madagascar map to complete the exercise. Here's how you add a document from MyUEN to your IA project: Using UEN to link to a document from the IA Watch this movie about Madagascar. Think about where on this ...

  3. Conserving Madagascar's Freshwater Biodiversity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    JONATHAN P. BENSTEAD, PATRICK H. DE RHAM, JEAN-LUC GATTOLLIAT, FRANÃ?OIS-MARIE GIBON, PAUL V. LOISELLE, MICHEL SARTORI, JOHN S. SPARKS, and MELANIE L. J. STIASSNY (; )

    2003-11-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience is about conserving freshwater diversity in Madagascar. The island nation of Madagascar, an international conservation priority, is now also recognized as a global hotspot for freshwater biodiversity. Three emerging characteristics of Madagascar's threatened freshwater biota deserve increased attention from the scientific and conservation communities. First, species richness is not low, as was once assumed for both the freshwater fishes and the invertebrates. Second, many species are restricted to a specific region or even to single river basins. Often these species are also limited to streams or rivers draining primary forest habitat. Finally, many of the island's freshwater fishes are basal taxa, having diverged earlier than any other extant members of their clade. As such, these taxa assume disproportional phylogenetic importance. In the face of ongoing environmental threats, links among microendemism, forest stream specialization, and basal phylogenetic position highlight the importance and vulnerability of these species and provide a powerful incentive for immediate conservation action.

  4. The Madagascar rosewood massacre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek Schuurman; Porter P. Lowry

    Valuable timber has been exploited from Madagascar's rainforests for many decades, and Malagasy rosewood and palissandre (Dalbergia spp.) are among the most sought after hardwoods in the world. Large quantities have been harvested and exported at an increasing rate over the last decade, almost entirely from illegal logging in protected areas, in particular Masoala and Marojejy National Parks, which comprise

  5. Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches: Information and Care

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches: Information and Care L-278 The Madagascar hissing cockroach or classroom project information on the biology and care of the Madagascar hissing cockroach. Description and Biology The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) is approximately 2 to 4 inches long and weighs 1/4 to 7

  6. Oceanography of West Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Bemiasa

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - October 2009) in Western and Northern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. Along selected hydrographical transects, a total of 182 CTD stations were conducted and ranged to a maximum of 3000 m depth. Water samples were also collected with Niskin bottles at predefined depths. A Seabird 911plus CTD was used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and oxygen. As results, along the west and south coast of Madagascar, the shelf is narrow and widen slightly along the north-west coast. In all ten transects the isotherms showed stratified waters from the coast to offshore. A maximum salinity layer was observed at subsurface in all transects. Dissolved oxygen had a maximum at around 500 m depth in all transects. Low fluorescence values were observed in the upper 150-200 m, with maximum values in the range of 0.14-0.22 µg/l at intermediate layers. The conditions were consistent along and between the transects, with more variation observed at transect 9. No upwelling was observed along the western coast. The surface temperature (5 m depth) increased from 22°C in the south to 26°C in the north. The horizontal distribution of surface salinities showed homogenous conditions with values between 35.4psu (south) and 35.0 psu (north). Also starting from the coast to offshore, both the surface temperatures and surface salinities showed homogenous patterns.

  7. Zooplankton of West Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiasa, John; Remanevy, Sitraka

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - October 2009) in Western and Northern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. Zooplankton samples were collected with Hydrobios Multinet at all environmental stations ranging from 200 m depth to the surface. The Multinet was equipped with 5 nets for depth-stratified sampling. The nets were fitted with 180 µm mesh size and the water flow through the nets was measured. The Multinet was deployed and retrieved at a rate of ~ 1.5 m per second and was obliquely hauled. The five nets were triggered at the pre-selected depth intervals 0-25m, 25-50m, 50-80m, 80-120m and 120-200m. All samples were stored in marked bottles and preserved with buffered formaldehyde of 4% for further analysis. As results,the zooplankton abundance was influenced by physico-chemical factors. During the study period 34 Family of zooplankton were identified which are dominated by Copepoda (58,69%) followed by Radiolaria (12,06%), Appendicularia (6,47%), Sagitta (5,11%), Larvae (4,57%), Ostracoda (3,13%), pelagic Foraminifera (2,15%). Family of zooplankton with abundance <1% were also recorded, namely Salpidae (0,94%), Euphausiacea (0,44%), Tintinnidae (0,39%), Annélidae Polychètes (0,34%), Mysidacea (0,21%), Ptéropodae (0,13%). Highest number of zooplankton were found at the depth below the maximum of fluorescence during the day. Copepods distribution depends on site and depth. During this study, the number of identified species is always superior to 50 for all sampling sites. The findings of the present study will help to improve the scientific knowledge of the marine ecosystem of the west coast of Madagascar.

  8. Oceanography of East Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiasa, John

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - September 2008) in Southern and Eastern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. A total of 102 CTD stations were conducted along selected hydrographical transects and ranged to a maximum of 3000 m depth. Water samples were also collected with Niskin bottles at predefined depths. A Seabird 911plus CTD was used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and oxygen. As results, the first section between latitude 25o-26oS showed sea surface temperature values ranging between 25oC to 15oC upper 250m depth. As part of the south-west, the shelf is narrow and widen slightly along the tip south of the Island coast. In contrast of the west coast, in all transects performed along the south and the east coast, in most cases, the isotherms showed non stratified waters from the coast to offshore. The presence of the upwelling system in the south-east coast modifies drastically the patterns of all measured parameters. Fluorescence had a maximum values (0.25 µg/l) at surface near the coast in 2nd to 5th transects. Inversely, low temperature values were observed along the south and south-east with minimum values in the range of 18. 5oC-11oC at 50-250 m depth. These conditions were consistent along and between the 2nd to 5th transects, with more variation observed at transect 5. The salinity values (5 m depth) decreased from 35.7 psu in the south to 34.5 psu in the east. The horizontal distribution of oxygen showed non homogenous conditions with values between 5 ml/l (south) and 2.5 ml/l (south-east). Also starting from the coast to offshore, surface temperatures and surface salinities, surface fluorescence and dissolved oxygen showed non homogenous patterns.

  9. Viral Etiology of Influenza-Like Illnesses in Antananarivo, Madagascar, July 2008 to June 2009

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Viral Etiology of Influenza-Like Illnesses in Antananarivo, Madagascar, July 2008 to June 2009 Influenza Centre, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar (IPM), Antananarivo, Madagascar, 2 Epidemiology Unit, IPM, Antananarivo, Madagascar Abstract Background: In Madagascar, despite an influenza surveillance established

  10. Leptospirosis after a stay in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Frédéric; Kuli, Barbara; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Goarant, Cyrille; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed leptospirosis in a patient who recently traveled to Madagascar, a country where only two cases have been reported since 1955. Although laboratory and clinical presentations were atypical and despite leptospirosis not being a documented disease in Madagascar, blood and urine tests for leptospirosis enabled retrospective confirmation of the diagnosis. PMID:25319525

  11. Imperfect Isolation: Factors and Filters Shaping Madagascar’s Extant Vertebrate Fauna

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Karen E.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Ali, Jason R.; Goodman, Steven M.; Vences, Miguel; Sutherland, Michael R.; Irwin, Mitchell T.; Krause, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of phylogenetic topology and estimates of divergence timing have facilitated a reconstruction of Madagascar’s colonization events by vertebrate animals, but that information alone does not reveal the major factors shaping the island’s biogeographic history. Here, we examine profiles of Malagasy vertebrate clades through time within the context of the island’s paleogeographical evolution to determine how particular events influenced the arrival of the island’s extant groups. First we compare vertebrate profiles on Madagascar before and after selected events; then we compare tetrapod profiles on Madagascar to contemporary tetrapod compositions globally. We show that changes from the Mesozoic to the Cenozoic in the proportions of Madagascar’s tetrapod clades (particularly its increase in the representation of birds and mammals) are tied to changes in their relative proportions elsewhere on the globe. Differences in the representation of vertebrate classes from the Mesozoic to the Cenozoic reflect the effects of extinction (i.e., the non-random susceptibility of the different vertebrate clades to purported catastrophic global events 65 million years ago), and new evolutionary opportunities for a subset of vertebrates with the relatively high potential for transoceanic dispersal potential. In comparison, changes in vertebrate class representation during the Cenozoic are minor. Despite the fact that the island’s isolation has resulted in high vertebrate endemism and a unique and taxonomically imbalanced extant vertebrate assemblage (both hailed as testimony to its long isolation), that isolation was never complete. Indeed, Madagascar’s extant tetrapod fauna owes more to colonization during the Cenozoic than to earlier arrivals. Madagascar’s unusual vertebrate assemblage needs to be understood with reference to the basal character of clades originating prior to the K-T extinction, as well as to the differential transoceanic dispersal advantage of other, more recently arriving clades. Thus, the composition of Madagascar’s endemic vertebrate assemblage itself provides evidence of the island's paleogeographic history. PMID:23626770

  12. Phylogeography and Molecular Epidemiology of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Phylogeography and Molecular Epidemiology of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar Amy J. Vogler1 , Fabien Epidemiology of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 5(9): e1319. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001319. pestis in Madagascar has been difficult to study due to the great genetic similarity among isolates. We

  13. Pneumonic plague outbreak, Northern Madagascar, 2011.

    PubMed

    Richard, Vincent; Riehm, Julia M; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Ratsitoharina, Maherisoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Andrianalimanana, Samuel; Scholz, Holger C; Rajerison, Minoarisoa

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to Madagascar, particularly to the central highlands. Although plague has not been previously reported in northern Madagascar, an outbreak of pneumonic plague occurred in this remote area in 2011. Over a 27-day period, 17 suspected, 2 presumptive, and 3 confirmed human cases were identified, and all 15 untreated 20 patients died. Molecular typing of Y. pestis isolated from 2 survivors and 5 Rattus rattus rat samples identified the Madagascar-specific 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype and 4 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat patterns. This outbreak had a case-fatality rate of 100% for nontreated patients. The Y. pestis 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype might cause larger epidemics. Multidrug-resistant strains and persistence of the pathogen in natural foci near human settlements pose severe risks to populations in plague-endemic regions and require outbreak response strategies. PMID:25530466

  14. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rumpker, G.; Heit, B.; Rambolamana, G.; Rindraharisaona, E.; Priestley, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    The island of Madagascar occupies a key region in both the assembly and the multi-stage breakup of Gondwanaland, itself part of the super-continent Pangaea. Madagascar consists of an amalgamation of continental material, with the oldest rocks being of Archaean age. Its ancient fabric is characterised by several shear zones, some of them running oblique to the N-S trend, in particular in the south of the island. More recently during the Neogene, moderate volcanism has occurred in the Central and Northern part of the island, and there are indications of uplift throughout Eastern Madagascar over the last 10 Ma. Although Madagascar is now located within the interior of the African plate and far away from major plate boundaries (> 1000 km from the East African rift system and even further from the Central and South-West Indian Ridges), its seismic activity indicates that some deformation is taking place, and present-day kinematic models based on geodetic data and earthquake moment tensors in the global catalogues identify a diffuse N-S-oriented minor boundary separating two microplates, which appears to pass through Madagascar. In spite of the presence of Archaean and Proterozoic rocks continent-wide scale studies indicate a thin lithosphere (<120 km) throughout Madagascar, but are based on sparse data and cannot resolve the difference between eastern and western Madagascar. We are operating a ENE-WSW oriented linear array of 25 broadband stations in southern Madagascar, extending from coast to coast and sampling the sedimentary basins in the west as well as the metamorphic rocks in the East, cutting geological boundaries seen at the surface at high angle. The array crosses the prominent Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone which is thought to have been formed during Gondwanaland assembly. The array recorded the magnitude 5.3 earthquake of January 25, 2013 which occurred just off its western edge. In addition, in May 2013 we have deployed 25 short period sensors in the eastern part of the study area, where there is some so-far poorly characterised seismicity. We will present preliminary results on the lithospheric crust and mantle structure based on surface wave dispersion and waveform modelling, focussing on the contrast between the metamorphic areas in the east and the presumably stretched regions in the west. Station distribution Red diamonds: Temporary Broadband Light red squares: Short period Green: permanent stations Other temporary experiments: Open dark blue boxes: RHUM-RUM stations Open light blue boxes: MACOMO stations

  15. Evolution in the hypervariable environment of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Robert E.; Richard, Alison F.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the diverse ecoregions of Madagascar share one distinctive climatic feature: unpredictable intra- or interannual precipitation compared with other regions with comparable rainfall. Climatic unpredictability is associated with unpredictable patterns of fruiting and flowering. It is argued that these features have shaped the evolution of distinctive characteristics in the mammalian fauna of the island. Endemic Herpestidae and Tenrecidae and members of five endemic primate families differ from closely related species elsewhere, exhibiting extremes of “fastness” and “slowness” in their life histories. Climatic features may also account for the dearth of frugivorous birds and mammals in Madagascar, and for the evolutionary prevalence of species with large body mass. PMID:17698810

  16. Social change and premarital fertility in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel Garenne; Julien Zwang

    Premarital fertility, defined as birth before first marriage, is investigated in Madagascar, using two Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in 1992 and 1997. About 8 per cent of all births and 23 per cent of first births take place before marriage, despite a low underlying mean age at first marriage, estimated to be 18.6 years in the absence of

  17. Breeding distribution and ecology of the threatened Madagascar Plover Charadrius thoracicus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sama Zefania; Peter R Long; Tamás Székely

    The Madagascar Plover Charadrius thoracicus is a threatened wader endemic to Madagascar. We report the first detailed study of its distribution and breeding ecology. Madagascar Plovers breed on the west coast of Madagascar between the Mahavavy delta in the north and Fort-Dauphin in the south-east. Between 2002 and 2005, we found a total of 149 nests concentrated at two sites:

  18. The antiquity of Madagascar's grasslands and the rise of C4 grassy biomes

    E-print Network

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Madagascar, southern Africa, East Africa. Methods We compared the number of C4 grass genera in Madagascar African genera with only one or two species, Madagascar has 86.6% of southern Africa's and 89.4% of south-central Africa's grass genera. C4 grass species make up c. 4% of the flora of both Madagascar and southern Africa

  19. Reconciling the Origins of Africa, India and Madagascar with Vertebrate Dispersal Scenarios

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Masters; M. J. de Wit; R. J. Asher

    2006-01-01

    Africa, India and Madagascar were once part of the supercontinent of Gondwana. This land mass began to fragment approx. 170 million years ago, and by 83 million years, all of the major components we recognize today were separated by tracts of water. Madagascar’s fossil record and estimates of the timing of the extant vertebrate radiations in Madagascar are not easily

  20. A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    of this enlarged distribution and ongoing degradation of the habitats where it lives, it has been reA Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar Monografie del Museo Regionale di Scienze VENCES9 Update of the Global Amphibian Assessment for Madagascar in light of species discoveries

  1. Export Processing Zones in Madagascar : an Endangered Success Story

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Pierre Cling; Mireille Razafindrakoto; François Roubaud

    2004-01-01

    (english) The success of export processing zones in Madagascar, or Zone Franche, since 1990 is an isolated case in Africa, apart from Mauritius. This paper explains that Zone Franche has had a very significant macro-economic impact in terms of exports and jobs. Thanks to Zone Franche, before the 2002 crisis Madagascar had become the second largest African exporter of clothing,

  2. Wintering habitats of Eleonora's Falcons Falco eleonorae in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ugo Mellone; Pascual López-López; Ruben Limiñana; Vicente Urios

    2011-01-01

    Capsule Eleonora's Falcons wintering in Madagascar selected degraded humid forests and cultivated areas close to pristine humid forest.Aims To identify the habitat preferences of Eleonora's Falcon Falco eleonorae on their wintering grounds in Madagascar, and to use this information to gain insights into the conservation priorities of this species.Methods A total of 11 Eleonora's Falcons were captured in Spain in

  3. Wintering habitats of Eleonora's Falcons Falco eleonorae in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ugo Mellone; Pascual López-López; Ruben Limiñana; Vicente Urios

    2012-01-01

    Capsule Eleonora's Falcons wintering in Madagascar selected degraded humid forests and cultivated areas close to pristine humid forest.Aims To identify the habitat preferences of Eleonora's Falcon Falco eleonorae on their wintering grounds in Madagascar, and to use this information to gain insights into the conservation priorities of this species.Methods A total of 11 Eleonora's Falcons were captured in Spain in

  4. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Rümpker, Georg; Gerard, Rambolamana; Elisa, Rindraharisaona; Priestley, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The island of Madagascar occupies a key region in both the assembly and the multi-stage breakup of Gondwanaland, itself part of the super-continent Pangaea. Madagascar consists of an amalgamation of continental material, with the oldest rocks being of Archaean age. Its ancient fabric is characterised by several shear zones, some of them running oblique to the N-S trend, in particular in the south of the island. More recently during the Neogene, moderate volcanism has occurred in the Central and Northern part of the island, and there are indications of uplift throughout Eastern Madagascar over the last 10 Ma. Although Madagascar is now located within the interior of the African plate and far away from major plate boundaries (> 1000 km from the East African rift system and even further from the Central and South-West Indian Ridges), its seismic activity indicates that some deformation is taking place, and present-day kinematic models based on geodetic data and earthquake moment tensors in the global catalogues identify a diffuse N-S-oriented minor boundary separating two microplates, which appears to pass through Madagascar. In spite of the presence of Archaean and Proterozoic rocks continent-wide scale studies indicate a thin lithosphere (<120 km) throughout Madagascar, but are based on sparse data. We are operating a ENE-WSW oriented linear array of 25 broadband stations in southern Madagascar, extending from coast to coast and sampling the sedimentary basins in the west as well as the metamorphic rocks in the East, cutting geological boundaries seen at the surface at high angle. The array crosses the prominent Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone which is thought to have been formed during Gondwanaland assembly, although this interpretation has recently been questioned. The array recorded the magnitude 5.3 earthquake of January 25, 2013 which occurred just off its western edge. In addition, in May 2013 we have deployed 25 short period sensors in the eastern part of the study area, where there is some so-far poorly characterised seismicity. We present preliminary results on the lithospheric crust and mantle structure based on surface wave dispersion and waveform modelling, focussing on the contrast between the metamorphic areas in the east and the presumably stretched regions in the west. Interstation Green's functions have been obtained from all pairs of vertical broadband records, with coherent Rayleigh waves being identifiable for periods of 3-40 s. In addition, two-station phase dispersion measurements have allowed us to determine phase dispersion between 25 and 60 s. The ambient noise and earthquake data both indicate a slow-down of surface propagation in the western part of the array for periods < 40-45 s, but faster propagation in the western part for periods >45 s.

  5. An Abelisauroid Theropod Dinosaur from the Turonian of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Farke, Andrew A.; Sertich, Joseph J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical evidence strongly supports the complete isolation of India and Madagascar (Indo-Madagascar) by ?100 million years ago, though sparse terrestrial fossil records from these regions prior to ?70 million years ago have limited insights into their biogeographic history during the Cretaceous. A new theropod dinosaur, Dahalokely tokana, from Turonian-aged (?90 million years old) strata of northernmost Madagascar is represented by a partial axial column. Autapomorphies include a prominently convex prezygoepipophyseal lamina on cervical vertebrae and a divided infraprezygapophyseal fossa through the mid-dorsal region, among others. Phylogenetic analysis definitively recovers the species as an abelisauroid theropod and weakly as a noasaurid. Dahalokely is the only known dinosaur from the interval during which Indo-Madagascar likely existed as a distinct landmass, but more complete material is needed to evaluate whether or not it is more closely related to later abelisauroids of Indo-Madagascar or those known elsewhere in Gondwana. PMID:23637961

  6. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G.; White, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is located on the fringes of the African superswell. Its position and the existence of a +30 mGal long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly suggest that its present-day topography is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic crust encompassing the island imply that Madagascar straddles a dynamic topographic gradient. In June-July 2012, we examined geologic evidence for Neogene uplift around the Malagasy coastline. Uplifted coral reef deposits, fossil beach rock, and terraces demonstrate that the northern and southern coasts are probably being uplifted at a rate of ~0.2 mm/yr. Rates of uplift clearly vary around the coastline. Inland, extensive peneplains occur at elevations of 1 - 2 km. These peneplains are underlain by 10 - 20 m thick laterite deposits, and there is abundant evidence for rapid erosion (e.g. lavaka). Basaltic volcanism also occurred during Neogene times. These field observations can be combined with an analysis of drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~100 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. An inverse model is then used to minimize the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~20 to ~4. Our results suggest that youthful and rapid uplift of 1-2 km occurred at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ?15 Myr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Hauts Plateaux). Our field observations and modeling indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  7. Tungiasis Outbreak in Travelers From Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Belaz, Sorya; Gay, Eugénie; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Guiguen, Claude

    2015-07-01

    Seven patients from a group of 16 travelers were diagnosed at our institution with one or more sand fleas on their toes, 1 day to 3 weeks after returning from Madagascar. A questionnaire was sent to the whole group to collect clinical and epidemiological information, which showed that 9 of 13 (69%) had received pre-travel medical advice, but none were aware of sand flea; thus prevention measures were rarely applied. Five of seven (71%) patients wore open sandals throughout the trip. Overall, 10 sand fleas were extracted. PMID:26031478

  8. [Gumboro disease (infectious bursitis) in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Rajaonarison, J J; Rakotonindrina, S; Rakotondramary, E K; Razafimanjary, S

    1994-01-01

    Four Gumboro disease (IBD) outbreaks were identified between February and June 1993 in the Antananarivo area (Madagascar) exhibiting the largest commercial poultry production activity. Affected birds were 3 to 5 weeks old, the mortality rate ranged from 5.70 to 27.4%. Typical symptoms and gross lesions were observed, necrotic degeneration of bursal follicles was also detected. By means of agar-immunodiffusion test, IBD viral antigen was demonstrated. Since the IBD has never been recorded in the country before, the probability of an external origin through the importation of day-old chicks is high. PMID:7991892

  9. Mammalian biodiversity on Madagascar controlled by ocean currents.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jason R; Huber, Matthew

    2010-02-01

    Madagascar hosts one of the world's most unusual, endemic, diverse and threatened concentrations of fauna. To explain its unique, imbalanced biological diversity, G. G. Simpson proposed the 'sweepstakes hypothesis', according to which the ancestors of Madagascar's present-day mammal stock rafted there from Africa. This is an important hypothesis in biogeography and evolutionary theory for how animals colonize new frontiers, but its validity is questioned. Studies suggest that currents were inconsistent with rafting to Madagascar and that land bridges provided the migrants' passage. Here we show that currents could have transported the animals to the island and highlight evidence inconsistent with the land-bridge hypothesis. Using palaeogeographic reconstructions and palaeo-oceanographic modelling, we find that strong surface currents flowed from northeast Mozambique and Tanzania eastward towards Madagascar during the Palaeogene period, exactly as required by the 'sweepstakes process'. Subsequently, Madagascar advanced north towards the equatorial gyre and the regional current system evolved into its modern configuration with flows westward from Madagascar to Africa. This may explain why no fully non-aquatic land mammals have colonized Madagascar since the arrival of the rodents and carnivorans during the early-Miocene epoch. One implication is that rafting may be the dominant means of overseas dispersal in the Cenozoic era when palaeocurrent directions are properly considered. PMID:20090678

  10. Satellite Altimetry over rivers of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambeloson, Johary; Paris, Adrien; Rakotondraompiana, Solofo; calmant, stephane

    2015-04-01

    In Madagascar, many in-situ stations aren't any longer working and the few lasting are too sparse to provide sufficient spatial coverage of the big island. Establishing additional way for observing surface waters is an important key for better understanding and management of the water ressource of the country. Also, data from the remaining stations are lately updated. Hence, spatial altimetry have been tested to estimate variation of heights of surface waters for the first time in Madagascar over the rivers, generally narrow and shallow. Results reported here have been obtained by processing Envisat, Jason 2 and Saral data. Some virtual stations (ground tracks crossing rivers) were found and associated time series have been produced. The Envisat series have been validated by comparison with with gauge measurements over the Sofia river. Also, some internal validation were possible at some crossovers. Good correlations were obtained as well as relatively low root mean squared error, comparable with previous studies. These esults indicate that satellite altimetry is exploitable and has potential applications for the malagasy rivers.

  11. Mammalian biodiversity on Madagascar controlled by ocean currents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason R. Ali; Matthew Huber

    2010-01-01

    Madagascar hosts one of the world's most unusual, endemic, diverse and threatened concentrations of fauna. To explain its unique, imbalanced biological diversity, G.G.Simpson proposed the `sweepstakes hypothesis', according to which the ancestors of Madagascar's present-day mammal stock rafted there from Africa. This is an important hypothesis in biogeography and evolutionary theory for how animals colonize new frontiers, but its validity

  12. The Spread of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus in Madagascar Described by a Sentinel Surveillance

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Spread of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus in Madagascar Described by a Sentinel Surveillance Virology Unit, National Influenza Center, Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, Antananarivo, Madagascar, 3 Malagasy Ministry of Health, Antananarivo, Madagascar Abstract Background: The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus

  13. Madagascar: Heads It's a Continent, Tails It's an Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Maarten J.

    Neither geologists nor biologists have a definition that is capable of classifying Madagascar unambiguously as an island or a continent; nor can they incorporate Malagasy natural history into a single model rooted in Africa or Asia. Madagascar is a microcosm of the larger continents, with a rock record that spans more than 3000 million years (Ma), during which it has been united episodically with, and divorced from, Asian and African connections. This is reflected in its Precambrian history of deep crustal tectonics and a Phanerozoic history of biodiversity that fluctuated between cosmopolitanism and parochialism. Both vicariance and dispersal events over the past 90 Ma have blended a unique endemism on Madagascar, now in decline following rapid extinctions that started about 2000 years ago.

  14. Malagasy dialects and the peopling of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Serva, Maurizio; Petroni, Filippo; Volchenkov, Dima; Wichmann, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Malagasy DNA is half African and half Indonesian, nevertheless the Malagasy language, spoken by the entire population, belongs to the Austronesian family. The language most closely related to Malagasy is Maanyan (Greater Barito East group of the Austronesian family), but related languages are also in Sulawesi, Malaysia and Sumatra. For this reason, and because Maanyan is spoken by a population which lives along the Barito river in Kalimantan and which does not possess the necessary skill for long maritime navigation, the ethnic composition of the Indonesian colonizers is still unclear. There is a general consensus that Indonesian sailors reached Madagascar by a maritime trek, but the time, the path and the landing area of the first colonization are all disputed. In this research, we try to answer these problems together with other ones, such as the historical configuration of Malagasy dialects, by types of analysis related to lexicostatistics and glottochronology that draw upon the automated method recently proposed by the authors. The data were collected by the first author at the beginning of 2010 with the invaluable help of Joselinà Soafara Néré and consist of Swadesh lists of 200 items for 23 dialects covering all areas of the island. PMID:21632612

  15. A chronology for late prehistoric Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Burney, David A; Burney, Lida Pigott; Godfrey, Laurie R; Jungers, William L; Goodman, Steven M; Wright, Henry T; Jull, A J Timothy

    2004-01-01

    A database has been assembled with 278 age determinations for Madagascar. Materials 14C dated include pretreated sediments and plant macrofossils from cores and excavations throughout the island, and bones, teeth, or eggshells of most of the extinct megafaunal taxa, including the giant lemurs, hippopotami, and ratites. Additional measurements come from uranium-series dates on speleothems and thermoluminescence dating of pottery. Changes documented include late Pleistocene climatic events and, in the late Holocene, the apparently human-caused transformation of the environment. Multiple lines of evidence point to the earliest human presence at ca. 2300 14C yr BP (350 cal yr BC). A decline in megafauna, inferred from a drastic decrease in spores of the coprophilous fungus Sporormiella spp. in sediments at 1720+/-40 14C yr BP (230-410 cal yr AD), is followed by large increases in charcoal particles in sediment cores, beginning in the SW part of the island, and spreading to other coasts and the interior over the next millennium. The record of human occupation is initially sparse, but shows large human populations throughout the island by the beginning of the Second Millennium AD. Dating of the "subfossil" megafauna, including pygmy hippos, elephant birds, giant tortoises, and large lemurs, demonstrates that most if not all the extinct taxa were still present on the island when humans arrived. Many taxa overlapped chronologically with humans for a millennium or more. The extinct lemurs Hadropithecus stenognathus, Pachylemur insignis, Mesopropithecus pithecoides, and Daubentonia robusta, and the elephant birds Aepyornis spp. and Mullerornis spp., were still present near the end of the First Millennium AD. Palaeopropithecus ingens, Megaladapis edwardsi, and Archaeolemur sp. (cf. edwardsi) may have survived until the middle of the Second Millennium A.D. One specimen of Hippopotamus of unknown provenance dates to the period of European colonization. PMID:15288523

  16. Investing in intermediate means of transport in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Starkey; Luc Rasamoela

    Efficient rural transport systems require complementary infrastructure, motorised vehicles, intermediate means of transport, boats, railways and an air network. Intermediate means of transport are essential for domestic use, agricultural production, local trade and consolidating larger loads. In rural areas, vicious circles of scarce transport, insufficient users and inadequate support services hinder development. In Madagascar, as elsewhere, transport investment has been

  17. Sahonagasy Action Plan Conservation Programs for the Amphibians of Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Andreone, Franco

    ACSAM A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar Une Stratégie de Conservation pour les A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Mada- gascar The ACSAM is an initiative designed to achieve the con other parts of the world. IUCN - International Union for Conservation of Na- ture Founded in 1948

  18. Participatory Ecological Monitoring of the Alaotra Wetlands in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herizo T. Andrianandrasana; Jonah Randriamahefasoa; Joanna Durbin; Richard E. Lewis; Jonah H. Ratsimbazafy

    2005-01-01

    Participatory ecological monitoring is a realistic and effective approach in wetlands such as Alaotra, Madagascar, where important biodiversity is found in an area with high human population density. Since 2001, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, government technical services, regional non-governmental organisations and local communities have collected data on key species, such as waterbirds, a locally endemic lemur and useful natural resources.

  19. Neoproterozoic continental arc magmatism in west-central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handke, Michael J.; Tucker, Robert D.; Ashwal, Lewis D.

    1999-04-01

    Published geologic maps, regional geological relations, and new U-Pb ages for intrusive igneous rocks in west-central Madagascar define a 450-km-long belt of rocks emplaced in middle Neoproterozoic time. We report precise U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages for 11 coeval gabbro and granitoid plutons from the Itremo region, located in the southern part of this belt. The ages for all gabbroic and granitic plutons and deformed equivalents define an ˜25 m.y. period of magmatic activity between 804 and 779 Ma (at maximum uncertainty). Granitoids intrusive into the Quartzo-Schisto-Calcaire series provide a minimum depositional age of 791 Ma for this Mesoproterozoic platformal sedimentary sequence. Our results, combined with other recent U-Pb age determinations, define a belt of plutonic rocks in west-central Madagascar emplaced between 804 and 776 Ma. We propose that these middle Neoproterozoic rocks constitute the root of a continental magmatic arc emplaced at the time of, or slightly preceding, the breakup of the Rodinian supercontinent. Neoproterozoic plate reconstructions place Madagascar on the putative margin of Rodinia, and therefore the plutonic belt in west-central Madagascar provides important constraints on the timing and extent of middle Neoproterozoic tectonic events in Rodinia and the critical period of Rodinia's transformation into Gondwana.

  20. Lemur Habitat and Dental Senescence in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Doug M.

    Lemur Habitat and Dental Senescence in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar Stephen J. King,1; habitat variation; Propithecus edwardsi ABSTRACT Not only can teeth provide clues about diet, but they also can be indicators of habitat quality. Conspecific groups living in different habitats with dif

  1. Cyclopoid copepods associated with antipatharian coelenterates in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Humes

    1969-01-01

    Previous work (in i960) at Nosy Bé, in northwestern Madagascar, resulted in the collection by dredging of the antipatharian Stichopathes echinulata Brook parasitized by the copepod Vahinius petax Humes, 1967. More recently (in 1964 and 1967) I have obtained by SCUBA diving several other antipatharians with which the copepods described below were associated. The collection in 1964 was made as

  2. High plant diversity of lowland rainforest vestiges in eastern Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Dumetz

    1999-01-01

    Based on cartography, floristic inventory and vegetation analysis in the north and south of the Eastern Domain of Madagascar we identified three original tropical rainforest types which are among the world's most biodiverse known sites for plants: the littoral forest on sand, the lowland forest on gneiss and the lowland forest on basalt. Floristic and structural comparisons were conducted on

  3. Historical biogeography of the strepsirhine primates of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Lying some 400 km off the coast of southeastern Africa, Madagascar is the world's largest oceanic island. It has been in roughly the same position relative to its parent continent for 120 million years, and as a consequence its mammal fauna is unusual in composition, with a low number of major taxa but a high diversity at lower taxonomic levels. Among Madagascar's native terrestrial mammals, only the orders Primates, Rodentia, Carnivora and Insectivora are represented (plus, until recently, the enigmatic and endemic Bibymalagasia, and Artiodactyla in the form of semiaquatic pygmy hippopotamuses). This reflects the fact that terrestrial mammals are notoriously poor over-water dispersers; yet at the same time the ancestors of all of Madagascar's mammals had to have crossed a wide oceanic barrier to get to the island at various points during the Tertiary. Here I examine the palaeogeographic evidence for potential land bridge or 'stepping-stone' connections with adjacent continents from the Mesozoic through the Cenozoic, and review the fossil records and phylogenies of each of Madagascar's mammalian groups in an attempt to estimate the minimum number of crossings necessary to produce the island's current faunal composition. Probable monophyletic origins for each major group, and thus a smaller rather than a larger number of crossings of the Mozambique Channel, imply that this water barrier has acted as a powerful filter; so powerful that it is unclear whether any crossings would have been possible without some form of subaerial connection, however ephemeral, at least from time to time during the Tertiary. Clarification of how Madagascar's terrestrial mammal fauna may have originated is thus as likely to emerge from the geology of the seafloor surrounding the island as it is to come from the fossil record or from the internal and external relationships of its various components. PMID:17053332

  4. Corps de la Paix Madagascar Livre du Stagiare. Langue: Malagasy Ofisialy (Peace Corps Madagascar Volunteer Manual. Language: Official Malagasy).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tshiangale, Mupemba Wa

    This manual for Malagasy is designed for the specific language instruction needs of Peace Corps personnel working in Madagascar. It is written primarily in English and Malagasy, with introductory sections in French. It consists of 29 topical lessons, each geared to a specific domain and competency and containing information on needed materials,…

  5. Corps de la Paix Madagascar Livre du Formateur. Langue: Sakalava (Peace Corps Madagascar Teacher's Manual. Language: Sakalava).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tshiangale, Mupemba Wa

    This teacher's manual for Sakalava, a dialect of Malagasy, is designed for the specific language instruction needs of Peace Corps personnel in Madagascar. It is written primarily in French and Sakalava, with some titles in English. It consists of 29 topical lessons, each geared to a specific domain and competency and containing information on…

  6. IDiversite et Endemisme a Madagascar pp : 229-242 Aout 2000 ISBN 2-903700-04-4 \\ POLYPHYLY OF TOMOPTERNA (AMPHIBIA: RANIDAE) BASED ON

    E-print Network

    of Tomopterna are not informative regarding continental drift and biogeographic Madagascar-India relationships, Molecular phylogeny, Madagascar, India, South Africa, Continental drift, Reproductive modes RESUME.- Les

  7. In situ observations of mesoscale undercurrents off eastern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsoni, Leandro; Aguiar-Gonzalez, Borja; Maas, Leo; van Aken, Hendrik; Nauw, Janine; Ridderinkhof, Herman

    2015-04-01

    The South-West Indian Ocean (SWIO) presents one of the most intriguing western boundary regions of all subtropical gyres. Unlike other gyres, in the SWIO the Madagascar island imposes a physical barrier to the westward flowing South Equatorial Current (SEC), which reaches the Madagascar coast between 17°S and 20°S. At this location, the SEC bifurcates into two branches: the poleward branch feeds into the East Madagascar Current (EMC), which further south will feed the Agulhas Current (AC); on the other hand, the poleward branch feeds into the North Madagascar Current (NMC), which turns around Cape Amber, at the northern tip of Madagascar, and continues westward towards the east coast of Africa. Besides the patterns of the boundary currents described above, undercurrents flowing opposite and beneath the mentioned surface currents are also reported to occur: the equatorward East Madagascar Undercurrent (EMUC) and the poleward North Madagascar Undercurrent (NMUC). This work is based on field studies of both undercurrents. We deployed a cross-slope array of five moorings at 23°S off eastern Madagascar, which was maintained from late 2010 till early 2013 (~2.5 years). A total of 6 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiles and 10 Recording Current Meters were coupled to the moorings. Direct measurements were made from near surface (~50 m) to deep in the water column (~4000 m). The observations reveal a recurring equatorward EMUC with its core hugging the continental slope, at a depth of 1260 m and at an approximate distance of 29 km from the coast. The core velocity has a mean value of 4.1 (±6.3) cm s-1, while maximum speeds reach up to 20 cm -1. The volume transport is estimated to be 1.33 (±1.14) Sv with maxima up to 6 Sv. At the northern tip of Madagascar, off Cape Ambar, we present the first observational evidence of a poleward NMUC. These results are based on a hydrographic cruise (March 2001), where vertical profiles of velocity were sampled across the continental slope. The data show an NMUC also hugging the continental slope, but its core is observed at 460 m depth. Its core velocity reaches over 0.7 m s-1 and its volume transport is estimated to be around 3.5 Sv. The thermohaline characteristics show a saltier and warmer NMUC, compared to the surrounding offshore waters, transporting mainly South Indian Central Water. Two dominant frequency bands were found in the time series of EMUC volume transport: nearly semi-annual and nearly bi-monthly. The NMUC is concurrent with an inshore cell of coastal downwelling due to Ekman Transport towards the coast, which may be associated, at least in part, with the NMUC variability. The comparison between both results stresses the importance of long-term direct observations at fixed locations.

  8. Implications of recent geological investigations of the Mozambique Channel for the mammalian colonization of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    McCall, R A

    1997-05-22

    Madagascar separated from continental Africa during the break-up of Gondwanaland early in the Cretaceous. The presence of several terrestrial mammalian groups on Madagascar is paradoxical as (i) these groups postdate the departure of Madagascar from Africa: and ii) terrestrial mammals are poor dispersers across wide water barriers. Recent geological studies focusing on the Davie Fracture Zone of the Mozambique Channel offer a resolution to this situation, by suggesting the presence of a land-bridge from the mid-Eocene to the early Miocene, an interval that matches the ages of Madagascar's mammalian groups. PMID:9178538

  9. A bizarre predatory dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Sampson, S D; Carrano, M T; Forster, C A

    2001-01-25

    Here we report the discovery of a small-bodied (approximately 1.8 m) predatory dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Madagascar. Masiakasaurus knopfleri, gen. et sp. nov., represented by several skull elements and much of the postcranial skeleton, is unique in being the only known theropod with a highly procumbent and distinctly heterodont lower dentition. Such a derived dental morphology is otherwise unknown among dinosaurs. Numerous skeletal characteristics indicate that Masiakasaurus is a member of Abelisauroidea, an enigmatic clade of Gondwanan theropods. Previously, small-bodied abelisauroids were known only from Argentina. The occurrence of Masiakasaurus on Madagascar suggests that small-bodied abelisauroids, like their larger-bodied counterparts, were more cosmopolitan, radiating throughout much of Gondwana and paralleling the diversification of small coelurosaur theropods in Laurasia. PMID:11206544

  10. A Triassic Fauna from Madagascar, Including Early Dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Flynn; Parrish; Rakotosamimanana; Simpson; Whatley; Wyss

    1999-10-22

    The discovery of a Middle to Late Triassic ( approximately 225 to 230 million years old) terrestrial vertebrate fauna from Madagascar is reported. This fauna documents a temporal interval not well represented by continental vertebrate assemblages elsewhere in the world. It contains two new prosauropod dinosaurs, representing some of the earliest dinosaur occurrences known globally. This assemblage provides information about the poorly understood transition to the dinosaur-dominated faunas of the latest Triassic. PMID:10531059

  11. Extinction Risks and the Conservation of Madagascar's Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Richard K. B.; Tognelli, Marcelo F.; Bowles, Philip; Cox, Neil; Brown, Jason L.; Chan, Lauren; Andreone, Franco; Andriamazava, Alain; Andriantsimanarilafy, Raphali R.; Anjeriniaina, Mirana; Bora, Parfait; Brady, Lee D.; Hantalalaina, Elisoa F.; Glaw, Frank; Griffiths, Richard A.; Hilton-Taylor, Craig; Hoffmann, Michael; Katariya, Vineet; Rabibisoa, Nirhy H.; Rafanomezantsoa, Jeannot; Rakotomalala, Domoina; Rakotondravony, Hery; Rakotondrazafy, Ny A.; Ralambonirainy, Johans; Ramanamanjato, Jean-Baptiste; Randriamahazo, Herilala; Randrianantoandro, J. Christian; Randrianasolo, Harison H.; Randrianirina, Jasmin E.; Randrianizahana, Hiarinirina; Raselimanana, Achille P.; Rasolohery, Andriambolantsoa; Ratsoavina, Fanomezana M.; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Robsomanitrandrasana, Eric; Rollande, Finoana; van Dijk, Peter P.; Yoder, Anne D.; Vences, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background An understanding of the conservation status of Madagascar's endemic reptile species is needed to underpin conservation planning and priority setting in this global biodiversity hotspot, and to complement existing information on the island's mammals, birds and amphibians. We report here on the first systematic assessment of the extinction risk of endemic and native non-marine Malagasy snakes, lizards, turtles and tortoises. Methodology/Principal Findings Species range maps from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species were analysed to determine patterns in the distribution of threatened reptile species. These data, in addition to information on threats, were used to identify priority areas and actions for conservation. Thirty-nine percent of the data-sufficient Malagasy reptiles in our analyses are threatened with extinction. Areas in the north, west and south-east were identified as having more threatened species than expected and are therefore conservation priorities. Habitat degradation caused by wood harvesting and non-timber crops was the most pervasive threat. The direct removal of reptiles for international trade and human consumption threatened relatively few species, but were the primary threats for tortoises. Nine threatened reptile species are endemic to recently created protected areas. Conclusions/Significance With a few alarming exceptions, the threatened endemic reptiles of Madagascar occur within the national network of protected areas, including some taxa that are only found in new protected areas. Threats to these species, however, operate inside and outside protected area boundaries. This analysis has identified priority sites for reptile conservation and completes the conservation assessment of terrestrial vertebrates in Madagascar which will facilitate conservation planning, monitoring and wise-decision making. In sharp contrast with the amphibians, there is significant reptile diversity and regional endemism in the southern and western regions of Madagascar and this study highlights the importance of these arid regions to conserving the island's biodiversity. PMID:25111137

  12. Chapelieriamagna, a new species of Rubiaceae from eastern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Kainulainen, Kent; Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G

    2015-01-01

    A new species of Chapelieria was discovered during a recent field trip to the Masoala National Park in eastern Madagascar, and is described here as Chapelieriamagna Kainul., sp. nov. This species is readily distinguishable from previously described species of the genus by its quadrangular shoots, triangular-calyptrate stipules, sessile leaves, pubescent styles, and ridged fruits. It also differs in the larger number of ovules and the much larger size of leaves and fruits. PMID:25698895

  13. Fire ecology and fire politics in Mali and Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian A. Kull; Paul Laris

    \\u000a Anthropogenic fires dominate Africa, where they have long shaped landscapes and livelihoods. Humans evolved in Africa’s fire-prone\\u000a grasslands and savannas, eventually taking ignition into their own hands. This chapter reviews current knowledge about and\\u000a concerns over lire in two African countries. Mali and Madagascar. Vast areas of land burn in both countries each year as people\\u000a light fires to shape

  14. Field Survey of the 2004 Indonesian Tsunami in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Okal; H. M. Fritz; R. Raveloson; G. Joelson; P. Pancoskova; G. Rambolamanana

    2005-01-01

    We present a report from the work of the International Tsunami Survey Team in Madagascar in the aftermath of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami. During an 11-day campaign, the team surveyed approximately 950 km of coastlines along the Eastern shore of the island, building a database of 52 standardized measurements of flow-depth, run-up and inundation, obtained primarily from eyewitness reports. Maximum

  15. Chapelieria magna, a new species of Rubiaceae from eastern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Kent; Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Chapelieria was discovered during a recent field trip to the Masoala National Park in eastern Madagascar, and is described here as Chapelieria magna Kainul., sp. nov. This species is readily distinguishable from previously described species of the genus by its quadrangular shoots, triangular-calyptrate stipules, sessile leaves, pubescent styles, and ridged fruits. It also differs in the larger number of ovules and the much larger size of leaves and fruits. PMID:25698895

  16. Sarandibrinus, a new genus of Saprininae subfamily from Madagascar (Coleoptera, Histeridae) (Second contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Sarandibrinus araceliae, a new genus and species of the Saprininae subfamily is described from southern Madagascar. The new taxon exhibits autapomorphic characters for the Saprininae subfamily and is unusual especially for its large and deep prosternal foveae and the shape of spiculum gastrale. The description is accompanied by color habitus images, SEM micrographs, mouthparts and antenna line drawings and drawings of the male genitalia. Key to the genera of the Saprininae of Madagascar and the adjacent archipelagos is given. Hypocaccus (Baeckmanniolus) rubiciliae (Lewis, 1899) is newly reported from Madagascar and Hypocaccus (Nessus) perparvulus (Desbordes, 1916) is new to Mauritius. PMID:25147466

  17. A geological synthesis of the Precambrian shield in Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Roig, J.Y.; Moine, B.; Delor, C.; Peters, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Available U–Pb geochronology of the Precambrian shield of Madagascar is summarized and integrated into a synthesis of the region’s geological history. The shield is described in terms of six geodynamic domains, from northeast to southwest, the Bemarivo, Antongil–Masora, Antananarivo, Ikalamavony, Androyan–Anosyan, and Vohibory domains. Each domain is defined by distinctive suites of metaigneous rocks and metasedimentary groups, and a unique history of Archean (?2.5 Ga) and Proterozoic (?1.0 Ga, ?0.80 Ga, and ?0.55 Ga) reworking. Superimposed within and across these domains are scores of Neoproterozoic granitic stocks and batholiths as well as kilometer long zones of steeply dipping, highly strained rocks that record the effects of Gondwana’s amalgamation and shortening in latest Neoproterozoic time (0.560–0.520 Ga). The present-day shield of Madagascar is best viewed as part of the Greater Dharwar Craton, of Archean age, to which three exotic terranes were added in Proterozoic time. The domains in Madagascar representing the Greater Dharwar Craton include the Antongil–Masora domain, a fragment of the Western Dharwar of India, and the Neoarchean Antananarivo domain (with its Tsaratanana Complex) which is broadly analogous to the Eastern Dharwar of India. In its reconstructed position, the Greater Dharwar Craton consists of a central nucleus of Paleo-Mesoarchean age (>3.1 Ga), the combined Western Dharwar and Antongil–Masora domain, flanked by mostly juvenile “granite–greenstone belts” of Neoarchean age (2.70–2.56 Ga). The age of the accretionary event that formed this craton is approximately 2.5–2.45 Ga. The three domains in Madagascar exotic to the Greater Dharwar Craton are the Androyan–Anosyan, Vohibory, and Bemarivo. The basement to the Androyan–Anosyan domain is a continental terrane of Paleoproterozoic age (2.0–1.78 Ga) that was accreted to the southern margin (present-day direction) of the Greater Dharwar Craton in pre-Stratherian time (>1.6 Ga), and rejuvenated at 1.03–0.93 Ga with the creation of the Ikalamavony domain. The Vohibory domain, an oceanic terrane of Neoproterozoic age was accreted to the Androyan–Anosyan domain in Cryogenian time (?0.63–0.60 Ga). The Bemarivo domain of north Madagascar is a terrane of Cryogenian igneous rocks, with a cryptic Paleoproterozoic basement, that was accreted to the Greater Dharwar Craton in latest Ediacaran to earliest Cambrian time (0.53–0.51 Ga).

  18. Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 105131 Tropical deforestation in Madagascar: analysis using hierarchical,

    E-print Network

    Silander Jr., John A.

    2005-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 105­131 Tropical deforestation in Madagascar: analysis using­effect relationships for deforestation at various scales has proven difficult even when rates of deforestation appear approach to develop a novel deforestation model for the eastern wet forested zone of Madagascar, a global

  19. Dwarf geckos of Madagascar are a poorly known group of small, typically inconspicuous diurnal lizards

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    Dwarf geckos of Madagascar are a poorly known group of small, typically inconspicuous diurnal), dwarf geckos contain a large number of microendemic species restricted often to single localities only of the least known species of dwarf geckos in Madagascar is L. blancae. This species was originally described

  20. Chow Down! Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Explore Basic Nutrition Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Madagascar hissing cockroach ("Gromphadorhina portentosa") is one of the most exciting and enjoyable animals to incorporate into your science curriculum. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHCs) do not bite, are easy to handle, produce little odor compared to many terrarium animals, have a fascinating social structure, are easy to breed, teach…

  1. Molecular evolution and radiation of dung beetles in Madagascar Luisa Orsini*, Helena Koivulehto and Ilkka Hanski

    E-print Network

    Hanski, Ilkka

    Molecular evolution and radiation of dung beetles in Madagascar Luisa Orsini*, Helena Koivulehto taxonomic levels, making Madagascar one of the hotspots of global biodiversity. Dung beetles, represented and geographic distribution of dung beetles worldwide. A detailed analysis of sequence composition identified

  2. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H.; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N.; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J.; Ali, Jason R.; Samonds, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar’s Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine. PMID:26075723

  3. Mapping the Traces of the Assembly and Multistage Breakup of Gondwanaland in the Lithosphere of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindraharisaona, E. J.; Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rumpker, G.; Heit, B.; Rambolamanana, G.; Priestley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Madagascar is an ideal place to study the multistage assembly and break up of Gondwanaland, the supercontinent whose breakup also gave rise to most of present day continental regions. At the end of the Proterozoic the assembly of Gondwanaland has placed the Malagasy basement between the Antarctic, Dharwar, Arabo-Nubian and Nubian-Tanzanian cratons. The continental collision processes accompanying the assembly left their mark on the Malagasy basement, currently exposed in the Eastern two thirds of the island, in the form of metamorphic and mineral belts as well as massive ductile shear zones. During the Jurassic Madagascar, India and Seychelles were breaking up from African. Long after the breakaway of India and the Seychelles from Madagascar (Cretaceous time), volcanic activation has occurred in several locations of Madagascar mostly in the central and northern part (Neogene period). The surface traces of assembly and breakup processes have been studied extensively using geological methods in Madagascar but the imprint on the deep structure has so far not been studied in much detail. Between 2012 and 2014, 25 broadband stations were operated in the Southern Madagascar extending from East coast (Mananjary) to West coast (Toliary). The array crosses the Bongolava-Ranontsara shear zone, which is one of the major shear zones in Madagascar. In addition, between 2013 and 2014, 25 short period stations were deployed in the southeastern part of Madagascar. We will present preliminarily results of the lithosphere structure in the southern part of Madagascar based on surface wave dispersion analysis from both earthquakes and ambient noise combine with receiver function analysis. We will focus mostly on the contrast between the lithosphere structure in the eastern (Precambrian rocks) and the western (Sedimentary basins) parts of Madagascar.

  4. Long-term observations of the East Madagascar Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsoni, L.; Aguiar-González, B.; Maas, L. R. M.; van Aken, H. M.; Ridderinkhof, H.

    2015-06-01

    An array of five moorings was deployed at 23°S off eastern Madagascar and maintained for about 2.5 years as part of the "INdian-ATlantic EXchange in present and past climate" (INATEX) experiment. The observations reveal a recurrent equatorward undercurrent (during 692 of 888 days), the East Madagascar Undercurrent (EMUC), flowing below the poleward surface East Madagascar Current (EMC). The average core of the undercurrent was found near the continental slope, at a depth of 1260 m and at an approximate distance of 29 km from the coast, with mean velocities of 6.4 (±4.8) cm s-1. Maximum speeds reach 20 cm s-1. The mean equatorward volume transport is estimated to be 1.33 (±1.41) Sv with maxima up to 6 Sv. The baroclinic/barotropic partitioning of the geostrophic flow shows a persistent equatorward baroclinic velocity in the undercurrent core, which is sometimes inhibited by a stronger poleward barotropic contribution. The wavelet spectrum analysis of the transport time series displays two dominant frequency bands: (i) nearly bi-monthly (46-79 days), previously observed in the surface EMC, and attributed to the forcing of barotropic waves generated in the Mascarene Basin; and (ii) nearly semi-annual (132-187 days), which seems to be related to the semi-annual cycle in the equatorial winds near the Indian Ocean eastern boundary. A historical dataset of temperature-salinity Argo profiles was used to investigate the spatial variability of the thermohaline properties at intermediate levels. Lastly, Argo-derived velocities suggest an undercurrent flowing upstream until approximately 17°S.

  5. Lower and Middle Cenomanian ammonites from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, William James; Walaszczyk, Ireneusz; Gale, Andrew S.; Dembicz, Krzysztof; Praszkier, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    Kennedy, W.J., Walaszczyk, I., Gale, A.S., Dembicz, K. and Praszkier, T. 2013. Lower and Midle Cenomanian ammonites from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar. Acta Geologica Polonica, 63(4), 625-655. Warszawa. Lower and Middle Cenomanian ammonite assemblages have been collected on a bed-by-bed basis from localities at Vohipaly and Mahaboboka, Madagascar, as well as from outcrops around Berekata, all in the Morondava Basin, southwest Madagascar. These collections demonstrate the presence of the upper Lower Cenomanian Mantelliceras dixoni Zone and the lower Middle Cenomanian Cunningtoniceras inerme Zone of the north-western European standard sequence. These records indicate that the striking anomalies in the zonal assemblages of the classic divisions of the Madagascan Cenomanian are based on mixed assemblages, rather than a succession that differs radically from that elsewhere in the world. The dixoni Zone fauna is: Desmoceras cf. latidorsatum (Michelin, 1838), Pachydesmoceras kossmati Matsumoto, 1987, Forbesiceras sp., F. baylissiWright & Kennedy, 1984, F. largilliertianum (d'Orbigny, 1841), Mantelliceras cantianum Spath, 1926a, M. dixoni Spath, 1926b, M. mantelli (J. Sowerby, 1814), M. picteti Hyatt, 1903, M. saxbii (Sharpe, 1857), Sharpeiceras sp., S. falloti (Collignon, 1931), S. mocambiquense (Choffat, 1903), S. cf. florencae Spath, 1925, Acompsoceras renevieri (Sharpe, 1857), A. tenue Collignon, 1964, Calycoceras sp., Mrhiliceras lapparenti (Pervinquière, 1907), Mariella (Mariella) stolizcai (Collignon, 1964), Hypoturrilites taxyfabreae (Collignon, 1964), Turrilites scheuchzerianus Bosc, 1801, Sciponoceras cucullatum Collignon, 1964, and Sciponoceras antanimangaensis (Collignon, 1964). The presence of Calycoceras in a Lower Cenomanian association represents a precocious appearance of a genus typically Middle and Upper Cenomanian in occurrence, and matches records from Tunisia. The inerme Zone yields a more restricted assemblage: Pachydesmoceras kossmati, Forbesiceras baylissi, Acanthoceras sp. juv., Cunningtoniceras cunningtoni (Sharpe, 1855) and Hypoturrilites taxyfabreae.

  6. Geological evolution of the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo Belt, northern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Schofield, D.I.; Goodenough, K.M.; Horstwood, M.; Tucker, R.; Bauer, W.; Annells, R.; Howard, K. J.; Walsh, G.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2009-01-01

    The broadly east-west trending, Late Neoproterozoic Bemarivo Belt in northern Madagascar has been re-surveyed at 1:100 000 scale as part of a large multi-disciplinary World Bank-sponsored project. The work included acquisition of 14 U-Pb zircon dates and whole-rock major and trace element geochemical data of representative rocks. The belt has previously been modelled as a juvenile Neoproterozoic arc and our findings broadly support that model. The integrated datasets indicate that the Bemarivo Belt is separated by a major ductile shear zone into northern and southern "terranes", each with different lithostratigraphy and ages. However, both formed as Neoproterozoic arc/marginal basin assemblages that were translated southwards over the north-south trending domains of "cratonic" Madagascar, during the main collisional phase of the East African Orogeny at ca. 540 Ma. The older, southern terrane consists of a sequence of high-grade paragneisses (Sahantaha Group), which were derived from a Palaeoproterozoic source and formed a marginal sequence to the Archaean cratons to the south. These rocks are intruded by an extensive suite of arc-generated metamorphosed plutonic rocks, known as the Antsirabe Nord Suite. Four samples from this suite yielded U-Pb SHRIMP ages at ca. 750 Ma. The northern terrane consists of three groups of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks, including a possible Archaean sequence (Betsiaka Group: maximum depositional age approximately 2477 Ma) and two volcano-sedimentary sequences (high-grade Milanoa Group: maximum depositional age approximately 750 Ma; low grade Daraina Group: extrusive age = 720-740 Ma). These supracrustal rocks are intruded by another suite of arc-generated metamorphosed plutonic rocks, known as the Manambato Suite, 4 samples of which gave U-Pb SHRIMP ages between 705 and 718 Ma. Whole-rock geochemical data confirm the calc-alkaline, arc-related nature of the plutonic rocks. The volcanic rocks of the Daraina and Milanoa groups also show characteristics of arc-related magmatism, but include both calc-alkaline and tholeiitic compositions. It is not certain when the two Bemarivo terranes were juxtaposed, but ages from metamorphic rims on zircon suggest that both the northern and southern terranes were accreted to the northern cratonic margin of Madagascar at about 540-530 Ma. Terrane accretion included the assembly of the Archaean Antongil and Antananarivo cratons and the high-grade Neoproterozoic Anaboriana Belt. Late- to post-tectonic granitoids of the Maevarano Suite, the youngest plutons of which gave ca. 520 Ma ages, intrude all terranes in northern Madagascar showing that terrane accretion was completed by this time. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

  7. A new species of Pandanaceae from northern Madagascar, Pandanus ankaranensis.

    PubMed

    Callmander, Martin W; Laivao, Michel O; Randrianaivo, Richard

    2010-09-01

    A new species, Pandanus ankaranensis Callm. & Laivao (Pandanaceae), is described from the karst region of Ankarana in northern Madagascar. It resembles P. grallatus B. C. Stone, another member of Pandanus sect. Mammillares H. St. John occurring in the area. The new taxon can be distinguished by its larger and wider leaves that are persistent on the branches, the stipe often lying on the rocks where plants grow, and its larger syncarps. Pandanus ankaranensis is classified as Vulnerable based on the IUCN Red List criteria. PMID:21698065

  8. Proterozoic tectonostratigraphy and paleogeography of central Madagascar derived from detrital zircon U-Pb age populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, R.; Coleman, D.S.; Chokel, C.B.; DeOreo, S.B.; Wooden, J.L.; Collins, A.S.; De Waele, B.; Kroner, A.

    2004-01-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb ages determined by SHRIMP distinguish two clastic sequences among Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks from central Madagascar. The Itremo Group is older: zircon data, stromatolite characteristics, and carbon isotope data all point to a depositional age around 1500-1700 Ma. The Molo Group is younger, deposited between ???620 Ma (the age of the youngest zircon) and ???560 Ma (the age of metamorphic overgrowths on detrital cores). Geochronologic provenance analysis of the Itremo Group points to sources in East Africa as well as local sources in central and southern Madagascar but provides no evidence for a detrital contribution from northern and eastern Madagascar nor from southern India. Detrital zircon and sedimentologic similarities between rocks of the Itremo Group and the Zambian Muva Supergroup suggest a lithostratigraphic correlation between the two. The Molo Group has a strong 1000-1100 Ma detrital signature that also indicates an east African provenance and suggests a Neoproterozoic geographic connection with Sri Lanka but shows no indication of input from the Dharwar craton and eastern Madagascar. Central Madagascar was probably juxtaposed with the Tanzanian craton in the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic, whereas northern and eastern Madagascar were connected to India. Internal assembly of Madagascar postdates Neoproterozoic Molo Group sedimentation and is likely to have occurred at about 560 Ma. ?? 2004 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconciling the origins of Africa, India and Madagascar with vertebrate dispersal scenarios.

    PubMed

    Masters, J C; de Wit, M J; Asher, R J

    2006-01-01

    Africa, India and Madagascar were once part of the supercontinent of Gondwana. This land mass began to fragment approx. 170 million years ago, and by 83 million years, all of the major components we recognize today were separated by tracts of water. Madagascar's fossil record and estimates of the timing of the extant vertebrate radiations in Madagascar are not easily reconciled with this history of fragmentation. Fossil faunas that lived prior to approx. 65 million years had a cosmopolitan flavour, but this was lost after the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Phylogenetic reconstructions of most extant Malagasy vertebrate radiations indicate divergence times that postdate the End-Cretaceous (lemurs, tenrecs, cichlid fish) and even the Early Miocene (chameleons, carnivores, rodents). Most biogeographic explanations of these groups rely, therefore, on Simpson's model of sweepstakes dispersal (see also cover figure), but there are significant problems in applying the model to migrations from Africa to Madagascar, although its application is not so intractable between India and Madagascar. Alternative migration routes for consideration lie: (1) along the suite of fracture zones between Antarctica and Africa/Madagascar (known as the Antarctic-Africa Corridor), which may have been exposed episodically above sea level; (2) along a series of submerged basaltic ridges/plateaus with known or suspected continental crust between Antarctica and Africa/Madagascar/India flanking the Antarctic-Africa Corridor (e.g. the Madagascar Ridge, Mozambique Ridge, Conrad Plateau, Gunnerus Ridge); (3) between Africa and Madagascar along the Davie Ridge (parts of which are known to have been exposed episodically above sea level); (4) along the Deccan hotspot corridor between India and greater Africa. PMID:17053327

  10. Madagascar: A continental fragment of the paleo-super Dharwar craton of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Negi, J. G.

