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Sample records for madagascar enquette epidemiologique

  1. Madagascar.

    PubMed

    1987-08-01

    Madagascar, in the Indian Ocean near Mozambique, is officially known as the Democratic Republic of Madagascar. This republic has 3 branches of government and includes 6 provinces or subdivisions. Since 1981, it has received more than $62 million in grants and concessional sales from the US. There have been other types of assistance as well, including a development assistance program begun in 1985. Its population is largely of mixed Asian and African origin. There exists an historic rivalry between the Catholic coastal people, Cotiers, and the Protestant Merina, who predominate in civil service, business, and the professions. To combat this, the government has set one of its goals to be the highlighting of nationalism. The beginning of Madagascar's written history can be traced to when the Arabs established trading posts along the coastal areas. Eventually, Madagascar moved toward independence from the French and became an autonomous state in 1958. The president is elected for a 7-year term and is the head, during that time, of the Supreme Revolutionary Council. There is a 3-tiered court system, including a lower court for civil and criminal cases, a criminal court for more serious crimes, and a supreme court. The government represents a strong socialist philosophy and outright criticism of the President and his government is not tolerated. The economy of Malagasy is dominated by agriculture, which employs about 85% of the population. Although it faces some serious problems in the areas of foreign exchange and imports/exports, Madagascar is a potentially prosperous country. It boasts diversified agricultural production, it is rich in minerals, and it maintains strong commercial ties to the West. Madagascar's major trading partners are France, the US, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Soviet Union, Qatar, and Japan. Madagascar maintains the Popular Armed Forces for its defense; however, there is a heavy reliance on the Soviet Union for military equipment and training. US-Malagasy relations have been warm for most of its history until 1971 when the US ambassador and 5 members of his staff were expelled. In 1980, a new ambassador arrived and in 1981, 2 Food for Peace rice agreements were concluded. In 1986, Madagascar became the 1st African country to be the recipient of assistance under the program Food for Progress, given to nations which have undertaken successful economic reform. PMID:12177963

  2. Deforestation, Madagascar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This high oblique view shows the majority of the island of Madagascar (22.0S, 45.5E). This Texas sized island is now largely deforested and is suffering from severe soil erosion as well as a declining biological species diversity and productivity. At the turn of the century, the island was almost totally forested but now, forests cover only about 10 percent of the surface. Evidence of soil erosion can be seen in the offshore sediment plumes.

  3. Deforestation, Madagascar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This high oblique view shows the majority of the island of Madagascar (19.0S, 47.5E). This Texas sized island is now largely deforested and is suffering from severe soil erosion as well as a declining biological species diversity and productivity. At the turn of the century, the island was almost totally forested but now, forests cover only about 10 percent of the surface. Evidence of soil erosion can be seen in the offshore sediment plumes.

  4. Trigonalidae (Hymenoptera) of Madagascar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven species of the primarily hyperparasitoid family Trigonalidae are reported from Madagascar: Orthogonalys brevis Smith and Tripotin, sp. n., Orthogonalys gigantea Benoit, 1951; O. hova Bischoff, 1933; O. maculata Bischoff, 1933; Orthogonalys parahova Smith and Tripotin, sp. n., O. seyrigi Bisch...

  5. Onilahy River, Madagascar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Near the southern tip of Madagascar, the Onilahy River (23.5S, 44E) drains a near barren landscape, the result of rapid deforestation for quick profits from the lumber industry with no regard to the environmental impact. At the turn of the century, the island was a lush tropical paradise with about 90 percent of the surface forested. Now, at the close of the century, only about 10 percent of the forests remain in inaccessible rugged terrain.

  6. Seismotectonics of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertil, Didier; Marc Regnoult, Jean

    1998-08-01

    Instrumental seismic activity in Madagascar over a 16-years period, as well as the largest earthquakes experienced over the last century, are studied using seismic signal recordings and the archives of the Antananarivo Geophysical Observatory (Institut et Observatoire de Géophysique d'Antananarivo). Earthquakes occur in most of the island. The known focal mechanisms indicate a general E-W extension, consistent with the stretching currently observed in the Mozambique channel and on the eastern edge of the African continent. Seismic areas cover the main Pliocene-Quaternary tectonic formations. Other events are located near Pan-African tectonics structures, preferentially reactivated within the Precambrian basement complex. A regional origin of stresses cannot explain completely the spatial distribution of all the earthquakes in the central highlands of Madagascar. An other possible stress origin can be a thermal bulge on which the main Pliocene Quaternary tectonic and volcanic structures of this region are situated. The current tectonic phase of extension seems to correspond to an early stage of reactivation. Madagascar could be part of the E-W extension zone associated with diffuse seismicity affecting East Africa south of the Equator.

  7. Oceanography of West Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Bemiasa

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - October 2009) in Western and Northern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. Along selected hydrographical transects, a total of 182 CTD stations were conducted and ranged to a maximum of 3000 m depth. Water samples were also collected with Niskin bottles at predefined depths. A Seabird 911plus CTD was used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and oxygen. As results, along the west and south coast of Madagascar, the shelf is narrow and widen slightly along the north-west coast. In all ten transects the isotherms showed stratified waters from the coast to offshore. A maximum salinity layer was observed at subsurface in all transects. Dissolved oxygen had a maximum at around 500 m depth in all transects. Low fluorescence values were observed in the upper 150-200 m, with maximum values in the range of 0.14-0.22 µg/l at intermediate layers. The conditions were consistent along and between the transects, with more variation observed at transect 9. No upwelling was observed along the western coast. The surface temperature (5 m depth) increased from 22°C in the south to 26°C in the north. The horizontal distribution of surface salinities showed homogenous conditions with values between 35.4psu (south) and 35.0 psu (north). Also starting from the coast to offshore, both the surface temperatures and surface salinities showed homogenous patterns.

  8. Zooplankton of West Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiasa, John; Remanevy, Sitraka

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - October 2009) in Western and Northern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. Zooplankton samples were collected with Hydrobios Multinet at all environmental stations ranging from 200 m depth to the surface. The Multinet was equipped with 5 nets for depth-stratified sampling. The nets were fitted with 180 µm mesh size and the water flow through the nets was measured. The Multinet was deployed and retrieved at a rate of ~ 1.5 m per second and was obliquely hauled. The five nets were triggered at the pre-selected depth intervals 0-25m, 25-50m, 50-80m, 80-120m and 120-200m. All samples were stored in marked bottles and preserved with buffered formaldehyde of 4% for further analysis. As results,the zooplankton abundance was influenced by physico-chemical factors. During the study period 34 Family of zooplankton were identified which are dominated by Copepoda (58,69%) followed by Radiolaria (12,06%), Appendicularia (6,47%), Sagitta (5,11%), Larvae (4,57%), Ostracoda (3,13%), pelagic Foraminifera (2,15%). Family of zooplankton with abundance <1% were also recorded, namely Salpidae (0,94%), Euphausiacea (0,44%), Tintinnidae (0,39%), Annélidae Polychètes (0,34%), Mysidacea (0,21%), Ptéropodae (0,13%). Highest number of zooplankton were found at the depth below the maximum of fluorescence during the day. Copepods distribution depends on site and depth. During this study, the number of identified species is always superior to 50 for all sampling sites. The findings of the present study will help to improve the scientific knowledge of the marine ecosystem of the west coast of Madagascar.

  9. [Latrodectism in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ramialiharisoa, A; de Haro, L; Jouglard, J; Goyffon, M

    1994-01-01

    Data concerning lactrodectism in Madagascar is scarce. Two spider species of the Latrodectus genus are found on the Grand Isle: the black widow Latrodectus mactans mena vody and the brown widow Latrodectus geometricus. From March 1991 through July 1992, 10 cases of envenomation by these spiders were treated in the Intensive Care Unit of Antananarivo Hospital. Symptomatology was remarkable with regard to severity (one fatality due to cardiovascular failure, one gangrene of the foot) as well as clinical manifestations (immediate local pain, kidney dysfunction, arterial hypertension). In two cases, the spider was captured and identified. Both were female brown widows (Latrodectus geometricus), which might explain the differences observed in comparison with the classic features of latrodectism that have been established from American and European black widow bites. Since antivenom was unavailable, only symptomatic treatment was administered, including intravenous calcium that proved effective for pain relief. PMID:7934777

  10. Oceanography of East Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiasa, John

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - September 2008) in Southern and Eastern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. A total of 102 CTD stations were conducted along selected hydrographical transects and ranged to a maximum of 3000 m depth. Water samples were also collected with Niskin bottles at predefined depths. A Seabird 911plus CTD was used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and oxygen. As results, the first section between latitude 25o-26oS showed sea surface temperature values ranging between 25oC to 15oC upper 250m depth. As part of the south-west, the shelf is narrow and widen slightly along the tip south of the Island coast. In contrast of the west coast, in all transects performed along the south and the east coast, in most cases, the isotherms showed non stratified waters from the coast to offshore. The presence of the upwelling system in the south-east coast modifies drastically the patterns of all measured parameters. Fluorescence had a maximum values (0.25 µg/l) at surface near the coast in 2nd to 5th transects. Inversely, low temperature values were observed along the south and south-east with minimum values in the range of 18. 5oC-11oC at 50-250 m depth. These conditions were consistent along and between the 2nd to 5th transects, with more variation observed at transect 5. The salinity values (5 m depth) decreased from 35.7 psu in the south to 34.5 psu in the east. The horizontal distribution of oxygen showed non homogenous conditions with values between 5 ml/l (south) and 2.5 ml/l (south-east). Also starting from the coast to offshore, surface temperatures and surface salinities, surface fluorescence and dissolved oxygen showed non homogenous patterns.

  11. Logistical teamwork tames Madagascar wildcats

    SciTech Connect

    Twa, W.

    1986-03-01

    Amoco Production Company's exploration program in western Madagascar's Sakalaya coastal plain exemplifies the unique logistical challenges both operator and drilling contractor must undergo to reach the few remaining onshore frontier areas. Sakalava is characterized by deep rivers, flood prone tributaries, and a lone 40 km hard-surface road. Problems caused by a lack of port facilities and oil field services are complicated by thousands of square miles of unimproved wooded plains. Rainwater from the nearby mountains of central Madagascar frequently floods rivers in the Sakalava coastal plain leaving impassable marshes in their wake. Prior to this project, about 45 wells had been drilled in Madagascar. Most recently, state oil company Omnis contracted Bawden Drilling International Inc. to drill nine wells for its heavy oil project on the Tsimioro oil prospect. Bawden provided both logistical and drilling services for that program.

  12. Resistances et initiatives a Madagascar (Resistance and Initiatives in Madagascar).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georges, Claude

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the cultural, political, and institutional barriers to population education in Madagascar and the strategies and initiatives that have been adopted to overcome them, including emphasizing the national character of a project, accommodating the values and ideals of the people involved, and assuring teachers of their classroom autonomy.…

  13. Atmospheric Effects of Biomass Burning in Madagascar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.; Hoegy, Walter R.; Ziemke, Jerry R.; Thorpe, Arthur; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous tropospheric ozone and aerosols observed using the TOMS satellite instrument are reported for Madagascar during the 1979 through 1999 time period Ozone observations made using the TOMS tropospheric ozone convective-cloud differential method show that the tropospheric ozone amount associated with Madagascar has an average monthly value of 30 DU (Dobson units). The average value is enhanced by 10 to 15 DU in October This maximum coincides with the time of maximum biomass area burning in Madagascar and parts of southern Africa. The aerosol index derived from TOMS is examined for correlation with biomass burning in Madagascar and southern Africa. There is good correlation between a satellite observation derived fire index for different parts of Madagascar, tropospheric ozone and the TOMS aerosol index in the same geographical area. Aerosols from fires were found to reach their peak in November and to persist over Madagascar until sometime in December.

  14. Leptospirosis after a stay in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Frédéric; Kuli, Barbara; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Goarant, Cyrille; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed leptospirosis in a patient who recently traveled to Madagascar, a country where only two cases have been reported since 1955. Although laboratory and clinical presentations were atypical and despite leptospirosis not being a documented disease in Madagascar, blood and urine tests for leptospirosis enabled retrospective confirmation of the diagnosis. PMID:25319525

  15. Imperfect Isolation: Factors and Filters Shaping Madagascar’s Extant Vertebrate Fauna

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Karen E.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Ali, Jason R.; Goodman, Steven M.; Vences, Miguel; Sutherland, Michael R.; Irwin, Mitchell T.; Krause, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of phylogenetic topology and estimates of divergence timing have facilitated a reconstruction of Madagascar’s colonization events by vertebrate animals, but that information alone does not reveal the major factors shaping the island’s biogeographic history. Here, we examine profiles of Malagasy vertebrate clades through time within the context of the island’s paleogeographical evolution to determine how particular events influenced the arrival of the island’s extant groups. First we compare vertebrate profiles on Madagascar before and after selected events; then we compare tetrapod profiles on Madagascar to contemporary tetrapod compositions globally. We show that changes from the Mesozoic to the Cenozoic in the proportions of Madagascar’s tetrapod clades (particularly its increase in the representation of birds and mammals) are tied to changes in their relative proportions elsewhere on the globe. Differences in the representation of vertebrate classes from the Mesozoic to the Cenozoic reflect the effects of extinction (i.e., the non-random susceptibility of the different vertebrate clades to purported catastrophic global events 65 million years ago), and new evolutionary opportunities for a subset of vertebrates with the relatively high potential for transoceanic dispersal potential. In comparison, changes in vertebrate class representation during the Cenozoic are minor. Despite the fact that the island’s isolation has resulted in high vertebrate endemism and a unique and taxonomically imbalanced extant vertebrate assemblage (both hailed as testimony to its long isolation), that isolation was never complete. Indeed, Madagascar’s extant tetrapod fauna owes more to colonization during the Cenozoic than to earlier arrivals. Madagascar’s unusual vertebrate assemblage needs to be understood with reference to the basal character of clades originating prior to the K-T extinction, as well as to the differential transoceanic dispersal advantage of other, more recently arriving clades. Thus, the composition of Madagascar’s endemic vertebrate assemblage itself provides evidence of the island's paleogeographic history. PMID:23626770

  16. Dipoles of the South East Madagascar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridderinkhof, W.; Le Bars, D.; Heydt, A. S.; Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2013-02-01

    Satellite altimetry data covering 18 years together with hydrographic observations around south Madagascar show that after separation from the coast, the South East Madagascar Current (SEMC) propagates southwestward and breaks up into a regular series of symmetric counter-rotating vortex pairs. Most of them split and propagate into the Agulhas retroflection system. Interannual variability of the dipole formation is related to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. In the observation period two "early" Agulhas retroflection events appeared both related to strong Madagascar dipoles. The symmetry of the dipoles may originate from the boundary current where negative vorticity on the inshore side is adjacent to positive vorticity further offshore.

  17. The Africa Madagascar connection and mammalian migrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Philip D.; Woods, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    Madagascar separated from Africa in the Middle-Late Jurassic and has been in its present position relative to Africa since the Early Cretaceous (˜120-130 my). Several Early Eocene to Late Oligocene (˜50-26 my) terrestrial mammalian groups are observed on Madagascar that have a similar ancestral lineage to those found in Africa. These mammalian groups means of transport across the Mozambique Channel from Africa to Madagascar was either by traversing on exposed land masses across a land bridge or by swimming/rafting, since (1) Madagascar has been separated from mainland Africa for at least 70 my before their arrival, and (2) it is unlikely that similar ancestral lineage's evolved simultaneously in separated regions. No evidence has been found for a land bridge across the Mozambique Channel. The mammals thus either swam or have been swept away on vegetation mats from rivers flowing out of Mozambique or Tanzania.

  18. A rehabilitation training partnership in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Andrianabela, Sonia; Hariharan, Ram; Ford, Helen L; Chamberlain, M Anne

    2015-09-01

    We describe here the development of a mid-level training programme for doctors in Madagascar to direct regional and national rehabilitation services. Eight doctors enrolled and all gained their diplomas and have gone on to form the Association of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine of Madagascar, which is leading further training and service developments. The course was specific to Madagascar's needs, and was devised according to the vision of the senior rehabilitation specialist in the Ministry of Health in Madagascar with support from the University of Antananarivo. The syllabus was developed with a senior Rehabilitation Medicine consultant responsible for setting up a comprehensive range of services and teaching in a University teaching hospital in the UK. Major barriers to success include the economic and political situation in Madagascar, which worsened steadily over the period of the training, the lack of resources for health, rehabilitation and rehabilitation workshops, and the withdrawal of aid. The sustainability of the training and the improved services that have been initiated will be evaluated, but these will be influenced by the situation of the country. It is hoped that this description of a highly practical training using modern teaching methods will be of use in other low-resource countries. Much of the teaching input was given by clinicians from a UK teaching hospital, and this resource will continue to be needed. PMID:26271518

  19. Asystasia mosaic Madagascar virus: a novel bipartite begomovirus infecting the weed Asystasia gangetica in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, Alexandre; Harimalala, Mireille; Hoareau, Murielle; Ranomenjanahary, Sahondramalala; Reynaud, Bernard; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe for the first time the complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus in Madagascar isolated from the weed Asystasia gangetica (Acanthaceae), for which we propose the tentative name asystasia mosaic Madagascar virus (AMMGV). DNA-A and -B nucleotide sequences of AMMGV were only distantly related to known begomovirus sequence and shared highest nucleotide sequence identity of 72.9 % (DNA-A) and 66.9 % (DNA-B) with a recently described bipartite begomovirus infecting Asystasia sp. in West Africa. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this novel virus from Madagascar belongs to a new lineage of Old World bipartite begomoviruses. PMID:25900620

  20. Pneumonic plague outbreak, Northern Madagascar, 2011.

    PubMed

    Richard, Vincent; Riehm, Julia M; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Ratsitoharina, Maherisoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Andrianalimanana, Samuel; Scholz, Holger C; Rajerison, Minoarisoa

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to Madagascar, particularly to the central highlands. Although plague has not been previously reported in northern Madagascar, an outbreak of pneumonic plague occurred in this remote area in 2011. Over a 27-day period, 17 suspected, 2 presumptive, and 3 confirmed human cases were identified, and all 15 untreated 20 patients died. Molecular typing of Y. pestis isolated from 2 survivors and 5 Rattus rattus rat samples identified the Madagascar-specific 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype and 4 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat patterns. This outbreak had a case-fatality rate of 100% for nontreated patients. The Y. pestis 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype might cause larger epidemics. Multidrug-resistant strains and persistence of the pathogen in natural foci near human settlements pose severe risks to populations in plague-endemic regions and require outbreak response strategies. PMID:25530466

  1. Pneumonic Plague Outbreak, Northern Madagascar, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Vincent; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Ratsitoharina, Maherisoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Andrianalimanana, Samuel; Scholz, Holger C.; Rajerison, Minoarisoa

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to Madagascar, particularly to the central highlands. Although plague has not been previously reported in northern Madagascar, an outbreak of pneumonic plague occurred in this remote area in 2011. Over a 27-day period, 17 suspected, 2 presumptive, and 3 confirmed human cases were identified, and all 15 untreated 20 patients died. Molecular typing of Y. pestis isolated from 2 survivors and 5 Rattus rattus rat samples identified the Madagascar-specific 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype and 4 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat patterns. This outbreak had a case-fatality rate of 100% for nontreated patients. The Y. pestis 1.ORI3-k single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype might cause larger epidemics. Multidrug-resistant strains and persistence of the pathogen in natural foci near human settlements pose severe risks to populations in plague-endemic regions and require outbreak response strategies. PMID:25530466

  2. Evolution in the hypervariable environment of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Robert E.; Richard, Alison F.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the diverse ecoregions of Madagascar share one distinctive climatic feature: unpredictable intra- or interannual precipitation compared with other regions with comparable rainfall. Climatic unpredictability is associated with unpredictable patterns of fruiting and flowering. It is argued that these features have shaped the evolution of distinctive characteristics in the mammalian fauna of the island. Endemic Herpestidae and Tenrecidae and members of five endemic primate families differ from closely related species elsewhere, exhibiting extremes of “fastness” and “slowness” in their life histories. Climatic features may also account for the dearth of frugivorous birds and mammals in Madagascar, and for the evolutionary prevalence of species with large body mass. PMID:17698810

  3. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rumpker, G.; Heit, B.; Rambolamana, G.; Rindraharisaona, E.; Priestley, K. F.

    2013-12-01

    The island of Madagascar occupies a key region in both the assembly and the multi-stage breakup of Gondwanaland, itself part of the super-continent Pangaea. Madagascar consists of an amalgamation of continental material, with the oldest rocks being of Archaean age. Its ancient fabric is characterised by several shear zones, some of them running oblique to the N-S trend, in particular in the south of the island. More recently during the Neogene, moderate volcanism has occurred in the Central and Northern part of the island, and there are indications of uplift throughout Eastern Madagascar over the last 10 Ma. Although Madagascar is now located within the interior of the African plate and far away from major plate boundaries (> 1000 km from the East African rift system and even further from the Central and South-West Indian Ridges), its seismic activity indicates that some deformation is taking place, and present-day kinematic models based on geodetic data and earthquake moment tensors in the global catalogues identify a diffuse N-S-oriented minor boundary separating two microplates, which appears to pass through Madagascar. In spite of the presence of Archaean and Proterozoic rocks continent-wide scale studies indicate a thin lithosphere (<120 km) throughout Madagascar, but are based on sparse data and cannot resolve the difference between eastern and western Madagascar. We are operating a ENE-WSW oriented linear array of 25 broadband stations in southern Madagascar, extending from coast to coast and sampling the sedimentary basins in the west as well as the metamorphic rocks in the East, cutting geological boundaries seen at the surface at high angle. The array crosses the prominent Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone which is thought to have been formed during Gondwanaland assembly. The array recorded the magnitude 5.3 earthquake of January 25, 2013 which occurred just off its western edge. In addition, in May 2013 we have deployed 25 short period sensors in the eastern part of the study area, where there is some so-far poorly characterised seismicity. We will present preliminary results on the lithospheric crust and mantle structure based on surface wave dispersion and waveform modelling, focussing on the contrast between the metamorphic areas in the east and the presumably stretched regions in the west. Station distribution Red diamonds: Temporary Broadband Light red squares: Short period Green: permanent stations Other temporary experiments: Open dark blue boxes: RHUM-RUM stations Open light blue boxes: MACOMO stations

  4. Barriers to Student Success in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Abigail R.; Reuter, Kim E.; Gudiel, Arleen A.; Hessert, Bryan P.; Sewall, Brent J.

    2014-01-01

    Various indicators suggest that math and science students in many developing countries are lagging behind their counterparts in other nations. Using Madagascar as a case study, we aimed to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of education among those enrolled in science and math programs at primary, secondary, and university institutions; and, (2)…

  5. New species of Polysphondylium from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Cavender, James C; Landolt, John C; Romeralo, Maria; Perrigo, Allison; Vadell, Eduardo M; Stephenson, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Two series of samples collected for isolation of dictyostelid cellular slime molds (dictyostelids) in Madagascar yielded a relatively large number of isolates of Polysphondylium. Most of these turned out to be species new to science that show varying degrees of clustering from unclustered to coremiform as well as an ability to migrate. Migratory ability (phototaxis) is a common feature of species assigned to Group 2 of the Polysphondylia and is common in the new species from Madagascar. Another common feature, clustering, appears to be a strategy for keeping fruiting bodies erect for a longer time in a climate that is relatively dry, whereas migratory ability may function seasonally when there is more rainfall. Thirteen species are described herein. Each of these is characterized by a particular set of distinguishing features, and collectively they expand our concept of the genus Polysphondylium. PMID:26490703

  6. A Way Forward for Healthcare in Madagascar?

    PubMed

    Marks, Florian; Rabehanta, Nathalie; Baker, Stephen; Panzner, Ursula; Park, Se Eun; Fobil, Julius N; Meyer, Christian G; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphaël

    2016-03-15

    A healthcare utilization survey was conducted as a component of the Typhoid Fever Surveillance in Africa Program (TSAP). The findings of this survey in Madagascar contrasted with those in other sites of the program; namely, only 30% of the population sought healthcare at the government-provided healthcare facilities for fever. These findings promoted us to determine the drivers and barriers in accessing and utilizing healthcare in Madagascar. Here we review the results of the TSAP healthcare utilization initiative and place them in the context of the current organization of the Madagascan healthcare system. Our work highlights the demands of the population for access to appropriate healthcare and the need for novel solutions that can quickly provide an affordable and sustainable basic healthcare infrastructure until a government-funded scheme is in place. PMID:26933025

  7. Madagascar's grasses and grasslands: anthropogenic or natural?

    PubMed

    Vorontsova, Maria S; Besnard, Guillaume; Forest, Félix; Malakasi, Panagiota; Moat, Justin; Clayton, W Derek; Ficinski, Paweł; Savva, George M; Nanjarisoa, Olinirina P; Razanatsoa, Jacqueline; Randriatsara, Fetra O; Kimeu, John M; Luke, W R Quentin; Kayombo, Canisius; Linder, H Peter

    2016-01-27

    Grasses, by their high productivity even under very low pCO2, their ability to survive repeated burning and to tolerate long dry seasons, have transformed the terrestrial biomes in the Neogene and Quaternary. The expansion of grasslands at the cost of biodiverse forest biomes in Madagascar is often postulated as a consequence of the Holocene settlement of the island by humans. However, we show that the Malagasy grass flora has many indications of being ancient with a long local evolutionary history, much predating the Holocene arrival of humans. First, the level of endemism in the Madagascar grass flora is well above the global average for large islands. Second, a survey of many of the more diverse areas indicates that there is a very high spatial and ecological turnover in the grass flora, indicating a high degree of niche specialization. We also find some evidence that there are both recently disturbed and natural stable grasslands: phylogenetic community assembly indicates that recently severely disturbed grasslands are phylogenetically clustered, whereas more undisturbed grasslands tend to be phylogenetically more evenly distributed. From this evidence, it is likely that grass communities existed in Madagascar long before human arrival and so were determined by climate, natural grazing and other natural factors. Humans introduced zebu cattle farming and increased fire frequency, and may have triggered an expansion of the grasslands. Grasses probably played the same role in the modification of the Malagasy environments as elsewhere in the tropics. PMID:26791612

  8. Madagascar's grasses and grasslands: anthropogenic or natural?

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Guillaume; Forest, Félix; Malakasi, Panagiota; Moat, Justin; Clayton, W. Derek; Ficinski, Paweł; Savva, George M.; Nanjarisoa, Olinirina P.; Razanatsoa, Jacqueline; Randriatsara, Fetra O.; Kimeu, John M.; Luke, W. R. Quentin; Kayombo, Canisius; Linder, H. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Grasses, by their high productivity even under very low pCO2, their ability to survive repeated burning and to tolerate long dry seasons, have transformed the terrestrial biomes in the Neogene and Quaternary. The expansion of grasslands at the cost of biodiverse forest biomes in Madagascar is often postulated as a consequence of the Holocene settlement of the island by humans. However, we show that the Malagasy grass flora has many indications of being ancient with a long local evolutionary history, much predating the Holocene arrival of humans. First, the level of endemism in the Madagascar grass flora is well above the global average for large islands. Second, a survey of many of the more diverse areas indicates that there is a very high spatial and ecological turnover in the grass flora, indicating a high degree of niche specialization. We also find some evidence that there are both recently disturbed and natural stable grasslands: phylogenetic community assembly indicates that recently severely disturbed grasslands are phylogenetically clustered, whereas more undisturbed grasslands tend to be phylogenetically more evenly distributed. From this evidence, it is likely that grass communities existed in Madagascar long before human arrival and so were determined by climate, natural grazing and other natural factors. Humans introduced zebu cattle farming and increased fire frequency, and may have triggered an expansion of the grasslands. Grasses probably played the same role in the modification of the Malagasy environments as elsewhere in the tropics. PMID:26791612

  9. Development of Environmental Education Programs for Protected Areas in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormsby, Alison

    2007-01-01

    Environmental education programs for schools in the peripheral zone of protected areas in Madagascar are still needed in numerous locations. My research investigated the status of environmental education and communication (EE&C) programs at Masoala National Park, Madagascar, as well as the attitudes of local residents toward the park and park…

  10. Why so scarce? Dictyopharidae from Madagascar (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha).

    PubMed

    Stroi?ski, Adam; Szwedo, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of Dictyopharidae from Madagascar-Tupala occulta gen. et sp. nov. is described and illustrated. It is the third known dictyopharid and the second representing tribe Dictyopharini. Two other taxa with taxonomic problems ascribed to Dictyopharidae are discussed. The question of paucity of Dictyopharidae of Madagascar is raised and several possible explanations are presented. PMID:26624411

  11. Development of Environmental Education Programs for Protected Areas in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormsby, Alison

    2007-01-01

    Environmental education programs for schools in the peripheral zone of protected areas in Madagascar are still needed in numerous locations. My research investigated the status of environmental education and communication (EE&C) programs at Masoala National Park, Madagascar, as well as the attitudes of local residents toward the park and park…

  12. Zonal jets in the Madagascar plankton bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Beronavera, F. B.

    2012-04-01

    We study the relation between advection by mesoscale eddies and jets and the remarkable eastward propagation of the Madagascar plankton bloom. Analyzing geostrophic velocity fields from altimetry with state-of-the-art Lagrangian techniques, we find fast coherent zonal jets in the recently discovered South Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC) at the exact position of the bloom. The coherent jets have a length of up to 1500km and provide a fast transport to the east. We use a new simple Lagrangian metric, the Finite-Time Zonal Drift (FTZD) to quantify the zonal transport and find that the jets can partly explain the explosive eastward propagation seen in the evolution of the Madagascar plankton bloom. Numerical experiments with a passive tracer concentration released at a known upwelling region south of Madagascar also supports the hypothesis that an important nutrient source of the plankton bloom could be located in that area. Until now, the reasons for the eastward propagation of the bloom's front remained totally unclear and even a propagation against the mean flow had been suggested. Moreover, we extract zonal jet-like Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) from fields of the well-established Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) that can be identified with barriers to meridional transport. Comparing these LCS with fields of chlorophyll concentration of the Madagascar plankton bloom measured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of view Sensor (SeaWiFS), we show that the location of jet-like LCS coincide with the boundaries of the plankton bloom, e.g. an LCS prevents cross-transport and confines the bloom to one side of the LCS. Phytoplankton is one of the few natural tracers that can be used to verify if the ubiquitous zonal mesoscale jets act as transport barriers. In the case of the Madagascar plankton bloom, we find clear evidence that the zonal jets in the SICC indeed represent transport barriers to the ambient flow and shape the northern boundary of the chlorophyll distribution. In other countercurrents, the Atlantic North Equatorial Countercurrent off Brazil and the Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent off Indonesia, similar plankton patterns with sharp meandering boundaries appear which suggests that the results presented here might be valid more generally.