    1992-06-01

    The morphological kinship of Madagascar to its immediate neighbors on the west (African continent) and east (Indian subcontinent) during the Early and middle Cretaceous has been debated for the past two decades on the basis of available geologic, tectonic, and paleomagnetic information. Most of the paleoreconstructions of Madagascar have shown its attachment to the east African continent. We present magnetic satelite and gravity data, and morphological, geophysical, and geotectonic similarities to hypothesize that in the period before the breakup of Gondwana, Madagascar was a continental fragment of the paleo-super Dharwar craton of India.

  11. Mangrove forest distributions and dynamics in Madagascar (1975-2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giri, C.; Muhlhausen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests of Madagascar are declining, albeit at a much slower rate than the global average. The forests are declining due to conversion to other land uses and forest degradation. However, accurate and reliable information on their present distribution and their rates, causes, and consequences of change have not been available. Earlier studies used remotely sensed data to map and, in some cases, to monitor mangrove forests at a local scale. Nonetheless, a comprehensive national assessment and synthesis was lacking. We interpreted time-series satellite data of 1975, 1990, 2000, and 2005 using a hybrid supervised and unsupervised classification approach. Landsat data were geometrically corrected to an accuracy of ?? one-half pixel, an accuracy necessary for change analysis. We used a postclassification change detection approach. Our results showed that Madagascar lost 7% of mangrove forests from 1975 to 2005, to a present extent of ???2,797 km2. Deforestation rates and causes varied both spatially and temporally. The forests increased by 5.6% (212 km2) from 1975 to 1990, decreased by 14.3% (455 km 2) from 1990 to 2000, and decreased by 2.6% (73 km2) from 2000 to 2005. Similarly, major changes occurred in Bombekota Bay, Mahajamba Bay, the coast of Ambanja, the Tsiribihina River, and Cap St Vincent. The main factors responsible for mangrove deforestation include conversion to agriculture (35%), logging (16%), conversion to aquaculture (3%), and urban development (1%). ?? 2008 by MDPI.

  12. [Profile and characteristics of pregnant adolescents in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Randriambololona, D; Andrianmiakatsoa Raobelle, E; Hanitrinihay Rafehivola, I; Rajaonarison, B; Andrianampanalinarivo Hery, R

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar's population is predominantly young: those under 15 years account for 45% of the total population, and their number is expected to double again by 2025. First pregnancies accelerate particularly between the ages of 15 and 19 years among Malagasy teens. It seemed essential to know the profile of pregnant adolescents receiving care at a level-2 maternity hospital in the capital so that care and social services can be adapted to meet their specific needs. We found that teenagers accounted for 16.04% of the admissions to this maternity ward. Although more than half had used contraception at some point (most often condoms), most had not planned and did not want this pregnancy. The overall fetal loss rate was 9.77%, and the rate of complicated induced abortions 4.23%. Nearly three quarters (73.15%) of the teens had regular prenatal care. The preterm delivery rate was 3.25%. Promoting reproductive health education and preventing teenage pregnancy are urgent public health policy priorities in Madagascar. PMID:24876177

  13. Mangrove Forest Distributions and Dynamics in Madagascar (1975–2005)

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Chandra; Muhlhausen, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests of Madagascar are declining, albeit at a much slower rate than the global average. The forests are declining due to conversion to other land uses and forest degradation. However, accurate and reliable information on their present distribution and their rates, causes, and consequences of change have not been available. Earlier studies used remotely sensed data to map and, in some cases, to monitor mangrove forests at a local scale. Nonetheless, a comprehensive national assessment and synthesis was lacking. We interpreted time-series satellite data of 1975, 1990, 2000, and 2005 using a hybrid supervised and unsupervised classification approach. Landsat data were geometrically corrected to an accuracy of ± one-half pixel, an accuracy necessary for change analysis. We used a postclassification change detection approach. Our results showed that Madagascar lost 7% of mangrove forests from 1975 to 2005, to a present extent of ?2,797 km2. Deforestation rates and causes varied both spatially and temporally. The forests increased by 5.6% (212 km2) from 1975 to 1990, decreased by 14.3% (455 km2) from 1990 to 2000, and decreased by 2.6% (73 km2) from 2000 to 2005. Similarly, major changes occurred in Bombekota Bay, Mahajamba Bay, the coast of Ambanja, the Tsiribihina River, and Cap St Vincent. The main factors responsible for mangrove deforestation include conversion to agriculture (35%), logging (16%), conversion to aquaculture (3%), and urban development (1%).

  14. Madagascar Flatidae (Hemiptera, Fulgoromorpha): state-of-the-art and research challenges

    PubMed Central

    ?wierczewski, Dariusz; Stroi?ski, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The paper provides a historical review of the research on Flatidae in Madagascar and indicates future prospects. While the first two species of Madagascar Flatidae were described by Guérin-Méneville (1844), it was Signoret (1860) who made the first real attempt to enhance our knowledge of the Hemiptera fauna of Madagascar by describing several additional species. Over the following century and a half, several investigators have turned their attention to this group of insects, with the final number of species recorded for the island reaching 79. Despite this long history of research, it is evident that much still remains to be done. Detailed taxonomic research will allow the natural history of Madagascar and changes in the biological diversity of its endemic ecosystems to be better understood. This paper should be considered as an introduction to a complex study on the systematics and phylogeny of worldwide Flatidae planthoppers. PMID:24039526

  15. A review of mosquitoes associated with Rift Valley fever virus in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Tantely, Luciano M; Boyer, Sébastien; Fontenille, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonotic disease occurring throughout Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Madagascar. The disease is caused by a Phlebovirus (RVF virus [RVFV]) transmitted to vertebrate hosts through the bite of infected mosquitoes. In Madagascar, the first RVFV circulation was reported in 1979 based on detection in mosquitoes but without epidemic episode. Subsequently, two outbreaks occurred: the first along the east coast and in the central highlands in 1990 and 1991 and the most recent along the northern and eastern coasts and in the central highlands in 2008 and 2009. Despite the presence of 24 mosquitoes species potentially associated with RVFV transmission in Madagascar, little associated entomological information is available. In this review, we list the RVFV vector, Culex antennatus, as well as other taxa as candidate vector species. We discuss risk factors from an entomological perspective for the re-emergence of RVF in Madagascar. PMID:25732680

  16. Latitude drives diversification in Madagascar's endemic dry forest rodent Eliurus myoxinus

    E-print Network

    Yoder, Anne

    , STEVEN M. GOODMAN3,4 and ANNE D. YODER1 1 Department of Biology, Duke University, Box 90338, Durham, NC influences of colonization and migration (Yoder & Nowak, 2006). The biomes of Madagascar are notably heteroge

  17. Home Sweet Home: How to Build a Madagascar Hissing Cockroach Habitat Out of Recycled Materials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ron Wagler

    2010-04-01

    Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHC) are amazing insects that can be an integral part of an effective science learning and teaching environment. MHCs have a fascinating social structure. They make excellent pets, teach students how to properly care for an

  18. STUDY OF LAND USE ISSUES CHARACTERIZING THE AMBALAVAO-ANDRINGITRA REGION OF MADAGASCAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: GF9500572 Title: Study of Land Use Issues Characterizing the Ambalavao-Andringitra Region of Madagascar Fellow (Principal Investigator): Christian Arthur Kull Institution: University of Colorado EPA Grant Representati...

  19. THE FOOD HABITS OF THE BARN OWL TYTO ALBA AT THREE SITES ON MADAGASCAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven M. Goodman; Olivier Langrand; Christopher J. Raxworthy

    1993-01-01

    Goodman, S. M., Langrand, O. & Raxworthy, C. J. 1993. The food habits of the Barn Owl Tyro alba at three sites on Madagascar. Ostrich 64:160-171.Regurgitated food remains of the Barn Owl Tyro alba were collected within the rain forest of the Eastern Region of Madagascar (Andasibe and Manombo) and in the sub-arid thorn scrub of the Western Region (Beza

  20. Bee conservation in Sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar: diversity, status and threats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Connal D. Eardley; Mary Gikungu; Michael P. Schwarz

    2009-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar contain a wealth of bee diversity, with particularly high levels of endemicity in Madagascar.\\u000a Although Africa contains seven biodiversity hotspots, the bee fauna appears rather moderate given the size of the continent.\\u000a This could be due to various factors, an important one being the dearth of bee taxonomists working in Africa and difficulties\\u000a in carrying out

  1. Oxygen isotope systematics of gem corundum deposits in Madagascar: relevance for their geological origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaston Giuliani; Anthony Fallick; Michel Rakotondrazafy; Daniel Ohnenstetter; Alfred Andriamamonjy; Théogène Ralantoarison; Saholy Rakotosamizanany; Marie Razanatseheno; Yohann Offant; Virginie Garnier; Christian Dunaigre; Dietmar Schwarz; Alain Mercier; Voahangy Ratrimo; Bruno Ralison

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of gem corundum was measured from 22 deposits and occurrences in Madagascar to provide a gemstone\\u000a geological identification and characterization. Primary corundum deposits in Madagascar are hosted in magmatic (syenite and\\u000a alkali basalt) and metamorphic rocks (gneiss, cordieritite, mafic and ultramafic rocks, marble, and calc-silicate rocks).\\u000a In both domains the circulation of fluids, especially along shear

  2. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEFF A. JOHNSON; RUTH E. TINGA; MELANIE CULVER; FRANK HAILER

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite

  3. Reconstruction of Madagascar and Africa: Evidence from the Davie Fracture Zone and Western Somali Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, Millard F.; Rabinowitz, Philip D.

    1987-08-01

    New seismic reflection, gravity, and magnetic data from offshore East Africa allow the Davie Fracture Zone to be traced from ˜11°S to its intersection with the Kenyan coast at ˜2°S, constraining the relative motion of Madagascar and Africa. Seasat-derived free air gravity anomalies and slope/rise positive magnetic anomalies observed in shipboard data help to locate the continent-ocean boundaries (COB) off the shore of East Africa and Madagascar. Seismic reflection data further document a diapirprovince off Madagascar, presumably conjugate to that observed off Kenya and Somalia. The Dhow and Very Large Crude Carrier (VLCC) basement ridges are complex features and do not appear to be simple fracture zones owing their existence entirely to the separation of Madagascar and Africa. From these data we determine a predrift fit of Madagascar and Africa involving a 14.2° rotation of Madagascar to Africa about a pole at 10°N, 150°E. The geometry of the reconstruction adheres to seismic and potential field data indicating the oceanic nature and extent of the Comoros Basin and of the Somali Basin between Kenya and the Seychelles, and it does not conflict with onshore or offshore stratigraphy. Timing of the opening of the Western Somali Basin is constrained by Mesozoic marine magnetic anomalies and extrapolation to the interpreted COB and occurred between approximately 165 and 130 Ma.

  4. Terrestrial runoff influences white syndrome prevalence in SW Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, C; Baele, J M; Kushmaro, A; Fréjaville, Y; Eeckhaut, I

    2014-10-01

    Terrestrial runoff and sedimentation have been implicated in a variety of impacts on scleractinian corals. However, despite accumulating evidence, little work has been done to investigate their influence on coral disease development. This study examined the role that river runoff and the associated sedimentation could play in affecting the prevalence of the coral disease "white syndrome" in SW Madagascar. Corals from reefs affected by river discharge and terrestrial sediments were more affected by white syndrome than reefs located far from any source of terrestrial runoff. Terrestrial runoff-affected reefs also displayed a wider diversity of coral species affected by this disease. While much evidence has been pointing in the direction of indirect effects of such runoff on coral disease development, our data corroborates earlier suggestions that pathogens are present within the sediments. As such, sediments released on reefs through river discharge could act as reservoirs of coral pathogens. PMID:25218232

  5. Sauropod dinosaur osteoderms from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Curry Rogers, Kristina; D'Emic, Michael; Rogers, Raymond; Vickaryous, Matthew; Cagan, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Osteoderms are bones embedded within the dermis, and are common to select members of most major tetrapod lineages. The largest known animals that bear osteoderms are members of Titanosauria, a diverse clade of sauropod dinosaurs. Here we report on two titanosaur osteoderms recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Maevarano Formation of Madagascar. Each osteoderm was discovered in association with a partial skeleton representing a distinct ontogenetic stage of the titanosaur Rapetosaurus krausei. Combined, these specimens provide novel insights into the arrangement and function of titanosaur osteoderms. Taphonomic data confirm that Rapetosaurus developed only limited numbers of osteoderms in its integument. The adult-sized osteoderm is the most massive integumentary skeletal element yet discovered, with an estimated volume of 9.63?litres. Uniquely, this specimen possesses an internal cavity equivalent to more than half its total volume. Large, hollow osteoderms may have functioned as mineral stores in fecund, rapidly growing titanosaurs inhabiting stressed environments. PMID:22127060

  6. Healing words: becoming a spirit-host in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Mack, John

    2011-08-01

    In discussion of healing processes in sub-Saharan Africa, emphasis is characteristically placed on the role of performance. Yet in spirit mediumship, speech is also an important element in therapeutic practices. In Madagascar, the spirits (tromba) are often of exotic origins (frequently in time as well as space) and the language used is likewise exotic. A complex of techniques of enchantment is employed: amongst them, music, changes of dress, the burning of perfumes and incense, rum, putting matches in the mouth, or the use of herbal medicines. Sometimes artefacts, such as - in the case discussed - a large model ship, are employed. Although the setting is shrine-like, the techniques are at once both dynamic and eclectic, collapsing time and space into a single embodied moment when the spirit speaks through the vehicle of the medium. Such 'spirit-speech' is itself empowered and empowering, cathartic and curative. PMID:21810039

  7. Three parallel radiations of Canthonini dung beetles in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Wirta, Helena; Viljanen, Heidi; Orsini, Luisa; Montreuil, Olivier; Hanski, Ilkka

    2010-11-01

    Madagascar has an exceptionally large fauna of more than 250 species of endemic dung beetles. Based on molecular phylogenies, the species descend from eight independent overseas colonisations, of which four have given rise to big radiations. Here, we analyse the tribe Canthonini with three parallel radiations following the respective colonisations at 64-44 Mya (Arachnodes-Epilissus, 101 species), 30-19 Mya (Epactoides, 37 species), and 24-15 Mya (Apotolamprus-Nanos, 61 species). All three radiations have taken place in forests, but there are also substantial differences between them. The oldest radiation exhibits the greatest ecological diversification, including monophyletic groups of primate and cattle dung specialists and multiple shifts to arboreal foraging. Analysis of pairs of sister species suggests allopatric speciation in the oldest and the youngest, apparently non-adaptive, radiations, whereas in Epactoides closely related species have diverged ecologically and have largely overlapping geographical ranges, suggestive of adaptive radiation in parapatry or regional sympatry. PMID:20732432

  8. Violences conjugales à Antananarivo (Madagascar): un enjeu de santé publique

    PubMed Central

    Gastineau, Bénédicte; Gathier, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La violence conjugale a été étudiée dans beaucoup de pays développés mais peu en Afrique subsaharienne. Madagascar est un pays où ce phénomène est peu documenté. Méthodes En 2007, une enquête sur la violence conjugale à Antananarivo (ELVICA) a été menée sur la violence conjugale envers les femmes dans la capitale malgache. ELVICA a interrogé 400 femmes en union, de 15 à 59 ans. Des informations sur les caractéristiques démographiques, socioéconomiques des couples ont été collectées ainsi que sur les actes de violences physiques des hommes sur leurs épouses. L’objectif de cet article est d’identifier les facteurs de risques de la violence conjugale grave, celle qui a des conséquences sur la santé physique des femmes. Résultats Trente-cinq pour cent des femmes qui ont déclaré avoir subi au moins une forme de violence physique au cours des 12 mois précédent l’enquête. Presque la moitié (46%) des femmes violentées ont déclaré avoir déjà eu des hématomes, et environ un quart (23%) des plaies avec saignement. Vingt-deux pour cent ont déjà dû consulter un médecin. Parmi les nombreuses variables socioéconomiques et démographiques testées, quelques-unes sont associées positivement au risque de violence conjugale grave: le fait pour une femme d’être en union consensuelle et d’avoir une activité professionnelle. Il y aussi un lien entre la violence subie et l’autonomie des femmes (liberté accordée par le mari de travailler, de circuler, de voir sa famille). Conclusion A Madagascar, comme ailleurs, la lutte contre les violences conjugales est un élément majeur de l’amélioration du statut et de la santé des femmes. PMID:22514757

  9. Comparing Methods for Prioritising Protected Areas for Investment: A Case Study Using Madagascar’s Dry Forest Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Charlie J.; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Metcalfe, Kristian; Raselimanana, Achille P.; Smith, Robert J.; Davies, Zoe G.

    2015-01-01

    There are insufficient resources available to manage the world’s existing protected area portfolio effectively, so the most important sites should be prioritised in investment decision-making. Sophisticated conservation planning and assessment tools developed to identify locations for new protected areas can provide an evidence base for such prioritisations, yet decision-makers in many countries lack the institutional support and necessary capacity to use the associated software. As such, simple heuristic approaches such as species richness or number of threatened species are generally adopted to inform prioritisation decisions. However, their performance has never been tested. Using the reptile fauna of Madagascar’s dry forests as a case study, we evaluate the performance of four site prioritisation protocols used to rank the conservation value of 22 established and candidate protected areas. We compare the results to a benchmark produced by the widely-used systematic conservation planning software Zonation. The four indices scored sites on the basis of: i) species richness; ii) an index based on species’ Red List status; iii) irreplaceability (a key metric in systematic conservation planning); and, iv) a novel Conservation Value Index (CVI), which incorporates species-level information on endemism, representation in the protected area system, tolerance of habitat degradation and hunting/collection pressure. Rankings produced by the four protocols were positively correlated to the results of Zonation, particularly amongst high-scoring sites, but CVI and Irreplaceability performed better than Species Richness and the Red List Index. Given the technological capacity constraints experienced by decision-makers in the developing world, our findings suggest that heuristic metrics can represent a useful alternative to more sophisticated analyses, especially when they integrate species-specific information related to extinction risk. However, this can require access to, and understanding of, more complex species data. PMID:26162073

  10. Stone tools and foraging in northern Madagascar challenge Holocene extinction models

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Robert E.; Radimilahy, Chantal; Wright, Henry T.; Jacobs, Zenobia; Kelly, Gwendolyn O.; Berna, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Past research on Madagascar indicates that village communities were established about AD 500 by people of both Indonesian and East African heritage. Evidence of earlier visits is scattered and contentious. Recent archaeological excavations in northern Madagascar provide evidence of occupational sites with microlithic stone technologies related to foraging for forest and coastal resources. A forager occupation of one site dates to earlier than 2000 B.C., doubling the length of Madagascar’s known occupational history, and thus the time during which people exploited Madagascar’s environments. We detail stratigraphy, chronology, and artifacts from two rock shelters. Ambohiposa near Iharana (Vohémar) on the northeast coast, yielded a stratified assemblage with small flakes, microblades, and retouched crescentic and trapezoidal tools, probably projectile elements, made on cherts and obsidian, some brought more that 200 km. 14C dates are contemporary with the earliest villages. No food remains are preserved. Lakaton’i Anja near Antsiranana in the north yielded several stratified assemblages. The latest assemblage is well dated to A.D. 1050–1350, by 14C and optically stimulated luminescence dating and pottery imported from the Near East and China. Below is a series of stratified assemblages similar to Ambohiposa. 14C and optically stimulated luminescence dates indicate occupation from at least 2000 B.C. Faunal remains indicate a foraging pattern. Our evidence shows that foragers with a microlithic technology were active in Madagascar long before the arrival of farmers and herders and before many Late Holocene faunal extinctions. The differing effects of historically distinct economies must be identified and understood to reconstruct Holocene histories of human environmental impact. PMID:23858456

  11. L'évolution géologique de Madagascar et la dislocation du Gondwana: une introductionThe geological evolution of Madagascar: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, A.; Groupe campus 'le rifting malgache'

    1999-05-01

    Between eastern Africa and the Indian Ocean, Madagascar was a part of the Gondwana at the end of the Proterozoic. Its evolution, from the Carboniferous through to the present times, displays successive stages of the Gondwana disintegration. The original location of Madagascar, close to present Kenya, is deduced from sedimentological, structural and palæomagnetic data. During Permo-Triassic times, it was submitted to a northeast-southwest regional extension, which resulted in the opening of the Karoo Basins. During the Mid-Late Jurassic, opening of the Somalian and Mozambican Oceanic Basins was accompanied by the translation of Madagascar along a north-south trending transform fault, located along the present Davie Ridge. The Late Cretaceous was characterised in the island by an acceleration of the subsidence in the coastal basins and by an important magmatic, essentially effusive, activity. This marked the beginning of a northeast-southwest extension, opening of the Mascarene Oceanic Basin and separation of India from Madagascar. Since the Neogene up to present times, another extensional regime developed, as in eastern Africa, characterised by a roughly east-west extensional horizontal direction, which results in the opening of faulted basins and the emission of Pliocene-Quaternary alkaline magmas.

  12. In and out of Madagascar: Dispersal to Peripheral Islands, Insular Speciation and Diversification of Indian Ocean Daisy Trees (Psiadia, Asteraceae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joeri S. Strijk; Richard D. Noyes; Dominique Strasberg; Corinne Cruaud; Fredéric Gavory; Mark W. Chase; Richard J. Abbott; Christophe Thébaud

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar is surrounded by archipelagos varying widely in origin, age and structure. Although small and geologically young, these archipelagos have accumulated disproportionate numbers of unique lineages in comparison to Madagascar, highlighting the role of waif-dispersal and rapid in situ diversification processes in generating endemic biodiversity. We reconstruct the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the genus Psiadia (Asteraceae), a plant genus

  13. Seismic reflection profiling and basement topography in the Somali Basin: possible fracture zones between Madagascar and Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth T. Bunce; Peter Molnar

    1977-01-01

    Continuous seismic profiling in the western Somali Basin reveals basement topography aligned approximately north to south. We interpret three buried ridges, approximately 50 km apart, approximately parallel to the Davie Ridge in the Mozambique Channel, as fracture zones along which Madagascar moved away from Africa. These data therefore support the northern paleopositions of Madagascar suggested by du Toit [1937] and

  14. Excess mortality associated with the 2009 A(H1N1)v influenza pandemic in Antananarivo, Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Excess mortality associated with the 2009 A(H1N1)v influenza pandemic in Antananarivo, Madagascar S revision 12 May 2012; Accepted 23 May 2012 SUMMARY It is difficult to assess the mortality burden to be negligible in Africa. We assessed the impact of the 2009 influenza epidemic on mortality in Madagascar

  15. Elaphoglossum nidusoides (Dryopteridaceae), a New Species of Fern from Madagascar with an Unusual Phylogenetic Position in the

    E-print Network

    Elaphoglossum nidusoides (Dryopteridaceae), a New Species of Fern from Madagascar with an Unusual.S.A. 4 Author for correspondence (rouhan@mnhn.fr) Communicating Editor: Mark P. Simmons ABSTRACT. A fern by the succulent fronds. KEYWORDS: Elaphoglossum, fern, Madagascar, new species, phylogeny, Squamipedia

  16. Export Processing Zones in Madagascar: the impact of the dismantling of clothing quotas on employment and labour standards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Pierre Cling; Mireille Razafindrakoto; François Roubaud

    2007-01-01

    (english) The success of Export Processing Zones (EPZs) or the Zone Franche in Madagascar is, with the exception of Mauritius, an isolated and unrecognized case in Africa. The Zone Franche has had a highly significant macroeconomic impact in terms of exports and jobs. Madagascar became the number two clothing exporter in sub-Saharan Africa. At its peek in 2004, the Zone

  17. Education and Training in Madagascar: Toward a Policy Agenda for Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction. A World Bank Country Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    Madagascar is a poor, primarily rural country in which three-quarters of the population has subsisted below the poverty line for at least two decades. In view of the important role of education in the government's poverty reduction agenda, this report documents the current status of educational development in Madagascar and the key constraints on…

  18. Did lemurs have sweepstake tickets? An exploration of Simpson's model for the colonization of Madagascar by mammals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Stankiewicz; C. Thiart; J. C. Masters; M. J. De Wit

    2006-01-01

    Aim To investigate the validity of Simpson's model of sweepstakes dispersal, particularly as it applies to the colonization of Madagascar by African mammals. We chose lemurs as a classic case. Location The East African coast, the Mozambique Channel and Madagascar. Methods First, we investigated the assumptions underlying Simpson's statistical model as it relates to dispersal events. Second, we modelled the

  19. Phylogeography, systematics and conservation status of boid snakes from Madagascar SALAMANDRA, Rheinbach, 39(3/4), 2003

    E-print Network

    181 Phylogeography, systematics and conservation status of boid snakes from Madagascar SALAMANDRA of boid snakes from Madagascar (Sanzinia and Acrantophis) MIGUEL VENCES &FRANK GLAW Abstract To assess specimen from Ankarafantsika forest, and diagnosed by its colour pattern (brown vs. mostly greenish

  20. Detection in and circulation of Bluetongue virus among domestic ruminants in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Viarouge, Cyril; Ravalohery, Jean-Pierre; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Sailleau, Corinne; Tantely, Michael Luciano; Elissa, Nohal; Cardinale, Eric; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Zientara, Stephan; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-17

    So far, no published data was available concerning the circulation of Bluetongue virus (BTV) in Madagascar. During a survey on Rift Valley Fever, we were able to detect a virus belonging to BTV. Therefore, we conducted a study aiming at characterizing molecularly the BTV isolated and assess the importance of circulation of BTV in Madagascar. A total of 4393 sera from ruminants selected randomly by stratification and sampled in 30 districts of Madagascar were tested for BTV. Moreover, 175 cattle were followed during 11 months. Phylogenetic analyses were performed from virus isolated from unfed pools of mosquitoes. Overall, the estimated mean seroprevalence of infection at the national level was 95.9% (95% CI: [95.2-96.5]) in cattle and 83.7% (95% CI: [81.4-85.9]) in small ruminants. Estimation of incidence rate was 54 per 100 cattle-years assuming that the incidence rate is constant all year along. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BTV detected belong to serotype 2. In conclusion, our results showed that BTV is endemic in Madagascar and highly prevalent among cattle. In our study we did not work on the vector involved in transmission of BTV in cattle. Thus, research should be conducted to better describe epidemiology of BTV in Madagascar including vectors and assess economic impact of the disease associated to BTV infections. PMID:25736861

  1. Sentinel surveillance system for early outbreak detection in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Following the outbreak of chikungunya in the Indian Ocean, the Ministry of Health directed the necessary development of an early outbreak detection system. A disease surveillance team including the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar (IPM) was organized to establish a sentinel syndromic-based surveillance system. The system, which was set up in March 2007, transmits patient data on a daily basis from the various voluntary general practitioners throughout the six provinces of the country to the IPM. We describe the challenges and steps involved in developing a sentinel surveillance system and the well-timed information it provides for improving public health decision-making. Methods Surveillance was based on data collected from sentinel general practitioners (SGP). The SGPs report the sex, age, visit date and time, and symptoms of each new patient weekly, using forms addressed to the management team. However, the system is original in that SGPs also report data at least once a day, from Monday to Friday (number of fever cases, rapid test confirmed malaria, influenza, arboviral syndromes or diarrhoeal disease), by cellular telephone (encrypted message SMS). Information can also be validated by the management team, by mobile phone. This data transmission costs 120 ariary per day, less than US$1 per month. Results In 2008, the sentinel surveillance system included 13 health centers, and identified 5 outbreaks. Of the 218,849 visits to SGPs, 12.2% were related to fever syndromes. Of these 26,669 fever cases, 12.3% were related to Dengue-like fever, 11.1% to Influenza-like illness and 9.7% to malaria cases confirmed by a specific rapid diagnostic test. Conclusion The sentinel surveillance system represents the first nationwide real-time-like surveillance system ever established in Madagascar. Our findings should encourage other African countries to develop their own syndromic surveillance systems. Prompt detection of an outbreak of infectious disease may lead to control measures that limit its impact and help prevent future outbreaks. PMID:20092624

  2. Trans-oceanic and endemic origins of the small minnow mayflies (Ephemeroptera, Baetidae) of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael T; Gattolliat, Jean-Luc; Sartori, Michel; Elouard, Jean-Marc; James, Helen; Derleth, Pascale; Glaizot, Olivier; de Moor, Ferdy; Vogler, Alfried P

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relative importance of dispersal and vicariance in forming the Madagascar insect fauna, sequencing approximately 2300?bp from three rRNA gene regions to investigate the phylogeny of Afrotropical small minnow mayflies (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae). Six lineages contained trans-oceanic sister taxa, and variation in genetic divergence between sister taxa revealed relationships that range from very recent dispersal to ancient vicariance. Dispersal was most recent and frequent in species that spend the larval stage in standing water, adding to evidence that these evolutionarily unstable habitats may select for ecological traits that increase dispersal in insects. Ancestral state likelihood analysis suggested at least one Afrotropical lineage had its origin in Madagascar, demonstrating that unidirectional dispersal from a continental source may be too simplistic. We conclude that the Malagasy mayfly fauna should be considered in a biogeographical context that extends beyond Madagascar itself, encompassing trans-oceanic dispersal within multiple lineages. PMID:16096096

  3. Timing of hot spot--related volcanism and the breakup of madagascar and India.

    PubMed

    Storey, M; Mahoney, J J; Saunders, A D; Duncan, R A; Kelley, S P; Coffin, M F

    1995-02-10

    Widespread basalts and rhyolites were erupted in Madagascar during the Late Cretaceous. These are considered to be related to the Marion hot spot and the breakup of Madagascar and Greater India. Seventeen argon-40/argon-39 age determinations reveal that volcanic rocks and dikes from the 1500-kilometer-long rifted eastern margin of Madagascar were emplaced rapidly (mean age = 87.6 +/- 0.6 million years ago) and that the entire duration of Cretaceous volcanism on the island was no more than 6 million years. The evidence suggests that the thick lava pile at Volcan de l'Androy in the south of the island marks the focal point of the Marion hot spot at approximately 88 million years ago and that this mantle plume was instrumental in causing continental breakup. PMID:17813912

  4. Atelier paludisme: an international malaria training course held in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Domarle, Olivier; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Robert, Vincent; Ariey, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The Atelier Paludisme (Malaria Workshop) is an international training course organized by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, which has been held annually for the past five years. The course was designed for both young and experienced researchers, as well as for healthcare professionals, mostly from malaria-endemic countries. Its objective is to provide participants with a broad knowledge of all features of malaria, to improve their skills in project management, to break geographical isolation by using the Internet as a source of documentary information. This six-week course makes use of concepts of andragogy and problem-based learning, i.e. a relationship between participants and tutors, which promotes a process of exchange rather than the simple transmission of knowledge, where participants have to search actively for information. This approach to training, combined with the wide background and experience of those involved, creates positive dynamics and enables participants to acquire new skills, develop their critical and analytical abilities. This paper describes the course and the lessons learned from its evaluation. PMID:18471291

  5. Atelier paludisme: an international malaria training course held in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Domarle, Olivier; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Robert, Vincent; Ariey, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The Atelier Paludisme (Malaria Workshop) is an international training course organized by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar, which has been held annually for the past five years. The course was designed for both young and experienced researchers, as well as for healthcare professionals, mostly from malaria-endemic countries. Its objective is to provide participants with a broad knowledge of all features of malaria, to improve their skills in project management, to break geographical isolation by using the Internet as a source of documentary information. This six-week course makes use of concepts of andragogy and problem-based learning, i.e. a relationship between participants and tutors, which promotes a process of exchange rather than the simple transmission of knowledge, where participants have to search actively for information. This approach to training, combined with the wide background and experience of those involved, creates positive dynamics and enables participants to acquire new skills, develop their critical and analytical abilities. This paper describes the course and the lessons learned from its evaluation. PMID:18471291

  6. Insatiable demands: Income, energy and environmental policy in Madagascar

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    The island nation of Madagascar is suffering the collision of three distinct trends: economic stagnation, a rapidly expanding population and a severely threatened natural resource base. Demands for growth, new energy reserves and environmental conservation, especially of forest resources, are creating a policy dilemma for both government officials and donors. This study seeks to bring new evidence to bear on this policy dilemma. Primary data on urban household income, family size and consumption of various energy types are used to test two main hypothesis (1) that charcoal, which constitutes the fuel of choice for a vast majority of the sample, is a normal rather than an inferior good, and (2) that demand for wood-fuels constitutes a genuine threat to the viability of the forest resource. The data indicate that income elasticities of demand for charcoal are positive over a broad range of per capita income levels, revealing that charcoal is, indeed a normal good for a large portion of the population represented by the sample. A model of forest degradation is built which establishes a clear link between wood-fuel demand and forest degradation. Together, these findings make clear that under current income patterns, and for the forseeable future, charcoal is a normal good and its consumption by urban residents constitutes a serious threat to the natural forest resource. The study concludes with a policy analysis which identifies existing market failures due to government policies and recommends changes based on tested policy prescriptions in other parts of the developing world.

  7. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.A.; Tingay, R.E.; Culver, M.; Hailer, F.; Clarke, M.L.; Mindell, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16 of these loci were also characterized in the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish-eagle compared to other surveyed Haliaeetus species. Determining whether this low diversity is the result of a recent bottleneck or a more historic event has important implications for their conservation. Using a Bayesian coalescent-based method, we show that Madagascar fish-eagles have maintained a small effective population size for hundreds to thousands of years and that its low level of neutral genetic diversity is not the result of a recent bottleneck. Therefore, efforts made to prevent Madagascar fish-eagle extinction should place high priority on maintenance of habitat requirements and reducing direct and indirect human persecution. Given the current rate of deforestation in Madagascar, we further recommend that the population be expanded to occupy a larger geographical distribution. This will help the population persist when exposed to stochastic factors (e.g. climate and disease) that may threaten a species consisting of only 200 adult individuals while inhabiting a rapidly changing landscape. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  8. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeff A; Tingay, Ruth E; Culver, Melanie; Hailer, Frank; Clarke, Michèle L; Mindell, David P

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16 of these loci were also characterized in the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish-eagle compared to other surveyed Haliaeetus species. Determining whether this low diversity is the result of a recent bottleneck or a more historic event has important implications for their conservation. Using a Bayesian coalescent-based method, we show that Madagascar fish-eagles have maintained a small effective population size for hundreds to thousands of years and that its low level of neutral genetic diversity is not the result of a recent bottleneck. Therefore, efforts made to prevent Madagascar fish-eagle extinction should place high priority on maintenance of habitat requirements and reducing direct and indirect human persecution. Given the current rate of deforestation in Madagascar, we further recommend that the population be expanded to occupy a larger geographical distribution. This will help the population persist when exposed to stochastic factors (e.g. climate and disease) that may threaten a species consisting of only 200 adult individuals while inhabiting a rapidly changing landscape. PMID:19140964

  9. Chow Down! Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Explore Basic Nutrition Concepts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ron Wagler

    2009-03-01

    The Madagascar hissing cockroach gromphadorhina portentosa) is one of the most exciting and enjoyable animals to incorporate into your science curriculum. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHCs) do not bite, are easy to handle, produce little odor compared to many terrarium animals, have a fascinating social structure, are easy to breed, teach students how to properly care for animals, and are very cool looking! This article describes an inquiry-based MHC activity and further questions for your students to explore. The activity and questions address basic concepts of nutrition.

  10. Surveillance and control of rabies in La Reunion, Mayotte, and Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mayotte and La Reunion islands are currently free of animal rabies and surveillance is performed by the French Human and Veterinary Public Health Services. However, dog rabies is still enzootic in Madagascar with 4 to 10 confirmed human cases each year. The number of antirabies medical centres in Madagascar is still scarce to provide easy access to the local population for post-exposure rabies prophylaxis. Furthermore, stray dog populations are considerable and attempts to control rabies by mass campaigns of dog vaccination have not received sufficient attention from the national health authorities. To address these challenges, an expanded program to control rabies needs to be initiated by the Malagasy authorities. PMID:24016204

  11. The Toarcian Bathonian succession of the Antsiranana Basin (NW Madagascar): Facies analysis and tectono-sedimentary history in the development of the East Africa-Madagascar conjugate margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Mauro; Benvenuti, Marco

    2008-04-01

    The latest Early to Middle Jurassic succession of the Antsiranana Basin (NW Madagascar) records the complex transition from the continental rifting of Gondwana to the drifting of Madagascar-India from East Africa. The Madagascan Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic successions have been included in several paleogeographic and geodynamic models explaining the evolution of the Gondwana margins. Nevertheless, in some cases, as for the Toarcian-Bathonian deposits of the Antsiranana Basin, no significant stratigraphic revision has been carried out since the early 1970s. New field surveys allow reconsidering the stratigraphic and structural context and the palaeoenvironmental meaning of Toarcian-Bathonian successions occurring in different parts of the basin. These successions rest on the Triassic-Early Jurassic Isalo Sandstone which records pre-breakup rift events with a dominantly fluvial deposition. This situation is similar to other continental rift basins of Gondwana. After a regional Toarcian transgression the different portions of the Antsiranana Basin were characterized by significantly diversified and coeval depositional environments. The basin can be subdivided in a SW and NE part separated by a NW-SE trending structural high. In the SW part of the basin (Ampasindava sub-basin) the so-called "Jurassique paralique" [Rerat, J.C., 1964. Note sur les variations de faciès des sèries jurassiques du nord de Madagascar. Comptes Rendus Semaine gèologique, Tananarive, pp. 15-22] or " Facies Mixtes de la Presqu'ile de Ampasindava" [Besairie, H., Collignon, M., 1972. Géologie de Madagascar; I. Les terrains sédimentaires. Annales Géologiques de Madagascar, 35, 1-463], a 1500 m thick prevalently terrigenous deposit, has been subdivided into four units. They document the long-lasting development of coastal-deltaic systems in a highly subsiding area. In the NE portion of the basin (Ankarana-Analamera sub-basin), a coeval mixed carbonate-terrigenous succession subdivided in five units for a total thickness of 500 m, was deposited during relative sea-level fluctuations in a ramp setting characterized by relatively lower subsidence. The stratigraphic-depositional evolution was dependant on the presence of NW-trending, actively growing highs which fed the south-western sub-basin. The clastic supply balanced the tectonically created accommodation space in this portion of the basin. The revised and extended paleogeographical reconstruction has been included into a breakup model of the East Africa-Madagascar rift during the opening of the Mozambique Channel.

  12. Low-temperature evolution of the Morondava rift shoulder in western Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Jörg; Seward, Diane; Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Separation of Madagascar from eastern Africa resulted in the development of sedimentary basins covering the west coast of Madagascar. The largest and oldest of these basins, the Morondava basin, is bound to the east by crystalline basement of Precambrian age and stretches into the Mozambique Channel to the west. The evolution of the sedimentary sequence is mainly influenced by (I) a Permo-Triassic continental failed rift (e.g. Clark, 1998), also referred to as the Karroo rift (e.g., Montenat et al., 1996) and (II) the early Jurassic separation of Madagascar from eastern Africa (Geiger et al., 2004). Deposits related to the Karroo rift are restricted to a narrow corridor along the basement-basin contact. The rift locus shifted to the west before final separation and relative southward displacement of Madagascar commenced in early Jurassic times (Geiger et al., 2004). In the central part of the basin, the basement-basin contact features a steep escarpment with an altitude difference of greater than 1000 m from the sedimentary plains to the crystalline basement. Here, apatite fission-track analysis of a series of both basement and sediment samples across the escarpment provides the possibility to study the low temperature evolution of the exhuming Precambrian basement in the rift basin shoulder and the associated thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. The timing of basement surface exposure is constrained by the stratigraphic ages of the overlying sediments and modelling of the thermal evolution indicates post-depositional thermal overprinting of basement and Karroo age sediments with partial annealing of fission tracks related to burial by Mesozoic sediments. The temperatures of this heating / reheating of the basin shoulder increase towards the west in the presently exposed sequences. The westernmost sample experienced almost complete resetting of the detrital apatite grains. The general younging of the apparent apatite fission-track ages towards the west indicates activity of faults, re-activating inherited Precambrian structures along the present basin-basement contact during Karroo sedimentation. Furthermore, our data show that onset of final exhumation can be correlated with (I) the end of Madagascar's drift southward relative to Africa along the Davie Ridge in the Mozambique Channel during the Early Cretaceous (Coffin and Rabinowitz, 1988), (II) activity of the Marion hot spot beneath southern Madagascar and associated Late Cretaceous break-up between Madagascar and India (Storey et al., 1995), and (III) the collision of India with Eurasia and subsequent re-organization of transform faults and spreading ridges. References Clark, D.N. (1998): Review of the exploration potential of Madagascar. Houston Geological Society Bulletin, p. 23-29. Coffin, M.F. and Rabinowitz, P.D. (1988): Evolution of the conjugate east African-Madagascan Margins and the western Somali basins. GSA Special Paper 226, pp. 78. Geiger, M., Clark, D.N. and Mette, W. (2004): Reappraisal of the timing of the breakup of Gondwana based on sedimentological and seismic evidence from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar. Journal of African Earth Sciences, v. 38, p. 363-381. Montenat, C., Ramahavory, L. and Croisile, M. (1996): Tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Western Madagascan margin during the Jurassic in the Morondava basin, Madagascar. Bulletin des centres de recherches Exploration-Production Elf Aquitaine, v. 20, p. 323-340. Storey, M., Mahoney, J.J., Saunders, A.D., Duncan, R.A., Kelley, S.P. and Coffin, M.F. (1995): Timing of hot spot-related volcanism and the break-up of Madagascar and India. Science, v. 267, p. 852-855.

  13. Economic valuation of subsistence harvest of wildlife in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Golden, Christopher D; Bonds, Matthew H; Brashares, Justin S; Rasolofoniaina, B J Rodolph; Kremen, Claire

    2014-02-01

    Wildlife consumption can be viewed as an ecosystem provisioning service (the production of a material good through ecological functioning) because of wildlife's ability to persist under sustainable levels of harvest. We used the case of wildlife harvest and consumption in northeastern Madagascar to identify the distribution of these services to local households and communities to further our understanding of local reliance on natural resources. We inferred these benefits from demand curves built with data on wildlife sales transactions. On average, the value of wildlife provisioning represented 57% of annual household cash income in local communities from the Makira Natural Park and Masoala National Park, and harvested areas produced an economic return of U.S.$0.42 ha(-1) · year(-1). Variability in value of harvested wildlife was high among communities and households with an approximate 2 orders of magnitude difference in the proportional value of wildlife to household income. The imputed price of harvested wildlife and its consumption were strongly associated (p< 0.001), and increases in price led to reduced harvest for consumption. Heightened monitoring and enforcement of hunting could increase the costs of harvesting and thus elevate the price and reduce consumption of wildlife. Increased enforcement would therefore be beneficial to biodiversity conservation but could limit local people's food supply. Specifically, our results provide an estimate of the cost of offsetting economic losses to local populations from the enforcement of conservation policies. By explicitly estimating the welfare effects of consumed wildlife, our results may inform targeted interventions by public health and development specialists as they allocate sparse funds to support regions, households, or individuals most vulnerable to changes in access to wildlife. PMID:24405165

  14. Human and environmental controls over aboveground carbon storage in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate, high-resolution mapping of aboveground carbon density (ACD, Mg C ha-1) could provide insight into human and environmental controls over ecosystem state and functioning, and could support conservation and climate policy development. However, mapping ACD has proven challenging, particularly in spatially complex regions harboring a mosaic of land use activities, or in remote montane areas that are difficult to access and poorly understood ecologically. Using a combination of field measurements, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and satellite data, we present the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon stocks in Madagascar. Results We found that elevation and the fraction of photosynthetic vegetation (PV) cover, analyzed throughout forests of widely varying structure and condition, account for 27-67% of the spatial variation in ACD. This finding facilitated spatial extrapolation of LiDAR-based carbon estimates to a total of 2,372,680 ha using satellite data. Remote, humid sub-montane forests harbored the highest carbon densities, while ACD was suppressed in dry spiny forests and in montane humid ecosystems, as well as in most lowland areas with heightened human activity. Independent of human activity, aboveground carbon stocks were subject to strong physiographic controls expressed through variation in tropical forest canopy structure measured using airborne LiDAR. Conclusions High-resolution mapping of carbon stocks is possible in remote regions, with or without human activity, and thus carbon monitoring can be brought to highly endangered Malagasy forests as a climate-change mitigation and biological conservation strategy. PMID:22289685

  15. Economic Valuation of Subsistence Harvest of Wildlife in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Christopher D.; Bonds, Matthew H.; Brashares, Justin S.; Rasolofoniaina, B. J. Rodolph; Kremen, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife consumption can be viewed as an ecosystem provisioning service (the production of a material good through ecological functioning) because of wildlife’s ability to persist under sustainable levels of harvest. We used the case of wildlife harvest and consumption in northeastern Madagascar to identify the distribution of these services to local households and communities to further our understanding of local reliance on natural resources. We inferred these benefits from demand curves built with data on wildlife sales transactions. On average, the value of wildlife provisioning represented 57% of annual household cash income in local communities from the Makira Natural Park and Masoala National Park, and harvested areas produced an economic return of U.S.$0.42 ha?1 · year?1. Variability in value of harvested wildlife was high among communities and households with an approximate 2 orders of magnitude difference in the proportional value of wildlife to household income. The imputed price of harvested wildlife and its consumption were strongly associated (p< 0.001), and increases in price led to reduced harvest for consumption. Heightened monitoring and enforcement of hunting could increase the costs of harvesting and thus elevate the price and reduce consumption of wildlife. Increased enforcement would therefore be beneficial to biodiversity conservation but could limit local people’s food supply. Specifically, our results provide an estimate of the cost of offsetting economic losses to local populations from the enforcement of conservation policies. By explicitly estimating the welfare effects of consumed wildlife, our results may inform targeted interventions by public health and development specialists as they allocate sparse funds to support regions, households, or individuals most vulnerable to changes in access to wildlife. PMID:24405165

  16. The genetic population structure of the gray mouse lemur ( Microcebus murinus), a basal primate from Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Wimmer; Diethard Tautz; Peter M. Kappeler

    2002-01-01

    The genetic structure of a population is closely connected to fundamental evolutionary processes and aspects of social behavior. Information on genetic structure is therefore instrumental for the interpretation of social behavior and evolutionary reconstructions of social systems. Gray mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus) are basal primates endemic to Madagascar whose social organization is characterized by solitary foraging at night and communal

  17. Promoting intermediate means of transport for the rural poor: a case study from Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Starkey

    Efficient rural transport systems require complementary infrastructure, motorised vehicles, intermediate means of transport, boats, railways and an air network. Intermediate means of transport are essential for domestic use, agricultural production, local trade and consolidating larger loads. In rural areas, vicious circles of scarce transport, insufficient users and inadequate support services hinder development. In Madagascar, as elsewhere, transport investment has been

  18. Processing and marketing of holothurians in the Toliara region, southwestern Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thierry Lavitra; Dina Rachelle; Richard Rasolofonirina; Michel Jangoux; Igor Eeckhaut

    2008-01-01

    In Madagascar, sea cucumbers are processed into dried product (trepang) before being exported. Careful processing is necessary in order to yield high quality trepang (e.g. aspect, form, consistence, smell). Nowadays, processing is carried out mainly by collectors whose methods depend on the exporter's demand. Processing methods, especially for Holothuria scabra (sandfish) , have continued to evolve over the last decade.

  19. Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum, a novel taxon associated with virescence and phyllody of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addressed the taxonomic position and group classification of a phytoplasma responsible for virescence and phyllody symptoms in naturally diseased Madagascar periwinkle plants in western Malaysia. Unique regions in the 16S rRNA gene from the Malaysian periwinkle virescence (MaPV) phytopla...

  20. Search for superheavy-element decay in samples of Madagascar monazite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. H. Ketelle; G. D. OKelley; R. W. Stoughton; J. Halperin

    1976-01-01

    Two samples of Madagascar monazite from the same geological formation as the biotite studied by Gentry et al. were examined by using a neutron multiplicity counter capable of detecting binary or ternary spontaneous fission decay in any element. No events characteristic of spontaneous fission decay of superheavy elements were found. Derived limits indicate that if superheavy elements were present, then

  1. The “Degraded” Tapia Woodlands of Highland Madagascar: Rural Economy, Fire Ecology, and Forest Conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian A. Kull

    2002-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for deforestation. However, highland “tapia” (Uapaca bojeri) woodlands may present a counterexample of indigenous management leading to woodland conservation. Contrary to common wisdom that these woodlands are degraded, tapia woodland extent and composition have seen little change this century. Tapia woodlands harbor many benefits, including wild silkworms (whose cocoons have been harvested for centuries to weave

  2. Age and paleoenvironment of the Maastrichtian to Paleocene of the Mahajanga Basin, Madagascar: a multidisciplinary approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Abramovich; G. Keller; T. Adatte; W. Stinnesbeck; L. Hottinger; D. Stueben; Z. Berner; B. Ramanivosoa; A. Randriamanantenasoa

    2003-01-01

    Lithology, geochemistry, stable isotopes and integrated high-resolution biostratigraphy of the Berivotra and Amboanio sections provide new insights into the age, faunal turnovers, climate, sea level and environmental changes of the Maastrichtian to early Paleocene of the Mahajanga Basin of Madagascar. In the Berivotra type area, the dinosaur-rich fluvial lowland sediments of the Anembalemba Member prevailed into the earliest Maastrichtian. These

  3. Observations of the southern East Madagascar Current and undercurrent and countercurrent system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Nauw; H. M. van Aken; A. Webb; J. R. E. Lutjeharms; W. P. M. de Ruijter

    2008-01-01

    In April 2001 four hydrographic sections perpendicular to the southern East Madagascar Current were surveyed as part of the Agulhas Current Sources Experiment. Observations with a vessel mounted and a lowered ADCP produced information on the current field while temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrient data obtained with a CTD-Rosette system, gave information on the water mass structure of the currents

  4. Effects of anthropogenic environmental changes on amphibian diversity in the rain forests of eastern Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Vallan

    2002-01-01

    Madagascar has one of the world's highest rates of human population increase, which is coupled with an increase of resource exploitation, particularly food and firewood. Forests are cleared and converted to rice fields or plantations (mainly Eucalyptus or pine). How does deforestation affect the amphibian diversity of the original biotope, the rain forest? To answer this question, the amphibian fauna

  5. Reconciling fossils and molecules: Cenozoic divergence of cichlid fishes and the biogeography of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Vences; J. Freyhof; R. Sonnenberg; J. Kosuch; M. Veith

    2001-01-01

    Aim The biogeographical origins of the extant vertebrates endemic to Madagascar are largely unsolved, but have often been related to vicariance in the context of fragmentation of the supercontinent Gondwana in the Mesozoic. Such hypotheses are especially appealing in the case of cichlid fishes, which show phylogenetic relationships reflecting the temporal successions of the breakup of Gondwana. We used molecular

  6. Home Sweet Home: How to Build a Madagascar Hissing Cockroach Habitat out of Recycled Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHC) are amazing insects that can be an integral part of an effective science learning and teaching environment. MHCs have a fascinating social structure. They make excellent pets, teach students how to properly care for animals, and their large size adds to their "wow" factor. These characteristics make them unique…

  7. Hybridization between mouse lemurs in an ecological transition zone in southern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Gligor, M; Ganzhorn, J U; Rakotondravony, D; Ramilijaona, O R; Razafimahatratra, E; Zischler, H; Hapke, A

    2009-02-01

    Hybrid zones in ecotones can be useful model systems for the study of evolutionary processes that shape the distribution and discreteness of species. Such studies could be important for an improved understanding of the complex biogeography of Madagascar, which is renowned for its outstanding degree of small-scale endemism. Certain forest remnants in central Madagascar indicate that transitional corridors across the island could have connected microendemics in different forest types in the past. Evolutionary processes in such corridors are difficult to study because most of these corridors have disappeared due to deforestation in central Madagascar. We studied a hybrid zone in one of the few remaining ecotonal corridors between dry and humid forests in Madagascar, which connects two species of mouse lemurs, Microcebus griseorufus in dry spiny forest and Microcebus murinus in humid littoral forest. We sampled 162 mouse lemurs at nine sites across this boundary. Morphometric analyses revealed intermediate morphotypes of many individuals in transitional habitat. Bayesian clustering of microsatellite genotypes and assignment tests yielded evidence for a mixed ancestry of mouse lemurs in the ecotone, where we also observed significant linkage disequilibria and heterozygote deficiency. In contrast to these observations, mitochondrial haplotypes displayed a sharply delimited boundary at the eastern edge of spiny forest, which was noncoincident with the signals from microsatellite data. Among several alternative scenarios, we propose asymmetric nuclear introgression due to male-biased dispersal, divergent environmental selection, and an expansion of dry spiny forest in the course of aridification as a probable explanation of our observations. PMID:19161471

  8. Understanding Mortality and the Life of the Ancestors in Rural Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rita Astuti; Paul L. Harris

    2008-01-01

    Across two studies, a wide age range of participants was interviewed about the nature of death. All participants were living in rural Madagascar in a community where ancestral beliefs and practices are widespread. In Study 1, children (8-17 years) and adults (19-71 years) were asked whether bodily and mental processes continue after death. The death in question was presented in

  9. Promouvoir la maîtrise locale et régionale du développement : Une démarche participative à Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe de Rham; Bernard Lecomte

    1994-01-01

    A la fin des années 80, un projet de reboisement est mené dans quelques communautés à Madagascar avec le soutien financier de la Suisse. Ce projet connaît un succès sur le plan technique et son efficacité est reconnue, mais il se heurte à deux problèmes essentiels : comment réussir la diffusion et comment assurer la continuité des activités sans une

  10. Diverse Genotypes of Yersinia pestis Caused Plague in Madagascar in 2007

    PubMed Central

    Rajerison, Minoaerisoa; Andersen, Genevieve; Hall, Carina M.; Zimmermann, Thomas; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M.; Scholz, Holger C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of human plague and is endemic in various African, Asian and American countries. In Madagascar, the disease represents a significant public health problem with hundreds of human cases a year. Unfortunately, poor infrastructure makes outbreak investigations challenging. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA was extracted directly from 93 clinical samples from patients with a clinical diagnosis of plague in Madagascar in 2007. The extracted DNAs were then genotyped using three molecular genotyping methods, including, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing, multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) analysis. These methods provided increasing resolution, respectively. The results of these analyses revealed that, in 2007, ten molecular groups, two newly described here and eight previously identified, were responsible for causing human plague in geographically distinct areas of Madagascar. Conclusions/Significance Plague in Madagascar is caused by numerous distinct types of Y. pestis. Genotyping method choice should be based upon the discriminatory power needed, expense, and available data for any desired comparisons. We conclude that genotyping should be a standard tool used in epidemiological investigations of plague outbreaks. PMID:26069964

  11. Aligning Conservation Priorities Across Taxa in Madagascar with High-Resolution Planning Tools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Kremen; A. Cameron; A. Moilanen; S. J. Phillips; C. D. Thomas; H. Beentje; J. Dransfield; B. L. Fisher; F. Glaw; T. C. Good; G. J. Harper; R. J. Hijmans; D. C. Lees; E. Louis; R. A. Nussbaum; C. J. Raxworthy; A. Razafimpahanana; G. E. Schatz; M. Vences; D. R. Vieites; P. C. Wright; M. L. Zjhra

    2008-01-01

    Globally, priority areas for biodiversity are relatively well known, yet few detailed plans exist to direct conservation action within them, despite urgent need. Madagascar, like other globally recognized biodiversity hot spots, has complex spatial patterns of endemism that differ among taxonomic groups, creating challenges for the selection of within-country priorities. We show, in an analysis of wide taxonomic and geographic

  12. The skull of Rapetosaurus krausei (Sauropoda: Titanosauria) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristina Curry Rogers; Catherine A. Forster

    2004-01-01

    Rapetosaurus krausei (Sauropoda: Titanosauria) from the Upper Cretaceous Maevarano Formation of Madagascar is the best-preserved and most complete titanosaur yet described. The skull of Rapetosaurus is particularly significant because most titanosaurs are diagnosed solely on the basis of fragmentary postcranial material, and knowledge of the titanosaur skull has remained incomplete. Material referred to Rapetosaurus includes the type skull from an

  13. Tectonic framework of the Precambrian of Madagascar and its Gondwana connections: a review and reappraisal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. F. Windley; A. Razafiniparany; T. Razakamanana; D. Ackermand

    1994-01-01

    The Precambrian of Madagascar is divided into two sectors by the north-west trending sinistral Ranotsara shear zone, which continues in the Mozambique belt, probably as the Surma shear zone, and in Southern India as the Achankovil shear zone. South of Ranotsara six north-south trending tectonic belts are recognized that consist largely of granulite and high amphibolite facies paragneisses, phlogopite diopsidites,

  14. New material of Dadadon isaloi (Cynodontia, Traversodontidae) from the Triassic of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lovasoa Ranivoharimanana; Christian F. Kammerer; John J. Flynn; André R. Wyss

    2011-01-01

    New material of the traversodontid cynodont Dadadon isaloi from the Triassic of southwestern Madagascar is described. The new material consists of a complete, well-preserved skull (FMNH PR 2232) and an unassociated, partial lower jaw (UA 10608). The new material reveals several novel aspects of Dadadon's morphology. Newly recognized autapomorphies that diagnose Dadadon include a fourth upper incisor with posterior accessory

  15. Which Advisory System to Support Innovation in Conservation Agriculture? The Case of Madagascar's Lake Alaotra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faure, Guy; Penot, Eric; Rakotondravelo, Jean Chrysostome; Ramahatoraka, Haja Andrisoa; Dugue, Patrick; Toillier, Aurelie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To promote sustainable agriculture, various development projects are encouraging farmers around Madagascar's Lake Alaotra to adopt conservation agriculture techniques. This article's objective is to analyze the capacity of a project-funded advisory system to accompany such an innovation and to design and implement an advisory method aimed…

  16. THE FIRST COMPREHENSIVE SURVEY OF AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES AT MONTAGNE DES FRANÇAIS, MADAGASCAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEREMY SABEL; KATIE GREEN; JEFFREY DAWSON; CHARLIE GARDNER; JANINE ROBINSON; GEORGINA STARKIE; MIGUEL VENCES; FRANK GLAW

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed the calcareous massif Montagne des Français in northern Madagascar for amphibians and reptiles. We recorded nine amphibian and 52 reptile species by direct sampling and pitfall trapping in the first detailed survey to focus on this area. Consequently 78.7% of the species found were new records for Montagne des Français. The majority of species (60.7%) were only found

  17. An old adaptive radiation of forest dung beetles in Madagascar Helena Wirta *, Luisa Orsini, Ilkka Hanski

    E-print Network

    Hanski, Ilkka

    An old adaptive radiation of forest dung beetles in Madagascar Helena Wirta *, Luisa Orsini, Ilkka the evolutionary history of the endemic dung beetle tribe Helictopleurini (Scarabaeidae) and its relationship. Four species of the extant 65 species have shifted to use the dung of the recently introduced cattle

  18. Research, valorization and exploitation of biological resources for medicinal purposes in the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Randimbivololona

    1996-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely used for treatment of diseases in Madagascar (the Malagasy Republic). Different types of users, including individuals, researchers, groups of researchers and State institutions use medicinal plants as crude materials either for trade, scientific investigations or export. To preserve these forest products for extended use, Malagasy legislation controls the collection of medicinal plants, especially those destined for

  19. Understanding Mortality and the Life of the Ancestors in Rural Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astuti, Rita; Harris, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Across two studies, a wide age range of participants was interviewed about the nature of death. All participants were living in rural Madagascar in a community where ancestral beliefs and practices are widespread. In Study 1, children (8-17 years) and adults (19-71 years) were asked whether bodily and mental processes continue after death. The…

  20. Ecology and Conservation of the Crowned Lemur, Lemur coronatus, at Ankarana, N. Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane M. Wilson; Paul D. Stewart; Guy-Suzon Ramangason; A. M. Denning; M. S. Hutchings

    1989-01-01

    Forests of Ankarana limestone massif in northern Madagascar support one of the largest and least disturbed populations of Crowned Lemurs, Lemur coronatus. This paper reports a preliminary study of the ecology of this species in the Ankarana Special Reserve conducted at the end of the dry season in 1986, with additional information collected a year later. Crowned Lemurs occur in

  1. Stone tools and foraging in northern Madagascar challenge Holocene extinction models.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Robert E; Radimilahy, Chantal; Wright, Henry T; Jacobs, Zenobia; Kelly, Gwendolyn O; Berna, Francesco

    2013-07-30

    Past research on Madagascar indicates that village communities were established about AD 500 by people of both Indonesian and East African heritage. Evidence of earlier visits is scattered and contentious. Recent archaeological excavations in northern Madagascar provide evidence of occupational sites with microlithic stone technologies related to foraging for forest and coastal resources. A forager occupation of one site dates to earlier than 2000 B.C., doubling the length of Madagascar's known occupational history, and thus the time during which people exploited Madagascar's environments. We detail stratigraphy, chronology, and artifacts from two rock shelters. Ambohiposa near Iharana (Vohémar) on the northeast coast, yielded a stratified assemblage with small flakes, microblades, and retouched crescentic and trapezoidal tools, probably projectile elements, made on cherts and obsidian, some brought more that 200 km. (14)C dates are contemporary with the earliest villages. No food remains are preserved. Lakaton'i Anja near Antsiranana in the north yielded several stratified assemblages. The latest assemblage is well dated to A.D. 1050-1350, by (14)C and optically stimulated luminescence dating and pottery imported from the Near East and China. Below is a series of stratified assemblages similar to Ambohiposa. (14)C and optically stimulated luminescence dates indicate occupation from at least 2000 B.C. Faunal remains indicate a foraging pattern. Our evidence shows that foragers with a microlithic technology were active in Madagascar long before the arrival of farmers and herders and before many Late Holocene faunal extinctions. The differing effects of historically distinct economies must be identified and understood to reconstruct Holocene histories of human environmental impact. PMID:23858456

  2. In or Out-of-Madagascar?—Colonization Patterns for Large-Bodied Diving Beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bukontaite, Rasa; Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra; Randriamihaja, Jacquelin Herisahala; Bergsten, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    High species diversity and endemism within Madagascar is mainly the result of species radiations following colonization from nearby continents or islands. Most of the endemic taxa are thought to be descendants of a single or small number of colonizers that arrived from Africa sometime during the Cenozoic and gave rise to highly diverse groups. This pattern is largely based on vertebrates and a small number of invertebrate groups. Knowledge of the evolutionary history of aquatic beetles on Madagascar is lacking, even though this species-rich group is often a dominant part of invertebrate freshwater communities in both standing and running water. Here we focus on large bodied diving beetles of the tribes Hydaticini and Cybistrini. Our aims with this study were to answer the following questions 1) How many colonization events does the present Malagasy fauna originate from? 2) Did any colonization event lead to a species radiation? 3) Where did the colonizers come from—Africa or Asia—and has there been any out-of-Madagascar event? 4) When did these events occur and were they concentrated to any particular time interval? Our results suggest that neither in Hydaticini nor in Cybistrini was there a single case of two or more endemic species forming a monophyletic group. The biogeographical analysis indicated different colonization histories for the two tribes. Cybistrini required at least eight separate colonization events, including the non-endemic species, all comparatively recent except the only lotic (running water) living Cybister operosus with an inferred colonization at 29 Ma. In Hydaticini the Madagascan endemics were spread out across the tree, often occupying basal positions in different species groups. The biogeographical analyses therefore postulated the very bold hypothesis of a Madagascan origin at a very deep basal node within Hydaticus and multiple out-of-Madagascar dispersal events. This hypothesis needs to be tested with equally intense taxon sampling of mainland Africa as for Madagascar. PMID:25794184

  3. In or out-of-Madagascar?--Colonization patterns for large-bodied diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Bukontaite, Rasa; Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra; Randriamihaja, Jacquelin Herisahala; Bergsten, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    High species diversity and endemism within Madagascar is mainly the result of species radiations following colonization from nearby continents or islands. Most of the endemic taxa are thought to be descendants of a single or small number of colonizers that arrived from Africa sometime during the Cenozoic and gave rise to highly diverse groups. This pattern is largely based on vertebrates and a small number of invertebrate groups. Knowledge of the evolutionary history of aquatic beetles on Madagascar is lacking, even though this species-rich group is often a dominant part of invertebrate freshwater communities in both standing and running water. Here we focus on large bodied diving beetles of the tribes Hydaticini and Cybistrini. Our aims with this study were to answer the following questions 1) How many colonization events does the present Malagasy fauna originate from? 2) Did any colonization event lead to a species radiation? 3) Where did the colonizers come from--Africa or Asia--and has there been any out-of-Madagascar event? 4) When did these events occur and were they concentrated to any particular time interval? Our results suggest that neither in Hydaticini nor in Cybistrini was there a single case of two or more endemic species forming a monophyletic group. The biogeographical analysis indicated different colonization histories for the two tribes. Cybistrini required at least eight separate colonization events, including the non-endemic species, all comparatively recent except the only lotic (running water) living Cybister operosus with an inferred colonization at 29 Ma. In Hydaticini the Madagascan endemics were spread out across the tree, often occupying basal positions in different species groups. The biogeographical analyses therefore postulated the very bold hypothesis of a Madagascan origin at a very deep basal node within Hydaticus and multiple out-of-Madagascar dispersal events. This hypothesis needs to be tested with equally intense taxon sampling of mainland Africa as for Madagascar. PMID:25794184

  4. Seismic Control on Location of Lavakas (Midslope Gullies) in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoazanamparan, F.; Cox, R.; Macklin, S. J.; Rakotondrazafy, A.

    2006-05-01

    Madagascar's central highlands are deeply weathered, with 1-2 m of laterite overlying 10s of metres of saprolite. These unstable materials sit at altitudes on the order of 1000m in recently uplifted, steep terrain characterised by convex hills with slopes averaging 25 degrees and local ridge-valley elevation changes of 100- 500 m. In many areas these slopes bear numerous erosional features called lavakas, with mapped densities up to 25/k2 in some areas. Lavakas are tadpole-shaped gullies with vertical sides and flat floors. They are wide at the headwall and taper to a narrow, deeply incised outfall, which connects to the valley drainage. They are not fed by overland flow, but develop by groundwater sapping and subterranean erosion in the porous and friable saprolite beneath the baked lateritic duracrust. The controls on lavaka formation are poorly understood. Interplay between climate, topography, and bedrock geology is known to be important, and human activity is also implicated. However, there are many areas with appropriate rainfall, hillslope geometry and geology where lavakas do not form. Likewise, lavakas form readily in some areas with little human activity, and do not form in other areas that are heavily used. Our analysis suggests that seismic activity may be a significant regional factor driving lavaka formation. Using GIS analysis, we compared the locations of recent earthquakes (1347 events with magnitudes 3.0-5.4, recorded between 1979 and 1995) with the distribution of zones where lavakas are abundant (as mapped by Henri Besairie in 1957), and found that they are strongly correlated. We cannot say whether individual seismic events are responsible for specific lavakas; but the observation that lavakas are most common in zones that are seismically active implies that earthquakes play a significant role. Repeated mild earth-shaking events might aid in loosening the saprolite and making it more vulnerable to lavaka-forming processes; or individual earthquakes might initiate collapse of slopes already weakened by groundwater sapping. More detailed work into the relationships between individual lavakas and local seismicity is needed to determine which of these mechanisms might be active. Our ongoing GIS analysis will quantify the relative importance of geology, topography, and seismicity in the location of lavaka-prone areas.

  5. [Vector control in the epidemics of the Madagascar highlands].

    PubMed

    Randriantsimaniry, D

    1995-01-01

    The Plateau, or more precisely the highlands, cover most of the central part of Madagascar with an altitude higher than 1,000 m. There the climate is tropical with a wet and hot season, from October through April coincident with further outbreaks of malaria. This alternates with a dry season from May through September when the temperature is not favorable to the development of the vectors and the extrinsic cycle of the parasite. The malaria is unstable. The short season of transmission is sometimes amplified by abnormally abundant rain or higher than average temperatures. The population can hardly develop self-protection. The epidemics are deadly. The transmission essentially occurs with Anopheles arabiensis, a zoophile species, exophage and occasionally anthropophile and A. funestus anthropophile and endophile. Starting in 1949, a program for fighting malaria was founded on drug prophylaxis and spraying persistent insecticides within the homes. This approach gave spectacular results with a prolonged elimination of the disease, the consequence of which was the establishment of the Zone of Surveillance of the High Plateau (ZSHP). With decreasing efforts of the fight, the transmission progressively resumed starting in 1975 with outbreaks of epidemics. The most deadly outbreak was between 1984 and 1987, marked by an increase of morbidity and mortality. The factors which favored further outbreaks of malaria are listed as follows: 1) a slackening of the surveillance system; 2) the socio-economic context leading to the weakness of the national sanitary system and the inaccessibility of the antimalaria medication for the rural masses; 3) the reappearance of A. funestus, an excellent vector which had been eliminated by the treatments between 1949 and 1960; 4) after the previous elimination, the quasi-total absence of self-protection for the population when subjected to a series of cyclones; 5) movements of nonprotected travellers migrating for agricultural work from the highlands towards the coasts or the slopes which are zones of more stable malaria. Starting in 1988, the Madagascan sanitary authorities, with international and bilateral help, established a strategic approach based on early drug therapy and spraying within the homes with DTT pm 75 at a dose of 2 g/m2. These operations could cover some focalized zones with habitants, numbering 720,000 from 1988 to 1989; 380,000 from 1989 to 1990; 480,000 from 1990 to 1991; and 2,400,000 from 1993 to 1994. The evaluation of the efficacy of these methods in fighting malaria showed spectacular and conclusive results for the epidemiological plan, including less prevalence of the parasite, morbidity and mortality. In addition, there were important impacts on the vectors, including decreases of vector-human contact, residual fauna and longevity. PMID:8784547

  6. Geological evolution of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, D.I.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; De Waele, B.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Key, R.M.; Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; Lidke, D.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Antongil Craton, along with the Masora and Antananarivo cratons, make up the fundamental Archaean building blocks of the island of Madagascar. They were juxtaposed during the late-Neoproterozoic to early Palaeozoic assembly of Gondwana. In this paper we give a synthesis of the geology of the Antongil Craton and present previously published and new geochemical and U-Pb zircon analyses to provide an event history for its evolution.The oldest rocks in the Antongil Craton form a nucleus of tonalitic gneiss, characteristic of Palaeo-Mesoarchaean cratons globally, including phases dated between 3320 ?? 14. Ma to 3231 ?? 6. Ma and 3187 ?? 2. Ma to 3154 ?? 5. Ma. A series of mafic dykes was intruded into the Mesoarchaean tonalites and a sedimentary succession was deposited on the craton prior to pervasive deformation and migmatisation of the region. The age of deposition of the metasediments has been constrained from a volcanic horizon to around 3178 ?? 2. Ma and subject to migmatisation at around 2597 ?? 49. Ma. A subsequent magmatic episode generated voluminous, weakly foliated granitic rocks, that also included additions from both reworked older crustal material and younger source components. An earlier granodiorite-dominated assemblage, dated between 2570 ?? 18. Ma and 2542 ?? 5. Ma, is largely exposed in xenoliths and more continuously in the northern part of the craton, while a later monzogranite-dominated phase, dated between 2531 ?? 13. Ma and 2513 ?? 0.4. Ma is more widely developed. Together these record the stabilisation of the craton, attested to by the intrusion of a younger dyke swarm, the age of which is constrained by a sample of metagabbro dated at 2147 ?? 6. Ma, providing the first evidence for Palaeoproterozoic rocks from the Antongil Craton.The youngest events recorded in the isotopic record of the Antongil Craton are reflected in metamorphism, neocrystallisation and Pb-loss at 792 ?? 130. Ma to 763 ?? 13. Ma and 553 ?? 68. Ma. These events are interpreted as being the only manifestation of the Pan-African orogeny seen in the craton, which led to the assembly of the tectonic blocks that comprise the island. ?? 2010 NERC.

  7. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Miriam Christina; Rümpker, Georg; Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Josiane Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2015-04-01

    Madagascar is considered as a key region with respect to the assembly and break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana. Following the collision between East- and West-Gondwana (~700-650 Ma), its position was central to the Panafrican orogenesis. Madagascar then separated from East Africa and later from the Indian and Antarctic plates until these processes came to a halt about 69 Ma ago. Today, Madagascar consists of different tectonic units; the eastern parts (two thirds of the island) are composed mainly of Precambian rocks, whereas the western part is dominated by sedimentary deposits. Furthermore, southern Madagascar is characterized by several NS to NW-SE trending shear zones. Madagascar has been the target of a number of geological studies, but seismological investigations of the presumed complex lithosphere-asthenosphere system and of deeper upper-mantle structures are sparse. To increase our understanding of these structures and related tectonic processes, we installed a dense temporary seismic network in southern Madagascar. It consisted of 25 broadband and 25 short-period stations, which were in operation for up to 2 years between 2012 and 2014. The broadband stations crossed the island along an east-west profile; the eastern section was supplemented by a network of short-period stations. Here we present results from shear-wave splitting analyses to infer the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in response to deformational processes. The polarization of the fast shear wave and the delay time between the fast and slow waves provide constraints on the anisotropic fabric. For our study, we use SKS-phases from up to 12 events recorded at the temporary stations and from 10 events at the permanent GEOFON station VOI. We first apply a single-event splitting analysis by minimizing the transverse component. For stations that do not show a significant azimuthal dependence of the splitting parameters, we also apply a joint inversion involving all recorded SKS waveforms. Our preliminary results exhibit delay times between 0.4 and 1.5 s. In the center of the E-W profile, fast axes are mainly oriented NNW-SSE, whereas east of the Ranotsara shear zone, fast axes are oriented NE-SW. Additionally, we will apply splitting analysis of Ps phases as well as waveform modelling to resolve the possible influence of the crust on the anisotropy inferred from the SKS phases.

  8. Deforestation history of the eastern rain forests of Madagascar from satellite images

    SciTech Connect

    Green, G.M.; Sussman, R.W. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1990-04-13

    Madagascar is biologically one of the richest areas on Earth, and its plants and animals are among the most endangered. Satellite images and vegetation maps based on earlier aerial photographs were used to determine the extent of eastern rain forests in Madagascar and to monitor the rate of deforestation over a 35-year period. In 1985, 3.8 million hectares of rain forest remained, representing only 50% of the 7.6 million hectares existing in 1950 and 34% of the estimated original extent (11.2 million hectares). Between 1950 and 1985, the rate of deforestation averaged 111,000 hectares per year. Deforestation was most rapid in areas with low topographic relief and high population density. If cutting of forests continues at the same pace, only forests on the steepest slopes will survive the next 35 years.

  9. Reproductive Schedules of Female Microcebus rufus at Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marina B. Blanco

    2008-01-01

    I examined the reproductive status of female brown mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) from October 2005 to early January, 2006 at Ranomafana National Park, an eastern rain forest in Madagascar. I employed intensive\\u000a capture\\/mark\\/recapture techniques to track individual changes in vaginal morphology and body mass and collected vaginal smears\\u000a for individuals with open vaginas. I observed moderate estrous synchrony (vaginal openings

  10. Direct and Indirect Impacts of Raptor Predation on Lemurs in Southeastern Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah M. Karpanty

    2006-01-01

    I calculated rates of predation by 2 species of diurnal raptors, Polyboroides radiatus and Accipiter henstii, on the lemur community of Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar from 2700 h of observation and 470 prey deliveries at 7 nests\\u000a of each hawk species. The 2 hawks consumed 7 of 12 lemurs found in the park region, with a body mass of 63–3500 g and

  11. The Effect of Recent Volcanic Activity on the Seismic Structure of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Pratt, M. J.; Shore, P.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamanana, G.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic structure of Madagascar is determined using ambient-noise and two-plane-wave earthquake surface waves analyses. A deep low-velocity anomaly is seen in regions of recent volcanic activity in the central and northern regions of the island. The primary data used are from the 2011-2013 MACOMO (Madagascar, the Comoros, and Mozambique) broadband seismic array from the PASSCAL program of IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), funded by the NSF. Additional data came from the RHUM-RUM project (led by G. Barruol and K. Sigloch), the Madagascar Seismic Profile (led by F. Tilmann), and the GSN. For the ambient-noise study, Rayleigh wave green's functions for all interstation paths are extracted from the broadband seismic data recorded from August 2011 until October 2013. Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion curves are extracted in the 8 - 50 s period range, identifying shallow crustal structure. For deeper structure, the two-plane-wave method is used on teleseismic earthquake data to obtain surface wave phase velocities in the 20 - 182 s period range. In the inversion, a finite-frequency kernel is used for each period, and a 1-D shear velocity structure is determined at each location. A three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle is obtained from assembling the 1-D models. Preliminary results show a good correlation between the Rayleigh wave velocities and the geology of Madagascar, which includes areas of ancient Archaean craton. The slowest seismic velocities are associated with known volcanic regions in both the central and northern regions, which have experienced volcanic activity within the past million years.

  12. Neoproterozoic extension in the greater dharwar craton: A reevaluation of the "betsimisaraka suture" in madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Roig, J.-Y.; Delor, C.; Amlin, Y.; Goncalves, P.; Rabarimanana, M.H.; Ralison, A.V.; Belcher, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Precambrian shield of Madagascar is reevaluated with recently compiled geological data and new U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) geochronology. Two Archean domains are recognized: the eastern Antongil-Masora domain and the central Antananarivo domain, the latter with distinctive belts of metamafic gneiss and schist (Tsaratanana Complex). In the eastern domain, the period of early crust formation is extended to the Paleo-Mesoarchean (3.32-3.15 Ga) and a supracrustal sequence (Fenerivo Group), deposited at 3.18 Ga and metamorphosed at 2.55 Ga, is identified. In the central domain, a Neoarchean period of high-grade metamorphism and anatexis that affected both felsic (Betsiboka Suite) and mafic gneisses (Tsaratanana Complex) is documented. We propose, therefore, that the Antananarivo domain was amalgamated within the Greater Dharwar Craton (India + Madagascar) by a Neoarchean accretion event (2.55-2.48 Ga), involving emplacement of juvenile igneous rocks, high-grade metamorphism, and the juxtaposition of disparate belts of mafic gneiss and schist (metagreenstones). The concept of the "Betsimisaraka suture" is dispelled and the zone is redefined as a domain of Neoproterozoic metasedimentary (Manampotsy Group) and metaigneous rocks (Itsindro-Imorona Suite) formed during a period of continental extension and intrusive igneous activity between 840 and 760 Ma. Younger orogenic convergence (560-520 Ma) resulted in east-directed overthrusting throughout south Madagascar and steepening with local inversion of the domain in central Madagascar. Along part of its length, the Manampotsy Group covers the boundary between the eastern and central Archean domains and is overprinted by the Angavo-Ifanadiana high-strain zone that served as a zone of crustal weakness throughout Cretaceous to Recent times.

  13. Diet, Nutritional Ecology, and Birth Season of Eulemur macaco in an Anthropogenic Forest in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Simmen; Françoise Bayart; André Marez; Annette Hladik

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the feeding ecology of Eulemur macaco macaco in an old coastal secondary forest of northwestern Madagascar. We analyzed whether the local combination of introduced and\\u000a native plant species could provide viable anthropic conditions for sustaining the black lemurs. Fruits (79 spp.) dominated\\u000a the annual diet (>104 species from 50 families via observations ad libitum and use of a

  14. EXCEPTIONAL CHIAVENNITE ASSOCIATED WITH PEZZOTTAITE FROM THE SAKAVALANA PEGMATITE, AMBATOVITA, MADAGASCAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Federico Pezzotta; Alessandro Guastoni; Hervé Forner; Francesco Demartin; Roy Kristiansen

    exceptional specimens of chiavennite were recently found, associated with the new mineral pezzottaite, in the Sakavalana pegmatite at Ambatovita, in central-western Madagascar. Chiavennite at Ambatovita formed as a late-stage mineral, after quartz, amazonite, albite, spodumene, Cs-bearing beryl and pezzottaite, liddicoatite, Cs-rich muscovite-lepidolite, danburite and other accessories such as zircon, pyrochlore-group minerals and cassiterite. Chiavennite formed together with hambergite, a late

  15. Diving accidents related to sea-cucumber fishing at Nosy Be, Madagascar 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Maillaud

    1999-01-01

    Summary On the north-east coast of Madagascar, certain varieties of sea cucumber (dingha-dingha in Malagasy) are col- lected by scuba-diving or skin-diving and then market- ed as trepang in Asian countries. Diving accidents are frequent even though no statistics are available locally. We describe decompression accidents, cases of drowning of skin-divers and shark attacks, and highlight the cir- cumstances surrounding

  16. The impact of advective transport by the South Indian Ocean Countercurrent on the Madagascar plankton bloom

    E-print Network

    Olascoaga, Maria Josefina

    plankton bloom F. Huhn,1,2 A. von Kameke,1,3 V. Pérez-Muñuzuri,1,4 M. J. Olascoaga,2 and F. J. Beron-Vera2­2007) of satellite ocean color data we analyze the spatiotemporal patterns in the seasonal Madagascar plankton bloom upwelling region, and extends to the east further than the largest plankton blooms ($2500 km). In bloom

  17. Susceptibility to Yersinia pestis Experimental Infection in Wild Rattus rattus , Reservoir of Plague in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Tollenaere; L. Rahalison; M. Ranjalahy; J.-M. Duplantier; S. Rahelinirina; S. Telfer; C. Brouat

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, the black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection), a disease still responsible for hundreds of cases each year in this country. This study used experimental plague\\u000a challenge to assess susceptibility in wild-caught rats to better understand how R. rattus can act as a plague reservoir. An important difference in plague resistance between

  18. Searching for the oldest baobab of Madagascar: radiocarbon investigation of large Adansonia rubrostipa trees.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F; Danthu, Pascal; Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel Leong; Patrut, Roxana T; Lowy, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab) specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called "Grandmother" consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab) specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the "polygamous baobab", consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs. PMID:25806967

  19. Searching for the Oldest Baobab of Madagascar: Radiocarbon Investigation of Large Adansonia rubrostipa Trees

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Patrut, Roxana T.; Lowy, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab) specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called “Grandmother” consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab) specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the “polygamous baobab”, consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs. PMID:25806967

  20. Crystallographic Study of U-Th bearing minerals in Tranomaro, Anosy Region- Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Sahoa, F E; Andriambololona, Raoelina; Geckeis, H; Marquardt, C; Finck, N

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional fossil fuel, there is a renewed interest in the nuclear fuel to support increasing energy demand. New studies are then undertaken to characterize Madagascar U-Th bearing minerals. This is the case for the urano-thorianite bearing pyroxenites in the south East of Madagascar. In this region, several quarries were abandoned, after being mined by the French Atomic Energy Commission (C.E.A) in the fifties and sixties and are now explored by new mining companies. For this purpose, seven U-Th bearing mineral samples from old abandoned uranium quarries in Tranomaro, Amboasary Sud, Madagascar (46{\\deg} 28' 0"E, 24{\\deg} 36' 0"S), have been collected. To determine the mineral microstructure, they were investigated for qualitative and quantitative identification of crystalline compounds using X-ray powder diffraction analytical method (XRD). Results showed that the U and Th compounds, as minor elements, are present in various crystalline structures. This is important to understand their...

  1. Biodiversity conservation and drug discovery: Can they be combined? The Suriname and Madagascar experiences.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shugeng; Kingston, David G I

    2009-08-01

    The approach to new drugs through natural products has proved to be the single most successful strategy for the discovery of new drugs, but in recent years its use has been deemphasized by many pharmaceutical companies in favor of approaches based on combinatorial chemistry and genomics, among others.Drug discovery from natural sources requires continued access to plant, marine, and microbial biomass, and so the preservation of tropical rainforests is an important part of our drug discovery program. Sadly, many of the tropical forests of the world are under severe environmental pressure, and deforestation is a serious problem in most tropical countries. One way to combat this loss is to demonstrate their value as potential sources of new pharmaceutical or agrochemical products.As part of an effort to integrate biodiversity conservation and drug discovery with economic development, we initiated an International Cooperative biodiversity Group (ICBG) to discover potential pharmaceuticals from the plant biodiversity of Suriname and Madagascar. The Group, established with funding from agencies of the United States government, involved participants from the USA, Suriname, and Madagascar. The basic approach was to search for bioactive plants in the Suriname and Malagasy flora, and to isolate their bioactive constituents by the best available methods, but the work included capacity building as well as research. Progress on this project will be reported, drawing on results obtained from the isolation of bioactive natural products from Suriname and Madagascar. The benefits of this general approach to biodiversity and drug discovery will also be discussed. PMID:20161050

  2. Conservation education in Madagascar: three case studies in the biologically diverse island-continent.

    PubMed

    Dolins, Francine L; Jolly, Alison; Rasamimanana, Hantanirina; Ratsimbazafy, Jonah; Feistner, Anna T C; Ravoavy, Florent

    2010-05-01

    Few Malagasy children and adults are aware of the rare and unique fauna and flora indigenous to their island-continent, including flagship lemur species. Even the Malagasy ancestral proverbs never mentioned lemurs, but these same proverbs talked about the now extinct hippopotamus. Madagascar's geography, history, and economic constraints contribute to severe biodiversity loss. Deforestation on Madagascar is reported to be over 100,000 ha/year, with only 10-15% of the island retaining natural forest [Green & Sussman, 1990]. Educating children, teacher-training, and community projects about environmental and conservation efforts to protect the remaining natural habitats of endangered lemur species provide a basis for long-term changes in attitudes and practices. Case studies of three conservation education projects located in different geographical regions of Madagascar, Centre ValBio, Madagacar Wildlife Conservation Alaotra Comic Book Project, and The Ako Book Project, are presented together with their ongoing stages of development, assessment, and outcomes. We argue that while nongovernmental organizational efforts are and will be very important, the Ministry of Education urgently needs to incorporate biodiversity education in the curriculum at all levels, from primary school to university. PMID:20039330

  3. Temporal and spatial evolution of dynamic support from river profiles: A framework for Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Gareth G.; Paul, Jonathan D.; White, Nicky; Winterbourne, Jeffrey

    2012-04-01

    We present a strategy for calculating uplift rates as a function of space and time from large sets of longitudinal river profiles. This strategy assumes that the shape of a river profile is controlled by the history of uplift rate and moderated by the erosional process. We assume that upstream drainage area is invariant. The algorithm was tested on a set of ˜100 river profiles which were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. This set of profiles was simultaneously inverted to obtain uplift rate as a smooth function of space and time. The fit between observed and calculated profiles is excellent and suggests that Madagascar was uplifted by 1-2 km at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ˜15 Myrs. The location of Madagascar suggests that its topographic elevation is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic fragments encompassing the island show that the island straddles a dynamic topographic gradient which generates asymmetric Neogene uplift. Volcanism, warped peneplains and uplifted marine terraces corroborate the existence of youthful uplift. We suggest that sets of longitudinal river profiles contain useful information about the history of regional uplift which can be extracted by inverse modeling and calibrated by independent geologic observations.

  4. Biodiversity conservation and drug discovery: Can they be combined? The Suriname and Madagascar experiences

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shugeng; Kingston, David G. I.

    2009-01-01

    The approach to new drugs through natural products has proved to be the single most successful strategy for the discovery of new drugs, but in recent years its use has been deemphasized by many pharmaceutical companies in favor of approaches based on combinatorial chemistry and genomics, among others. Drug discovery from natural sources requires continued access to plant, marine, and microbial biomass, and so the preservation of tropical rainforests is an important part of our drug discovery program. Sadly, many of the tropical forests of the world are under severe environmental pressure, and deforestation is a serious problem in most tropical countries. One way to combat this loss is to demonstrate their value as potential sources of new pharmaceutical or agrochemical products. As part of an effort to integrate biodiversity conservation and drug discovery with economic development, we initiated an International Cooperative biodiversity Group (ICBG) to discover potential pharmaceuticals from the plant biodiversity of Suriname and Madagascar. The Group, established with funding from agencies of the United States government, involved participants from the USA, Suriname, and Madagascar. The basic approach was to search for bioactive plants in the Suriname and Malagasy flora, and to isolate their bioactive constituents by the best available methods, but the work included capacity building as well as research. Progress on this project will be reported, drawing on results obtained from the isolation of bioactive natural products from Suriname and Madagascar. The benefits of this general approach to biodiversity and drug discovery will also be discussed. PMID:20161050

  5. The amino acid and stable isotope biogeochemistry of elephant bird ( Aepyornis) eggshells from southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Simon J.; Miller, Gifford H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Chivas, Allan R.; Murray-Wallace, Colin V.

    2006-09-01

    A diverse suite of animals became extinct on Madagascar during the Late Holocene. As observed on landmasses elsewhere, the extinction process broadly coincided with the arrival of people. Our research on the amino acid racemisation and the carbon and oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of elephant bird ( Aepyornis) eggshells from southern Madagascar refines models that attempt to explain the extinction process. A correlation between the extent of isoleucine epimerisation (aIle/Ile) and radiocarbon age of eggshells allows aIle/Ile to serve as a proxy for eggshell age. The aIle/Ile values indicate the majority (87%) of eggshells in this study are Holocene, with the remainder representing Pleistocene Aepyornis populations, and that further amino acid analyses would help to constrain the timing of Aepyornis extinction. Carbon isotope ratios in the organic and calcite fractions of eggshells indicate that Aepyornis primarily browsed C 3 vegetation. Oxygen isotope values are more negative and less variable than in eggshells of ostriches living in semi-arid environments, suggesting that Aepyornis populations relied upon groundwater-fed coastal wetlands for their drinking water. The isotope results require that the changing abundances of C 3 vegetation and groundwater-fed watering points be considered in models that aim to understand the extinction of Aepyornis in southern Madagascar.

  6. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  7. Detecting cryptic speciation in the widespread and morphologically conservative carpet chameleon (Furcifer lateralis) of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Florio, A M; Ingram, C M; Rakotondravony, H A; Louis, E E; Raxworthy, C J

    2012-07-01

    Species delimitation within recently evolved groups can be challenging because species may be difficult to distinguish morphologically. Following the General Lineage Concept, we apply a multiple evidence approach to assess species limits within the carpet chameleon Furcifer lateralis, which is endemic to Madagascar and exported in large numbers for the pet trade. Cryptic speciation within F. lateralis was considered likely because this species (1) has a vast distribution, (2) occupies exceptionally diverse habitats and (3) exhibits subtle regional differences in morphology. Phylogenetic trees reconstructed using nuclear and mitochondrial genes recovered three well-supported clades corresponding with geography. Morphological results based on canonical variates analysis show that these clades exhibit subtle differences in head casque morphology. Ecological niche modelling results found that these phylogenetic groups also occupy unique environmental space and exhibit patterns of regional endemism typical of other endemic reptiles. Combined, our findings provide diverse yet consistent evidence for the existence of three species. Consequently, we elevate the subspecies F. lateralis major to species rank and name a new species distributed in northern and western Madagascar. Initial ecological divergence, associated with speciation of F. lateralis in humid eastern habitat, fits the Ecographic Constraint model for species diversification in Madagascar. By contrast, the second speciation event provides some support for the Riverine Barrier model, with the Mangoky River possibly causing initial isolation between species. These findings thus support two contrasting models of speciation within closely related species and demonstrate the utility of applying a combined-evidence approach for detecting cryptic speciation. PMID:22686488

  8. Oceanic variability around Madagascar : connections to the large-scale Indian Ocean circulation and its forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastanga, V.

    2007-06-01

    The connection between the mesoscale eddy activity around Madagascar and the large-scale interannual variability in the Indian Ocean is investigated. We use the combined TOPEX/Poseidon-ERS sea surface height (SSH) data for the period 1993-2003. The SSH-fields in the Mozambique Channel and east of Madagascar exhibit a significant interannual oscillation. This is related to the arrival of large-scale anomalies that propagate westward in the band 10-15S in response to the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events. Positive (negative) SSH anomalies associated to a positive (negative) IOD phase induce a shift in the intensity and position of the tropical and subtropical gyres in the Indian Ocean. A weakening (strengthening) results in the intensity of the South Equatorial Current and its branches along east Madagascar. In addition, the flow through the narrows of the Mozambique Channel around 17S increases (decreases) during periods of a stronger and northward (southward) extension of the subtropical (tropical) gyre. Interaction between the currents in the narrows and southward propagating eddies from the northern Channel leads to interannual variability in the eddy kinetic energy of the central Channel in phase with the one in the SSH-field. The origin of the eddy variability along the 25S band in the Indian Ocean is also investigated. We have found that the surface circulation east of Madagascar shows an anticyclonic subgyre bounded to the south by eastward flow from southwest Madagascar and to the north by the westward flowing South Equatorial Current (SEC) between 15-20S. The shallow, eastward flow, named the South Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC), extends above the deep reaching, westward flowing SEC up to 95E, with its core over the latitude of the high variability band. Applying a 2-layer model reveals that regions of large vertical shear along the SICC-SEC system are baroclinically unstable. Estimates of the frequencies (3.5-6 times/year) and wavelengths (290-470 km) of the unstable modes are close to observations of the mesoscale eddy variability derived from altimetry data. It is likely then that Rossby wave variability locally generated in the subtropical South Indian Ocean by baroclinic instability is the origin of the eddy variability around 25S as seen for example in satellite altimetry.

  9. The re-stocking of captive-bred ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata) into the Betampona Reserve, Madagascar: methodology and recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Britt; Charles Welch; Andrea Katz; Bernard Iambana; Ingrid Porton; Randall Junge; Graham Crawford; Cathy Williams; David Haring

    2004-01-01

    Since November 1997 the Madagascar Fauna Group has released 13 captive-bred black and white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata) into the Betampona Reserve in eastern Madagascar. The release programme has three major aims: (1) to assess the ability of captive-bred V. v. variegata to adapt to life in their natural habitat; (2) to investigate the contribution that such a release

  10. A new deep branch of eurasian mtDNA macrohaplogroup M reveals additional complexity regarding the settlement of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Current models propose that mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroups M and N evolved from haplogroup L3 soon after modern humans left Africa. Increasingly, however, analysis of isolated populations is filling in the details of, and in some cases challenging, aspects of this general model. Results Here, we present the first comprehensive study of three such isolated populations from Madagascar: the Mikea hunter-gatherers, the neighbouring Vezo fishermen, and the Merina central highlanders (n = 266). Complete mitochondrial DNA genome sequences reveal several unresolved lineages, and a new, deep branch of the out-of-Africa founder clade M has been identified. This new haplogroup, M23, has a limited global distribution, and is restricted to Madagascar and a limited range of African and Southwest Asian groups. Conclusions The geographic distribution, phylogenetic placement and molecular age of M23 suggest that the colonization of Madagascar was more complex than previously thought. PMID:20003445

  11. Deep phylogenetic divergence between Scolytoplatypus and Remansus, a new genus of Scolytoplatypodini from Madagascar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    PubMed Central

    Jordal, Bjarte H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Scolytoplatypodini Blandford is a monotypic tribe of ambrosia beetles found in Asia, Madagascar and Africa. Only three species are currently known from Madagascar and four additional species are here described as new to science. Phylogenetic analyses of morphological and molecular data revealed that four of the seven endemic species are deeply separated from all other species by genetic and distinct morphological characters and therefore placed in a new genus Remansus Jordal. The split between this ancient lineage and Scolytoplatypus Schaufuss was estimated to approximate Palaeocene age (63 Ma), extending the minimum age of ambrosia feeding for this tribe to the beginning of the Palaeocene?Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). In addition to the ancient origin of Remansus in Madagascar during the Palaeocene, a second origin occurred in Scolytoplatypus no more than 13 Ma. A geographical origin of the latter in South-Eastern Africa was unequivocally inferred from the phylogenies. PMID:24294090

  12. Seismo and sequence stratigraphy of Cenozoic units of the Morondava Basin, offshore western Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Dirk; Stollhofen, Harald; Klimke, Jennifer; Franke, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The N-S trending Morondava Basin extends in width from western onshore Madagascar over about 350 km westwards to the offshore Davie Ridge in the Mozambique Channel. Although basin formation was initiated during Karoo times, the main basin evolution took place during Jurassic rifting and subsequent drifting until middle Cretaceous as a result of Gondwana breakup (Geiger et al., 2004). Contemporaneous to the separation of India and Madagascar widespread flood basalts were emplaced during the late Cretaceous (Storey et al., 1995). Present knowledge of the Morondava Basin is mainly based on outcrop studies, seismic surveys and borehole information (e.g. Geiger et al., 2004), gathered in western onshore Madagascar, although the fast majority of the basin, including its depocenter is located offshore in the Mozambique Channel, now at up to 3,500 m water depth. Almost all of the recent offshore studies of the Morondava Basin rely on industrial data but up to date publications of exploration results are generally rare and mostly anonymized. Our study aims to extend knowledge, particularly on the offshore seismic and sequence stratigraphy of the Morondava Basin. A key question is also to test the proposed tectonic stability of the Davie Ridge over the last 40 Ma. For this purpose 12 seismic profiles and bathymetric data, acquired in early 2014 by RV SONNE, are interpreted. Most of the profiles cover the distal deep marine areas of the northern Morondava Basin between the Davie Ridge and the shelf break of Madagascar. Top Cretaceous, Top Eocene, Top Oligocene, the Middle Miocene Unconformity and the Base Pliocene, are mapped as major seismic marker horizons. Especially shelf and slope sedimentary units are important resources to reconstruct the tectonostratigraphic basin evolution. At the continental slope diffuse to chaotic seismic pattern of Miocene and younger age are identified which are subdivided by laterally continuous, high frequency reflectors with a higher impedance contrast. Bounded by the Base Tertiary and the Base Pliocene these units can be used to develop and verify a sequence stratigraphic approach for the Cenozoic in the Morondava Basin. Prelimary results indicate that the major sedimentation at the continental slope moved after Early Pliocene significantly landwards. In general the thickness of post-Pliocene units increases to the east. Work in progress encompasses the application of seismo and sequence stratigraphic concept for Mesozoic sedimentary units and a correlation with other, potentially time-equivalent, basins in the area, such as the Mandawa Basin in northern Mozambique. References Geiger, M., Clark, D.N., und Mette, W., 2004, Reappraisal of the timing of the break-up of Gondwana based on sedimentological und seismic evidence from the Morondava Basin, SW Madagascar: Journal of African Earth Sciences, v. 38, p. 363-381. Storey, M., Mahoney, J. J., Saunders, A. D., Duncan, R. A., Kelley, S. P., und Coffin, M. F., 1995, Timing of Hot Spot--Related Volcanism und the Breakup of Madagascar und India: Science, v. 267, no. 5199, p. 852-855.

  13. Mitochondrial introgressive hybridization following a demographic expansion in the tomato frogs of Madagascar, genus Dyscophus.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Terwengel, Pablo; Andreone, Franco; Louis, Edward; Vences, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot with a unique fauna and flora largely endemic at the species level and highly threatened by habitat destruction. The processes underlying population-level differentiation in Madagascar's biota are poorly understood and have been proposed to be related to Pleistocene climatic cycles, yet the levels of genetic divergence observed are often suggestive of ancient events. We combined molecular markers of different variability to assess the phylogeography of Madagascar's emblematic tomato frogs (Dyscophus guineti and D. antongilii) and interpret the observed pattern as resulting from ancient and recent processes. Our results suggest that the initial divergence between these taxa is probably old as reflected by protein-coding nuclear genes and by a strong mitochondrial differentiation of the southernmost population. Dramatic changes in their demography appear to have been triggered by the end of the last glacial period and possibly by the short return of glacial conditions known as the 8K event. This dramatic change resulted in an approximately 50-fold reduction of the effective population size in various populations of both species. We hypothesize these species' current mitochondrial DNA diversity distribution reflects a swamping of the mitochondrial genetic diversity of D. guineti by that of D. antongilii previous to the populations' bottlenecks during the Holocene, and probably as a consequence of D. antongilii demographic expansion approximately 1 million years ago. Our data support the continued recognition of D. antongilii and D. guineti as separate species and flag D. guineti as the more vulnerable species to past and probably also future environmental changes. PMID:24308649

  14. Tectonic significance of granitoid plutons from the Andasibe paragneiss belt, east-central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharimahefa, T.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the crustal evolution of the central Madagascar is of major significance in the study of the Precambrian basement of Madagascar and the greater Gondwana supercontinent. The study area, known as Andasibe paragneiss defines a fold belt that stretches from Ambatondrazaka to Soavina area in eastern Madagascar and is intruded by extensive granitoid intrusions. The western part of Andasibe paragneiss lies within the crustal scale Angavo shear zone, and is characterized by fine to medium-grained foliated paragneiss, which also include biotite-hornblende gneiss, migmatitic quartzofeldspathic gneiss, sillimanite-bearing gneiss, garnet-bearing gneiss, graphitic gneiss intercalates with schist, quartzite, muscovite-bearing gneiss and marble. Three samples of granitoid plutons intruding the Andasibe paragneiss yielded isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon ages of 801.2×3.8Ma, 776.5×4.4Ma and 772.1×4.2Ma. These dates are interpreted to represent the crystallization ages of these rocks and are comparable to other reported U-Pb emplacement ages for granitoid plutons within and along the north-central margin of the Angavo shear zone, which are suggested to be related to ca. 820 Ma successor-arc plutonism. These granitoids pre-dates the Angavo shear zone and folds affecting the plutons foliation are believed to have formed during the East-African Orogen, which in this part of the Malagasy Precambrian basement, is considered to have associated with Neoproterozoic extensive magmatism ca. 820 Ma to 540 Ma.

  15. Structural mapping and analysis of a Madagascar Precambrian shear zone using enhanced Landsat Thematic Mapper Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kilmer, D.S.; Duncan, I.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Recently, the west coast of Madagascar has become a frontier region for petroleum exploration. Major structures in the Precambrian shield of Madagascar may have a strong control on the development of sedimentary basins, as has been documented in the Morondava basin. The 2.5-3.0+ Ga shield of Madagascar is an amphibolite- to granulite-grade metamorphic gneiss terrain, intruded by anorthosites and 550-Ma granites and pegmatites. Landsat Thematic Mapper data provides a cost-effective method for regional-scale structural mapping of this poorly known terrain. A five-component linear mixing model has been used to enhance the lithologic information in this six-band data. Lithologic component images thus produced utilize the full geologic spectral range of the data. A preliminary structural geologic map compiled from the component images has greater detail than existing maps at 1:100,000 scale, to which it has been compared. The Ankafotra-Saririaky shear zone has been identified as a north-northeast-trending, 15- to 20-km-wide region of appressed folds, attenuated layering, and subparallel faults on the western side of the shield. Two anorthosite massifs that occur within this shear zone have the structural characteristics of boudins in a ductile matrix. The shear deformed a preexisting terrain of poly-phase folding, characterized by tight folds and complex fold interference structures displayed by basins and domes on a scale of 10 km. Enhanced remote sensing data can be used to characterize the nature and mechanism of shear deformation in such zones.

  16. New Material of Beelzebufo, a Hyperossified Frog (Amphibia: Anura) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Susan E.; Groenke, Joseph R.; Jones, Marc E. H.; Turner, Alan H.; Krause, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The extant anuran fauna of Madagascar is exceptionally rich and almost completely endemic. In recent years, many new species have been described and understanding of the history and relationships of this fauna has been greatly advanced by molecular studies, but very little is known of the fossil history of frogs on the island. Beelzebufo ampinga, the first named pre-Holocene frog from Madagascar, was described in 2008 on the basis of numerous disarticulated cranial and postcranial elements from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Maevarano Formation of Madagascar. These specimens documented the presence of a hyperossified taxon that differed strikingly from extant Malagasy frogs in its large size and heavy coarse cranial exostosis. Here we describe and analyse new, articulated, and more complete material of the skull, vertebral column, and hind limb, as well as additional isolated elements discovered since 2008. ?CT scans allow a detailed understanding of both internal and external morphology and permit a more accurate reconstruction. The new material shows Beelzebufo to have been even more bizarre than originally interpreted, with large posterolateral skull flanges and sculptured vertebral spine tables. The apparent absence of a tympanic membrane, the strong cranial exostosis, and vertebral morphology suggest it may have burrowed during seasonally arid conditions, which have been interpreted for the Maevarano Formation from independent sedimentological and taphonomic evidence. New phylogenetic analyses, incorporating both morphological and molecular data, continue to place Beelzebufo with hyloid rather than ranoid frogs. Within Hyloidea, Beelzebufo still groups with the South American Ceratophryidae thus continuing to pose difficulties with both biogeographic interpretations and prior molecular divergence dates. PMID:24489877

  17. Analysis of patterns of bushmeat consumption reveals extensive exploitation of protected species in eastern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Richard K B; Keane, Aidan; Rakotoarivelo, Andrinajoro R; Rakotomboavonjy, Victor; Randrianandrianina, Felicien H; Razafimanahaka, H Julie; Ralaiarimalala, Sylvain R; Jones, Julia P G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of wild meat consumption from tropical forests is important for designing approaches to address this major threat to biodiversity and mitigate potential pathways for transmission of emerging diseases. Bushmeat consumption has been particularly poorly studied in Madagascar, one of the world's hottest biodiversity hotspots. Studying bushmeat consumption is challenging as many species are protected and researchers must consider the incentives faced by informants. Using interviews with 1154 households in 12 communes in eastern Madagascar, as well as local monitoring data, we investigated the importance of socio-economic variables, taste preference and traditional taboos on consumption of 50 wild and domestic species. The majority of meals contain no animal protein. However, respondents consume a wide range of wild species and 95% of respondents have eaten at least one protected species (and nearly 45% have eaten more than 10). The rural/urban divide and wealth are important predictors of bushmeat consumption, but the magnitude and direction of the effect varies between species. Bushmeat species are not preferred and are considered inferior to fish and domestic animals. Taboos have provided protection to some species, particularly the Endangered Indri, but we present evidence that this taboo is rapidly eroding. By considering a variety of potential influences on consumption in a single study we have improved understanding of who is eating bushmeat and why. Evidence that bushmeat species are not generally preferred meats suggest that projects which increase the availability of domestic meat and fish may have success at reducing demand. We also suggest that enforcement of existing wildlife and firearm laws should be a priority, particularly in areas undergoing rapid social change. The issue of hunting as an important threat to biodiversity in Madagascar is only now being fully recognised. Urgent action is required to ensure that heavily hunted species are adequately protected. PMID:22194787

  18. [Intestinal schistosomiasis from Schistosoma mansoni in Madagascar: extent and center of the endemic].

    PubMed

    Ollivier, G; Brutus, L; Cot, M

    1999-05-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium affect respectively 2 million and 500,000 persons in Madagascar. Over the past decade, S. mansoni has spread in the central Highlands of Madagascar, essentially throughout the mid-west and Antananarivo plain. To understand this recent change in the epidemiology of S. mansoni, we examined the relationship between its spatial distribution and several host factors, including labour migration, urbanization and water development projects. In the Highlands, the disease in distribution could be superimposed on the potential expansion areas of snail distribution defined in 1958. However, the distribution is not homogeneous, as for example the road between Betafo and Mandoto (South West of Antananarivo). This focal pattern described in other African countries is unique to the central Highlands of Madagascar. Rice cultivation is the main economic activity and is associated with intense water contact. The focal distribution may be related to an environmental adaptation of host-parasite interaction depending on behavioural patterns, water and soil chemistry and incompatibility between Biomphalaria pfeifferi and S. mansoni. It is also possible that these focal patterns precede homogeneous endemicity, as along the road Itasy-Tsiroanomandidy (west Antananarivo). Major water development carried out in this migration area led to a rapid endemization of the disease. In Befato-Mandoto, where soil management is more restricted, schistosomiasis due to S. mansoni seems to have been established in some foci where epidemiologic conditions are favourable (for example, traditional irrigation canals). In contrast, the spread of S. mansoni in the Antananarivo plain closely follows the settlement of an infected rural population. Epidemiologic surveys conducted on school children in the Antananarivo suburbs, where sanitary conditions are poor, showed a prevalence of 25%. Human migration linked to development projects and urbanization seems to be the principal factor associated with the spread of schistosomiasis in the mid-west area and Antananarivo plain. In the Highlands, the preferential exposure of adult labour migrants has contributed to the widening of the endemic area. PMID:10399598

  19. The GLOBE/Madagascar Malaria Project: Creating Student/Educator/Scientist Partnerships With Regional Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, D.; Boger, R.; Rafalimanana, A.

    2006-05-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease spread by mosquitoes in the genus Anopheles. It causes more than 300,000,000 acute illnesses and more than one million deaths annually, including the death of one African child every 30 seconds. Recent epidemiological trends include increases in malaria mortality and the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. Some experts believe that predicted climate changes during the 21st century will bring malaria to areas where it is not now common. The GLOBE Program is currently collaborating with students, educators, scientists, health department officials, and government officials in Madagascar to develop a program that combines existing GLOBE protocols for measuring atmospheric and water quality parameters with a new protocol for collecting and identifying mosquito larvae at the genus (Anopheles and non-Anopheles) level. There are dozens of Anopheles species and sub-species that are adapted to a wide range of micro-environmental conditions encountered in Madagascar's variable climate. Local data collection is essential because mosquitoes typically spend their entire lives within a few kilometers of their breeding sites. The GLOBE Program provides an ideal framework for such a project because it offers a highly structured system for defining experiment protocols that ensure consistent procedures, a widely dispersed network of observing sites, and a centralized data collection and reporting system. Following a series of training activities in 2005, students in Madagascar are now beginning to collect data. Basic environmental parameters and first attempts at larvae collection and identification are presented. Results from this project can be used to increase public awareness of malaria, to provide new scientific data concerning environmental impacts on mosquito breeding, and to provide better information for guiding effective mitigation strategies. Problems encountered include difficulties in visiting and communicating with remote school sites. These are typical problems in developing tropical countries where malaria is endemic and their solution benefits the entire scientific and educational infrastructure in those countries.

  20. Medicinal plants used by women from Agnalazaha littoral forest (Southeastern Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The country of Madagascar is renowned for its high level of biodiversity and endemism, as well as the overwhelming pressures and threats placed on the natural resources by a growing population and climate change. Traditional medicine plays an important role in the daily lives of the Malagasy for various reasons including limited access to healthcare, limited markets and traditional values. The objective of this study was to assess the modern utitilization of the Agnalazaha Forest by the local population in Mahabo-Mananivo, Madagascar, for medicinal plants used by women, and to establish a list of medicinal plants used by women sourced from Agnalazaha Forest. Methods Ethnobotanical studies were conducted over a period of five months in 2010 to determine the diversity of medicinal plants used by women in the commune of Mahabo-Mananivo. In all, 498 people were interviewed, both male and female ranging age from 15 to over 60 years old. Results 152 medicinal plants used by local people were collected during the ethnobotanical studies. Among the recorded species, eight native species are widely used by women. These species are known for their therapeutic properties in treating placental apposition and complications during childbirth as well as tropical illnesses such as malaria, filariasis, and sexual diseases like gonorrhea and syphilis. Conclusions Littoral forests are rare ecosystems that are highly threatened on the island nation of Madagascar. Our investigation into the use of medicinal plants sourced from and around the Agnalazaha Forest by the women of Mahabo-Mananivo reinforces the need for this natural resource as a first line of health care for rural families. PMID:24188563

  1. Oxygen isotope systematics of gem corundum deposits in Madagascar: relevance for their geological origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Fallick, Anthony; Rakotondrazafy, Michel; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Andriamamonjy, Alfred; Ralantoarison, Théogène; Rakotosamizanany, Saholy; Razanatseheno, Marie; Offant, Yohann; Garnier, Virginie; Dunaigre, Christian; Schwarz, Dietmar; Mercier, Alain; Ratrimo, Voahangy; Ralison, Bruno

    2007-02-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of gem corundum was measured from 22 deposits and occurrences in Madagascar to provide a gemstone geological identification and characterization. Primary corundum deposits in Madagascar are hosted in magmatic (syenite and alkali basalt) and metamorphic rocks (gneiss, cordieritite, mafic and ultramafic rocks, marble, and calc-silicate rocks). In both domains the circulation of fluids, especially along shear zones for metamorphic deposits, provoked in situ transformation of the corundum host rocks with the formation of metasomatites such as phlogopite, sakenite, and corundumite. Secondary deposits (placers) are the most important economically and are contained in detrital basins and karsts. The oxygen isotopic ratios (18O/16O) of ruby and sapphire from primary deposits are a good indicator of their geological origin and reveal a wide range of ?18O (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) between 1.3 and 15.6‰. Metamorphic rubies are defined by two groups of ?18O values in the range of 1.7 to 2.9‰ (cordieritite) and 3.8 to 6.1‰ (amphibolite). “Magmatic” rubies from pyroxenitic xenoliths contained in the alkali basalt of Soamiakatra have ?18O values ranging between 1.3 and 4.7‰. Sapphires are classified into two main groups with ?18O in the range of 4.7 to 9.0‰ (pyroxenite and feldspathic gneiss) and 10.7 to 15.6‰ (skarn in marble from Andranondambo). The ?18O values for gem corundum from secondary deposits have a wide spread between -0.3 and 16.5‰. The ruby and sapphire found in placers linked to alkali basalt environments in the northern and central regions of Madagascar have consistent ?18O values between 3.5 and 6.9‰. Ruby from the placers of Vatomandry and Andilamena has ?18O values of 5.9‰, and between 0.5 and 4.0‰, respectively. The placers of the Ilakaka area are characterized by a huge variety of colored sapphires and rubies, with ?18O values between -0.3 and 16.5‰, and their origin is debated. A comparison with oxygen isotope data obtained on gem corundum from Eastern Africa, India, and Sri Lanka is presented. Giant placer deposits from Sri Lanka, Madagascar, and Tanzania have a large variety of colored sapphires and rubies with a large variation in ?18O due to mingling of corundum of different origin: mafic and ultramafic rocks for ruby, desilicated pegmatites for blue sapphire, syenite for yellow, green, and blue sapphire, and skarn in marbles for blue sapphire.

  2. Geology, petrology and isotope geochemistry of massif-type anorthosites from southwest Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lewis D. Ashwal; Michael A. Hamilton; Vincent P. I. Morel; Roger A. Rambeloson

    1998-01-01

    Four massif-type anorthosite bodies 25–100?km2 in area occur within high-pressure granulite facies supracrustal gneisses in southwestern Madagascar. Two of these bodies\\u000a (Ankafotia and Saririaky) appear to have been pulled apart by 40?km in a ductile shear zone, but structural features such\\u000a as sub-vertical stretching lineations indicate an origin by intense west-directed flattening and pure shear. Country rocks\\u000a (Graphite Series) include

  3. A new Gephyromantis (Phylacomantis) frog species from the pinnacle karst of Bemaraha, western Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Crottini, Angelica; Glaw, Frank; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Jenkins, Richard K.B.; Mercurio, Vincenzo; Randrianantoandro, Christian; Randrianirina, Jasmin E.; Andreone, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new mantellid frog of the subfamily Mantellinae from the karstic Bemaraha Plateau, western Madagascar. The new species belongs to the genus Gephyromantis, subgenus Phylacomantis, which previously included Gephyromantis azzurrae, Gephyromantis corvus and Gephyromantis pseudoasper. Gephyromantis atsingy sp. n. has a snout-vent length of 35–43 mm and is a scansorial frog living among the Tsingy de Bemaraha pinnacles and inside the caves present in the area. A morphological analysis and biomolecular comparison revealed the degree of differentiation between these four species of the Phylacomantis subgenus.The new species seems to be endemic to Tsingy de Bemaraha. PMID:21594161

  4. A method for quantifying biodiversity loss and its application to a 50-year record of deforestation across Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Vermont, University of

    of deforestation across Madagascar Thomas F. Allnutt1,2 , Simon Ferrier3,4 , Glenn Manion3 , George V. N. Powell1 Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA Keywords Biodiversity loss; deforestation; endemism; extinction of deforestation and endemism. Deforestation has been extensive, but impacts of forest loss on biodiversity have

  5. A new deep branch of eurasian mtDNA macrohaplogroup M reveals additional complexity regarding the settlement of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François-X Ricaut; Harilanto Razafindrazaka; Murray P Cox; Jean-M Dugoujon; Evelyne Guitard; Clement Sambo; Maru Mormina; Marta Mirazon-Lahr; Bertrand Ludes; Eric Crubézy

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current models propose that mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroups M and N evolved from haplogroup L3 soon after modern humans left Africa. Increasingly, however, analysis of isolated populations is filling in the details of, and in some cases challenging, aspects of this general model. RESULTS: Here, we present the first comprehensive study of three such isolated populations from Madagascar: the Mikea

  6. Modèle de lithosphère pour l'île de Madagascar (océan Indien occidental): nouvelle interprétation des données gravimétriques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondraompiana, Solofo A.; Albouy, Yves; Piqué, Alain

    1999-05-01

    A survey of the transfer function between the relief and anomalies of Bouguer and a direct modelling of six gravimetric profiles permits the deduction of the isostatic compensation mechanism for the island of Madagascar and a model of the lithosphere. These results are compared to the other geophysical and geological data.

  7. Inverting the impacts: Mining, conservation and sustainability claims near the Rio Tinto\\/QMM ilmenite mine in Southeast Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline Seagle

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces a genealogy of land access and legitimization strategies culminating in the current convergence of mining and conservation in Southeast Madagascar, contributing to recent debates analyzing the commonalities and interdependencies between seemingly discrete types of land acquisitions. Drawing upon research carried out near the Rio Tinto\\/QMM ilmenite mine in 2009 (January–March), it focuses on how local Malagasy land

  8. A null model for species richness gradients: bounded range overlap of butterflies and other rainforest endemics in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID C LEES; CLAIRE KREMEN; LANTO ANDRIAMAMPIANINA

    1999-01-01

    Species richness has classically been thought to increase from the poles towards the Equator, and from high elevations down to sea-level. However, the largest radiation of butterflies in Madagascar, the subtribe Mycalesina (c. 67 spp.) does not exhibit such a monotonic pattern, either for empirical records or for interpolated species ranges. Instead, summation of mycalesine ranges generates a domed curve

  9. SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE SOLUTIONS USING LOCAL MATERIALS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    of living of the country. Keywords: Madagascar, Insulation, Passive solutions, Thermal comfort 1 thermal comfort without using active solutions. The aim of this work is to offer simple technical passive highlands, the problem of thermal comfort in buildings occurs mainly during winter time. Currently, people

  10. A new species of the genus Mygdonia (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae)
    from Madagascar with a key to species.