  13. Investigating the Lithospheric Structure of Southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Rümpker, Georg; Gerard, Rambolamana; Elisa, Rindraharisaona; Priestley, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The island of Madagascar occupies a key region in both the assembly and the multi-stage breakup of Gondwanaland, itself part of the super-continent Pangaea. Madagascar consists of an amalgamation of continental material, with the oldest rocks being of Archaean age. Its ancient fabric is characterised by several shear zones, some of them running oblique to the N-S trend, in particular in the south of the island. More recently during the Neogene, moderate volcanism has occurred in the Central and Northern part of the island, and there are indications of uplift throughout Eastern Madagascar over the last 10 Ma. Although Madagascar is now located within the interior of the African plate and far away from major plate boundaries (> 1000 km from the East African rift system and even further from the Central and South-West Indian Ridges), its seismic activity indicates that some deformation is taking place, and present-day kinematic models based on geodetic data and earthquake moment tensors in the global catalogues identify a diffuse N-S-oriented minor boundary separating two microplates, which appears to pass through Madagascar. In spite of the presence of Archaean and Proterozoic rocks continent-wide scale studies indicate a thin lithosphere (<120 km) throughout Madagascar, but are based on sparse data. We are operating a ENE-WSW oriented linear array of 25 broadband stations in southern Madagascar, extending from coast to coast and sampling the sedimentary basins in the west as well as the metamorphic rocks in the East, cutting geological boundaries seen at the surface at high angle. The array crosses the prominent Bongolava-Ranotsara shear zone which is thought to have been formed during Gondwanaland assembly, although this interpretation has recently been questioned. The array recorded the magnitude 5.3 earthquake of January 25, 2013 which occurred just off its western edge. In addition, in May 2013 we have deployed 25 short period sensors in the eastern part of the study area, where there is some so-far poorly characterised seismicity. We present preliminary results on the lithospheric crust and mantle structure based on surface wave dispersion and waveform modelling, focussing on the contrast between the metamorphic areas in the east and the presumably stretched regions in the west. Interstation Green's functions have been obtained from all pairs of vertical broadband records, with coherent Rayleigh waves being identifiable for periods of 3-40 s. In addition, two-station phase dispersion measurements have allowed us to determine phase dispersion between 25 and 60 s. The ambient noise and earthquake data both indicate a slow-down of surface propagation in the western part of the array for periods < 40-45 s, but faster propagation in the western part for periods >45 s.

  14. An Abelisauroid Theropod Dinosaur from the Turonian of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Farke, Andrew A.; Sertich, Joseph J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Geophysical evidence strongly supports the complete isolation of India and Madagascar (Indo-Madagascar) by ?100 million years ago, though sparse terrestrial fossil records from these regions prior to ?70 million years ago have limited insights into their biogeographic history during the Cretaceous. A new theropod dinosaur, Dahalokely tokana, from Turonian-aged (?90 million years old) strata of northernmost Madagascar is represented by a partial axial column. Autapomorphies include a prominently convex prezygoepipophyseal lamina on cervical vertebrae and a divided infraprezygapophyseal fossa through the mid-dorsal region, among others. Phylogenetic analysis definitively recovers the species as an abelisauroid theropod and weakly as a noasaurid. Dahalokely is the only known dinosaur from the interval during which Indo-Madagascar likely existed as a distinct landmass, but more complete material is needed to evaluate whether or not it is more closely related to later abelisauroids of Indo-Madagascar or those known elsewhere in Gondwana. PMID:23637961

  15. Economie et enseignement a Madagascar. (Economy and Education in Madagascar.) Financement des systemes educatifs: etudes de cas Nationales 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugon, Philippe

    The purpose of this volume is to analyze the problems of school finance in Madagascar, including those that have arisen in the past decade and those anticipated in the present decade (through 1980). More generally, this book examines past and future connections between the economic and educational systems in Madagascar. The author examines the…

  16. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G.; White, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is located on the fringes of the African superswell. Its position and the existence of a +30 mGal long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly suggest that its present-day topography is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic crust encompassing the island imply that Madagascar straddles a dynamic topographic gradient. In June-July 2012, we examined geologic evidence for Neogene uplift around the Malagasy coastline. Uplifted coral reef deposits, fossil beach rock, and terraces demonstrate that the northern and southern coasts are probably being uplifted at a rate of ~0.2 mm/yr. Rates of uplift clearly vary around the coastline. Inland, extensive peneplains occur at elevations of 1 - 2 km. These peneplains are underlain by 10 - 20 m thick laterite deposits, and there is abundant evidence for rapid erosion (e.g. lavaka). Basaltic volcanism also occurred during Neogene times. These field observations can be combined with an analysis of drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~100 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. An inverse model is then used to minimize the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~20 to ~4. Our results suggest that youthful and rapid uplift of 1-2 km occurred at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ˜15 Myr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Hauts Plateaux). Our field observations and modeling indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  17. [Plants and traditional medicine in southeast Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Beaujard, P

    1988-01-01

    This paper makes a first inventory of plants used by the medicine-men of the South-East of Madagascar (Tanala and Antemoro regions). The heirs - directly or indirectly - to an esoteric "moslem" knowledge which has been transmitted since the XVth century by the aristocratic islamized groups, the medicine-men are also the possessors of a knowledge which has been acquired by the autochthonous groups, that are said "masters of the earth" (commoners). Some divergences in the respective practices of the Tanala and Antemoro medicine-men seem to be connected with differences in the social structure and in the links between society and the environment. PMID:3193788

  18. Tungiasis Outbreak in Travelers From Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Belaz, Sorya; Gay, Eugénie; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Guiguen, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Seven patients from a group of 16 travelers were diagnosed at our institution with one or more sand fleas on their toes, 1 day to 3 weeks after returning from Madagascar. A questionnaire was sent to the whole group to collect clinical and epidemiological information, which showed that 9 of 13 (69%) had received pre-travel medical advice, but none were aware of sand flea; thus prevention measures were rarely applied. Five of seven (71%) patients wore open sandals throughout the trip. Overall, 10 sand fleas were extracted. PMID:26031478

  19. The Madagascar Bloom - a serendipitous study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Quartly, G.

    2012-12-01

    The late austral summer (February-April) phytoplankton bloom that occurs east of Madagascar, exhibits significant interannual variability and at its largest extent covers ~1% of the world's ocean surface area. The bloom raises many intriguing questions about how it begins, is sustained, propagates to the east, exports carbon and ends. It has been observed and studied using satellite ocean colour observations, but the lack of in situ data makes it difficult to address these questions. Here we describe observations that were made on a cruise in February 2005 serendipitously. These show clearly for the first time the existence of both a deep chlorophyll maximum at ~70-110m depths (seen in SeaSoar fluorimeter data) and a surface chlorophyll signature (seen in SeaWiFS satellite ocean colour data). The observations also show the modulation of biological signature at the surface by the eddy field, but not apparently of the deep chlorophyll maximum. In situ observations indicate that Trichodesmium dominates the bloom nearer to Madagascar, while the diatom Rhizosolenia clevei (and its symbiont Richelia intracellularis) dominates further from the island. In addition, SeaSoar Optical Plankton Counter (OPC), temperature and salinity data suggest that the surface bloom seen in the SeaWiFS data is confined to the shallow (~30m) mixed layer. It is hypothesised that the interannual variability in bloom intensity may be due to variations in coastal upwelling and thus the supply of iron, which is a micronutrient that can limit diazotroph growth.

  20. The Madagascar Bloom: A serendipitous study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Quartly, G. D.

    2013-01-01

    The late austral summer (February-April) phytoplankton bloom that occurs east of Madagascar exhibits significant interannual variability and at its largest extent covers ~1% of the world's ocean surface area. The bloom raises many intriguing questions about how it begins, is sustained, propagates to the east, exports carbon, and ends. It has been observed and studied using satellite ocean color observations, but the lack of in situ data makes it difficult to address these questions. Here we describe observations that were made serendipitously on a cruise in February 2005. These show clearly for the first time the simultaneous existence of a deep chlorophyll maximum at ~70-110 m depths (seen in SeaSoar fluorimeter data) and a surface chlorophyll signature [seen in Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite ocean color data]. The observations also show the modulation of the biological signature at the surface by the eddy field but not of the deep chlorophyll maximum. Trichodesmium dominates the bloom nearer to Madagascar, while the diatom Rhizosolenia clevei (and its symbiont Richelia intracellularis) dominates further from the island. The surface bloom seen in the SeaWiFS data is confined to the shallow (~30 m) mixed layer. It is hypothesized that the interannual variability in bloom intensity may be due to variations in coastal upwelling and thus the supply of iron, which is a micronutrient that can limit diazotroph growth.

  1. Satellite Altimetry over rivers of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambeloson, Johary; Paris, Adrien; Rakotondraompiana, Solofo; calmant, stephane

    2015-04-01

    In Madagascar, many in-situ stations aren't any longer working and the few lasting are too sparse to provide sufficient spatial coverage of the big island. Establishing additional way for observing surface waters is an important key for better understanding and management of the water ressource of the country. Also, data from the remaining stations are lately updated. Hence, spatial altimetry have been tested to estimate variation of heights of surface waters for the first time in Madagascar over the rivers, generally narrow and shallow. Results reported here have been obtained by processing Envisat, Jason 2 and Saral data. Some virtual stations (ground tracks crossing rivers) were found and associated time series have been produced. The Envisat series have been validated by comparison with with gauge measurements over the Sofia river. Also, some internal validation were possible at some crossovers. Good correlations were obtained as well as relatively low root mean squared error, comparable with previous studies. These esults indicate that satellite altimetry is exploitable and has potential applications for the malagasy rivers.

  2. Deforestation and plant diversity of Madagascar's littoral forests.

    PubMed

    Consiglio, Trisha; Schatz, George E; McPherson, Gordon; Lowry, Porter P; Rabenantoandro, Johny; Rogers, Zachary S; Rabevohitra, Raymond; Rabehevitra, David

    2006-12-01

    Few studies have attempted to quantify the reduction or document the floristic composition of forests in Madagascar. Thus, we focused specifically on deforestation and plant diversity in Madagascar's eastern littoral community. We used a data set of approximately 13,500 specimen records compiled from both historical and contemporary collections resulting from recent intensive inventory efforts to enumerate total plant species richness and to analyze the degree of endemism within littoral forests. Change in littoral forest cover from original to current extent was estimated using geographical information systems tools, remote sensing data (satellite imagery and low-elevation digital photography), and environmental data layers. Of the original littoral forest only 10.3% remains in the form of small forest parcels, and only 1.5% of these remaining fragments are included within the existing protected-areas network. Additionally, approximately 13% of Madagascar's total native flora has been recorded from these forests that originally occupied <1% of its total land surface, and over 25% of the 1535 plant species known from littoral forests are endemic to this community. Given the ongoing pressure from human settlement along Madagascar's eastern coast, protection of the remaining forest fragments is critical for their survival. Fifteen of the largest intact littoral forest fragments we identified, collectively representing 41.5% of remaining littoral forest, are among priority sites recommended to the government of Madagascar for plant conservation and incorporation into the protected-areas network. PMID:17181815

  3. Influenza seasonality in Madagascar: the mysterious African free-runner

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Wladimir Jimenez; Guillebaud, Julia; Viboud, Cecile; Razanajatovo, Norosoa Harline; Orelle, Arnaud; Zhou, Steven Zhixiang; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The seasonal drivers of influenza activity remain debated in tropical settings where epidemics are not clearly phased. Antananarivo is a particularly interesting case study because it is in Madagascar, an island situated in the tropics and with quantifiable connectivity levels to other countries. Objectives We aimed at disentangling the role of environmental forcing and population fluxes on influenza seasonality in Madagascar. Methods We compiled weekly counts of laboratory-confirmed influenza-positive specimens for the period 2002 to 2012 collected in Antananarivo, with data available from sub-Saharan countries and countries contributing most foreign travelers to Madagascar. Daily climate indicators were compiled for the study period. Results Overall, influenza activity detected in Antananarivo predated that identified in temperate Northern Hemisphere locations. This activity presented poor temporal matching with viral activity in other countries from the African continent or countries highly connected to Madagascar excepted for A(H1N1)pdm09. Influenza detection in Antananarivo was not associated with travel activity and, although it was positively correlated with all climatic variables studied, such association was weak. Conclusions The timing of influenza activity in Antananarivo is irregular, is not driven by climate, and does not align with that of countries in geographic proximity or highly connected to Madagascar. This work opens fresh questions regarding the drivers of influenza seasonality globally particularly in mid-latitude and less-connected regions to tailor vaccine strategies locally. PMID:25711873

  4. A novel cassava-infecting begomovirus from Madagascar: cassava mosaic Madagascar virus.

    PubMed

    Harimalala, Mireille; Lefeuvre, Pierre; De Bruyn, Alexandre; Tiendrébéogo, Fidèle; Hoareau, Murielle; Villemot, Julie; Ranomenjanahary, Sahondramalala; Andrianjaka, Alice; Reynaud, Bernard; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    Cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMGs) are implicated in cassava mosaic disease (CMD), the main constraint to cassava production in Africa. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequences of the DNA-A and DNA-B of a newly characterized CMG found infecting cassava in Madagascar, for which we propose the tentative name cassava mosaic Madagascar virus. With the exception of two recombinant regions that resembled a CMG, we determined that the non-recombinant part of the DNA-A component is distantly related to the other CMGs. Whereas the DNA-B component possesses one recombinant region originating from an unidentified virus, the rest of the genome was seen to be closely related to members of the species East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus (EACMZV). Phylogenetic analysis based on complete genome sequences demonstrated that DNA-A and DNA-B components are outliers related to the clade of EACMV-like viruses and that DNA-A is related to the monopartite tomato leaf curl begomoviruses described in islands in the south-west Indian Ocean. PMID:22777180

  5. Madagascar: Heads It's a Continent, Tails It's an Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Maarten J.

    Neither geologists nor biologists have a definition that is capable of classifying Madagascar unambiguously as an island or a continent; nor can they incorporate Malagasy natural history into a single model rooted in Africa or Asia. Madagascar is a microcosm of the larger continents, with a rock record that spans more than 3000 million years (Ma), during which it has been united episodically with, and divorced from, Asian and African connections. This is reflected in its Precambrian history of deep crustal tectonics and a Phanerozoic history of biodiversity that fluctuated between cosmopolitanism and parochialism. Both vicariance and dispersal events over the past 90 Ma have blended a unique endemism on Madagascar, now in decline following rapid extinctions that started about 2000 years ago.

  6. Cretaceous may hold promise in Majunga basin, Madagascar

    SciTech Connect

    Lalaharisaina, J.V. ); Ferrand, N.J. )

    1994-08-01

    Recent drilling in the Majunga basin of northwestern Madagascar revealed unexpected light oil shows in excellent quality reservoir sands of Mid-Cretaceous age. Regional reconstructions show the development of a prograding clastic shelf from the Aptian until the Mid-Turonian that extended laterally from the northwest costs of Madagascar into Northwest India and Southeast Pakistan. Six untested play concepts have been identified in Cretaceous reservoirs of the Majunga basin. These plays offer multiple objectives in the depth range of 800--2,500 m within a well defined area. Further untested plays exist for Tertiary and Dogger objectives. The paper describes the geologic setting, exploration history the Cretaceous reservoirs, source rocks, and other potential plays. Political changes in Madagascar the last four years have led to an open door policy for foreign investment. Favorable terms are on offer for investment in the petroleum sector, and high potential exists for development on this island continent.

  7. First observational evidence of a North Madagascar Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsoni, Leandro; Aguiar-González, Borja; Nauw, Janine J.; Ridderinkhof, Herman; Maas, Leo R. M.

    2015-12-01

    In situ observations reveal a southeastward-directed North Madagascar Undercurrent (NMUC) below and opposite to the equatorward-directed North Madagascar Current (NMC) off Cape Amber, at the northern tip of Madagascar. Results show an undercurrent hugging the continental slope with its core at 460 m depth and velocities over 0.7 m s-1. Its volume transport is estimated to be 3.1-3.8 Sv, depending on the velocity extrapolation methods used to fill in the data gaps near the slope (no-slip and full-slip, respectively). The thermohaline characteristics show a saltier and warmer NMUC, compared to the surrounding offshore waters, transporting mainly South Indian Central Water. Also, strong horizontal gradients of density are found in the NMUC domain. An inshore cell of coastal downwelling due to Ekman Transport toward the coast is identified, which can explain, at least in part, the strong baroclinic pressure gradients as well as the NMUC development and possible persistence.

  8. Understanding the Persistence of Plague Foci in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Kreppel, Katharina; Elissa, Nohal; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Carniel, Elisabeth; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Jambou, Ronan

    2013-01-01

    Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is still found in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Madagascar reports almost one third of the cases worldwide. Y. pestis can be encountered in three very different types of foci: urban, rural, and sylvatic. Flea vector and wild rodent host population dynamics are tightly correlated with modulation of climatic conditions, an association that could be crucial for both the maintenance of foci and human plague epidemics. The black rat Rattus rattus, the main host of Y. pestis in Madagascar, is found to exhibit high resistance to plague in endemic areas, opposing the concept of high mortality rates among rats exposed to the infection. Also, endemic fleas could play an essential role in maintenance of the foci. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of these factors as well as human behavior in the persistence of plague in Madagascar. PMID:24244760

  9. Malagasy dialects and the peopling of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Serva, Maurizio; Petroni, Filippo; Volchenkov, Dima; Wichmann, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Malagasy DNA is half African and half Indonesian, nevertheless the Malagasy language, spoken by the entire population, belongs to the Austronesian family. The language most closely related to Malagasy is Maanyan (Greater Barito East group of the Austronesian family), but related languages are also in Sulawesi, Malaysia and Sumatra. For this reason, and because Maanyan is spoken by a population which lives along the Barito river in Kalimantan and which does not possess the necessary skill for long maritime navigation, the ethnic composition of the Indonesian colonizers is still unclear. There is a general consensus that Indonesian sailors reached Madagascar by a maritime trek, but the time, the path and the landing area of the first colonization are all disputed. In this research, we try to answer these problems together with other ones, such as the historical configuration of Malagasy dialects, by types of analysis related to lexicostatistics and glottochronology that draw upon the automated method recently proposed by the authors. The data were collected by the first author at the beginning of 2010 with the invaluable help of Joselinà Soafara Néré and consist of Swadesh lists of 200 items for 23 dialects covering all areas of the island. PMID:21632612

  10. Malagasy dialects and the peopling of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Serva, Maurizio; Petroni, Filippo; Volchenkov, Dima; Wichmann, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Malagasy DNA is half African and half Indonesian, nevertheless the Malagasy language, spoken by the entire population, belongs to the Austronesian family. The language most closely related to Malagasy is Maanyan (Greater Barito East group of the Austronesian family), but related languages are also in Sulawesi, Malaysia and Sumatra. For this reason, and because Maanyan is spoken by a population which lives along the Barito river in Kalimantan and which does not possess the necessary skill for long maritime navigation, the ethnic composition of the Indonesian colonizers is still unclear. There is a general consensus that Indonesian sailors reached Madagascar by a maritime trek, but the time, the path and the landing area of the first colonization are all disputed. In this research, we try to answer these problems together with other ones, such as the historical configuration of Malagasy dialects, by types of analysis related to lexicostatistics and glottochronology that draw upon the automated method recently proposed by the authors. The data were collected by the first author at the beginning of 2010 with the invaluable help of Joselinà Soafara Néré and consist of Swadesh lists of 200 items for 23 dialects covering all areas of the island. PMID:21632612

  11. A chronology for late prehistoric Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Burney, David A; Burney, Lida Pigott; Godfrey, Laurie R; Jungers, William L; Goodman, Steven M; Wright, Henry T; Jull, A J Timothy

    2004-01-01

    A database has been assembled with 278 age determinations for Madagascar. Materials 14C dated include pretreated sediments and plant macrofossils from cores and excavations throughout the island, and bones, teeth, or eggshells of most of the extinct megafaunal taxa, including the giant lemurs, hippopotami, and ratites. Additional measurements come from uranium-series dates on speleothems and thermoluminescence dating of pottery. Changes documented include late Pleistocene climatic events and, in the late Holocene, the apparently human-caused transformation of the environment. Multiple lines of evidence point to the earliest human presence at ca. 2300 14C yr BP (350 cal yr BC). A decline in megafauna, inferred from a drastic decrease in spores of the coprophilous fungus Sporormiella spp. in sediments at 1720+/-40 14C yr BP (230-410 cal yr AD), is followed by large increases in charcoal particles in sediment cores, beginning in the SW part of the island, and spreading to other coasts and the interior over the next millennium. The record of human occupation is initially sparse, but shows large human populations throughout the island by the beginning of the Second Millennium AD. Dating of the "subfossil" megafauna, including pygmy hippos, elephant birds, giant tortoises, and large lemurs, demonstrates that most if not all the extinct taxa were still present on the island when humans arrived. Many taxa overlapped chronologically with humans for a millennium or more. The extinct lemurs Hadropithecus stenognathus, Pachylemur insignis, Mesopropithecus pithecoides, and Daubentonia robusta, and the elephant birds Aepyornis spp. and Mullerornis spp., were still present near the end of the First Millennium AD. Palaeopropithecus ingens, Megaladapis edwardsi, and Archaeolemur sp. (cf. edwardsi) may have survived until the middle of the Second Millennium A.D. One specimen of Hippopotamus of unknown provenance dates to the period of European colonization. PMID:15288523

  12. Family Background, School Characteristics, and Children's Cognitive Achievement in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter; Randrianarisoa, Jean Claude; Sahn, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses linked household, school, and test score data from Madagascar to investigate the relation of household characteristics and school factors to the cognitive skills of children ages 8-10 and 14-16. In contrast to most achievement test studies in developing countries, the study uses representative rather than school-based samples of…

  13. Interannual variability of rainfall characteristics over southwestern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamahefasoa, T. S. M.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The interannual variability of daily frequency of rainfall [>1 mm/day] and heavy rainfall [>30 mm/day] is studied for the southwestern region of Madagascar, which is relatively arid compared to the rest of the island. Attention is focused on the summer rainy season from December to March at four stations (Morondava, Ranohira, Toliara and Taolagnaro), whose daily rainfall data covering the period 1970-2000 were obtained from the Madagascar Meteorological Service. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) was found to have a relatively strong correlation with wet day frequency at each station and, particularly, for Toliara in the extreme southwest. In terms of seasonal rainfall totals, most El Niño (La Niña) summers receive below (above) average amounts. An ENSO connection with heavy rainfall events was less clear. However, for heavy rainfall events, the associated atmospheric circulation displays a Southern Annular Mode-like pattern throughout the hemisphere. For ENSO years and the neutral seasons 1979/80, 1981/82 which had large anomalies in wet day frequency, regional atmospheric circulation patterns consisted of strong anomalies in low-level moisture convergence and uplift over and near southwestern Madagascar that made conditions correspondingly more or less favourable for rainfall. Dry (wet) summers in southern Madagascar were also associated with an equatorward (poleward) displacement of the ITCZ in the region.

  14. Family Background, School Characteristics, and Children's Cognitive Achievement in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter; Randrianarisoa, Jean Claude; Sahn, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses linked household, school, and test score data from Madagascar to investigate the relation of household characteristics and school factors to the cognitive skills of children ages 8-10 and 14-16. In contrast to most achievement test studies in developing countries, the study uses representative rather than school-based samples of…

  15. Autochthonous Melioidosis in Humans, Madagascar, 2012 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Djaomazala, Innocente; Dubois-Cauwelaert, Natasha; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Ralison, Fidiarivony; Herindrainy, Perlinot; Andriamalala, Nivosoa C.; Sarovich, Derek S.; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Currie, Bart J.

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease affecting humans and animals in the tropics. Only sporadic cases have been reported from Africa and the Indian Ocean region. We describe 2 confirmed autochthonous cases of human melioidosis in Madagascar, both from novel genotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei. PMID:25272365

  16. Six new species of Microdon Meigen from Madagascar (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Reemer, Menno; Bot, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Six new species of the myrmecophilous hoverfly genus Microdon Meigen (Diptera: Syrphidae) are described from Madagascar. Redescriptions are given for the three other Madagascan species of this genus. Keys are presented to the Madagascan genera of the subfamily Microdontinae and to the Madagascan species of Microdon. PMID:26624434

  17. Has Madagascar Lost Its Exceptional Leptospirosis Free-Like Status?

    PubMed Central

    Ratsitorahina, Maherisoa; Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Michault, Alain; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Richard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a widespread but underreported cause of morbidity and mortality. It has rarely been reported in either humans or animals in Madagascar. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the inhabitants in Moramanga, Madagascar, in June 2011, to estimate the prevalence of human infection using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT). This activity was carried out as part of a workshop implemented by the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar, focusing on surveillance with a one week field study and targeting the health staff of the district level. Results In total, we sampled 678 inhabitants from 263 households. The sex ratio (M/F) was 0.65 and the mean age 26.7 years. We obtained a value of 2.9% for the first recorded seroprevalence of this disease in the human community of Moramanga. Questionnaire responses revealed frequent contacts between humans and rodents in Moramanga. However, activities involving cattle were identified as a risk factor significantly associated with seropositivity (OR=3). Conclusion Leptospirosis remains a neglected disease in Madagascar. This study highlights the need to quantify the public health impact of this neglected disease in a more large scale, in all the country and to establish point-of-care laboratories in remote areas. PMID:25874381

  18. Corps de la Paix Madagascar Livre du Formateur. Langue: Sakalava (Peace Corps Madagascar Teacher's Manual. Language: Sakalava).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tshiangale, Mupemba Wa

    This teacher's manual for Sakalava, a dialect of Malagasy, is designed for the specific language instruction needs of Peace Corps personnel in Madagascar. It is written primarily in French and Sakalava, with some titles in English. It consists of 29 topical lessons, each geared to a specific domain and competency and containing information on…

  19. Corps de la Paix Madagascar Livre du Stagiare. Langue: Malagasy Ofisialy (Peace Corps Madagascar Volunteer Manual. Language: Official Malagasy).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tshiangale, Mupemba Wa

    This manual for Malagasy is designed for the specific language instruction needs of Peace Corps personnel working in Madagascar. It is written primarily in English and Malagasy, with introductory sections in French. It consists of 29 topical lessons, each geared to a specific domain and competency and containing information on needed materials,…

  20. The Application of TOMS Ozone, Aerosol and UV-B Data to Madagascar Air Quality Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A.C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data products for the area of Madagascar are presented. In addition to total ozone, aerosols and UV-B tropospheric ozone results are shown from 1979 to the present. Tropospheric ozone over Africa and Madagascar is enhanced by 10 to 15 DU in October. This maximum coincides with the time of maximum biomass area burning in Africa and Madagascar. Ozone observations were made from 1979 to 1999 using the TOMS tropospheric ozone convective cloud differential method. As a result of easterly trade winds, ozone originating on Madagascar is transported to the west over the Mozambique Channel. In El Nino years higher level westerly winds descend to transport low level ozone easterly. This results in African continental ozone being transported east of Madagascar. Long range transport of African ozone is observed during El Nino periods. The potential of TOMS and other space data for use in public education and research on Madagascar air quality is demonstrated.