    PubMed

    Ba?a?, Petr; Brailovsky, Harry; Hubá?ková, Lenka; Hemala, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    A new species, Mygdonia milivoji sp. nov. (Coreidae: Coreinae: Mictini) from south-west Madagascar is described, illustrated and compared with widely distributed M. elongata Distant, 1879. A key to Mygdonia species based on females is given and distribution of both Madagascan species is briefly discussed. PMID:25544533

  11. The activation of local service suppliers by incoming tour operators in a “developing” destination – the case of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oystein Jensen

    2009-01-01

    This article elucidates how organised tourism initiated by the international tour operator system can involve local actors in a developing country with a young tourism industry. The empirical basis is incoming tour operators in Madagascar with the focus on their policies and practices in getting involved with local tour operators and individual providers of service by the realisation of their

  12. Web gigantism in Darwin's bark spider, a new species from Madagascar (Araneidae: Caerostris) Matjaz Kuntner1,2

    E-print Network

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    Web gigantism in Darwin's bark spider, a new species from Madagascar (Araneidae: Caerostris) Matjaz, is grossly underestimated. Most species build large webs at forest edges, clearings, and gardens niche: casting its web across streams, rivers and lakes, so that the orb is suspended above water

  13. A study of the phycocolloids from Gelidium madagascariense and Eucheuma denticulatum (Rhodophyta) collected on the south coasts of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Mollion; M. Andriantsiferana; M. Sekkal

    1990-01-01

    Several species of red algae known to contain agar or carrageenan are abundant on the southeast and southwest coasts of Madagascar. The agarophyte Gelidium madagascariense, collected in the Fort Dauphin area, has been exported on a small scale to Japan for several years. FT-IR and GLC analysis show that it contains an agar polymer, of which the methylated fraction contains

  14. Well-Being Is a Process of Becoming: Respondent-Led Research with Organic Farmers in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnworth, Cathy Rozel

    2009-01-01

    Malagasy "players"--farmers, middle men, organic organisations and policy makers--see in export-orientated organic agriculture a way for Madagascar to build upon its historic export strengths: spices, essential oils, medicinal plants and tropical fruits. They point to the "de facto" organic status of most farming in the country and view organic…

  15. Widespread presence of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild amphibian communities in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Bletz, Molly C.; Rosa, Gonçalo M.; Andreone, Franco; Courtois, Elodie A.; Schmeller, Dirk S.; Rabibisoa, Nirhy H. C.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana C. E.; Raharivololoniaina, Liliane; Vences, Miguel; Weldon, Ché; Edmonds, Devin; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Harris, Reid N.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Crottini, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been a significant driver of amphibian declines. While globally widespread, Bd had not yet been reported from within Madagascar. We document surveys conducted across the country between 2005 and 2014, showing Bd's first record in 2010. Subsequently, Bd was detected in multiple areas, with prevalence reaching up to 100%. Detection of Bd appears to be associated with mid to high elevation sites and to have a seasonal pattern, with greater detectability during the dry season. Lineage-based PCR was performed on a subset of samples. While some did not amplify with any lineage probe, when a positive signal was observed, samples were most similar to the Global Panzootic Lineage (BdGPL). These results may suggest that Bd arrived recently, but do not exclude the existence of a previously undetected endemic Bd genotype. Representatives of all native anuran families have tested Bd-positive, and exposure trials confirm infection by Bd is possible. Bd's presence could pose significant threats to Madagascar's unique “megadiverse” amphibians. PMID:25719857

  16. Key odorants in cured Madagascar vanilla beans (Vanilla planiforia) of differing bean quality.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Inai, Yoko; Miyazawa, Norio; Kurobayashi, Yoshiko; Fujita, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The odor-active volatiles in Madagascar vanilla beans (Vanilla planiforia) of two grades, red whole beans as standard quality and cuts beans as substandard quality, were characterized by instrumental and sensory analyses. The higher contents of vanillin and ?-damascenone in red whole beans than in cuts beans respectively contributed to significant differences in the sweet and dried fruit-like notes, while the higher contents of guaiacol and 3-phenylpropanoic acid in cuts beans than in red whole beans respectively contributed to significant differences in the phenolic and metallic notes. A sensory evaluation to compare red whole beans and their reconstituted aroma characterized both samples as being similar, while in respect of the phenolic note, the reconstituted aroma significantly differed from the reconstituted aroma with guaiacol added at the concentration ratio of vanillin and guaiacol in cuts beans. It is suggested from these results that the concentration ratio of vanillin and guaiacol could be used as an index for the quality of Madagascar vanilla beans. PMID:23470767

  17. The settlement of Madagascar: what dialects and languages can tell us.

    PubMed

    Serva, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The dialects of Madagascar belong to the Greater Barito East group of the Austronesian family and it is widely accepted that the Island was colonized by Indonesian sailors after a maritime trek that probably took place around 650 CE. The language most closely related to Malagasy dialects is Maanyan, but Malay is also strongly related especially for navigation terms. Since the Maanyan Dayaks live along the Barito river in Kalimantan (Borneo) and they do not possess the necessary skill for long maritime navigation, they were probably brought as subordinates by Malay sailors. In a recent paper we compared 23 different Malagasy dialects in order to determine the time and the landing area of the first colonization. In this research we use new data and new methods to confirm that the landing took place on the south-east coast of the Island. Furthermore, we are able to state here that colonization probably consisted of a single founding event rather than multiple settlements. To reach our goal we find out the internal kinship relations among all the 23 Malagasy dialects and we also find out the relations of the 23 dialects to Malay and Maanyan. The method used is an automated version of the lexicostatistic approach. The data from Madagascar were collected by the author at the beginning of 2010 and consist of Swadesh lists of 200 items for 23 dialects covering all areas of the Island. The lists for Maanyan and Malay were obtained from a published dataset integrated with the author's interviews. PMID:22363465

  18. Performance of a receptive language test among young children in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ann M; Fernald, Lia C H; Galasso, Emanuela; Ratsifandrihamanana, Lisy

    2015-01-01

    Language tests developed and validated in one country may lose their desired properties when translated for use in another, possibly resulting in misleading estimates of ability. Using Item Response Theory (IRT) methodology, we assess the performance of a test of receptive vocabulary, the U.S.-validated Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III), when translated, adapted, and administered to children 3 to 10 years of age in Madagascar (N = 1372), in the local language (Malagasy). Though Malagasy is considered a single language, there are numerous dialects spoken in Madagascar. Our findings were that test scores were positively correlated with age and indicators of socio-economic status. However, over half (57/96) of items evidenced unexpected response variation and/or bias by local dialect spoken. We also encountered measurement error and reduced differentiation among person abilities when we used the publishers' recommended stopping rules, largely because we lost the original item ordering by difficulty when we translated test items into Malagasy. Our results suggest that bias and testing inefficiency introduced from the translation of the PPVT can be significantly reduced with the use of methods based on IRT at both the pre-testing and analysis stages. We explore and discuss implications for cross-cultural comparisons of internationally recognized tests, such as the PPVT. PMID:25830221

  19. Rural livelihoods and access to natural capital: Differences between migrants and non-migrants in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Nawrotzki, Raphael J.; Hunter, Lori M.; Dickinson, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although natural resources play a central role in rural livelihoods across the globe, little research has explored the relationship between migration and natural capital use, particularly in combination with other livelihood capitals (i.e., human, social, financial and physical). OBJECTIVE Grounded in the rural livelihood framework, this paper explores the association between the livelihood capital availability, especially natural capital, for migrants and non-migrants in rural Madagascar. METHODS Data from the 2008/2009 Demographic and Health Survey are used in combination with satellite imagery of vegetation coverage (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, NDVI) to proxy natural resources. Hierarchical multilevel models allow for inclusion of cross-level interactions between migrant status and proximate natural resources as determinants of the status of livelihood assets. RESULTS Three key findings emerge. First, higher levels of proximate natural resources are associated with greater financial, human, and social capital for both migrants and non-migrants. Second, migrants have, on average, greater financial, physical, human, and social capital than non-migrants, and urban-to-rural migrants do exceptionally well on all capital asset categories. Third, migrants residing in areas with higher levels of natural capital tend to have significantly higher levels of human capital (education). CONCLUSION Although we cannot examine livelihood strategies per se, the results suggest variation in livelihood potential among migrants and non-migrants in rural Madagascar, with migrants tending to have greater capital assets. In addition, access to natural resources is a central livelihood strategy. PMID:25364297

  20. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ayako; Randaoharison, Pierana Gabriel; Matsui, Mitsuaki

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency obstetric care is necessary to save the lives of women experiencing complications at delivery, and for newborn babies. Out-of-pocket costs are one of the critical factors hindering access to such services in low- and middle-income countries. This study measured out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section and neonatal care at an urban tertiary public hospital in Madagascar, assessed affordability in relation to household expenditure and investigated where families found the money to cover these costs. Data were collected for 103 women and 73 newborns at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga in the Boeny region of Madagascar between September 2007 and January 2008. Out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section were catastrophic for middle and lower socio-economic households, and treatment for neonatal complications also created a big financial burden, with geographical and other financial barriers further limiting access to hospital care. This study identified 12 possible cases where the mother required an emergency caesarean section and her newborn required emergency care, placing a double burden on the household. In an effort to make emergency obstetric and neonatal care affordable and available to all, including those living in rural areas and those of medium and lower socio-economic status, well-designed financial risk protection mechanisms and a strong commitment by the government to mobilise resources to finance the country's health system are necessary. PMID:21555082

  1. Investigating Mantle Structure with Broadband Seismic Arrays in Madagascar and Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamanana, G.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty-one broadband seismometers were installed in Madagascar (25) and Mozambique (6) in 2011-2012 as part of the 2-year MACOMO project of the IRIS PASSCAL program. A major goal is to investigate the occurrence of hot spot intraplate volcanism in Madagascar and its possible connection to other African volcanic activity and the lower mantle LLSVP (large low shear-velocity province). The African LLSVP is the largest seismic anomaly within the earth, and as an enormous thermochemical boundary layer between the mantle and, it plays a vitally important role in controlling the nature of vertical mass flux within the mantle, and therefore both mantle convection and its manifestation at the surface as plate tectonics. The African LLSVP is thought to play an important role in the abundant occurrence of hot spot volcanism on the African plate, but the mechanism by which this occurs is not known due to the extremely limited data sampling available at this location in the Southern Hemisphere. These arrays on the world's 4th-largest island (the first such array of its kind) and in Mozambique, together with existing African Array stations and concurrent temporary installations of land and OBS stations by French and German projects, is providing unprecedented data that will allow us to seismically map (using velocity and attenuation seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting, and receiver function analysis for topography variations on mantle boundaries, and other methods) the connection between surface hot spot volcanism and other mantle seismic anomalies such as the LLSVP.

  2. Performance of a Receptive Language Test among Young Children in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ann M.; Fernald, Lia C. H.; Galasso, Emanuela; Ratsifandrihamanana, Lisy

    2015-01-01

    Language tests developed and validated in one country may lose their desired properties when translated for use in another, possibly resulting in misleading estimates of ability. Using Item Response Theory (IRT) methodology, we assess the performance of a test of receptive vocabulary, the U.S.-validated Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III), when translated, adapted, and administered to children 3 to 10 years of age in Madagascar (N = 1372), in the local language (Malagasy). Though Malagasy is considered a single language, there are numerous dialects spoken in Madagascar. Our findings were that test scores were positively correlated with age and indicators of socio-economic status. However, over half (57/96) of items evidenced unexpected response variation and/or bias by local dialect spoken. We also encountered measurement error and reduced differentiation among person abilities when we used the publishers’ recommended stopping rules, largely because we lost the original item ordering by difficulty when we translated test items into Malagasy. Our results suggest that bias and testing inefficiency introduced from the translation of the PPVT can be significantly reduced with the use of methods based on IRT at both the pre-testing and analysis stages. We explore and discuss implications for cross-cultural comparisons of internationally recognized tests, such as the PPVT. PMID:25830221

  3. Vast underestimation of Madagascar's biodiversity evidenced by an integrative amphibian inventory

    PubMed Central

    Vieites, David R.; Wollenberg, Katharina C.; Andreone, Franco; Köhler, Jörn; Glaw, Frank; Vences, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Amphibians are in decline worldwide. However, their patterns of diversity, especially in the tropics, are not well understood, mainly because of incomplete information on taxonomy and distribution. We assess morphological, bioacoustic, and genetic variation of Madagascar's amphibians, one of the first near-complete taxon samplings from a biodiversity hotspot. Based on DNA sequences of 2,850 specimens sampled from over 170 localities, our analyses reveal an extreme proportion of amphibian diversity, projecting an almost 2-fold increase in species numbers from the currently described 244 species to a minimum of 373 and up to 465. This diversity is widespread geographically and across most major phylogenetic lineages except in a few previously well-studied genera, and is not restricted to morphologically cryptic clades. We classify the genealogical lineages in confirmed and unconfirmed candidate species or deeply divergent conspecific lineages based on concordance of genetic divergences with other characters. This integrative approach may be widely applicable to improve estimates of organismal diversity. Our results suggest that in Madagascar the spatial pattern of amphibian richness and endemism must be revisited, and current habitat destruction may be affecting more species than previously thought, in amphibians as well as in other animal groups. This case study suggests that worldwide tropical amphibian diversity is probably underestimated at an unprecedented level and stresses the need for integrated taxonomic surveys as a basis for prioritizing conservation efforts within biodiversity hotspots. PMID:19416818

  4. Effects of anthropogenic disturbance on indri (Indri indri) health in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Junge, Randall E; Barrett, Meredith A; Yoder, Anne D

    2011-07-01

    Anthropogenic habitat disturbance impairs ecosystem health by fragmenting forested areas, introducing environmental contamination, and reducing the quality of habitat resources. The effect of this disturbance on wildlife health is of particular concern in Madagascar, one of the world's biodiversity hotspots, where anthropogenic pressures on the environment remain high. Despite the conservation importance of threatened lemur populations in Madagascar, few data exist on the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on lemur health. To examine these impacts, indri (Indri indri) populations were evaluated from two forest reserves that differ in their exposure to anthropogenic disturbance. We compared the health status of 36 indri individuals from two sites: one population from a protected, undisturbed area of lowland evergreen humid forest and the other population from a reserve exposed to frequent tourism and forest degradation. Comparison of indri health parameters between sites suggests an impact of anthropogenic disturbance, including significant differences in leukocyte count and differential, 12 serum parameters, 6 trace minerals, and a higher diversity of parasites, with a significant difference in the presence of the louse, Trichophilopterus babakotophilus. These data suggest that indri living in disturbed forests may experience physiological changes and increased susceptibility to parasitism, which may ultimately impair reproductive success and survival. PMID:21344463

  5. Miocene benthic foraminifera from Nosy Makamby and Amparafaka, Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N.; Andrianavalona, Tsiory H.; Razafimbelo, Rachel; Rahantarisoa, Lydia; Ali, Jason R.; Samonds, Karen E.

    2014-12-01

    Madagascar is well known for its fossil deposits and hosts one of the world's most important Upper Cretaceous terrestrial faunal sites (in the Mahajanga and Morondava Basins in the west and northwest of the island). Cenozoic marine fossils are also described from Madagascar, but these have received far less attention from the paleontological community, with most of this work dating from the 19th and early 20th centuries. Our study reports a new comprehensive microfossil assemblage from a Miocene sequence on the island of Nosy Makamby. After washing, sieving and sorting (?30 kg), twenty-five genera of foraminifera were identified including Alveolina, Ammodiscus, Ammonia, Archaias, Bolivina, Borelis, Cassidulina, Cyclammina, Cycloforina, Dentalina, Elphidium, Hauerina, Lagena, Lepidocyclina, Nodosaria, Nonion, Nonionella, Peneroplis, Pyrgo, Quinqueloculina, Rhabdammina, Spirillina, Spirolina, Spiroloculina and Triloculina. Ostracods are found in association with the foraminifera, as well as many other macroinvertebrate fossils (including bivalves, gastropods, and echinoids) in addition to vertebrate fossils. Together, the assemblage indicates that during the late Miocene, Nosy Makamby was a tropical, near-shore environment, probably similar to that seen today. Furthermore, the existence of epiphytic foraminiferans (e.g., Elphidium) suggests that sea-grass beds were likely present.

  6. A multidisciplinary study on lavaka (gully erosion) formation in Central Highlands, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveloson, A.; Visnovitz, F.; Székely, B.; Molnár, G.; Udvardi, B.

    2012-04-01

    Madagascar is a very important place to study erosion. Due to some forms of gully erosion called lavaka the country is among the first regarding its erosion rate. Lavakas are very abundant in the highlands of Madagascar (they can reach up to 30/km2). Therefore they have been subject of many studies in the past 60 years. Lavaka formation seems to be triggered by many regional effects (thin laterite layer on thick saprolite layer, smoothly convex hills, climate) and local causes (rain attack, earth falls, lack of vegetation) both natural and anthropogenic (deforestation, roads, paths) but the real nature of these erosion features are not fully understood. Based on field surveys, photogrammetrical, geomorphological and lithological-sedimentological methods two different kinds of lavaka (toe-slope and mid-slope) were studied in Tsiafahy, Central Highlands. Our main goal was to understand the formation of lavakas in order to prevent their consequences such as the degradation of agricultural lands, villages and nearby roads. For this purpose we digitalized geological and hydrological maps of the country and compared them with maps showing the occurrence of lavakas in Madagascar. 3D (three-dimensional) modeling of the actual eroding surface was achieved with photogrammetric methods applying the few hundred photos we made during the field surveys. We tested several 3D modeling software and used the best ones (with higher accuracy and resolution) to model a toe-slope lavaka. In order to model a more complex mid-slope lavaka a new program has been developed in MATLAB as well. Such photogrammetric evaluation and 3D modeling of lavakas were achieved for the first time and therefore the results are yet preliminary. Sedimentological features (grain size distribution and mineral composition) of an active mid-slope lavaka were also investigated to define the difference between the lateritic and saprolitic layers of the lavaka. Preliminary results show that the most important causes of lavaka formation are the climate and the lithological features of these areas. According to our field surveys and analysis lavaka's saprolitic layer can be divided into two different units: a yellow colored saprolitic layer with smaller hydraulic conductivity and a reddish saprolitic layer which could be interpreted as the transition between the yellow saprolitic and the upper red lateritic layer. Field surveys and photos show that the complex structure of the lavakas strongly correlate to the distribution of these different saprolitic units. The understanding of 3D distribution of these material types is the key to the lavaka formation. Further studies will concentrate on improving the obtained models and using them for geomorphologic studies including calculating relief, aspects and volume.

  7. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2?). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2?), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°?2? CuK?, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°?2? CuK? obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian Ocean in the Upper Cretaceous, that was characterized by extensive rhyolitic to basaltic magmatism along Madagascar's eastern coast.

  8. Thermoluminescence External Personnel Monitoring of Workers in Diagnostic Radiology in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambololona, Raoelina; Ratovonjanahary, J. F.; Randriantsizafy, R. D.; Rakotoson, E.; Razafindrabe, R. L.

    2002-07-01

    Results of thermoluminescence personnel external monitoring are reported from 1990 to 2000 for workers in diagnostic radiology which represents more than 75% of the professional exposure in Madagascar and for which enough data for good statistical considerations are available. Average and individual doses distribution are presented. In most cases, compliance with dose limits is verified though some high exposures have been identified. Globaly, these doses can be compared with the average effective dose from natural radiation sources. Methods for the evaluation of quality and performance are presented as long as the doses measured are all in the low range. In radiation protection, an important principle is to meet the requirements of the implementation of ALARA, in order to limit or reduce exposures. This work can be used as reference for decision makers for corrective measures or further investigation when substantial variation in average doses is observed.

  9. Anjozorobe Hantavirus, a New Genetic Variant of Thailand Virus Detected in Rodents from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Razafindralambo, Nadia Kaloina; Lacoste, Vincent; Olive, Marie-Marie; Barivelo, Tony Andrianaivo; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Lavergne, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Until now, there was only serological evidence that hantaviruses were circulating in rodents and infecting humans from Madagascar. To assess the presence of a hantavirus on the island, between October, 2008, and March, 2010, we sampled 585 rodents belonging to seven species in the Anjozorobe-Angavo forest corridor, 70?km north from the capital city Antananarivo. A hantavirus was detected from organs of the ubiquist roof rat (Rattus rattus) and of the endemic Major's tufted-tailed rat (Eliurus majori). Amazingly, sequence analysis of the S (small), M (medium), and L (large) coding DNA sequence of this virus showed that the Anjozorobe strain (proposed name) was a new genetic variant of Thailand virus (THAIV) that comprises other variants found in Southeast Asia. Because THAIV is suspected of causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans, ongoing studies are addressing the risk of infection by this new variant in the Malagasy population. PMID:24575755

  10. Animal health studies using participatory epidemiology in the Mandrare Valley, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, Elise L; Thrusfield, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    Pastoral herders in Madagascar have limited access to animal health workers and veterinary medicines, and more information on their livestock diseases is needed, so that effective animal health programmes can be implemented. In this study, participatory epidemiology methods were used to gather such information in the Mandrare Valley. These included pair-wise ranking and matrix scoring. Eleven diseases were deemed to be priorities by pair-wise ranking. Matrix scoring and characterisation showed that the informant groups associated many disease syndromes with the same diseases, indicating agreement and understanding of the key diseases. The Malagasy-named syndromes, Soko, Besorko and Mamany lio, which are gastrointestinal parasitism, clostridial disease and babesiosis, respectively, were identified by every informant group. A greater sample size may be needed to characterise the diseases precisely with matrix scoring because, in this study, the matrices' scores had wide confidence intervals. PMID:23999777

  11. A necessarily complex model to explain the biogeography of the amphibians and reptiles of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason L; Cameron, Alison; Yoder, Anne D; Vences, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Pattern and process are inextricably linked in biogeographic analyses, though we can observe pattern, we must infer process. Inferences of process are often based on ad hoc comparisons using a single spatial predictor. Here, we present an alternative approach that uses mixed-spatial models to measure the predictive potential of combinations of hypotheses. Biodiversity patterns are estimated from 8,362 occurrence records from 745 species of Malagasy amphibians and reptiles. By incorporating 18 spatially explicit predictions of 12 major biogeographic hypotheses, we show that mixed models greatly improve our ability to explain the observed biodiversity patterns. We conclude that patterns are influenced by a combination of diversification processes rather than by a single predominant mechanism. A 'one-size-fits-all' model does not exist. By developing a novel method for examining and synthesizing spatial parameters such as species richness, endemism and community similarity, we demonstrate the potential of these analyses for understanding the diversification history of Madagascar's biota. PMID:25297804

  12. Genome assembly and annotation of a Drosophila simulans strain from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    PALMIERI, NICOLA; NOLTE, VIOLA; CHEN, JUN; SCHLÖTTERER, CHRISTIAN

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila simulans is a close relative of the genetic model D. melanogaster. Its worldwide distribution in combination with the absence of segregating chromosomal inversions makes this species an increasingly attractive model to study the molecular signatures of adaptation in natural and experimental populations. In an effort to improve the genomic resources for D. simulans, we assembled and annotated the genome of a strain originating from Madagascar (M252), the ancestral range of D. simulans. The comparison of the M252 genome to other available D. simulans assemblies confirmed its high quality, but also highlighted genomic regions that are difficult to assemble with NGS data. The annotation of M252 provides a clear improvement with alternative splicing for 52% of the multiple-exon genes, UTRs for 70% of the genes, 225 novel genes and 781 pseudogenes being reported. We anticipate that the M252 genome will be a valuable resource for many research questions. PMID:24961367

  13. [Premarital sex in Antananarivo (Madagascar): how are students freeing themselves from the norms?].

    PubMed

    Gastineau, Bénédicte; Binet, Clotilde

    2013-06-01

    This paper aims to analyze the representations of premarital sexuality among young people in a context where they are strongly encouraged not to engage in premarital sexual relations. This link between prevention messages, representations and behaviours has been studied among a student population in Madagascar. The analysis is based on a socio-demographic survey conducted in 2006. Results show that young men and women share the ideal of abstinence before marriage. The promotion of premarital sexual abstinence within AIDS programs reinforces gender differences. It is mainly young women who are urged to be abstinent, whereas young men have the means--condom use--to transgress the taboo of premarital sex and protect themselves against health risks. Thus, young men have a dual strategy. On the one hand, they attach great importance to premarital abstinence with their future wife; on the other hand, they can have sex with occasional partners and are then protected by condoms. PMID:24069762

  14. The Burden of Acute Disease in Mahajanga, Madagascar – A 21 Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vijay C.; Andriamalala, Clara N.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop effective and regionally-appropriate emergency care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are hindered by a lack of data on both the burden of disease in the region and on the state of existing care delivery mechanisms. This study describes the burden of acute disease presenting to an emergency unit in Mahajanga, Madagascar. Methods and Findings Handwritten patient registries on all emergency department patients presenting between 1 January 2011 and 30 September 2012 were reviewed and data entered into a database. Data included age, sex, diagnosis, and disposition. We classified diagnoses into Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) multi-level categories. The population was 53.5% male, with a median age of 31 years. The five most common presenting conditions were 1) Superficial injury; contusion, 2) Open wounds of head; neck; and trunk, 3) Open wounds of extremities, 4) Intracranial injury, and 5) Unspecified injury and poisoning. Trauma accounted for 48%, Infectious Disease for 15%, Mental Health 6.1%, Noncommunicable 29%, and Neoplasms 1.2%. The acuity seen was high, with an admission rate of 43%. Trauma was the most common reason for admission, representing 19% of admitted patients. Conclusions This study describes the burden of acute disease at a large referral center in northern Madagascar. The Centre Hôpitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga sees a high volume of acutely ill and injured patients. Similar to other reports from the region, trauma is the most common pathology observed, though infectious disease was responsible for the majority of adult mortality. Typhoid fever other intestinal infections were the most lethal CCS-coded pathologies. By utilizing a widely understood classification system, we are able to highlight contrasts between Mahajanga’s acute and overall disease burden as well as make comparisons between this region and the rest of the globe. We hope this study will serve to guide the development of context-appropriate emergency medicine systems in the region. PMID:25738300

  15. Madagascar Highland erosion: What can we learn from the archive precipitation data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imola Szabó, Amanda; Raveloson, Andrea; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    In Madagascar, soil erosion is significant even when it is compared to world averages, resulting in special geomorphic forms known as lavakas appearing in the Highland regions of the island. The development of these features is due to rather unique multifactorial environmental conditions. Among many factors (geology, soil composition, human influence, etc.) the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation is a key factor. The presence of the dry and wet season seems to be responsible for the enhanced generation of small cracks that might eventually lead to the development of a gully. However, the way of the development of such gully erosions are unknown. To what extent of the actual precipitation pattern to what extent the weather contributes to the aforementioned phenomenon has not yet been studied in great detail. The aim of our research is to study the climatic and weather conditions of lavaka-prone areas for the last decades. The typical cyclonal pattern affects the Madagascar Highlands in various ways. The precipitation and the soil moisture data show that the spatial distribution can be correlated with the appearance of lavakas to a given extent, however the local distribution cannot be explained only based on the precipitation pattern. The severity of the wet season varies strongly in the various decades leading to different precipitation maxima in January-March period. In general the effectiveness of the gully erosion is thought to be highly enhanced if the run-off of the area show large temporal variations. According to our studies this variability is quite high in certain seasons, and, despite of the low spatial resolution, related to the lavaka-prone areas. However, neither the amount of the precipitation, nor the variability alone cannot explain the high variation found in the spatial density and length distribution. Further multidisciplinary studies are necessary to draw conclusions about lavaka formation and describe the process of lavaka development. This is ILARG-contribution Nr. 11.

  16. Early-warning health and process indicators for sentinel surveillance in Madagascar 2007-2011

    PubMed Central

    Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Razanajatovo, Norosoa Harline; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Ravolomanana, Lisette; Randrianarivo-Solofoniaina, Armand Eugène; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Piola, Patrice; Finlay-Vickers, Alyssa; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Richard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemics pose major threats in resource-poor countries, and surveillance tools for their early detection and response are often inadequate. In 2007, a sentinel surveillance system was established in Madagascar, with the aim of rapidly identifying potential epidemics of febrile or diarrhoeal syndromes and issuing alerts. We present the health and process indicators for the five years during which this system was constructed, showing the spatiotemporal trends, early-warning sign detection capability and process evaluation through timely analyses of high-quality data. Methods: The Malagasy sentinel surveillance network is currently based on data for fever and diarrhoeal syndromes collected from 34 primary health centres and reported daily via the transmission of short messages from mobile telephones. Data are analysed daily at the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar to make it possible to issue alerts more rapidly, and integrated process indicators (timeliness, data quality) are used to monitor the system. Results: From 2007 to 2011, 917,798 visits were reported. Febrile syndromes accounted for about 11% of visits annually, but the trends observed differed between years and sentinel sites. From 2007 to 2011, 21 epidemic alerts were confirmed. However, delays in data transmission were observed (88% transmitted within 24 hours in 2008; 67% in 2011) and the percentage of forms transmitted each week for validity control decreased from 99.9% in 2007 to 63.5% in 2011. Conclusion: A sentinel surveillance scheme should take into account both epidemiological and process indicators. It must also be governed by the main purpose of the surveillance and by local factors, such as the motivation of healthcare workers and telecommunication infrastructure. Permanent evaluation indicators are required for regular improvement of the system. PMID:25598869

  17. Landscape attributes driving avian influenza virus circulation in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Laure; Paul, Mathilde C; Leger, Lucas; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina R; Maminiaina, Olivier F; Jourdan, Marion; Molia, Sophie; Rakotondravao, René; Chevalier, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    While the spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus has been studied throughout Southeast Asia, little is known on the spatial risk factors for avian influenza in Africa. In the present paper, we combined serological data from poultry and remotely sensed environmental factors in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar to explore for any association between avian influenza and landscape variables. Serological data from cross-sectional surveys carried out on poultry in 2008 and 2009 were examined together with a Landsat 7 satellite image analysed using supervised classification. The dominant landscape features in a 1-km buffer around farmhouses and distance to the closest water body were extracted. A total of 1,038 individual bird blood samples emanating from 241 flocks were analysed, and the association between avian influenza seroprevalence and these landcape variables was quantified using logistic regression models. No evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 avian influenza subtypes was found, suggesting that only low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) circulated. Three predominant land cover classes were identified around the poultry farms: grassland savannah, rice paddy fields and wetlands. A significant negative relationship was found between LPAI seroprevalence and distance to the closest body of water. We also found that LPAI seroprevalence was higher in farms characterised by predominant wetlands or rice landscapes than in those surrounded by dry savannah. Results from this study suggest that if highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus were introduced in Madagascar, the environmental conditions that prevail in Lake Alaotra region may allow the virus to spread and persist. PMID:24893021

  18. Geochronology and 4+ thermometry of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) metamorphism in southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, F.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) metamorphism--regional metamorphism at >900° C--in a collisional setting requires some combination of: i) unusually radiogenic crust, ii) advection of heat by magmatism, iii) conduction of mantle-derived heat, and iv) shear heating. The Neoproterozoic continental collision zone exposed in Madagascar provides a good opportunity to investigate these potential causes; we use three 4+ thermometers (Zr-in-rutile, Ti-in-zircon, and Ti-in-quartz) and U/Th-Pb geochronology of monazite and zircon to evaluate the magnitude, timing, and duration of UHT metamorphism in southern Madagascar. U-Pb dates from metamorphic monazite and zircon with complex intragrain (re)crystallization textures range from ~600 Ma to ~500 Ma. Zircon and monazite with HREE depletion and dates of 600-540 Ma suggest (re)crystallization in the presence of garnet. All monazite shows negative Eu anomalies (compatible with the presence of plagioclase), but monazite with dates from ~570 to ~530 Ma has more pronounced anomalies. Zr-in-rutile temperatures span 700 to 960° C and Ti-in-quartz temperatures span 600 to 950° C. The UHT metamorphism is assumed to postdate both the accretion of an arc terrane to West Gondwana at ~600 Ma and the suturing of East and West Gondwana prior to ~570 Ma. The 40 Myr between distinct episodes of alkali plutonism at ~570 Ma (deformed) and ~530 Ma (nondeformed) coincide with more-negative Eu anomalies in monazite, and may reflect the period of orogenesis associated with UHT metamorphism. The measured K, Th, and U contents of rocks within the UHT domain [GAF-BGR, 2008] indicate an average heat production of >5 ?W/m3. This is sufficient to produce UHT metamorphism in 60-km thick crust within 40 Myr.

  19. Radiogenic heating to ultrahigh temperature: Geochronology and 4+ thermometry across southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, F.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    As zones of focused metamorphism, melting, and ductile deformation, hot crustal sections are especially important for understanding the evolution of the lower crust in convergent orogens, such as Tibet. One of the best exposed crustal sections that reached ultrahigh-temperature (UHT: >900° C) is in southern Madagascar. There, the association of UHT mineral assemblages with exceptionally high concentrations of radioactive heat-producing elements begs the question of whether radiogenic heating caused UHT. Partial melting, retrogression and rapid elemental diffusion at high temperature, however, have left a complex record of radiometric dates that span 150 Myr (~650-500 Ma), making it difficult to address this question. We apply laser-ablation split-stream ICPMS (LASS) petrochronology and 4+ cation thermometry to better constrain the lengthscales and timescales over which high temperatures were sustained in southern Madagascar. By deciphering complex intragrain (re)crystallization textures of zircon and monazite from a broad geographical area, we deduce that orogenesis lasted >60 Myr. Specifically, 600-540 Ma zircon and monazite with HREE depletion suggest (re)crystallization in the presence of garnet. All monazite show negative Eu anomalies (compatible with the presence of plagioclase), but ~570 to ~530 Ma monazite has more-pronounced anomalies. Ti-in-zircon and Zr-in-rutile thermometry confirm ultrahigh temperatures within a restricted area of ~100 x 200 km. These thermal and chronologic constraints allow us to evaluate the potential causes of heating. Measured K, Th, and U contents of rocks within the UHT domain indicate an average heat-production rate of >4 ?W/m3, sufficient to produce UHT metamorphism in 60-km thick crust within 60 Myr. We conclude that high concentrations of heat-producing elements caused focused heat production in young metasedimentary rocks that were sandwiched between older crustal domains. We speculate that ultrahigh temperatures caused by radiogenic heating led to preferential crustal melting within—and ductile extrusion of—the young metasediments.

  20. Forest Management Devolution: Gap Between Technicians' Design and Villagers' Practices in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rives, Fanny; Carrière, Stéphanie M.; Montagne, Pierre; Aubert, Sigrid; Sibelet, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    In the 1980s, tropical forest-management principles underwent a shift toward approaches giving greater responsibilities to rural people. One argument for such a shift were the long-term relations established between rural people and their natural resources. In Madagascar, a new law was drawn up in 1996 (Gelose law), which sought to integrate rural people into forest management. A gap was observed between the changes foreseen by the projects implementing the Gelose law and the actual changes. In this article, we use the concept of the social-ecological system (SES) to analyze that gap. The differences existing between the planned changes set by the Gelose contract in the village of Ambatoloaka (northwest of Madagascar) and the practices observed in 2010 were conceptualized as a gap between two SESs. The first SES is the targeted one (i.e., a virtual one); it corresponds to the designed Gelose contract. The second SES is the observed one. It is characterized by the heterogeneity of forest users and uses, which have several impacts on forest management, and by very dynamic social and ecological systems. The observed SES has been reshaped contingent on the constraints and opportunities offered by the Gelose contract as well as on other ecological and social components. The consequences and opportunities that such an SES reshaping would offer to improve the implementation of the Gelose law are discussed. The main reasons explaining the gap between the two SESs are as follows: (1) the clash between static and homogeneous perceptions in the targeted SES and the dynamics and heterogeneity that characterize the observed SES; and (2) the focus on one specific use of forest ecosystems (i.e., charcoal-making) in the targeted SES. Forest management in the observed SES depends on several uses of forest ecosystems.

  1. Randomised controlled trial of alternative male and female condom promotion strategies targeting sex workers in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hoke, Theresa H; Feldblum, Paul J; Van Damme, Kathleen; Nasution, Marlina D; Grey, Thomas W; Wong, Emelita L; Ralimamonjy, Louisette; Raharimalala, Leonardine; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether individual clinic?based counselling as a supplement to peer education for male and female condom promotion leads to greater use of protection and lower STI prevalence among sex workers in Madagascar already exposed to intensive male condom promotion. Methods In two public dispensaries in Madagascar, a total of 901 sex workers were randomly allocated between two alternative male and female condom promotion interventions: peer education only, or peer education supplemented with individual clinic?based counselling. Participants were followed for 12?months. Every 2?months they made clinic visits, where they were interviewed on condom use. Peer educators counselled all participants on condom use as they accompanied their assigned participants to study visits. Participants assigned to receive the supplemental intervention were counselled by a trained clinician following study interviews. Participants were tested and treated for chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomoniasis every 6?months. We used logistic regression to assess whether the more intensive intervention was associated with reduced STI prevalence. Use of protection with clients and non?paying partners was assessed by study arm, site, and visit. Results There was no statistically significant association between study arm and aggregated STI prevalence. No substantial differences in levels of reported protection were noted between study groups. Conclusions This study found little evidence for gains from more thorough clinical counselling on male and female condom use. These findings suggest that less clinically intensive interventions such as peer education could be suitable for male and female condom promotion in populations already exposed to barrier method promotion. PMID:17591662

  2. Newcastle Disease Virus in Madagascar: Identification of an Original Genotype Possibly Deriving from a Died Out Ancestor of Genotype IV

    PubMed Central

    Maminiaina, Olivier F.; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R.; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M.; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A.; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed. PMID:21085573

  3. Tracing Arab-Islamic inheritance in Madagascar: study of the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA in the Antemoro.

    PubMed

    Capredon, Mélanie; Brucato, Nicolas; Tonasso, Laure; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Rakotondrabe, Andriamihaja Bakomalala; Ratolojanahary, Mamisoa Adelta; Randriamarolaza, Louis-Paul; Champion, Bernard; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Madagascar is located at the crossroads of the Asian and African worlds and is therefore of particular interest for studies on human population migration. Within the large human diversity of the Great Island, we focused our study on a particular ethnic group, the Antemoro. Their culture presents an important Arab-Islamic influence, but the question of an Arab biological inheritance remains unresolved. We analyzed paternal (n=129) and maternal (n=135) lineages of this ethnic group. Although the majority of Antemoro genetic ancestry comes from sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian gene pools, we observed in their paternal lineages two specific haplogroups (J1 and T1) linked to Middle Eastern origins. This inheritance was restricted to some Antemoro sub-groups. Statistical analyses tended to confirm significant Middle Eastern genetic contribution. This study gives a new perspective to the large human genetic diversity in Madagascar. PMID:24278350

  4. Tracing Arab-Islamic Inheritance in Madagascar: Study of the Y-chromosome and Mitochondrial DNA in the Antemoro

    PubMed Central

    Capredon, Mélanie; Brucato, Nicolas; Tonasso, Laure; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Rakotondrabe, Andriamihaja Bakomalala; Ratolojanahary, Mamisoa Adelta; Randriamarolaza, Louis-Paul; Champion, Bernard; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Madagascar is located at the crossroads of the Asian and African worlds and is therefore of particular interest for studies on human population migration. Within the large human diversity of the Great Island, we focused our study on a particular ethnic group, the Antemoro. Their culture presents an important Arab-Islamic influence, but the question of an Arab biological inheritance remains unresolved. We analyzed paternal (n=129) and maternal (n=135) lineages of this ethnic group. Although the majority of Antemoro genetic ancestry comes from sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian gene pools, we observed in their paternal lineages two specific haplogroups (J1 and T1) linked to Middle Eastern origins. This inheritance was restricted to some Antemoro sub-groups. Statistical analyses tended to confirm significant Middle Eastern genetic contribution. This study gives a new perspective to the large human genetic diversity in Madagascar. PMID:24278350

  5. Sensitivity of a semi-arid tropical lake basin to environmental changes (Lake Ihotry basin, South-West of Madagascar)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Vallet-Coulomb; A. Maurin; F. Gasse; L. Ferry; L. Robison

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study is to analyse the sensitivity of water ressources in a large semi-arid catchment, based on few hydro-meteorological and satellite images analysis. The site is located in the south-west of Madagascar. The catchment, which surface is 3000 km^2, is limited in its eastern side by a North-south relief up to 1000m high. The most important part

  6. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Ramirez, Sara D.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease. Standardized population monitoring of key amphibian and reptile species should be established with urgency to enable early detection of potential impacts of disease emergence in this global biodiversity hotspot. PMID:26083349

  7. POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE AND COMPETENCE AS A VECTOR FOR DENGUE TYPE 2 VIRUS OFAEDES AEGYPTIAND AEDES ALBOPICTUS FROM MADAGASCAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie Vazeille; Laurence Mousson; Ignace Rakatoarivony; Re Gine Villeret; Franc Ois Rodhain; Jean-bernard Duchemin; Anna-bella Failloux

    Abstract. Starch gel electrophoresis was used to assess the polymorphism,of 7 isoenzymes,in single mosquitoes (field-collected F0 or F1 generation) for Aedes albopictus (8 strains) from northern Madagascar. Mosquitoes of the F2 generation (3 strains of Aedes aegypti and 10 strains of Ae. albopictus) were tested for oral susceptibility to dengue type 2 virus. Aedes aegypti was less susceptible to viral

  8. Détermination du régime des feux en milieu de savane à Madagascar à partir de séries temporelles d'images MODIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Jacquin; Véronique Cheret; David Sheeren; Gérard Balent

    2011-01-01

    Dans les milieux de savanes, l'identification des surfaces brûlées et leur suivi sont des informations essentielles pour assurer une bonne gestion et conservation de ces écosystèmes. L'approche choisie repose sur l'analyse de séries temporelles d'images de télédétection à moyenne résolution spatiale. Les savanes étudiées sont situées sur le bassin versant de Marovoay au nord-ouest de Madagascar : elles présentent la particularité

  9. Systematics of the Madagascar Anelosimus spiders: remarkable local richness and endemism, and dual colonization from the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Jencik, Brian B.; Veve, Giselle M.; Hanitriniaina, Sahondra; Agostini, Diego; Goh, Seok Ping; Pruitt, Jonathan; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the alarming rates of deforestation and forest fragmentation, Madagascar still harbors extraordinary biodiversity. However, in many arthropod groups, such as spiders, this biodiversity remains mostly unexplored and undescribed. The first subsocial Madagascan species of the theridiid spider genus Anelosimus were described in 2005 when six new species were found to coexist in the Périnet forest fragment within Andasibe-Mantadia NP. However, this discovery was based only on a few specimens and the extent of this Madagascan radiation has remained unknown. We here report on a thorough survey of >350 colonies from Périnet, and three pilot surveys into additional Madagascar forests (Ambohitantely, Ranamofana, and Montagne d’Ambre). The morphological, molecular and natural history data from these surveys facilitated a revised taxonomy and phylogenetic hypothesis of Madagascan Anelosimus. This subsocial clade currently comprises six previously known (Anelosimus andasibe Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus may Agnarsson, 2005, Anelosimus nazariani Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus sallee Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus salut Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus vondrona Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005) and 10 new species: Anelosimus ata sp. n., Anelosimus buffoni sp. n., Anelosimus darwini sp. n., Anelosimus hookeri sp. n., Anelosimus huxleyi sp. n., Anelosimus lamarcki sp. n., Anelosimus moramora sp. n., Anelosimus tita sp. n., Anelosimus torfi sp. n., Anelosimus wallacei sp. n.. With the exception of Anelosimus may and Anelosimus vondrona, all other species appear to be single forest endemics. While additional sampling is necessary, these data imply a much higher local richness and endemism in Madagascan forests than in any other comparable area globally. The phylogenetic results establish a sister clade relationship between the subsocial Anelosimus in Madagascar and the American ‘eximius group’, and between the solitary Anelosimus decaryi on Madagascar and a solitary American clade. These findings imply duplicate colonizations from America, an otherwise rare biogeographical pattern, calling for more detailed investigation of Anelosimus biogeography. PMID:26175602

  10. The structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath Mozambique and Madagascar from combined surface wave and ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, P.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Wysession, M. E.; Pratt, M. J.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamana, G.; Rakotondraibe, T.; Sy Tanjona Andriampenomanana ny Ony, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present results based on applying the two-plane wave method to the observed amplitude and phase of fundamental mode surface waves from the NSF-funded MACOMO IRIS PASSCAL broadband seismometer deployment in Madagascar and Mozambique. The two-plane wave method (Forsyth and Li, 2005) involves modeling arriving surface waves by a two-plane-wave field. Combining this method with ambient noise will allow the joint inversion of phase velocities from 5 to 180 s, to generate a high-resolution 3-D shear wave velocity model from the surface to a depth of ~200 km beneath Madagascar, Mozambique and the surrounding regions. Using the two-plane wave method, the phase and amplitude of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves from distant earthquakes recorded at MACOMO are inverted for 2-D phase velocity maps at periods from 18 to 180 s. The ambient noise method (a separate study) is limited to short periods and therefore it is sensitive only to the crust and uppermost mantle structure. The 3-D shear-wave velocity structure beneath East Africa (Mozambique and Madagascar) where the East African Orogeny was instrumental in the amalgamation of Gondwana (~540 Ma) is investigated by using the implicit relation between phase-velocity dispersion and shear-wave structure. The phase velocities, at selected periods and at each node of the phase velocity maps, are inverted for a 1-D structure; the 1-D models at each node form the 3-D shear-wave model. Phase-velocity tomographic images show 2-D lateral variations in phase velocities at each period. Preliminary results show that above periods of 124 sec we noticed a rapid vertical transition to low phase velocities beneath southern Madagascar.

  11. Metabolism and temperature regulation during daily torpor in the smallest primate, the pygmy mouse lemur ( Microcebus myoxinus ) in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Schmid; T. Ruf; G. Heldmaier

    2000-01-01

    Thermoregulation, energetics and patterns of torpor in the pygmy mouse lemur, Microcebus myoxinus, were investigated under natural conditions of photoperiod and temperature in the Kirindy\\/CFPF Forest in western Madagascar.\\u000a M. myoxinus entered torpor spontaneously during the cool dry season. Torpor only occurred on a daily basis and torpor bout duration was\\u000a on average 9.6?h, and ranged from 4.6?h to 19.2?h.

  12. LONDONITE, A NEW MINERAL SPECIES: THE Cs-DOMINANT ANALOGUE OF RHODIZITE FROM THE ANTANDROKOMBY GRANITIC PEGMATITE, MADAGASCAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM B. SIMMONS; FEDERICO PEZZOTTA; ALEXANDER U. FALSTER; KAREN L. WEBBER

    2001-01-01

    Londonite, (Cs,K,Rb) Al4 Be4 (B,Be)12 O28, is the Cs-dominant analogue of rhodizite. It occurs with rhodizite at Antandrokomby, a dike of granitic pegmatite in the Manandona valley, Antsirabe region, and at Ampanivana and Antsongombato, in the Betafo region south of Mahaiza, all in Madagascar. Londonite occurs in the inner zones and in miarolitic cavities of hig hly evolved pegmatites rich

  13. Fatal mass poisoning in madagascar following ingestion of a shark ( carcharhinus leucas): Clinical and epidemiological aspects and isolation of toxins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascal Boisier; Gérard Ranaivoson; Noëlson Rasolofonirina; barryson Andriamahefazafy; Jean Roux; Suzanne Chanteau; masayuki Satake; Yasumoto Takeshi

    1995-01-01

    In November 1993, 188 people were admitted to hospital after eating the meat from a single shark (Carcharhinus leucas) in Manakara, a medium-sized town on the south-east coast of Madagascar. This shark and its meat had no unusual characteristics. The attack rate was about 100%. The first clinical signs appeared within 5–10 hr after ingestion. The patients presented with neurological

  14. Bringing Safe Water to Remote Populations: An Evaluation of a Portable Point-of-Use Intervention in Rural Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pavani Kalluri Ram; Elaine Kelsey; Oliver Rakotomalala; Robert E. Quick

    2007-01-01

    Rural populations disproportionately lack access to improved water supplies. We evaluated a novel scheme that employed community-based sales agents to disseminate the Safe Water System (SWS)—a household-level water chlorination and safe storage intervention—in rural Madagascar. Respondents from 242 households in 4 villages were inter- viewed; all used surface water for drinking water. Respondents from 239 households (99%) had heard of

  15. Low-temperature evolution of the Morondava rift basin shoulder in western Madagascar: An apatite fission track study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, JöRg; Seward, Diane; Schreurs, Guido

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of the rift shoulder and the sedimentary sequence of the Morondava basin in western Madagascar was mainly influenced by a Permo-Triassic continental failed rift (Karroo rift), and the early Jurassic separation of Madagascar from Africa. Karroo deposits are restricted to a narrow corridor along the basement-basin contact and parts of this contact feature a steep escarpment. Here, apatite fission track (AFT) analysis of a series of both basement and sediment samples across the escarpment reveals the low-temperature evolution of the exhuming Precambrian basement in the rift basin shoulder and the associated thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. Seven basement and four Karroo sediment samples yield apparent AFT ages between ˜330 and ˜215 Ma and ˜260 and ˜95 Ma, respectively. Partially annealed fission tracks and thermal modeling indicate post-depositional thermal overprinting of both basement and Karroo sediment. Rocks presently exposed in the rift shoulder indicate temperatures of >60°C associated with this reheating whereby the westernmost sample in the sedimentary plain experienced almost complete resetting of the detrital apatite grains at temperatures of about ˜90-100°C. The younging of AFT ages westward indicates activity of faults, re-activating inherited Precambrian structures during Karroo sedimentation. Furthermore, our data suggest onset of final cooling/exhumation linked to (1) the end of Madagascar's drift southward relative to Africa during the Early Cretaceous, (2) activity of the Marion hot spot and associated Late Cretaceous break-up between Madagascar and India, and (3) the collision of India with Eurasia and subsequent re-organization of spreading systems in the Indian Ocean.

  16. Sedimentological features of lateritic and saprolitic horizons in a mid-slope lavaka, Central Highlands, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udvardi, B.; Raveloson, A.; Visnovitz, F.; Szabó, Cs.; Kovács, I.; Székely, B.

    2012-04-01

    Madagascar is characterized by a world-record erosion rate, especially in the Central Highlands and the vicinity of Lake Alaotra. As a consequence of the high erosion rate several specific erosional landforms develop in the area. Among them an inverted teardrop-shaped geomorphic feature, the lavaka, meaning 'hole' in Malagasy, is very typical in the hilly landscape. These unique features are widespread in Madagascar though somewhat similar patterns can also be found in Congo, South Africa and Brazil. In these areas, material from the lavakas is washed down from the hillsides into the streams and rivers after every heavy rain (1500-1800 mm/yr). The high sediment load from the eroded lavakas can damage the infrastructure (collapses roads, bridges and buildings) and may destroy agricultural land (swamp fields). The distribution of lavakas is very diverse: despite the same climatologic, geological environment and anthropogenic effects a large difference in density of lavakas can be observed. For this reason it cannot be fully constrained how lavakas form and develop. Their formation is affected by natural factors (hydrological and climatic effects, geology, tectonics, vegetation, etc.) and also by anthropogenic influences (deforestation, grassland burning, overgrazing). The basic condition for the formation of lavakas often includes the petrographic characteristics of the area. Lavaka-generating substrates can be separated into two main weathered units: thin upper laterite (less than one meter) and thicker deeper saprolite (several tens of meters) on the crystalline basement. This study focuses on a mid-slope lavaka, in the area of Tsiafahy, in Madagascar's Central Highlands. To ascertain the composition of the material and to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of the lateritic and saprolitic profile on precambrian magmatic basement, we investigated the grain size distribution and mineral composition of an active lavaka. Our results show the significance of water on slope stability. The calculated hydraulic conductivity values from laterite indicate (at least one order of magnitude) higher value than in the saprolite, but each layer have very low hydraulic conductivity. In the saprolite can be also identified two separated horizons. The difference between laterite and saprolite are reflected also in the mineralogical compositions, primarily through the presence of gibbsite in the lateritic profile. In the total profile quartz and kaolinite are predominant. The observed features can be interpreted as an indication for ferrallitization which generates a deep weathered ferralsol zone. The preferable leakage in the saprolite is enhanced by the higher modal abundance of the coarser grains relative to the laterite. The coarser grains are cemented by kaolinite, iron-oxihidroxide and calcite. These minerals are dominant in the fine-grained fraction which may be easily mobilized by water causing high erodibility that facilitates headward erosion of deeper saprolitic horizon. Due to its low hydraulic conductivity the penetration of the rainfall through the laterite is a slow process. Thus, the top layer protects the lower strata from erosional removal; however, presence of cracks in the lateritic horizon may speed up the removal of the top layer paving the way to reach the lower, more erodible saprolite.

  17. Preparer une firme-reseau dans le transport routier des hydrocarbures le cas de TOTAL Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razakamanifidiny, Patrick Dany

    2009-12-01

    In a dynamic context, a network firm is more and more suggested in scientific writings as a prevalent strategy to develop several firms in subcontracting link in order to satisfy the needs of their customers asking for products which are complex to manufacture. However, due to lack of sufficient preparation, most of network organizations fail. That's why it seems legitimate to explore an avenue of research on the preparation step of a network firm. How a third intermediary can develop and try out a change process in order to stimulate the commitment of films to organize themselves in network? This study is developed inside the framework of an intervention-research applied to the case of the oil distribution company TOTAL Madagascar. 71 weeks of intervention actions carried out with 27 subcontracting firms of hydrocarbon road transport located to Antananarivo are recorded within this framework. One of the critical elements in the oil distribution in Madagascar is the scarcity of the subcontracting firms of hydrocarbon road transport which are able to meet the required quality criterions. A lack of management standards observed in several small and medium enterprises of hydrocarbon road transport, a growth of the number of tankers accidents, and an insufficiency of individual resources to develop competences constitute the main reasons which explain this scarcity. By this way, a preparation step of a network firm was developed in order to increase the management competences of the subcontracting firms of hydrocarbon road transport, and to develop their capacity of collective learning. This step comes from the evolutionary perspective which consists in elaborating and implementing uprooting, movement and rooting activities related to a change implementation model taking reactions of the participating enterprises into consideration, through a change understanding process from objection to exploration until engagement. The realization of theses activities had been allowed: 44 managers of 27 participating firms to be trained, certified and sensitized with the network firm practice, 78% of the participating firms to be enthusiastic to pass to the creation of a network firm, and the enterprise pivot TOTAL Madagascar to record a significant diminution of the number of tankers accidents which is passed from 10 (77% of the total number of the tankers accidents) at the beginning of the process in 2003 to 5 (36%) at the end of this process in 2005 and to 3 (27%) in 2007. These tangible and positive results seem to prove the commitment of firms participating in the preparation step of the network firm. In this way, it is appropriate to put the hypothesis according to the experience done within the framework of this study that could be considered as a learning trajectory type of the preparation step which efficiently stimulates the intention of the participating firms to be organized in network. This present case, through these results, strengthens the consideration according to the success of the network firm which depends in the efficiency of the change process related to its preparation. Thus, a main scientific contribution of this present step rely on its originality which is the integration of two change models (implementation and understanding) inside the same research conceptual framework. In a managerial side, the essential of this step may be transferable to the other contexts which look upon the determinant role of the researcher acting as a change co-leader. That shows the utility of this step within the framework of a doctorate applied in administration. Keywords: Subcontracting -- Change -- Network firm -- Hydrocarbon Road Transport -- Small and Medium Enterprises

  18. Imaging the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary beneath South Africa and Madagascar using S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Kaestle, E.; Kind, R.

    2012-12-01

    South Africa's lithosphere preserves a nearly un-interrupted geological history of more than 3.5 billion years. It was formed during the break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana over a period of 80 million years and therefore is the longest, best-preserved geological record of the planet Earth. Investigation of the thickness of continental roots, which migrate coherently with plates, therefore belongs to the most systematic keys in order to understand the continental evolution. This goal will be achieved using the novel technique of S receiver function. This technique employing S-to-P conversions appears promising for detecting the LAB and has already proven its power for mapping the LAB in the tectonically different regions. We used the available data from more than 85 temporary and permanent broadband stations in South Africa and Madagascar to detect the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Our results obtain detailed images of the LAB with improved resolution. S receiver functions clearly resolve the Moho boundary at depths ranging between 35 and 45 km beneath South Africa in good agreement with the previous studies. Even though we can not find any correlation between the crustal thickness and the age of the terrains. Deeper structure can be also well imaged by S receiver functions. Our results clearly show the presence of more than one negative converted phase beneath Kalahari Craton. On the other hand, they reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the South African continent. The first discontinuity can be seen at depths ranging between 160-220 km beneath the Archean Cratons and surrounding Phanerozoic belts, whereas the deeper discontinuity at about 300 km can be only imaged beneath the Archean Cratons. We interpret the deeper boundary at 300 km as the LAB of the old Archean Craton beneath South Africa. The shallower discontinuity at 160-220 km depth may show a mid-lithospheric boundary, which probably reveals a relict of the old mantle lithosphere. Our results obtained from the stations located in Madagascar can only confirm the presence of the mid-lithopheric boundary at 170 km depth.

  19. Imaging the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary beneath South Africa and Madagascar using S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Kaestle, E.; Kind, R.

    2012-04-01

    South Africa's lithosphere preserves a nearly un-interrupted geological history of more than 3.5 billion years. It was formed during the break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana over a period of 80 million years and therefore is the longest, best-preserved geological record of the planet Earth. Investigation of the thickness of continental roots, which migrate coherently with plates, therefore belongs to the most systematic keys in order to understand the continental evolution. This goal will be achieved using the novel technique of S receiver function. This technique employing S-to-P conversions appears promising for detecting the LAB and has already proven its power for mapping the LAB in the tectonically different regions. We used the available data from more than 85 temporary and permanent broadband stations in South Africa and Madagascar to detect the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Our results obtain detailed images of the LAB with improved resolution. S receiver functions clearly resolve the Moho boundary at depths ranging between 35 and 45 km beneath South Africa in good agreement with the previous studies. Even though we can not find any correlation between the crustal thickness and the age of the terrains. Deeper structure can be also well imaged by S receiver functions. Our results clearly show the presence of more than one negative converted phase beneath Kalahari Craton. On the other hand, they reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the South African continent. The first discontinuity can be seen at depths ranging between 160-230 km beneath the Archean Cratons and surrounding Phanerozoic belts, whereas the deeper discontinuity at 300 km can be only imaged beneath the Archean Cratons. We interpret the deeper boundary at 300 km as the LAB of the old Archean Craton beneath South Africa. The shallower discontinuity at 160-230 km depth may show a mid-lithospheric boundary, which probably reveals a relict of the old mantle lithosphere. Our results obtained from the stations located in Madagascar can only confirm the presence of the mid-lithopheric boundary at 170 km depth.

  20. Evaluation of a volunteer community-based health worker program for providing contraceptive services in Madagascar?

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Maria F.; Walldorf, Jenny; Kolesar, Robert; Agarwal, Aarti; Kourtis, Athena P.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Finlay, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background Madagascar recently scaled up their volunteer community health worker (CHW) program in maternal health and family planning to reach remote and underserved communities. Study design We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation using a systematic sample of 100 CHWs trained to provide contraceptive counseling and short-acting contraceptive services at the community level. CHWs were interviewed on demographics, recruitment, training, supervision, commodity supply, and other measures of program functionality; tested on knowledge of injectable contraception; and observed by an expert while completing five simulated client encounters with uninstructed volunteers. We developed a CHW performance score (0–100%) based on the number of counseling activities adequately met during the client encounters and used multivariable linear regression to identify correlates of the score. Results CHWs had a mean performance score of 73.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 70.3–77.6%). More education, more weekly volunteer hours, and receiving a refresher training correlated with a higher performance score. We found no other associations between measures of the components previously identified as essential for effective CHW programs and performance score. Conclusions Although areas of deficiency were identified, CHWs proved capable of providing high-quality contraception services. PMID:23850074

  1. Profil épidemio-clinique et radiologique des atteintes ostéo-articulaires des hémophiles à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Narindra, Lova Hasina Rajaonarison Ny Ony; Rabemanorintsoa, Feno Hasina; Randrianantenaina, Faralahy Ravelonarivo; Rakoto, Olivat Alson Aimée; Ahmad, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Déterminer le profil épidémio-clinique et radiologique des atteintes ostéo-articulaires des hémophiles malagasy. Méthodes Une étude prospective, descriptive portant sur 25 patients hémophiles venant de tout Madagascar a été réalisée. Des radiographies numérisées des genoux, des chevilles et des coudes en incidence de face et de profil ainsi qu'une échographie des hanches, des genoux, des chevilles et des coudes ont été réalisées chez ces patients. Le type et la sévérité de la maladie ainsi que l'aspect de la cavité articulaire, la synoviale, les noyaux épiphysaires et les surfaces articulaires ont été analysés. Résultats Soixante-huit pourcent des patients étaient hémophiles de type A et 32 % de type B. Quarante pourcent étaient classés sévères, 28 % modérés et 32 % mineurs. Les atteintes ostéo-articulaires ont été retrouvées chez 56 % des patients. Il n'existait pas de prédominance d'atteinte selon le type ni la sévérité de la maladie. Les plus jeunes étaient les plus atteints et l'articulation du genou et de la cheville étaient les plus touchées. Conclusion Les complications ostéo-articulaire de l'hémophilie sont graves et ne dépendent pas du type ni de la sévérité de l'affection. Elles touchent surtout les enfants d'âge scolaire. Le couple radiographie-échographie permet de diagnostiquer et de surveiller ces lésions. PMID:25870742

  2. [Anemia among schoolchildren 5 to 14 years old in Sainte Marie (Madagascar)].

    PubMed

    Blanchy, S; Genin, C; Rene, P; Randriasamimanana, J R; Lepers, J P

    1993-01-01

    The Island of Sainte Marie is located at 6 km from the Eastern Coast of Madagascar. The climate is a muggy tropical one, with an average temperature rising above 20 degrees C all along the year and precipitations superior to 2500 mm. In 1990, a clinical surveillance of ten affections has been performed by every health units of the Island: paludal syndromes, nutrition disorders and anemia have been the focus of symptomatic definition. Blood samples have been taken from 100 pupils of the village of Ambodiforaha for hemogram determination and research of malaria hematozoon. Four pupils out of five show biological anemia, more than 10% suffer from acute anemia (less than 3.5 millions of red blood cells for each microliters, hematocrit inferior to 30, less than 9 g of hemoglobin for 100 ml). 87% suffer from nutritional anemia, 17% from iron-deficient anemia. Those figures cannot be found in health statistics. There is a high rate of nutritional and iron deficient anemia, but the problem is not well perceived or not at all by the health system. Anemia must be related to the strength of paludal transmission, to the importance of nutrition disorders and the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis. A better knowledge of the epidemiology of anemias and their morbid consequences would allow the setting of a prevention programme useful for children under 5 years and for pregnant women. PMID:8192544

  3. A-type stratoid granites of Madagascar: evidence of Rodinia rifting at ca 790 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelec, Anne; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    The so-called stratoid granites are sheet-like granites emplaced as conformable sills in the Precambrian basement of central Madagascar. Most of them have A-type affinities (Nédélec et al. 1995). They are everywhere characterized by the same structural pattern evidencing two stages of deformation. The first one (foliations mildly dipping to the west and lineations trending WSW) is regarded as the consequence of synkinematic magma emplacement. The second stage, characterized by interference folds, steeply dipping foliations and subhorizontal lineations trending to the north, corresponds to a more or less pronounced reworking in ductile conditions, regarded as the result of Late Pan-African transcurrent tectonics. To the north of Antananarivo, the stratoid granites are associated with comagmatic quartz-syenites. New U-Pb zircons ages obtained by in situ analyses reveal two group of ages: upper intercept ages of ca 790 Ma, and younger ages of ca 550 Ma corresponding to crystal rims. These new data question the geological significance of former TIMS ages of ca 630 Ma formerly obtained from the same rocks (Paquette & Nédélec 1998). It is suggested that the stratoid granites and syenites were emplaced during a crustal thinning event corresponding to an early Rodinia rifting stage. The Pan-African imprint on these rocks is therefore limited to reheating, tectonic reworking and deep fluid transfer in the vicinity of Late-Neoproterozoic shear zones at ca 550 Ma (Nédélec et al. 2014).

  4. Comparative and population mitogenomic analyses of Madagascar's extinct, giant 'subfossil' lemurs.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Logan; Ratan, Aakrosh; Godfrey, Laurie R; Crowley, Brooke E; Hughes, Cris E; Lei, Runhua; Cui, Yinqiu; Wood, Mindy L; Muldoon, Kathleen M; Andriamialison, Haingoson; McGraw, John J; Tomsho, Lynn P; Schuster, Stephan C; Miller, Webb; Louis, Edward E; Yoder, Anne D; Malhi, Ripan S; Perry, George H

    2015-02-01

    Humans first arrived on Madagascar only a few thousand years ago. Subsequent habitat destruction and hunting activities have had significant impacts on the island's biodiversity, including the extinction of megafauna. For example, we know of 17 recently extinct 'subfossil' lemur species, all of which were substantially larger (body mass ?11-160 kg) than any living population of the ?100 extant lemur species (largest body mass ?6.8 kg). We used ancient DNA and genomic methods to study subfossil lemur extinction biology and update our understanding of extant lemur conservation risk factors by i) reconstructing a comprehensive phylogeny of extinct and extant lemurs, and ii) testing whether low genetic diversity is associated with body size and extinction risk. We recovered complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes from five subfossil lemur taxa, and generated sequence data from population samples of two extinct and eight extant lemur species. Phylogenetic comparisons resolved prior taxonomic uncertainties and confirmed that the extinct subfossil species did not comprise a single clade. Genetic diversity estimates for the two sampled extinct species were relatively low, suggesting small historical population sizes. Low genetic diversity and small population sizes are both risk factors that would have rendered giant lemurs especially susceptible to extinction. Surprisingly, among the extant lemurs, we did not observe a relationship between body size and genetic diversity. The decoupling of these variables suggests that risk factors other than body size may have as much or more meaning for establishing future lemur conservation priorities. PMID:25523037

  5. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum', a novel taxon associated with virescence and phyllody of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus).