  1. In situ observations of mesoscale undercurrents off eastern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsoni, Leandro; Aguiar-Gonzalez, Borja; Maas, Leo; van Aken, Hendrik; Nauw, Janine; Ridderinkhof, Herman

    2015-04-01

    The South-West Indian Ocean (SWIO) presents one of the most intriguing western boundary regions of all subtropical gyres. Unlike other gyres, in the SWIO the Madagascar island imposes a physical barrier to the westward flowing South Equatorial Current (SEC), which reaches the Madagascar coast between 17°S and 20°S. At this location, the SEC bifurcates into two branches: the poleward branch feeds into the East Madagascar Current (EMC), which further south will feed the Agulhas Current (AC); on the other hand, the poleward branch feeds into the North Madagascar Current (NMC), which turns around Cape Amber, at the northern tip of Madagascar, and continues westward towards the east coast of Africa. Besides the patterns of the boundary currents described above, undercurrents flowing opposite and beneath the mentioned surface currents are also reported to occur: the equatorward East Madagascar Undercurrent (EMUC) and the poleward North Madagascar Undercurrent (NMUC). This work is based on field studies of both undercurrents. We deployed a cross-slope array of five moorings at 23°S off eastern Madagascar, which was maintained from late 2010 till early 2013 (~2.5 years). A total of 6 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiles and 10 Recording Current Meters were coupled to the moorings. Direct measurements were made from near surface (~50 m) to deep in the water column (~4000 m). The observations reveal a recurring equatorward EMUC with its core hugging the continental slope, at a depth of 1260 m and at an approximate distance of 29 km from the coast. The core velocity has a mean value of 4.1 (±6.3) cm s-1, while maximum speeds reach up to 20 cm -1. The volume transport is estimated to be 1.33 (±1.14) Sv with maxima up to 6 Sv. At the northern tip of Madagascar, off Cape Ambar, we present the first observational evidence of a poleward NMUC. These results are based on a hydrographic cruise (March 2001), where vertical profiles of velocity were sampled across the continental slope. The data show an NMUC also hugging the continental slope, but its core is observed at 460 m depth. Its core velocity reaches over 0.7 m s-1 and its volume transport is estimated to be around 3.5 Sv. The thermohaline characteristics show a saltier and warmer NMUC, compared to the surrounding offshore waters, transporting mainly South Indian Central Water. Two dominant frequency bands were found in the time series of EMUC volume transport: nearly semi-annual and nearly bi-monthly. The NMUC is concurrent with an inshore cell of coastal downwelling due to Ekman Transport towards the coast, which may be associated, at least in part, with the NMUC variability. The comparison between both results stresses the importance of long-term direct observations at fixed locations.

  2. Possible Fruit Protein Effects on Primate Communities in Madagascar and the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Ganzhorn, Jörg U.; Arrigo-Nelson, Summer; Boinski, Sue; Bollen, An; Carrai, Valentina; Derby, Abigail; Donati, Giuseppe; Koenig, Andreas; Kowalewski, Martin; Lahann, Petra; Norscia, Ivan; Polowinsky, Sandra Y.; Schwitzer, Christoph; Stevenson, Pablo R.; Talebi, Mauricio G.; Tan, Chia; Vogel, Erin R.; Wright, Patricia C.

    2009-01-01

    Background The ecological factors contributing to the evolution of tropical vertebrate communities are still poorly understood. Primate communities of the tropical Americas have fewer folivorous but more frugivorous genera than tropical regions of the Old World and especially many more frugivorous genera than Madagascar. Reasons for this phenomenon are largely unexplored. We developed the hypothesis that Neotropical fruits have higher protein concentrations than fruits from Madagascar and that the higher representation of frugivorous genera in the Neotropics is linked to high protein concentrations in fruits. Low fruit protein concentrations in Madagascar would restrict the evolution of frugivores in Malagasy communities. Methodology/Principal Findings We reviewed the literature for nitrogen concentrations in fruits from the Neotropics and from Madagascar, and analyzed fruits from an additional six sites in the Neotropics and six sites in Madagascar. Fruits from the Neotropical sites contain significantly more nitrogen than fruits from the Madagascar sites. Nitrogen concentrations in New World fruits are above the concentrations to satisfy nitrogen requirements of primates, while they are at the lower end or below the concentrations to cover primate protein needs in Madagascar. Conclusions/Significance Fruits at most sites in the Neotropics contain enough protein to satisfy the protein needs of primates. Thus, selection pressure to develop new adaptations for foods that are difficult to digest (such as leaves) may have been lower in the Neotropics than in Madagascar. The low nitrogen concentrations in fruits from Madagascar may contribute to the almost complete absence of frugivorous primate species on this island. PMID:20016841

  3. Implications of recent geological investigations of the Mozambique Channel for the mammalian colonization of Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, R A

    1997-01-01

    Madagascar separated from continental Africa during the break-up of Gondwanaland early in the Cretaceous. The presence of several terrestrial mammalian groups on Madagascar is paradoxical as (i) these groups postdate the departure of Madagascar from Africa: and ii) terrestrial mammals are poor dispersers across wide water barriers. Recent geological studies focusing on the Davie Fracture Zone of the Mozambique Channel offer a resolution to this situation, by suggesting the presence of a land-bridge from the mid-Eocene to the early Miocene, an interval that matches the ages of Madagascar's mammalian groups. PMID:9178538

  4. Antibodies to haemorrhagic fever viruses in Madagascar populations.

    PubMed

    Mathiot, C C; Fontenille, D; Georges, A J; Coulanges, P

    1989-01-01

    Sera of 381 adult people from 5 areas in Madagascar were tested by the indirect immunofluorescence method for antibodies against Congo-Crimean haemorrhagic fever and Rift Valley fever viruses (Bunyaviridae), Ebola (strains Zaire and Sudan) and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), and Lassa virus (Arenaviridae). The highest prevalence rate was that of Ebola virus (4.5%). As no haemorrhagic syndrome has been found associated with this virus, the possible presence of a less pathogenic, antigenically related, strain is discussed. The prevalences of Congo-Crimean haemorrhagic fever and Rift Valley viruses were very low, despite previous viral isolations from potential vectors. No serum reacted against Lassa or Marburg antigens. The results are analysed in the light of the geographical and bioecological characteristics of Madagascar, which is a true 'microcontinent' very different from the African mainland. PMID:2515626

  5. Chapelieria magna, a new species of Rubiaceae from eastern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Kent; Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Chapelieria was discovered during a recent field trip to the Masoala National Park in eastern Madagascar, and is described here as Chapelieria magna Kainul., sp. nov. This species is readily distinguishable from previously described species of the genus by its quadrangular shoots, triangular-calyptrate stipules, sessile leaves, pubescent styles, and ridged fruits. It also differs in the larger number of ovules and the much larger size of leaves and fruits. PMID:25698895

  6. Extinction Risks and the Conservation of Madagascar's Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Richard K. B.; Tognelli, Marcelo F.; Bowles, Philip; Cox, Neil; Brown, Jason L.; Chan, Lauren; Andreone, Franco; Andriamazava, Alain; Andriantsimanarilafy, Raphali R.; Anjeriniaina, Mirana; Bora, Parfait; Brady, Lee D.; Hantalalaina, Elisoa F.; Glaw, Frank; Griffiths, Richard A.; Hilton-Taylor, Craig; Hoffmann, Michael; Katariya, Vineet; Rabibisoa, Nirhy H.; Rafanomezantsoa, Jeannot; Rakotomalala, Domoina; Rakotondravony, Hery; Rakotondrazafy, Ny A.; Ralambonirainy, Johans; Ramanamanjato, Jean-Baptiste; Randriamahazo, Herilala; Randrianantoandro, J. Christian; Randrianasolo, Harison H.; Randrianirina, Jasmin E.; Randrianizahana, Hiarinirina; Raselimanana, Achille P.; Rasolohery, Andriambolantsoa; Ratsoavina, Fanomezana M.; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Robsomanitrandrasana, Eric; Rollande, Finoana; van Dijk, Peter P.; Yoder, Anne D.; Vences, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background An understanding of the conservation status of Madagascar's endemic reptile species is needed to underpin conservation planning and priority setting in this global biodiversity hotspot, and to complement existing information on the island's mammals, birds and amphibians. We report here on the first systematic assessment of the extinction risk of endemic and native non-marine Malagasy snakes, lizards, turtles and tortoises. Methodology/Principal Findings Species range maps from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species were analysed to determine patterns in the distribution of threatened reptile species. These data, in addition to information on threats, were used to identify priority areas and actions for conservation. Thirty-nine percent of the data-sufficient Malagasy reptiles in our analyses are threatened with extinction. Areas in the north, west and south-east were identified as having more threatened species than expected and are therefore conservation priorities. Habitat degradation caused by wood harvesting and non-timber crops was the most pervasive threat. The direct removal of reptiles for international trade and human consumption threatened relatively few species, but were the primary threats for tortoises. Nine threatened reptile species are endemic to recently created protected areas. Conclusions/Significance With a few alarming exceptions, the threatened endemic reptiles of Madagascar occur within the national network of protected areas, including some taxa that are only found in new protected areas. Threats to these species, however, operate inside and outside protected area boundaries. This analysis has identified priority sites for reptile conservation and completes the conservation assessment of terrestrial vertebrates in Madagascar which will facilitate conservation planning, monitoring and wise-decision making. In sharp contrast with the amphibians, there is significant reptile diversity and regional endemism in the southern and western regions of Madagascar and this study highlights the importance of these arid regions to conserving the island's biodiversity. PMID:25111137

  7. Madagascar corals reveal Pacific multidecadal modulation of rainfall since 1708

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, C. A.; Zinke, J.; Peeters, F.; Park, W.; Scheufen, T.; Kasper, S.; Randriamanantsoa, B.; McCulloch, M. T.; Brummer, G.-J. A.

    2012-03-01

    The Pacific Ocean modulates Australian and North American rainfall variability on multidecadal timescales, in concert with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). It has been suggested that Pacific decadal variability may also influence Indian Ocean surface temperature and rainfall in a far-field response, similar to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on interannual timescales. However, instrumental records of rainfall are too short and too sparse to confidently assess such multidecadal climatic teleconnections. Here, we present four climate archives spanning the past 300 yr from giant Madagascar corals. We decouple 20th century human deforestation effects from rainfall induced soil erosion using spectral luminescence scanning and geochemistry. The corals provide the first evidence for Pacific decadal modulation of rainfall over the Western Indian Ocean. We find that positive PDO phases are associated with increased Indian Ocean temperatures and rainfall in Eastern Madagascar, while precipitation in Southern Africa and Eastern Australia declines. Consequently, the negative PDO phase that started in 1998 should lead to reduced rainfall over Eastern Madagascar and increased precipitation in Southern Africa and Eastern Australia. We conclude that the PDO has important implications for future multidecadal variability of African rainfall, where water resource management is increasingly important under the warming climate.

  8. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) Susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%): only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down) and KD90 (90% Knock-Down) times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar. PMID:25369291

  9. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Sebastien; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%): only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down) and KD90 (90% Knock-Down) times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar. PMID:25369291

  10. Sporormiella and the late Holocene extinctions in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Burney, David A; Robinson, Guy S; Burney, Lida Pigott

    2003-09-16

    Fossil spores of the dung fungus Sporormiella spp. in sediment cores from throughout Madagascar provide new information concerning megafaunal extinction and the introduction of livestock. Sporormiella percentages are very high in prehuman southwest Madagascar, but at the site with best stratigraphic resolution the spore declines sharply by approximately 1,720 yr B.P. (radiocarbon years ago). Within a few centuries there is a concomitant rise in microscopic charcoal that probably represents human transformation of the local environment. Reduced megaherbivore biomass in wooded savannas may have resulted in increased plant biomass and more severe fires. Some now-extinct taxa persisted locally for a millennium or more after the inferred megafaunal decline. Sites in closed humid forests of northwest Madagascar and a montane ericoid formation of the central highlands show only low to moderate Sporormiella percentages before humans. A subsequent rise in spore concentrations, thought to be evidence for livestock proliferation, occurs earliest at Amparihibe in the northwest at approximately 1,130 yr B.P. PMID:12960385

  11. Sarandibrinus, a new genus of Saprininae subfamily from Madagascar (Coleoptera, Histeridae) (Second contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Sarandibrinus araceliae, a new genus and species of the Saprininae subfamily is described from southern Madagascar. The new taxon exhibits autapomorphic characters for the Saprininae subfamily and is unusual especially for its large and deep prosternal foveae and the shape of spiculum gastrale. The description is accompanied by color habitus images, SEM micrographs, mouthparts and antenna line drawings and drawings of the male genitalia. Key to the genera of the Saprininae of Madagascar and the adjacent archipelagos is given. Hypocaccus (Baeckmanniolus) rubiciliae (Lewis, 1899) is newly reported from Madagascar and Hypocaccus (Nessus) perparvulus (Desbordes, 1916) is new to Mauritius. PMID:25147466

  12. Broken forest: Applying the integrated conservation and development paradigm to Madagascar's protected areas

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, R.; Rabezandria, R.; Daviesson, R.; Guyton, W.; Rakotobe.

    1992-06-01

    The destruction of Madagascar's primary forests through agricultural clearing poses a grave threat to the island's biodiversity. The report assesses the potential of the planned Sustainable and Viable Environmental Management (SAVEM) Project to minimize this threat by implementing Integrated Conservation Development Projects (ICDP's), which link resource conservation to income-generating activities, in the peripheral zones of Madagascar's protected areas.

  13. Chow Down! Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Explore Basic Nutrition Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Madagascar hissing cockroach ("Gromphadorhina portentosa") is one of the most exciting and enjoyable animals to incorporate into your science curriculum. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHCs) do not bite, are easy to handle, produce little odor compared to many terrarium animals, have a fascinating social structure, are easy to breed, teach…

  14. Survey of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in lemurs from the Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Gillespie, Thomas R; Wright, Patricia C; Arsenault, Julie; Villeneuve, Alain; Lair, Stéphane

    2013-07-01

    We detected Cryptosporidium sp. by direct immunofluorescence in fecal samples from greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus) and eastern rufous mouse lemurs (Microcebus rufus) inhabiting the Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. This is the first report of an occurrence of these potentially zoonotic parasites in free-ranging lemurs in the rain forest of Madagascar. PMID:23778635

  15. Chow Down! Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Explore Basic Nutrition Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Madagascar hissing cockroach ("Gromphadorhina portentosa") is one of the most exciting and enjoyable animals to incorporate into your science curriculum. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHCs) do not bite, are easy to handle, produce little odor compared to many terrarium animals, have a fascinating social structure, are easy to breed, teach…

  16. A geological synthesis of the Precambrian shield in Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Roig, J.Y.; Moine, B.; Delor, C.; Peters, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Available U–Pb geochronology of the Precambrian shield of Madagascar is summarized and integrated into a synthesis of the region’s geological history. The shield is described in terms of six geodynamic domains, from northeast to southwest, the Bemarivo, Antongil–Masora, Antananarivo, Ikalamavony, Androyan–Anosyan, and Vohibory domains. Each domain is defined by distinctive suites of metaigneous rocks and metasedimentary groups, and a unique history of Archean (∼2.5 Ga) and Proterozoic (∼1.0 Ga, ∼0.80 Ga, and ∼0.55 Ga) reworking. Superimposed within and across these domains are scores of Neoproterozoic granitic stocks and batholiths as well as kilometer long zones of steeply dipping, highly strained rocks that record the effects of Gondwana’s amalgamation and shortening in latest Neoproterozoic time (0.560–0.520 Ga). The present-day shield of Madagascar is best viewed as part of the Greater Dharwar Craton, of Archean age, to which three exotic terranes were added in Proterozoic time. The domains in Madagascar representing the Greater Dharwar Craton include the Antongil–Masora domain, a fragment of the Western Dharwar of India, and the Neoarchean Antananarivo domain (with its Tsaratanana Complex) which is broadly analogous to the Eastern Dharwar of India. In its reconstructed position, the Greater Dharwar Craton consists of a central nucleus of Paleo-Mesoarchean age (>3.1 Ga), the combined Western Dharwar and Antongil–Masora domain, flanked by mostly juvenile “granite–greenstone belts” of Neoarchean age (2.70–2.56 Ga). The age of the accretionary event that formed this craton is approximately 2.5–2.45 Ga. The three domains in Madagascar exotic to the Greater Dharwar Craton are the Androyan–Anosyan, Vohibory, and Bemarivo. The basement to the Androyan–Anosyan domain is a continental terrane of Paleoproterozoic age (2.0–1.78 Ga) that was accreted to the southern margin (present-day direction) of the Greater Dharwar Craton in pre-Stratherian time (>1.6 Ga), and rejuvenated at 1.03–0.93 Ga with the creation of the Ikalamavony domain. The Vohibory domain, an oceanic terrane of Neoproterozoic age was accreted to the Androyan–Anosyan domain in Cryogenian time (∼0.63–0.60 Ga). The Bemarivo domain of north Madagascar is a terrane of Cryogenian igneous rocks, with a cryptic Paleoproterozoic basement, that was accreted to the Greater Dharwar Craton in latest Ediacaran to earliest Cambrian time (0.53–0.51 Ga).

  17. The modern diatom spectra of Madagascar and diatom-inferred Late Quaternary climatic changes in northeastern and central Madagascar

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to classify diatoms in modern sediment surface samples in freshwater sites into assemblages and to assess the historical changes in lake level changes and climatic conditions in Madagascar during the Late Quaternary. Analysis of taxonomic percentages of diatoms in recently deposited sediments from various sites shows that diatom communities in these sites can be grouped by means of cluster analysis into distinct assemblages, some of which show similarities to groupings found in East Africa. pH and conductivity appear to be important factors correlating with differences in diatom communities in these study sites. Trends in diatom assemblages in a sediment core taken from Lake Alaotra, supplemented by those in sediments of the paleolake Ampasambazimba, suggest that the late Pleistocene in northeastern Madagascar was arid, though aridity was probably not as constant or as severe as in many areas of eastern and northern Africa; the Holocene was a period of moderate but variable conditions, marked by a distinct dry episode ca 5000 yr B.P. and a drying trend toward the late Holocene. Changes in diatom assemblages in a sediment core from Lake Kavitaha in central Madagascar suggest changes in the surrounding environment during at least two periods in the late Holocene. These coincide with increases in charcoal influx and, around 700 yr B.P., with the intensification of agricultural activity in the area.

  18. Mapping the Traces of the Assembly and Multistage Breakup of Gondwanaland in the Lithosphere of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindraharisaona, E. J.; Tilmann, F. J.; Yuan, X.; Rumpker, G.; Heit, B.; Rambolamanana, G.; Priestley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Madagascar is an ideal place to study the multistage assembly and break up of Gondwanaland, the supercontinent whose breakup also gave rise to most of present day continental regions. At the end of the Proterozoic the assembly of Gondwanaland has placed the Malagasy basement between the Antarctic, Dharwar, Arabo-Nubian and Nubian-Tanzanian cratons. The continental collision processes accompanying the assembly left their mark on the Malagasy basement, currently exposed in the Eastern two thirds of the island, in the form of metamorphic and mineral belts as well as massive ductile shear zones. During the Jurassic Madagascar, India and Seychelles were breaking up from African. Long after the breakaway of India and the Seychelles from Madagascar (Cretaceous time), volcanic activation has occurred in several locations of Madagascar mostly in the central and northern part (Neogene period). The surface traces of assembly and breakup processes have been studied extensively using geological methods in Madagascar but the imprint on the deep structure has so far not been studied in much detail. Between 2012 and 2014, 25 broadband stations were operated in the Southern Madagascar extending from East coast (Mananjary) to West coast (Toliary). The array crosses the Bongolava-Ranontsara shear zone, which is one of the major shear zones in Madagascar. In addition, between 2013 and 2014, 25 short period stations were deployed in the southeastern part of Madagascar. We will present preliminarily results of the lithosphere structure in the southern part of Madagascar based on surface wave dispersion analysis from both earthquakes and ambient noise combine with receiver function analysis. We will focus mostly on the contrast between the lithosphere structure in the eastern (Precambrian rocks) and the western (Sedimentary basins) parts of Madagascar.

  19. Les aspergillomes pulmonaires: à propos de 37 cas à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoson, Joëlson Lovaniaina; Razafindramaro, Notahiana; Rakotomizao, Jocelyn Robert; Vololontiana, Hanta Marie Danielle; Andrianasolo, Radonirina Lazasoa; Ravahatra, Kiady; Tiaray, Michel; Rajaoarifetra, Jobeline; Rakotoharivelo, Hendriniaina; Andrianarisoa, Ange Christophe Félix

    2011-01-01

    L'aspergillome pulmonaire est une colonisation par Aspergillus d'une cavité pulmonaire préformée. Nos objectifs étaient de définir le profil épidémio-clinique et thérapeutique des aspergillomes pulmonaires et essayer de dégager les facteurs favorisants de cette affection à Madagascar. Nous avons réalisés une étude prospective, descriptive, analytique durant 59 mois sur les aspergillomes pulmonaires à Antananarivo Madagascar. Etaient inclus dans cette étude les malades ayant un diagnostic d'aspergillome pulmonaire. Trente-sept (37) cas d'aspergillome pulmonaire étaient recensés parmi les 8 392 patients hospitalisés dans le service de Pneumologie (0,44%). Il s'agit de 29 hommes (78,38%) et 8 femmes (21,61%), d’âge moyen de 43 ans. Les facteurs prédisposant étaient dominés par la tuberculose pulmonaire (89,19%). Le délai moyen d'apparition de l'aspergillome chez les malades ayant un antécédent de tuberculose pulmonaire à bacilloscopie positive (TPM+) était de 8 ans et 6 mois avec un délai extrême de un mois à 23 ans. L'hémoptysie était le mode de révélation le plus fréquent (91,89%). Le traitement était médical chez 27 patients (72,97%) et médico-chirurgical chez 10 patients (27,03%). Vingt sept patients étaient perdus de vue (72,97%), et pour les 10 patients suivis (27,02%), 70% avaient une évolution favorable avec disparition des signes, et 30% présentaient des hémoptysies récidivantes. Le taux de mortalité postopératoire était de 4% et 50% des patients avaient des complications postopératoires. La surveillance des lésions séquellaires de tuberculose pulmonaire qui constituent les facteurs favorisants prédominant d'aspergillome pulmonaire à Madagascar nécessite une attention particulière. La prise en charge de la tuberculose doit être précoce et adaptée surtout dans les pays à forte prévalence tuberculeuse. PMID:22187586

  20. Lower and Middle Cenomanian ammonites from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, William James; Walaszczyk, Ireneusz; Gale, Andrew S.; Dembicz, Krzysztof; Praszkier, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    Kennedy, W.J., Walaszczyk, I., Gale, A.S., Dembicz, K. and Praszkier, T. 2013. Lower and Midle Cenomanian ammonites from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar. Acta Geologica Polonica, 63(4), 625-655. Warszawa. Lower and Middle Cenomanian ammonite assemblages have been collected on a bed-by-bed basis from localities at Vohipaly and Mahaboboka, Madagascar, as well as from outcrops around Berekata, all in the Morondava Basin, southwest Madagascar. These collections demonstrate the presence of the upper Lower Cenomanian Mantelliceras dixoni Zone and the lower Middle Cenomanian Cunningtoniceras inerme Zone of the north-western European standard sequence. These records indicate that the striking anomalies in the zonal assemblages of the classic divisions of the Madagascan Cenomanian are based on mixed assemblages, rather than a succession that differs radically from that elsewhere in the world. The dixoni Zone fauna is: Desmoceras cf. latidorsatum (Michelin, 1838), Pachydesmoceras kossmati Matsumoto, 1987, Forbesiceras sp., F. baylissiWright & Kennedy, 1984, F. largilliertianum (d'Orbigny, 1841), Mantelliceras cantianum Spath, 1926a, M. dixoni Spath, 1926b, M. mantelli (J. Sowerby, 1814), M. picteti Hyatt, 1903, M. saxbii (Sharpe, 1857), Sharpeiceras sp., S. falloti (Collignon, 1931), S. mocambiquense (Choffat, 1903), S. cf. florencae Spath, 1925, Acompsoceras renevieri (Sharpe, 1857), A. tenue Collignon, 1964, Calycoceras sp., Mrhiliceras lapparenti (Pervinquière, 1907), Mariella (Mariella) stolizcai (Collignon, 1964), Hypoturrilites taxyfabreae (Collignon, 1964), Turrilites scheuchzerianus Bosc, 1801, Sciponoceras cucullatum Collignon, 1964, and Sciponoceras antanimangaensis (Collignon, 1964). The presence of Calycoceras in a Lower Cenomanian association represents a precocious appearance of a genus typically Middle and Upper Cenomanian in occurrence, and matches records from Tunisia. The inerme Zone yields a more restricted assemblage: Pachydesmoceras kossmati, Forbesiceras baylissi, Acanthoceras sp. juv., Cunningtoniceras cunningtoni (Sharpe, 1855) and Hypoturrilites taxyfabreae.

  1. Long-term observations of the East Madagascar Undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsoni, L.; Aguiar-González, B.; Maas, L. R. M.; van Aken, H. M.; Ridderinkhof, H.

    2015-06-01

    An array of five moorings was deployed at 23°S off eastern Madagascar and maintained for about 2.5 years as part of the "INdian-ATlantic EXchange in present and past climate" (INATEX) experiment. The observations reveal a recurrent equatorward undercurrent (during 692 of 888 days), the East Madagascar Undercurrent (EMUC), flowing below the poleward surface East Madagascar Current (EMC). The average core of the undercurrent was found near the continental slope, at a depth of 1260 m and at an approximate distance of 29 km from the coast, with mean velocities of 6.4 (±4.8) cm s-1. Maximum speeds reach 20 cm s-1. The mean equatorward volume transport is estimated to be 1.33 (±1.41) Sv with maxima up to 6 Sv. The baroclinic/barotropic partitioning of the geostrophic flow shows a persistent equatorward baroclinic velocity in the undercurrent core, which is sometimes inhibited by a stronger poleward barotropic contribution. The wavelet spectrum analysis of the transport time series displays two dominant frequency bands: (i) nearly bi-monthly (46-79 days), previously observed in the surface EMC, and attributed to the forcing of barotropic waves generated in the Mascarene Basin; and (ii) nearly semi-annual (132-187 days), which seems to be related to the semi-annual cycle in the equatorial winds near the Indian Ocean eastern boundary. A historical dataset of temperature-salinity Argo profiles was used to investigate the spatial variability of the thermohaline properties at intermediate levels. Lastly, Argo-derived velocities suggest an undercurrent flowing upstream until approximately 17°S.

  2. Age-specific seroprevalence of hepatitis A in Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Carod, Jean-François; Ramarokoto, Charles-Emile; Chrétien, Jean-Baptiste; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Talarmin, Antoine; Richard, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an enteric, viral, infectious disease endemic in many developing countries such as Madagascar. Infection is often subclinical or asymptomatic in children; however, symptomatic acute infections become more common with increasing age. In some developing countries, improvements in living conditions have led to changes in the epidemiological pattern of HAV infection. There are very few reports on the prevalence of HAV in Madagascar. This study was to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus antibodies in relation to age in the city of Antananarivo, Madagascar. Methods Serum samples collected in 2004 during a cross-sectional survey of individuals aged between two and 24 years from Antananarivo were tested for anti-HAV antibody using a commercial enzyme immunoassay kit. Subjects were investigated using a standardized social and medical history questionnaire. Results 926 subjects were enrolled including 406 males and 520 females. There were 251 children under 10 years old and 675 subjects between 10 and 24 years old. Of the 926 serum samples tested, 854 (92.2%) were positive for anti-HAV antibodies. The number of seropositive samples was similar for males and females. The overall seroprevalence was 83.7% (210/251) for children under 10 years old and 95.5% (644/675) for subjects aged between 10 and 24 years (p < 0.001). Conclusion Despite improvements in sanitary conditions and hygiene over the last few years, the prevalence of HAV in Antananarivo is high. Only children under five years old remain susceptible to HAV infection. Immunization against HAV is not needed at the present time in the Madagascan population, but should be recommended for travellers. PMID:18538023

  3. Geological evolution of the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo Belt, northern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Schofield, D.I.; Goodenough, K.M.; Horstwood, M.; Tucker, R.; Bauer, W.; Annells, R.; Howard, K. J.; Walsh, G.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2009-01-01

    The broadly east-west trending, Late Neoproterozoic Bemarivo Belt in northern Madagascar has been re-surveyed at 1:100 000 scale as part of a large multi-disciplinary World Bank-sponsored project. The work included acquisition of 14 U-Pb zircon dates and whole-rock major and trace element geochemical data of representative rocks. The belt has previously been modelled as a juvenile Neoproterozoic arc and our findings broadly support that model. The integrated datasets indicate that the Bemarivo Belt is separated by a major ductile shear zone into northern and southern "terranes", each with different lithostratigraphy and ages. However, both formed as Neoproterozoic arc/marginal basin assemblages that were translated southwards over the north-south trending domains of "cratonic" Madagascar, during the main collisional phase of the East African Orogeny at ca. 540 Ma. The older, southern terrane consists of a sequence of high-grade paragneisses (Sahantaha Group), which were derived from a Palaeoproterozoic source and formed a marginal sequence to the Archaean cratons to the south. These rocks are intruded by an extensive suite of arc-generated metamorphosed plutonic rocks, known as the Antsirabe Nord Suite. Four samples from this suite yielded U-Pb SHRIMP ages at ca. 750 Ma. The northern terrane consists of three groups of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks, including a possible Archaean sequence (Betsiaka Group: maximum depositional age approximately 2477 Ma) and two volcano-sedimentary sequences (high-grade Milanoa Group: maximum depositional age approximately 750 Ma; low grade Daraina Group: extrusive age = 720-740 Ma). These supracrustal rocks are intruded by another suite of arc-generated metamorphosed plutonic rocks, known as the Manambato Suite, 4 samples of which gave U-Pb SHRIMP ages between 705 and 718 Ma. Whole-rock geochemical data confirm the calc-alkaline, arc-related nature of the plutonic rocks. The volcanic rocks of the Daraina and Milanoa groups also show characteristics of arc-related magmatism, but include both calc-alkaline and tholeiitic compositions. It is not certain when the two Bemarivo terranes were juxtaposed, but ages from metamorphic rims on zircon suggest that both the northern and southern terranes were accreted to the northern cratonic margin of Madagascar at about 540-530 Ma. Terrane accretion included the assembly of the Archaean Antongil and Antananarivo cratons and the high-grade Neoproterozoic Anaboriana Belt. Late- to post-tectonic granitoids of the Maevarano Suite, the youngest plutons of which gave ca. 520 Ma ages, intrude all terranes in northern Madagascar showing that terrane accretion was completed by this time. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

  4. Proterozoic tectonostratigraphy and paleogeography of central Madagascar derived from detrital zircon U-Pb age populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, R.; Coleman, D.S.; Chokel, C.B.; DeOreo, S.B.; Wooden, J.L.; Collins, A.S.; De Waele, B.; Kroner, A.

    2004-01-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb ages determined by SHRIMP distinguish two clastic sequences among Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks from central Madagascar. The Itremo Group is older: zircon data, stromatolite characteristics, and carbon isotope data all point to a depositional age around 1500-1700 Ma. The Molo Group is younger, deposited between ???620 Ma (the age of the youngest zircon) and ???560 Ma (the age of metamorphic overgrowths on detrital cores). Geochronologic provenance analysis of the Itremo Group points to sources in East Africa as well as local sources in central and southern Madagascar but provides no evidence for a detrital contribution from northern and eastern Madagascar nor from southern India. Detrital zircon and sedimentologic similarities between rocks of the Itremo Group and the Zambian Muva Supergroup suggest a lithostratigraphic correlation between the two. The Molo Group has a strong 1000-1100 Ma detrital signature that also indicates an east African provenance and suggests a Neoproterozoic geographic connection with Sri Lanka but shows no indication of input from the Dharwar craton and eastern Madagascar. Central Madagascar was probably juxtaposed with the Tanzanian craton in the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic, whereas northern and eastern Madagascar were connected to India. Internal assembly of Madagascar postdates Neoproterozoic Molo Group sedimentation and is likely to have occurred at about 560 Ma. ?? 2004 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  5. A Non-Stationary Relationship between Global Climate Phenomena and Human Plague Incidence in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kreppel, Katharina S.; Caminade, Cyril; Telfer, Sandra; Rajerison, Minoarison; Rahalison, Lila; Morse, Andy; Baylis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Plague, a zoonosis caused by Yersinia pestis, is found in Asia and the Americas, but predominantly in Africa, with the island of Madagascar reporting almost one third of human cases worldwide. Plague's occurrence is affected by local climate factors which in turn are influenced by large-scale climate phenomena such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The effects of ENSO on regional climate are often enhanced or reduced by a second large-scale climate phenomenon, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). It is known that ENSO and the IOD interact as drivers of disease. Yet the impacts of these phenomena in driving plague dynamics via their effect on regional climate, and specifically contributing to the foci of transmission on Madagascar, are unknown. Here we present the first analysis of the effects of ENSO and IOD on plague in Madagascar. Methodology/principal findings We use a forty-eight year monthly time-series of reported human plague cases from 1960 to 2008. Using wavelet analysis, we show that over the last fifty years there have been complex non-stationary associations between ENSO/IOD and the dynamics of plague in Madagascar. We demonstrate that ENSO and IOD influence temperature in Madagascar and that temperature and plague cycles are associated. The effects on plague appear to be mediated more by temperature, but precipitation also undoubtedly influences plague in Madagascar. Our results confirm a relationship between plague anomalies and an increase in the intensity of ENSO events and precipitation. Conclusions/significance This work widens the understanding of how climate factors acting over different temporal scales can combine to drive local disease dynamics. Given the association of increasing ENSO strength and plague anomalies in Madagascar it may in future be possible to forecast plague outbreaks in Madagascar. The study gives insight into the complex and changing relationship between climate factors and plague in Madagascar. PMID:25299064

  6. Africa and Madagascar during Permo-Triassic time: The evidence of the vertebrate faunas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battail, Bernard; Beltan, Laurence; Dutuit, Jean-Michel

    Various sediments ranging from the Carboniferous to the Quaternary, including Permo Triassic beds, were deposited on the western margin of Madagascar. These can be compared with the sediments of the African Karoo. Comparative analysis of the vertebrate faunas from Madagascar and Africa, however, shows many differences and gives rise to questions which fall into three categories: phylogenetic relationship, faunal dispersal in Africa and Madagascar, and connection with other parts of Gondwanaland and Laurasia. The Late Permian and Early Triassic ichthyofaunas from Madagascar bear affinities with those of South Africa only at a generic or familial level, but the tetrapod faunas are completely different. The Late Triassic tetrapod fauna of Madagascar is represented only by scarce material; it differs from the South African fauna and can be better compared with that from North Africa. During the Late Permian and Early Triassic, Madagascar was obviously cut from the African continent by a marine barrier. The faunal relationships between Madagascar and North Africa in the Late Triassic can possibly be explained by migrations along the southern shore of the Tethys. Detailed consideration of all the possible connections of Africa and Madagascar with the rest of the world is beyond the scope of this paper. We found it useful, however, to give a few demonstrative examples of such connections in order to place the African and Malagasy faunas in a more global context. The Early Triassic ichthyofaunas from Madagascar are, in part, related to those of South Africa, but they display more affinities with Laurasian faunas from British Columbia, Greenland, and Spitsbergen. In addition, there are, apparently, close relationships between the trematosaurs from Madagascar and from Spitsbergen. The reptilian fauna from the Lystrosaurus zone of South Africa, which has no equivalent in Madagascar, is very closely related to the fauna from the Fremouw Formation of Antarctica. The reptilian fauna from the Cynognathus zone of South Africa can be compared with the fauna of the Puesto Viejo Formation of Argentina. In the Late Triassic there were faunal similarities between Madagascar and the western part of Laurasia, while no obvious connection between South Africa and Laurasia can be detected.

  7. Could the Madagascar bloom be fertilized by Madagascan iron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokosz, M. A.; Robinson, J.; McGrain, H.; Popova, E. E.; Yool, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the oligotrophic waters to the east of Madagascar, a large phytoplankton bloom is found to occur in late austral summer. This bloom is composed of nitrogen fixers and can cover up to ˜1% of the world's ocean surface area. Satellite observations show that its spatial structure is closely tied to the underlying mesoscale eddy field in the region. The causes of the bloom and its temporal behavior (timing of its initiation and termination) and spatial variability are poorly understood, in part due to a lack of in situ observations. Here an eddy resolving 1/12° resolution ocean general circulation model and Lagrangian particle tracking are used to examine the hypothesis that iron from sediments around Madagascar could be advected east by the mesoscale eddy field to fertilize the bloom, and that variability in advection could explain the significant interannual variability in the spatial extent of the bloom. The model results suggest that this is indeed possible and furthermore imply that the bloom could be triggered by warming of the mixed layer, leading to optimal conditions for nitrogen fixers to grow, while its termination could be due to iron exhaustion. It is found that advection of Madagascan iron could resupply the bloom region with this micronutrient in the period between the termination of one bloom and the initiation of the next in the following year.

  8. Summer climate of Madagascar and monsoon pulsing of its vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2015-09-01

    This study analyzes the climate of Madagascar (12°-26°S, 43°-50°E) and its relation to the Indian Ocean during austral summer (Dec-Mar). Moisture converges onto a standing easterly wave and floods are prevalent in late summer. All-island daytime land temperatures exceed 38 °C in October and are ~4 °C above sea temperatures during summer. Analysis of thermally induced diurnal convection and circulation revealed inflow during the afternoon recirculated from the southeastern mountains and the warm Mozambique Channel. Summer rainfall follows latent and sensible heat flux during the first half of the day, and gains a surplus by evening via thunderstorms over the western plains. At the inter-annual time-scale, 2.3 years oscillations in all-island rainfall appear linked with the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation and corresponding 80 Dobson Unit ozone fluctuations during flood events. Wet spells at frequencies from 11-27 days derive from locally-formed tropical cyclones and NW-cloud bands. Flood case studies exhibit moisture recycling in the confluence zone between the sub-tropical anticyclone and the lee-side vortex. Hovmoller analysis of daily rainfall reinforces the concept of local generation and pulsing by cross-equatorial (Indian winter) monsoon flow rather than zonal atmospheric waves. Since the surface water budget is critical to agriculture in Madagascar, this study represents a further step to understand its meso-scale summer climate.

  9. Mangrove Forest Distributions and Dynamics in Madagascar (1975–2005)

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Chandra; Muhlhausen, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests of Madagascar are declining, albeit at a much slower rate than the global average. The forests are declining due to conversion to other land uses and forest degradation. However, accurate and reliable information on their present distribution and their rates, causes, and consequences of change have not been available. Earlier studies used remotely sensed data to map and, in some cases, to monitor mangrove forests at a local scale. Nonetheless, a comprehensive national assessment and synthesis was lacking. We interpreted time-series satellite data of 1975, 1990, 2000, and 2005 using a hybrid supervised and unsupervised classification approach. Landsat data were geometrically corrected to an accuracy of ± one-half pixel, an accuracy necessary for change analysis. We used a postclassification change detection approach. Our results showed that Madagascar lost 7% of mangrove forests from 1975 to 2005, to a present extent of ?2,797 km2. Deforestation rates and causes varied both spatially and temporally. The forests increased by 5.6% (212 km2) from 1975 to 1990, decreased by 14.3% (455 km2) from 1990 to 2000, and decreased by 2.6% (73 km2) from 2000 to 2005. Similarly, major changes occurred in Bombekota Bay, Mahajamba Bay, the coast of Ambanja, the Tsiribihina River, and Cap St Vincent. The main factors responsible for mangrove deforestation include conversion to agriculture (35%), logging (16%), conversion to aquaculture (3%), and urban development (1%).

  10. Blood transcriptomes reveal novel parasitic zoonoses circulating in Madagascar's lemurs.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Peter A; Hayes, Corinne E; Williams, Cathy V; Junge, Randall E; Razafindramanana, Josia; Mass, Vanessa; Rakotondrainibe, Hajanirina; Yoder, Anne D

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic diseases are a looming threat to global populations, and nearly 75% of emerging infectious diseases can spread among wildlife, domestic animals and humans. A 'One World, One Health' perspective offers us an ideal framework for understanding and potentially mitigating the spread of zoonoses, and the island of Madagascar serves as a natural laboratory for conducting these studies. Rapid habitat degradation and climate change on the island are contributing to more frequent contact among humans, livestock and wildlife, increasing the potential for pathogen spillover events. Given Madagascar's long geographical isolation, coupled with recent and repeated introduction of agricultural and invasive species, it is likely that a number of circulating pathogens remain uncharacterized in lemur populations. Thus, it is imperative that new approaches be implemented for de novo pathogen discovery. To this end, we used non-targeted deep sequencing of blood transcriptomes from two species of critically endangered wild lemurs (Indri indri and Propithecus diadema) to characterize blood-borne pathogens. Our results show several undescribed vector-borne parasites circulating within lemurs, some of which may cause disease in wildlife, livestock and humans. We anticipate that advanced methods for de novo identification of unknown pathogens will have broad utility for characterizing other complex disease transmission systems. PMID:26814226

  11. Mangrove forest distributions and dynamics in Madagascar (1975-2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giri, C.; Muhlhausen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mangrove forests of Madagascar are declining, albeit at a much slower rate than the global average. The forests are declining due to conversion to other land uses and forest degradation. However, accurate and reliable information on their present distribution and their rates, causes, and consequences of change have not been available. Earlier studies used remotely sensed data to map and, in some cases, to monitor mangrove forests at a local scale. Nonetheless, a comprehensive national assessment and synthesis was lacking. We interpreted time-series satellite data of 1975, 1990, 2000, and 2005 using a hybrid supervised and unsupervised classification approach. Landsat data were geometrically corrected to an accuracy of ?? one-half pixel, an accuracy necessary for change analysis. We used a postclassification change detection approach. Our results showed that Madagascar lost 7% of mangrove forests from 1975 to 2005, to a present extent of ???2,797 km2. Deforestation rates and causes varied both spatially and temporally. The forests increased by 5.6% (212 km2) from 1975 to 1990, decreased by 14.3% (455 km 2) from 1990 to 2000, and decreased by 2.6% (73 km2) from 2000 to 2005. Similarly, major changes occurred in Bombekota Bay, Mahajamba Bay, the coast of Ambanja, the Tsiribihina River, and Cap St Vincent. The main factors responsible for mangrove deforestation include conversion to agriculture (35%), logging (16%), conversion to aquaculture (3%), and urban development (1%). ?? 2008 by MDPI.

  12. Summer climate of Madagascar and monsoon pulsing of its vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2016-02-01

    This study analyzes the climate of Madagascar (12°-26°S, 43°-50°E) and its relation to the Indian Ocean during austral summer (Dec-Mar). Moisture converges onto a standing easterly wave and floods are prevalent in late summer. All-island daytime land temperatures exceed 38 °C in October and are ~4 °C above sea temperatures during summer. Analysis of thermally induced diurnal convection and circulation revealed inflow during the afternoon recirculated from the southeastern mountains and the warm Mozambique Channel. Summer rainfall follows latent and sensible heat flux during the first half of the day, and gains a surplus by evening via thunderstorms over the western plains. At the inter-annual time-scale, 2.3 years oscillations in all-island rainfall appear linked with the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation and corresponding 80 Dobson Unit ozone fluctuations during flood events. Wet spells at frequencies from 11-27 days derive from locally-formed tropical cyclones and NW-cloud bands. Flood case studies exhibit moisture recycling in the confluence zone between the sub-tropical anticyclone and the lee-side vortex. Hovmoller analysis of daily rainfall reinforces the concept of local generation and pulsing by cross-equatorial (Indian winter) monsoon flow rather than zonal atmospheric waves. Since the surface water budget is critical to agriculture in Madagascar, this study represents a further step to understand its meso-scale summer climate.

  13. Madagascar Flatidae (Hemiptera, Fulgoromorpha): state-of-the-art and research challenges

    PubMed Central

    Świerczewski, Dariusz; Stroiński, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The paper provides a historical review of the research on Flatidae in Madagascar and indicates future prospects. While the first two species of Madagascar Flatidae were described by Guérin-Méneville (1844), it was Signoret (1860) who made the first real attempt to enhance our knowledge of the Hemiptera fauna of Madagascar by describing several additional species. Over the following century and a half, several investigators have turned their attention to this group of insects, with the final number of species recorded for the island reaching 79. Despite this long history of research, it is evident that much still remains to be done. Detailed taxonomic research will allow the natural history of Madagascar and changes in the biological diversity of its endemic ecosystems to be better understood. This paper should be considered as an introduction to a complex study on the systematics and phylogeny of worldwide Flatidae planthoppers. PMID:24039526

  14. A review of mosquitoes associated with Rift Valley fever virus in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Tantely, Luciano M; Boyer, Sébastien; Fontenille, Didier

    2015-04-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonotic disease occurring throughout Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Madagascar. The disease is caused by a Phlebovirus (RVF virus [RVFV]) transmitted to vertebrate hosts through the bite of infected mosquitoes. In Madagascar, the first RVFV circulation was reported in 1979 based on detection in mosquitoes but without epidemic episode. Subsequently, two outbreaks occurred: the first along the east coast and in the central highlands in 1990 and 1991 and the most recent along the northern and eastern coasts and in the central highlands in 2008 and 2009. Despite the presence of 24 mosquitoes species potentially associated with RVFV transmission in Madagascar, little associated entomological information is available. In this review, we list the RVFV vector, Culex antennatus, as well as other taxa as candidate vector species. We discuss risk factors from an entomological perspective for the re-emergence of RVF in Madagascar. PMID:25732680

  15. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J; Ali, Jason R; Samonds, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar's Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine. PMID:26075723

  16. STUDY OF LAND USE ISSUES CHARACTERIZING THE AMBALAVAO-ANDRINGITRA REGION OF MADAGASCAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: GF9500572
    Title: Study of Land Use Issues Characterizing the Ambalavao-Andringitra Region of Madagascar
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Christian Arthur Kull
    Institution: University of Colorado
    EPA Grant Representati...

  17. Genetic Diversity of the Ring-Tailed Lemur (Lemur catta) in South-Central Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Tara A; Gray, Olivia; Gould, Lisa; Burrell, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar's lemurs, now deemed the most endangered group of mammals, represent the highest primate conservation priority in the world. Due to anthropogenic disturbances, an estimated 10% of Malagasy forest cover remains. The endangered Lemur catta is endemic to the southern regions of Madagascar and now occupies primarily fragmented forest habitats. We examined the influence of habitat fragmentation and isolation on the genetic diversity of L. catta across 3 different forest fragments in south-central Madagascar. Our analysis revealed moderate levels of genetic diversity. Genetic differentiation among the sites ranged from 0.05 to 0.11. These data suggest that the L. catta populations within south-central Madagascar have not yet lost significant genetic variation. However, due to ongoing anthropogenic threats faced by ring-tailed lemurs, continued conservation and research initiatives are imperative for long-term viability of the species. PMID:26022303

  18. Comprehensive Red List Assessment Reveals Exceptionally High Extinction Risk to Madagascar Palms

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoarinivo, Mijoro; Dransfield, John; Bachman, Steven P.; Moat, Justin; Baker, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of baseline IUCN Red List assessments for plants is a crucial step in conservation planning. Nowhere is this more important than in biodiversity hotspots that are subject to significant anthropogenic pressures, such as Madagascar. Here, all Madagascar palm species are assessed using the IUCN Red List categories and criteria, version 3.1. Our results indicate that 83% of the 192 endemic species are threatened, nearly four times the proportion estimated for plants globally and exceeding estimates for all other comprehensively evaluated plant groups in Madagascar. Compared with a previous assessment in 1995, the number of Endangered and Critically Endangered species has substantially increased, due to the discovery of 28 new species since 1995, most of which are highly threatened. The conservation status of most species included in both the 1995 and the current assessments has not changed. Where change occurred, more species have moved to lower threat categories than to higher categories, because of improved knowledge of species and their distributions, rather than a decrease in extinction risk. However, some cases of genuine deterioration in conservation status were also identified. Palms in Madagascar are primarily threatened by habitat loss due to agriculture and biological resource use through direct exploitation or collateral damage. The recent extension of Madagascar’s protected area network is highly beneficial for palms, substantially increasing the number of threatened species populations included within reserves. Notably, three of the eight most important protected areas for palms are newly designated. However, 28 threatened and data deficient species are not protected by the expanded network, including some Critically Endangered species. Moreover, many species occurring in protected areas are still threatened, indicating that threatening processes persist even in reserves. Definitive implementation of the new protected areas combined with local community engagement are essential for the survival of Madagascar’s palms. PMID:25075612

  19. U-Pb zircon geochronology and geochemistry of Late Jurassic basalts in Maevatanana, Madagascar: Implications for the timing of separation of Madagascar from Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi-An; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Hou, Ke-Jun; Liu, Shan-Bao; Liu, Jia-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic zircon ages for the Maevatanana basalts in Madagascar indicate that Madagascar separated from Africa at 149.8 ± 2.1 Ma. Rocks produced by this basaltic magmatism associated with rifting are characterized by low SiO2 (49.6-50.3 wt.%), high total FeO (>13.9 wt.%), TiO2 (>3.7 wt.%), and P2O5 (>0.5 wt.%), and extremely high Na2O/K2O (3.08-3.27). Geochemical variations can be ascribed to significant fractional crystallization of clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Maevatanana basalts suggest affinities with calc-alkaline basalt. Additionally the basalts have distinct ocean-island-basalt-like geochemical features that may be related to the Marion plume. We speculate that the Maevatanana basalts are the product of the Marion mantle plume related to separation of Madagascar from Africa in the Late Jurassic.

  20. Checklist of Fishes from Madagascar Reef, Campeche Bank, México

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study presents the first list of fish species from Madagascar Reef, Campeche Bank, Gulf of México. Field surveys and literature review identified 54 species belonging to 8 orders, 30 families and 43 genera, comprising both conspicuous and cryptic fishes. Species richness was lower at this reef site compared to reefs in the Mexican Caribbean, Veracruz or Tuxpan, but was similar to other reefs in the same region. Species composition was a mixture of species present in all the reef systems of the Mexican Atlantic. Hypoplectrus ecosur was recorded here for the first time in the Gulf of Mexico, Mycteroperca microlepis, Equetus lanceolatus and Chaetodipterus faber were new records for the reefs of the Campeche Bank, Elacatinus xanthiprora was recorded for the second time in Mexico and expanded its known distribution westwards from Alacranes Reef and Sanopus reticulatus, endemic of the Yucatan state, was recorded here for the first time on a reef. PMID:24891834

  1. Checklist of fishes from madagascar reef, campeche bank, méxico.

    PubMed

    Zarco Perello, Salvador; Moreno Mendoza, Rigoberto; Simões, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the first list of fish species from Madagascar Reef, Campeche Bank, Gulf of México. Field surveys and literature review identified 54 species belonging to 8 orders, 30 families and 43 genera, comprising both conspicuous and cryptic fishes. Species richness was lower at this reef site compared to reefs in the Mexican Caribbean, Veracruz or Tuxpan, but was similar to other reefs in the same region. Species composition was a mixture of species present in all the reef systems of the Mexican Atlantic. Hypoplectrusecosur was recorded here for the first time in the Gulf of Mexico, Mycteropercamicrolepis, Equetuslanceolatus and Chaetodipterusfaber were new records for the reefs of the Campeche Bank, Elacatinusxanthiprora was recorded for the second time in Mexico and expanded its known distribution westwards from Alacranes Reef and Sanopusreticulatus, endemic of the Yucatan state, was recorded here for the first time on a reef. PMID:24891834

  2. Capture, Movement, Trade, and Consumption of Mammals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Kim E; Randell, Haley; Wills, Abigail R; Janvier, Totozafy Eric; Belalahy, Tertius Rodriguez; Sewall, Brent J

    2016-01-01

    Wild meat trade constitutes a threat to many animal species. Understanding the commodity chain of wild animals (hunting, transportation, trade, consumption) can help target conservation initiatives. Wild meat commodity chain research has focused on the formal trade and less on informal enterprises, although informal enterprises contribute to a large portion of the wild meat trade in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the formal and informal components of these commodity chains by focusing on the mammalian wild meat trade in Madagascar. Our objectives were to: (1) identify hunting strategies used to capture different wild mammals; (2) analyze patterns of movement of wild meat from the capture location to the final consumer; (3) examine wild meat prices, volumes, and venues of sale; and (4) estimate the volume of wild meat consumption. Data were collected in May-August 2013 using semi-structured interviews with consumers (n = 1343 households, 21 towns), meat-sellers (n = 520 restaurants, open-air markets stalls, and supermarkets, 9 towns), and drivers of inter-city transit vehicles (n = 61, 5 towns). We found that: (1) a wide range of hunting methods were used, though prevalence of use differed by animal group; (2) wild meat was transported distances of up to 166 km to consumers, though some animal groups were hunted locally (<10 km) in rural areas; (3) most wild meat was procured from free sources (hunting, gifts), though urban respondents who consumed bats and wild pigs were more likely to purchase those meats; and (4) wild meat was consumed at lower rates than domestic meat, though urban respondents consumed wild meat twice as much per year compared to rural respondents. Apart from the hunting stage, the consumption and trade of wild meat in Madagascar is also likely more formalized than previously thought. PMID:26926987

  3. Capture, Movement, Trade, and Consumption of Mammals in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kim E.; Randell, Haley; Wills, Abigail R.; Janvier, Totozafy Eric; Belalahy, Tertius Rodriguez; Sewall, Brent J.

    2016-01-01

    Wild meat trade constitutes a threat to many animal species. Understanding the commodity chain of wild animals (hunting, transportation, trade, consumption) can help target conservation initiatives. Wild meat commodity chain research has focused on the formal trade and less on informal enterprises, although informal enterprises contribute to a large portion of the wild meat trade in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the formal and informal components of these commodity chains by focusing on the mammalian wild meat trade in Madagascar. Our objectives were to: (1) identify hunting strategies used to capture different wild mammals; (2) analyze patterns of movement of wild meat from the capture location to the final consumer; (3) examine wild meat prices, volumes, and venues of sale; and (4) estimate the volume of wild meat consumption. Data were collected in May-August 2013 using semi-structured interviews with consumers (n = 1343 households, 21 towns), meat-sellers (n = 520 restaurants, open-air markets stalls, and supermarkets, 9 towns), and drivers of inter-city transit vehicles (n = 61, 5 towns). We found that: (1) a wide range of hunting methods were used, though prevalence of use differed by animal group; (2) wild meat was transported distances of up to 166 km to consumers, though some animal groups were hunted locally (<10 km) in rural areas; (3) most wild meat was procured from free sources (hunting, gifts), though urban respondents who consumed bats and wild pigs were more likely to purchase those meats; and (4) wild meat was consumed at lower rates than domestic meat, though urban respondents consumed wild meat twice as much per year compared to rural respondents. Apart from the hunting stage, the consumption and trade of wild meat in Madagascar is also likely more formalized than previously thought. PMID:26926987

  4. Violences conjugales à Antananarivo (Madagascar): un enjeu de santé publique

    PubMed Central

    Gastineau, Bénédicte; Gathier, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction La violence conjugale a été étudiée dans beaucoup de pays développés mais peu en Afrique subsaharienne. Madagascar est un pays où ce phénomène est peu documenté. Méthodes En 2007, une enquête sur la violence conjugale à Antananarivo (ELVICA) a été menée sur la violence conjugale envers les femmes dans la capitale malgache. ELVICA a interrogé 400 femmes en union, de 15 à 59 ans. Des informations sur les caractéristiques démographiques, socioéconomiques des couples ont été collectées ainsi que sur les actes de violences physiques des hommes sur leurs épouses. L’objectif de cet article est d’identifier les facteurs de risques de la violence conjugale grave, celle qui a des conséquences sur la santé physique des femmes. Résultats Trente-cinq pour cent des femmes qui ont déclaré avoir subi au moins une forme de violence physique au cours des 12 mois précédent l’enquête. Presque la moitié (46%) des femmes violentées ont déclaré avoir déjà eu des hématomes, et environ un quart (23%) des plaies avec saignement. Vingt-deux pour cent ont déjà dû consulter un médecin. Parmi les nombreuses variables socioéconomiques et démographiques testées, quelques-unes sont associées positivement au risque de violence conjugale grave: le fait pour une femme d’être en union consensuelle et d’avoir une activité professionnelle. Il y aussi un lien entre la violence subie et l’autonomie des femmes (liberté accordée par le mari de travailler, de circuler, de voir sa famille). Conclusion A Madagascar, comme ailleurs, la lutte contre les violences conjugales est un élément majeur de l’amélioration du statut et de la santé des femmes. PMID:22514757

  5. Origin of birefringence in andradite from Arizona, Madagascar, and Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Sytle M.; Klincker, Allison M.