    PubMed

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Davis, Robert E; Harrison, Nigel A; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Dickinson, Matthew; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Zhao, Yan

    2013-02-01

    This study addressed the taxonomic position and group classification of a phytoplasma responsible for virescence and phyllody symptoms in naturally diseased Madagascar periwinkle plants in western Malaysia. Unique regions in the 16S rRNA gene from the Malaysian periwinkle virescence (MaPV) phytoplasma distinguished the phytoplasma from all previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Pairwise sequence similarity scores, calculated through alignment of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that the MaPV phytoplasma 16S rRNA gene shared 96.5?% or less sequence similarity with that of previously described 'Ca. Phytoplasma' species, justifying the recognition of the MaPV phytoplasma as a reference strain of a novel taxon, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum'. The 16S rRNA gene F2nR2 fragment from the MaPV phytoplasma exhibited a distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profile and the pattern similarity coefficient values were lower than 0.85 with representative phytoplasmas classified in any of the 31 previously delineated 16Sr groups; therefore, the MaPV phytoplasma was designated a member of a new 16Sr group, 16SrXXXII. Phytoplasmas affiliated with this novel taxon and the new group included diverse strains infecting periwinkle, coconut palm and oil palm in Malaysia. Three phytoplasmas were characterized as representatives of three distinct subgroups, 16SrXXXII-A, 16SrXXXII-B and 16SrXXXII-C, respectively. PMID:22523165

  6. Quantifying the Short-Term Costs of Conservation Interventions for Fishers at Lake Alaotra, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Andrea P. C.; Milner-Gulland, E. J.; Jones, Julia P. G.; Bunnefeld, Nils; Young, Richard; Nicholson, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal fisheries are a key source of food and income for millions of people, but if poorly managed, fishing can have declining returns as well as impacts on biodiversity. Management interventions such as spatial and temporal closures can improve fishery sustainability and reduce environmental degradation, but may carry substantial short-term costs for fishers. The Lake Alaotra wetland in Madagascar supports a commercially important artisanal fishery and provides habitat for a Critically Endangered primate and other endemic wildlife of conservation importance. Using detailed data from more than 1,600 fisher catches, we used linear mixed effects models to explore and quantify relationships between catch weight, effort, and spatial and temporal restrictions to identify drivers of fisher behaviour and quantify the potential effect of fishing restrictions on catch. We found that restricted area interventions and fishery closures would generate direct short-term costs through reduced catch and income, and these costs vary between groups of fishers using different gear. Our results show that conservation interventions can have uneven impacts on local people with different fishing strategies. This information can be used to formulate management strategies that minimise the adverse impacts of interventions, increase local support and compliance, and therefore maximise conservation effectiveness. PMID:26107284

  7. Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

  8. Polyphase Neoproterozoic orogenesis within the east Africa- Antarctica orogenic belt in central and northern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Key, R.M.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; Waele, D.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Styles, M.T.; Conrad, J.; Encarnacion, J.; Lidke, D.J.; O'connor, E. A.; Potter, C.; Smith, R.A.; Walsh, G.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.

    2011-01-01

    Our recent geological survey of the basement of central and northern Madagascar allowed us to re-evaluate the evolution of this part of the East Africa-Antarctica Orogen (EAAO). Five crustal domains are recognized, characterized by distinctive lithologies and histories of sedimentation, magmatism, deformation and metamorphism, and separated by tectonic and/or unconformable contacts. Four consist largely of Archaean metamorphic rocks (Antongil, Masora and Antananarivo Cratons, Tsaratanana Complex). The fifth (Bemarivo Belt) comprises Proterozoic meta-igneous rocks. The older rocks were intruded by plutonic suites at c. 1000 Ma, 820-760 Ma, 630-595 Ma and 560-520 Ma. The evolution of the four Archaean domains and their boundaries remains contentious, with two end-member interpretations evaluated: (1) all five crustal domains are separate tectonic elements, juxtaposed along Neoproterozoic sutures and (2) the four Archaean domains are segments of an older Archaean craton, which was sutured against the Bemarivo Belt in the Neoproterozoic. Rodinia fragmented during the early Neoproterozoic with intracratonic rifts that sometimes developed into oceanic basins. Subsequent Mid- Neoproterozoic collision of smaller cratonic blocks was followed by renewed extension and magmatism. The global 'Terminal Pan-African' event (560-490 Ma) finally stitched together the Mid-Neoproterozoic cratons to form Gondwana. ?? The Geological Society of London 2011.

  9. Etiologies des pleurésies exsudatives: à propos de 424 cas à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoson, Joëlson Lovaniaina; Andrianasolo, Radonirina Lazasoa; Rakotomizao, Robert Jocelyn; Vololontiana, Marie Danielle Hanta; Ravahatra, Kiady; Rajaoarifetra, Jobeline; Andrianarisoa, Christophe Félix Ange

    2011-01-01

    Introduction La pleurésie constitue un motif fréquent de consultation en pneumologie. Notre travail a pour objectif de déterminer les étiologies des pleurésies exsudatives afin d'en faciliter les démarches étiologiques. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective réalisée chez des patients ayant une pleurésie exsudative et bénéficiant une biopsie pleurale à l'aveugle à l'aide de l'aiguille de Castelain, pendant une période de 5 ans (2005 à 2009). Résultats Parmi les 424 patients inclus, 259 hommes (61,08%) et 165 femmes (38,91%) étaient individualisés. Les pleurésies étaient d'origine tuberculeuse dans 298 cas (70, 28%), métastatique dans 63 cas (14,85%), inflammation non spécifique dans 51 cas (12,02%). Des fibres musculaires striées étaient biopsiées dans 12 cas (2,83%). Conclusion La biopsie pleurale occupe une place prépondérante dans la recherche étiologique des pleurésies d'exsudatives à Madagascar où la tuberculose sévit encore en mode endémique. PMID:22145067

  10. Phanerozoic upper crustal tectono-thermal development of basement rocks from central Madagascar: An integrated fission-track and structural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, B.; Jacobs, J.; Kastowski, M.; Graser, G.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated study of fission-track (FT) dating and structural geology revealed a complex tectono-thermal history preserved in basement rocks of central Madagascar since the amalgamation of Gondwana at the end of the Cambrian. A detailed study of five domains argues for several cooling steps with associated brittle deformations during the separation of Madagascar. Titanite and apatite FT ages range between 483 Ma and 266 Ma and between 460 Ma and 79 Ma, respectively. The titanite FT data indicate that the final cooling after the latest metamorphic overprint was terminated at c. 500 Ma (FC1). A 150 Myr phase of minor cooling (SC2), possibly related to a phase of tectonic quiescence and isostatic compensation, followed episode FC1. Between the Carboniferous and Early Jurassic, when an intracontinental rift developed between East Africa and Madagascar, complex brittle deformation effected the western margin of Madagascar and led to differential cooling of small basement blocks (FC3-FC5). During this period, ductile structural trends were reactivated at the western basement margin and in the centre of the island. A Late Cretaceous thermal event (T1) affected apatite FT data of samples from western-central and the eastern margin of Madagascar. These ages are related to the Madagascar-India/Seychelles break-up, whereby the thermal penetration along the eastern coast was restricted to the west by the Angavo shear zone (AGSZ). The Cretaceous evolution of the eastern margin was associated with minor erosion and was triggered by vertical displacements along brittle structures.

  11. Predicting plant diversity patterns in Madagascar: understanding the effects of climate and land cover change in a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kerry A; Parks, Katherine E; Bethell, Colin A; Johnson, Steig E; Mulligan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Climate and land cover change are driving a major reorganization of terrestrial biotic communities in tropical ecosystems. In an effort to understand how biodiversity patterns in the tropics will respond to individual and combined effects of these two drivers of environmental change, we use species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated for recent climate and land cover variables and projected to future scenarios to predict changes in diversity patterns in Madagascar. We collected occurrence records for 828 plant genera and 2186 plant species. We developed three scenarios, (i.e., climate only, land cover only and combined climate-land cover) based on recent and future climate and land cover variables. We used this modelling framework to investigate how the impacts of changes to climate and land cover influenced biodiversity across ecoregions and elevation bands. There were large-scale climate- and land cover-driven changes in plant biodiversity across Madagascar, including both losses and gains in diversity. The sharpest declines in biodiversity were projected for the eastern escarpment and high elevation ecosystems. Sharp declines in diversity were driven by the combined climate-land cover scenarios; however, there were subtle, region-specific differences in model outputs for each scenario, where certain regions experienced relatively higher species loss under climate or land cover only models. We strongly caution that predicted future gains in plant diversity will depend on the development and maintenance of dispersal pathways that connect current and future suitable habitats. The forecast for Madagascar's plant diversity in the face of future environmental change is worrying: regional diversity will continue to decrease in response to the combined effects of climate and land cover change, with habitats such as ericoid thickets and eastern lowland and sub-humid forests particularly vulnerable into the future. PMID:25856241

  12. First detection of African Swine Fever Virus in Ornithodoros porcinus in Madagascar and new insights into tick distribution and taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background African Swine Fever Virus has devastated more than the half of the domestic pig population in Madagascar since its introduction, probably in 1997-1998. One of the hypotheses to explain its persistence on the island is its establishment in local Ornithodoros soft ticks, whose presence has been reported in the past from the north-western coast to the Central Highlands. The aim of the present study was to verify such hypothesis by conducting tick examinations in three distinct zones of pig production in Madagascar where African Swine Fever outbreaks have been regularly reported over the past decade and then to improve our knowledge on the tick distribution and taxonomy. Results Ornithodoros ticks were only found in one pig farm in the village of Mahitsy, north-west of Antananarivo in the Central Highlands, whereas the tick seemed to be absent from the two other study zones near Ambatondrazaka and Marovoay. Using 16SrDNA PCR amplification and sequencing, it was confirmed that the collected ticks belonged to the O. porcinus species and is closely related to the O. p. domesticus sub-species Walton, 1962. ASFV was detected in 7.14% (13/182) of the field ticks through the amplification of part of the viral VP72 gene, and their ability to maintain long-term infections was confirmed since all the ticks came from a pig building where no pigs or any other potential vertebrate hosts had been introduced for at least four years. Conclusions Considering these results, O. porcinus is a reservoir for ASFV and most likely acts as vector for ASFV in Madagascar, but its apparent restricted distribution may limit its role in the epidemiology of the disease in domestic pigs. PMID:21118485

  13. Epidemiology of Pathogenic Enterobacteria in Humans, Livestock, and Peridomestic Rodents in Rural Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Bublitz, DeAnna C.; Wright, Patricia C.; Bodager, Jonathan R.; Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T.; Bliska, James B.; Gillespie, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the families of enteric bacteria are globally important diarrheal agents. Despite their potential for zoonotic and environmental transmission, few studies have examined the epidemiology of these pathogens in rural systems characterized by extensive overlap among humans, domesticated and peridomestic animals. We investigated patterns of infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, and Yersinia spp. (enterocolitica, and pseudotuberculosis) in Southeastern Madagascar where the potential for the aforementioned interactions is high. In this pilot project we conducted surveys to examine behaviors potentially associated with risk of infection and if infection with specific enterobacteria species was associated with diarrheal disease. Methodology/Principal Findings PCR was conducted on DNA from human, livestock, and rodent fecal samples from three villages. Overall, human prevalence was highest (77%), followed by rodents (51%) and livestock (18%). Rodents were ?2.8 times more likely than livestock to carry one of the bacteria. The incidence of individual species varied between villages, with the observation that, E. coli and Shigella spp. were consistently associated with co-infections. As an aggregate, there was a significant risk of infection linked to a water source in one village. Individually, different pathogens were associated with certain behaviors, including: those who had used medication, experienced diarrhea in the past four weeks, or do not use toilets. Conclusions/Significance Different bacteria were associated with an elevated risk of infection for various human activities or characteristics. Certain bacteria may also predispose people to co-infections. These data suggest that a high potential for transmission among these groups, either directly or via contaminated water sources. As these bacteria were most prevalent in humans, it is possible that they are maintained in humans and that transmission to other species is infrequent. Further studies are needed to understand bacterial persistence, transmission dynamics, and associated consequences in this and similar systems. PMID:24983990

  14. Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Dynamic Support From River Profiles: A Framework for Madagascar and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G. G.; White, N.

    2012-04-01

    It is generally accepted that the surface topography of Africa is a manifestation of convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. Here, we present an inverse method whereby longitudinal river profiles are interrogated to extract quantitative estimates of spatial and temporal variations in the rate of tectonic uplift. Surface processes can provide an important window into transient convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. River profiles act as 'tectonic tape recorders': we assume the generation of broad, convex-upward knickzones to represent the effect of tectonic uplift shifting the river system into a state of disequilibrium. Profiles evolve through time primarily via the headward retreat of these knickzones. We use a conjugate gradient inverse algorithm to minimise the misfit between observed river profiles - derived from a regional Digital Elevation Model (DEM) - and calculated profiles obtained by varying the uplift rate history. We jointly invert a total of 98 Malagasy and 570 African river profiles to obtain a history of the cumulative tectonic uplift through geological time. We show that Africa has undergone two phases of rapid uplift: first in Eocene times; secondly, since 10 Ma. While the first gave rise to broad, long wavelength topography, the second led to more localised domal swells of high relief. We propose the existence of two wavelengths of dynamic support, reflecting a change in the style of convection in the upper mantle since 50 Ma. Our results correlate strongly with independent geological estimates of uplift across Africa and Madagascar, while our calculated landscape surface following 50 Myr of uplift corresponds closely to a surface fit across present-day drainage divides. Finally we calculate the solid sediment flux delivered to major African deltas as a function of time. This onshore record provides an important indirect constraint on the history of vertical motions at the surface, and agrees well with the offshore flux record, obtained from mapping the thickness of chronostratigraphic sediment packages at the deltas.

  15. Patterns of Loss and Regeneration of Tropical Dry Forest in Madagascar: The Social Institutional Context

    PubMed Central

    Elmqvist, Thomas; Pyykönen, Markku; Tengö, Maria; Rakotondrasoa, Fanambinantsoa; Rabakonandrianina, Elisabeth; Radimilahy, Chantal

    2007-01-01

    Loss of tropical forests and changes in land-use/land-cover are of growing concern worldwide. Although knowledge exists about the institutional context in which tropical forest loss is embedded, little is known about the role of social institutions in influencing regeneration of tropical forests. In the present study we used Landsat images from southern Madagascar from three different years (1984, 1993 and 2000) and covering 5500 km2, and made a time-series analysis of three distinct large-scale patterns: 1) loss of forest cover, 2) increased forest cover, and 3) stable forest cover. Institutional characteristics underlying these three patterns were analyzed, testing the hypothesis that forest cover change is a function of strength and enforcement of local social institutions. The results showed a minor decrease of 7% total forest cover in the study area during the whole period 1984–2000, but an overall net increase of 4% during the period 1993–2000. The highest loss of forest cover occurred in a low human population density area with long distances to markets, while a stable forest cover occurred in the area with highest population density and good market access. Analyses of institutions revealed that loss of forest cover occurred mainly in areas characterized by insecure property rights, while areas with well-defined property rights showed either regenerating or stable forest cover. The results thus corroborate our hypothesis. The large-scale spontaneous regeneration dominated by native endemic species appears to be a result of a combination of changes in precipitation, migration and decreased human population and livestock grazing pressure, but under conditions of maintained and well-defined property rights. Our study emphasizes the large capacity of a semi-arid system to spontaneously regenerate, triggered by decreased pressures, but where existing social institutions mitigate other drivers of deforestation and alternative land-use. PMID:17476324

  16. Land cover effects on infiltration and preferential flow pathways in the high rainfall zone of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwartendijk, Bob; van Meerveld, Ilja; Ravelona, Maafaka; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitohaina; Ghimire, Chandra; Bruijnzeel, Sampurno; Jones, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Shortened slash-and-burn cycles exhaust agricultural land and have resulted in extensive tracts of highly degraded land across the tropics. Land degradation typically results in decreased rainfall infiltration due to a reduced field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil because of a progressive decline in soil organic matter, exposure to raindrop impact, surface sealing and compaction. This results, in turn, in enhanced surface runoff and erosion, and consequently less subsurface flow and groundwater recharge. On the other hand, natural vegetation regrowth or active reforestation can lead to a renewed accumulation of soil organic matter, macropore development and increased infiltration rates. As part of the P4GES project (Can Paying 4 Global Ecosystem Services values reduce poverty?; www.p4ges.org), we study the effects of land use change and reforestation on water resources in the Corridor Ankeniheny-Zahamena (CAZ) in eastern Madagascar. In this poster, we present the results of infiltration and preferential flow measurements in four different land uses in the southern part of the CAZ: (i) closed canopy forest, (ii) 3-14 year-old regrowth on fallow land (savokas), (iii) exhausted and severely degraded land (tany maty), and (iv) recently reforested sites (6-8 years old). The results show that infiltrability increases significantly after several years of forest regrowth after land abandonment, but it remains unclear whether active replanting decreases the time required for restoration of soil hydrological functioning. Preferential flow pathways differed strikingly between the respective land cover types: infiltration in mature forests was predominantly characterized by macropore flow (preferential flow pathways), whereas infiltration in exhausted agricultural land was dominated by matrix flow (few preferential flow pathways). Occurrence of preferential flow pathways in reforestation and fallow sites varied considerably. These results suggest that land cover significantly affects hydrological flow pathways and that natural regeneration and active reforestation of degraded land can result in increased infiltration and a reduced likelihood for surface runoff.

  17. A Decade of Plague in Mahajanga, Madagascar: Insights into the Global Maritime Spread of Pandemic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Amy J.; Chan, Fabien; Nottingham, Roxanne; Andersen, Genevieve; Drees, Kevin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Wagner, David M.; Chanteau, Suzanne; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A cluster of human plague cases occurred in the seaport city of Mahajanga, Madagascar, from 1991 to 1999 following 62 years with no evidence of plague, which offered insights into plague pathogen dynamics in an urban environment. We analyzed a set of 44 Mahajanga isolates from this 9-year outbreak, as well as an additional 218 Malagasy isolates from the highland foci. We sequenced the genomes of four Mahajanga strains, performed whole-genome sequence single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery on those strains, screened the discovered SNPs, and performed a high-resolution 43-locus multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis of the isolate panel. Twenty-two new SNPs were identified and defined a new phylogenetic lineage among the Malagasy isolates. Phylogeographic analysis suggests that the Mahajanga lineage likely originated in the Ambositra district in the highlands, spread throughout the northern central highlands, and was then introduced into and became transiently established in Mahajanga. Although multiple transfers between the central highlands and Mahajanga occurred, there was a locally differentiating and dominant subpopulation that was primarily responsible for the 1991-to-1999 Mahajanga outbreaks. Phylotemporal analysis of this Mahajanga subpopulation revealed a cycling pattern of diversity generation and loss that occurred during and after each outbreak. This pattern is consistent with severe interseasonal genetic bottlenecks along with large seasonal population expansions. The ultimate extinction of plague pathogens in Mahajanga suggests that, in this environment, the plague pathogen niche is tenuous at best. However, the temporary large pathogen population expansion provides the means for plague pathogens to disperse and become ecologically established in more suitable nonurban environments. PMID:23404402

  18. Successful contracting of prevention services: fighting malnutrition in Senegal and Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Marek, T; Diallo, I; Ndiaye, B; Rakotosalama, J

    1999-12-01

    There are very few documented large-scale successes in nutrition in Africa, and virtually no consideration of contracting for preventive services. This paper describes two successful large-scale community nutrition projects in Africa as examples of what can be done in prevention using the contracting approach in rural as well as urban areas. The two case-studies are the Secaline project in Madagascar, and the Community Nutrition Project in Senegal. The article explains what is meant by 'success' in the context of these two projects, how these results were achieved, and how certain bottlenecks were avoided. Both projects are very similar in the type of service they provide, and in combining private administration with public finance. The article illustrates that contracting out is a feasible option to be seriously considered for organizing certain prevention programmes on a large scale. There are strong indications from these projects of success in terms of reducing malnutrition, replicability and scale, and community involvement. When choosing that option, a government can tap available private local human resources through contracting out, rather than delivering those services by the public sector. However, as was done in both projects studied, consideration needs to be given to using a contract management unit for execution and monitoring, which costs 13-17% of the total project's budget. Rigorous assessments of the cost-effectiveness of contracted services are not available, but improved health outcomes, targeting of the poor, and basic cost data suggest that the programmes may well be relatively cost-effective. Although the contracting approach is not presented as the panacea to solve the malnutrition problem faced by Africa, it can certainly provide an alternative in many countries to increase coverage and quality of services. PMID:10787654

  19. Comparing Methods for Prioritising Protected Areas for Investment: A Case Study Using Madagascar's Dry Forest Reptiles.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Charlie J; Raxworthy, Christopher J; Metcalfe, Kristian; Raselimanana, Achille P; Smith, Robert J; Davies, Zoe G

    2015-01-01

    There are insufficient resources available to manage the world's existing protected area portfolio effectively, so the most important sites should be prioritised in investment decision-making. Sophisticated conservation planning and assessment tools developed to identify locations for new protected areas can provide an evidence base for such prioritisations, yet decision-makers in many countries lack the institutional support and necessary capacity to use the associated software. As such, simple heuristic approaches such as species richness or number of threatened species are generally adopted to inform prioritisation decisions. However, their performance has never been tested. Using the reptile fauna of Madagascar's dry forests as a case study, we evaluate the performance of four site prioritisation protocols used to rank the conservation value of 22 established and candidate protected areas. We compare the results to a benchmark produced by the widely-used systematic conservation planning software Zonation. The four indices scored sites on the basis of: i) species richness; ii) an index based on species' Red List status; iii) irreplaceability (a key metric in systematic conservation planning); and, iv) a novel Conservation Value Index (CVI), which incorporates species-level information on endemism, representation in the protected area system, tolerance of habitat degradation and hunting/collection pressure. Rankings produced by the four protocols were positively correlated to the results of Zonation, particularly amongst high-scoring sites, but CVI and Irreplaceability performed better than Species Richness and the Red List Index. Given the technological capacity constraints experienced by decision-makers in the developing world, our findings suggest that heuristic metrics can represent a useful alternative to more sophisticated analyses, especially when they integrate species-specific information related to extinction risk. However, this can require access to, and understanding of, more complex species data. PMID:26162073

  20. Phylogenomics and taxonomy of Lecomtelleae (Poaceae), an isolated panicoid lineage from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Guillaume; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Malé, Pierre-Jean G.; Coissac, Eric; Ralimanana, Hélène; Vorontsova, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims An accurate characterization of biodiversity requires analyses of DNA sequences in addition to classical morphological descriptions. New methods based on high-throughput sequencing may allow investigation of specimens with a large set of genetic markers to infer their evolutionary history. In the grass family, the phylogenetic position of the monotypic genus Lecomtella, a rare bamboo-like endemic from Madagascar, has never been appropriately evaluated. Until now its taxonomic treatment has remained controversial, indicating the need for re-evaluation based on a combination of molecular and morphological data. Methods The phylogenetic position of Lecomtella in Poaceae was evaluated based on sequences from the nuclear and plastid genomes generated by next-generation sequencing (NGS). In addition, a detailed morphological description of L. madagascariensis was produced, and its distribution and habit were investigated in order to assess its conservation status. Key Results The complete plastid sequence, a ribosomal DNA unit and fragments of low-copy nuclear genes (phyB and ppc) were obtained. All phylogenetic analyses place Lecomtella as an isolated member of the core panicoids, which last shared a common ancestor with other species >20 million years ago. Although Lecomtella exhibits morphological characters typical of Panicoideae, an unusual combination of traits supports its treatment as a separate group. Conclusions The study showed that NGS can be used to generate abundant phylogenetic information rapidly, opening new avenues for grass phylogenetics. These data clearly showed that Lecomtella forms an isolated lineage, which, in combination with its morphological peculiarities, justifies its treatment as a separate tribe: Lecomtelleae. New descriptions of the tribe, genus and species are presented with a typification, a distribution map and an IUCN conservation assessment. PMID:23985988

  1. Opium poppy and Madagascar periwinkle: model non-model systems to investigate alkaloid biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Peter J; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Alkaloids represent a large and diverse group of compounds that are related by the occurrence of a nitrogen atom within a heterocyclic backbone. Unlike other types of secondary metabolites, the various structural categories of alkaloids are unrelated in terms of biosynthesis and evolution. Although the biology of each group is unique, common patterns have become apparent. Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), which produces several benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, and Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), which accumulates an array of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, have emerged as the premier organisms used to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The status of these species as model systems results from decades of research on the chemistry, enzymology and molecular biology responsible for the biosynthesis of valuable pharmaceutical alkaloids. Opium poppy remains the only commercial source for morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic analgesics, such as oxycodone, derived from thebaine. Catharanthus roseus is the only source for the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Impressive collections of cDNAs encoding biosynthetic enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in the formation of benzylisoquinoline and monoterpenoid indole alkaloids are now available, and the rate of gene discovery has accelerated with the application of genomics. Such tools have allowed the establishment of models that describe the complex cell biology of alkaloid metabolism in these important medicinal plants. A suite of biotechnological resources, including genetic transformation protocols, has allowed the application of metabolic engineering to modify the alkaloid content of these and related species. An overview of recent progress on benzylisoquinoline and monoterpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy and C. roseus is presented. PMID:18476877

  2. Organic matter sources and early diagenetic degradation in a tropical peaty marsh (Tritrivakely, Madagascar). Implications for environmental reconstruction during the Sub-Atlantic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonia Bourdon; Fatima Laggoun-Défarge; Jean-Robert Disnar; Ousmane Maman; Bernard Guillet; Sylvie Derenne; Claude Largeau

    2000-01-01

    Peat samples from a one metre core and living Cyperaceae, collected in Tritrivakely marsh in Madagascar, were studied to determine the organic matter (OM) composition and extent of OM degradation in this core. The study was carried out combining light microscopy observations, bulk analyses, infra-red spectroscopy, hydrolyses of sugars, oxidation of lignin and pyrolyses. In the surface peat, organic matter

  3. A new tree hole breeding Anodonthyla (Chordata: Anura: Microhylidae: Cophylinae) from low-altitude rainforests of the Masoala Peninsula, northeastern Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danté B. Fenolio; Mark E. Walvoord; Jim F. Stout; Jasmin E. Randrianirina; Franco Andreone

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new arboreal, cophyline, microhylid frog from the rainforest of northeastern Madagascar belonging to the genus Anodonthyla. Anodonthyla hutchisoni, new species, is named in honor of a lifetime of dedication to excellence in herpetology by V. H. Hutchison. Anodonthyla hutchisoni differs from a close relative, A. boulengeri, in having generally larger morphometric features and in aspects of pattern

  4. Cahiers scientifiques de l'ocan Indien occidental 4, 2013 : 29-38. 29 Rgime alimentaire du grand gecko vert de Madagascar, Phelsuma grandis

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    gecko vert de Madagascar, Phelsuma grandis Gray, 1870 sur l'île de La Réunion (Squamata : Gekkonidae/10/2013, accepté le : 07/12/2013 RÉSUMÉ : Phelsuma grandis Gray, 1870 est un gecko introduit sur l'île de La'autres espèces de geckos. P. grandis manifeste un comportement alimentaire de type opportuniste, à large spectre

  5. Look at That!: Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Develop and Enhance the Scientific Inquiry Skill of Observation in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Middle school students can develop and enhance their observation skills by participating in teacher-guided scientific inquiry (NRC 1996) activities where they observe animals that tend to act in known, predictable ways. Madagascar hissing cockroaches ("Gromphadorhina portentosa") are one such animal. This article presents beginning, intermediate,…

  6. These are electronic appendices to the paper by Nagy et al. 2003 Multiple colonizations of Madagascar and Socotra by colubrid snakes: evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial gene

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    of Madagascar and Socotra by colubrid snakes: evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial gene phylogenies. Proc. R showed no affinities to Malagasy taxa in previous analyses (Kraus & Brown 1998; Slowinski & Lawson 2002 of Langaha, Ithycyphus and Micropisthodon contains diurnal arboreal snakes of a similar general habitus

  7. Age and geochemistry of Early Cambrian post-collisional granites from the Ambatondrazaka area in east-central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiu-Long; Rasoamalala, V.; Razoeliarimalala, M.; Ralison, B.; Luo, Zhao-Hua

    2015-06-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data are presented on Early Cambrian granites from the Ambatondrazaka area in east-central Madagascar. U-Pb zircon dating reveals that these granites were emplaced at ?520 Ma within a post-collisional setting. They are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and enriched in large ion lithophile elements. Using zircon Ce anomalies as proxy, it is indicated that they crystallized under moderately reduced conditions with an oxygen fugacity of FMQ+0.75/NNO-0.09. Their low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.706715 and 0.706869) and notably negative ?Nd(t) values (-24.1 and -23.4) imply a magma source of mafic continental crustal material, probably analogous to the Neoarchean mafic gneisses of the Tsaratanana Complex. The low zircon ?Hf(t) values (-16.4 to -12.9) further support a mafic crustal source with a 176Lu/177Hf ratio of ?0.017. On the other hand, their depletion in HREE and slight depletion in Nb help constrain the melting pressure between ?10 and 13 kbar. Taken together, a mafic lower crustal source is favored for these granites. Our results demonstrate the role of crustal anatexis in the origin of Late Ediacaran-Early Cambrian post-collisional magmatism in Madagascar.

  8. Spatial and temporal arrival patterns of Madagascar's vertebrate fauna explained by distance, ocean currents, and ancestor type

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Karen E.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Ali, Jason R.; Goodman, Steven M.; Vences, Miguel; Sutherland, Michael R.; Irwin, Mitchell T.; Krause, David W.

    2012-01-01

    How, when, and from where Madagascar's vertebrates arrived on the island is poorly known, and a comprehensive explanation for the distribution of its organisms has yet to emerge. We begin to break that impasse by analyzing vertebrate arrival patterns implied by currently existing taxa. For each of 81 clades, we compiled arrival date, source, and ancestor type (obligate freshwater, terrestrial, facultative swimmer, or volant). We analyzed changes in arrival rates, with and without adjusting for clade extinction. Probability of successful transoceanic dispersal is negatively correlated with distance traveled and influenced by ocean currents and ancestor type. Obligate rafters show a decrease in probability of successful transoceanic dispersal from the Paleocene onward, reaching the lowest levels after the mid-Miocene. This finding is consistent with a paleoceanographic model [Ali JR, Huber M (2010) Nature 463:653–656] that predicts Early Cenozoic surface currents periodically conducive to rafting or swimming from Africa, followed by a reconfiguration to present-day flow 15–20 million years ago that significantly diminished the ability for transoceanic dispersal to Madagascar from the adjacent mainland. PMID:22431643

  9. How Much Variation Can One Ant Species Hold? Species Delimitation in the Crematogaster kelleri-Group in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Blaimer, Bonnie B.; Fisher, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the species-level taxonomy of the Malagasy Crematogaster (Crematogaster) kelleri-group and an additional more distantly related species of the same subgenus. Morphological data from worker, queen and male ants, as well as genetic data from three nuclear genes (long wavelength rhodopsin, arginine kinase and carbomoylphosphate synthase) and one mitochondrial marker (cytochrome oxidase I) led to the recognition of six species. Within the C. kelleri-group, three new species are described: C. hazolava Blaimer sp. n., C. hafahafa Blaimer sp. n. and C. tavaratra Blaimer sp. n. The previously described taxa C. kelleri Forel and C. madagascariensis André are validated by our analysis. Conversely, our data suggests synonymy of C. adrepens Forel (with C. kelleri) and C. gibba Emery (with C. madagascariensis). A more distantly related and phylogenetically isolated species, C. tsisitsilo Blaimer sp. n., is further described. We report high levels of morphological and molecular variation in C. kelleri and illustrate that this variation can be explained partly by geography. Species descriptions, images, distribution maps and identification keys based on worker ants, as well as on queen and male ants where available, are presented for all six species. Our work highlights the elevated species richness of Crematogaster ants throughout Madagascar’s humid forests, especially in the far northern tip of the island, and the need to use multiple data sources to ensure clear demarcation of this diversity. PMID:23874503

  10. Genome-wide evidence of Austronesian–Bantu admixture and cultural reversion in a hunter-gatherer group of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Pagani, Luca; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Antao, Tiago; Capredon, Mélanie; Sambo, Clément; Radimilahy, Chantal; Rakotoarisoa, Jean-Aimé; Blench, Roger M.; Letellier, Thierry; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural evidence suggest that Madagascar was the final point of two major dispersals of Austronesian- and Bantu-speaking populations. Today, the Mikea are described as the last-known Malagasy population reported to be still practicing a hunter-gatherer lifestyle. It is unclear, however, whether the Mikea descend from a remnant population that existed before the arrival of Austronesian and Bantu agriculturalists or whether it is only their lifestyle that separates them from the other contemporary populations of South Madagascar. To address these questions we have performed a genome-wide analysis of >700,000 SNP markers on 21 Mikea, 24 Vezo, and 24 Temoro individuals, together with 50 individuals from Bajo and Lebbo populations from Indonesia. Our analyses of these data in the context of data available from other Southeast Asian and African populations reveal that all three Malagasy populations are derived from the same admixture event involving Austronesian and Bantu sources. In contrast to the fact that most of the vocabulary of the Malagasy speakers is derived from the Barito group of the Austronesian language family, we observe that only one-third of their genetic ancestry is related to the populations of the Java-Kalimantan-Sulawesi area. Because no additional ancestry components distinctive for the Mikea were found, it is likely that they have adopted their hunter-gatherer way of life through cultural reversion, and selection signals suggest a genetic adaptation to their new lifestyle. PMID:24395773

  11. Mesoscale eddy variability in the southern extension of the East Madagascar Current: Seasonal cycle, energy conversion terms, and eddy mean properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halo, Issufo; Penven, Pierrick; Backeberg, Björn; Ansorge, Isabelle; Shillington, Frank; Roman, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we used more than 17 years of satellite altimetry observations and output from an ocean model to investigate the mesoscale eddy variability and forcing mechanisms to the south of Madagascar. Analysis of energy conversion terms in the model has shown seasonality on eddy formation, both by barotropic and baroclinic instabilities: maximum in winter (JJA) and minimum in summer (DJF). The eddies were mainly formed in the upper ocean (0-300 m) and at intermediate depths (800-2000 m) by barotropic and baroclinic instabilities, respectively. The former dominated in the southeastern margin of Madagascar, and the latter to the southwest, where the South-East Madagascar Current (SEMC) separates from the continental shelf. Seasonality of the eddy formation appeared linked with the seasonal intensification of the SEMC. The energy conversion terms indicated that the eddies have a significant contribution to the large-scale circulation, but not being persistent throughout the year, occurring mainly during the fall season (MAM). Eddy demography from altimetry and model provided information on eddy preferential sites for birth, annual occurrence (6-13 per year), eddy mean diameter (124-178 km), mean amplitude (9-28 cm), life-time (90-183 days), and maximum traveling distances (325-1052 km). Eddies formed to the southwest of Madagascar exhibited distinct characteristics from those formed in the southeast. Nevertheless, all eddies were highly nonlinear, suggesting that they are potential vectors of connectivity between Madagascar and Africa. This may have a significant impact on the ecology of this region.

  12. Proximal and distal styles of pegmatite-related metasomatic emerald mineralization at Ianapera, southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianjakavah, Prosper Rakotovao; Salvi, Stefano; Béziat, Didier; Rakotondrazafy, Michel; Giuliani, Gaston

    2009-10-01

    The Ianapera emerald deposit is located in the Neoproterozoic Vohibory Block of southern Madagascar. The local geology consists of intercalated migmatitic gneissic units and calcareous metasedimentary rocks, containing boudinaged metamorphosed mafic/ultramafic lenses, all intruded by pegmatite veins. These units occur near the hinge of the tightly folded Ianapera antiform, within a few kilometers of the Ampanihy shear zone. Emerald mineralization is hosted by metasomatic phlogopite veins, and bodies developed within the mafic/ultramafic rocks. Based on field and textural relationships, we distinguish proximal and distal styles of mineralization. Proximal mineralization occurs at the contact of pegmatite veins with mafic/ultramafic units; in the distal style, pegmatites are not observed. Three types of emeralds could be distinguished, mainly on the basis of color and mineral zoning. Some of these emeralds have the most Al-depleted and Cr-rich composition ever recorded. Another characteristic feature to the Ianapera deposit and, to our knowledge, yet unreported, is the association of some emeralds with scapolite in metasomatised mafic rocks. Mineral inclusions are common in most emeralds and include phlogopite, carbonates, barite, K-feldspar, quartz, pyrite, zircon, monazite, bastnaesite, phenakite, plus Fe and Cr oxides. However, feldspar and rare earth element-bearing minerals occur predominantly in proximal emeralds, which also have a more incompatible trace-element signature than distal emeralds. We propose a model related to syn- to post-tectonic magmatic-hydrothermal activity. Pegmatitic bodies intruded units of the Ianapera antiform probably during tectonic relaxation. Exsolution of fluids rich in halogens and incompatible elements from the cooling pegmatites caused hydrothermal metasomatism of Cr-bearing mafic/ultramafic rocks in direct contact with the pegmatites. Local fracturing favored fluid infiltration, permitting the formation of distal mineralization. Emerald composition was controlled by the chemistry of the host rock. The presence of carbonate mineral inclusions in the emeralds and the high F-activity indicated by elevated F-contents in newly formed minerals suggest transport of Be as a fluoride-carbonate complex. It seems likely that beryl formation was triggered by precipitation of F-rich phlogopite, which removed the complexing ligand from the fluid.

  13. Risk factors for avian influenza and Newcastle disease in smallholder farming systems, Madagascar highlands.

    PubMed

    Rasamoelina Andriamanivo, H; Lancelot, R; Maminiaina, O F; Rakotondrafara, T F; Jourdan, M; Renard, J F; Gil, P; Servan de Almeida, R; Albina, E; Martinez, D; Tillard, E; Rakotondravao, R; Chevalier, V

    2012-04-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza (AI) are issues of interest to avian producers in Madagascar. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the major constraint for village aviculture, and avian influenza viruses type A (AIAV) are known to circulate in bird flocks. This study aims at classifying smallholder poultry farms, according to the combination of risk factors potentially associated with NDV and AIAV transmission and to assess the level of infection for each farm class. Two study sites, Lake Alaotra and Grand Antananarivo, were chosen with respect to their differences in terms of agro-ecological features and poultry productions. A typology survey involving 526 farms was performed to identify possible risk factors for (i) within-village, and (ii) between-village virus transmission. A cross-sectional serological study was also carried out in 270 farms to assess sero-prevalences of NDV and AIAV for each farm class and the link between them and risk factor patterns. For within-village transmission, four classes of farms were identified in Grand Antananarivo and five in Lake Alaotra. For between-village virus transmission, four classes of farms were identified for each site. In both sites, NDV sero-prevalence was higher than for AIAV. There was no evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 subtypes of AIAV. Sero-prevalences were significantly higher in Lake Alaotra than in Grand Antananarivo for both viruses (OR=2.4, p=0.02 for NDV, and OR=9.6, p<0.0001 for AIAV). For within-village NDV transmission in Grand Antananarivo, backyard chicken farms (OR=3.6, p<0.001), and chicken farms with biosecurity awareness (OR=3.4, p<0.01) had greater odds of having antibodies against NDV than the others. For between-village virus transmission, farms with multiple external contacts, and farms using many small markets had greater odds of having antibodies against NDV than the others (OR=5.4, p<0.01). For AIAV, there were no differences in sero-prevalences among farm classes. In Lake Alaotra, the observed high density of palmipeds and widespread rice paddies were associated with high sero-prevalences for both viruses, and a homogeneous risk of virus transmission between the different farm classes. In Grand Antananarivo, farm visits by collectors or animal health workers, and farm contacts with several markets were identified as potential risk factors for NDV transmission. Further studies are needed to identify the circulating virus genotypes, model their transmission risk, and provide adapted control measures. PMID:22130311

  14. Lavaka, the unusual gullies of Madagascar: A review for improved data collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveloson, Andrea; Szabó, Amanda I.; Ludván, Brigitta; Székely, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    Land degradation in Madagascar is a complex challenge due to the spectacular gullies (called lavaka) that have a number of undesirable effects. These hillslope gullies have been observed for a long time, but the causes of lavakization are still controversial and many questions remain unanswered. Our aim is to assemble and review lavaka researches since 1953 to understand why these didn't lead to success. Exact location of the field surveys, cited triggering factors and results of these scientific papers have been studied in detail. An overview of the many contributing factors is given in order to better understand lavaka formation and distribution. A review is also given on our 3 years work that included the evaluation of lavaka distribution and evolution using satellite images, investigation of the role of the different factors contributing to lavakas formation (concentrating first of all on geology, topography and climatology) and classification done based on earlier studies and satellite images. We conclude that most of the lavaka researches have been achieved along the main roads and therefore are restricted to the middle part of the Malagasy Highland. The study areas designated by different researchers have similar properties in term of soils, climate, and vegetation leading mainly to the same conclusions and although lithology and climatic conditions are mentioned as key factors, their effect on lavaka density and characteristics have not been revealed in details yet. Our studies based on field survey, remote sensing and GIS showed a strong relationship between gully presence, vegetation cover, elevation, relief and slope angle. Geology, soil and precipitation seem to be less important in a medium scales notwithstanding with the fact that many studies dealing with lavaka emphasize their importance in lavakization process. Gully abundance maps showed that lavaka can also occur at lower topographic levels, gentle slopes and sandy sediments notwithstanding with the fact that previous studies emphasize the importance of elevated topography, steep slope and lateritic soils as preconditions in lavakization. BS contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow. This is ILARG contribution Nr 15.

  15. Results of a randomised trial of male condom promotion among Madagascar sex workers

    PubMed Central

    Feldblum, P; Hatzell, T; Van Damme, K; Nasution, M; Rasamindrakotroka, A; Grey, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To test the effect of supplementing peer promotion of male condom use with clinic based counselling, measured in terms of STI prevalence and reported male condom use. Methods: 1000 female sex workers in Madagascar were randomised to two study arms: peer education supplemented by individual risk reduction counselling by a clinician (peer + clinic) versus condom promotion by peer educators only (peer only). STI testing was conducted at baseline and 6 months. Behavioural interviews were administered at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months. Results: At baseline, women in the peer only arm had prevalences of 16.0%, 23.6%, and 12.1% for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and trichomoniasis respectively, with an aggregate prevalence of 38.2%. Baseline STI prevalences for the peer + clinic arm were slightly lower and 34.1% in aggregate. At 6 months, aggregate STI prevalence increased in the peer only arm to 41.4%, whereas the aggregate prevalence diminished slightly to 32.1% in the peer + clinic arm. In logistic regression analyses, the estimated odds ratios (ORs) for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, trichomoniasis, and aggregate STI were 0.7 (95% confidence interval 0.4 to 1.0), 0.7 (0.5 to 1.0), 0.8 (0.6 to 1.2), and 0.7 (0.5 to 0.9) respectively, comparing the peer + clinic arm with the peer only arm. The logistic regression OR for reported condom use with clients in the past 30 days increased from 1.1 at 2 months to 1.8 at 6 months, comparing the peer + clinic arm with the peer only arm, and was 1.4 overall (1.1 to 1.8). Adjustment for baseline factors changed the regression results little. Conclusions: The impact of male condom promotion on behaviour can be heightened through more concentrated counselling on risk reduction. Persistently high STI prevalence despite increases in reported condom use by sex workers supports the need for multidimensional control programmes. PMID:15800098

  16. Early Initiation of and Exclusive Breastfeeding in Large-scale Community-based Programmes in Bolivia and Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Sanei, Linda C.; Franklin, Nadra

    2006-01-01

    About one-fourth to one-half of all infant deaths in developing countries occur in the first week of life. Immediate breastfeeding within the first hour, followed by early exclusive breastfeeding, improves the health and survival status of newborns. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that breastfeeding practices, crucial to infant health, can be improved at scale in developing countries. During 1999–2003, the LINKAGES Project, funded by the United States Agency for International Development, implemented its community-based model to bring about rapid change in individual behaviours and community norms regarding early and exclusive breastfeeding, at a scale [LINKAGES’ definition of ‘scale’ was adapted from a CORE Group background paper on ‘Scaling-up’ maternal, newborn, and child health services, 11 July 2005] that could achieve significant public-health impact. ‘Scale’ was defined as bringing improved infant-feeding practices to more people over a wider geographic area, more quickly, more equitably, and with sustainability as a goal. During this time, country-specific programmes were designed and implemented in Bolivia and Madagascar, with catchment populations of one million and six million respectively. These country programmes were implemented with multiple local government, private voluntary organizations, and partners of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) through existing health and nutrition activities. Breastfeeding was an entry point to work at all levels of the healthcare system and, within communities, using policy/advocacy and training for healthcare workers, with a particular emphasis on front-line health workers and community members. Harmonized messages and materials, including mass media, were developed and used by partners. Timely initiation of breastfeeding was one indicator measured. Data collected through rapid assessment surveys showed statistically significant increases (p<0.001) in timely initiation of breastfeeding in both the countries. In Bolivia, timely initiation of breastfeeding went from 56% in 2000 to 69% in 2001 and reached 74% by the end of 2003. In Madagascar, the initiation rate went from 34% at baseline in 2000 to 69% in 2001, 76% in 2002, and rose to 78% in 2004. Exclusive breastfeeding during the first month of life was also measured. At baseline in Bolivia, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding for the first month of life was 81% (2000), decreased slightly in 2001, and then increased to 88% by the end of the Project in 2003. In Madagascar, it started high at 86% in 2000, increased during the implementation of the programme, and by 2004, was 91%. These results were achieved quickly and sustained over the course of the intervention. PMID:17591350

  17. Isolation of a non-haemadsorbing, non-cytopathic strain of African swine fever virus in Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzague, M.; Roger, F.; Bastos, A.; Burger, C.; Randriamparany, T.; Smondack, S.; Cruciere, C.

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) suspected clinically in Madagascar (1998-9) was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide sequencing, following virus isolation. No haemadsorption or cytopathic effect could be detected following leukocyte inoculation, but viral growth in cells was confirmed by PCR. Detection of ASF virus genome was carried out by amplification of a highly conserved region coding for the p72 protein. Nucleotide sequencing of the amplicon revealed 99.2% nucleotide identity between the recent Malagasy strains and a virus recovered from the 1994 outbreak in Mozambique (SPEC265). A serological survey performed on 449 sera, revealed that only 5.3% of the sera taken from pigs between 1998 and 1999 were positive. PMID:11467803

  18. Regression of Severe Tungiasis-Associated Morbidity after Prevention of Re-Infestation: A Case Series from Rural Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Thielecke, Marlene; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Rogier, Christophe; Richard, Vincent; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Tungiasis (sand flea disease) is a neglected tropical disease. Heavy infestation results in mutilation of the feet and difficulty in walking. We identified eight individuals with extremely severe tungiasis in rural Madagascar. To prevent reinfestation, four individuals received solid shoes and four received a daily application of an herbal repellent effective against Tunga penetrans. Over a period of 10 weeks the feet were examined and the severity of tungiasis-associated morbidity was measured. Within this period, the severity score for acute tungiasis decreased 41% in the shoe group and 89% in the repellent group. The four major inflammation-related symptoms disappeared in the four patients of the repellent group, but only in two patients of the shoe group. Those observations indicate that cases with extremely severe tungiasis, associated morbidity almost totally disappears within 10 weeks if the feet are protected by a repellent. Wearing shoes reduced acute morbidity only marginally. PMID:24043689

  19. Regression of severe tungiasis-associated morbidity after prevention of re-infestation: a case series from rural Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Thielecke, Marlene; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Rogier, Christophe; Richard, Vincent; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2013-11-01

    Tungiasis (sand flea disease) is a neglected tropical disease. Heavy infestation results in mutilation of the feet and difficulty in walking. We identified eight individuals with extremely severe tungiasis in rural Madagascar. To prevent reinfestation, four individuals received solid shoes and four received a daily application of an herbal repellent effective against Tunga penetrans. Over a period of 10 weeks the feet were examined and the severity of tungiasis-associated morbidity was measured. Within this period, the severity score for acute tungiasis decreased 41% in the shoe group and 89% in the repellent group. The four major inflammation-related symptoms disappeared in the four patients of the repellent group, but only in two patients of the shoe group. Those observations indicate that cases with extremely severe tungiasis, associated morbidity almost totally disappears within 10 weeks if the feet are protected by a repellent. Wearing shoes reduced acute morbidity only marginally. PMID:24043689

  20. Fatal mass poisoning in Madagascar following ingestion of a shark (Carcharhinus leucas): clinical and epidemiological aspects and isolation of toxins.

    PubMed

    Boisier, P; Ranaivoson, G; Rasolofonirina, N; Andriamahefazafy, B; Roux, J; Chanteau, S; Satake, M; Yasumoto, T

    1995-10-01

    In November 1993, 188 people were admitted to hospital after eating the meat from a single shark (Carcharhinus leucas) in Manakara, a medium-sized town on the south-east coast of Madagascar. This shark and its meat had no unusual characteristics. The attack rate was about 100%. The first clinical signs appeared within 5-10 hr after ingestion. The patients presented with neurological symptoms almost exclusively, the most prominent being a constant, severe ataxia. Gastrointestinal troubles, like diarrhoea and vomiting, were rare. The overall case mortality ratio was close to 30% among the 200 poisoned inhabitants. There were no reports of previous similar poisonings in this area, and fishermen in Manakara usually eat this kind of shark without problems. Bacteriological and chemical causes were eliminated. Two liposoluble toxins were isolated from the liver and tentatively named carchatoxin-A and -B, respectively. They were distinct from ciguatoxin in their chromatographic properties. PMID:8599186

  1. Rivaling the World's Smallest Reptiles: Discovery of Miniaturized and Microendemic New Species of Leaf Chameleons (Brookesia) from Northern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Glaw, Frank; Köhler, Jörn; Townsend, Ted M.; Vences, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background One clade of Malagasy leaf chameleons, the Brookesia minima group, is known to contain species that rank among the smallest amniotes in the world. We report on a previously unrecognized radiation of these miniaturized lizards comprising four new species described herein. Methodology/Principal Findings The newly discovered species appear to be restricted to single, mostly karstic, localities in extreme northern Madagascar: Brookesia confidens sp. n. from Ankarana, B. desperata sp. n. from Forêt d'Ambre, B. micra sp. n. from the islet Nosy Hara, and B. tristis sp. n. from Montagne des Français. Molecular phylogenetic analyses based on one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes of all nominal species in the B. minima group congruently support that the four new species, together with B. tuberculata from Montagne d'Ambre in northern Madagascar, form a strongly supported clade. This suggests that these species have diversified in geographical proximity in this small area. All species of the B. minima group, including the four newly described ones, are characterized by very deep genetic divergences of 18–32% in the ND2 gene and >6% in the 16S rRNA gene. Despite superficial similarities among all species of this group, their status as separate evolutionary lineages is also supported by moderate to strong differences in external morphology, and by clear differences in hemipenis structure. Conclusion/Significance The newly discovered dwarf chameleon species represent striking cases of miniaturization and microendemism and suggest the possibility of a range size-body size relationship in Malagasy reptiles. The newly described Brookesia micra reaches a maximum snout-vent length in males of 16 mm, and its total length in both sexes is less than 30 mm, ranking it among the smallest amniote vertebrates in the world. With a distribution limited to a very small islet, this species may represent an extreme case of island dwarfism. PMID:22348069

  2. An Unexpected Recurrent Transmission of Rift Valley Fever Virus in Cattle in a Temperate and Mountainous Area of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Veronique; Rakotondrafara, Toky; Jourdan, Marion; Heraud, Jean Michel; Andriamanivo, Harena Rasamoelina; Durand, Benoit; Ravaomanana, Julie; Rollin, Pierre E.; Rakotondravao, René

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is an acute, zoonotic viral disease of domestic ruminants, caused by a phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae family). A large outbreak occurred in Madagascar in 2008–2009. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the point prevalence of antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV) in cattle in the Anjozorobe district, located in the wet and temperate highland region of Madagascar and yet heavily affected by the disease, and analyse environmental and trade factors potentially linked to RVFV transmission. A serological study was performed in 2009 in 894 bovines. For each bovine, the following variables were recorded: age, location of the night pen, minimum distance from the pen to the nearest water point and the forest, nearest water point type, and herd replacement practices. The serological data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. The overall anti-RVFV IgG seroprevalence rate was 28% [CI95% 25–31]. Age was statistically linked to prevalence (p?=?10?4), being consistent with a recurrent RVFV circulation. Distance from the night pen to the nearest water point was a protective factor (p?=?5.10?3), which would be compatible with a substantial part of the virus transmission being carried out by nocturnal mosquito vectors. However, water point type did not influence the risk of infection: several mosquito species are probably involved. Cattle belonging to owners who purchase animals to renew the herd were significantly more likely to have seroconverted than others (p?=?0.04): cattle trade may contribute to the introduction of the virus in this area. The minimum distance of the night pen to the forest was not linked to the prevalence. This is the first evidence of a recurrent transmission of RVFV in such an ecosystem that associates a wet, temperate climate, high altitude, paddy fields, and vicinity to a dense rain forest. Persistence mechanisms need to be further investigated. PMID:22206026

  3. Assessing Water Management of Mining Effluent Using Temporal and Spatial Hydrologic Analyses: The Case of QIT Madagascar Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Associated with the commencement of any water-intensive mining operation is the formation of a set of policies, standards, and sampling protocols that guide the management of all water resources connected to the mining facility, surrounding environment, and affected communities. This study explores the interface between corporate water management and hydrologic methods by evaluating changes in water quality over the course of the mining cycle at QIT Madagascar Minerals (QMM) in Tolagnaro, Madagascar. Sampling and lab research of processed water were conducted following established QMM procedures and then analyzed in conjunction with the complete QMM water quality database. Water quality was analyzed spatially to exhibit how processed water changes as it moves throughout the mining cycle before release into the environment. Graphical representation of the spatial changes in various parameters exhibit deterioration in water quality relative to the source, improvement in quality before being released as effluent, and natural remediation by wetlands before discharge into the Mandromondromotra River. In addition, water quality parameters were evaluated temporally, using data supplied by QMM's Service de l'Eau et Déchets. Yearly and monthly comparisons of hydrological parameters highlight data gaps, the effects of seasonality, and the evolution of water quality monitoring at QMM. Technical evaluation of processed water as it flows through the mining system provides insight into how water monitoring and management can best be adapted at the corporate level to prevent negative impacts on the environment. Water quality data for various parameters from April 2013 at each of the sampling locations. The graphs highlight spatial changes in parameters as water moves from the sources (WD90, Paddock 3), to sites on the mine (500M, Basmin, SCC2), to release points (WMC703, WMC803), to discharge points into the MMM River.

  4. Stratigraphic Analysis of Upper Cretaceous Rocks in the Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar: Implications for Ancient and Modern Faunas.

    PubMed

    Rogers; Hartman; Krause

    2000-05-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar, yield some of the most significant and exquisitely preserved vertebrate fossils known from Gondwana. The sedimentology of these strata and their stratigraphic relations have been the focus of renewed geological investigations during the course of five expeditions since 1993. We here designate stratotypes and formalize the terrestrial Maevarano Formation, with three new members (Masorobe, Anembalemba, Miadana), and the overlying marine Berivotra Formation. The Maevarano Formation accumulated on a broad, semiarid alluvial plain bounded to the southeast by crystalline highlands and to the northwest by the Mozambique Channel. The Berivotra Formation was deposited in an open marine setting that evolved from a clastic- to a carbonate-dominated shelf, resulting in deposition of the overlying Betsiboka limestone of Danian age. New stratigraphic data clearly indicate that the Maevarano Formation correlates, at least in part, with the Maastrichtian Berivotra Formation, and this in turn indicates that the most fossiliferous portions of the Maevarano Formation are Maastrichtian in age, rather than Campanian as previously reported. This revised age for the Maevarano vertebrate assemblage indicates that it is approximately contemporaneous with the vertebrate fauna recovered from the Deccan basalt volcano-sedimentary sequence of India. The comparable age of these two faunas is significant because the faunas appear to be more similar to one another than either is to those from any other major Gondwanan landmass. The revised age of the Maevarano Formation, when considered in the light of our recent fossil discoveries, further indicates that the ancestral stocks of Madagascar's overwhelmingly endemic modern vertebrate fauna arrived on the island in post-Mesozoic times. The basal stocks of the modern vertebrate fauna are conspicuously absent in the Maevarano Formation. Finally, the revised age of the Maevarano Formation serves to expand our global perspective on the K/T event by clarifying the age of a diverse, and arguably the best preserved, sample of Gondwanan vertebrates from the terminal Cretaceous. PMID:10769157

  5. Late Quaternary history of the Vakinankaratra volcanic field (central Madagascar): insights from luminescence dating of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufer, Daniel; Preusser, Frank; Schreurs, Guido; Gnos, Edwin; Berger, Alfons

    2014-05-01

    The Quaternary Vakinankaratra volcanic field in the central Madagascar highlands consists of scoria cones, lava flows, tuff rings, and maars. These volcanic landforms are the result of processes triggered by intracontinental rifting and overlie Precambrian basement or Neogene volcanic rocks. Infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating was applied to 13 samples taken from phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in the Antsirabe-Betafo region with the aim of constraining the chronology of the volcanic activity. Establishing such a chronology is important for evaluating volcanic hazards in this densely populated area. Stratigraphic correlations of eruption deposits and IRSL ages suggest at least five phreatomagmatic eruption events in Late Pleistocene times. In the Lake Andraikiba region, two such eruption layers can be clearly distinguished. The older one yields ages between 109 ± 15 and 90 ± 11 ka and is possibly related to an eruption at the Amboniloha volcanic complex to the north. The younger one gives ages between 58 ± 4 and 47 ± 7 ka and is clearly related to the phreatomagmatic eruption that formed Lake Andraikiba. IRSL ages of a similar eruption deposit directly overlying basement laterite in the vicinity of the Fizinana and Ampasamihaiky volcanic complexes yield coherent ages of 68 ± 7 and 65 ± 8 ka. These ages provide the upper age limit for the subsequently developed Iavoko, Antsifotra, and Fizinana scoria cones and their associated lava flows. Two phreatomagmatic deposits, identified near Lake Tritrivakely, yield the youngest IRSL ages in the region, with respective ages of 32 ± 3 and 19 ± 2 ka. The reported K-feldspar IRSL ages are the first recorded numerical ages of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in Madagascar, and our results confirm the huge potential of this dating approach for reconstructing the volcanic activity of Late Pleistocene to Holocene volcanic provinces.

  6. Microstructural evidences of garnet plasticity in the continental crust. New example from south Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamoud, Karim; Martelat, Jean-Emmanuel; Cordier, Patrick; Schulmann, Karel; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc

    2010-05-01

    Garnet mechanical behaviour is of great importance to understand the rheological evolution of rocks within the mantle and the lower crust. Well-constrained natural examples of plastically deformed garnets are scarce; consequently their identification and the physical parameters controlling their occurrence are still debated. In southern Madagascar, a granulitic metamorphic event has developed during a late Panafrican - Cambrian, east-west shortening (570 Ma). This has led to the development of vertical transpressive shear zones. Within these zones, we identified variations in garnet microstructure following the deformation sequence. In order to understand this evolution, we carried out a thorough microstructural description of samples using the following techniques: optical microscopy and SEM imaging, EBSD technique (localized lattice-preferred orientation), TEM for dislocation density, EMP for chemical analyses, as well as crystal size distribution, statistic grain boundary and shapes analyses (Lexa et al., 2005). The hand samples were quartzites or two-feldspars quartzo- feldsphatic rocks bearing 10 modal percent of garnet. As strain increases, various garnet textures were observed: Type 1) millimetre-sized rounded garnets bearing two types of inclusions, i.e. elongated quartz ribbons and well oriented sillimanite parallel to the lineation; Type 2) elliptic very elongated and lobed garnets (1 to 8 aspect ratio); Type 3) smaller elongated pinch and swell garnets (1 to 3 aspect ratio); and finally Type 4) rounded small garnets (300 microns in diameter). Type 1 textures are due to multiple nucleation garnets and coalescence controlled by aluminous aggregates (biotite and sillimanite). As strain increases, these large skeleton garnets start to re-crystallise preferentially at the tip of lenticular quartz inclusions, giving Type 2 very elongated garnets with unique CPO. The latter then continues to re-crystallise by sub-grain rotation as underlined by the CPO in situ measurements of new re-orientated grains (Type 3). In the type 4, few large garnets remain and only smaller-sized rounded garnets are left. In these highly deformed rocks, fine sillimanite needles are locally preserved and tilted with respect to the main foliation. All garnets from Type 2 to 4 textures are chemically homogeneous. Data from garnets, quartz, and feldspars are compared for each microstructural type and progressive deformation. The observed microstructures are in accordance with garnet ductility coeval with the deformation of quartz K-feldspar and plagioclase and showing mixing of all phases (random distribution) as well as constant grain size (average diameter 200 microns). Our analyses show that under the high-temperature and dry conditions (850°C) all phases are mechanically active. This indicates convergence of strength minerals marked by contrasting (laboratory derived) rheologies. Lexa, O., Štípská, P., Schulmann, K., Baratoux, L., Kröner, A., 2005. Contrasting textural record of two distinct metamorphic events of similar P-T conditions and different durations. Journal of Metamorphic Geology 23. 649-666. http://petrol.natur.cuni.cz/~ondro/polylx:home

  7. Geology, petrology and isotope geochemistry of massif-type anorthosites from southwest Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D.; Hamilton, Michael A.; Morel, Vincent P. I.; Rambeloson, Roger A.