    2013-07-01

    The crystal structure of four birefringent andradite samples (two from Arizona, one from Madagascar, and one from Iran) was refined with the Rietveld method, space group Iaoverline{3} d, and monochromatic synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data. Each sample contains an assemblage of three different cubic phases. From the electron-microprobe (EMPA) results, fine-scale intergrowths in the Arizona-2 and Madagascar samples appear homogeneous with nearly identical compositions of {Ca2.99Mg0.01}?3[{{Fe}}_{1.99}^{3 + } {{Mn}}_{0.01}^{3 + }]?2(Si2.95Al0.03 {{Fe}}_{0.02}^{3 + })?3O12, Adr98 (Arizona-2), and Adr97 (Madagascar). Both samples are near-end-member andradite, ideally {Ca3}[{{Fe}}2^{3 + }](Si3)O12, so cation ordering in the X, Y, or Z sites is not possible. Because of the large-scale intergrowths, the Arizona-1 and Iran samples contain three different compositions. Arizona-1 has compositions Adr97 (phase-1), Adr93Grs4 (phase-2), and Adr87Grs11 (phase-3). Iran sample has compositions Adr86Uv12 (phase-1), Adr69Uv30 (phase-2), and Adr76Uv22 (phase-3). The crystal structure of the three phases within each sample was modeled quite well as indicated by the Rietveld refinement statistics of reduced ?2 and overall R ( F 2) values of, respectively, 1.980 and 0.0291 (Arizona-1); 1.091 and 0.0305 (Arizona-2); 1.362 and 0.0231 (Madagascar); and 1.681 and 0.0304 (Iran). The dominant phase for each sample has the following unit-cell parameters (Å) and weight fractions (%): a = 12.06314(1), 51.93(9) (Arizona-1); 12.04889(1), 52.47(1) (Arizona-2); 12.06276(1), 52.21(8) (Madagascar); and 12.05962(2), 63.3(1) (Iran). For these dominant phases, the distances and site occupancy factors ( sofs) in terms of neutral atoms at the Ca(X), Fe(Y), and Si(Z) sites are as follows: = 2.4348, Fe-O = 2.0121(6), Si-O = 1.6508(6) Å; Ca( sof) = 0.955(2), Fe( sof) = 0.930(2), and Si( sof) = 0.917(2) (Arizona-1); = 2.4288, Fe-O = 2.0148(7), Si-O = 1.6476(7) Å; Ca( sof) = 0.953(2), Fe( sof) = 0.891(2), and Si( sof) = 0.927(2) (Arizona-2); = 2.4319, Fe-O = 2.0220(6), Si-O = 1.6460(6) Å; Ca( sof) = 0.955(2), Fe( sof) = 0.941(2), and Si( sof) = 0.939(2) (Madagascar); and = 2.4344, Fe-O = 2.0156(8), Si-O = 1.6468(8) Å; Ca( sof) = 0.928(2), Fe( sof) = 0.908(2), and Si( sof) = 0.932(3) (Iran). The sofs based on the EMPA results are similar to those obtained from the Rietveld refinement. Each phase in the HRPXRD results can be correlated with a specific chemical composition. For example, the Iran sample composition Adr63Uv30 corresponds to phase-3 that has the smallest unit-cell parameter; Adr76Uv22 corresponds to phase-1 that has the intermediate cell value; and Adr86Uv13 corresponds to phase-2 that has the largest unit-cell parameter. The bond distances compare well with those obtained from radii sum. The three different cubic phases in each sample cause strain that arises from the mismatch of the cubic unit-cell parameters and give rise to birefringence.

  6. Paleoenvironment of Ankilitelo Cave (late Holocene, southwestern Madagascar): implications for the extinction of giant lemurs.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Kathleen M

    2010-04-01

    Following human arrival, Madagascar suffered well-documented megafaunal extinctions and widespread deforestation. Although humans are widely considered to be the primary cause of the extinctions, the relative contributions of climate change and human activities to this ecological transformation remain uncertain. Reconstructing the habitats of the giant lemurs of Madagascar can provide key information for understanding the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their extinction. In this study, I present a faunal analysis of the subfossil assemblage from Ankilitelo Cave, southwestern Madagascar. This assemblage documents the latest known occurrence of five species of extinct giant lemur, in association with abundant well-preserved small mammal remains. I compared the small mammal fauna at Ankilitelo with 27 extant Malagasy mammal communities spanning the range of Madagascar's habitat types. Similarities in species composition between modern communities and Ankilitelo were assessed using cluster analysis. Ecological similarities were examined by assigning each species to dietary, locomotor, activity pattern, and body size categories. Multiple discriminant analysis was then used to classify Ankilitelo relative to modern habitat types in Madagascar, based on the ecological structure of the subfossil fauna. Results indicate that the habitat surrounding Ankilitelo during the late Holocene was similar to the succulent woodlands of modern southwestern Madagascar. This suggests that approximately 500yr BP, these semi-arid habitats supported a subfossil lemur community that included the highly-suspensory Palaeopropithecus, and deliberate slow-climber Megaladapis, as well as Archaeolemur, Pachylemur, and Daubentonia robusta. In such environments, these giant lemurs would likely have been highly vulnerable to increasing human pressure in southwestern Madagascar. PMID:20226497

  7. Education and Training in Madagascar: Toward a Policy Agenda for Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction. A World Bank Country Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    Madagascar is a poor, primarily rural country in which three-quarters of the population has subsisted below the poverty line for at least two decades. In view of the important role of education in the government's poverty reduction agenda, this report documents the current status of educational development in Madagascar and the key constraints on…

  8. Education and Training in Madagascar: Toward a Policy Agenda for Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction. A World Bank Country Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    Madagascar is a poor, primarily rural country in which three-quarters of the population has subsisted below the poverty line for at least two decades. In view of the important role of education in the government's poverty reduction agenda, this report documents the current status of educational development in Madagascar and the key constraints on…

  9. Presence of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Native Amphibians Exported from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis is driven by the spread of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd), a highly virulent pathogen threatening global amphibian biodiversity. Although pandemic in distribution, previous intensive field surveys have failed to detect Bd in Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot home to hundreds of endemic amphibian species. Due to the presence of Bd in nearby continental Africa and the ecological crisis that can be expected following establishment in Madagascar, enhanced surveillance is imperative. I sampled 565 amphibians commercially exported from Madagascar for the presence of Bd upon importation to the USA, both to assist early detection efforts and demonstrate the conservation potential of wildlife trade disease surveillance. Bd was detected in three animals via quantitative PCR: a single Heterixalus alboguttatus, Heterixalus betsileo, and Scaphiophryne spinosa. This is the first time Bd has been confirmed in amphibians from Madagascar and presents an urgent call to action. Our early identification of pathogen presence prior to widespread infection provides the necessary tools and encouragement to catalyze a swift, targeted response to isolate and eradicate Bd from Madagascar. If implemented before establishment occurs, an otherwise likely catastrophic decline in amphibian biodiversity may be prevented. PMID:24599336

  10. Detection in and circulation of Bluetongue virus among domestic ruminants in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Viarouge, Cyril; Ravalohery, Jean-Pierre; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Sailleau, Corinne; Tantely, Michael Luciano; Elissa, Nohal; Cardinale, Eric; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Zientara, Stephan; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-17

    So far, no published data was available concerning the circulation of Bluetongue virus (BTV) in Madagascar. During a survey on Rift Valley Fever, we were able to detect a virus belonging to BTV. Therefore, we conducted a study aiming at characterizing molecularly the BTV isolated and assess the importance of circulation of BTV in Madagascar. A total of 4393 sera from ruminants selected randomly by stratification and sampled in 30 districts of Madagascar were tested for BTV. Moreover, 175 cattle were followed during 11 months. Phylogenetic analyses were performed from virus isolated from unfed pools of mosquitoes. Overall, the estimated mean seroprevalence of infection at the national level was 95.9% (95% CI: [95.2-96.5]) in cattle and 83.7% (95% CI: [81.4-85.9]) in small ruminants. Estimation of incidence rate was 54 per 100 cattle-years assuming that the incidence rate is constant all year along. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BTV detected belong to serotype 2. In conclusion, our results showed that BTV is endemic in Madagascar and highly prevalent among cattle. In our study we did not work on the vector involved in transmission of BTV in cattle. Thus, research should be conducted to better describe epidemiology of BTV in Madagascar including vectors and assess economic impact of the disease associated to BTV infections. PMID:25736861

  11. Provenance and tectonic significance of the Palaeoproterozoic metasedimentary successions of central and nothern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Macey, P.H.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Schofield, D.I.; Goodenough, K.M.; Bauer, W.; Key, R.M.; Potter, C.J.; Armstrong, R.A.; Miller, J.A.; Randriamananjara, T.; Ralison, V.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Bejoma, M.

    2011-01-01

    New detrital zircon U–Pb age data obtained from various quartzite units of three spatially separated supracrustal packages in central and northern Madagascar, show that these units were deposited between 1.8 and 0.8 Ga and have similar aged provenances. The distribution of detrital zircon ages indicates an overwhelming contribution of sources with ages between 2.5 and 1.8 Ga. Possible source rocks with an age of 2.5 Ga are present in abundance in the crustal segments (Antananarivo, Antongil and Masora Domains) either side of a purported Neoproterozoic suture ("Betsimisaraka Suture Zone"). Recently, possible source rocks for the 1.8 Ga age peak have been recognised in southern Madagascar. All three supracrustal successions, as well as the Archaean blocks onto which they were emplaced, are intruded by mid-Neoproterozoic magmatic suites placing a minimum age on their deposition. The similarities in detrital pattern, maximum and minimum age of deposition in the three successions, lend some support to a model in which all of Madagascar's Archaean blocks form a coherent crustal entity (the Greater Dharwar Craton), rather than an amalgamate of disparate crustal blocks brought together only during Neoproterozoic convergence. However, potential source terranes exist outside Madagascar and on either side of the Neoproterozoic sutures, so that a model including a Neoproterozoic suture in Madagascar cannot be dispelled outright.

  12. Amphibian Chytrid Fungus in Madagascar neither Shows Widespread Presence nor Signs of Certain Establishment.

    PubMed

    Kolby, Jonathan E; Skerratt, Lee F

    2015-01-01

    The global spread of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) is associated with amphibian mass mortality, population decline, and extinction. Over the past decade, concern has been expressed for the potential introduction of Bd to Madagascar, a global hotspot of amphibian biodiversity. Following years without detection, widespread Bd presence in Madagascar has now been reported (Bletz et al. 2015a), raising international conservation concern. Before reacting to this finding with a significant management response, the accuracy and context of the data warrant cautious review. Re-examination of a 10-year dataset together with results from more recent surveillance (Kolby et al. 2015) does not yet demonstrate widespread Bd presence. Detection of Bd at "positive" locations in Madagascar has been inconsistent for unknown reasons. Whether Bd is established in Madagascar (i.e. populations are self-sustaining) or instead requires continued introduction to persist also remains uncertain. The deployment of emergency conservation rescue initiatives is expected to target areas where the distribution of Bd and the risk of chytridiomycosis endangering amphibians is believed to overlap. Thus, erroneous description of Bd presence would misdirect limited conservation resources. Standardized surveillance and confirmatory surveys are now imperative to reliably characterize the distribution, potential spread, virulence and overall risk of Bd to amphibians in Madagascar. PMID:26465924

  13. Amphibian Chytrid Fungus in Madagascar neither Shows Widespread Presence nor Signs of Certain Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    The global spread of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) is associated with amphibian mass mortality, population decline, and extinction. Over the past decade, concern has been expressed for the potential introduction of Bd to Madagascar, a global hotspot of amphibian biodiversity. Following years without detection, widespread Bd presence in Madagascar has now been reported (Bletz et al. 2015a), raising international conservation concern. Before reacting to this finding with a significant management response, the accuracy and context of the data warrant cautious review. Re-examination of a 10-year dataset together with results from more recent surveillance (Kolby et al. 2015) does not yet demonstrate widespread Bd presence. Detection of Bd at “positive” locations in Madagascar has been inconsistent for unknown reasons. Whether Bd is established in Madagascar (i.e. populations are self-sustaining) or instead requires continued introduction to persist also remains uncertain. The deployment of emergency conservation rescue initiatives is expected to target areas where the distribution of Bd and the risk of chytridiomycosis endangering amphibians is believed to overlap. Thus, erroneous description of Bd presence would misdirect limited conservation resources. Standardized surveillance and confirmatory surveys are now imperative to reliably characterize the distribution, potential spread, virulence and overall risk of Bd to amphibians in Madagascar. PMID:26465924

  14. Poverty reduction and Millennium Development Goals: recognizing population, health, and environment linkages in rural Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Gaffikin, Lynne; Ashley, Jeffrey; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2007-01-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), committed to by all 191 United Nations member states, are rooted in the concept of sustainable development. Although 2007 (midway) reports indicated that programs are under way, unfortunately many countries are unlikely to reach their goals by 2015 due to high levels of poverty. Madagascar is one such example, although some gains are being made. Attempts of this island nation to achieve its MDGs, expressed most recently in the form of a Madagascar Action Plan, are notable in their emphasis on (1) conserving the country's natural resource base, (2) the effect of demographic trends on development, and (3) the importance of health as a prerequisite for development. Leadership in the country's struggle for economic growth comes from the president of the Republic, in part, through his "Madagascar Naturally" vision as well as his commitment to universal access to family planning, among other health and development interventions. However, for resource-limited countries, such as Madagascar, to get or stay "on track" to achieving the MDGs will require support from many sides. "Madagascar cannot do it alone and should not do it alone." This position is inherent in the eighth MDG: "Develop a global partnership for development." Apparently, it takes a village after all - a global one. PMID:18311367

  15. The odd man out in Sub-Saharan Africa: understanding the tobacco use prevalence in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tobacco industry has globalized and tobacco use continues to increase in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, the data and research to inform policy initiatives for addressing this phenomenon is sparse. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of adult tobacco use in 17 Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries, and to identify key factors associated with adult tobacco consumption choices (smoked, smokeless tobacco and dual use) in Madagascar. Methods We used Demographic Health Survey for estimating tobacco use prevalence among adults in SSA. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to identify key determinants of adult tobacco consumption choices in Madagascar. Results While differences in tobacco use exist in SSA, Madagascar has exceptionally higher prevalence rates (48.9% of males; 10.3% of females). The regression analyses showed complexity of tobacco use in Madagascar and identified age, education, wealth, employment, marriage, religion and place of residence as factors significantly associated with the choice of tobacco use among males, while age, wealth, and employment were significantly associated with that of females. The effects, however, differ across the three choices of tobacco use compared to non-use. Conclusions Tobacco use in Madagascar was higher than the other 16 SSA countries. Although the government continues to enact policies to address the problem, there is a need for effective implementation and enforcement. There is also the need for health education to modify social norms and denormalize tobacco use. PMID:24044737

  16. Why is Madagascar special? The extraordinarily slow evolution of pelican spiders (Araneae, Archaeidae).

    PubMed

    Wood, Hannah M; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Griswold, Charles E; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-02-01

    Although Madagascar is an ancient fragment of Gondwana, the majority of taxa studied thus far appear to have reached the island through dispersal from Cenozoic times. Ancient lineages may have experienced a different history compared to more recent Cenozoic arrivals, as such lineages would have encountered geoclimatic shifts over an extended time period. The motivation for this study was to unravel the signature of diversification in an ancient lineage by comparing an area known for major geoclimatic upheavals (Madagascar) versus other areas where the environment has been relatively stable. Archaeid spiders are an ancient paleoendemic group with unusual predatory behaviors and spectacular trophic morphology that likely have been on Madagascar since its isolation. We examined disparities between Madagascan archaeids and their non-Madagascan relatives regarding timing of divergence, rates of trait evolution, and distribution patterns. Results reveal an increased rate of adaptive trait diversification in Madagascan archaeids. Furthermore, geoclimatic events in Madagascar over long periods of time may have facilitated high species richness due to montane refugia and stability, rainforest refugia, and also ecogeographic shifts, allowing for the accumulation of adaptive traits. This research suggests that time alone, coupled with more ancient geoclimatic events allowed for the different patterns in Madagascar. PMID:25491087

  17. [Water and environment in the Southwest of Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Razanamparany, L

    1993-04-01

    The dry and arid southwest region of Madagascar is not a desert but resembles the Sahel region of West Africa. The chronic water deficit is aggravated by the heat and constant winds that accelerate evapotranspiration on the permeable soils. The dryness occurs because the southwest region lies outside the main pluviogenic systems. Erosion occurs at all seasons. In the winter the sun and winds are the main causes, while the rare storms are more conducive to run-off and to erosion than to absorption. The acute water shortage in the southwest has prompted hydrogeologic research and well-drilling, but the high salt content of the water and other impurities will be a limiting factor for development of the area. The population of the southwest is extremely mobile. Human settlements are concentrated in the valleys and depressions and along major roads. Customary rights to land under the control of the traditional chiefs regulate tenure in most areas. But especially in the river bottoms, the coming of cash crops cultivated with modern equipment has resulted in significant erosion which has aggravated ecological problems. Accelerating soil degradation has led peasants to extend their lands under cultivation to the detriment of forest cover. Cattle herding remains the principal economic activity in the southwest. Herding has progressed from nomadism to pastoralism, but it remains a sign of power and wealth. Transhumance is the strategy of herders faced with shortages of water and pasturage, demographic pressure, and environmental degradation. Raising of sheep and goats constitutes a supplemental food source, medium of exchange, and form of savings. But angora goats graze on everything in their path, devastating their surrounds. Fear of cattle thefts militates against efforts to improve the quality of the stock. The various problems together have prompted a wasteful exploitation of the forest resources. Development strategies for the area explored by the government have all been forced to consider the high cost of potable water. A water project forms part of the Environmental Plan of Action launched by Madagascar with the assistance of international organizations. PMID:12286688

  18. Spatial Biodiversity Patterns of Madagascar's Amphibians and Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason L.; Sillero, Neftali; Glaw, Frank; Bora, Parfait; Vieites, David R.; Vences, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Madagascar has become a model region for testing hypotheses of species diversification and biogeography, and many studies have focused on its diverse and highly endemic herpetofauna. Here we combine species distribution models of a near-complete set of species of reptiles and amphibians known from the island with body size data and a tabulation of herpetofaunal communities from field surveys, compiled up to 2008. Though taxonomic revisions and novel distributional records arose since compilation, we are confident that the data are appropriate for inferring and comparing biogeographic patterns among these groups of organisms. We observed species richness of both amphibians and reptiles was highest in the humid rainforest biome of eastern Madagascar, but reptiles also show areas of high richness in the dry and subarid western biomes. In several amphibian subclades, especially within the Mantellidae, species richness peaks in the central eastern geographic regions while in reptiles different subclades differ distinctly in their richness centers. A high proportion of clades and subclades of both amphibians and reptiles have a peak of local endemism in the topographically and bioclimatically diverse northern geographic regions. This northern area is roughly delimited by a diagonal spanning from 15.5°S on the east coast to ca. 15.0°S on the west coast. Amphibian diversity is highest at altitudes between 800–1200 m above sea-level whereas reptiles have their highest richness at low elevations, probably reflecting the comparatively large number of species specialized to the extended low-elevation areas in the dry and subarid biomes. We found that the range sizes of both amphibians and reptiles strongly correlated with body size, and differences between the two groups are explained by the larger body sizes of reptiles. However, snakes have larger range sizes than lizards which cannot be readily explained by their larger body sizes alone. Range filling, i.e., the amount of suitable habitat occupied by a species, is less expressed in amphibians than in reptiles, possibly reflecting their lower dispersal capacity. Taxonomic composition of communities assessed by field surveys is largely explained by bioclimatic regions, with communities from the dry and especially subarid biomes distinctly differing from humid and subhumid biomes. PMID:26735688

  19. Spatial Biodiversity Patterns of Madagascar's Amphibians and Reptiles.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason L; Sillero, Neftali; Glaw, Frank; Bora, Parfait; Vieites, David R; Vences, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Madagascar has become a model region for testing hypotheses of species diversification and biogeography, and many studies have focused on its diverse and highly endemic herpetofauna. Here we combine species distribution models of a near-complete set of species of reptiles and amphibians known from the island with body size data and a tabulation of herpetofaunal communities from field surveys, compiled up to 2008. Though taxonomic revisions and novel distributional records arose since compilation, we are confident that the data are appropriate for inferring and comparing biogeographic patterns among these groups of organisms. We observed species richness of both amphibians and reptiles was highest in the humid rainforest biome of eastern Madagascar, but reptiles also show areas of high richness in the dry and subarid western biomes. In several amphibian subclades, especially within the Mantellidae, species richness peaks in the central eastern geographic regions while in reptiles different subclades differ distinctly in their richness centers. A high proportion of clades and subclades of both amphibians and reptiles have a peak of local endemism in the topographically and bioclimatically diverse northern geographic regions. This northern area is roughly delimited by a diagonal spanning from 15.5°S on the east coast to ca. 15.0°S on the west coast. Amphibian diversity is highest at altitudes between 800-1200 m above sea-level whereas reptiles have their highest richness at low elevations, probably reflecting the comparatively large number of species specialized to the extended low-elevation areas in the dry and subarid biomes. We found that the range sizes of both amphibians and reptiles strongly correlated with body size, and differences between the two groups are explained by the larger body sizes of reptiles. However, snakes have larger range sizes than lizards which cannot be readily explained by their larger body sizes alone. Range filling, i.e., the amount of suitable habitat occupied by a species, is less expressed in amphibians than in reptiles, possibly reflecting their lower dispersal capacity. Taxonomic composition of communities assessed by field surveys is largely explained by bioclimatic regions, with communities from the dry and especially subarid biomes distinctly differing from humid and subhumid biomes. PMID:26735688

  20. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H.; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N.; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J.; Ali, Jason R.; Samonds, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar’s Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine. PMID:26075723

  1. The impact of advective transport by the South Indian Ocean Countercurrent on the Madagascar plankton bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Beron-Vera, F. J.

    2012-03-01

    Based on ten years (1998-2007) of satellite ocean color data we analyze the spatiotemporal patterns in the seasonal Madagascar plankton bloom with respect to the advection of the recently discovered Southern Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC). In maps of Finite-time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) and Finite-Time Zonal Drift (FTZD) computed from altimetry derived velocities we observe a narrow zonal jet that starts at ˜25°S at the southern tip of Madagascar, an important upwelling region, and extends to the east further than the largest plankton blooms (˜2500 km). In bloom years, the jet coincides with large parts of the northern boundary of the plankton bloom, acting as a barrier to meridional transport. Our findings suggest that advection is an important and so far underestimated mechanism for the eastward propagation and the extent of the plankton bloom. This supports the hypothesis of a single nutrient source south of Madagascar.

  2. Age progressive volcanism in the Comores Archipelago and Northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerick, C. M.

    The Comores islands and Tertiary volcanic province of Northern Madagascar form a sub-linear trend of alkalic shield volvanoes across the northern Mozambique Channel. Potassium-argon dating of shield building lavas confirms an eastward increase in age of volcanism along the chain, consistent with a hotspot origin for the lineament. The rate of migration of the Somali Plate over the mantle source is approximately 45 mm/yr. This new geochronology for the Comores island chain is used to model the absolute motion of the Somali Plate for the last 10 million years. A systematic departure of the Somali Plate absolute motion from the African Plate absolute motion during this period represents a component of relative motion across the East African Rift at the rate of .330 deg/m.y., about an Euler pole located at 63.6 deg. S,2.3. deg. E. The geometry of older portions of the Comores and Reunion trends indicates that there was no significant relative motion between the African and Somali Plates prior to about 10 m.y. ago. Sequential reconstructions from 200-0 m.y. are presented.

  3. [Pulmonary abscess: a 111-case series in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Rakotoson, J L; Rebasy, L; Andrianasolo, R; Rakotoharivelo, H; Rakotomizao, J R; Andrianarisoa, A C F

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a series of 111 cases of pulmonary abscess observed over a 4-year period in Madagascar. There were 75 men (67.6%) and 36 women (32.4%) with a mean age of 38 years. Alcohol and tobacco use was found in 32.2% of cases. Thirteen patients (11.7%) used chewing tobacco and all patients were exposed to passive smoking. Eighty-eight patients (79.2%) had a history of bronchopulmonary disorders. Onset was progressive in 63% of cases. The main symptoms were fever (81.9%), pulmonary condensation (74.7%) and pleurisy (9.9%). Coughing was productive in 91.8% cases including 54% of patients having muco-purulent expectorations. In 49 patients (44.1%), chest radiography showed an opacity with a hydroaeric level. The abscess was solitary in 40 cases, multiple in 9, and bilateral in 5. In-hospital antibiotherapy was performed on a presumptive basis: tritherapy in 92 patients (82.9%), bitherapy in 18 (16.2%) and monotherapy in one (0.9%). Other treatment modalities inculuded respiratory kinesitherapy in 57 cases (51.3%), surgical drainage in four (3.6%) and pneumonectomy in one (0.9%). Outcome was favorable in 93 cases (8,7%) but there were 18 deaths (16.2%). This study emphasizes the value of achieving early diagnosis, identifying supporting factors and starting appropriate treatment promptly. PMID:22235615

  4. A new species of Ptychochromis from southeastern Madagascar (Teleostei: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christopher M; Arroyave, Jairo; Sparks, John S

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new species in the endemic Malagasy cichlid genus Ptychochromis. Ptychochromis mainty, new species, is known from four individuals, all collected in the Fort Dauphin region of southeastern Madagascar, and shares a palatine morphology (eastern-type palatine) with other eastern congeners. Ptychochromis mainty is distinguished from all congeners by a nearly uniform dark brown to black pigmentation pattern in preservation and by the presence of a relatively continuous and expansive black longitudinal midlateral blotch in life, extending from the posterior margin of the opercle to the caudal peduncle. The new species is further distinguished from other eastern Ptychochromis species by having minimal or no overlap of the first supraneural with the dorsoposterior region of the supraoccipital crest (vs. marked overlap). We present a molecular-based phylogeny for all available Ptychochromis species, which supports the hypothesis that P. mainty is a distinct taxon. The new species is recovered as the sister taxon to P. grandidieri within a clade comprising species with an eastern-type palatine morphology. We present a geometric morphometric analysis that provides additional evidence to distinguish P. mainty from congeners. PMID:26624703

  5. Maternal health practices, beliefs and traditions in southeast Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jessica L; Short, Samm; Robson, Laura; Andriatsihosena, Mamy Soafaly

    2014-09-01

    Contextualising maternal health in countries with high maternal mortality is vital for designing and implementing effective health interventions. A research project was therefore conducted to explore practices, beliefs and traditions around pregnancy, delivery and postpartum in southeast Madagascar. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 256 pregnant women, mothers of young children, community members and stakeholders; transcripts were analysed to identify and explore predetermined and emerging themes. A questionnaire was also conducted with 373 women of reproductive age from randomly selected households. Data was analysed using STATA. Results confirmed high local rates of maternal mortality and morbidity and revealed a range of traditional health care practices and beliefs impacting on women's health seeking behaviours. The following socio-cultural barriers to health were identified: 1) lack of knowledge, 2) risky practices, 3) delays seeking biomedical care, and 4) family and community expectations. Recommendations include educational outreach and behaviour change communications targeted for women, their partners and family, increased engagement with traditional midwives and healers, and capacity building of formal health service providers. PMID:25438515

  6. Immunological characteristics of malaria antibodies in two regions of Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    Deloron, P; Jaureguiberry, G; Gaudebout, C; Le Bras, J; Savel, J; Pocidalo, J J

    1987-01-01

    Antibodies directed against antigens of the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum were studied in the plasma of 29 individuals infected with P. falciparum and living in two areas of Madagascar. These plasma samples were investigated by four immunological methods: indirect fluorescence, immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled P. falciparum polypeptides, inhibition of the in vitro growth of P. falciparum, and double diffusion in a gelose plate. A multifactorial correspondence analysis of the results obtained for each sample revealed that the nature of several of the antibodies varied according to the age and place of residence of the subjects. In comparison with plasma samples from older individuals, specimens from young children had a higher immunofluorescence titer, immunoprecipitated several additional peptides (90, 110, and 118 kilodaltons), revealed more precipitation lines in the Ouchterlony plate technique, and did not inhibit the in vitro growth of P. falciparum to the same extent. Furthermore, as opposed to plasma samples from individuals living in the high central plateau, plasma samples from individuals living on the east coast of the island inhibited the penetration of erythrocytes by merozoites of one of the two studied P. falciparum strains and preferentially immunoprecipitated low-, rather than high-, molecular-weight peptides. PMID:3108313

  7. Insatiable demands: Income, energy and environmental policy in Madagascar

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    The island nation of Madagascar is suffering the collision of three distinct trends: economic stagnation, a rapidly expanding population and a severely threatened natural resource base. Demands for growth, new energy reserves and environmental conservation, especially of forest resources, are creating a policy dilemma for both government officials and donors. This study seeks to bring new evidence to bear on this policy dilemma. Primary data on urban household income, family size and consumption of various energy types are used to test two main hypothesis (1) that charcoal, which constitutes the fuel of choice for a vast majority of the sample, is a normal rather than an inferior good, and (2) that demand for wood-fuels constitutes a genuine threat to the viability of the forest resource. The data indicate that income elasticities of demand for charcoal are positive over a broad range of per capita income levels, revealing that charcoal is, indeed a normal good for a large portion of the population represented by the sample. A model of forest degradation is built which establishes a clear link between wood-fuel demand and forest degradation. Together, these findings make clear that under current income patterns, and for the forseeable future, charcoal is a normal good and its consumption by urban residents constitutes a serious threat to the natural forest resource. The study concludes with a policy analysis which identifies existing market failures due to government policies and recommends changes based on tested policy prescriptions in other parts of the developing world.