    Four massif-type anorthosite bodies 25-100km2 in area occur within high-pressure granulite facies supracrustal gneisses in southwestern Madagascar. Two of these bodies (Ankafotia and Saririaky) appear to have been pulled apart by 40km in a ductile shear zone, but structural features such as sub-vertical stretching lineations indicate an origin by intense west-directed flattening and pure shear. Country rocks (Graphite Series) include abundant graphite schist (some with >60% graphite), marble, quartzite, and minor amphibolite and leucogneiss. Comagmatic granitoids (e.g. charnockites) are conspicuously absent. The anorthosite bodies are dominated by coarse grained anorthosites and leuconorites (feldspars typically 3-5cm, up to 1m) minor norites and oxide-rich ferrogabbros occur near the margins, but ultramafic rocks are absent. Typical mineralogy of the anorthositic rocks is: plagioclase (An41-54)+orthopyroxene (En38-66)+/-augite (Mg# = 32-68)+/-ilmenite+/-magnetite+/- apatite. High-alumina (to 6.1 wt% Al2O3) orthopyroxene megacrysts are widespread; most have exsolutions of calcic plagioclase (An72-85) but some contain garnet lamellae. Metamorphism has produced abundant recrystallization and sporadic coronitic garnet (Mg #=12-36)+clinopyroxene assemblages. Rb-Sr isotopic analyses of whole-rocks and minerals reveal no meaningful age relationships. The age of late Neoproterozoic metamorphism is best constrained at 559+/-50Ma by a 6-point Sm-Nd mineral isochron (whole rock, plag, pyx, ilm, apat, gar) from a Saririaky oxide-rich gabbro. The igneous crystallization age of the anorthosites is estimated at 660+/-60Ma by a 19-point combined whole-rock and mineral Sm-Nd isochron for samples from both the Ankafotia and Saririaky bodies. Initial isotopic ratios calculated at 0.66Ga among 13 whole rocks are: Nd=+2.6 to +5.2 (mean=+3.7) and ISr=0.70328-0.70407 (mean=0.70347), indicating derivation of the Malagasy anorthosites from a depleted mantle source, and little, if any, contamination with Archean crustal material. One anorthosite sample with Nd=-1.4 and ISr=0.70344 (calculated at 0.66Ga) probably reflects the effects of assimilation of Early to Middle Proterozoic crustal basement, but typical surrounding graphite schist (Nd=+0.3, ISr=0.70636, both at 0.66Ga TDM= 1131Ma) represents only a minor potential contaminant for the anorthosite bodies. TDM model ages of the Malagasy anorthosites (797-1280Ma mean of 14 samples=949Ma), as those of most other massif-type anorthosites, are older than the true crystallization age, because of crustal contamination effects. Our isotopic data, together with recent U-Pb data from the anorthosites and surrounding country rocks, are consistent with emplacement of the Malagasy anorthosite bodies at or before the start of a protracted, high-grade metamorphic event or series of events between about 630 and 550Ma. This period coincides with the collision between, and amalgamation of, East and West Gondwana.

  8. Preliminary study of a radiological survey in an abandoned uranium mining area in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Rabesiranana; M, Rasolonirina; F, Solonjara A.; Andriambololona., Raoelina; L, Mabit

    2010-05-01

    The region of Vinaninkarena located in central Madagascar (47°02'40"E, 19°57'17"S), is known to be a high natural radioactive area. Uranium ore was extracted in this region during the 1950s and the early 1960s. In the mid-1960s, mining activities were stopped and the site abandoned. In the meantime, the region, which used to be without any inhabitants, has recently been occupied by new settlers with presumed increase in exposure of the local population to natural ionizing radiation. In order to assess radiological risk, a survey to assess the soil natural radioactivity background was conducted during the year 2004. This study was implemented in the frame of the FADES Project SP99v1b_21 entitled: Assessment of the environmental pollution by multidisciplinary approach, and the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Cooperation Project MAG 7002 entitled: Effects of air and water pollution on human health. Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to determine the geographical coordinates of the top soil samples (0-15cm) collected. The sampling was performed using a multi integrated scale approach to estimate the spatial variability of the parameters under investigation (U, Th and K) using geo-statistical approach. A total of 205 soil samples was collected in the study site (16 km2). After humidity correction, the samples were sealed in 100 cm3 cylindrical air-tight plastic containers and stored for more than 6 months to reach a secular equilibrium between parents and short-lived progeny (226Ra and progeny, 238U and 234Th). Measurements were performed using a high-resolution HPGe Gamma-detector with a 30% relative efficiency and an energy resolution of 1.8 keV at 1332.5 keV, allowing the determination of the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In case of secular equilibrium, a non-gamma-emitting radionuclide activity was deduced from its gamma emitting progeny. This was the case for 238U (from 234Th), 226Ra (from 214Pb and 214Bi) and 232Th (from 228Ac, 212Pb or 208Tl). Furthermore, in order to assess the radiological effect, the kerma rate in the air at 1 m above ground level was calculated for each sampled points using standard activity-kerma rate conversion coefficients for uranium, thorium series and potassium. Geostatistical interpolation tools (e.g. Inverse Distance Weighting power 2 and Ordinary Kriging) were used to optimize the data set mapping. The measured Potassium-40 activity was 333 Bq kg-1 ± 95% (Mean ± Coefficient of Variation), the Uranium activity was 195 Bq kg-1 ± 53% and the Thorium activity was 139 Bq kg-1 ± 29%. The world average concentrations are reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as 400 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 35 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 30 Bq kg-1 for 232Th. The results show that generally, 40K concentrations in soils of the area are slightly lower than the world average value, whereas uranium and thorium series activities are noticeably higher. On average the kerma rate reaches 143 nGy h-1 with a standard deviation of 41 nGy h-1 and a coefficient of variation of 28%. The information obtained was mapped and the dose exposition was also assessed for the local settlers. Key-words: soil contamination, environmental radioactivity, radioecology, dose exposure.

  9. Activation of minority-variant Plasmodium vivax hypnozoites following artesunate?+?amodiaquine treatment in a 23-year old man with relapsing malaria in Antananarivo, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In endemic areas, Plasmodium vivax relapses are difficult to distinguish from new infections. Genotyping of patients who experience relapse after returning to a malaria-free area can be used to explore the nature of hypnozoite activation and relapse. This paper describes a person who developed P. vivax malaria for the first time after travelling to Boriziny in the malaria endemic coastal area of Madagascar, then suffered two P. vivax relapses 11 weeks and 21 weeks later despite remaining in Antananarivo in the malaria-free central highlands area. He was treated with the combination artesunate?+?amodiaquine according to the national malaria policy in Madagascar. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP at pvmsp-3? as well as pvmsp1 heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA) showed the same dominant genotype at each relapse. Multiple recurring minority variants were also detected at each relapse, highlighting the propensity for multiple hypnozoite clones to activate simultaneously to cause relapse. PMID:23721298

  10. A new species of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) from the Sahamalaza Peninsula, northwest Madagascar, with acoustic monitoring of its nocturnal calling activity

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Samuel G.; Andreone, Franco; Crottini, Angelica; Holderied, Marc W.; Rakotozafy, Lovasoa Sylviane; Schwitzer, Christoph; Rosa, Gonçalo M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of treefrog of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) is described from the Sahamalaza – Iles Radama National Park in northwest Madagascar. This new species is green in colour with bright red speckling across its head and dorsum; similar in morphology to other species of this group including: B. bottae, B. rappiodes, B. erythrodactylus and B. tasymena. The new species can be distinguished by its advertisement call and by a genetic divergence of more than 4.9% in the analysed mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene fragment. Its call consists of two note types: a trill and a click; although similar sounding to B. bottae, the trill note of the new species has a faster pulse rate while the click note is predominantly two-pulsed rather than three. All individuals were detected from the banks of two streams in Ankarafa Forest. The new species represents the only member of the B. rappiodes group endemic to Madagascar’s western coast, with the majority of other members known from the eastern rainforest belt. Despite its conspicuous call, it has not been detected from other surveys of northwest Madagascar and it is likely to be a local endemic to the peninsula. The ranges of two other amphibian species also appear restricted to Sahamalaza, and so the area seems to support a high level of endemicity. Although occurring inside a National Park, this species is highly threatened by the continuing decline in the quality and extent of its habitat. Due to these threats it is proposed that this species should be classified as Critically Endangered according to the IUCN Red List criteria. PMID:25152689

  11. Paleogeography of the Seychelles Bank and the northwest Madagascar Shelf during the last glacio-eustatic regression (18,000 a B.P.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badyukov, D. D.; Demidenko, E. L.; Kaplin, P. A.

    1989-03-01

    The Seychelles Bank and Madagascar Shelf in the western Indian Ocean were explored geologically during a cruise of the R/V “professor Shtokman” in 1986. Using the data of relief, sediment characteristics and their sequences of strata, paleogeographic maps (18,000 a B.P.) of these areas were produced. These maps show that the Bank and the Shelf are carbonate platforms with complicated topography. The data indicate an important role of sea level oscillation in relief development of this area.

  12. A review of agricultural research issues raised by the system of rice intensification (SRI) from Madagascar: opportunities for improving farming systems for resource-poor farmers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willem A. Stoop; Norman Uphoff; Amir Kassam

    2002-01-01

    The “system of rice intensification” (SRI) that evolved in the 1980s and 1990s in Madagascar permits resource-limited farmers to realise yields of up to 15 t of paddy\\/hectare on infertile soils, with greatly reduced rates of irrigation and without external inputs. This paper reviews the plant physiological and bio-ecological factors associated with agronomic practices that could explain the extraordinary yields

  13. Natural Disasters and Primate Populations: The Effects of a 2Year Drought on a Naturally Occurring Population of Ring-Tailed Lemurs ( Lemur catta ) in Southwestern Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Gould; Robert W. Sussman; Michelle L. Sauther

    1999-01-01

    We examine demographic patterns from a long-term study (1987–1996) of the population of ring-tailed lemurs in the Beza-Mahafaly Special Reserve, in southwestern Madagascar. In particular, we focus on the effects that a severe drought in 1991 and 1992 had on the population. The population of adult animals peaked in 1991 but decreased rapidly during the subsequent drought and immediate postdrought

  14. Mountain Refugia Play a Role in Soil Arthropod Speciation on Madagascar: A Case Study of the Endemic Giant Fire-Millipede Genus Aphistogoniulus

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Thomas; Raupach, Michael J.; Decker, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the speciation mechanisms prevalent within hotspots of biodiversity, and the evolutionary processes behind the rise of their species-rich and endemic biota, we investigated the phylogeny of the giant fire-millipede genus Aphistogoniulus Silvestri, 1897, a Malagasy endemic. This study is the first comprehensive (molecular and morphological) phylogenetic study focusing on millipede (class Diplopoda) speciation on Madagascar. The morphological analysis is based on 35 morphological characters and incorporates ten described as well as two newly described species (A. rubrodorsalis n. sp. and A. jeekeli n. sp.) of Aphistogoniulus. The molecular analysis is based on both mitochondrial (COI and 16S), and nuclear genes (complete 18S rDNA), together comprised of 3031 base pairs, which were successfully sequenced for 31 individual specimens and eight species of Aphistogoniulus. In addition to the null-model (speciation by distance), two diversification models, mountain refugia and ecotone shift, were discovered to play a role in the speciation of soil arthropods on Madagascar. Mountain refugia were important in the speciation of the A. cowani clade, with three species occurring in the Andringitra and Ranomafana Mountains in the southeast (A. cowani), the Ambohijanahary and Ambohitantely Mountains in the mid-west (A. sanguineus), and the Marojejy Mountain in the northeast (A. rubrodorsalis n. sp.). An ecotone shift from the eastern rainforest to the unique subarid spiny forest of Mahavelo was discovered in the A. vampyrus - A. aridus species-pair. In the monophyletic A. diabolicus clade, evidence for divergent evolution of sexual morphology was detected: species with greatly enlarged gonopods are sister-taxa to species with normal sized gonopods. Among the large-bodied Spirobolida genera of Madagascar, Colossobolus and Sanguinobolus were found to be close sister-genera to Aphistogoniulus. Forest destruction has caused forest corridors between populations to disappear, which might limit the possible resolution of biogeographic analyses on Madagascar. PMID:22162998

  15. Vertebrate time-tree elucidates the biogeographic pattern of a major biotic change around the K–T boundary in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Crottini, Angelica; Madsen, Ole; Poux, Celine; Strauß, Axel; Vieites, David R.; Vences, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The geographic and temporal origins of Madagascar's biota have long been in the center of debate. We reconstructed a time-tree including nearly all native nonflying and nonmarine vertebrate clades present on the island, from DNA sequences of two single-copy protein-coding nuclear genes (BDNF and RAG1) and a set of congruent time constraints. Reconstructions calculated with autocorrelated or independent substitution rates over clades agreed in placing the origins of the 31 included clades in Cretaceous to Cenozoic times. The two clades with sister groups in South America were the oldest, followed by those of a putative Asian ancestry that were significantly older than the prevalent clades of African ancestry. No colonizations from Asia occurred after the Eocene, suggesting that dispersal and vicariance of Asian/Indian groups were favored over a comparatively short period during, and shortly after, the separation of India and Madagascar. Species richness of clades correlates with their age but those clades that have a large proportion of species diversity in rainforests are significantly more species-rich. This finding suggests an underlying pattern of continuous speciation through time in Madagascar's vertebrates, with accelerated episodes of adaptive diversification in those clades that succeeded radiating into the rainforests. PMID:22431616

  16. Structure and metamorphism of the granitic basement around Antananarivo: A key to the Pan-African history of central Madagascar and its Gondwana connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NéDéLec, Anne; Ralison, Bruno; Bouchez, Jean-Luc; GréGoire, Vincent

    2000-10-01

    The Precambrian basement of Madagascar acquired a polyphase imprint during the Pan-African orogeny. In northern central Madagascar, emplacement of stratoid alkaline granites at midcrustal depth (4-5 kbars) led to formation of a layered crust in a postcollisional extensional regime at 630 Ma (D1). Subsequently, the structures of the stratoid granites were rotated by the sinistral and transpressive E-W Antananarivo flexure (or virgation) zone (D2). East of Antananarivo the structures of the D1 layered crust and the D2 virgation are crosscut by the steeply dipping N-S foliations of the Angavo belt. Lineations gently plunging to the north attest that the Angavo belt is a major strike-slip shear zone that formed under low-pressure granulitic conditions (3 kbars, 790°C). The nearby porphyritic Carion granite was emplaced at the end of this period of N-S shearing (D3), which can thus be no younger than 530 Ma. Late-Pan-African (580-550 Ma) strike-slip motion along broadly N-S shear zones has been recognized elsewhere in Madagascar and in its Gondwana connections. Continuation of the Angavo belt as one of the high strain belts of the Arabian-Nubian Shield is discussed in the general framework of Gondwana assembly.

  17. Vertebrate time-tree elucidates the biogeographic pattern of a major biotic change around the K-T boundary in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Crottini, Angelica; Madsen, Ole; Poux, Celine; Strauss, Axel; Vieites, David R; Vences, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The geographic and temporal origins of Madagascar's biota have long been in the center of debate. We reconstructed a time-tree including nearly all native nonflying and nonmarine vertebrate clades present on the island, from DNA sequences of two single-copy protein-coding nuclear genes (BDNF and RAG1) and a set of congruent time constraints. Reconstructions calculated with autocorrelated or independent substitution rates over clades agreed in placing the origins of the 31 included clades in Cretaceous to Cenozoic times. The two clades with sister groups in South America were the oldest, followed by those of a putative Asian ancestry that were significantly older than the prevalent clades of African ancestry. No colonizations from Asia occurred after the Eocene, suggesting that dispersal and vicariance of Asian/Indian groups were favored over a comparatively short period during, and shortly after, the separation of India and Madagascar. Species richness of clades correlates with their age but those clades that have a large proportion of species diversity in rainforests are significantly more species-rich. This finding suggests an underlying pattern of continuous speciation through time in Madagascar's vertebrates, with accelerated episodes of adaptive diversification in those clades that succeeded radiating into the rainforests. PMID:22431616

  18. Description of a new species of the Miniopterus aelleni group (Chiroptera: Miniopteridae) from upland areas of central and northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Steven M; Ramasindrazana, Beza

    2015-01-01

    Recent molecular genetic work, combined with morphological comparisons, on Malagasy members of the bat genus Miniopterus (Family Miniopteridae), has uncovered a number of cryptic species. Based on recently collected specimens and associated tissues, we examine patterns of variation in M. aelleni, the holotype of which comes from Ankarana in northern Madagascar. Using molecular genetic (mitochondrial cytochrome b) and morphological characters we describe a new species, M. ambohitrensis sp. nov. In northern Madagascar, M. ambohitrensis and M. aelleni are allopatric, but occur in relatively close geographical contact (approximately 40 km direct line distance) with M. ambohitrensis found at Montagne d'Ambre in montane humid forest and M. aelleni sensu stricto at Ankarana in dry deciduous forest. Morphologically, this new taxon is differentiated from M. aelleni based on pelage coloration, external measurements, craniodental differences, and tragus shape. Comparisons using 725 bp of cytochrome b found a divergence of 1.1% within M. aelleni sensu stricto, 0.8% within M. ambohitrensis, and 3.3% between these two clades. The two sister species do not demonstrate acoustical differences based on recordings made in a flight cage. Miniopterus ambohitrensis is known from four localities in the northern and central portions of Madagascar, all from montane regions and across an elevational range from about 800 to 1600 m; its calculated "Extent of occurrence" is 15,143 km2. It is possible that this species is at least partially migratory. PMID:25947452

  19. Phylogeographic analysis of the true lemurs (genus Eulemur) underlines the role of river catchments for the evolution of micro-endemism in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Due to its remarkable species diversity and micro-endemism, Madagascar has recently been suggested to serve as a biogeographic model region. However, hypothesis-based tests of various diversification mechanisms that have been proposed for the evolution of the island’s micro-endemic lineages are still limited. Here, we test the fit of several diversification hypotheses with new data on the broadly distributed genus Eulemur using coalescent-based phylogeographic analyses. Results Time-calibrated species tree analyses and population genetic clustering resolved the previously polytomic species relationships among eulemurs. The most recent common ancestor of eulemurs was estimated to have lived about 4.45 million years ago (mya). Divergence date estimates furthermore suggested a very recent diversification among the members of the “brown lemur complex”, i.e. former subspecies of E. fulvus, during the Pleistocene (0.33-1.43 mya). Phylogeographic model comparisons of past migration rates showed significant levels of gene flow between lineages of neighboring river catchments as well as between eastern and western populations of the redfronted lemur (E. rufifrons). Conclusions Together, our results are concordant with the centers of endemism hypothesis (Wilmé et al. 2006, Science 312:1063–1065), highlight the importance of river catchments for the evolution of Madagascar’s micro-endemic biota, and they underline the usefulness of testing diversification mechanisms using coalescent-based phylogeographic methods. PMID:24228694

  20. Nonradioactive heteroduplex tracking assay for the detection of minority-variant chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Jonathan J; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin; Ariey, Frédéric; Mwapasa, Victor; Meshnick, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Background Strains of Plasmodium falciparum genetically resistant to chloroquine (CQ) due to the presence of pfcrt 76T appear to have been recently introduced to the island of Madagascar. The prevalence of such resistant genotypes is reported to be low (< 3%) when evaluated by conventional PCR. However, these methods are insensitive to low levels of mutant parasites present in patients with polyclonal infections. Thus, the current estimates may be an under representation of the prevalence of the CQ-resistant P. falciparum isolates on the island. Previously, minority variant chloroquine resistant parasites were described in Malawian patients using an isotopic heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), which can detect pfcrt 76T-bearing P. falciparum minority variants in individual patients that were undetectable by conventional PCR. However, as this assay required a radiolabeled probe, it could not be used in many resource-limited settings. Methods This study describes a digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled chemiluminescent heteroduplex tracking assay (DIG-HTA) to detect pfcrt 76T-bearing minority variant P. falciparum. This assay was compared to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and to the isotopic HTA for detection of genetically CQ-resistant parasites in clinical samples. Results Thirty one clinical P. falciparum isolates (15 primary isolates and 16 recurrent isolates) from 17 Malagasy children treated with CQ for uncomplicated malaria were genotyped for the pfcrt K76T mutation. Two (11.7%) of 17 patients harboured genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains after therapy as detected by HTA. RFLP analysis failed to detect any pfcrt K76T-bearing isolates. Conclusion These findings indicate that genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum are more common than previously thought in Madagascar even though the fitness of the minority variant pfcrt 76T parasites remains unclear. In addition, HTAs for malaria drug resistance alleles are promising tools for the surveillance of anti-malarial resistance. The use of a non-radioactive label allows for the use of HTAs in malaria endemic countries. PMID:19291288

  1. Plasmodium vivax dhfr and dhps mutations in isolates from Madagascar and therapeutic response to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine

    PubMed Central

    Barnadas, Céline; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Raherinjafy, Rogelin; Jahevitra, Martial; Picot, Stéphane; Ménard, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Background Four of five Plasmodium species infecting humans are present in Madagascar. Plasmodium vivax remains the second most prevalent species, but is understudied. No data is available on its susceptibility to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, the drug recommended for intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy. In this study, the prevalence of P. vivax infection and the polymorphisms in the pvdhfr and pvdhps genes were investigated. The correlation between these polymorphisms and clinical and parasitological responses was also investigated in P. vivax-infected patients. Methods Plasmodium vivax clinical isolates were collected in eight sentinel sites from the four major epidemiological areas for malaria across Madagascar in 2006/2007. Pvdhfr and pvdhps genes were sequenced for polymorphism analysis. The therapeutic efficacy of SP in P. vivax infections was assessed in Tsiroanomandidy, in the foothill of the central highlands. An intention-to-treat analysis of treatment outcome was carried out. Results A total of 159 P. vivax samples were sequenced in the pvdhfr/pvdhps genes. Mutant-types in pvdhfr gene were found in 71% of samples, and in pvdhps gene in 16% of samples. Six non-synonymous mutations were identified in pvdhfr, including two novel mutations at codons 21 and 130. For pvdhps, beside the known mutation at codon 383, a new one was found at codon 422. For the two genes, different combinations were ranged from wild-type to quadruple mutant-type. Among the 16 patients enrolled in the sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine clinical trial (28 days of follow-up) and after adjustment by genotyping, 3 (19%, 95% CI: 5%–43%) of them were classified as treatment failure and were pvdhfr 58R/117N double mutant carriers with or without the pvdhps 383G mutation. Conclusion This study highlights (i) that genotyping in the pvdhfr and pvdhps genes remains a useful tool to monitor the emergence and the spread of P. vivax sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistant in order to improve the national antimalarial drug policy, (ii) the issue of using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine as a monotherapy for intermittent preventive treatment of pregnant women or children. PMID:18302746

  2. An insight into the breakup of Gondwana: Identifying events through low-temperature thermochronology from the basement rocks of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, Diane; Grujic, D.; Schreurs, G.

    2004-06-01

    Fission track analysis was applied to the Precambrian suites of Madagascar in order to identify the lower-temperature cooling histories and their relationships to the Phanerozoic events that affected the island. Apatite ages range from 431 to 68 Ma, and zircon ages range from 452 to 238 Ma. Thermochronologically, the island can be divided into a southern, central, and northern region each with a subdivision on an east-west basis. The southern region is sharply separated from the central region by strongly contrasting apparent apatite ages over the northwest-southeast striking Ranotsara Shear Zone (RSZ). The change in apparent ages over the RSZ is indicative of later reactivation along younger brittle faults. The central region has the oldest ages of the island and has a diffuse contact to the third region northward. Along the entire western margin of the Precambrian basement initial Paleozoic exhumation was followed by heating (burial by sediments) during Jurassic and Cretaceous times. A decrease in ages along the eastern margin from 119 to 68 Ma coincides with the predicted positions of the Marion hot spot after effects of erosion are considered. On the other hand, these ages may represent progressive opening of the margin in a southward direction together with associated denudation of the rift shoulder. The eastern part of the central region has remained very stable since at least Devonian times, undergoing only long-term very slow exhumation at rates of 1-5 m/Myr.

  3. Identification of nasal colonization with ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in patients, health care workers and students in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Micheel, Volker; Hogan, Benedikt; Rakotoarivelo, Rivo Andry; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael; Razafimanatsoa, Fetra; Razafindrabe, Tsiriniaina; Rakotondrainiarivelo, Jean Philibert; Crusius, Sabine; Poppert, Sven; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Frickmann, Hagen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-03-01

    This study assesses the nasal occurrence of ?-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae both in patients in a hospital department of infectious diseases at admission and in healthy Madagascan students and health care workers. Nasal swabs from 681 students, 824 health care workers, and 169 patients were obtained in Antananarivo, Madagascar, and transferred to Germany. Screening for ?-lactamase (ESBL, ampC) producing Enterobacteriaceae was performed by cultural and molecular approaches, comprising Brilliance ESBL agar, E-testing, ABCD-testing, and commercial hyplex ESBL and SuperBug ID PCR. Regarding ESBL-positive strains and strains with resistance against at least three out of the four tested bactericidal antibiotic drugs, 0.3% (five out of 1541) of the students and health care workers group showed nasal colonization, whereas colonization was observed in 7.1% (12 out of 169) of the hospitalized patients at admission. No appreciably reduced detection rates after sample storage and intercontinental transport were observed. A considerable proportion of nasal colonization with cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae was demonstrated in Madagascan hospital patients at admission, posing a risk of developing future endogenous infections. The nasal colonization of healthy individuals was negligible. Good storage and transport stability of Enterobacteriaceae will allow for future studies even in areas difficult to access. PMID:25908994

  4. High Prevalence of Hepatitis E in Humans and Pigs and Evidence of Genotype-3 Virus in Swine, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Temmam, Sarah; Besnard, Lydia; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Foray, Coralie; Rasamoelina-Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina; Héraud, Jean-Michel; Cardinale, Eric; Dellagi, Koussay; Pavio, Nicole; Pascalis, Hervé; Porphyre, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes an orofecal disease transmitted through poor hygiene environments, contaminated food (mainly pork products), or by contacts with infected animals. Very little data are currently available regarding the disease in the Southwestern Indian Ocean Islands. We report the first sero- and viro-survey for HEV in human and swine in Madagascar. A seroprevalence rate of 14.1% (60 of 427) was measured in slaughterhouse workers. Seroprevalence to HEV in pigs was estimated to 71.2% (178 of 250), strongly suggesting the existence of a zoonotic cycle. Three out of 250 pig livers (1.2%) tested HEV RNA-positive by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analyses based on 1-kb sequences of the ORF 2-3 identified these viruses as HEV genotype 3. Sequences clustered in a distinct Malagasy sub-clade, possibly representative of a new sub-genotype, for which the date of emergence was estimated around 1989. Further studies are needed to confirm other transmission routes of HEV to humans, especially through non-zoonotic cycles. PMID:23208879

  5. Ornamental exterior versus therapeutic interior of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus): the two faces of a versatile herb.

    PubMed

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Valdiani, Alireza; Cahill, David; Tan, Yee-How; Maziah, Mahmood; Abiri, Rambod

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) known as Madagascar periwinkle (MP) is a legendary medicinal plant mostly because of possessing two invaluable antitumor terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), vincristine and vinblastine. The plant has also high aesthetic value as an evergreen ornamental that yields prolific blooms of splendid colors. The plant possesses yet another unique characteristic as an amiable experimental host for the maintenance of the smallest bacteria found on earth, the phytoplasmas and spiroplasmas, and serves as a model for their study. Botanical information with respect to synonyms, vernacular names, cultivars, floral morphology, and reproduction adds to understanding of the plant while the geography and ecology of periwinkle illustrate the organism's ubiquity. Good agronomic practices ensure generous propagation of healthy plants that serve as a source of bioactive compounds and multitudinous horticultural applications. The correlation between genetic diversity, variants, and TIA production exists. MP is afflicted with a whole range of diseases that have to be properly managed. The ethnobotanical significance of MP is exemplified by its international usage as a traditional remedy for abundant ailments and not only for cancer. TIAs are present only in micro quantities in the plant and are highly poisonous per se rendering a challenge for researchers to increase yield and reduce toxicity. PMID:25667940

  6. The age and petrogenesis of alkaline magmatism in the Ampasindava Peninsula and Nosy Be archipelago, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, C.; Tucker, R. D.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.

    2015-05-01

    The Ampasindava alkaline province consists of a series of circular and elliptical intrusions, lava flows, dyke swarms and plugs of Cenozoic age emplaced into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Antsiranana basin (NW Madagascar) and above the crystalline basement. The magmatism in the Ampasindava region is linked to a NW-SE trending extensional tectonic setting. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on feldspar separate of alkali granites and basaltic dykes yielded ages of 18.01 ± 0.36 Ma and 26 ± 7 Ma, respectively. Alkali basalts and basanites, nepheline syenites and phonolites, and silica saturated-to-oversaturated syenites, trachytes, granites and rhyolites are the main outcropping lithologies. These rocks have sodic affinity. The felsic rocks are dominant, and range from peraluminous to peralkaline. The mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns of the mafic lavas match those of Na-alkaline lavas in within-plate rift settings. The patterns are identical in shape and absolute concentrations to those of the Bobaomby (Cap d'Ambre) and Massif d'Ambre primitive volcanic rocks. These geochemical features are broadly compatible with variable degrees of partial melting of incompatible element-enriched mantle sources. The mineralogical and geochemical variations are consistent with fractional crystallization processes involving removal of olivine, feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. Removal of small amount of titanite explains the concave upward lanthanide pattern in the evolved nepheline syenites and phonolites, which are additionally rich in exotic silicates typical of agpaitic magmas (eudialyte, F-disilicates).

  7. Isolation and structural elucidation of cytotoxic compounds from the root bark of Diospyros quercina (Baill.) endemic to Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ruphin, Fatiany Pierre; Baholy, Robijaona; Emmanuel, Randrianarivo; Amelie, Raharisololalao; Martin, Marie-Therese; Koto–te-Nyiwa, Ngbolua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To isolate and characterize the cytotoxic compounds from Diospyros quercina (Baill.) G.E. Schatz & Lowry (Ebenaceae). Methods An ethno-botanical survey was conducted in the south of Madagascar from July to August 2010. Bio-guided fractionation assay was carried out on the root bark of Diospyros quercina, using cytotoxicity bioassay on murine P388 leukemia cell lines as model. The structures of the cytotoxic compounds were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Results Biological experiments resulted in the isolation of three bioactive pure compounds (named TR-21, TR-22, and TR-23) which exhibited very good in vitro cytotoxic activities with the IC50 values of (0.017?5±0.0060) µg/mL, (0.089±0.005) µg/mL and (1.027±0.070) µg/mL respectively. Thus, they support the claims of traditional healers and suggest the possible correlation between the chemical composition of this plant and its wide use in Malagasy folk medicine to treat cancer. Conclusions The ability of isolated compounds in this study to inhibit cell growth may represent a rational explanation for the use of Diospyros quercina root bark in treating cancer by Malagasy traditional healers. Further studies are, therefore, necessary to evaluate the in vivo anti-neoplastic activity of these cytotoxic compounds as effective anticancer drugs. PMID:25182433

  8. A 7-Deoxyloganetic Acid Glucosyltransferase Contributes a Key Step in Secologanin Biosynthesis in Madagascar Periwinkle[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Keisuke; Salim, Vonny; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Edmunds, Elizabeth; Nagatoshi, Mai; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Mizukami, Hajime; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Iridoids form a broad and versatile class of biologically active molecules found in thousands of plant species. In addition to the many hundreds of iridoids occurring in plants, some iridoids, such as secologanin, serve as key building blocks in the biosynthesis of thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) and many quinoline alkaloids. This study describes the molecular cloning and functional characterization of three iridoid glucosyltransfeases (UDP-SUGAR GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE6 [UGT6], UGT7, and UGT8) from Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) with remarkably different catalytic efficiencies. Biochemical analyses reveal that UGT8 possessed a high catalytic efficiency toward its exclusive iridoid substrate, 7-deoxyloganetic acid, making it better suited for the biosynthesis of iridoids in periwinkle than the other two iridoid glucosyltransfeases. The role of UGT8 in the fourth to last step in secologanin biosynthesis was confirmed by virus-induced gene silencing in periwinkle plants, which reduced expression of this gene and resulted in a large decline in secologanin and MIA accumulation within silenced plants. Localization studies of UGT8 using a carborundum abrasion method for RNA extraction show that its expression occurs preferentially within periwinkle leaves rather than in epidermal cells, and in situ hybridization studies confirm that UGT8 is preferentially expressed in internal phloem associated parenchyma cells of periwinkle species. PMID:24104568

  9. Phlebotomine sand flies from Madagascar (Diptera: Psychodidae). VII. An identification key for Phlebotomus with the description of Phlebotomus (Anaphlebotomus) vaomalalae n. sp.

    PubMed Central

    Randrianambinintsoa, Fano José; Léger, Nicole; Robert, Vincent; Depaquit, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    An identification key of the Phlebotomus in Madagascar is proposed as well as the description of the male and female Phlebotomus (Anaphlebotomus) vaomalalae n. sp. from Mikea Forest in the south-west of Madagascar. The assignation of this new species to the genus Phlebotomus is based on the presence of mesanepisternal setae. Its inclusion in the subgenus Anaphlebotomus is based on the males on the presence of four spines on the style, the lack of a coxite basal process and the existence of a bifurcated paramere. The female has cibarial and pharyngeal armature and spermathecal architecture similar to Phlebotomus fertei and Phlebotomus berentiensis, two other Malagasy species which belong to Anaphlebotomus. Male and female are held to belong to the same species because of their morphological characters, the homology (100%) of their partial cytochrome b mtDNA sequences and their capture in the same trap. P. vaomalalae n. sp. is a small species compared to the other Phlebotomus species of Madagascar. The cibarium of the male and the female of P. vaomalalae n. sp. is armed with teeth, like those of other Malagasy Phlebotomus. However, it differs in the arrangement and shape of the respective teeth and denticles. The male of P. vaomalalae n. sp. looks like that of P. fontenillei due to its tuft of coxal setae (lacking in P. berentiensis and P. fertei) but differs from this species by the location of this tuft. As P. fertei and P. berentiensis, there is no spermathecal common duct in P. vaomalalae n. sp. PMID:23419267

  10. A spatially explicit metapopulation model and cattle trade analysis suggests key determinants for the recurrent circulation of rift valley Fever virus in a pilot area of madagascar highlands.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gaëlle; Chevalier, Véronique; Tantely, Luciano Michaël; Fontenille, Didier; Durand, Benoît

    2014-12-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne zoonotic disease that causes high morbidity and mortality in ruminants. In 2008-2009, a RVF outbreak affected the whole Madagascar island, including the Anjozorobe district located in Madagascar highlands. An entomological survey showed the absence of Aedes among the potential RVF virus (RVFV) vector species identified in this area, and an overall low abundance of mosquitoes due to unfavorable climatic conditions during winter. No serological nor virological sign of infection was observed in wild terrestrial mammals of the area, suggesting an absence of wild RVF virus (RVFV) reservoir. However, a three years serological and virological follow-up in cattle showed a recurrent RVFV circulation. The objective of this study was to understand the key determinants of this unexpected recurrent transmission. To achieve this goal, a spatial deterministic discrete-time metapopulation model combined with cattle trade network was designed and parameterized to reproduce the local conditions using observational data collected in the area. Three scenarios that could explain the RVFV recurrent circulation in the area were analyzed: (i) RVFV overwintering thanks to a direct transmission between cattle when viraemic cows calve, vectors being absent during the winter, (ii) a low level vector-based circulation during winter thanks to a residual vector population, without direct transmission between cattle, (iii) combination of both above mentioned mechanisms. Multi-model inference methods resulted in a model incorporating both a low level RVFV winter vector-borne transmission and a direct transmission between animals when viraemic cows calve. Predictions satisfactorily reproduced field observations, 84% of cattle infections being attributed to vector-borne transmission, and 16% to direct transmission. These results appeared robust according to the sensitivity analysis. Interweaving between agricultural works in rice fields, seasonality of vector proliferation, and cattle exchange practices could be a key element for understanding RVFV circulation in this area of Madagascar highlands. PMID:25474116

  11. A Spatially Explicit Metapopulation Model and Cattle Trade Analysis Suggests Key Determinants for the Recurrent Circulation of Rift Valley Fever Virus in a Pilot Area of Madagascar Highlands

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Gaëlle; Chevalier, Véronique; Tantely, Luciano Michaël; Fontenille, Didier; Durand, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a vector-borne zoonotic disease that causes high morbidity and mortality in ruminants. In 2008–2009, a RVF outbreak affected the whole Madagascar island, including the Anjozorobe district located in Madagascar highlands. An entomological survey showed the absence of Aedes among the potential RVF virus (RVFV) vector species identified in this area, and an overall low abundance of mosquitoes due to unfavorable climatic conditions during winter. No serological nor virological sign of infection was observed in wild terrestrial mammals of the area, suggesting an absence of wild RVF virus (RVFV) reservoir. However, a three years serological and virological follow-up in cattle showed a recurrent RVFV circulation. The objective of this study was to understand the key determinants of this unexpected recurrent transmission. To achieve this goal, a spatial deterministic discrete-time metapopulation model combined with cattle trade network was designed and parameterized to reproduce the local conditions using observational data collected in the area. Three scenarios that could explain the RVFV recurrent circulation in the area were analyzed: (i) RVFV overwintering thanks to a direct transmission between cattle when viraemic cows calve, vectors being absent during the winter, (ii) a low level vector-based circulation during winter thanks to a residual vector population, without direct transmission between cattle, (iii) combination of both above mentioned mechanisms. Multi-model inference methods resulted in a model incorporating both a low level RVFV winter vector-borne transmission and a direct transmission between animals when viraemic cows calve. Predictions satisfactorily reproduced field observations, 84% of cattle infections being attributed to vector-borne transmission, and 16% to direct transmission. These results appeared robust according to the sensitivity analysis. Interweaving between agricultural works in rice fields, seasonality of vector proliferation, and cattle exchange practices could be a key element for understanding RVFV circulation in this area of Madagascar highlands. PMID:25474116

  12. Flexural Rigidity of the Lithosphere as a Powerful Tool for the Continental Correlation: A study on the Paleo-fit of India and Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratheesh Kumar, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial configuration of continents can be analyzed through their response to long-term forces, as a function of the elastic property of the lithosphere, which is parameterized as effective elastic thickness (Te). The Te method has been widely used as a key proxy to examine the long-term strength/rigidity structure of the lithosphere. The present study employs the gravity inversion and flexure inversion techniques that operate in spatial domain in order to estimate the spatial variation of Te as well as the Moho configuration along the western continental margins of India (WCMI) and eastern continental margin of Madagascar (ECMM). The main objective of the present study is to understand the nature of isostasy and structure of the lithosphere along these conjugate passive margins. The results correlate well with the continental and oceanic regional-scale structures including ridges and basins in the WCMI and ECMM that reveal their mode of evolution. This study obtained comparable results from both the passive margins such as a linear zone of anomalously low-Te (1-5 km) along the WCMI (~1680 km long), which exactly correlates with the low-Te patterns obtained all along the ECMM. These low-Te zones along the passive margins are attributed as paleo-rift inception points of lithosphere thermally and mechanically weakened by the combined effects of the Marion hotspot and lithospheric extension due to rifting. When these conjugate passive margins were correlated by matching the mirrored low-Te linear zones, obtained a best fit position of Madagascar against India during the Gondwana Rifting time. The hence derived India-Madagascar paleo-fit model is well justified by the best close-fit of the crustal geometry and bathymetry of the continental shelf margins, and also by the matching of tectonic lineaments, lithology and geochronological belts along the margins of both the continents.

  13. Ammonite and inoceramid biostratigraphy and biogeography of the Cenomanian through basal Middle Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) of the Morondava Basin, western Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walaszczyk, Ireneusz; James Kennedy, William; Dembicz, Krzysztof; Gale, Andrew S.; Praszkier, Tomasz; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand H.; Randrianaly, Hasina

    2014-01-01

    The stratigraphic distribution of ammonite and inoceramid faunas of the richly fossiliferous Cenomanian through basal Middle Campanian (Upper Cretaceous) succession of the Morondava Basin, western Madagascar, is provided, and biozonations, based on both groups, are established. The correlation with former schemes is discussed and the chronostratigraphic potential of each of the groups is evaluated, with reference to their biogeographic affinities. The study is based on entirely new field collections at four sections in the central and southern part of the Morondava Basin: (1) Antsirasira-Ampolipoly, (2) Mahaboboka, (3) Vohipaly, and (4) Manasoa-on-Onilahy. Geological logs and field details of these sections are also provided.

  14. Bone Histology and Primary Growth Rates in Hatchling Titanosaurs from Madagascar: New Insights from Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, B. C.; Whitney, M.; Rogers, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Sauropods are the largest known terrestrial vertebrates and exhibit a greater ontogenetic variation in body size than any other taxon. More than 120 species of sauropods are known from the Jurassic and Cretaceous, and a wealth of specimens documents their enormous adult body sizes. Juvenile sauropods, in contrast, are rare. Though titanosaur eggs containing embryos have been recovered, to date the smallest known post-hatching juveniles are only a little less than half of known adult size, and details of the earliest stages of sauropod ontogeny remain particularly poorly understood. Here we report on two partial skeletons of hatchling Rapetosaurus krausei, a titanosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Maevarano Formation of Madagascar, and provide important new data on primary early stage growth rates in sauropods. The two partial skeletons come from different localities in the Anembalemba Member of the Maevarano Formation. There is no duplication of elements for either specimen. Comparison of greatest length ratios for appendicular elements to those of a complete sub-adult Rapetosaurus confirms that there are only two individuals present, that there is no significant allometry in Rapetosaurus postcranial ontogeny, and that each individual is less than 15% adult size. The smaller specimen includes a sacral neural arch, three caudal centra, three caudal neural arches, left pubis, right femur (maximum length [ml] = 19.3 cm), tibia (ml = 12.7 cm), and metacarpal III, left and right fibulae, humeri, and metatarsal I, and a phalanx. The larger specimen includes a caudal centrum and neural arch, right metacarpal I, right tibia (ml = 17.9 cm), and left metacarpal IV. In order to non-destructively sample these exceptional Rapetosaurus juvenile elements, we employed micro-computed tomography to garner bone histology data. The micro-computed tomography was carried out using an X5000 high-resolution microfocus X-ray CT system located in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota. The microfocus head has a minimum focal spot size of < 6 microns and the detector has a pixel pitch of 74.8 ?m. Machine parameters (e.g. voltage, current, tube to detector distance) vary based on sample size and desired magnification. For this study 70-100 kV (260-370 ?A) was sufficient to penetrate the samples and obtain good contrast. We were able to achieve an effective pixel pitch of 36-48 ?m for the larger samples and 14-28 ?m for sub-volumes. 2-D radiographs were collected and these data were reconstructed to produce a 3-D volume for visual analysis, and slices of the 3-D volume for quantitative analysis. Our results indicate that primary bone growth in Rapetosaurus is highly vascularized woven and fibrolamellar bone. However, even in these very small juvenile individuals, endosteal remodeling is common at the mid-diaphysis and extends in some areas into the mid-cortex. The presence of a single line of arrested growth is recorded in each individual. These results are surprising given the small size of the elements, and support the hypothesis that intensive remodeling observed in the bones of older juvenile Rapetosaurus may be dictated, at least in part, by resource limitations during periods of drought/ecological stress recorded in the Maevarano Formation of Madagascar.

  15. Effects of forest structure and composition on food availability for Varecia variegata at Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balko, E.A.; Underwood, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of a long-term field study that examined the effects of forest disturbance on the availability of palatable fruit and its utilization by V. variegata. Forest structure and tree species composition were measured in three adjacent study areas, with different histories of disturbance, in Ranomafana National Park (RNP), Madagascar. V. variegata abundance was monitored by frequent encounters with resident groups and periodic censuses conducted along trails. Finally, the abundance of mature fruit in species used by V. variegata was scored monthly at representative trees at several locations. V. variegata abundance was most consistent in the least anthropogenically disturbed site, while no established lemur groups were observed in the heavily logged site for over a decade post-harvest. Lemur abundance was variable in the selectively logged site. The presence of select food trees, particularly specimens with voluminous crowns capable of producing abundant fruit crops, appears to be key to the establishment and expansion of V variegata groups. Our analysis of year-long fruit utilization revealed a high degree of preference for several species of trees. Two species exhibited mature fruit in a low percentage of stems but were available for a protracted period of time, while two additional species showed high intraspecific fruiting synchrony and were available for a shorter period of time. These contrasting phenologies, rather than the individual tree species, may be most important to V. variegata due to their coincident timing of fruit maturation with key lemur life-history events. Any disturbance-natural or anthropogenic-that disrupts the phenology cycles of food trees has the potential to impact lemur abundance and dispersion. Intense disturbances, such as heavy logging or severe cyclones, have long-lasting impacts on fruit production, while selective logging or moderate cyclonic windthrow cause more transient impacts. V. variegata is adapted to deal with an intrinsically erratic food supply by virtue of its reproductive biology and social behavior.

  16. Predicting the impacts of climate change on the distribution of threatened forest-restricted birds in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Andriamasimanana, Rado H; Cameron, Alison

    2013-01-01

    The greatest common threat to birds in Madagascar has historically been from anthropogenic deforestation. During recent decades, global climate change is now also regarded as a significant threat to biodiversity. This study uses Maximum Entropy species distribution modeling to explore how potential climate change could affect the distribution of 17 threatened forest endemic bird species, using a range of climate variables from the Hadley Center's HadCM3 climate change model, for IPCC scenario B2a, for 2050. We explore the importance of forest cover as a modeling variable and we test the use of pseudo-presences drawn from extent of occurrence distributions. Inclusion of the forest cover variable improves the models and models derived from real-presence data with forest layer are better predictors than those from pseudo-presence data. Using real-presence data, we analyzed the impacts of climate change on the distribution of nine species. We could not predict the impact of climate change on eight species because of low numbers of occurrences. All nine species were predicted to experience reductions in their total range areas, and their maximum modeled probabilities of occurrence. In general, species range and altitudinal contractions follow the reductive trend of the Maximum presence probability. Only two species (Tyto soumagnei and Newtonia fanovanae) are expected to expand their altitude range. These results indicate that future availability of suitable habitat at different elevations is likely to be critical for species persistence through climate change. Five species (Eutriorchis astur, Neodrepanis hypoxantha, Mesitornis unicolor, Euryceros prevostii, and Oriola bernieri) are probably the most vulnerable to climate change. Four of them (E. astur, M. unicolor, E. prevostii, and O. bernieri) were found vulnerable to the forest fragmentation during previous research. Combination of these two threats in the future could negatively affect these species in a drastic way. Climate change is expected to act differently on each species and it is important to incorporate complex ecological variables into species distribution models. PMID:23610622

  17. Assessing natural resource use by forest-reliant communities in Madagascar using functional diversity and functional redundancy metrics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kerry A; Flynn, Dan F B; Abram, Nicola K; Ingram, J Carter; Johnson, Steig E; Wright, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Biodiversity plays an integral role in the livelihoods of subsistence-based forest-dwelling communities and as a consequence it is increasingly important to develop quantitative approaches that capture not only changes in taxonomic diversity, but also variation in natural resources and provisioning services. We apply a functional diversity metric originally developed for addressing questions in community ecology to assess utilitarian diversity of 56 forest plots in Madagascar. The use categories for utilitarian plants were determined using expert knowledge and household questionnaires. We used a null model approach to examine the utilitarian (functional) diversity and utilitarian redundancy present within ecological communities. Additionally, variables that might influence fluctuations in utilitarian diversity and redundancy--specifically number of felled trees, number of trails, basal area, canopy height, elevation, distance from village--were analyzed using Generalized Linear Models (GLMs). Eighteen of the 56 plots showed utilitarian diversity values significantly higher than expected. This result indicates that these habitats exhibited a low degree of utilitarian redundancy and were therefore comprised of plants with relatively distinct utilitarian properties. One implication of this finding is that minor losses in species richness may result in reductions in utilitarian diversity and redundancy, which may limit local residents' ability to switch between alternative choices. The GLM analysis showed that the most predictive model included basal area, canopy height and distance from village, which suggests that variation in utilitarian redundancy may be a result of local residents harvesting resources from the protected area. Our approach permits an assessment of the diversity of provisioning services available to local communities, offering unique insights that would not be possible using traditional taxonomic diversity measures. These analyses introduce another tool available to conservation biologists for assessing how future losses in biodiversity will lead to a reduction in natural resources and provisioning services from forests. PMID:21909413

  18. Beyond an AFLP genome scan towards the identification of immune genes involved in plague resistance in Rattus rattus from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Tollenaere, C; Jacquet, S; Ivanova, S; Loiseau, A; Duplantier, J-M; Streiff, R; Brouat, C

    2013-01-01

    Genome scans using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers became popular in nonmodel species within the last 10 years, but few studies have tried to characterize the anonymous outliers identified. This study follows on from an AFLP genome scan in the black rat (Rattus rattus), the reservoir of plague (Yersinia pestis infection) in Madagascar. We successfully sequenced 17 of the 22 markers previously shown to be potentially affected by plague-mediated selection and associated with a plague resistance phenotype. Searching these sequences in the genome of the closely related species Rattus norvegicus assigned them to 14 genomic regions, revealing a random distribution of outliers in the genome (no clustering). We compared these results with those of an in silico AFLP study of the R. norvegicus genome, which showed that outlier sequences could not have been inferred by this method in R. rattus (only four of the 15 sequences were predicted). However, in silico analysis allowed the prediction of AFLP markers distribution and the estimation of homoplasy rates, confirming its potential utility for designing AFLP studies in nonmodel species. The 14 genomic regions surrounding AFLP outliers (less than 300 kb from the marker) contained 75 genes encoding proteins of known function, including nine involved in immune function and pathogen defence. We identified the two interleukin 1 genes (Il1a and Il1b) that share homology with an antigen of Y. pestis, as the best candidates for genes subject to plague-mediated natural selection. At least six other genes known to be involved in proinflammatory pathways may also be affected by plague-mediated selection. PMID:23237097

  19. Novel, closely related, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) genotypes from Madagascar, Mozambique and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Le Groumellec, Marc; Lightner, Donald V

    2013-09-24

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is highly pathogenic to penaeid shrimp and has caused significant economic losses in the aquaculture industry around the world. During 2010 to 2012, WSSV caused severe mortalities in cultured penaeid shrimp in Saudi Arabia, Mozambique and Madagascar. To investigate the origins of these WSSV, we performed genotyping analyses at 5 loci: the 3 open reading frames (ORFs) 125, 94 and 75, each containing a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), and deletions in the 2 variable regions, VR14/15 and VR23/24. We categorized the WSSV genotype as {N125, N94, N75, ?X14/15, ?X23/24} where N is the number of repeat units in a specific ORF and ?X is the length (base pair) of deletion within the variable region. We detected 4 WSSV genotypes, which were characterized by a full-length deletion in ORF94/95, a relatively small ORF75 and one specific deletion length in each variable region. There are 2 closely related genotypes in these 3 countries: {6125, del94, 375, ?595014/15, ?1097123/24} and {7125, del94, 375, ?595014/15, ?1097123/24}, where del is the full-length ORF deletion. In Saudi Arabia, 2 other related types of WSSV were also found: {6125, 794, 375, ?595014/15, ?1097123/24} and {8125, 1394, 375, ?595014/15, ?1097123/24}. The identical patterns of 3 loci in these 4 types indicate that they have a common lineage, and this suggests that the WSSV epidemics in these 3 countries were from a common source, possibly the environment. PMID:24062547

  20. Cooperative rescue and predator fatality involving a group-living strepsirrhine, Coquerel's sifaka (Propithecus coquereli), and a Madagascar ground boa (Acrantophis madagascariensis).

    PubMed

    Gardner, Charlie J; Radolalaina, Patrick; Rajerison, Mahandry; Greene, Harry W

    2015-04-01

    The interactions between primates and their snake predators are of interest because snakes have influenced the evolution of primate visual systems and predation has driven the evolution of primate behaviour, including group living. However, there are few accounts of primate-snake interactions in the wild. We report an incident from Northwest Madagascar in which a large female Madagascar ground boa (Acrantophis madagascariensis) captured an adult female Coquerel's sifaka (Propithecus coquereli); upon capture, the prey's group members proceeded to bite and scratch the snake until it released the prey, which survived. However, a broken mandible suffered by the boa during the incident led to its death by starvation 2 months later. Our observations demonstrate that, in addition to improved predator detection and deterrence (i.e., mobbing), active defence against some predators may provide an additional benefit to group living in Coquerel's sifaka, and suggest that predation on group-living primates may be more costly for predators than attacking a solitary species of similar body size. PMID:25737055

  1. Sensitivity of a semi-arid tropical lake basin to environmental changes (Lake Ihotry basin, South-West of Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Maurin, A.; Gasse, F.; Ferry, L.; Robison, L.

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the study is to analyse the sensitivity of water ressources in a large semi-arid catchment, based on few hydro-meteorological and satellite images analysis. The site is located in the south-west of Madagascar. The catchment, which surface is 3000 km^2, is limited in its eastern side by a North-south relief up to 1000m high. The most important part of the catchment is made of a sandy plain, with a very poorly structured hydrographic network. The average annual precipitation varies in the catchment from 600 mm in the plain to 1000 mm in the mountains, with an an average temperature of 25^oC and an annual potential evapotranspiration rate of almost 2000mm. In the plain, surface and subsurface water circulation converges to Lake Ihotry, which has no surface outlet. The lake, very shallow, usually undergoes hudge seasonnal and inter-annual variations in water surface (from 60 to 120 km^2) and in water conductivity (from 7 to 23 mS/cm). In the catchment, no river flow data are available, partly because of the great instability of the hydrographic network. A dynamic model of lake water and salinity balances is used to establish the lake water balance and the temporal variations of water inflows, based on the daily data of precipitation, lake level and pan evaporation obtained during a 3 years field measurement campain. These results provide indirect data for validating a catchment hydrological model. We present the first results of the application of a semi-distributed hydrological modelling approach based on the determination of hydrological response units (HRU). The analysis of four stereoscopic couples of panchromatic SPOT scenes (10m resolution), allows to elaborate a digital elevation model and a vegetation map. The cultivated areas represent more than 20% of the total surface of the catchment, that is more than half of the plain. The delineation of the HRU’s is mainly based on the vegetation map, which seems to be a good integrator of the combined effects of pedology, geology, and topography on hydrological caracteristics. The hydrologic connectivity between the different HRU’s is established using available geological and geomorphological data. The catchment model will be used to study the sensitivity of the hydrological system to environmental changes in the different types of HRU. Special attention will be paid to the impact of irrigated cultivation on water availability and water salinity.

  2. Unusual evolution of silica-under- and -oversaturated alkaline rocks in the Cenozoic Ambohimirahavavy Complex (Madagascar): Mineralogical and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrade, Guillaume; Béziat, Didier; Salvi, Stefano; Tiepolo, Massimo; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Rakotovao, Soatsitohaina

    2014-10-01

    The almost unknown Ambohimirahavavy ring complex in the Cenozoic alkaline province of northwestern Madagascar has recently attracted considerable interest because of the discovery of important rare-metal mineralization. The complex consists of arc-shaped bodies made up of silica-under- and -oversaturated syenites and extremely evolved peralkaline granitic dykes, as well as several mafic to felsic volcanic units, including basalt, phonolite and trachyte, all of which have an alkaline affinity. Uranium-lead zircon ages of 24.2 ± 0.6 Ma and 23.5 ± 6.8 Ma have been obtained for nepheline syenites and peralkaline granitic dykes, respectively, which, together with field data and ages of neighboring complexes, support emplacement controlled by regional lithospheric structures, rather than an evolving hot spot. Whole-rock major and trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic data for the mafic suite suggest that the parental melt of this complex was generated by low degrees of melting of a metasomatized mantle source with residual amphibole. Fractional crystallization of this alkali basaltic melt likely produced the silica-undersaturated suite. We propose that the silica-oversaturated suite evolved from the undersaturated melt after contamination of the latter by crustal material. Further evolution to peralkaline compositions in both suites is attributed mainly to plagioclase and alkali feldspar segregation. Nepheline and feldspar compositions, as well as considerations of mineral equilibria among mafic silicates and Fe-Ti oxide minerals indicate crystallization temperatures of 1000 to 700 °C and an oxygen fugacity of 0.4 to 0.8 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer at 1 kbar for the silica-undersaturated melt, and temperatures of 860 to 570 °C and an oxygen fugacity of 1.5 to 3.8 log units below FMQ for the oversaturated syenitic melt. The undersaturated melt evolved towards a more peralkaline composition. Crystallization of arfvedsonite plus aegirine further reduced the melt the evolution of which ended with fluid exsolution. At late stages of crystallization, the oversaturated melt departed from the reducing trend of the undersaturated melt, evolving towards high oxygen fugacity. Very late exsolution of the fluid permitted concentration of the HFSE in the last stages of magmatic evolution with local production of low-temperature pegmatitic phases extremely enriched in these elements.

  3. A new geological framework for south-central Madagascar, and its relevance to the "out-of-Africa" hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Roig, J.Y.; Macey, P.H.; Delor, C.; Amelin, Y.; Armstrong, R.A.; Rabarimanana, M.H.; Ralison, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The Precambrian shield of south-central Madagascar, excluding the Vohibory region, consists of three geologic domains, from north to south: Antananarivo, Ikalamavony-Itremo, and Anosyen-Androyen. The northern Antananarivo domain represents the Neoarchean sector of the Greater Dharwar Craton amalgamated at 2.52-2.48. Ga. The Greater Dharwar Craton is overlain by several groups of Meso- to Neoproterozoic supracrustal rocks (Ambatolampy, Manampotsy, Ampasary, Sahantaha, and Maha Groups) each with a common and diagnostic signature of Paleoproterozoic detrital zircons (2.2-1.8. Ga). The central domain (Ikalamavony-Itremo) consists of two distinct parts. The Itremo Sub-domain, in the east, is a structurally intercalated sequence of Neoarchean gneiss and shallow marine metasedimentary rocks of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic age (Itremo Group), the latter with Paleoproterozoic detrital zircons ranging in age between 2.2 and 1.8. Ga. The Ikalamavony Sub-domain, to the west, contains abundant volcano-clastic metasediments and lesser quartzite (Ikalamavony Group), formed between 1.03. Ga and 0.98. Ga, and intruded by igneous rocks (Dabolava Suite) of Stenian-Tonian age. Structurally intercalated with these are sheets of Neoarchean gneiss (~2.5. Ga) and Neoproterozoic metaclastic rocks (Molo Group). Like the Itremo Group, quartzite of the Ikalamavony Group has detrital zircons of Paleoproterozoic age (2.1-1.8. Ga). The southern domain of Anosyen-Androyen consists of a newly recognized suite of Paleoproterozoic igneous rocks (2.0-1.8. Ga), and stratified supracrustal rocks also having Paleoproterozoic detrital zircons (2.3-1.8. Ga). The contact between the Anosyen-Androyen and Ikalamavony-Itremo domains, formerly known as the Ranotsara-Bongolava shear zone, is a tightly folded and highly flattened boundary that was ductilely deformed in Ediacaran time. It is roughly equivalent to the Palghat-Cauvery shear zone in south India, and it defines approximately the boundary between the Archean Greater Dharwar Craton (to the north) and the Paleoproterozoic terrane of Anosyen-Androyen (to the south).

  4. Viral and Atypical Bacterial Etiology of Acute Respiratory Infections in Children under 5 Years Old Living in a Rural Tropical Area of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Rabezanahary, Henintsoa; Randriamarotia, Martin; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Najjar, Josette; Vernet, Guy; Contamin, Bénédicte; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2012-01-01

    Background In Madagascar, very little is known about the etiology and prevalence of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in a rural tropical area. Recent data are needed to determine the viral and atypical bacterial etiologies in children with defined clinical manifestations of ARIs. Methods During one year, we conducted a prospective study on ARIs in children between 2 to 59 months in the community hospital of Ampasimanjeva, located in the south-east of Madagascar. Respiratory samples were analyzed by multiplex real-time RT-PCR, including 18 viruses and 2 atypical bacteria. The various episodes of ARI were grouped into four clinical manifestations with well-documented diagnosis: “Community Acquired Pneumonia”(CAP, group I), “Other acute lower respiratory infections (Other ALRIs, group II)”, “Upper respiratory tract infections with cough (URTIs with cough, group III)”and “Upper respiratory tract infections without cough (URTIs without cough, group IV)”. Results 295 children were included in the study between February 2010 and February 2011. Viruses and/or atypical bacteria respiratory pathogens were detected in 74.6% of samples, the rate of co-infection was 27.3%. Human rhinovirus (HRV; 20.5%), metapneumovirus (HMPV A/B, 13.8%), coronaviruses (HCoV, 12.5%), parainfluenza virus (HPIV, 11.8%) and respiratory syncytial virus A and B (RSV A/B, 11.8%) were the most detected. HRV was predominantly single detected (23.8%) in all the clinical groups while HMPV A/B (23.9%) was mainly related to CAP (group I), HPIV (17.3%) to the “Other ALRIs” (group II), RSV A/B (19.5%) predominated in the group “URTIs with cough” (group III) and Adenovirus (HAdV, 17.8%) was mainly detected in the “without cough” (group IV). Interpretation This study describes for the first time the etiology of respiratory infections in febrile children under 5 years in a malaria rural area of Madagascar and highlights the role of respiratory viruses in a well clinically defined population of ARIs. PMID:22912897

  5. Drilling in Current-Controlled Sedimentary Environments on the Southeast African Margin - The SAFARI Pre-Site Survey Challenges on the Madagascar, Mozambique and the South African Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, V.; Preu, B.; Schwenk, T.; Palamenghi, L.; Schneider, R.; Zahn, R.; Hall, I.

    2009-04-01

    As part of the global conveyer belt circulation, the Agulhas, Mozambique and Madagascar Currents are guided southward along the Southeast African margin as strong contour currents, affecting local sediment mobilization, redistribution and deposition. To gain a better understanding of their evolution through time, a transect of drill sites ranging from the southern tip of Africa to Madagascar was proposed by Zahn et al. (SAFARI, IODP proposal 702). As contour currents become erosive in their vicinity, deposition may be inhibited and incoming sediment will be redistributed. To find suitable drill sites, they must be positioned strategically to provide continuous depositional records on the one hand by not not being located in the core of the current, and to record variations in current activity and strength, which requires a certain proximity to the mean current position. Furthermore, sources of sediment and their spatial and temporal variability play a role for the interpretation of accumulation rates, provenance of particles, reconstruction of current velocities and terrestrial input, which can be compared as climate indicators with marine geochemical tracers. Six different working areas, West of Capetown, Natal Valley, Limpopo Cone, Zambezi margin, Davie Ridge and N-Madagascar margin, were visited during R/V Meteor Cruises M63/1 (2005) and M75/3 (2008) to gain an understanding of sediment deposition and to select sites for the drilling proposal. Main observations of both cruises were, in contrast to the expectation of margins being predominantly shaped by fan deposition and mass wasting processes, the widespread occurrences of large scales contourite bodies, which were situated between 100 and 1500 m water depth. They appear to be independent of the mechanisms and volume of sediment input, revealing a close relationship to the acting contour currents. Accordingly, the drift bodies appear to be suitable deposits which record the activity of the currents by sedimentologic properties. For the preparation of the drilling proposal we started to develop a regional stratigraphy to estimate accumulation rates and to reconstruct the shift of depocenters in space and time. Examples are shown for different working areas with a focus on the Limpopo and Zambezi, where extended drift deposits tell the story of onset and variation of the regional current systems.