  8. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeff A; Tingay, Ruth E; Culver, Melanie; Hailer, Frank; Clarke, Michèle L; Mindell, David P

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16 of these loci were also characterized in the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish-eagle compared to other surveyed Haliaeetus species. Determining whether this low diversity is the result of a recent bottleneck or a more historic event has important implications for their conservation. Using a Bayesian coalescent-based method, we show that Madagascar fish-eagles have maintained a small effective population size for hundreds to thousands of years and that its low level of neutral genetic diversity is not the result of a recent bottleneck. Therefore, efforts made to prevent Madagascar fish-eagle extinction should place high priority on maintenance of habitat requirements and reducing direct and indirect human persecution. Given the current rate of deforestation in Madagascar, we further recommend that the population be expanded to occupy a larger geographical distribution. This will help the population persist when exposed to stochastic factors (e.g. climate and disease) that may threaten a species consisting of only 200 adult individuals while inhabiting a rapidly changing landscape. PMID:19140964

  9. Comprehensive Red List assessment reveals exceptionally high extinction risk to Madagascar palms.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarinivo, Mijoro; Dransfield, John; Bachman, Steven P; Moat, Justin; Baker, William J

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of baseline IUCN Red List assessments for plants is a crucial step in conservation planning. Nowhere is this more important than in biodiversity hotspots that are subject to significant anthropogenic pressures, such as Madagascar. Here, all Madagascar palm species are assessed using the IUCN Red List categories and criteria, version 3.1. Our results indicate that 83% of the 192 endemic species are threatened, nearly four times the proportion estimated for plants globally and exceeding estimates for all other comprehensively evaluated plant groups in Madagascar. Compared with a previous assessment in 1995, the number of Endangered and Critically Endangered species has substantially increased, due to the discovery of 28 new species since 1995, most of which are highly threatened. The conservation status of most species included in both the 1995 and the current assessments has not changed. Where change occurred, more species have moved to lower threat categories than to higher categories, because of improved knowledge of species and their distributions, rather than a decrease in extinction risk. However, some cases of genuine deterioration in conservation status were also identified. Palms in Madagascar are primarily threatened by habitat loss due to agriculture and biological resource use through direct exploitation or collateral damage. The recent extension of Madagascar's protected area network is highly beneficial for palms, substantially increasing the number of threatened species populations included within reserves. Notably, three of the eight most important protected areas for palms are newly designated. However, 28 threatened and data deficient species are not protected by the expanded network, including some Critically Endangered species. Moreover, many species occurring in protected areas are still threatened, indicating that threatening processes persist even in reserves. Definitive implementation of the new protected areas combined with local community engagement are essential for the survival of Madagascar's palms. PMID:25075612

  10. Receiver function analysis and preliminary body wave tomography of the MACOMO network in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, M. J.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Shore, P.; Rambolamana, G.; Sy Tanjona Andriampenomanana ny Ony, F.; Rakotondraibe, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a set of seismological studies of the continental island of Madagascar using new seismic data from the NSF-funded MACOMO (MAdagascar, COmores, and MOzambique) IRIS PASSCAL broadband seismometer array. MACOMO involved the deployment during 2011-2013 of 26 broadband seismometers in Madagascar and 6 seismometers in Mozambique, providing the first seismic imaging across the world's 4th-largest island. We present preliminary crustal structure variations from receiver function analyses and body wave tomography results. We calculate radial receiver functions for all Madagascar stations and use the weighted linear regression methodology of Herrmann and Ammon [2002] to invert for shear velocity. Upper mantle and crustal structures from the receiver function analyses are used to help determine starting models for the teleseismic travel-time tomography. The tectonic structure of Madagascar is generally divided into four crustal blocks. Initial seismic imaging shows that the Archean Antongil block that runs along the east of the island has the thickest crust (>40 km) and three Proterozoic terranes that make up the central highlands and are bounded by fault and shear zones are closer to the average crustal thickness (35 km). There has been late Cenozoic intraplate volcanism in northern and central Madagascar (as recently as 1 million years ago), and different hypotheses for its origin will be evaluated by the preliminary results from the three different seismic studies. Complete analyses will be done incorporating seismic data from simultaneous and complementary array of both land- and ocean-based seismometers from French and German deployments.

  11. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.A.; Tingay, R.E.; Culver, M.; Hailer, F.; Clarke, M.L.; Mindell, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16 of these loci were also characterized in the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish-eagle compared to other surveyed Haliaeetus species. Determining whether this low diversity is the result of a recent bottleneck or a more historic event has important implications for their conservation. Using a Bayesian coalescent-based method, we show that Madagascar fish-eagles have maintained a small effective population size for hundreds to thousands of years and that its low level of neutral genetic diversity is not the result of a recent bottleneck. Therefore, efforts made to prevent Madagascar fish-eagle extinction should place high priority on maintenance of habitat requirements and reducing direct and indirect human persecution. Given the current rate of deforestation in Madagascar, we further recommend that the population be expanded to occupy a larger geographical distribution. This will help the population persist when exposed to stochastic factors (e.g. climate and disease) that may threaten a species consisting of only 200 adult individuals while inhabiting a rapidly changing landscape. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  12. Surveillance and control of rabies in La Reunion, Mayotte, and Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mayotte and La Reunion islands are currently free of animal rabies and surveillance is performed by the French Human and Veterinary Public Health Services. However, dog rabies is still enzootic in Madagascar with 4 to 10 confirmed human cases each year. The number of antirabies medical centres in Madagascar is still scarce to provide easy access to the local population for post-exposure rabies prophylaxis. Furthermore, stray dog populations are considerable and attempts to control rabies by mass campaigns of dog vaccination have not received sufficient attention from the national health authorities. To address these challenges, an expanded program to control rabies needs to be initiated by the Malagasy authorities. PMID:24016204

  13. [HIV infection in tuberculosis patients in Madagascar. Situation in 1-93].

    PubMed

    Morvan, J M; Auregan, G; Rasamindrakotroka, A J; de Ravel, T; Roux, J F

    1994-01-01

    In Madagascar, the estimated incidence of tuberculosis is high (320 per 100,000) when human immunodeficiency virus (VIH) infection progress slowly. The authors have studied HIV seroprevalence in a group of tubercular patients and in two reference groups (general population and outpatients of the Clinical Biology Centre of Institut Pasteur). Circulation of HIV1 virus was observed with a low prevalence rate in all the 3 groups. There was no significant difference between tubercular patients and healthy population. Tubercular people ought to be a watch group for the epidemiological surveillance of HIV infection evolution in Madagascar. PMID:7575038

  14. [Rapid diagnosis of rabies by the ELISA method. Its application in Madagascar: advantages and disadvantages].

    PubMed

    Morvan, J; Mouden, J C; Coulanges, P

    1990-01-01

    ELISA technique in the rabies rapid diagnosis is compared with other methods used in the PASTEUR Institute of MADAGASCAR (immunofluorescence, mouse inoculation, and histopathology). The results of the comparative study of 80 samples of suspect animals show that ELISA sensibility is better than immunofluorescence one. Sensibility, specificity and viability of ELISA are comparable with those of the two confirmation techniques. In MADAGASCAR, ELISA is adapted to testing samples not conserved in good conditions, exposed to heat, after a big travelling time. It is to be hoped that samples are numerous to control rabies: in this condition price of ELISA is not expensive. PMID:2078080

  15. Low-temperature evolution of the Morondava rift shoulder in western Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Jörg; Seward, Diane; Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Separation of Madagascar from eastern Africa resulted in the development of sedimentary basins covering the west coast of Madagascar. The largest and oldest of these basins, the Morondava basin, is bound to the east by crystalline basement of Precambrian age and stretches into the Mozambique Channel to the west. The evolution of the sedimentary sequence is mainly influenced by (I) a Permo-Triassic continental failed rift (e.g. Clark, 1998), also referred to as the Karroo rift (e.g., Montenat et al., 1996) and (II) the early Jurassic separation of Madagascar from eastern Africa (Geiger et al., 2004). Deposits related to the Karroo rift are restricted to a narrow corridor along the basement-basin contact. The rift locus shifted to the west before final separation and relative southward displacement of Madagascar commenced in early Jurassic times (Geiger et al., 2004). In the central part of the basin, the basement-basin contact features a steep escarpment with an altitude difference of greater than 1000 m from the sedimentary plains to the crystalline basement. Here, apatite fission-track analysis of a series of both basement and sediment samples across the escarpment provides the possibility to study the low temperature evolution of the exhuming Precambrian basement in the rift basin shoulder and the associated thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. The timing of basement surface exposure is constrained by the stratigraphic ages of the overlying sediments and modelling of the thermal evolution indicates post-depositional thermal overprinting of basement and Karroo age sediments with partial annealing of fission tracks related to burial by Mesozoic sediments. The temperatures of this heating / reheating of the basin shoulder increase towards the west in the presently exposed sequences. The westernmost sample experienced almost complete resetting of the detrital apatite grains. The general younging of the apparent apatite fission-track ages towards the west indicates activity of faults, re-activating inherited Precambrian structures along the present basin-basement contact during Karroo sedimentation. Furthermore, our data show that onset of final exhumation can be correlated with (I) the end of Madagascar's drift southward relative to Africa along the Davie Ridge in the Mozambique Channel during the Early Cretaceous (Coffin and Rabinowitz, 1988), (II) activity of the Marion hot spot beneath southern Madagascar and associated Late Cretaceous break-up between Madagascar and India (Storey et al., 1995), and (III) the collision of India with Eurasia and subsequent re-organization of transform faults and spreading ridges. References Clark, D.N. (1998): Review of the exploration potential of Madagascar. Houston Geological Society Bulletin, p. 23-29. Coffin, M.F. and Rabinowitz, P.D. (1988): Evolution of the conjugate east African-Madagascan Margins and the western Somali basins. GSA Special Paper 226, pp. 78. Geiger, M., Clark, D.N. and Mette, W. (2004): Reappraisal of the timing of the breakup of Gondwana based on sedimentological and seismic evidence from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar. Journal of African Earth Sciences, v. 38, p. 363-381. Montenat, C., Ramahavory, L. and Croisile, M. (1996): Tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Western Madagascan margin during the Jurassic in the Morondava basin, Madagascar. Bulletin des centres de recherches Exploration-Production Elf Aquitaine, v. 20, p. 323-340. Storey, M., Mahoney, J.J., Saunders, A.D., Duncan, R.A., Kelley, S.P. and Coffin, M.F. (1995): Timing of hot spot-related volcanism and the break-up of Madagascar and India. Science, v. 267, p. 852-855.

  16. Human and environmental controls over aboveground carbon storage in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate, high-resolution mapping of aboveground carbon density (ACD, Mg C ha-1) could provide insight into human and environmental controls over ecosystem state and functioning, and could support conservation and climate policy development. However, mapping ACD has proven challenging, particularly in spatially complex regions harboring a mosaic of land use activities, or in remote montane areas that are difficult to access and poorly understood ecologically. Using a combination of field measurements, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and satellite data, we present the first large-scale, high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon stocks in Madagascar. Results We found that elevation and the fraction of photosynthetic vegetation (PV) cover, analyzed throughout forests of widely varying structure and condition, account for 27-67% of the spatial variation in ACD. This finding facilitated spatial extrapolation of LiDAR-based carbon estimates to a total of 2,372,680 ha using satellite data. Remote, humid sub-montane forests harbored the highest carbon densities, while ACD was suppressed in dry spiny forests and in montane humid ecosystems, as well as in most lowland areas with heightened human activity. Independent of human activity, aboveground carbon stocks were subject to strong physiographic controls expressed through variation in tropical forest canopy structure measured using airborne LiDAR. Conclusions High-resolution mapping of carbon stocks is possible in remote regions, with or without human activity, and thus carbon monitoring can be brought to highly endangered Malagasy forests as a climate-change mitigation and biological conservation strategy. PMID:22289685

  17. Delimiting Species without Nuclear Monophyly in Madagascar's Mouse Lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Weisrock, David W.; Rasoloarison, Rodin M.; Fiorentino, Isabella; Ralison, José M.; Goodman, Steven M.; Kappeler, Peter M.; Yoder, Anne D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Speciation begins when populations become genetically separated through a substantial reduction in gene flow, and it is at this point that a genetically cohesive set of populations attain the sole property of species: the independent evolution of a population-level lineage. The comprehensive delimitation of species within biodiversity hotspots, regardless of their level of divergence, is important for understanding the factors that drive the diversification of biota and for identifying them as targets for conservation. However, delimiting recently diverged species is challenging due to insufficient time for the differential evolution of characters—including morphological differences, reproductive isolation, and gene tree monophyly—that are typically used as evidence for separately evolving lineages. Methodology In this study, we assembled multiple lines of evidence from the analysis of mtDNA and nDNA sequence data for the delimitation of a high diversity of cryptically diverged population-level mouse lemur lineages across the island of Madagascar. Our study uses a multi-faceted approach that applies phylogenetic, population genetic, and genealogical analysis for recognizing lineage diversity and presents the most thoroughly sampled species delimitation of mouse lemur ever performed. Conclusions The resolution of a large number of geographically defined clades in the mtDNA gene tree provides strong initial evidence for recognizing a high diversity of population-level lineages in mouse lemurs. We find additional support for lineage recognition in the striking concordance between mtDNA clades and patterns of nuclear population structure. Lineages identified using these two sources of evidence also exhibit patterns of population divergence according to genealogical exclusivity estimates. Mouse lemur lineage diversity is reflected in both a geographically fine-scaled pattern of population divergence within established and geographically widespread taxa, as well as newly resolved patterns of micro-endemism revealed through expanded field sampling into previously poorly and well-sampled regions. PMID:20360988

  18. Economic Valuation of Subsistence Harvest of Wildlife in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Christopher D.; Bonds, Matthew H.; Brashares, Justin S.; Rasolofoniaina, B. J. Rodolph; Kremen, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife consumption can be viewed as an ecosystem provisioning service (the production of a material good through ecological functioning) because of wildlife’s ability to persist under sustainable levels of harvest. We used the case of wildlife harvest and consumption in northeastern Madagascar to identify the distribution of these services to local households and communities to further our understanding of local reliance on natural resources. We inferred these benefits from demand curves built with data on wildlife sales transactions. On average, the value of wildlife provisioning represented 57% of annual household cash income in local communities from the Makira Natural Park and Masoala National Park, and harvested areas produced an economic return of U.S.$0.42 ha−1 · year−1. Variability in value of harvested wildlife was high among communities and households with an approximate 2 orders of magnitude difference in the proportional value of wildlife to household income. The imputed price of harvested wildlife and its consumption were strongly associated (p< 0.001), and increases in price led to reduced harvest for consumption. Heightened monitoring and enforcement of hunting could increase the costs of harvesting and thus elevate the price and reduce consumption of wildlife. Increased enforcement would therefore be beneficial to biodiversity conservation but could limit local people’s food supply. Specifically, our results provide an estimate of the cost of offsetting economic losses to local populations from the enforcement of conservation policies. By explicitly estimating the welfare effects of consumed wildlife, our results may inform targeted interventions by public health and development specialists as they allocate sparse funds to support regions, households, or individuals most vulnerable to changes in access to wildlife. PMID:24405165

  19. Economic valuation of subsistence harvest of wildlife in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Golden, Christopher D; Bonds, Matthew H; Brashares, Justin S; Rasolofoniaina, B J Rodolph; Kremen, Claire

    2014-02-01

    Wildlife consumption can be viewed as an ecosystem provisioning service (the production of a material good through ecological functioning) because of wildlife's ability to persist under sustainable levels of harvest. We used the case of wildlife harvest and consumption in northeastern Madagascar to identify the distribution of these services to local households and communities to further our understanding of local reliance on natural resources. We inferred these benefits from demand curves built with data on wildlife sales transactions. On average, the value of wildlife provisioning represented 57% of annual household cash income in local communities from the Makira Natural Park and Masoala National Park, and harvested areas produced an economic return of U.S.$0.42 ha(-1) · year(-1). Variability in value of harvested wildlife was high among communities and households with an approximate 2 orders of magnitude difference in the proportional value of wildlife to household income. The imputed price of harvested wildlife and its consumption were strongly associated (p< 0.001), and increases in price led to reduced harvest for consumption. Heightened monitoring and enforcement of hunting could increase the costs of harvesting and thus elevate the price and reduce consumption of wildlife. Increased enforcement would therefore be beneficial to biodiversity conservation but could limit local people's food supply. Specifically, our results provide an estimate of the cost of offsetting economic losses to local populations from the enforcement of conservation policies. By explicitly estimating the welfare effects of consumed wildlife, our results may inform targeted interventions by public health and development specialists as they allocate sparse funds to support regions, households, or individuals most vulnerable to changes in access to wildlife. PMID:24405165

  20. Which Advisory System to Support Innovation in Conservation Agriculture? The Case of Madagascar's Lake Alaotra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faure, Guy; Penot, Eric; Rakotondravelo, Jean Chrysostome; Ramahatoraka, Haja Andrisoa; Dugue, Patrick; Toillier, Aurelie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To promote sustainable agriculture, various development projects are encouraging farmers around Madagascar's Lake Alaotra to adopt conservation agriculture techniques. This article's objective is to analyze the capacity of a project-funded advisory system to accompany such an innovation and to design and implement an advisory method aimed…

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of Trachylepis skink species from Madagascar and the Seychelles (Squamata: Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Lima, Alexandra; James Harris, D; Rocha, Sara; Miralles, Aurélien; Glaw, Frank; Vences, Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Lizards of the genus Trachylepis are a species-rich group of skinks mainly inhabiting Africa, Madagascar, and several other islands in the western Indian Ocean. All except one probably introduced species of Madagascan Trachylepis are endemic. Two species groups have been distinguished on the basis of subocular scale shape but their phylogenetic relationships remained unclear. We inferred a multilocus phylogeny of the Madagascan Trachylepis species, based on a concatenated dataset of 3261 bp from 3 mitochondrial and 4 nuclear genes with a dense Madagascan taxon sampling and find high support for the monophyly of the endemic Madagascan Trachylepis. The two species groups in Madagascar are highly supported as clades. The highland species T. boettgeri is nested in the T. aureopunctata species group of mainly arid-adapted species, suggesting a colonization of highland swamps by ancestors inhabiting dry western Madagascar. The Seychellois species were sister to the T. maculilabris/T. comorensis clade, suggesting their origin directly out of Africa as with Seychellois chameleons. In Madagascar, a high intraspecific molecular variation was confirmed for T. gravenhorstii, T. elegans, and T. vato, indicating a need for taxonomic revision. PMID:23435267

  2. Dispersing towards Madagascar: Biogeography and evolution of the Madagascan endemics of the Spermacoceae tribe (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Janssens, Steven B; Groeninckx, Inge; De Block, Petra J; Verstraete, Brecht; Smets, Erik F; Dessein, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Despite the close proximity of the African mainland, dispersal of plant lineages towards Madagascar remains intriguing. The composition of the Madagascan flora is rather mixed and shows besides African representatives, also floral elements of India, Southeast Asia, Australia, and the Neotropics. Due to its proportionally large number of Madagascan endemics, the taxonomically troublesome Spermacoceae tribe is an interesting group to investigate the origin and evolution of the herbaceous Rubiaceae endemic to Madagascar. The phylogenetic position of these endemics were inferred using four plastid gene markers. Age estimates were obtained by expanding the Spermacoceae dataset with representatives of all Rubiaceae tribes. This allowed incorporation of multiple fossil-based calibration points from the Rubiaceae fossil record. Despite the high morphological diversity of the endemic herbaceous Spermacoceae on Madagascar, only two colonization events gave rise to their current diversity. The first clade contains Lathraeocarpa, Phylohydrax and Gomphocalyx, whereas the second Madagascan clade includes the endemic genera Astiella, Phialiphora, Thamnoldenlandia and Amphistemon. The tribe Spermacoceae is estimated to have a Late Eocene origin, and diversified during Oligocene and Miocene. The two Madagascan clades of the tribe originated in the Oligocene and radiated in the Miocene. The origin of the Madagascan Spermacoceae cannot be explained by Gondwanan vicariance but only by means of Cenozoic long distance dispersal events. Interestingly, not only colonization from Africa occurred but also long distance dispersal from the Neotropics shaped the current diversity of the Spermacoceae tribe on Madagascar. PMID:26639100

  3. Understanding Mortality and the Life of the Ancestors in Rural Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astuti, Rita; Harris, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Across two studies, a wide age range of participants was interviewed about the nature of death. All participants were living in rural Madagascar in a community where ancestral beliefs and practices are widespread. In Study 1, children (8-17 years) and adults (19-71 years) were asked whether bodily and mental processes continue after death. The…

  4. Examining the Environmental Awareness of Children and Adolescents in the Ranomafana Region, Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korhonen, Kaisa; Lappalainen, Anu

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines children's and adolescents' environmental awareness in rural Madagascar. Two types of school survey among 8- to 21-year-old students and pupils in 18 schools were used for data collection. The objective of this comparative study was to examine the environmental awareness and knowledge of children and adolescents living under…

  5. Diverse Genotypes of Yersinia pestis Caused Plague in Madagascar in 2007

    PubMed Central

    Rajerison, Minoaerisoa; Andersen, Genevieve; Hall, Carina M.; Zimmermann, Thomas; Soanandrasana, Rahelinirina; Andrianaivoarimanana, Voahangy; Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Nottingham, Roxanne; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M.; Scholz, Holger C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of human plague and is endemic in various African, Asian and American countries. In Madagascar, the disease represents a significant public health problem with hundreds of human cases a year. Unfortunately, poor infrastructure makes outbreak investigations challenging. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA was extracted directly from 93 clinical samples from patients with a clinical diagnosis of plague in Madagascar in 2007. The extracted DNAs were then genotyped using three molecular genotyping methods, including, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing, multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) analysis. These methods provided increasing resolution, respectively. The results of these analyses revealed that, in 2007, ten molecular groups, two newly described here and eight previously identified, were responsible for causing human plague in geographically distinct areas of Madagascar. Conclusions/Significance Plague in Madagascar is caused by numerous distinct types of Y. pestis. Genotyping method choice should be based upon the discriminatory power needed, expense, and available data for any desired comparisons. We conclude that genotyping should be a standard tool used in epidemiological investigations of plague outbreaks. PMID:26069964

  6. THE subfossil occurrence and paleoecological significance of small mammals at ankilitelo cave, southwestern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muldoon, K.M.; De Blieux, D. D.; Simons, E.L.; Chatrath, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Small mammals are rarely reported from subfossil sites in Madagascar despite their importance for paleoenvironmental reconstruction, especially as it relates to recent ecological changes on the island. We describe the uniquely rich subfossil small mammal fauna from Ankilitelo Cave, southwestern Madagascar. The Ankilitelo fauna is dated to the late Holocene (???500 years ago), documenting the youngest appearances of the extinct giant lemur taxa Palaeopropithecus, Megaladapis, and Archaeolemur, in association with abundant remains of small vertebrates, including bats, tenrecs, carnivorans, rodents, and primates. The Ankilitelo fauna is composed of 34 mammalian species, making it one of the most diverse Holocene assemblages in Madagascar. The fauna comprises the 1 st report of the short-tailed shrew tenrec (Microgale brevicaudata) and the ring-tailed mongoose (Galidia elegans) in southwestern Madagascar. Further, Ankilitelo documents the presence of southwestern species that are rare or that have greatly restricted ranges today, such as Nasolo's shrew tenrec (M. nasoloi), Grandidier's mongoose (Galidictis grandidieri), the narrow-striped mongoose (Mungotictis decemlineata), and the giant jumping rat (Hypogeomys antimena). A simple cause for the unusual small mammal occurrences at Ankilitelo is not obvious. Synergistic interactions between climate change, recent fragmentation and human-initiated degradation of forested habitats, and community-level processes, such as predation, most likely explain the disjunct distributions of the small mammals documented at Ankilitelo. ?? 2009 American Society of Mammalogists.

  7. Genetics of the Pig Tapeworm in Madagascar Reveal a History of Human Dispersal and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Tetsuya; Carod, Jean-François; Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Hoberg, Eric P.; Ito, Akira

    2014-01-01

    An intricate history of human dispersal and geographic colonization has strongly affected the distribution of human pathogens. The pig tapeworm Taenia solium occurs throughout the world as the causative agent of cysticercosis, one of the most serious neglected tropical diseases. Discrete genetic lineages of T. solium in Asia and Africa/Latin America are geographically disjunct; only in Madagascar are they sympatric. Linguistic, archaeological and genetic evidence has indicated that the people in Madagascar have mixed ancestry from Island Southeast Asia and East Africa. Hence, anthropogenic introduction of the tapeworm from Southeast Asia and Africa had been postulated. This study shows that the major mitochondrial haplotype of T. solium in Madagascar is closely related to those from the Indian Subcontinent. Parasitological evidence presented here, and human genetics previously reported, support the hypothesis of an Indian influence on Malagasy culture coinciding with periods of early human migration onto the island. We also found evidence of nuclear-mitochondrial discordance in single tapeworms, indicating unexpected cross-fertilization between the two lineages of T. solium. Analyses of genetic and geographic populations of T. solium in Madagascar will shed light on apparently rapid evolution of this organism driven by recent (<2,000 yr) human migrations, following tens of thousands of years of geographic isolation. PMID:25329310

  8. Home Sweet Home: How to Build a Madagascar Hissing Cockroach Habitat out of Recycled Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHC) are amazing insects that can be an integral part of an effective science learning and teaching environment. MHCs have a fascinating social structure. They make excellent pets, teach students how to properly care for animals, and their large size adds to their "wow" factor. These characteristics make them unique…

  9. Which Advisory System to Support Innovation in Conservation Agriculture? The Case of Madagascar's Lake Alaotra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faure, Guy; Penot, Eric; Rakotondravelo, Jean Chrysostome; Ramahatoraka, Haja Andrisoa; Dugue, Patrick; Toillier, Aurelie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To promote sustainable agriculture, various development projects are encouraging farmers around Madagascar's Lake Alaotra to adopt conservation agriculture techniques. This article's objective is to analyze the capacity of a project-funded advisory system to accompany such an innovation and to design and implement an advisory method aimed…

  10. Earth structure and instrumental seismicity of Madagascar: Implications on the seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindraharisaona, Elisa Josiane; Guidarelli, Mariangela; Aoudia, Abdlkarim; Rambolamanana, Gérard

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the knowledge of the seismotectonics of Madagascar. We first investigate the structure of the Earth beneath Madagascar through the joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities. Then we use the obtained velocity models to relocate local earthquakes in order to analyse the distribution of seismicity. Finally, we use structural models and earthquake coordinates to compute focal mechanisms. Our retrieved Earth structure models confirm a thin lithosphere beneath Madagascar when compared to the nearby East African Rift. The High Plateau in the Central region coincides with the thinnest lithosphere over the slowest asthenosphere. Our results are in good agreement with the gravity anomalies and likely confirm a localised asthenospheric upwelling beneath the central part of Madagascar. The surface expression of the asthenospheric upwelling consists in a horst-graben structure. The moderate seismicity is localised along pre-existing structures reflecting an E-W extension that is mostly accommodated in the lower crust.

  11. Understanding Mortality and the Life of the Ancestors in Rural Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astuti, Rita; Harris, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Across two studies, a wide age range of participants was interviewed about the nature of death. All participants were living in rural Madagascar in a community where ancestral beliefs and practices are widespread. In Study 1, children (8-17 years) and adults (19-71 years) were asked whether bodily and mental processes continue after death. The…

  12. Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum, a novel taxon associated with virescence and phyllody of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addressed the taxonomic position and group classification of a phytoplasma responsible for virescence and phyllody symptoms in naturally diseased Madagascar periwinkle plants in western Malaysia. Unique regions in the 16S rRNA gene from the Malaysian periwinkle virescence (MaPV) phytopla...

  13. Home Sweet Home: How to Build a Madagascar Hissing Cockroach Habitat out of Recycled Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MHC) are amazing insects that can be an integral part of an effective science learning and teaching environment. MHCs have a fascinating social structure. They make excellent pets, teach students how to properly care for animals, and their large size adds to their "wow" factor. These characteristics make them unique…

  14. AMS 14C Dates for Extinct Lemurs from Caves in the Ankarana Massif, Northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Elwyn L.; Burney, David A.; Chatrath, Prithijit S.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Jungers, William L.; Rakotosamimanana, Berthe

    1995-03-01

    An extensive late Quaternary fauna, including many extinct giant lemurs, has been collected recently in a 110+-km system of caves in the Ankarana Massif of northern Madagascar. AMS 14C dates for the acid-insoluble (collagen/gelatin) fraction of bones of the giant lemur Megaladapis (26,150 ± 400 and 12,760 ± 70 yr B.P.) confirm its presence in the area during the late Pleistocene and provide the first Pleistocene 14 C ages from bones of the extinct megafauna of the island. The first date from bones of the recently described extinct Babakotia radofilai (4400 ± 60 yr B.P.) shows that it was present in northern Madagascar in mid-Holocene times. A comparatively recent age of 1020 ± 50 yr B.P. for the extinct Archaeolemur indicates survival of this genus for at least a millennium after the first direct evidence for humans in Madagascar. This suggests that the island's "extinction window" may have represented a longer time span than would have been expected under the Blitzkrieg model of late Quaternary extinctions. A mid-Holocene age (4560 ± 70 yr B.P.) for a bone sample of the small extant lemur Hapalemur simus indicates that the disappearance of this now-restricted species from the Ankarana occurred after this date. New data from the Ankarana and other sites on the island add to the consensus that major biotic changes occurred on Madagascar in the late Holocene.

  15. Stone tools and foraging in northern Madagascar challenge Holocene extinction models.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Robert E; Radimilahy, Chantal; Wright, Henry T; Jacobs, Zenobia; Kelly, Gwendolyn O; Berna, Francesco

    2013-07-30

    Past research on Madagascar indicates that village communities were established about AD 500 by people of both Indonesian and East African heritage. Evidence of earlier visits is scattered and contentious. Recent archaeological excavations in northern Madagascar provide evidence of occupational sites with microlithic stone technologies related to foraging for forest and coastal resources. A forager occupation of one site dates to earlier than 2000 B.C., doubling the length of Madagascar's known occupational history, and thus the time during which people exploited Madagascar's environments. We detail stratigraphy, chronology, and artifacts from two rock shelters. Ambohiposa near Iharana (Vohémar) on the northeast coast, yielded a stratified assemblage with small flakes, microblades, and retouched crescentic and trapezoidal tools, probably projectile elements, made on cherts and obsidian, some brought more that 200 km. (14)C dates are contemporary with the earliest villages. No food remains are preserved. Lakaton'i Anja near Antsiranana in the north yielded several stratified assemblages. The latest assemblage is well dated to A.D. 1050-1350, by (14)C and optically stimulated luminescence dating and pottery imported from the Near East and China. Below is a series of stratified assemblages similar to Ambohiposa. (14)C and optically stimulated luminescence dates indicate occupation from at least 2000 B.C. Faunal remains indicate a foraging pattern. Our evidence shows that foragers with a microlithic technology were active in Madagascar long before the arrival of farmers and herders and before many Late Holocene faunal extinctions. The differing effects of historically distinct economies must be identified and understood to reconstruct Holocene histories of human environmental impact. PMID:23858456

  16. Agro-environmental determinants of avian influenza circulation: a multisite study in Thailand, Vietnam and Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathilde C; Gilbert, Marius; Desvaux, Stéphanie; Andriamanivo, Harena Rasamoelina; Peyre, Marisa; Khong, Nguyen Viet; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Chevalier, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza have occurred and have been studied in a variety of ecological systems. However, differences in the spatial resolution, geographical extent, units of analysis and risk factors examined in these studies prevent their quantitative comparison. This study aimed to develop a high-resolution, comparative study of a common set of agro-environmental determinants of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in domestic poultry in four different environments: (1) lower-Northern Thailand, where H5N1 circulated in 2004-2005, (2) the Red River Delta in Vietnam, where H5N1 is circulating widely, (3) the Vietnam highlands, where sporadic H5N1 outbreaks have occurred, and (4) the Lake Alaotra region in Madagascar, which features remarkable similarities with Asian agro-ecosystems and where low pathogenic avian influenza viruses have been found. We analyzed H5N1 outbreak data in Thailand in parallel with serological data collected on the H5 subtype in Vietnam and on low pathogenic AIV in Madagascar. Several agro-environmental covariates were examined: poultry densities, landscape dominated by rice cultivation, proximity to a water body or major road, and human population density. Relationships between covariates and AIV circulation were explored using spatial generalized linear models. We found that AIV prevalence was negatively associated with distance to the closest water body in the Red River Delta, Vietnam highlands and Madagascar. We also found a positive association between AIV and duck density in the Vietnam highlands and Thailand, and with rice landscapes in Thailand and Madagascar. Our findings confirm the important role of wetlands-rice-ducks ecosystems in the epidemiology of AI in diverse settings. Variables influencing circulation of the H5 subtype in Southeast Asia played a similar role for low pathogenic AIV in Madagascar, indicating that this area may be at risk if a highly virulent strain is introduced. PMID:25029441

  17. In or out-of-Madagascar?--Colonization patterns for large-bodied diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Bukontaite, Rasa; Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra; Randriamihaja, Jacquelin Herisahala; Bergsten, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    High species diversity and endemism within Madagascar is mainly the result of species radiations following colonization from nearby continents or islands. Most of the endemic taxa are thought to be descendants of a single or small number of colonizers that arrived from Africa sometime during the Cenozoic and gave rise to highly diverse groups. This pattern is largely based on vertebrates and a small number of invertebrate groups. Knowledge of the evolutionary history of aquatic beetles on Madagascar is lacking, even though this species-rich group is often a dominant part of invertebrate freshwater communities in both standing and running water. Here we focus on large bodied diving beetles of the tribes Hydaticini and Cybistrini. Our aims with this study were to answer the following questions 1) How many colonization events does the present Malagasy fauna originate from? 2) Did any colonization event lead to a species radiation? 3) Where did the colonizers come from--Africa or Asia--and has there been any out-of-Madagascar event? 4) When did these events occur and were they concentrated to any particular time interval? Our results suggest that neither in Hydaticini nor in Cybistrini was there a single case of two or more endemic species forming a monophyletic group. The biogeographical analysis indicated different colonization histories for the two tribes. Cybistrini required at least eight separate colonization events, including the non-endemic species, all comparatively recent except the only lotic (running water) living Cybister operosus with an inferred colonization at 29 Ma. In Hydaticini the Madagascan endemics were spread out across the tree, often occupying basal positions in different species groups. The biogeographical analyses therefore postulated the very bold hypothesis of a Madagascan origin at a very deep basal node within Hydaticus and multiple out-of-Madagascar dispersal events. This hypothesis needs to be tested with equally intense taxon sampling of mainland Africa as for Madagascar. PMID:25794184

  18. Madagascar corals reveal a multidecadal signature of rainfall and river runoff since 1708

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, C. A.; Zinke, J.; Peeters, F.; Park, W.; Scheufen, T.; Kasper, S.; Randriamanantsoa, B.; McCulloch, M. T.; Brummer, G.-J. A.

    2013-03-01

    Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures (SST) influence rainfall variability on multidecadal and interdecadal timescales in concert with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). Rainfall variations in locations such as Australia and North America are therefore linked to phase changes in the PDO. Furthermore, studies have suggested teleconnections exist between the western Indian Ocean and Pacific Decadal Variability (PDV), similar to those observed on interannual timescales related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, as instrumental records of rainfall are too short and sparse to confidently assess multidecadal climatic teleconnections, here we present four coral climate archives from Madagascar spanning up to the past 300 yr (1708-2008) to assess such decadal variability. Using spectral luminescence scanning to reconstruct past changes in river runoff, we identify significant multidecadal and interdecadal frequencies in the coral records, which before 1900 are coherent with Asian-based PDO reconstructions. This multidecadal relationship with the Asian-based PDO reconstructions points to an unidentified teleconnection mechanism that affects Madagascar rainfall/runoff, most likely triggered by multidecadal changes in North Pacific SST, influencing the Asian Monsoon circulation. In the 20th century we decouple human deforestation effects from rainfall-induced soil erosion by pairing luminescence with coral geochemistry. Positive PDO phases are associated with increased Indian Ocean temperatures and runoff/rainfall in eastern Madagascar, while precipitation in southern Africa and eastern Australia declines. Consequently, the negative PDO phase that started in 1998 may contribute to reduced rainfall over eastern Madagascar and increased precipitation in southern Africa and eastern Australia. We conclude that multidecadal rainfall variability in Madagascar and the western Indian Ocean needs to be taken into account when considering water resource management under a future warming climate.

  19. Agro-Environmental Determinants of Avian Influenza Circulation: A Multisite Study in Thailand, Vietnam and Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Mathilde C.; Gilbert, Marius; Desvaux, Stéphanie; Rasamoelina Andriamanivo, Harena; Peyre, Marisa; Khong, Nguyen Viet; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Chevalier, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza have occurred and have been studied in a variety of ecological systems. However, differences in the spatial resolution, geographical extent, units of analysis and risk factors examined in these studies prevent their quantitative comparison. This study aimed to develop a high-resolution, comparative study of a common set of agro-environmental determinants of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in domestic poultry in four different environments: (1) lower-Northern Thailand, where H5N1 circulated in 2004–2005, (2) the Red River Delta in Vietnam, where H5N1 is circulating widely, (3) the Vietnam highlands, where sporadic H5N1 outbreaks have occurred, and (4) the Lake Alaotra region in Madagascar, which features remarkable similarities with Asian agro-ecosystems and where low pathogenic avian influenza viruses have been found. We analyzed H5N1 outbreak data in Thailand in parallel with serological data collected on the H5 subtype in Vietnam and on low pathogenic AIV in Madagascar. Several agro-environmental covariates were examined: poultry densities, landscape dominated by rice cultivation, proximity to a water body or major road, and human population density. Relationships between covariates and AIV circulation were explored using spatial generalized linear models. We found that AIV prevalence was negatively associated with distance to the closest water body in the Red River Delta, Vietnam highlands and Madagascar. We also found a positive association between AIV and duck density in the Vietnam highlands and Thailand, and with rice landscapes in Thailand and Madagascar. Our findings confirm the important role of wetlands-rice-ducks ecosystems in the epidemiology of AI in diverse settings. Variables influencing circulation of the H5 subtype in Southeast Asia played a similar role for low pathogenic AIV in Madagascar, indicating that this area may be at risk if a highly virulent strain is introduced. PMID:25029441

  20. A new species of the genus Adapterops (Coleoptera: Anthribidae) from northern Madagascar, with a catalogue and key to species.

    PubMed

    Trýzna, Miloš; Ba?a?, Petr

    2015-01-01

    A new species, Adapterops cedrici Trýzna & Ba?a? sp. nov. (Anthribidae: Choraginae: Araecerini), from northern Madagascar is described and illustrated. A key and catalogue of the genus Adapterops Frieser, 2010 is given. PMID:26701447

  1. Two new eimerians (Apicomplexa) from insectivorous mammals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Couch, Lee; Laakkonen, Juha; Goodman, Steven; Duszynski, Donald W

    2011-04-01

    Fecal samples from 126 insectivorous mammals in Madagascar were collected between spring 1999 and fall 2001. In the Afrosoricida, 21 species in 5 genera were sampled, including 17 species of Microgale (31/96, 32% infected), Hemicentetes semispinosus (1/2, 50%), Oryzorictes hova (1/5, 20%), Setifer setosus (8/13, 61.5%), and Tenrec ecaudatus (5/8, 62.5%); in the Soricomorpha, only Suncus murinus was examined and 1/2 (50%) were infected. Two morphotypes of eimeriid oocysts, representing 2 presumptive new species, were found in 47 (37%) infected animals; only 2 afrosoricid hosts (2% of all hosts, 4% of infected hosts) had both oocyst morphotypes. Sporulated oocysts of the first morphotype, Eimeria tenrececaudata n. sp., are subspheroidal, 18.8 × 17.4 (17-22 × 15-20), with a length?width ratio (L/W) of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack a micropyle but may contain 0-2 polar granules and a single, small round oocyst residuum, 3 × 2.3. Sporocysts are lemon-shaped, 9.9 × 6.6 (9-11 × 5-8), with a L/W of 1.5 (1.2-2.0); they have a prominent, slightly flattened Stieda body and a substieda body but lack a parastieda body. The sporocyst residuum consists of only a few granules between the sporozoites, which are sausage-shaped and have a large posterior refractile body. Oocysts of the second morphotype, Eimeria setifersetosa n. sp. are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 30.1 × 28.6 (27-34 × 25-34), with a L/W of 1.1 (1.0-1.2); they lack both micropyle and oocyst residuum, but 1-2 polar granules are usually present. Sporocysts are subspheroidal to broadly ellipsoidal, 9.6 × 7.3 (9-11 × 6-8), with a L/W of 1.3 (1.1-1.7); they have a broad Stieda body, lack sub- and parastieda bodies, and have a residuum of a few granules scattered throughout the sporocyst. Sporozoites were not clearly defined, but what seemed to be a single large refractile body is seen, presumably in each sporozoite. PMID:21506791

  2. Geological evolution of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, D.I.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; De Waele, B.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Key, R.M.; Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; Lidke, D.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Rabarimanana, M.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Antongil Craton, along with the Masora and Antananarivo cratons, make up the fundamental Archaean building blocks of the island of Madagascar. They were juxtaposed during the late-Neoproterozoic to early Palaeozoic assembly of Gondwana. In this paper we give a synthesis of the geology of the Antongil Craton and present previously published and new geochemical and U-Pb zircon analyses to provide an event history for its evolution.The oldest rocks in the Antongil Craton form a nucleus of tonalitic gneiss, characteristic of Palaeo-Mesoarchaean cratons globally, including phases dated between 3320 ?? 14. Ma to 3231 ?? 6. Ma and 3187 ?? 2. Ma to 3154 ?? 5. Ma. A series of mafic dykes was intruded into the Mesoarchaean tonalites and a sedimentary succession was deposited on the craton prior to pervasive deformation and migmatisation of the region. The age of deposition of the metasediments has been constrained from a volcanic horizon to around 3178 ?? 2. Ma and subject to migmatisation at around 2597 ?? 49. Ma. A subsequent magmatic episode generated voluminous, weakly foliated granitic rocks, that also included additions from both reworked older crustal material and younger source components. An earlier granodiorite-dominated assemblage, dated between 2570 ?? 18. Ma and 2542 ?? 5. Ma, is largely exposed in xenoliths and more continuously in the northern part of the craton, while a later monzogranite-dominated phase, dated between 2531 ?? 13. Ma and 2513 ?? 0.4. Ma is more widely developed. Together these record the stabilisation of the craton, attested to by the intrusion of a younger dyke swarm, the age of which is constrained by a sample of metagabbro dated at 2147 ?? 6. Ma, providing the first evidence for Palaeoproterozoic rocks from the Antongil Craton.The youngest events recorded in the isotopic record of the Antongil Craton are reflected in metamorphism, neocrystallisation and Pb-loss at 792 ?? 130. Ma to 763 ?? 13. Ma and 553 ?? 68. Ma. These events are interpreted as being the only manifestation of the Pan-African orogeny seen in the craton, which led to the assembly of the tectonic blocks that comprise the island. ?? 2010 NERC.

  3. Seismic Control on Location of Lavakas (Midslope Gullies) in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoazanamparan, F.; Cox, R.; Macklin, S. J.; Rakotondrazafy, A.

    2006-05-01

    Madagascar's central highlands are deeply weathered, with 1-2 m of laterite overlying 10s of metres of saprolite. These unstable materials sit at altitudes on the order of 1000m in recently uplifted, steep terrain characterised by convex hills with slopes averaging 25 degrees and local ridge-valley elevation changes of 100- 500 m. In many areas these slopes bear numerous erosional features called lavakas, with mapped densities up to 25/k2 in some areas. Lavakas are tadpole-shaped gullies with vertical sides and flat floors. They are wide at the headwall and taper to a narrow, deeply incised outfall, which connects to the valley drainage. They are not fed by overland flow, but develop by groundwater sapping and subterranean erosion in the porous and friable saprolite beneath the baked lateritic duracrust. The controls on lavaka formation are poorly understood. Interplay between climate, topography, and bedrock geology is known to be important, and human activity is also implicated. However, there are many areas with appropriate rainfall, hillslope geometry and geology where lavakas do not form. Likewise, lavakas form readily in some areas with little human activity, and do not form in other areas that are heavily used. Our analysis suggests that seismic activity may be a significant regional factor driving lavaka formation. Using GIS analysis, we compared the locations of recent earthquakes (1347 events with magnitudes 3.0-5.4, recorded between 1979 and 1995) with the distribution of zones where lavakas are abundant (as mapped by Henri Besairie in 1957), and found that they are strongly correlated. We cannot say whether individual seismic events are responsible for specific lavakas; but the observation that lavakas are most common in zones that are seismically active implies that earthquakes play a significant role. Repeated mild earth-shaking events might aid in loosening the saprolite and making it more vulnerable to lavaka-forming processes; or individual earthquakes might initiate collapse of slopes already weakened by groundwater sapping. More detailed work into the relationships between individual lavakas and local seismicity is needed to determine which of these mechanisms might be active. Our ongoing GIS analysis will quantify the relative importance of geology, topography, and seismicity in the location of lavaka-prone areas.

  4. Seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system beneath southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Miriam Christina; Rümpker, Georg; Tilmann, Frederik; Yuan, Xiaohui; Josiane Rindraharisaona, Elisa

    2015-04-01

    Madagascar is considered as a key region with respect to the assembly and break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana. Following the collision between East- and West-Gondwana (~700-650 Ma), its position was central to the Panafrican orogenesis. Madagascar then separated from East Africa and later from the Indian and Antarctic plates until these processes came to a halt about 69 Ma ago. Today, Madagascar consists of different tectonic units; the eastern parts (two thirds of the island) are composed mainly of Precambian rocks, whereas the western part is dominated by sedimentary deposits. Furthermore, southern Madagascar is characterized by several NS to NW-SE trending shear zones. Madagascar has been the target of a number of geological studies, but seismological investigations of the presumed complex lithosphere-asthenosphere system and of deeper upper-mantle structures are sparse. To increase our understanding of these structures and related tectonic processes, we installed a dense temporary seismic network in southern Madagascar. It consisted of 25 broadband and 25 short-period stations, which were in operation for up to 2 years between 2012 and 2014. The broadband stations crossed the island along an east-west profile; the eastern section was supplemented by a network of short-period stations. Here we present results from shear-wave splitting analyses to infer the seismic anisotropy of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in response to deformational processes. The polarization of the fast shear wave and the delay time between the fast and slow waves provide constraints on the anisotropic fabric. For our study, we use SKS-phases from up to 12 events recorded at the temporary stations and from 10 events at the permanent GEOFON station VOI. We first apply a single-event splitting analysis by minimizing the transverse component. For stations that do not show a significant azimuthal dependence of the splitting parameters, we also apply a joint inversion involving all recorded SKS waveforms. Our preliminary results exhibit delay times between 0.4 and 1.5 s. In the center of the E-W profile, fast axes are mainly oriented NNW-SSE, whereas east of the Ranotsara shear zone, fast axes are oriented NE-SW. Additionally, we will apply splitting analysis of Ps phases as well as waveform modelling to resolve the possible influence of the crust on the anisotropy inferred from the SKS phases.

  5. Deforestation history of the eastern rain forests of Madagascar from satellite images

    SciTech Connect

    Green, G.M.; Sussman, R.W. )

    1990-04-13

    Madagascar is biologically one of the richest areas on Earth, and its plants and animals are among the most endangered. Satellite images and vegetation maps based on earlier aerial photographs were used to determine the extent of eastern rain forests in Madagascar and to monitor the rate of deforestation over a 35-year period. In 1985, 3.8 million hectares of rain forest remained, representing only 50% of the 7.6 million hectares existing in 1950 and 34% of the estimated original extent (11.2 million hectares). Between 1950 and 1985, the rate of deforestation averaged 111,000 hectares per year. Deforestation was most rapid in areas with low topographic relief and high population density. If cutting of forests continues at the same pace, only forests on the steepest slopes will survive the next 35 years.

  6. A likely microendemic new species of terrestrial iguana, genus Chalarodon, from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Aurelien; Glaw, Frank; Ratsoavina, Fanomezana M; Vences, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A new species of the hitherto monotypic genus Chalarodon is described from southern Madagascar and a lectotype (ZMB 4360) is designated for C. madagascariensis Peters, 1854. The new species of terrestrial iguana, Chalarodon steinkampi sp. nov., is defined by several morphological characters and by concordant differentiation in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA with >5% uncorrected pairwise genetic distance in the 16S rRNA gene. It can be most clearly recognized by the presence of smooth (vs. keeled) gular and ventral scales, a spotted pattern extending from flanks onto belly, and an unpigmented throat. The new species is known from only a small area between the villages of Amboasary Sud and Esomony, located west of the Andohahela Massif, while C. madagascariensis appears to be widespread over much of southern and western Madagascar. We highlight the need for further exploration of this unprotected region which might host several other microendemic species. PMID:25947685

  7. Discovery of an island population of dwarf lemurs (Cheirogaleidae: Cheirogaleus) on Nosy Hara, far northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Charlie J; Jasper, Louise D

    2015-10-01

    The species-level diversity of Madagascar's lemurs has increased hugely over the last two decades, growing from 32 species in 1994 to 102 species in 2014. This growth is primarily due to the application of molecular phylogenetic analyses and the phylogenetic species concept to known populations, and few previously unknown lemur populations have been discovered during this time. We report on a new population of dwarf lemurs (Cheirogaleus sp.) from Nosy Hara, a 312-ha island in far northern Madagascar, which constitutes the northernmost distribution record for the genus. The dwarf lemurs appeared to show two characteristics of island populations-insular dwarfism and predator naïveté-that suggest a long isolation, and may thus represent an undescribed taxon. If this is the case, the dwarf lemurs of Nosy Hara are probably one of the rarest primate taxa on Earth. PMID:26243504

  8. Raising awareness of amphibian Chytridiomycosis will not alienate ecotourists visiting Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, Katharina C; Jenkins, Richard K B; Randrianavelona, Roma; Ralisata, Mahefa; Rampilamanana, Roseline; Ramanandraibe, Andrianirina; Ravoahangimalala, Olga Ramilijaona; Vences, Miguel

    2010-06-01

    Chytridiomycosis (Bd) is contributing to amphibian extinctions worldwide but has so far not been detected in Madagascar. The high likelihood for Bd to spread to the island and efface this amphibian diversity and endemism hotspot requires respective conservation policies to be developed. Bd could be introduced by the large number of tourists that visit protected areas; therefore, increasing awareness among tourists and encouraging them to participate in safety measures should be a priority conservation action. However, concerns have been raised that tourists would not be able to distinguish between an amphibian disease harmless to humans and emerging diseases that would imply a danger for human health, invoking a negative image of Madagascar as an ecotourism destination. We evaluated whether informing tourists about this infectious animal disease would cause health scare and diminish trip satisfaction. Based on 659 respondents we found that most ecotourists favored to be informed about Bd and were proactive about participating in prevention measures, refuting previous concerns. PMID:20517634

  9. Ecology and Conservation Status of Indian Ocean Humpback Dolphins (Sousa plumbea) in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Andrianarivelo, Norbert; Andrianantenaina, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The Indian Ocean humpback dolphin (Sousa plumbea) has been studied in several range states in the Southwest Indian Ocean, however little information exists on populations in Madagascar. Here, we review available literature and describe a study on S. plumbea conducted between 2004 and 2013 on the west coast of Madagascar, involving boat-based field surveys in the southwest and northwest regions, and interview surveys with local fishers from villages along most of the west coast. Field surveys in the southwest region of Anakao/St. Augustine Bay revealed low encounter rates and mean group size, and markedly declining trends in both from 1999 to 2013. Conversely, in the northwest region around Nosy Be and Nosy Iranja, encounter rates were higher, as were mean group sizes, suggesting an apparently more abundant and less impacted population. Interview surveys revealed by-catch of coastal dolphins along the entire west coast, including S. plumbea, as well as other species. Directed hunting, including drive hunts of groups of dolphins, was reported primarily in the southern regions, in the range of the Vezo Malagasy ethnicity; however, there was evidence of hunting starting in one area in the northwest, where hunting dolphins is normally considered taboo for the predominant Sakalava ethnicity. Thus, the conservation status of S. plumbea in Madagascar appears to be spatially heterogeneous, with some areas where the local population is apparently more impacted than others. Conservation measures are recommended to mitigate further decline in the southwest of Madagascar, while protecting habitat and ensuring resilience in the northwest. PMID:26555626

  10. The Effect of Recent Volcanic Activity on the Seismic Structure of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Pratt, M. J.; Shore, P.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamanana, G.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic structure of Madagascar is determined using ambient-noise and two-plane-wave earthquake surface waves analyses. A deep low-velocity anomaly is seen in regions of recent volcanic activity in the central and northern regions of the island. The primary data used are from the 2011-2013 MACOMO (Madagascar, the Comoros, and Mozambique) broadband seismic array from the PASSCAL program of IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), funded by the NSF. Additional data came from the RHUM-RUM project (led by G. Barruol and K. Sigloch), the Madagascar Seismic Profile (led by F. Tilmann), and the GSN. For the ambient-noise study, Rayleigh wave green's functions for all interstation paths are extracted from the broadband seismic data recorded from August 2011 until October 2013. Rayleigh wave group and phase velocity dispersion curves are extracted in the 8 - 50 s period range, identifying shallow crustal structure. For deeper structure, the two-plane-wave method is used on teleseismic earthquake data to obtain surface wave phase velocities in the 20 - 182 s period range. In the inversion, a finite-frequency kernel is used for each period, and a 1-D shear velocity structure is determined at each location. A three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle is obtained from assembling the 1-D models. Preliminary results show a good correlation between the Rayleigh wave velocities and the geology of Madagascar, which includes areas of ancient Archaean craton. The slowest seismic velocities are associated with known volcanic regions in both the central and northern regions, which have experienced volcanic activity within the past million years.

  11. A new perspective on the significance of the Ranotsara shear zone in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Giese, Jörg; Berger, Alfons; Gnos, Edwin

    2010-12-01

    The Ranotsara shear zone in Madagascar has been considered in previous studies to be a >350-km-long, intracrustal strike-slip shear zone of Precambrian/Cambrian age. Because of its oblique strike to the east and west coast of Madagascar, the Ranotsara shear zone has been correlated with shear zones in southern India and eastern Africa in Gondwana reconstructions. Our assessment using remote sensing data and field-based investigations, however, reveals that what previously has been interpreted as the Ranotsara shear zone is in fact a composite structure with a ductile deflection zone confined to its central segment and prominent NW-SE trending brittle faulting along most of its length. We therefore prefer the more neutral term “Ranotsara Zone”. Lithologies, tectonic foliations, and axial trace trajectories of major folds can be followed from south to north across most of the Ranotsara Zone and show only a marked deflection along its central segment. The ductile deflection zone is interpreted as a result of E-W indentation of the Antananarivo Block into the less rigid, predominantly metasedimentary rocks of the Southwestern Madagascar Block during a late phase of the Neoproterozoic/Cambrian East African Orogeny (c. 550-520 Ma). The Ranotsara Zone shows significant NW-SE striking brittle faulting that reactivates part of the NW-SE striking ductile structures in the flexure zone, but also extends along strike toward the NW and toward the SE. Brittle reactivation of ductile structures along the central segment of the Ranotsara Zone, confirmed by apatite-fission track results, may have led to the formation of a shallow Neogene basin underlying the Ranotsara plain. The present-day drainage pattern suggests on-going normal fault activity along the central segment. The Ranotsara Zone is not a megascale intracrustal strike-slip shear zone that crosscuts the entire basement of southern Madagascar. It can therefore not be used as a piercing point in Gondwana reconstructions.