  6. Nuclear factors GT1 and 3AF1 interact with multiple sequences within the promoter of the Tdc gene from Madagascar periwinkle: GT1 is involved in UV light-induced expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. B. F. Ouwerkerk; T. O. Trimborn; F. Hilliou; J. Memelink

    1999-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites of the terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) class comprise several compounds with pharmaceutical applications.\\u000a A key step in the TIA biosynthetic pathway is catalysed by the enzyme tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), which channels the primary\\u000a metabolite tryptophan into TIA metabolism. In Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle), the Tdc gene is expressed throughout plant development. Moreover, Tdc gene expression is induced

  7. Madagascar Explanation 2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Olsen

    2010-02-24

    This lesson is planned for third grade students. Students are provided a series of maps illustrating the geographic factors that influence the location of cities. Based upon these maps, students develop and revise hypotheses about why major cities are located where they are. This lesson serves as an introduction to a unit on the development of various communities, especially those indigenous to Utah. The purpose of the lesson is to have student develop initial generalizations concerning the influence that geographic features have upon the building of communities. Objectives Utah Core Curriculum Standards Standard 1: Students show how environments and communities change over time through the influence of people. Objective 1: Predict how human activity will influence environments and communities. b. Identify the influences of people on environments and environments on people. Standard 6: Students use map skills ...

  8. Madagascar Explanation 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brooke Robertshaw

    2010-02-17

    This lesson is planned for third grade students. Students are provided a series of maps illustrating the geographic factors that influence the location of cities. Based upon these maps, students develop and revise hypotheses about why major cities are located where they are. This lesson serves as an introduction to a unit on the development of various communities, especially those indigenous to Utah. The purpose of the lesson is to have student develop initial generalizations concerning the influence that geographic features have upon the building of communities. Objectives Utah Core Curriculum Standards Standard 1: Students show how environments and communities change over time through the influence of people. Objective 1: Predict how human activity will influence environments and communities. b. Identify the influences of people on environments and environments on people. Standard 6: Students use map skills ...

  9. The geology, SHRIMP U Pb geochronology and metallogenic significance of the Ankisatra-Besakay District, Andriamena belt, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabete, J.; Groves, D.; McNaughton, N.; Dunphy, J.

    2006-05-01

    The Ankisatra-Besakay District (A-BD), located about 200 km north of Antananarivo and 75 km east of Maevatanana in central-northern Madagascar, hosts two historical mines, the Ankisatra Pb-Zn ± Au and Besakay Pb-Ag mines. These shear-hosted en echelon quartz veins at Besakay and deformed tensional quartz veins at Ankisatra produced a total of 4446 t of lead and 156 t of zinc in the early 1940s. In addition, there is Pb-Zn-Cu mineralisation in both quartz-feldspar leucosome veins/bands and metasomatised granulite-facies mafic orthogneiss, Cu-Zn and associated Fe-Mn mineralisation in magnetite-pyrite enderbite breccia, and Cu-Zn mineralisation in retrograde shear zones in granulite-facies paragneiss in the A-BD. The country rocks in the A-BD consist of amphibolite to granulite-facies mafic and granitoid orthogneisses and paragneisses with horizons of silicate-facies BIF. The paragneissic rocks in the district tectonically overlie the biotite-granitoid hornfels and sub-volcanic mangeritic rocks, which are separated from amphibolite-facies alkali-feldspar granitoid and enderbitic rocks by a major structure. The A-BD is structurally characterised by: (1) E-W-trending tensional fractures, quartz veins and dolerite dykes; (2) buckling-related axial-planar fractures; and (3) N-S, NE-SW and NNE-SSW trending dextral strike-slip shear zones, dolerite sills and quartz veins in transpressional extensional zones. Uranium-Pb SHRIMP II geochronology of zircon constrains the peak of magmatic, metamorphic, deformational and metasomatic events in the A-BD. An important constraint is whether hosting terranes contain signatures of the ca. 1690-1590 Ma critical age window for world-class BHT Pb-Zn-Ag deposits elsewhere in the world. At least two magmatic events are recorded from the A-BD. An early magmatic event is recorded by a 2725 ± 12 Ma single xenocrystic magmatic zircon in the >2676 ± 6 Ma precursor to the granulite-facies mafic orthogneiss. A ca. 2503-2460 Ma event is recorded by a 2465 ± 6 Ma minimum age of magmatism for the precursor to metasomatised granulite-facies mafic orthogneiss and 2483 ± 20 Ma for the precursor to biotite-granitoid hornfels. Zircons extracted from both the metasomatised and unaltered granulite-facies mafic orthogneisses record peak metamorphic ages of 2465 ± 12 and 2390 ± 10 Ma, probably representing compressional deformation, partial melting, and associated local magmatic events within the ca. 2475-2380 Ma period. Inherited zircons from the quartzo-feldspathic granulite-facies paragneisses return ages of protolithic supracrustal rocks ranging from ca. 2870 to 1700 Ma. A widespread period of rifting, anatectic magmatism, basic-ultrabasic and mangerite magmatism, and related granulite-facies metamorphism occurred between ca. 820 and 780 Ma. The possible exhalative units (silicate-facies BIF and metasomatic, garnet-quartz-plagioclase rock) are of late-Archaean to early-Palaeoproterozoic, rather than Mesoproterozoic age. The terrane lacks the critical evolution age window of ca. 1770-1550 Ma, characteristic of well-documented BHT Provinces in the Broken Hill Block and Mt. Isa Block, Australia and ca. 1959-1135 Ma from the Bushmanland Ore District, South Africa. This suggests that either such an event did not occur in the crust now forming the A-BD or that the equivalent supracrustal rocks containing these age signatures were eroded during Proterozoic times. It is less likely that the intense 780-820 Ma event destroyed evidence for their prior existence. The galenas from the Ankisatra and Besakay deposits have signatures characteristic of small-scale mineralised systems which derived most of their lead from local crustal rocks older than ca. >2.7 Ga. They are thus atypical of BHT deposits and associated vein-style mineralisation from well-endowed terranes. It is concluded that there are neither direct signs nor indirect temporal signals of giant stratiform/stratabound BHT Pb-Zn-Ag mineralisation, nor clear evidence for the presence of characteristic transitional sequences and alteration styles asso

  10. Providing family planning services to remote communities in areas of high biodiversity through a Population-Health-Environment programme in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vik; Shellard, Tess

    2014-05-01

    Population-Health-Environment (PHE) is an interdisciplinary model of programme design which recognises the complex interconnections between people, their health and their environment. PHE responds holistically to the challenges faced by ecosystems and the communities dependent on them, with thematically distinct but interconnected work strands sharing the same infrastructure, resources and goals. This has been shown to achieve better outcomes than tackling health and environmental issues in isolation. This paper shows how PHE programme design has been used by Blue Ventures for providing family planning services in a remote, biodiverse coastal region in southwest Madagascar. The PHE programme has integrated family planning services into a pre-existing, community-based conservation programme, aided by the established infrastructure and good community relations developed by the conservation workers. Implementation of the programme has led to a strong uptake of family planning services, and couples in the region are now able to make their own family planning choices. Successes and challenges of the programme are discussed. PMID:24908460

  11. Gynecological Manifestations, Histopathological Findings, and Schistosoma-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Results Among Women With Schistosoma haematobium Infection: A Cross-sectional Study in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Randrianasolo, Bodo Sahondra; Jourdan, Peter Mark; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline; Ramarokoto, Charles Emile; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Ravaoalimalala, Vololomboahangy Elisabeth; Gundersen, Svein Gunnar; Feldmeier, Hermann; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding; van Lieshout, Lisette; Roald, Borghild; Leutscher, Peter; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke

    2015-01-01

    Background.?The pathophysiology of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) is only partially understood. This study aims to describe the histopathological findings, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results, and gynecological manifestations of FGS in women with different intensities of Schistosoma haematobium infection. Methods.?Women aged 15–35 years living in an S. haematobium-endemic area in Madagascar underwent pelvic and colposcopic examinations. Small biopsy specimens were obtained from lesions and examined histopathologically. Schistosoma PCR was done on urine, biopsy, cervicovaginal lavage, and genital mucosal surface specimens. Results.?Sandy patches and rubbery papules were found in 41 of 118 women (35%). Rubbery papules reflected an intense cellular immune reaction dominated by eosinophils, epithelial erosion, and viable ova. There was a significant decrease in the prevalence of rubbery papules with age, even after adjustment for urinary ova excretion. The sandy patches with grains showed moderate cellular immune reaction and ova (viable and/or calcified). They were most prevalent in cases with low-intensity urinary S. haematobium infection. Forty-two percent of women with Schistosoma-negative urine specimens had at least 1 genital specimen test positive for Schistosoma by PCR. Conclusions.?The results indicate a diversity of lesions caused by S. haematobium and a dynamic evolution of the genital lesions. Schistosoma PCR may give an indication of the diagnosis. PMID:25725656

  12. Integrative revision of the giant pill-millipede genus Sphaeromimus from Madagascar, with the description of seven new species (Diplopoda, Sphaerotheriida, Arthrosphaeridae)

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Thomas; Le, Daniel Minh-Tu; Loria, Stephanie F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Malagasy giant pill-millipede genus Sphaeromimus de Saussure & Zehntner, 1902 is revised. Seven new species, S. titanus sp. n., S. vatovavy sp. n., S. lavasoa sp. n., S. andohahela sp. n., S. ivohibe sp. n., S. saintelucei sp. n., and S. andrahomana sp. n. were discovered, in one case with the help of sequence data, in the rainforests of southeastern Madagascar. The species are described using light- and scanning electron microscopy. A key to all 10 species of the genus is presented. All but one (S. andohahela) of the newly discovered species are microendemics each occurring in isolated forest fragments. The mitochondrial COI barcoding gene was amplified and sequenced for 18 Sphaeromimus specimens, and a dataset containing COI sequences of 28 specimens representing all Sphaeromimus species (except S. vatovavy) was analyzed. All species are genetically monophyletic. Interspecific uncorrected genetic distances were moderate (4–10%) to high (18–25%), whereas intraspecific variation is low (0–3.5%). Sequence data allowed the correct identification of three colour morphs of S. musicus, as well as the identity of a cave specimen, which although aberrant in its morphology and colouration, was genetically identical to the holotype of S. andrahoma. PMID:25009417

  13. Integrative revision of the giant pill-millipede genus Sphaeromimus from Madagascar, with the description of seven new species (Diplopoda, Sphaerotheriida, Arthrosphaeridae).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas; Le, Daniel Minh-Tu; Loria, Stephanie F

    2014-01-01

    The Malagasy giant pill-millipede genus Sphaeromimus de Saussure & Zehntner, 1902 is revised. Seven new species, S. titanus sp. n., S. vatovavy sp. n., S. lavasoa sp. n., S. andohahela sp. n., S. ivohibe sp. n., S. saintelucei sp. n., and S. andrahomana sp. n. were discovered, in one case with the help of sequence data, in the rainforests of southeastern Madagascar. The species are described using light- and scanning electron microscopy. A key to all 10 species of the genus is presented. All but one (S. andohahela) of the newly discovered species are microendemics each occurring in isolated forest fragments. The mitochondrial COI barcoding gene was amplified and sequenced for 18 Sphaeromimus specimens, and a dataset containing COI sequences of 28 specimens representing all Sphaeromimus species (except S. vatovavy) was analyzed. All species are genetically monophyletic. Interspecific uncorrected genetic distances were moderate (4-10%) to high (18-25%), whereas intraspecific variation is low (0-3.5%). Sequence data allowed the correct identification of three colour morphs of S. musicus, as well as the identity of a cave specimen, which although aberrant in its morphology and colouration, was genetically identical to the holotype of S. andrahoma. PMID:25009417

  14. Emergence of rice yellow mottle virus in eastern Uganda: Recent and singular interplay between strains in East Africa and in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Ochola, Dennis; Issaka, Souley; Rakotomalala, Mbolarinosy; Pinel-Galzi, Agnès; Ndikumana, Innocent; Hubert, Judith; Hébrard, Eugénie; Séré, Yacouba; Tusiime, Geoffrey; Fargette, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics of rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) have developed recently in eastern Uganda, close to Lake Victoria in East Africa. Unexpectedly, all isolates from the affected area belonged to a single strain (named S4ug), a strain that is different from the S4lv strain that has been prevalent in the Lake Victoria basin for the past five decades. Interestingly, the S4ug strain is most closely related at the genomic level (except ORF1) to the strain present in Madagascar (S4mg), 2000km away. The minor parent of the S4mg recombinant strain could not be detected. Molecular clock dating analysis indicated that the singular sequence of events - that associated the emergence of a new strain (S4ug), a modular recombination between closely related strains (S4mg and S4ug) and a long distance transmission (S4mg) - occurred recently, within the past few decades. This finding is at variance with the process of gradual strain dispersal and diversification over two centuries throughout Africa that was previously established. PMID:25245592

  15. Late Quaternary climatic vegetational shifts in an ecological transition zone of northern Madagascar: insights from genetic analyses of two endemic rodent species.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, J-E; Raheriarisena, M; Goodman, S M

    2013-05-01

    The Loky-Manambato region, located in northern Madagascar, is a biotically rich contact zone between different forest biomes. Local current forest cover is composed of both humid and dry formations, which show elevational stratification. A recent phylogeographical study of a regional dry forest rodent, Eliurus carletoni (subfamily Nesomyinae), found genetic evidence of forest contractions between 18 750 and 7500 years BP, which based on extrapolation of the pollen subfossil record, was thought to be associated with an expansion of local humid forests. Herein, we conduct a genetic test of this hypothesis and focused on populations on two neighbouring massifs of forest-dependent rodent species, one associated with low-elevation dry forests (E. carletoni) and the other with higher elevation humid forests (Eliurus tanala). Using mitochondrial markers and a combination of traditional and coalescent-based phylogeographical, historical demographic and population genetic methods, we found evidence of historical connections between populations of E. tanala. Adjacent populations of E. carletoni and E. tanala exhibit opposite historical demographic patterns, and for both, evidence suggests that historical demographic events occurred within the last 25 000 years BP. These findings strongly support the proposed late Quaternary shifts in the floristic composition of the Loky-Manambato region. PMID:23621368

  16. Ring-Tailed Lemur (Lemur catta) Health Parameters across Two Habitats with Varied Levels of Human Disturbance at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Cora L; Norris, Aimee M; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; Youssouf Jacky, Ibrahim Antho

    2015-01-01

    The health of 36 wild, free-ranging ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve was assessed across 2 habitats of varied human impact: a reserve riverine gallery forest, and a degraded mixed dry deciduous and Alluaudia-dominated spiny forest. While there were no statistically significant differences in leukocyte count or differential between habitats, female lemurs in the reserve gallery forest had significantly higher percentages of monocytes and eosinophils than male lemurs in the gallery forest. Lemurs from the degraded spiny habitat had significantly higher mean packed cell volume, hematocrit, hemoglobin, total protein, blood urea nitrogen, chloride, ionized calcium and urine specific gravity than lemurs from the reserve gallery forest. These findings may reflect lower hydration levels in lemurs living in degraded habitat, providing evidence that environmental degradation has identifiable impacts on the physiology and health of wild, free-ranging ring-tailed lemurs living in nearby habitats. Given the greater evidence of human impact in the mixed dry deciduous/spiny forest habitat, a pattern seen throughout southern Madagascar, biomedical markers suggestive of decreased hydration can provide empirical data to inform new conservation policies facilitating the long-term survival of this lemur community. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:26022301

  17. A new microhylid frog, genus Rhombophryne, from northeastern Madagascar, and a re-description of R. serratopalpebrosa using micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Scherz, Mark D; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Vences, Miguel; Glaw, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The rainforests of the Marojejy massif in northern Madagascar are a well-known hotspot of amphibian species diversity and endemism. In the present paper, we re-describe Rhombophryne serratopalpebrosa (Guibé 1975), a cophyline microhylid frog from high altitude on this massif, based on a re-examination of its holotype, and describe Rhombophryne vaventy sp. nov. using characters of external morphology and osteology, illustrated by pdf-embedded comparative 3D models of their skeletons. Rhombophryne serratopalpebrosa differs from R. vaventy sp. nov. by smaller size (28 mm snout-vent length vs. 52.9 mm), skin texture (granular vs. rough and tubercular skin respectively), supratympanic fold shape (strong, long and straight reaching the eye vs. curved and not extending anteriorly beyond the tympanum), relative tympanum diameter (78% vs. 41% of eye diameter), shape of the postchoanal prevomerine palate, shape of the footplate of the columella, length of prepollex, and by other subtle osteological features. Morphological comparisons suggest that a specimen from Ambolokopatrika assigned to R. serratopalpebrosa in previous genetic studies might belong to yet another undescribed species, closely related to R. vaventy sp. nov., whereas DNA sequences of the topotypic R. serratopalpebrosa remain unknown. We therefore emphasise the need for collecting additional material from high altitudes of the Marojejy massif to understand the systematics, as well as the natural history, of this poorly known species. For the new species described herein, we propose a Red List threat status of Vulnerable, in line with other Marojejy endemics from a similar altitude.  PMID:25283290

  18. Structural and Synthetic Investigations of Tanikolide Dimer, a SIRT2 Selective Inhibitor, and Tanikolide Seco Acid from the Madagascar Marine Cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Marcelino; Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Shin, Won Kyo; Goeger, Douglas E.; Yokochi, Alexandre; Schemies, Jörg; Jung, Manfred; France, Dennis; Cornell-Kennon, Susan; Lee, Eun; Gerwick, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Tanikolide seco acid 2 and tanikolide dimer 3, the latter a novel and selective SIRT2 inhibitor, were isolated from the Madagascar marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula. The structure of 2, isolated as the pure R enantiomer, was elucidated by an X-ray experiment in conjunction with NMR and optical rotation data, whereas the depside molecular structure of 3 was initially thought to be a meso compound as established by NMR, MS and chiral HPLC analyses. Subsequent total synthesis of the three tanikolide dimer stereoisomers 4, 5, and ent-5, followed by chiral GC-MS comparisons with the natural product, showed it to be exclusively the R,R-isomer 5. Tanikolide dimer 3 (=5) inhibited SIRT2 with an IC50 = 176 nM in one assay format, and 2.4 µM in another. Stereochemical determination of symmetrical dimers such as compound 3 pose intriguing and subtle questions in structure elucidation, and as shown in the current work, are perhaps best answered in conjunction with total synthesis. PMID:19572575

  19. APPORT DU DECOUPAGE INFRA-COMMUNAL EN IRIS DANS LA SURVEILLANCE EPIDEMIOLOGIQUE DU CANCER DU POUMON

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra Senkowski; Marc Colonna; Dominique Bicout

    RESUME : La réalisation d'un Atlas du cancer dans l'agglomération grenobloise avait permis de révéler des disparités de répartition spatiale de l'incidence du cancer du poumon masculin à l'échelle communale. L'objectif de ce travail était donc d'utiliser une nouvelle échelle spatiale d'analyse (l'IRIS) pour déterminer si les disparités observées ne cachaient pas des disparités infra-communales passées inaperçues. Des excédents et

  20. Aspects epidemiologiques, cliniques et therapeutiques des otites externes: à propos de 801 cas

    PubMed Central

    Bathokedeou, Amana; Essobozou, Pegbessou; Akouda, Patassi; Essohanam, Boko; Eyawelohn, Kpémissi

    2014-01-01

    L'objectif de ce travail etait de déterminer l’épidémiologie, la clinique et la thérapeutique des otites externes (OE). Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective d'une année menée du 1er janvier au 31 décembre 2006 dans le service ORL du CHU-Tokoin. Huit cent un cas d'otite externe (OE) soit 11,9% des consultations étaient recensés. Le sexe féminin représentait 476 cas (59,42%). Le sex ratio était de 0,68. L’âge moyen des patients était de 25,4 ans avec des extrêmes de 05 mois et 81 ans. La tranche d’âge de 0-15 ans était la plus fréquente avec 360 cas (45%). L'allergie dans 74 cas (60,66%), la lésion de grattage dans 24 cas (19,67%), les corps étrangers du conduit auditif externe dans 18 cas (14,75%) et la natation dans 6 cas (4,92%) étaient les facteurs favorisants. L'otalgie dans 638 cas (79,65%) était le symptôme le plus fréquent. Les différentes formes cliniques des otites externes se répartissaient comme suit: otite externe diffuse dans 612 cas (76,40%), furoncle du CAE 126 dans cas (15,73%), otomycose dans 58 cas (7,24%), zona du conduit auditif externe dans 3 cas (0,37%) et otite externe nécrosante dans 2 cas (0,25%). Les gouttes auriculaires étaient administrées à tous les patients. L’évolution avait noté 799 patients (99,75%) guéris sans complication, un cas de décès et un cas de guérison avec séquelle. Traitée correctement, l'otite externe guérit sans complication. Son éviction passe par une sensibilisation des populations sur l'entretien du conduit auditif externe. PMID:25379111

  1. Profil epidemiologique des brulures d'enfants admis au Centre National des Brules, Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, A.; Atannaz, J.; Alaoui, M.; Rafik, A.; Ezzoubi, M.; Diouri, M.; Chlihi, A.; Bahechar, N.; Boukind, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ce travail rétrospectif analyse les particularités épidémiologiques de 543 cas de brûlures d'enfants, représentant 45,7% des admissions de notre centre, en vue de déterminer les éléments pouvant contribuer à renforcer la prévention, qui reste le traitement de choix de cette pathologie. La moyenne d'âge est de 4,25 ans avec une prédilection pour la tranche d'âge d'un à cinq ans, avec 42,5% des cas. Une atteinte masculine est retrouvée dans 63,5% des cas. La brûlure survient à domicile dans 85,1% et accidentellement dans 95% des cas. Les brûlures thermiques représentent 96,5% des causes dominées par les liquides dans 69,3% des cas. La surface cutanée brûlée est ? 20% dans 52,3%. La brûlure intéresse essentiellement les membres supérieurs (79,1%). 56,8% des enfants sont transférés par d'autres hôpitaux et le délai de prise en charge hospitalière est supérieur à 6 heures dans 65,5%. Le taux de mortalité a été de 13,2%. PMID:22639559

  2. LA SARCOSPORIDIOSE DES RUMINANTS AU MAROC ETUDE EPIDEMIOLOGIQUE PAR DEUX TECHNIQUES HISTOLOGIQUES

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    .8-16.2). Three factors of variations were considered: the host species, the age and the sex. Only the sex factor and 95.5% for sheep. This shows the particular role of oesophagus in sarcosporidiosis. In cattle-acute, diffuse or localized, with cell predominance. The cell reactinn is mostly of histio-monocytic type

  3. Cryogenian (˜830 Ma) mafic magmatism and metamorphism in the northern Madurai Block, southern India: A magmatic link between Sri Lanka and Madagascar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, William; Collins, Alan S.; Foden, John; Payne, Justin L.; Plavsa, Diana; Chetty, T. R. K.; Santosh, M.; Fanning, Mark

    2011-08-01

    The northern Madurai Block, southern India, lies directly south of, and partly deformed by, the Palghat-Cauvery Shear Zone System (PCSS) - a potential suture of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique Ocean. The Kadavur gabbro-anorthosite complex lies south of the PCSS, in the northern Madurai Block, and crystallized at 829 ± 14 Ma (LA-ICPMS zircon data) in a supra-subduction zone setting. The complex contains zircon ?Hf(t) values of -12.5 to -8.6 that represent Palaeoproterozoic T(DM) model ages (2.3-2.5 Ga). These broadly agree with a whole rock neodymium T(DM) model age of 2287 Ma. Oxygen isotope ? 18O ratios range from 5.82‰ and 6.74‰. The parental magma for the gabbro-anorthosites are interpreted to be derived from a juvenile Neoproterozoic mantle contaminated by Mesoarchaean igneous infra-crustal sources. The gabbro-anorthosites intrude quartzites with dominantly Palaeoproterozoic detrital zircons that contain Neoarchaean and Mesoarchaean hafnium model ages. These quartzite zircons contain metamorphic rims that yield an age of 843 ± 23 Ma demonstrating the autochthonous nature of the gabbro-anorthosite complex. Later felsic magmatism is recorded by the 766 ± 8 Ma crystallisation age of the protolith of a felsic gneiss. Cryogenian magmatism in the Madurai Block is interpreted to form part of an extensive arc magmatic province within the southern East African Orogen that can be traced from central Madagascar, through southern India to the Wanni Complex of Sri Lanka. This province is interpreted to have formed above a south/west dipping subduction system as the Mozambique Ocean was subducted under the Neoproterozoic continent Azania.

  4. Ecological effects of the invasive giant madagascar day gecko on endemic mauritian geckos: applications of binomial-mixture and species distribution models.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Gallagher, Laura E; Henshaw, Sion M; Besnard, Aurélien; Tucker, Rachel M; Bachraz, Vishnu; Ruhomaun, Kevin; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii) to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos. We used hierarchical binomial mixture models and repeated visual estimate surveys to calculate the abundance of the endemic geckos in sites with and without P. grandis. The predicted range of each species varied from 85 km2 to 376 km2. Sixty percent of the predicted range of P. grandis overlapped with the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos; 15% of the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos overlapped with P. grandis. Levin's niche breadth varied from 0.140 to 0.652 between P. grandis and the four endemic geckos. The abundance of endemic geckos was 89% lower in sites with P. grandis compared to sites without P. grandis, and the endemic geckos had been extirpated at four of ten sites we surveyed with P. grandis. Species Distribution Modelling, together with the breadth metrics, predicted that P. grandis can partly share the equivalent niche with endemic species and survive in a range of environmental conditions. We provide strong evidence that smaller endemic geckos are unlikely to survive in sympatry with P. grandis. This is a cause of concern in both Mauritius and other countries with endemic species of Phelsuma. PMID:24785293

  5. The Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don: Plastid Genome Evolution, Molecular Marker Identification, and Phylogenetic Implications in Asterids.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chuan; Chung, Wan-Chia; Chen, Ling-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthusroseus in the family Apocynaceae) is an important medicinal plant and is the source of several widely marketed chemotherapeutic drugs. It is also commonly grown for its ornamental values and, due to ease of infection and distinctiveness of symptoms, is often used as the host for studies on phytoplasmas, an important group of uncultivated plant pathogens. To gain insights into the characteristics of apocynaceous plastid genomes (plastomes), we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete plastome of C. roseus, which could be applied to other C. roseus-related studies. The C. roseus plastome is the second completely sequenced plastome in the asterid order Gentianales. We performed comparative analyses with two other representative sequences in the same order, including the complete plastome of Coffeaarabica (from the basal Gentianales family Rubiaceae) and the nearly complete plastome of Asclepiassyriaca (Apocynaceae). The results demonstrated considerable variations in gene content and plastome organization within Apocynaceae, including the presence/absence of three essential genes (i.e., accD, clpP, and ycf1) and large size changes in non-coding regions (e.g., rps2-rpoC2 and IRb-ndhF). To find plastome markers of potential utility for Catharanthus breeding and phylogenetic analyses, we identified 41 C. roseus-specific simple sequence repeats. Furthermore, five intergenic regions with high divergence between C. roseus and three other euasterids I taxa were identified as candidate markers. To resolve the euasterids I interordinal relationships, 82 plastome genes were used for phylogenetic inference. With the addition of representatives from Apocynaceae and sampling of most other asterid orders, a sister relationship between Gentianales and Solanales is supported. PMID:23825699

  6. Prevention of Tungiasis and Tungiasis-Associated Morbidity Using the Plant-Based Repellent Zanzarin: A Randomized, Controlled Field Study in Rural Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Thielecke, Marlene; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Rogier, Christophe; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Richard, Vincent; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Background Tungiasis, a parasitic skin disease caused by the female sand flea Tunga penetrans, is a prevalent condition in impoverished communities in the tropics. In this setting, the ectoparasitosis is associated with important morbidity. It causes disfigurement and mutilation of the feet. Feasible and effective treatment is not available. So far prevention is the only means to control tungiasis-associated morbidity. Methodology In two villages in Central Madagascar, we assessed the efficacy of the availability of closed shoes and the twice-daily application of a plant-based repellent active against sand fleas (Zanzarin) in comparison to a control group without intervention. The study population was randomized into three groups: shoe group, repellent group and control group and monitored for ten weeks. The intensity of infestation, the attack rate and the severity of tungiasis-associated morbidity were assessed every two weeks. Findings In the repellent group, the median attack rate became zero already after two weeks. The intensity of the infestation decreased constantly during the observation period and tungiasis-associated morbidity was lowered to an insignificant level. In the shoe group, only a marginal decrease in the intensity of infestation and in the attack rate was observed. At week 10, the intensity of infestation, the attack rate and the severity score for acute tungiasis remained significantly higher in the shoe group than in the repellent group. Per protocol analysis showed that the protective effect of shoes was closely related to the regularity with which shoes were worn. Conclusions Although shoes were requested by the villagers and wearing shoes was encouraged by the investigators at the beginning of the study, the availability of shoes only marginally influenced the attack rate of female sand fleas. The twice-daily application of a plant-based repellent active against sand fleas reduced the attack to zero and lowered tungiasis-associated morbidity to an insignificant level. PMID:24069481

  7. Fifty years of changes in reef flat habitats of the Grand Récif of Toliara (SW Madagascar) and the impact of gleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andréfouët, S.; Guillaume, M. M. M.; Delval, A.; Rasoamanendrika, F. M. A.; Blanchot, J.; Bruggemann, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    The Grand Récif of Toliara (GRT) in Madagascar is a large (33 km2) barrier reef system of the SW Indian Ocean that had been well investigated in the 1960s and early 1970s. A massive degradation of the reef has been reported since at least the early 1980s, just a few years after research activities ceased in the area. Examination of historical aerial photographs and modern high-resolution remote sensing images confirms a continuous loss of coral habitat on GRT outer reef flats between 1962 and 2011, with an average loss of 65 % and a range of 37-79 % loss during this 50-year period. The usual suspects of coral community declines (cyclones, bleaching and sedimentation) may have contributed to the demise of the GRT. However, an independent study (Salimo 1997) suggests that the chronic pressure of fisherman gleaning on reef flats with destructive tools is the main driver of the observed changes. Salimo's reported level of frequentation (6.8 fishermen per day and per km-2) and rates of destruction per fisherman (7.7 m2 of coral habitat h-1) yield a cumulated overall loss in agreement with the image-based rates of habitat loss. The GRT is unlikely to recover because this chronic stress is unlikely to decrease in the near future. Indeed, the GRT daily provides subsistence fishery resources for local Vezo people and to agriculturalist or pastoralist ethnic groups who have turned to exploiting coastal resources due to increasing aridity and dwindling agricultural and livestock production.

  8. The giant Madagascar hissing-cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa) as a source of antagonistic moulds: concerns arising from its use in a public setting.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Jay A; Glenn, Brian D; Benoit, Joshua B; Zettler, Lawrence W

    2008-03-01

    Cockroaches and their excreta have been linked to allergies and childhood asthma. The giant Madagascar hissing-cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa), heralded as an educational tool in classrooms, museums, zoos, is now available to the public as a children's pet raising health concerns. We provide a catalogue of potentially antagonistic moulds associated with this insect. Specimens were obtained from laboratories, classrooms, pet stores and private homes. Three different agar media were used to culture moulds from both internal and external cockroach surfaces. Pure cultures were obtained from hyphal tips excised by scalpel. A total of 14 mould taxa were obtained, mostly from external surfaces. The mycoflora was dominated by species of Rhizopus, Penicillium, Mucor, Trichoderma and Alternaria, and differed little among nymphs, adults, cast skins (exuviae) and faeces. A two-fold increase of Aspergillus niger isolates, however, was detected in exuviae and faeces. The mycoflora appeared to be equally distributed on the body regions in nymphs and adults alike. Most of the moulds recovered are common, well-known saprophytes with a prolific ability to produce asexual spores (e.g. conidia) when supplied with adequate moisture and an organic substrate (e.g. vegetable matter, pet food and exuviae). Cockroach rearing conditions thus serve as an ideal environment for mould growth and proliferation, and the subsequent use (handling) of these insects in a public forum increases the risk of inducing mould-related allergies in humans. Of special concern are moulds also capable of causing secondary infections (e.g. Rhizopus, Mucor, Aspergillus), gaining entry via open wounds and inhalation. This is mainly a point of public awareness aimed at individuals (especially children) prone to infections and allergies that might be exposed to this insect and/or its rearing conditions. PMID:18254744

  9. Ecological Effects of the Invasive Giant Madagascar Day Gecko on Endemic Mauritian Geckos: Applications of Binomial-Mixture and Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C.; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Gallagher, Laura E.; Henshaw, Sion M.; Besnard, Aurélien; Tucker, Rachel M.; Bachraz, Vishnu; Ruhomaun, Kevin; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii) to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos. We used hierarchical binomial mixture models and repeated visual estimate surveys to calculate the abundance of the endemic geckos in sites with and without P. grandis. The predicted range of each species varied from 85 km2 to 376 km2. Sixty percent of the predicted range of P. grandis overlapped with the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos; 15% of the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos overlapped with P. grandis. Levin's niche breadth varied from 0.140 to 0.652 between P. grandis and the four endemic geckos. The abundance of endemic geckos was 89% lower in sites with P. grandis compared to sites without P. grandis, and the endemic geckos had been extirpated at four of ten sites we surveyed with P. grandis. Species Distribution Modelling, together with the breadth metrics, predicted that P. grandis can partly share the equivalent niche with endemic species and survive in a range of environmental conditions. We provide strong evidence that smaller endemic geckos are unlikely to survive in sympatry with P. grandis. This is a cause of concern in both Mauritius and other countries with endemic species of Phelsuma. PMID:24785293

  10. Effect of incentives on insecticide-treated bed net use in sub-Saharan Africa: a cluster randomized trial in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality due to malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. Strategies using incentives to increase ITN use could be more efficient than traditional distribution campaigns. To date, behavioural incentives have been studied mostly in developed countries. No study has yet looked at the effect of incentives on the use of ITNs. Reported here are the results of a cluster randomized controlled trial testing household-level incentives for ITN use following a free ITN distribution campaign in Madagascar. Methods The study took place from July 2007 until February 2008. Twenty-one villages were randomized to either intervention or control clusters. Households in both clusters received a coupon redeemable for one ITN. After one month, intervention households received a bonus for ITN use, determined by visual confirmation of a mounted ITN. Data were collected at baseline, one month and six months. Both unadjusted and adjusted results, using cluster specific methods, are presented. Results At baseline, 8.5% of households owned an ITN and 6% were observed to have a net mounted over a bed in the household. At one month, there were no differences in ownership between the intervention and control groups (99.5% vs. 99.4%), but net use was substantially higher in the intervention group (99% vs. 78%), with an adjusted risk ratio of 1.24 (95% CI: 1.10 to 1.40; p < 0.001). After six months, net ownership had decreased in the intervention compared to the control group (96.7% vs. 99.7%), with an adjusted risk ratio of 0.97 (p < 0.01). There was no difference between the groups in terms of ITN use at six months; however, intervention households were more likely to use a net that they owned (96% vs. 90%; p < 0.001). Conclusions Household-level incentives have the potential to significantly increase the use of ITNs in target households in the immediate-term, but, over time, the use of ITNs is similar to households that did not receive incentives. Providing incentives for behaviour change is a promising tool that can complement traditional ITN distribution programmes and improve the effectiveness of ITN programmes in protecting vulnerable populations, especially in the short-term. PMID:20579392

  11. Supervised classifications of Landsat TM band ratio images and Landsat TM band ratio image with radar for geological interpretations of central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzana, Jennifer; Kusky, Tim; Higgs, Gary; Tucker, Robert

    2003-08-01

    Landsat TM and radar JERS-1 SAR (L-Band) imagery of the Itremo area, central Madagascar, were processed to emphasize structural geology features including folded quartzite ridges and plutons. TM band ratios 5/7, 5/1, 5/4?3/4 were assigned to RGB. Band 5/7 highlights pelitic schist, band 5/1 emphasizes mafic igneous rocks, and 5/4?3/4 distinguishes mafic from non-mafic rocks. In a second technique, band 5/7 was replaced with registered L-band radar imagery because radar is useful for differentiating between granite, granodiorite, diorite and serpentinite. The last technique evaluated in this study used the spectral information from the radar image as well as the 5/7, 5/1, 5/4?3/4 band ratio bands. Supervised classification training sites were selected using nine classes (clouds, quartzite, schist, gneiss, gabbro and basalt, granite, vegetation, water, and cloud shadows). The band ratio classification results are fairly accurate (a confusion matrix shows an accuracy of 89.346) and correspond well with geologic maps of the area showing complexly refolded nappes of quartzite, carbonate, schist, gneiss and gabbro, intruded by late granites. The radar, 5/1, 5/4?3/4 classification (accuracy of 89.04) shows significant differences from the band ratio classification, with fewer schist pixels displayed in the radar, 5/1, 5/4?3/4 classification, but with greater resolution of structural features including faults, fold nappes, and foliations. More pixels are displayed as mafic gneiss, and fewer quartzites appear in the radar classification. Some areas classified as quartzite in the first classification (and on the geologic maps) were classified as clouds in the radar/band ratio classification. This indicates that the 5/7 band contains significant spectral information that the radar band does not contain, which aided in mapping quartzite. This comparison illustrates that combined use of TM band ratioing merged with radar imagery can emphasize both spectral and textural features that aid geologic mapping using supervised classifications. A third technique was examined where a supervised classification was performed on an image containing the 5/7, 5/1, 5/4?3/4, and radar bands. The confusion matrix for this classification produced an accuracy of 91.23 which was better than either the 5/7, 5/1, 5/4?3/4 or the radar, 5/1, 5/4?3/4. It is preferable to keep all band ratio bands and the radar band to produce the most complete supervised classification image for geological feature discrimination.

  12. Tectonic history of the Itremo region, Madagascar, based on field and U/Pb geochronology, and supervised classifications of Landsat TM band ratio images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, T.; Tucker, R.; Inzana, J.; Raharimahefa, T.

    2003-04-01

    Landsat TM and Radar JERS-1 SAR (L-Band) imagery of the Itremo area, central Madagascar, were processed to emphasize structural features including folded quartzite ridges and pluton/country rock relationships. Late Archean to Paleoproterozoic migmatitic gneiss and schist are overlain by Mesoproterozoic stratified rocks. Proterozoic (˜1000 Ma--720 Ma) plutonic rocks were emplaced into both units above, and latest Neoproterozoic to middle Cambrian (˜570--520 Ma) granitoids were emplaced as regionally discordant and weakly foliated plutons throughout the region. TM band ratio images combined with registered L-band radar imagery and supervised classifications were made to emphasize both spectral and textural features, resulting in accurate resolution of geologic units and structural features. New field observations, analysis of satellite imagery, and isotopic measurements provide important constraints on the tectonic history of the region. Archean gneisses and Mesoproterozoic stratified rocks are the crystalline basement and platformal sedimentary cover, respectively, of a continental fragment of undetermined tectonic affinity (East or West Gondwanan, or neither). This continental fragment was invaded by subduction-related plutons from ˜1000 to ˜720 Ma, emplaced prior to regional metamorphism and deformation. Continental collision related to Gondwana's amalgamation began after ˜720 Ma and before ˜570 Ma. Collision related deformation and metamorphism continued through the Neoproterozoic with thermal effects lasting until ˜520 Ma. The oldest structures produced during continental collision are km-scale fold-thrust-nappes with east-southeast-directed vergence, resulting in inversion and repetition of Archean and Proterozoic rocks. During this early phase of convergence warm rocks were thrust over cool rocks producing the present distribution of regional metamorphic isograds. The vergence of nappes and distribution of metamorphic rocks are consistent with deformation in a zone of west or northwest-dipping continental convergence. Later upright folding of the nappes produced km-scale fold interference patterns. The geometry and orientation of these younger upright folds is consistent with E-W horizontal shortening within a sinistral transpressive regime, related to motion along the Ranotsara and related shear zones, and to initial phases of lower crustal exhumation and extensional tectonics in greater Gondwana.

  13. More than just talk: the framing of transactional sex and its implications for vulnerability to HIV in Lesotho, Madagascar and South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 'Transactional sex' was regarded by the mid-1990s as an important determinant of HIV transmission, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Little attention has been paid to what the terms used to denote transactional sex suggest about how it is understood. This study provides a nuanced set of descriptions of the meaning of transactional sex in three settings. Furthermore, we discuss how discourses around transactional sex suggest linkages to processes of globalization and hold implications for vulnerability to HIV. Methods The analysis in this article is based on three case studies conducted as part of a multi-country research project that investigated linkages between economic globalization and HIV. In this analysis, we contextualize and contrast the 'talk' about transactional sex through the following research methods in three study sites: descriptions revealed through semi-structured interviews with garment workers in Lesotho; focus groups with young women and men in Antananarivo, Madagascar; and focus groups and in-depth interviews with young women and men in Mbekweni, South Africa. Results Participants' talk about transactional sex reveals two themes: (1) 'The politics of differentiation' reflects how participants used language to demarcate identities, and distance themselves from contextually-based marginalized identities; and (2) 'Gender, agency and power' describes how participants frame gendered-power within the context of transactional sex practices, and reflects on the limitations to women's power as sexual agents in these exchanges. Talk about transactional sex in our study settings supports the assertion that emerging transactional sexual practices are linked with processes of globalization tied to consumerism. Conclusions By focusing on 'talk' about transactional sex, we locate definitions of transactional sex, and how terms used to describe transactional sex are morally framed for people within their local context. We take advantage of an opportunity to comparatively explore such talk across three different study sites, and contribute to a better understanding of both emerging sexual practices and their implications for HIV vulnerability. Our work underlines that transactional sex needs to be reflected as it is perceived: something very different from, but of at least equal concern to, formal sex work in the efforts to curb HIV transmission. PMID:21961516

  14. Annual report 2005 Baobabs, Madagascar

    E-print Network

    and coastal waters 14-16 Food security in the South 17-19 Public health and health policy 20-22 Globalisation, volunteers 821 3 @ @ @@ French Polynesia Mexico Ecuador Peru Bolivia Brazil Argentina Sweden Switzerland in Gabon. Two campaigns, Amadeus and Esmeraldas, explored major earthquake zone off the coasts of Peru

  15. Compliance, Safety, and Effectiveness of Fixed-Dose Artesunate-Amodiaquine for Presumptive Treatment of Non-Severe Malaria in the Context of Home Management of Malaria in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Ravony, Harintsoa; Vonimpaisomihanta, Jeanne-Aimée; Raherinjafy, Rogelin; Jahevitra, Martial; Rapelanoro, Rabenja; Rakotomanga, Jean De Dieu Marie; Malvy, Denis; Millet, Pascal; Ménard, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Home management of malaria is recommended for prompt, effective antimalarial treatment in children less than five years of age. Compliance, safety, and effectiveness of the new fixed-dose artesunate-amodiaquine regimen used to treat suspected malaria were assessed in febrile children enrolled in a 24-month cohort study in two settings in Madagascar. Children with fever were asked to visit community health workers. Presumptive antimalarial treatment was given and further visits were scheduled for follow-up. The primary endpoint was the risk of clinical/parasitologic treatment failure. Secondary outcomes included fever/parasite clearance, change in hemoglobin levels, and frequency of adverse events. The global clinical cure rate was 98.4% by day 28 and 97.9% by day 42. Reported compliance was 83.4%. No severe adverse effects were observed. This study provides comprehensive data concerning the clinical cure rate obtained with artesunate-amodiaquine and evidence supporting the scaling up of home management of malaria. PMID:22302849

  16. The IRD around Planting out rice, Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Africa and the Middle East The IRD is working on European projects in Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. In Tunisia it is lead partner in the internationally-known MERGUSIE programme

  17. SIX NEW GAERTNERA (RUBIACEAE) SPECIES FROM MADAGASCAR

    E-print Network

    Malcomber, Simon

    . pauciflora S. T. Malcomber & A. P. Davis. Distribution maps are provided for all species and four species with parenchy- ma bands, and compound pollen apertures with crescent-shaped costae (Igersheim et al., 1994

  18. Informe sobre actividades 2005 Baobabs, Madagascar

    E-print Network

    representaciones 1-3 4-6 7-12 13-25 26-50 51-62 105 133 @ Bélgica Marruecos El IRD en el mundo Véase página 60 la reforzó la presencia del IRD en el mediterráneo gracias a la apertura de una representación en Marruecos

  19. DIET OF THE MADAGASCAR HARRIER-HAWK, POLYBOROIDES RADIATUS, IN SOUTHEASTERN MADAGASCAR. (U915543)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Menopausal hormone therapy and new-onset diabetes in the French Etude Epidemiologique de Femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l’Education Nationale (E3N) cohort

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. de Lauzon-Guillain; A. Fournier; A. Fabre; N. Simon; S. Mesrine; M. C. Boutron-Ruault; B. Balkau; F. Clavel-Chapelon

    2009-01-01

    Aims\\/hypothesis  Two US randomised trials found a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes in women treated by menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) with\\u000a oral conjugated equine oestrogen combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the\\u000a influence of various MHTs, according to their formulation and route of administration, on new-onset diabetes in a cohort of\\u000a postmenopausal French women.

  1. [Case report of solitary breast cysticercosis in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Rakoto-Ratsimba, H N; Rabesalama, S S E N; Razafimahandry, H J C; Ranaivozanany, A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a case of solitary breast cysticercosis presenting as a banal breast lump in a 15-year-old girl. Surgical excision was performed and histological examination demonstrated the presence of two Cysticercus cellulosae larvae. Characteristic features of this uncommon location are discussed based on a review of the literature. PMID:17691439

  2. Delimiting Species without Nuclear Monophyly in Madagascar's Mouse Lemurs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Weisrock; Rodin M. Rasoloarison; Isabella Fiorentino; José M. Ralison; Steven M. Goodman; Peter M. Kappeler; Anne D. Yoder

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundSpeciation begins when populations become genetically separated through a substantial reduction in gene flow, and it is at this point that a genetically cohesive set of populations attain the sole property of species: the independent evolution of a population-level lineage. The comprehensive delimitation of species within biodiversity hotspots, regardless of their level of divergence, is important for understanding the factors

  3. Geographical and environmental approaches to urban malaria in Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies, conducted in the urban of Antananarivo, showed low rate of confirmed malaria cases. We used a geographical and environmental approach to investigate the contribution of environmental factors to urban malaria in Antananarivo. Methods Remote sensing data were used to locate rice fields, which were considered to be the principal mosquito breeding sites. We carried out supervised classification by the maximum likelihood method. Entomological study allowed vector species determination from collected larval and adult mosquitoes. Mosquito infectivity was studied, to assess the risk of transmission, and the type of mosquito breeding site was determined. Epidemiological data were collected from November 2006 to December 2007, from public health centres, to determine malaria incidence. Polymerase chain reaction was carried out on dried blood spots from patients, to detect cases of malaria. Rapid diagnostic tests were used to confirm malaria cases among febrile school children in a school survey. A geographical information system was constructed for data integration. Altitude, temperature, rainfall, population density and rice field surface area were analysed and the effects of these factors on the occurrence of confirmed malaria cases were studied. Results Polymerase chain reaction confirmed malaria in 5.1% of the presumed cases. Entomological studies showed An. arabiensis as potential vector. Rice fields remained to be the principal breeding sites. Travel report was considered as related to the occurrence of P. falciparum malaria cases. Conclusion Geographical and environmental factors did not show direct relationship with malaria incidence but they seem ensuring suitability of vector development. Absence of relationship may be due to a lack of statistical power. Despite the presence of An. arabiensis, scarce parasitic reservoir and rapid access to health care do not constitute optimal conditions to a threatening malaria transmission. However, imported malaria case is suggestive to sustain the pocket transmission in Antananarivo. PMID:20553598

  4. A Conservation Strategy for the Amphibians of Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    on modeling species distribution of Malagasy amphibians, and we identify target areas for exploration and biogeography. Although many of the newly discovered species are genetically, bio-acoustically; Köhler et al., 2005), their discovery questioning the validity of some species identifications

  5. Recent Emergence of New Variants of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANNIE GUIYOULE; BRUNO RASOAMANANA; CARMEN BUCHRIESER; PHILIPPE MICHEL; SUZANNE CHANTEAU; ELISABETH CARNIEL

    1997-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has been responsible for at least three pandemics. During the last pandemic, which started in Hong Kong in 1894, the microorganism colonized new, previously unscathed geographical areas where it has become well established. The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the genetic stability of Y. pestis strains introduced into a new

  6. Cytotoxic diterpenoids from Podocarpus madagascariensis from the Madagascar rainforest.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Micah; Chaturvedula, V S Prakash; Ratovoson, Fidisoa; Andriantsiferana, Rabodo; Rasamison, Vincent E; Guza, Rebecca C; Kingston, David G I

    2006-05-20

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an extract of the root and bark of Podocarpus madagascariensis resulted in the isolation of a new totarol diterpenoid (1) in addition to the three known cytotoxic diterpenoids 19-hydroxytotarol (2), totaradiol (3), and 4beta-carboxy-19-nor-totarol (4). The structure of the new compound 1 was established as methyl-13-hydroxy-14-isopropyl-9(11),12,14(8)-podocarpatriene-19-oate on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic interpretation and methylation of 4. All the compounds exhibited cytotoxic activity against the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. PMID:16835095

  7. Climate change in Madagascar; recent past and future February 2008

    E-print Network

    Tadross, Mark

    Randriamarolaza2 , Zo Rabefitia2 , Zheng Ki Yip1 1 Climate Systems Analysis Group, University of Cape Town. South, downscaled climate change projections, reviewed literature and the 4th Intergovernmental Panel on Climate to the southern and eastern coasts. Rainfall over the east coast is largely a product of easterly trade winds

  8. Tropical Cyclone Bejisa Near Madagascar - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite flew over Cyclone Bejisa on December 29, 2013 at 1507 UTC. This 3-D animation of TRMM data revealed strong thunderstorms around Bejisa's center were reaching heights above 16....

  9. Cytotoxic triterpenoids from Acridocarpus vivy from the Madagascar rain forest.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shugeng; Guza, Rebecca Clare; Miller, James S; Andriantsiferana, Rabodo; Rasamison, Vincent E; Kingston, David G I

    2004-06-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the cytotoxic MeOH extract obtained from Acridocarpus vivy led to the isolation of five new triterpenoids, acridocarpusic acids A-E (1-5); three known triterpenoids, moronic acid (6), ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid; and two known flavonoids, 4',5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone and 4',5-dihydroxy-3',7-dimethoxyflavone. The structures of the new compounds 1-5 were established on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data interpretation. Compound 3 showed significant cytotoxic activity in the A2780 assay, with an IC50 value of 0.7 microg/mL. PMID:15217279

  10. Antiproliferative compounds of Helmiopsis sphaerocarpa from the Madagascar rainforest.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shugeng; Brodie, Peggy; Miller, James S; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rakotondrafara, A; Andriantsiferana, Rabodo; Rasamison, Vincent E; Kingston, David G I

    2009-01-01

    Bioassay-directed separation of an ethanol extract of the leaves of Helmiopsis sphaerocarpa L.C. Barnett (Sterculiaceae) led to the isolation of the new compound 14alpha,15alpha-epoxy-3beta-hydroxytaraxerane (1) and the four known compounds taraxerol (2), stigmast-5-en-3-ol (3), 5alpha,8alpha-epidioxy-24(S)-methylcholesta-6,22-dien-3beta-ol (4), and 24xi-hydroperoxy-24-ethylcholesta-4,28(29)-dien-3-one (5). The structure of the new compound 1 was established on the basis of interpretation of its 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. All the compounds were tested against A2780 human ovarian cancer cell lines, and compounds 4 and 5 showed mild antiproliferative activity, with IC(50) values of 16 and 7 microg mL(-1), respectively. PMID:19401918

  11. Antiproliferative Compounds of Helmiopsis sphaerocarpa from the Madagascar Rainforest†

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shugeng; Brodie, Peggy; Miller, James S.; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rakotondrafara, A.; Andriantsiferana, Rabodo; Rasamison, Vincent E.; Kingston, David G. I.

    2010-01-01

    Bioassay-directed separation of an ethanol extract of the leaves of Helmiopsis sphaerocarpa L.C. Barnett (Sterculiaceae) led to the isolation of the new compound 14?,15?-epoxy-3?-hydroxytaraxerane (1) and the four known compounds taraxerol (2), stigmast-5-en-3-ol (3), 5?,8?-epidioxy-24(S)-methylcholesta-6,22-dien-3?-ol (4), and 24?-hydroperoxy-24-ethylcholesta-4,28(29)-dien-3-one (5). The structure of the new compound 1 was established on the basis of interpretation of its 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. All the compounds were tested against A2780 human ovarian cancer cell lines, and compounds 4 and 5 showed mild antiproliferative activity with IC50 values of 16 and 7 ?g/mL, respectively. PMID:19401918

  12. Révision du genre Bathiorhamnus Capuron (Rhamnaceae) endémique de Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    CALLMANDER, Martin W.; PHILLIPSON, Peter B.; BUERKI, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Le genre endèmique malgache Bathiorhamnus Capuron (Rhamnaceae) est l’objet d’une rèvision taxonomique. L’étude des caractères morphologiques permet de reconnaître sept espèces. En plus des deux espèces antérieurement reconnues: B. cryptophorus Capuron et B. louvelii (H.Perrier) Capuron, les trois variétés reconnues dans la seconde sont réévaluées et élevées au rang d’espèce: B. dentatus (Capuron) Callm., Phillipson & Buerki, B. macrocarpus (Capuron) Callm., Phillipson & Buerki, B. reticulatus (Capuron) Callm., Phillipson & Buerki. Deux nouvelles espèces sont décrites: B. capuronii Callm., Phillipson & Buerki, des forêts sèches de l’ouest et du nord et B. vohemarensis Callm., Phillipson & Buerki des forêts littorales situées autour de Vohémar au nord-est. Une clé du genre Bathiorhamnus est présentée ainsi qu’une évaluation préliminaire du statut de conservation de chaque espèce. PMID:21866216

  13. Antiprotozoal activities of Millettia richardiana (Fabaceae) from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rajemiarimiraho, Manitriniaina; Banzouzi, Jean-Théophile; Nicolau-Travers, Marie-Laure; Ramos, Suzanne; Cheikh-Ali, Zakaria; Bories, Christian; Rakotonandrasana, Olga L; Rakotonandrasana, Stéphane; Andrianary, Philippe Antoine; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    With at least 60% of the Millettia species (Fabaceae) being in medicinal use, we found it relevant to assess the potential antiprotozoal and antifungal activities of Millettia richardiana. Water and methanol crude extracts of the stem barks from M. richardiana and the six fractions resulting from the fractionation of the methanol extract were tested. The dichloromethane extracted fraction showed the best in vitro antiprotozoal activities (IC50=5.8 ?g/mL against Plasmodium falciparum, 11.8 ?g/mL against Leishmania donovani and 12.8 ?g/mL against Trypanosoma brucei brucei) as well as low cytotoxicity on several cell lines. The phytochemical analysis showed this selected fraction to be rich in terpenoids and alkaloids, which could explain its antiparasitic activity. A phytochemical study revealed the presence of lonchocarpenin, betulinic acid, ?-amyrin, lupeol, palmitic acid, linoleic acid and stearic acid, among which betulinic acid and lupeol could be the compounds responsible of these antiprotozoal activities. By contrast, neither the crude extracts nor the fractions showed antifungal activity against Candida. These results confirm the importance of the genus Millettia in Malagasy ethnomedicine, its potential use in antiparasitic therapy, and the interest of developing a sustainable exploitation of this plant. Moreover, both molecules betulinic acid and lupeol appeared as very relevant molecules for their antiprotozoal properties. PMID:24705564

  14. Imperfect Isolation: Factors and Filters Shaping Madagascar's Extant Vertebrate Fauna

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    17, 2013; Published April 23, 2013 Copyright: ß 2013 Samonds et al. This is an open-access article of Evolutionary Biology, Zoological Institute, Technical University of Braunschweig, Braunschweig, Germany, 7: The authors have no support or funding to report. Competing Interests: The authors have declared

  15. MADAGASCAR CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 1 --JUNE 2010 PAGE 6 Madagascar rosewood, illegal logging and the

    E-print Network

    rosewood, illegal logging and the tropical timber trade ABSTRACT Although deforestation rates, Dalbergia, exploitation forestière illégale, Convention du Patrimoine Mondial, CITES. DEFORESTATION, considerable attention has been given to efforts being made to stop deforestation in the tropics. Between 2000

  16. Species Review of Amphibian Extinction Risks in Madagascar: Conclusions from the Global Amphibian Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FRANCO ANDREONE; JOHN E. CADLE; NEIL COX; FRANK GLAW; RONALD A. NUSSBAUM; CHRISTOPHER J. RAXWORTHY; SIMON N. STUART; DENIS VALLAN; MIGUEL VENCES

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the extinction risks of Malagasy amphibians by evaluating their distribution, occur- rence in protected areas, population trends, habitat quality, and prevalence in commercial trade. We estimated and mapped the distribution of each of the 220 described Malagasy species and applied, for the first time, the IUCN Red List categories and criteria to all species described at the time

  17. Conservation priorities and potential threats influencing the hyper?diverse amphibians of Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Andreone; Luca Maria Luiselli

    2003-01-01

    The conservation of Madagascan amphibians was assessed using a set of natural history parameters. The more than two hundred species were grouped into 51 operational conservation units to get more reliable results than those afforded by the low level of knowledge available for most of the species. Results in terms of ecological sensitivity were obtained by means of a univariate

  18. Spatial Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: Tuberculosis-Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Sitraka; Mandrosovololona, Vatsiharizandry; Rakotonirina, Julio; Ramamonjisoa, Joselyne; Ranjalahy, Justin Rasolofomanana; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program. Methods We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups. Results The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10?6) in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10?3) in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis. Conclusion This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities. PMID:25386655

  19. Distribution patterns of living and subfossil podocopid ostracodes in the Nosy Bé area, northern Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Maddocks, R. F.

    1966-12-09

    - ous; BATTISTINI (1960) has analyzed a few of the littoral sediments, but in general the sublittoral sediments have not been described or mapped. Calcium carbonate sands, usually associated with coral masses but also with grassy expanses, are the most... extensive single sediment type in shallow water ( <10 m.); these are bioclastic sands com- posed of usually recognizable skeletal fragments of algal, coral, and other invertebrate remains in varying proportions. Sediment in mangrove areas near the mouths...

  20. A new labdane diterpene from Vitex cauliflora Moldenke from the Madagascar rainforest1

    PubMed Central

    Rasamison, Vincent E.; Ranaivo-Harimanana, Leon; Cao, Shugeng; Pan, Ende; Ratovoson, Fidy; Randriantafika, F.; Rakotondrajaona, R.; Rakotonandrasana, Stephan; Andriantsiferana, Rabodo

    2009-01-01

    Fractionation of an antiplasmodial ethanolic extract from the aerial parts of Vitex cauliflora led to the isolation of the new labdane diterpene 1 together with the known triterpene uvaol. The structure of the new compound 1 was established as 3-oxo,15,17,18-triacetoxy-labda-7,13E-diene on the basis of spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, MS). PMID:19635529

  1. Bioactive oleanane glycosides from Polyscias duplicata from the Madagascar dry forest.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Alexander L; Brodie, Peggy J; Callmander, Martin W; Rakotondrajaona, Roland; Rakotobe, Etienne; Rasamison, Vincent E; Kingston, David G I

    2015-04-01

    As part of the International Cooperative Biodiversity Group (ICBG) program, in a search for antiproliferative compounds, an ethanol extract of Polyscias duplicata was investigated due to its antiproliferative activity against the A2780 human ovarian cell cancer line (IC50 6 µg/mL). Seven known oleanane glycosides, 3?-[(?-L-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-16?-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (1, IC50 8 µM), 3?-[(?-L-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-16?,23-dihydroxyolean-12-en-18-oic acid (2, IC50 13 µM), 3?-[(O-?-D-glucopyranosyl-(t-->3)-?-L-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-16?-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (3, IC50 7 µM), 3?-[(O-?-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-2)-?-L-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-16?-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (4, IC50 2.8 µM), 3?-[(O-?-D-glucopyranosyl-(l-->3)-?-L- arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-23-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (5, IC50 10 µM), ?-[(O-?-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(-1.2)-?-L-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-23-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (6, IC50 3.4 µM), and 3?-[(?-L-arabinopyranosyl)oxy]-23-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (7, IC50 3.4 µM) were isolated, and their structures determined using spectroscopic methods. PMID:25960824

  2. Elevated testosterone is required for male copulatory behavior and aggression in Madagascar ground gecko (Paroedura picta).

    PubMed

    Golinski, Alison; Kubi?ka, Lukáš; John-Alder, Henry; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-09-01

    Elevated levels of gonadal androgens are often required for the expression of male-specific behavioral and morphological traits in all classes of vertebrates, including reptiles. Here, we tested the role of male gonadal androgens in the control of male sexual behavior, aggressive behavior, and size of the hemipenes in the gecko Paroedura picta. We performed hormonal manipulations involving castration with and without testosterone (T) replacement in males and application of exogenous T and ovariectomy in females. Castration suppressed sexual behavior and hemipenes size in males, and these effects were fully rescued by exogenous T. Sexual behavior and growth of the hemipenes were masculinized by male-typical levels of T in females, while ovariectomized females retained female-typical expression of these traits. These results indicate that the development of male sexual behavior in adult females does not require early or pubertal organization. Elevated T increased the likelihood of aggressive behavior directed toward a male intruder, but aggression occurred only rarely. Elevated T is necessary and sufficient for enlargement of the hemipenes and the expression of male sexual behavior in both males and females of Paroedura picta. In contrast to sexual behavior, the expression of aggressive behavior is apparently more dependent on other factors in addition to T itself. PMID:24852349

  3. Edge effects on morphometrics and body mass in two sympatric species of mouse lemurs in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ryan J; Lehman, Shawn M

    2014-01-01

    Edge effects are an inevitable and important consequence of forest loss and fragmentation. These effects include changes in species biology and biogeography. Here we examine variations in body mass and morphometrics for 2 sympatric species of mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus and M. ravelobensis) between edge and interior habitats in the dry deciduous forest at Ankarafantsika National Park. Between May and August 2012, we conducted mark-recapture experiments on mouse lemurs trapped along edge and interior forest transects within continuous forest adjacent to a large savannah. Of the 34 M. murinus captured during our study, 82% (n = 28) were trapped in interior habitats. Conversely, 72% (n = 47) of M. ravelobensis were captured in edge habitats. We found that mean body mass of M. murinus and M. ravelobensis did not differ between edge and interior habitats. However, female M. ravelobensis weighed significantly more in edge habitats (56.09 ± 1.74 g) than in interior habitats (48.14 ± 4.44 g). Our study provides some of the first evidence of sex differences in edge responses for a primate species. PMID:25591622

  4. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar)

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Université d'Orléans, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract Seven samples from a 1 m long peat core targets because of their dominant or even exclusive OM content, peat deposits have received relatively

  5. Defining spatial and temporal patterns of phylogeographic structure in Madagascar's iguanid

    E-print Network

    Yoder, Anne

    . YODER* *Department of Biology, Box 90338, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA, Animal Biology in abiotic factors might have contributed to diversification (e.g. ecogeographic constraint, Yoder & Heckman between vicariant and dispersal origins of endemic Mal- agasy clades (Nagy et al. 2003; Yoder et al. 2003

  6. New cytotoxic terpenoids from the wood of Vepris punctata from the Madagascar Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedula, V S Prakash; Schilling, Jennifer K; Miller, James S; Andriantsiferana, Rabodo; Rasamison, Vincent E; Kingston, David G I

    2004-05-01

    Continuation of the chemical examination of the cytotoxic constituents of the wood of Vepris punctata resulted in the isolation of the two new terpenoids 1 and 2 and eight known compounds, glechomanolide (3), isogermafurenolide, (E,E)-germacra-1(10),4,7(11)-triene, alpha-amyrin, lupeol, lupeyl acetate, taraxerol, and 3-epi-taraxerol, in addition to the alkaloids reported reported previously. The structures of the two new compounds were established on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data interpretation and chemical modifications. All the isolated compounds were tested against the A2780 human ovarian cancer cell line; the four sequiterpenoids showed moderate cytotoxic activity, while the six triterpenoids were inactive. PMID:15165160

  7. Le plus ancien hippopotame fossile ( Hippopotamus laloumena) de Madagascar (Belobaka, Province de Mahajanga)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martine Faure; Claude Guérin; Dominique Genty; Dominique Gommery; Beby Ramanivosoa

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Pleistocene site Belobaka XVII (about 20,000years) has yielded some Hippopotami remains included in a very hard breccia. Among this material two lower premolars, a juvenile calcaneus, two juvenile metatarsals and a first abaxial phalange have been cleaned and can be studied. They belong to Hippopotamus laloumenaFaure and Guérin, 1990, allowed us to know for the first time the P\\/2

  8. Neolignans and other metabolites from Ocotea cymosa from the Madagascar rain forest and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Rakotondraibe, L Harinantenaina; Graupner, Paul R; Xiong, Quanbo; Olson, Monica; Wiley, Jessica D; Krai, Priscilla; Brodie, Peggy J; Callmander, Martin W; Rakotobe, Etienne; Ratovoson, Fidy; Rasamison, Vincent E; Cassera, Maria B; Hahn, Donald R; Kingston, David G I; Fotso, Serge

    2015-03-27

    Ten new neolignans including the 6'-oxo-8.1'-lignans cymosalignans A (1a), B (2), and C (3), an 8.O.6'-neolignan (4a), ococymosin (5a), didymochlaenone C (6a), and the bicyclo[3.2.1]octanoids 7-10 were isolated along with the known compounds 3,4,5,3',5'-pentamethoxy-1'-allyl-8.O.4'-neolignan, 3,4,5,3'-tetramethoxy-1'-allyl-8.O.4'-neolignan, didymochlaenone B, virologin B, ocobullenone, and the unusual 2'-oxo-8.1'-lignan sibyllenone from the stems or bark of the Madagascan plant Ocotea cymosa. The new 8.O.6'-neolignan 4a, dihydrobenzofuranoid 5a, and the bicyclo[3.2.1]octanoid 7a had in vitro activity against Aedes aegypti, while the new compounds 5a, 7a, 8, and 10a and the known virolongin B (4b) and ocobullenone (10b) had antiplasmodial activity. We report herein the structure elucidation of the new compounds on the basis of spectroscopic evidence, including 1D and 2D NMR spectra, electronic circular dichroism, and mass spectrometry, and the biological activities of the new and known compounds. PMID:25650896

  9. The Importance of Wildlife Harvest to Human Health and Livelihoods in Northeastern Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Golden, Christopher DeWeir

    2011-01-01

    appropriate iron therapy was shown to improve brain neuralIron deficiency is the most prevalent nutrient deficiency worldwide and results in negative consequences for brainiron is prioritized to red cells at the expense of other tissues, most importantly the brain (

  10. Development and application of a phylogenomic toolkit: Resolving the evolutionary history of Madagascar's lemurs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie E. Horvath; David W. Weisrock; Stephanie L. Embry; Isabella Fiorentino; James P. Balhoff; Peter Kappeler; Gregory A. Wray; Huntington F. Willard; Anne D. Yoder

    2008-01-01

    Lemurs and the other strepsirrhine primates are of great interest to the primate genomics community due to their phylogenetic placement as the sister lineage to all other primates. Previous attempts to resolve the phylogeny of lemurs employed limited mitochondrial or small nuclear data sets, with many relationships poorly supported or entirely unresolved. We used genomic resources to develop 11 novel

  11. The allometry of parrot BMR: seasonal data for the Greater Vasa Parrot, Coracopsis vasa , from Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry G. LovegroveMike; Mike R. Perrin; Mark Brown

    In this study we examined the allometry of basal metabolic rate (BMR) of 31 parrot species. Unlike previous reports, we show\\u000a that parrots per se do not display BMRs that are any different to other captive-raised birds of their body size. An ordinary\\u000a least squares regression fitted the data best and body mass explained 95% of the variation in BMR.

  12. Organic matter sources and early diagenetic degradation in a tropical peaty marsh (Tritrivakely, Madagascar). Implications for

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Cyperaceae undergoes extensive degradation of its basic cell wall components, morphologically revealed, were studied to determine the organic matter (OM) composition and extent of OM degradation in this core of OM are (1) planktonic and benthic algae, (2) terrestrial plant remains and soil OM reworked from

  13. Douleurs induites par les soins: la réalité au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Befelatanana Antananarivo, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Mahavivola, Ernestho-Ghoud Indretsy; Olivah, Razanaparany Miarisoa Mireille; Mihary, Dodo; Hendriniaina, Rakotoharivelo; Lalao, Randriamboavonjy Rado; Henintsoa, Rakotonirainy Oliva; Fahafahantsoa, Rapelanoro Rabenja

    2014-01-01

    La douleur induite par les soins correspond à la douleur survenant lors des actes à visé diagnostique et/ou thérapeutique. A notre connaissance, nous n'avons pas encore des données disponibles pour les douleurs induites par les soins à l'Hôpital de Befelatanana. Nos objectifs étaient de décrire le profil épidémiologique de la douleur induite par les soins, d'identifier les principaux facteurs influençant sur l'intensité de la douleur et leurs retentissements chez les patients. Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective, transversale type un jour donné menée dans les douze services de Médecines au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Befelatanana en Novembre 2013. Cent deux patients ont été retenus dans l’étude et trois cent vingt trois actes douloureux étaient enregistrés. La fréquence de la douleur induite par les soins était de 69,86%. Le genre féminin prédominait dans 52% des cas (n = 53) avec un sex-ratio à 0,92. L’âge moyen était de 46 ans. Les ponctions vasculaires étaient l'acte prédominant dans 49,54% (n = 109) des cas. Les infirmiers réalisaient les soins dans 47,05% (n = 48) des cas. L'information verbale était la mesure préventive utilisée dans 57,84% des cas (n = 59). Le transport par marche à pied et au dos représentait 16,67% des cas (n = 17). Les patients naïfs des gestes étaient plus anxieux. Ces patients gardaient de mauvais souvenir dans 64,71% des cas (n = 66). La fréquence de douleur induite par les soins était trop élevée. Un effort important est nécessaire pour réduire la douleur induite par les soins PMID:25932071

  14. Charrue et varits de riz : matrise sociale des savoir faire techniques au Lac Alaotra, Madagascar.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    migrants en provenance d'autres régions malgaches, attirés par la réputation de richesse agricole et d'espace à coloniser. Projets et migrants ont ainsi introduit une masse de connaissances nouvelles sur ce différentes exploitations agricoles, en mettant en lumière les phases « d'hybridation » et d'adaptation de ces

  15. Exploiting alkaloid biosynthesis in Madagascar periwinkle to obtain natural product derivatives and new biocatalysts

    E-print Network

    Bernhardt, Peter, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Plant alkaloid biosynthesis produces many natural products with medicinal value. For example, vinblastine and vincristine from Catharanthus roseus monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis, and camptothecin derivatives from ...

  16. New treefrog of the genus Boophis Tschudi 1838 from the northwestern rainforests of Madagascar

    E-print Network

    Vieites, David R.

    94720-3160, USA (E-mail: vieites@berkeley.edu) Received 5 April 2005, accepted 1 July 2005 A new species species, respec- tively (GLAW & VENCES 2003). The new discoveries are due to a combination of increased). In this paper we describe a new species assigned to the B. goudoti group, one out of the seven groups of stream

  17. 76 FR 32010 - Certifications Pursuant to Public Law That 12 Nations Have Adopted Programs To Reduce the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ...2011, the Department decertified Madagascar. In the absence of a legitimate constitutional government in Madagascar since the 2009 coup d'[eacute...unable to conduct a Government of Madagascar sea turtle protection program...

  18. Madagascar corals track sea surface temperature variability in the Agulhas Current core region over the past 334 years.

    PubMed

    Zinke, J; Loveday, B R; Reason, C J C; Dullo, W-C; Kroon, D

    2014-01-01

    The Agulhas Current (AC) is the strongest western boundary current in the Southern Hemisphere and is key for weather and climate patterns, both regionally and globally. Its heat transfer into both the midlatitude South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic is of global significance. A new composite coral record (Ifaty and Tulear massive Porites corals), is linked to historical AC sea surface temperature (SST) instrumental data, showing robust correlations. The composite coral SST data start in 1660 and comprise 200 years more than the AC instrumental record. Numerical modelling exhibits that this new coral derived SST record is representative for the wider core region of the AC. AC SSTs variabilities show distinct cooling through the Little Ice Age and warming during the late 18(th), 19th and 20th century, with significant decadal variability superimposed. Furthermore, the AC SSTs are teleconnected with the broad southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, showing that the AC system is pivotal for inter-ocean heat exchange south of Africa. PMID:24637665

  19. Is the Mbita trap a reliable tool for evaluating the density of anopheline vectors in the highlands of Madagascar?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rémi Laganier; Fara M Randimby; Voahirana Rajaonarivelo; Vincent Robert

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One method of collecting mosquitoes is to use human beings as bait. This is called human landing collection and is a reference method for evaluating mosquito density per person. The Mbita trap, described by Mathenge et al in the literature, consists of an entry-no return device whereby humans are used as bait but cannot be bitten. We compared the

  20. Predicting species distributions from small numbers of occurrence records: a test case using cryptic geckos in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard G. Pearson; Christopher J. Raxworthy; Miguel Nakamura; A. Townsend Peterson

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim,Techniques,that predict,species potential,distributions,by,combining observed,occurrence,records with environmental,variables show,much,potential for application,across a range of biogeographical,analyses. Some of the most promising applications relate to species for which occurrence records are scarce, due to cryptic habits, locally restricted distributions or low sampling effort. However, the minimum sample sizes required to yield useful predictions remain difficult to determine. Here we developed,and tested a novel

  1. Applications of Ecological Niche Modeling for Species Delimitation: A Review and Empirical Evaluation Using Day Geckos (Phelsuma) from Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHRISTOPHER J. RAXWORTHY; COLLEEN M. INGRAM; Nirhy Rabibisoa; RICHARD G. PEARSON

    2007-01-01

    Although the systematic utility of ecological niche modeling is generally well known (e.g., concerning the recog- nition and discovery of areas of endemism for biogeographic analyses), there has been little discussion of applications concerning species delimitation, and to date, no empirical evaluation has been conducted. However, ecological niche mod- eling can provide compelling evidence for allopatry between populations, and can

  2. Livelihood Strategies and Land Use Changes in Response to Conservation: Pitfalls of Community-Based Forest Management in Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aurélie Toillier; Georges Serpantié; Dominique Hervé; Sylvie Lardon

    2011-01-01

    Faced with the low success rates of protected areas in conserving natural forests and supporting rural development, the Malagasy government recently chose to transfer forest resource management to local communities. Feedback about the implementation of this new policy suggests that agriculture continues to drive deforestation. This article explores farmers' household livelihood strategies and land use changes in response to changing

  3. Increase in the Number of Tuberculosis Cases Treated following Tuberculin Skin Testing in First-Year Schoolchildren in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ratovoson, Rila; Raharimanga, Voamalala; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Ravaloson, B.; Ratsitorahina, Maherisosa; Randremanana, Rindra; Ramarokoto, Herimanana; Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Richard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis continues to cause unacceptably high levels of disease and death worldwide. Active preventive strategies are required to improve tuberculosis control and to increase the number of cases treated in developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the tuberculin skin test (TST) in first-year schoolchildren as a means of increasing the number of tuberculosis cases detected through the screening of close contacts. Methods All members of the households of 90 schoolchildren assigned to three groups on the basis of TST category (?5 mm, [5–15)mm, ?15 mm) were screened for sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. The percentage detection of tuberculosis in close contacts was compared between TST categories. Results We identified 433 close contacts of the 90 schoolchildren, who were then evaluated for tuberculosis. We identified 11 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis among the close contacts (7 already on treatment and 4 previously undiagnosed): 0 in TST category ?5 mm, 3 in TST category [5–15) mm and 8 in TST category ?15 mm). This approach increased the detection of tuberculosis cases by a factor of 1.6 in first-year schoolchildren of the TST ?5 mm group. Conclusion TST in first-year schoolchildren is a potentially effective method for improving the detection of tuberculosis in close contacts. PMID:24743554

  4. Discovery, characterization, and rational design of the enzymes involved in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Madagascar periwinkle

    E-print Network

    Giddings, Lesley-Ann

    2011-01-01

    The chemical diversity found in plants has served as a major source of inspiration to many synthetic and biological chemists. Nature has evolved enzyme active sites to catalyze the synthesis of structurally complex compounds ...

  5. Ctenocheloides attenboroughi n. gen., n. sp. (Crustacea: Decapoda: Axiidea: Ctenochelidae), a new ghost shrimp with pectinate claw fingers from Madagascar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur Anker

    2010-01-01

    Ctenocheloides, n. gen., is established for a remarkable new species of ctenochelid ghost shrimp, Ctenocheloides attenboroughi, n. gen., n. sp., named after the British naturalist and presenter of numerous BBC nature documentaries, Sir David Attenborough. The holotype, a complete adult female, is presently the only specimen known. It was extracted from a large, mud-cemented piece of rubble collected at a

  6. Madagascar corals track sea surface temperature variability in the Agulhas Current core region over the past 334 years

    PubMed Central

    Zinke, J.; Loveday, B. R.; Reason, C. J. C.; Dullo, W.-C.; Kroon, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Agulhas Current (AC) is the strongest western boundary current in the Southern Hemisphere and is key for weather and climate patterns, both regionally and globally. Its heat transfer into both the midlatitude South Indian Ocean and South Atlantic is of global significance. A new composite coral record (Ifaty and Tulear massive Porites corals), is linked to historical AC sea surface temperature (SST) instrumental data, showing robust correlations. The composite coral SST data start in 1660 and comprise 200 years more than the AC instrumental record. Numerical modelling exhibits that this new coral derived SST record is representative for the wider core region of the AC. AC SSTs variabilities show distinct cooling through the Little Ice Age and warming during the late 18th, 19th and 20th century, with significant decadal variability superimposed. Furthermore, the AC SSTs are teleconnected with the broad southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, showing that the AC system is pivotal for inter-ocean heat exchange south of Africa. PMID:24637665

  7. 76 FR 34095 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ...ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), collected in the wild in Madagascar, for the purpose of scientific research. This notification...lemur species (Microcebus spp.), collected in the wild in Madagascar, for the purpose of scientific research. This...

  8. 76 FR 13619 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...Institutional Collaboration between the Institute Pasteur of Madagascar and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Malaria...Institutional Collaboration between the Institute Pasteur of Madagascar and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on...

  9. ZCT1 and ZCT2 transcription factors repress the activity of a gene promoter from the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway in Madagascar periwinkle cells.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Mouadh; Ginis, Olivia; Courdavault, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas; Gaillard, Cécile; Atanassova, Rossitza; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courtois, Martine; Oudin, Audrey

    2014-10-15

    In Catharanthus roseus, accumulating data highlighted the existence of a coordinated transcriptional regulation of structural genes that takes place within the secoiridoid biosynthetic branch, including the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and the following steps leading to secologanin. To identify transcription factors acting in these pathways, we performed a yeast one-hybrid screening using as bait a promoter region of the hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene involved in the responsiveness of C. roseus cells to hormonal signals inducing monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) production. We identified that ZCT2, one of the three members of the zinc finger Catharanthus protein (ZCT) family, can bind to a HDS promoter region involved in hormonal responsiveness. By trans-activation assays, we demonstrated that ZCT1 and ZCT2 but not ZCT3 repress the HDS promoter activity. Gene expression analyses in C. roseus cells exposed to methyljasmonate revealed a persistence of induction of ZCT2 gene expression suggesting the existence of feed-back regulatory events acting on HDS gene expression in correlation with the MIA production. PMID:25108262

  10. Stable isotopes complement focal individual observations and confirm dietary variability in reddish-gray mouse lemurs (Microcebus griseorufus) from southwestern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Brooke E; Rasoazanabary, Emilienne; Godfrey, Laurie R

    2014-09-01

    We examine the ecology of reddish-gray mouse lemurs from three habitats at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve using focal follows and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data. Focal observations indicate dietary differences among habitats as well as sexes and seasons. Both sexes consume more arthropods during the rainy season but overall, females consume more sugar-rich exudates and fruit than males, and individuals from riparian forest consume fewer arthropods and more fruit than those in xeric or dry forest. We ask whether these observations are isotopically detectable. Isotope data support differences between seasons and sexes. Nitrogen isotope values are higher during the rainy season when lemurs consume more arthropods, and higher in males than females, particularly during the dry season. However, differences among populations inferred from focal observations are not fully supported. Lemurs from riparian forest have lower isotope values than those in xeric scrub, but isotope data suggest that lemurs from the dry forest eat the least animal matter and that focal observations overestimated dry forest arthropod consumption. Overall, our results suggest that observational and isotopic data are complementary. Isotope data can be obtained from a larger number of individuals and can quantify ingestion of animal matter, but they apparently cannot quantify the relative consumption of different sugar-rich foods. Combined focal and isotope data provide valuable insight into the dietary constraints of reddish-grey mouse lemurs, with implications for their vulnerability to future habitat change. PMID:24898417

  11. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar): diagenesis appraisal and consequences for palaeoenvironmental

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake and petrographical work [2], we applied such an approach to the analysis of a peat core section to get additional (saturated and unsaturated n-FAs, plus i-C16) at the surface of the peat sequence and low amounts

  12. Antiplasmodial, cytotoxic activities and characterization of a new naturally occurring quinone methide pentacyclic triterpenoid derivative isolated from Salacia leptoclada Tul. (Celastraceae) originated from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ruphin, Fatiany Pierre; Baholy, Robijaona; Emmanue, Andrianarivo; Amelie, Raharisololalao; Martin, Marie-Therese; Koto-te-Nyiwa, Ngbolua

    2013-01-01

    Objective To validate scientifically the traditional use of Salacia leptoclada Tul. (Celastraceae) (S. leptoclada) and to isolate and elucidate the structure of the biologically active compound. Methods Bioassay-guided fractionation of the acetonic extract of the stem barks of S. leptoclada was carried out by a combination of chromatography technique and biological experiments in viro using Plasmodium falciparum and P388 leukemia cell lines as models. The structure of the biologically active pure compound was elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Results Biological screening of S. leptoclada extracts resulted in the isolation of a pentacyclic triterpenic quinone methide. The pure compound exhibited both in vitro a cytotoxic effect on murine P388 leukemia cells with IC50 value of (0.041±0.020) µg/mL and an antiplasmodial activity against the chloroquine-resistant strain FC29 of Plasmodium falciparum with an IC50 value of (0.052±0.030) µg/mL. Despite this interesting anti-malarial property of the lead compound, the therapeutic index was weak (0.788). In the best of our knowledge, the quinone methide pentacyclic triterpenoid derivative compound is reported for the first time in S. leptoclada. Conclusions The results suggest that furthers studies involving antineoplastic activity is needed for the development of this lead compound as anticancer drug. PMID:24075342

  13. Situation Report--Barbados, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Italy, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, and Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 15 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Barbados, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Italy, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, and Yogoslavia. Information…

  14. Spatial structure and the effects of host and soil environments on communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi in wooded savannas and rain forests of Continental Africa and Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Tedersoo, Leho; Bahram, Mohammad; Jairus, Teele; Bechem, Eneke; Chinoya, Stephen; Mpumba, Rebecca; Leal, Miguel; Randrianjohany, Emile; Razafimandimbison, Sylvain; Sadam, Ave; Naadel, Triin; Kõljalg, Urmas

    2011-07-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi play a key role in mineral nutrition of terrestrial plants, but the factors affecting natural distribution, diversity and community composition of particularly tropical fungi remain poorly understood. This study addresses shifts in community structure and species frequency of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi in relation to host taxa, soil depth and spatial structure in four contrasting African ecosystems. We used the rDNA and plastid trnL intron sequence analysis for identification of fungi and host plants, respectively. By partitioning out spatial autocorrelation in plant and fungal distribution, we suggest that African EcM fungal communities are little structured by soil horizon and host at the plant species and family levels. These findings contrast with patterns of vegetation in these forests and EcM fungal communities in other tropical and temperate ecosystems. The low level of host preference indirectly supports an earlier hypothesis that pioneer Phyllanthaceae may facilitate the establishment of late successional Fabaceae and potentially other EcM host trees by providing compatible fungal inoculum in deforested and naturally disturbed ecosystems of tropical Africa. PMID:21645161

  15. Revision of Sauvagella Bertin (Clupeidae; Pellonulinae; Ehiravini) with a Description of a New Species from the Freshwaters of Madagascar and Diagnosis of the Ehiravini

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie L. J. Stiassny; J. D. McEachran

    2002-01-01

    The Madagascan genus Sauvagella is revised and a new species, Sauvagella robusta, from the Ambomboa River (Sofia drainage) described. Preliminary analysis suggests Sauvagella is an ehiravin and that the pellonuline tribe Ehiravini is monophyletic. The immediate relationships of Sauvagella appear to lie with the single other ehiravin genus from Madagascan waters, Spratellomorpha. Reports of the occurrence of Gil- christella in

  16. Published online 7 October 2004 Multiple Miocene Melastomataceae dispersal

    E-print Network

    Renner, Susanne

    Published online 7 October 2004 Multiple Miocene Melastomataceae dispersal between Madagascar from Africa during the Miocene. Medinilla, with some 70 species in Madagascar and two in Africa, too, arrived during the Miocene, but from Asia. Gravesia, with 100 species in Madagascar and four in east

  17. 280 CaCtusandsuCCulentJournal DUKE BENADOMBook Review

    E-print Network

    Gorelick, Root

    to the public, but you can visit it now through the pages of this book. The Aloe of Madagascar [Les Aloe de, with far more variation than we had ever seen before. The Aloe of Madagascar [Les Aloe de MadagascarICK La Réunion), describing and illustrating all Aloe and Lomatophyllum species and even some subspe

  18. Submitted 31 January 2013 Accepted 26 March 2013

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Anurag

    shrubs and trees found in southern Africa and Madagascar. Pachypodium has diversified mostly into arid, succulent, xerophytic shrubs and small trees distributed in Madagascar and southern Africa (Table 1. baronii Constantin and Bois 2 Madagascar Shrub Red P. bispinosum (L.f.) A.DC. 1 Southern Africa Shrub Pink

  19. [Tapez un texte] CIRAD, UPR 105 Biens et services des cosystmes forestiers tropicaux,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The forms adopted are "conservation contracts" or contracts for "participatory ecological monitoring to conservation in the Eastern region of Madagascar On the assumption that participatory approaches and indirect

  20. 77 FR 58175 - Resale Royalty Right

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ...Chile, Congo, Columbia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guinea, Hondorus, Iraq, Ivory Coast, Laos, Madagascar, Mali, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Nicaragua, Paragua, Panama, Peru, Peru, Philippines, Romania, Russian...

  1. 75 FR 70724 - Notice of Petitions by Firms for Determination of Eligibility To Apply for Trade Adjustment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ...small parlor guitars to larger Dreadnoughts. Materials used in the manufacturing process include mahogany, Brazillian and Madagascar rosewoods, adirondacks and sitka sprucewoods. Miscellaneous mat Raven Industries,...

  2. HIGH RISK COUNTRIES Afghanistan

    E-print Network

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    , China Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Sudan Sri Lanka St. Vincent & the Grenadines Sudan Suriname

  3. UNIVERSITE DE CORSE-PASCAL PAOLI FACULTE DES SCIENCES ET TECHNIQUES

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    'Antananarivo, Madagascar et Monsieur Dominique SAUTER, Professeur à l'Université de Lorraine, Nancy France de m'avoir fait A ENERGIES RENOUVELABLES DE TYPE EOLIEN ________________________________ Jury Directeurs : M. Nicolas HERAUD, Madagascar Rapporteurs : Pr. Dominique SAUTER, Professeur, CRAN, Université de Lorraine, France Pr. Mariette

  4. Divergence dates for Malagasy lemurs estimated from multiple gene loci: geological and evolutionary context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne D. Yoder; Ziheng Yang

    2004-01-01

    The lemurs of Madagascar are a unique radiation of primates that show an extraordin- ary diversity of lifestyles, morphologies and behaviours. However, very little is known about the relative antiquity of lemuriform clades due to the lack of terrestrial fossils for the Tertiary of Madagascar. Here, we employ a Bayesian method to estimate divergence dates within the lemuriform radiation using

  5. Problems related to the farming of Holothuria scabra (Jaeger, 1833)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thierry Lavitra; Richard Rasolofonirina; Michel Jangoux; Igor Eeckhaut

    2009-01-01

    Different problems related to Holothuria scabra farming were observed at the sea cucumber aquaculture project Madagascar Holothurie S.A. (Toliara, Madagascar). In this paper, those problems are presented, their impact on sea cucumber production is characterised and solutions permitting to avoid or to minimise their impact are proposed. A drastic salinity drop occurred during low tides in one period of the

  6. Molecular Ecology (2009) 18, 5463 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.04012.x 2008 The Authors

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Jeff A.

    2009-01-01

    (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish, CA 94118, USA Abstract The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16

  7. FrogLog 22 (3), Number 111 (July 2014) | 1 The Challenges

    E-print Network

    Carranza, Salvador

    and ranavirus in Madagascar. Photo by J. Jacobs. #12;2 | FrogLog 22 (3), Number 111 (July 2014) Recent and Species: The Challenges of Amphibian Conservation in Tanzania Today 65 Investigating the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus and Ranavirus in Madagascar 67 Bouncing Along: An Update from the Endangered

  8. Biol. Lett. (2007) 3, 344347 doi:10.1098/rsbl.2007.0043

    E-print Network

    Hanski, Ilkka

    2007-01-01

    ; tropical extinctions; dung beetle; Helictopleurini 1. INTRODUCTION Nearly two-thirds of all described forest-inhabiting dung beetles in Madagascar. Our extensive sampling across Madagascar during 2002 50 years. The endemic forest dung beetles have small ranges (Viljanen et al. in preparation), as have

  9. Fiche technique Dtail des panneaux

    E-print Network

    - Biodiversité des cultures Panneau 4 - Paysage à Madagascar Panneau 5 - Labour d'un champ au Maroc Panneau 6 9 - Récolte d'un essaim d'abeilles au Maroc Panneau 10 - L'innovation en marche Panneau 11

  10. Glenda Romn Geographic Mapping Technologies, Corp.

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Seismic Hazards Indonesia Soil Moisture Michigan Geologic Analysis Madagascar Landslide Susceptibility El Geográfica utilizando visualizadores gratuitos ArcGIS Explorer #12;Geographic Mapping Technologies, Corp · 14 años - Firma privada de consultoría de GIS · Distribuidores exclusivos de ESRI · Proveemos apoyo

  11. Curriculum Vitae Karen L. Baab

    E-print Network

    Baab, Karen L.

    . Toussaint, M., Baab, K.L. and Harvati, K. The Spy scapulae. In Semal & Hauzeur (Eds): Spy cave, State of 120.L. and Jungers, W.L. Cranial shape variation in extant and giant subfossil lemurs from Madagascar. American

  12. Species Assemblage Structure and Ecomorphological Convergence in Perciform Fishes (Cichlidae and Centrarchidae) in Tropical and Temperate Floodplain Rivers

    E-print Network

    Montana, Carmen 1976-

    2012-08-16

    of the 2 most species-rich fish families (10% of extant teleost diversity) and are distributed across the principal fragments of the former Gondwana supercontinent, including Central and South America, Africa, Madagascar, the Middle East, and Southern...

  13. Oryx Vol 38 No 4 October 2004 2004 FFI, Oryx, 38(4), 410417 DOI: 10.1017/S003060530400078X Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Andreone, Franco

    amphibian diversity? The case of An'Ala, a tropical rainforest in eastern Madagascar Denis Vallan, Franco, rainforest, selective wood exploitation. Introduction Tropical rainforests worldwide are cleared centuries for an exploited tropical rainforest to attain climax following disturbance (Terborgh, 1992

  14. Reconstructing Austronesian population history in Island Southeast Asia

    E-print Network

    Lipson, Mark

    Austronesian languages are spread across half the globe, from Easter Island to Madagascar. Evidence from linguistics and archaeology indicates that the ‘Austronesian expansion,’ which began 4,000–5,000 years ago, likely ...

  15. Carnets de Gologie / Notebooks on Geology -Article 2009/01 (CG2009_A01) Les ostracodes de l'Albien-Turonien moyen

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    affinités avec celles de l'Inde (Rajasthan) ce qui mène à proposer l'existence de province faunistique indo these periods, the ostracode faunas of Madagascar show strong affinities with those of India (Rajasthan

  16. Britain is largest importer of illegal timber in EU says WWF Britain is largest importer of illegal timber in EU says WWF

    E-print Network

    , and finance on conservation and development (more) CONTENTS Rainforests Tropical Fish Madagascar Pictures Kids a significant impact on the depletion of the world's most threatened rainforests. Related article Nigeria has

  17. Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate

    E-print Network

    , over 15 million hectares of rainforest have been concessioned to loggers with little regard, economics, and finance on conservation and development (more) CONTENTS Rainforests Tropical Fish Madagascar financing regime that maintains the environmental services provided by the DRC's intact rainforests

  18. Pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR DE L'UNIVERSIT DE GRENOBLE

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    diarrhées infantiles à Madagascar : Analyse du risque Campylobacter Thèse soutenue publiquement le « 18 la cohorte, le Docteur Rila qui a initié l'étude de cohorte Campylobacter à Moramanga, l'équipe SIG

  19. JOURNAL OF NATURAL HISTORY, 2003, 125, preview article Distribution patterns of the Malagasy freshwater crabs (Crustacea

    E-print Network

    Cumberlidge, Neil

    JOURNAL OF NATURAL HISTORY, 2003, 1­25, preview article Distribution patterns of the Malagasy, Madagascar. Journal of Natural History ISSN 0022-2933 print/ISSN 1464-5262 online © 2003 Taylor & Francis Ltd

  20. Supplement 19, Part 2, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Parasites: Protozoa

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Shirley J.; Crawley, Lila R.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hood, Martha W.

    1975-01-01

    Anaplasma centrale Uilenberg, G., 1968 a congenital transmission, Madagascar cattle A[naplasma] centrale splenectomy, bovine Uilenberg, G., 1969 a Anaplasma centrale Uilenberg, G., 1970 a Oxytetracycline} Chlortetracycline Anaplasma centrale Welter...

  1. Syst. Biol. 54(5):719730, 2005 Copyright c Society of Systematic Biologists

    E-print Network

    Vieites, David R.

    . Among major islands, Madagascar has long been renowned for the uniqueness of its fauna and flora (Myers with Africa were severed approximately 160 to 158 Mya (Briggs, 2003). Terrestrial mammals are represented

  2. elirden2012 elirdbrevemente

    E-print Network

    DÁFRICA MADAGASCAR INDONESIA VIETNAM POLINESIA FRANCESA PERÚ BOLIVIA BRASIL MARTINICA MARRuECOS MALÍ NÍGER Gu día y aún más que ayer, se enfrentan los países en desarrollo: cambio climático, degradación del suelo

  3. 75 FR 54909 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...biological samples of Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) taken from the wild in the Beza Majafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, for the purpose of scientific research. Applicant: Roberto Delgado, Garza Garcia, Mexico; PRT-19421A The...

  4. 76 FR 62599 - Presidential Determination With Respect to Foreign Governments' Efforts Regarding Trafficking in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ...ii) of the Act, with respect to Cuba, the Democratic People's Republic of North Korea (DPRK), Eritrea, Iran, Madagascar, and Venezuela, not to provide certain funding for those countries' governments for Fiscal Year 2012, until such...

  5. 77 FR 58921 - Presidential Determination With Respect to Foreign Governments' Efforts Regarding Trafficking in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ...d)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act, with respect to Cuba, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Eritrea, Iran, Madagascar, and Syria not to provide certain funding for those countries' governments for Fiscal Year 2013, until such...

  6. 76 FR 78308 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ...from Hong Kong up to 20 angulated tortoises (Astrochelys yniphora) that were previously illegally removed from the wild in Madagascar. The import would be for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: University of Georgia...

  7. 75 FR 427 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...permit to import up to 10 angulated tortoises (Astrochelys yniphora) which were previously illegally removed from the wild in Madagascar. The import would be for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. This notification covers...

  8. 76 FR 63935 - Notification of the Removal of Conditions of Entry on Vessels Arriving From the Republic of Congo

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...Cambodia, Cameroon, Comoros, Cote d'Ivoire, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Iran, Liberia, Madagascar, Sao Tome and Principe, Syria, Timor-Leste, and Venezuela. This notice is issued under authority of 46...

  9. 76 FR 18771 - Notification of the Removal of Conditions of Entry on Vessels Arriving From the Islamic Republic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ...Cambodia, Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Iran, Liberia, Madagascar, Sao Tome and Principe, Syria, Timor-Leste, and Venezuela. This notice is issued under authority of 46...

  10. 77 FR 71608 - Notification of the Removal of Conditions of Entry on Vessels Arriving From the Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ...follows: Cambodia, Cameroon, Comoros, Cote d'Ivoire, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Iran, Liberia, Madagascar, Sao Tome and Principe, Syria, Timor-Leste, Venezuela, and Yemen. This current list is also available in the...

  11. 76 FR 77006 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ...requests a permit to import biological specimens collected from silky sifakas (Propithecus diadema candidus) in the wild in Madagascar for the purpose of scientific research. Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import...

  12. 78 FR 57368 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals: Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Navy Operations of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ...Mexico, U.S.; Mississippi and DeSoto Canyons, U.S. Indian Ocean: Masira Bay, Oman and the Geyser-Zelee Complex, Madagascar. North Sea: Dogger Bank, Germany. Mediterranean Sea: central Tyrrhenian Sea and areas in the northern...

  13. 77 FR 53901 - Notification of the Imposition of Conditions of Entry for Certain Vessels Arriving to the United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ...Cambodia, Cameroon, Comoros, Cote d'Ivoire, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Iran, Liberia, Madagascar, Sao Tome and Principe, Syria, Timor-Leste, Venezuela, and Yemen. This current list is also available in the...

  14. 76 FR 30954 - Notification of the Imposition of Conditions of Entry for Certain Vessels Arriving to the United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...Comoros, Republic of the Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Cuba, Equatorial Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Iran, Liberia, Madagascar, Sao Tome and Principe, Syria, Timor-Leste, and Venezuela. This current list is also available in the policy...

  15. 76 FR 44352 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...applicant requests a permit to import biological samples from white sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi), collected in the wild in Madagascar, for the purpose of scientific research. Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import...

  16. 76 FR 55419 - Report on Countries That Are Candidates for Millennium Challenge Account Eligibility in Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...into compliance with trafficking in persons requirements or that continuation of assistance is in the national interest. Madagascar is subject to section 7008 of the FY 2010 SFOAA, which prohibits assistance to the government of a country whose duly...

  17. sa.anderson@niwa.co.nz Sally Anderson*, I. Salinas, L. Tubbs, J.S. Lumsden, B. Diggles, V. Webb, Y.

    E-print Network

    Kane, Andrew S.

    to monitor S. aureus colonization in great apes and lemurs. Methods: Mucosal swabs from wild lemurs (n=25, Kirindy, Madagascar), feces, oral and genital swabs from captive chimpanzees (n=58, Ngamba and Entebbe

  18. International Projects: Food Grant value over $250,000

    E-print Network

    by focusing on interventions aimed at increasing agricultural productivity and farmers' income Country Partners Description MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION Food Security Research Project - Phase III AGRICULTURAL, FOOD, AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS Africa Angola; Madagascar; Malawi; Mali; Burkina

  19. Predicting the Introduction and Transmission of Rift Valley Fever Virus in the United States 

    E-print Network

    Golnar, Andrew John

    2014-12-09

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne virus in the family Bunyaviridae that has spread throughout continental Africa to Madagascar and the Arabian Peninsula. The establishment of RVFV in North America would ...

  20. Reprogramming alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus : synthetic biology in plants

    E-print Network

    Runguphan, Weerawat

    2011-01-01

    The medicinal plant Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) produces over 130 monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) natural products. Many of these compounds have pharmaceutical value, such as the anticancer agents vinblastine ...

  1. Cornell Population Center Presenters PAA 2013 Annual Meeting

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    ": Partial Information and Sexual Taboo among MiddleClass Women in Delhi, India #12;2 Eloundou EnyegueSaharan Africa Cognitive Skills, Schooling and Fertility Transition among Young Women in Madagascar Hill

  2. Transferable Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Streptomycin in Clinical Isolate of Yersinia pestis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annie Guiyoule; Guy Gerbaud; Carmen Buchrieser; Marc Galimand; Lila Rahalison; Suzanne Chanteau; Patrice Courvalin; Elisabeth Carniel

    2001-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics was reported in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar in 1997. We describe a second Y. pestis strain with high-level resistance to streptomycin, isolated from a human case of bubonic plague in Madagascar. The resistance determinants were carried by a self-transferable plasmid that could conjugate at high frequencies to other Y. pestis

  3. A multidimensional approach for detecting species patterns in Malagasy vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Anne D.; Olson, Link E.; Hanley, Carol; Heckman, Kellie L.; Rasoloarison, Rodin; Russell, Amy L.; Ranivo, Julie; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Karanth, K. Praveen; Raselimanana, Achille P.; Goodman, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    The biodiversity of Madagascar is extraordinarily distinctive, diverse, and endangered. It is therefore urgent that steps be taken to document, describe, interpret, and protect this exceptional biota. As a collaborative group of field and laboratory biologists, we employ a suite of methodological and analytical tools to investigate the vertebrate portion of Madagascar's fauna. Given that species are the fundamental unit of evolution, where micro- and macroevolutionary forces converge to generate biological diversity, a thorough understanding of species distribution and abundance is critical for understanding the evolutionary, ecological, and biogeographic forces that have shaped Malagasy vertebrate diversity. We illustrate the means by which we apply Mayr's “three basic tasks” of the systematist [Mayr, E. (1942) Systematics and the Origin of Species from the Viewpoint of a Zoologist (Harvard Univ. Press, Cambridge, MA)] to identify, classify, and study the organisms that together constitute Madagascar's vertebrate community. Using field inventory methods, specimen-based studies, and morphological and molecular analyses, we formulate hypotheses of species identity that then serve as the foundation for subsequent studies of biology and history. Our experience, as well as that of other investigators, has shown that much of the vertebrate species diversity in Madagascar is “cryptic” for both biological and practical reasons. Beyond issues of cryptic biological diversity, the resolution of species identity in Madagascar has been hampered because of a lack of vouchered comparative material at the population level. Through our activities, we are attempting to remedy these limitations while simultaneously enhancing research capacity in Madagascar. PMID:15851666

  4. Contrasting genetic diversity and population structure among three sympatric Madagascan shorebirds: parallels with rarity, endemism, and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart-Phillips, Luke J; Hoffman, Joseph I; Brede, Edward G; Zefania, Sama; Kamrad, Martina J; Székely, Tamás; Bruford, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relative contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to population structure and genetic diversity is a central goal of conservation and evolutionary genetics. One way to achieve this is through comparative population genetic analysis of sympatric sister taxa, which allows evaluation of intrinsic factors such as population demography and life history while controlling for phylogenetic relatedness and geography. We used ten conserved microsatellites to explore the population structure and genetic diversity of three sympatric and closely related plover species in southwestern Madagascar: Kittlitz's plover (Charadrius pecuarius), white-fronted plover (C. marginatus), and Madagascar plover (C. thoracicus). Bayesian clustering revealed strong population structure in the rare and endemic Madagascar plover, intermediate population structure in the white-fronted plover, and no detectable population structure in the geographically widespread Kittlitz's plover. In contrast, allelic richness and heterozygosity were highest for the Kittlitz's plover, intermediate for the white-fronted plover and lowest for the Madagascar plover. No evidence was found in support of the “watershed mechanism” proposed to facilitate vicariant divergence of Madagascan lemurs and reptiles, which we attribute to the vagility of birds. However, we found a significant pattern of genetic isolation by distance among populations of the Madagascar plover, but not for the other two species. These findings suggest that interspecific variation in rarity, endemism, and dispersal propensity may influence genetic structure and diversity, even in highly vagile species. PMID:25798218

  5. Multiple overseas dispersal in amphibians.

    PubMed Central

    Vences, Miguel; Vieites, David R; Glaw, Frank; Brinkmann, Henner; Kosuch, Joachim; Veith, Michael; Meyer, Axel

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians are thought to be unable to disperse over ocean barriers because they do not tolerate the osmotic stress of salt water. Their distribution patterns have therefore generally been explained by vicariance biogeography. Here, we present compelling evidence for overseas dispersal of frogs in the Indian Ocean region based on the discovery of two endemic species on Mayotte. This island belongs to the Comoro archipelago, which is entirely volcanic and surrounded by sea depths of more than 3500 m. This constitutes the first observation of endemic amphibians on oceanic islands that did not have any past physical contact to other land masses. The two species of frogs had previously been thought to be nonendemic and introduced from Madagascar, but clearly represent new species based on their morphological and genetic differentiation. They belong to the genera Mantidactylus and Boophis in the family Mantellidae that is otherwise restricted to Madagascar, and are distinguished by morphology and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from mantellid species occurring in Madagascar. This discovery permits us to update and test molecular clocks for frogs distributed in this region. The new calibrations are in agreement with previous rate estimates and indicate two further Cenozoic transmarine dispersal events that had previously been interpreted as vicariance: hyperoliid frogs from Africa to Madagascar (Heterixalus) and from Madagascar to the Seychelles islands (Tachycnemis). Our results provide the strongest evidence so far that overseas dispersal of amphibians exists and is no rare exception, although vicariance certainly retains much of its importance in explaining amphibian biogeography. PMID:14667332

  6. Seed Dispersal: Lemurs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pulse of the Planet

    2007-09-20

    Trees in Madagascar's forests have evolved traits that promote the dispersal of their seeds by lemurs. This two-minute radio program focuses on the interaction between forest plants and lemurs--the main seed dispersers in the forests. A guest scientist explains why lemurs ingest seeds that are large relative to their body size. He also notes that the fruits of Madagascar's trees have evolved to be strong smelling but drably colored in accordance with lemurs' keen sense of smell and poor vision. The program is available in text and audio formats. The latter includes audio of ring-tailed lemurs. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  7. Cassava mosaic virus disease in East Africa: a dynamic disease in a changing environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Legg; J. M. Thresh

    2000-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD), now known to be caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses (Family Geminiviridae; Genus Begomovirus), was first reported in East Africa in 1894. Epidemics occurred in Madagascar and Uganda in the 1930s and 1940s, and more localised rapid spread of CMD was observed in parts of coastal Tanzania in the 1930s and coastal Kenya in the 1970s. During

  8. Reciprocal recognition of sifaka ( Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi ) and redfronted lemur ( Eulemur fulvus rufus ) alarm calls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudia Fichtel

    2004-01-01

    Redfronted lemurs ( Eulemur fulvus rufus) and Verreaux's sifakas ( Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi) occur sympatrically in western Madagascar. Both species exhibit a so-called mixed alarm call system with functionally referential alarm calls for raptors and general alarm calls for carnivores and raptors. General alarm calls also occur in other contexts associated with high arousal, such as inter-group encounters. Field playback

  9. Hercynitequartz-bearing granulites from Brejes Dome area, Jequi Block, Bahia, Brazil: Influence of charnockite intrusion on

    E-print Network

    Nicollet, Christian

    Available online 30 June 2006 Abstract In the present study, we describe and discuss the geology, and therefore to obtain constraints for the better understanding of the geological evolution of the area. We), Madagascar (e.g. Nicollet, 1990), Algeria (e.g. Ouzegane and Boumaza, 1996), and Brazil (Moraes and Fuck

  10. Health, Education and Poverty Reduction. OECD Development Centre Policy Brief No. 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrisson, Christian

    2002-01-01

    It is generally agreed that spending on education and health is key to poverty reduction, but simply allocating more resources to these sectors does not ensure that poverty actually declines. On the basis of four in-depth case studies (on Indonesia, Madagascar, Peru and Tanzania) and three Technical Papers on malnutrition and primary education in…

  11. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 5(1):111-125. Submitted: 14 August 2008; Accepted: 20 July 2009.

    E-print Network

    , AB24 2TZ, United Kingdom 6 Zoologische Staatssammlung München, Münchhausenstr. 21, 81247 München the species recorded, 28% are endemic to the Bemaraha plateau and 48% appear to be dependent on forest habitat, those of reptiles demonstrate a link to the forests of northern Madagascar. We comment on former species

  12. Amphipoda (Crustacea) from Palau, Micronesia: families Melphidippidae, Oedicerotidae, Photidae, Pleustidae, Podoceridae, Stenothoidae, Synopiidae and Talitridae.

    PubMed

    Myers, A A

    2014-01-01

    Eleven species belonging to the families Melphidippidae, Oedicerotidae, Photidae, Pleustidae, Podoceridae, Stenothoidae, Synopiidae and Talitridae are recorded from Palau, Micronesia. Eight species are figured. One species is new to science and is described and figured. One species was previously known only from Australia, one only from Madagascar and one only from Fiji. PMID:24943185

  13. Effect of water temperature on the survival and growth of endobenthic Holothuria scabra (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea) juveniles reared in outdoor ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thierry Lavitra; Nicolas Fohy; Pierre-Gildas Gestin; Richard Rasolofonirina; Igor Eeckhaut

    2010-01-01

    The present work analyzes data from Madagascar Holothurie Société Anonyme to determine the effect of water temperature on the survival and growth of Holothuria scabra juveniles in ponds, and tests a system for heating pond water during the cold season (April-August). Our study shows that while water temperature does not affect the survival of endobenthic juveniles of H. scabra it

  14. The skin ulceration disease in cultivated juveniles of Holothuria scabra (Holothuroidea, Echinodermata)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Becker; D. Gillan; D. Lanterbecq; M. Jangoux; R. Rasolofonirina; J. Rakotovao; I. Eeckhaut

    2004-01-01

    It is frequently reported that cultivated holothuroids can suffer from a disease affecting their integument. We report here on a disease of juvenile Holothuria scabra, the widely marketed edible sea cucumber, reared in the Aqua-Lab hatchery of Toliara, Madagascar. This disease, which has been called skin ulceration disease, is very contagious and results from a severe bacterial infection that causes

  15. BioMed Central Page 1 of 11

    E-print Network

    Renner, Susanne

    AccessResearch article Phylogenetics of Cucumis (Cucurbitaceae): Cucumber (C. sativus) belongs@lrz.uni-muenchen.de * Corresponding author Equal contributors Abstract Background: Melon, Cucumis melo, and cucumber, C. sativus species in Australia and Indonesia, the other in Madagascar. Cucumber and its sister species, C. hystrix

  16. Phylogenetics of Cucumis (Cucurbitaceae) as understood in 20081 S.S. Renner*

    E-print Network

    Renner, Susanne

    sampling. One of these studies also addressed the position of Cucumis in the Cucurbitaceae family tree and Indonesia, the other in Madagascar. Cucumber and its sister species, C. hystrix, are nested among Australian of ongoing efforts by plant breeders worldwide to improve melon (C. melo) and cucumber (C. sativus

  17. Chikungunya Outbreaks — The Globalization of Vectorborne Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rémi N. Charrel; Xavier de Lamballerie; Didier Raoult

    2007-01-01

    n 2006, an outbreak of chi k un - gunya fever — an arthralgic disease caused by a mosquito- borne alphavirus — swept over a number of islands in the Indian Ocean (the Comoros, Mauritius, the Seychelles, Madagascar, May- otte, and Reunion). In Reunion, which has a population of 770,000, there were 265,000 clinical cases (an incidence of 34%), and

  18. Survey of Basic Education in Eastern Africa. UNESCO/UNICEF Co-Operation Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Nairobi (Kenya). Regional Office of Science and Technology for Africa.

    A survey of basic education in 13 Eastern African countries (Madagascar, Burundi, Comores, Ethiopia, Mauritius, Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, and Somalia) covers basic education programs and UNICEF's supporting role. Basic education is seen as a concept evolved in the region, involving formal school systems and…

  19. FOOD PRICE STABILISATION AND FOOD SECURITY: INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Dorosh

    2008-01-01

    The importance of food commodities to consumers and farmers leads most countries to attempt to influence the levels and stability of food prices. The specific policies adopted and the degree of price stabilisation actually achieved vary considerably across countries, however. This paper reviews the experience of four countries (China, India, Bangladesh and Madagascar) that have implemented explicit price stabilisation and

  20. The System of Rice Intensification (SRI) as a System of Agricultural Innovation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman Uphoff

    The System of Rice Intensification (SRI), developed in Madagascar some 25 years ago, is gaining increasing credence and momentum as probably 500,000 farmers in more than 20 countries are now using its methods to raise their rice production -- while also reducing their use of external inputs and production costs. Rather than focus on the innovation itself, this paper will

  1. IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel

    E-print Network

    IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel By Clare Byrne Visitors to Madagascar, Senegal to South Africa, biofuels is the buzzword as African countries wake up to the possibility of using their vast spaces to grow crops that reduce their fossil fuel bill. Biofuels also carry

  2. Evaluating effects of deforestation, hunting, and El Nin~ o events on a threatened lemur

    E-print Network

    Dunham, Amy E.

    Evaluating effects of deforestation, hunting, and El Nin~ o events on a threatened lemur Amy E the eastern rainforest of Madagascar, to evaluate the impact of deforestation, hunting, and El Nin~ o on its that hunting and deforestation are the most significant threats to the population. Analysis of several

  3. Cockroaches in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine Moseley

    2005-03-01

    Welcome the Madagascar hissing cockroach into your classroom--they are not your average pest! This article describes the basic biology of this relatively tame creature, and how to set up and care for a classroom colony. It includes a list of suggested inquiry-centered classroom activities that you and your students will find both educational and fun!

  4. 2000 Macmillan Magazines Ltd letters to nature

    E-print Network

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    a bat. Nature 350, 383±384 (1991). 17. Gould, E. Evidence for echolocation in the Tenrecidae of Madagascar. Proc. Am. Phil. Soc. 109, 352± 360 (1965). 18. Tomasi, T. E. Echolocation by the short for echolocation in the common shrew, Sorex araneus. J. Zool. Lond. 216, 655±662 (1988). 20. Speakman, J. R & Racey

  5. A phylogeny and biogeographic analysis for the Cape-Pondweed family Aponogetonaceae (Alismatales).

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Yun; Grimm, Guido W; Wang, Qing-Feng; Renner, Susanne S

    2015-01-01

    The monocot family Aponogetonaceae (Alismatales) consists only of Aponogeton, with 57 species occurring in Africa, Madagascar, India and Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia and Australia. Earlier studies inferred a Madagascan or Australian origin for the genus. Aponogeton-like pollen is documented from the Late Cretaceous of Wyoming, the early mid-Eocene of Canada, and the late mid-Eocene of Greenland. We obtained nuclear and plastid DNA sequences for 42 species and generated a time-calibrated phylogeny, rooted on appropriate outgroups. Statistical biogeographic analyses were carried out with or without the fossils incorporated in the phylogeny. The recent-most common ancestor of living Aponogetonaceae appears to date to the mid-Eocene and to have lived in Madagascar or Africa (but not Australia). Three transoceanic dispersal events from Africa/Madagascar to Asia sometime during the Miocene could explain the observed species relationships. As inferred in earlier studies, an ancient Australian species is sister to all other Aponogetonaceae, while the remaining Australian species stem from an Asian ancestor that arrived about 5million years ago. The family's ancient Northern Hemisphere fossil record and deepest extant divergence between a single Australian species and an Africa/Madagascar clade are statistically well-supported and rank among the most unusual patters in the biogeography of flowering plants. PMID:25462997

  6. Food partitioning among Malagasy primates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiirg U. Ganzhorn

    1988-01-01

    Food partitioning among lemurs was studied in relation to food patch size and plant chemistry in the eastern rainforest and a western deciduous forest of Madagascar. Patch size (i.e. crown diameter of food trees) is significantly correlated with group body weight of different lemur species. But intraspecific variability is high and prevents effective species separation. Chemical analyses of more than

  7. INDEPENDENT GENE PHYLOGENIES AND MORPHOLOGY DEMONSTRATE A MALAGASY ORIGIN FOR A WIDE-RANGING GROUP OF SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evgueni V. Zakharov; Campbell R. Smith; David C. Lees; Alison Cameron; Richard I. Vane-Wright; Felix A. H. Sperling

    2004-01-01

    Madagascar is home to numerous endemic species and lineages, but the processes that have contributed to its endangered diversity are still poorly understood. Evidence is accumulating to demonstrate the importance of Tertiary dispersal across varying distances of oceanic barriers, supplementing vicariance relationships dating back to the Cretaceous, but these hypotheses remain tentative in the absence of well-supported phylogenies. In the

  8. Introduction Day geckos of the genus Phelsuma are mainly

    E-print Network

    Vences, Miguel

    Introduction Day geckos of the genus Phelsuma are mainly confined to Madagascar and surrounding geckos, Phelsuma species are generally diurnal. Most species are characterized by a bright green colour of Rhoptropella ocellata, a gecko species from the Namaqua Mountains in South Africa that had formerly been

  9. Journal of AfricanEmh Sciences. Vol. 29, No. 1, pp.13% 151, 1999 PksO899-5382(99)00085-8

    E-print Network

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    the Late Permian-Early Jurassic Sakamena and the Late Carboniferous(?)-Early Permian Sakoa Group from, respectively, and imply palseolatitudes of 28OS and 55'S for southwest Madagascar in Late Permian-Early Triassic and Late Carboniferous(?)-Early Permian times. The majority of the data, however

  10. Techniques for the maintenance and propagation of phytoplasmas in glasshouse collections of Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Jennifer; Crossley, David; Dickinson, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma collections are a vital resource for researchers and diagnosticians studying phytoplasma diseases. They provide material as a point of reference and a research tool to increase our understanding of phytoplasmas and the diseases they cause. This chapter describes the techniques required to create and maintain collections of phytoplasma-infected Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle). PMID:22987402

  11. Through Perspective, CIRAD provides the opportunity

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or fokontany) to authenti- cate it by stamping it. Despite the lack of any national regulations,these papers André Teyssier "Small papers" in response to the failure of land titles Madagascar has inherited developed local methods for recognising rights, known as "small papers". This system involves setting down

  12. Basalts dredged from the Amirante ridge, western Indian ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, R.L.; Engel, C.G.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1968-01-01

    Oceanic tholeiitic basalts were dredged from 2500 to 3000 m depth on each flank of the Amirante Ridge, 1200 km southeast of Somalia in the western Indian Ocean, by R.V. Argo in 1964. One sample, probably shed from a flow or dike in basement beneath the coralline cap, gave a wholerock KAr age of 82??16??106 years. The age is similar to those reported by others for agglomerate from Providence Reef, nearer Madagascar, and for gabbro from Chain Ridge, the southwest member of Owen Fracture Zone, nearer the Somali coast. The Amirante Cretaceous-Early Tertiary occurrence lies between the "continental" 650 ?? 106 years granites of Seychelles Archipelago and the large Precambrian "continental" block of Madagascar. Trends of major structures and distribution of the related topographic and magnetic-anomaly lineations in 7-8 ?? 106 km2of the surrounding Indian Ocean suggest that in addition to spreading of the seafloor from the seismically-active Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge-Carlsberg Ridge complex there has been, since mid-Mesozoic time, distributed left-lateral shear along 52??-54??E that has moved Madagascar at least 700 km south relative to Seychelles Bank. Measurements by other indicate the absolute movement of Madagascar has been southward as well. The emplacement of oceanic tholeiitic basalts at shallow depth, the development of volcanic topography between the sedimented Somali and Mascarene basins, and the existence of the faulted Amirante Trench and Ridge are consequences of the displacement. ?? 1968.

  13. Reproductive Caste Performs Intranidal Tasks Instead of Workers in the Ant Mystrium oberthueri

    E-print Network

    Danchin, Etienne

    Reproductive Caste Performs Intranidal Tasks Instead of Workers in the Ant Mystrium oberthueri different tasks. In ants, the wingless worker caste performs non-reproductive activities and sometimes rogeri from Madagascar is a specialist predator on large centipedes, and the worker caste is highly

  14. ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH AND GROWTH OF RING-NECKED PHEASANTS FOLLOWING CONSUMPTION OF INFECTED

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Dan L.

    Madagascar are being developed for control of grasshoppers and locusts, as part of a search for alternatives directly, by consuming spores deposited on their food items, or secondarily, by consuming grasshoppers selected birds from each of the groups exposed to infected grasshoppers, plus the 2 control groups

  15. THE LEXICOSTATISTICAL CLASSIFICATION OF THE AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DYEN, ISIDORE

    STATISTICAL DATA DEALING WITH BASIC VOCABULARY COMPARISONS AMONG A SIGNIFICANT GROUP OF AUSTRONESIAN LANGUAGES ARE PRESENTED. SOME OF THE LANGUAGES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO SUBGROUPS UNDER GEOGRAPHICAL DIVISIONS, AND OTHERS ARE REGARDED AS SUBGROUPS IN THEMSELVES. THE LANGUAGES COVERED IN THE STUDY STRETCH GEOGRAPHICALLY FROM MADAGASCAR TO EASTER…

  16. Received 24 Feb 2014 | Accepted 14 Jul 2014 | Published 19 Aug 2014 Reconstructing Austronesian population

    E-print Network

    Reich, David

    are spread across half the globe, from Easter Island to Madagascar. Evidence from linguistics and archaeology Austronesian population history in Island Southeast Asia Mark Lipson1, Po-Ru Loh1,w, Nick Patterson2, Priya on Island Southeast Asia. We show that all sampled Austronesian groups harbour ancestry that is more closely

  17. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we...

  18. Subtropical SST dipole events in the southern Indian Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Swadhin K. Behera; Toshio Yamagata

    2001-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the subtropical southern Indian Ocean show interannual dipole events that are seasonally phase-locked to the austral summer. A positive phase of the event is characterized by cold SST anomalies in the eastern part i.e. off Australia and warm SST anomalies in the southwestern part, south of Madagascar. Such an event is found to produce

  19. Spatial Distribution of Dominant Arboreal Ants in a Malagasy Coastal Rainforest: Gaps and Presence of an

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spatial Distribution of Dominant Arboreal Ants in a Malagasy Coastal Rainforest: Gaps and Presence mosaic, exists in the rainforest on the Masoala Peninsula, Madagascar. In most tropical rainforests, very. These results suggest that the Masoala rainforest is threatened by a potential invasion by T. albipes

  20. World Bank to raise $250M for avoided deforestation in tropics World Bank to raise $250M for avoided deforestation in tropics

    E-print Network

    ) CONTENTS Rainforests Tropical Fish Madagascar Pictures Kids' Site About Contact Archives Newsletter rainforest nations have proposed a plan whereby industrialized nations would pay them to protect extent of tropical rainforests and the world's highest rate of forest loss -- said it promote a similar