  12. Neoproterozoic extension in the greater dharwar craton: A reevaluation of the "betsimisaraka suture" in madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Roig, J.-Y.; Delor, C.; Amlin, Y.; Goncalves, P.; Rabarimanana, M.H.; Ralison, A.V.; Belcher, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Precambrian shield of Madagascar is reevaluated with recently compiled geological data and new U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) geochronology. Two Archean domains are recognized: the eastern Antongil-Masora domain and the central Antananarivo domain, the latter with distinctive belts of metamafic gneiss and schist (Tsaratanana Complex). In the eastern domain, the period of early crust formation is extended to the Paleo-Mesoarchean (3.32-3.15 Ga) and a supracrustal sequence (Fenerivo Group), deposited at 3.18 Ga and metamorphosed at 2.55 Ga, is identified. In the central domain, a Neoarchean period of high-grade metamorphism and anatexis that affected both felsic (Betsiboka Suite) and mafic gneisses (Tsaratanana Complex) is documented. We propose, therefore, that the Antananarivo domain was amalgamated within the Greater Dharwar Craton (India + Madagascar) by a Neoarchean accretion event (2.55-2.48 Ga), involving emplacement of juvenile igneous rocks, high-grade metamorphism, and the juxtaposition of disparate belts of mafic gneiss and schist (metagreenstones). The concept of the "Betsimisaraka suture" is dispelled and the zone is redefined as a domain of Neoproterozoic metasedimentary (Manampotsy Group) and metaigneous rocks (Itsindro-Imorona Suite) formed during a period of continental extension and intrusive igneous activity between 840 and 760 Ma. Younger orogenic convergence (560-520 Ma) resulted in east-directed overthrusting throughout south Madagascar and steepening with local inversion of the domain in central Madagascar. Along part of its length, the Manampotsy Group covers the boundary between the eastern and central Archean domains and is overprinted by the Angavo-Ifanadiana high-strain zone that served as a zone of crustal weakness throughout Cretaceous to Recent times.

  13. Aye-aye population genomic analyses highlight an important center of endemism in northern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Louis, Edward E.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C.; Burhans, Richard C.; Lei, Runhua; Johnson, Steig E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Miller, Webb

    2013-01-01

    We performed a population genomics study of the aye-aye, a highly specialized nocturnal lemur from Madagascar. Aye-ayes have low population densities and extensive range requirements that could make this flagship species particularly susceptible to extinction. Therefore, knowledge of genetic diversity and differentiation among aye-aye populations is critical for conservation planning. Such information may also advance our general understanding of Malagasy biogeography, as aye-ayes have the largest species distribution of any lemur. We generated and analyzed whole-genome sequence data for 12 aye-ayes from three regions of Madagascar (North, West, and East). We found that the North population is genetically distinct, with strong differentiation from other aye-ayes over relatively short geographic distances. For comparison, the average FST value between the North and East aye-aye populations—separated by only 248 km—is over 2.1-times greater than that observed between human Africans and Europeans. This finding is consistent with prior watershed- and climate-based hypotheses of a center of endemism in northern Madagascar. Taken together, these results suggest a strong and long-term biogeographical barrier to gene flow. Thus, the specific attention that should be directed toward preserving large, contiguous aye-aye habitats in northern Madagascar may also benefit the conservation of other distinct taxonomic units. To help facilitate future ecological- and conservation-motivated population genomic analyses by noncomputational biologists, the analytical toolkit used in this study is available on the Galaxy Web site. PMID:23530231

  14. Aye-aye population genomic analyses highlight an important center of endemism in northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H; Louis, Edward E; Ratan, Aakrosh; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C; Burhans, Richard C; Lei, Runhua; Johnson, Steig E; Schuster, Stephan C; Miller, Webb

    2013-04-01

    We performed a population genomics study of the aye-aye, a highly specialized nocturnal lemur from Madagascar. Aye-ayes have low population densities and extensive range requirements that could make this flagship species particularly susceptible to extinction. Therefore, knowledge of genetic diversity and differentiation among aye-aye populations is critical for conservation planning. Such information may also advance our general understanding of Malagasy biogeography, as aye-ayes have the largest species distribution of any lemur. We generated and analyzed whole-genome sequence data for 12 aye-ayes from three regions of Madagascar (North, West, and East). We found that the North population is genetically distinct, with strong differentiation from other aye-ayes over relatively short geographic distances. For comparison, the average FST value between the North and East aye-aye populations--separated by only 248 km--is over 2.1-times greater than that observed between human Africans and Europeans. This finding is consistent with prior watershed- and climate-based hypotheses of a center of endemism in northern Madagascar. Taken together, these results suggest a strong and long-term biogeographical barrier to gene flow. Thus, the specific attention that should be directed toward preserving large, contiguous aye-aye habitats in northern Madagascar may also benefit the conservation of other distinct taxonomic units. To help facilitate future ecological- and conservation-motivated population genomic analyses by noncomputational biologists, the analytical toolkit used in this study is available on the Galaxy Web site. PMID:23530231

  15. The evolution of extinction risk: past and present anthropogenic impacts on the primate communities of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Laurie R; Irwin, Mitchell T

    2007-01-01

    There are two possible approaches to understanding natural and human-induced changes in the primate communities of Madagascar. One is to begin with present-day and recent historic interactions and work backwards. A second is to begin with paleoecological records of Malagasy primate communities before and immediately following human arrival, and the associated evidence of human and nonhuman primate interactions, and work forwards. On the basis of biological and climatic studies, as well as historic and ethnohistoric records, we are beginning to understand the abiotic and biotic characteristics of Madagascar's habitats, the lemurs' ecological adaptations to these unique habitats, the extent of forest loss, fragmentation and hunting, and the differential vulnerability of extant lemur species to these pressures. On the basis of integrated paleoecological, archaeological and paleontological research, we have begun to construct a detailed chronology for late prehistoric Madagascar. We are beginning to understand the complex sequence of events that led to one of the most dramatic recent megafaunal extinction/extirpation events. Combining the perspectives of the past and the present, we see a complex set of interactions affecting an initially rich but vulnerable fauna. The total evidence refutes any simple, unicausal (e.g. hunting/habitat destruction/climate change) explanation of megafaunal extinctions, yet unequivocally supports a major role--both direct and indirect--for humans as the trigger of the extinction process. It also supports a change over time in the relative importance of hunting versus habitat loss, and in the trophic characteristics of the primate communities in Madagascar. PMID:17855790

  16. Research, valorization and exploitation of biological resources for medicinal purposes in the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Randimbivololona, F

    1996-04-01

    Medicinal plants are widely used for treatment of diseases in Madagascar (the Malagasy Republic). Different types of users, including individuals, researchers, groups of researchers and State institutions use medicinal plants as crude materials either for trade, scientific investigations or export. To preserve these forest products for extended use, Malagasy legislation controls the collection of medicinal plants, especially those destined for export. However, according to the law, products coming from Malagasy medicinal plants are not patentable locally. PMID:9213616

  17. Preliminary findings on identification of mycorrhizal fungi from diverse orchids in the Central Highlands of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, Kazutomo; Zettler, Lawrence W; Kendon, Jonathan P; Bidartondo, Martin I; Stice, Andrew L; Skarha, Shannon; Corey, Laura L; Knight, Audrey C; Sarasan, Viswambharan

    2015-11-01

    The Orchid flora of Madagascar is one of the most diverse with nearly 1000 orchid taxa, of which about 90% are endemic to this biodiversity hotspot. The Itremo Massif in the Central Highlands of Madagascar with a Highland Subtropical climate range encompasses montane grassland, igneous and metamorphic rock outcrops, and gallery and tapia forests. Our study focused on identifying culturable mycorrhizae from epiphytic, lithophytic, and terrestrial orchid taxa to understand their diversity and density in a spatial matrix that is within the protected areas. We have collected both juvenile and mature roots from 41 orchid taxa for isolating their orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF), and to culture, identify, and store in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Twelve operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of three known orchid mycorrhizal genera, were recognized by analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 85 isolates, and, by comparing with GenBank database entries, each OTU was shown to have closely related fungi that were also found as orchid associates. Orchid and fungal diversity were greater in gallery forests and open grasslands, which is very significant for future studies and orchid conservation. As far as we know, this is the first ever report of detailed identification of mycorrhizal fungi from Madagascar. This study will help start to develop a programme for identifying fungal symbionts from this unique biodiversity hotspot, which is undergoing rapid ecosystem damage and species loss. The diversity of culturable fungal associates, their density, and distribution within the Itremo orchid hotspot areas will be discussed. PMID:25771863

  18. The amino acid and stable isotope biogeochemistry of elephant bird ( Aepyornis) eggshells from southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Simon J.; Miller, Gifford H.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Chivas, Allan R.; Murray-Wallace, Colin V.

    2006-09-01

    A diverse suite of animals became extinct on Madagascar during the Late Holocene. As observed on landmasses elsewhere, the extinction process broadly coincided with the arrival of people. Our research on the amino acid racemisation and the carbon and oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of elephant bird ( Aepyornis) eggshells from southern Madagascar refines models that attempt to explain the extinction process. A correlation between the extent of isoleucine epimerisation (aIle/Ile) and radiocarbon age of eggshells allows aIle/Ile to serve as a proxy for eggshell age. The aIle/Ile values indicate the majority (87%) of eggshells in this study are Holocene, with the remainder representing Pleistocene Aepyornis populations, and that further amino acid analyses would help to constrain the timing of Aepyornis extinction. Carbon isotope ratios in the organic and calcite fractions of eggshells indicate that Aepyornis primarily browsed C 3 vegetation. Oxygen isotope values are more negative and less variable than in eggshells of ostriches living in semi-arid environments, suggesting that Aepyornis populations relied upon groundwater-fed coastal wetlands for their drinking water. The isotope results require that the changing abundances of C 3 vegetation and groundwater-fed watering points be considered in models that aim to understand the extinction of Aepyornis in southern Madagascar.

  19. Temporal and spatial evolution of dynamic support from river profiles: A framework for Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Gareth G.; Paul, Jonathan D.; White, Nicky; Winterbourne, Jeffrey

    2012-04-01

    We present a strategy for calculating uplift rates as a function of space and time from large sets of longitudinal river profiles. This strategy assumes that the shape of a river profile is controlled by the history of uplift rate and moderated by the erosional process. We assume that upstream drainage area is invariant. The algorithm was tested on a set of ˜100 river profiles which were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. This set of profiles was simultaneously inverted to obtain uplift rate as a smooth function of space and time. The fit between observed and calculated profiles is excellent and suggests that Madagascar was uplifted by 1-2 km at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ˜15 Myrs. The location of Madagascar suggests that its topographic elevation is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic fragments encompassing the island show that the island straddles a dynamic topographic gradient which generates asymmetric Neogene uplift. Volcanism, warped peneplains and uplifted marine terraces corroborate the existence of youthful uplift. We suggest that sets of longitudinal river profiles contain useful information about the history of regional uplift which can be extracted by inverse modeling and calibrated by independent geologic observations.

  20. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Jason A.; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Pearson, Laurel N.; Quillen, Ellen E.; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D.; Perry, George H.

    2014-01-01

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  1. Searching for the Oldest Baobab of Madagascar: Radiocarbon Investigation of Large Adansonia rubrostipa Trees

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Patrut, Roxana T.; Lowy, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab) specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called “Grandmother” consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab) specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the “polygamous baobab”, consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs. PMID:25806967

  2. Biogeography of the Malagasy Celastraceae: Multiple independent origins followed by widespread dispersal of genera from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Christine D; Simmons, Mark P; Archer, Robert H; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Andriantiana, Jacky

    2016-01-01

    Of the 97 currently recognized genera of Celastraceae, 19 are native to Madagascar, including six endemics. In this study we conducted the most thorough phylogenetic analysis of Celastraceae yet completed with respect to both character and taxon sampling, and include representatives of five new endemic genera. Fifty-one new accessions, together with 328 previously used accessions of Celastrales, were sampled for morphological characters, two rDNA gene regions, and two plastid gene regions. The endemic Malagasy genera are resolved in two separate lineages-Xenodrys by itself and all other endemic genera in a clade that also includes four lineages inferred to have dispersed from Madagascar: Brexia madagascariensis (Mascarene Islands, coastal Africa), Elaeodendron (West Indies, Africa to New Caledonia), and Pleurostylia (Africa to New Caledonia). Of the 12 extant Malagasy Celastraceae lineages identified, eight are clearly of African origin. The origins of the remaining four lineages are less clear, but reasonable possibilities include America, Eurasia, Africa, southern India, Malesia, and Australia. Based on 95% credible age intervals from fossil-calibrated molecular dating, all 12 extant Malagasy Celastraceae lineages appear to have arisen following dispersal after the separation of Madagascar from other landmasses within the last 70 million years. PMID:26432393

  3. Searching for the oldest baobab of Madagascar: radiocarbon investigation of large Adansonia rubrostipa trees.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F; Danthu, Pascal; Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel Leong; Patrut, Roxana T; Lowy, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    We extended our research on the architecture, growth and age of trees belonging to the genus Adansonia, by starting to investigate large individuals of the most widespread Malagasy species. Our research also intends to identify the oldest baobabs of Madagascar. Here we present results of the radiocarbon investigation of the two most representative Adansonia rubrostipa (fony baobab) specimens, which are located in south-western Madagascar, in the Tsimanampetsotse National Park. We found that the fony baobab called "Grandmother" consists of 3 perfectly fused stems of different ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was found to be 1136 ± 16 BP. We estimated that the oldest part of this tree, which is mainly hollow, has an age close to 1,600 yr. This value is comparable to the age of the oldest Adansonia digitata (African baobab) specimens. By its age, the Grandmother is a major candidate for the oldest baobab of Madagascar. The second investigated specimen, called the "polygamous baobab", consists of 6 partially fused stems of different ages. According to dating results, this fony baobab is 1,000 yr old. This research is the first investigation of the structure and age of Malagasy baobabs. PMID:25806967

  4. Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jason A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Pearson, Laurel N; Quillen, Ellen E; Prista, António; Rocha, Jorge; Soodyall, Himla; Shriver, Mark D; Perry, George H

    2014-08-22

    While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the Duffy-null allele in the Malagasy, a recently admixed population with major ancestry components from both East Asia and mainland sub-Saharan Africa. We used genome-wide genetic data and extensive computer simulations to show that the high frequency of the Duffy-null allele in Madagascar can only be explained in the absence of positive natural selection under extreme demographic scenarios involving high genetic drift. However, the observed genomic single nucleotide polymorphism diversity in the Malagasy is incompatible with such extreme demographic scenarios, indicating that positive selection for the Duffy-null allele best explains the high frequency of the allele in Madagascar. We estimate the selection coefficient to be 0.066. Because vivax malaria is endemic to Madagascar, this result supports the hypothesis that malaria resistance drove fixation of the Duffy-null allele in mainland sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24990677

  5. Biodiversity conservation and drug discovery: Can they be combined? The Suriname and Madagascar experiences

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shugeng; Kingston, David G. I.

    2009-01-01

    The approach to new drugs through natural products has proved to be the single most successful strategy for the discovery of new drugs, but in recent years its use has been deemphasized by many pharmaceutical companies in favor of approaches based on combinatorial chemistry and genomics, among others. Drug discovery from natural sources requires continued access to plant, marine, and microbial biomass, and so the preservation of tropical rainforests is an important part of our drug discovery program. Sadly, many of the tropical forests of the world are under severe environmental pressure, and deforestation is a serious problem in most tropical countries. One way to combat this loss is to demonstrate their value as potential sources of new pharmaceutical or agrochemical products. As part of an effort to integrate biodiversity conservation and drug discovery with economic development, we initiated an International Cooperative biodiversity Group (ICBG) to discover potential pharmaceuticals from the plant biodiversity of Suriname and Madagascar. The Group, established with funding from agencies of the United States government, involved participants from the USA, Suriname, and Madagascar. The basic approach was to search for bioactive plants in the Suriname and Malagasy flora, and to isolate their bioactive constituents by the best available methods, but the work included capacity building as well as research. Progress on this project will be reported, drawing on results obtained from the isolation of bioactive natural products from Suriname and Madagascar. The benefits of this general approach to biodiversity and drug discovery will also be discussed. PMID:20161050

  6. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar. PMID:26844772

  7. Current Perspectives on Plague Vector Control in Madagascar: Susceptibility Status of Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Boyer, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    Plague is a rodent disease transmissible to humans by infected flea bites, and Madagascar is one of the countries with the highest plague incidence in the world. This study reports the susceptibility of the main plague vector Xenopsylla cheopis to 12 different insecticides belonging to 4 insecticide families (carbamates, organophosphates, pyrethroids and organochlorines). Eight populations from different geographical regions of Madagascar previously resistant to deltamethrin were tested with a World Health Organization standard bioassay. Insecticide susceptibility varied amongst populations, but all of them were resistant to six insecticides belonging to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides (alphacypermethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, etofenprox, deltamethrin, bendiocarb and propoxur). Only one insecticide (dieldrin) was an efficient pulicide for all flea populations. Cross resistances were suspected. This study proposes at least three alternative insecticides (malathion, fenitrothion and cyfluthrin) to replace deltamethrin during plague epidemic responses, but the most efficient insecticide may be different for each population studied. We highlight the importance of continuous insecticide susceptibility surveillance in the areas of high plague risk in Madagascar. PMID:26844772

  8. Springs and wire plants: anachronistic defences against Madagascar's extinct elephant birds.

    PubMed

    Bond, William J; Silander, John A

    2007-08-22

    The extinction of large vertebrates in the last few millennia has left a legacy of evolutionary anachronisms. Among these are plant structural defences that persist long after the extinction of the browsers. A peculiar, and controversial, example is a suite of traits common in divaricate (wide-angled branching) plants from New Zealand. Divaricate architecture has been interpreted as an adaptive response to cold climates or an anachronistic defence against the extinct moas. Madagascar, a larger tropical island, also had a fauna of large flightless birds, the elephant birds. If these extinct ratites selected for similar plant defences, we expected to find convergent features between New Zealand and Malagasy plants, despite their very different climates. We searched the southern thickets of Madagascar for plants with putative anti-ratite defences and scored candidate species for a number of traits common to many New Zealand divaricates. We found many Malagasy species in 25 families and 36 genera shared the same suite of traits, the 'wire plant' syndrome, as divaricates in New Zealand that resist ratite browsing. Neither ecologically, nor phylogenetically, matched species from South Africa shared these traits. Malagasy wire plants differ from many New Zealand divaricates in lacking the distinctive concentration of leaves in the interior of shrubs. We suggest that New Zealand divaricates have a unique amalgam of traits that acted as defences and also confer tolerance to cold. We conclude that many woody species in the thickets of southern Madagascar share, with New Zealand, anachronistic structural defences against large extinct bird browsers. PMID:17535797

  9. Conservation education in Madagascar: three case studies in the biologically diverse island-continent.

    PubMed

    Dolins, Francine L; Jolly, Alison; Rasamimanana, Hantanirina; Ratsimbazafy, Jonah; Feistner, Anna T C; Ravoavy, Florent

    2010-05-01

    Few Malagasy children and adults are aware of the rare and unique fauna and flora indigenous to their island-continent, including flagship lemur species. Even the Malagasy ancestral proverbs never mentioned lemurs, but these same proverbs talked about the now extinct hippopotamus. Madagascar's geography, history, and economic constraints contribute to severe biodiversity loss. Deforestation on Madagascar is reported to be over 100,000 ha/year, with only 10-15% of the island retaining natural forest [Green & Sussman, 1990]. Educating children, teacher-training, and community projects about environmental and conservation efforts to protect the remaining natural habitats of endangered lemur species provide a basis for long-term changes in attitudes and practices. Case studies of three conservation education projects located in different geographical regions of Madagascar, Centre ValBio, Madagacar Wildlife Conservation Alaotra Comic Book Project, and The Ako Book Project, are presented together with their ongoing stages of development, assessment, and outcomes. We argue that while nongovernmental organizational efforts are and will be very important, the Ministry of Education urgently needs to incorporate biodiversity education in the curriculum at all levels, from primary school to university. PMID:20039330

  10. Rapid human-induced landscape transformation in Madagascar at the end of the first millennium of the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Stephen J.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Faina, Peterson; McGee, David; Hardt, Ben; Ranivoharimanana, Lovasoa; Randrianasy, Jeannot

    2016-02-01

    The environmental impact of the early human inhabitants of Madagascar remains heavily debated. We present results from a study using two stalagmites collected from Anjohibe Cave in northwestern Madagascar to investigate the paleoecology and paleoclimate of northwestern Madagascar over the past 1800 years. Carbon stable isotopic data indicate a rapid, complete transformation from a flora dominated by C3 plants to a C4 grassland system. This transformation is well replicated in both stalagmites, occurred at 890 CE and was completed within one century. We infer that the change was the result of a dramatic increase in the use of fire to promote the growth of grass for cattle fodder. Further, stalagmite oxygen isotope ratios show no significant variation across the carbon isotope excursion, demonstrating that the landscape transformation was not related to changes in precipitation. Our study illustrates the profound impact early inhabitants had on the environment, and implies that forest loss was one trigger of megafaunal extinction.

  11. To Madagascar and back: long-distance, return migration across open ocean by a pregnant female bull shark Carcharhinus leucas.

    PubMed

    Lea, J S E; Humphries, N E; Clarke, C R; Sims, D W

    2015-12-01

    A large, pregnant, female bull shark Carcharhinus leucas was tracked migrating from Seychelles across open ocean to south-east Madagascar, c. 2000 km away, and back again. In Madagascar, the shark spent a prolonged period shallower than 5 m, consistent with entering estuarine habitat to pup, and upon return to Seychelles the shark was slender and no longer gravid. This represents an unprecedented return migration across the open ocean for a C. leucas and highlights the need for international collaboration to manage the regional C. leucas population sustainably. PMID:26511427

  12. Seismo and sequence stratigraphy of Cenozoic units of the Morondava Basin, offshore western Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Dirk; Stollhofen, Harald; Klimke, Jennifer; Franke, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The N-S trending Morondava Basin extends in width from western onshore Madagascar over about 350 km westwards to the offshore Davie Ridge in the Mozambique Channel. Although basin formation was initiated during Karoo times, the main basin evolution took place during Jurassic rifting and subsequent drifting until middle Cretaceous as a result of Gondwana breakup (Geiger et al., 2004). Contemporaneous to the separation of India and Madagascar widespread flood basalts were emplaced during the late Cretaceous (Storey et al., 1995). Present knowledge of the Morondava Basin is mainly based on outcrop studies, seismic surveys and borehole information (e.g. Geiger et al., 2004), gathered in western onshore Madagascar, although the fast majority of the basin, including its depocenter is located offshore in the Mozambique Channel, now at up to 3,500 m water depth. Almost all of the recent offshore studies of the Morondava Basin rely on industrial data but up to date publications of exploration results are generally rare and mostly anonymized. Our study aims to extend knowledge, particularly on the offshore seismic and sequence stratigraphy of the Morondava Basin. A key question is also to test the proposed tectonic stability of the Davie Ridge over the last 40 Ma. For this purpose 12 seismic profiles and bathymetric data, acquired in early 2014 by RV SONNE, are interpreted. Most of the profiles cover the distal deep marine areas of the northern Morondava Basin between the Davie Ridge and the shelf break of Madagascar. Top Cretaceous, Top Eocene, Top Oligocene, the Middle Miocene Unconformity and the Base Pliocene, are mapped as major seismic marker horizons. Especially shelf and slope sedimentary units are important resources to reconstruct the tectonostratigraphic basin evolution. At the continental slope diffuse to chaotic seismic pattern of Miocene and younger age are identified which are subdivided by laterally continuous, high frequency reflectors with a higher impedance contrast. Bounded by the Base Tertiary and the Base Pliocene these units can be used to develop and verify a sequence stratigraphic approach for the Cenozoic in the Morondava Basin. Prelimary results indicate that the major sedimentation at the continental slope moved after Early Pliocene significantly landwards. In general the thickness of post-Pliocene units increases to the east. Work in progress encompasses the application of seismo and sequence stratigraphic concept for Mesozoic sedimentary units and a correlation with other, potentially time-equivalent, basins in the area, such as the Mandawa Basin in northern Mozambique. References Geiger, M., Clark, D.N., und Mette, W., 2004, Reappraisal of the timing of the break-up of Gondwana based on sedimentological und seismic evidence from the Morondava Basin, SW Madagascar: Journal of African Earth Sciences, v. 38, p. 363-381. Storey, M., Mahoney, J. J., Saunders, A. D., Duncan, R. A., Kelley, S. P., und Coffin, M. F., 1995, Timing of Hot Spot--Related Volcanism und the Breakup of Madagascar und India: Science, v. 267, no. 5199, p. 852-855.

  13. The GLOBE/Madagascar Malaria Project: Creating Student/Educator/Scientist Partnerships With Regional Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, D.; Boger, R.; Rafalimanana, A.

    2006-05-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease spread by mosquitoes in the genus Anopheles. It causes more than 300,000,000 acute illnesses and more than one million deaths annually, including the death of one African child every 30 seconds. Recent epidemiological trends include increases in malaria mortality and the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. Some experts believe that predicted climate changes during the 21st century will bring malaria to areas where it is not now common. The GLOBE Program is currently collaborating with students, educators, scientists, health department officials, and government officials in Madagascar to develop a program that combines existing GLOBE protocols for measuring atmospheric and water quality parameters with a new protocol for collecting and identifying mosquito larvae at the genus (Anopheles and non-Anopheles) level. There are dozens of Anopheles species and sub-species that are adapted to a wide range of micro-environmental conditions encountered in Madagascar's variable climate. Local data collection is essential because mosquitoes typically spend their entire lives within a few kilometers of their breeding sites. The GLOBE Program provides an ideal framework for such a project because it offers a highly structured system for defining experiment protocols that ensure consistent procedures, a widely dispersed network of observing sites, and a centralized data collection and reporting system. Following a series of training activities in 2005, students in Madagascar are now beginning to collect data. Basic environmental parameters and first attempts at larvae collection and identification are presented. Results from this project can be used to increase public awareness of malaria, to provide new scientific data concerning environmental impacts on mosquito breeding, and to provide better information for guiding effective mitigation strategies. Problems encountered include difficulties in visiting and communicating with remote school sites. These are typical problems in developing tropical countries where malaria is endemic and their solution benefits the entire scientific and educational infrastructure in those countries.

  14. Convergent evolution of chemical defense in poison frogs and arthropod prey between Madagascar and the Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Valerie C.; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Rakotomalala, Valérie; Sierwald, Petra; Fisher, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    With few exceptions, aposematically colored poison frogs sequester defensive alkaloids, unchanged, from dietary arthropods. In the Neotropics, myrmicine and formicine ants and the siphonotid millipede Rhinotus purpureus are dietary sources for alkaloids in dendrobatid poison frogs, yet the arthropod sources for Mantella poison frogs in Madagascar remained unknown. We report GC-MS analyses of extracts of arthropods and microsympatric Malagasy poison frogs (Mantella) collected from Ranomafana, Madagascar. Arthropod sources for 11 “poison frog” alkaloids were discovered, 7 of which were also detected in microsympatric Mantella. These arthropod sources include three endemic Malagasy ants, Tetramorium electrum, Anochetus grandidieri, and Paratrechina amblyops (subfamilies Myrmicinae, Ponerinae, and Formicinae, respectively), and the pantropical tramp millipede R. purpureus. Two of these ant species, A. grandidieri and T. electrum, were also found in Mantella stomachs, and ants represented the dominant prey type (67.3% of 609 identified stomach arthropods). To our knowledge, detection of 5,8-disubstituted (ds) indolizidine iso-217B in T. electrum represents the first izidine having a branch point in its carbon skeleton to be identified from ants, and detection of 3,5-ds pyrrolizidine 251O in A. grandidieri represents the first ponerine ant proposed as a dietary source of poison frog alkaloids. Endemic Malagasy ants with defensive alkaloids (with the exception of Paratrechina) are not closely related to any Neotropical species sharing similar chemical defenses. Our results suggest convergent evolution for the acquisition of defensive alkaloids in these dietary ants, which may have been the critical prerequisite for subsequent convergence in poison frogs between Madagascar and the Neotropics. PMID:16087888

  15. Analysis of Patterns of Bushmeat Consumption Reveals Extensive Exploitation of Protected Species in Eastern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Richard K. B.; Keane, Aidan; Rakotoarivelo, Andrinajoro R.; Rakotomboavonjy, Victor; Randrianandrianina, Felicien H.; Razafimanahaka, H. Julie; Ralaiarimalala, Sylvain R.; Jones, Julia P. G.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of wild meat consumption from tropical forests is important for designing approaches to address this major threat to biodiversity and mitigate potential pathways for transmission of emerging diseases. Bushmeat consumption has been particularly poorly studied in Madagascar, one of the world's hottest biodiversity hotspots. Studying bushmeat consumption is challenging as many species are protected and researchers must consider the incentives faced by informants. Using interviews with 1154 households in 12 communes in eastern Madagascar, as well as local monitoring data, we investigated the importance of socio-economic variables, taste preference and traditional taboos on consumption of 50 wild and domestic species. The majority of meals contain no animal protein. However, respondents consume a wide range of wild species and 95% of respondents have eaten at least one protected species (and nearly 45% have eaten more than 10). The rural/urban divide and wealth are important predictors of bushmeat consumption, but the magnitude and direction of the effect varies between species. Bushmeat species are not preferred and are considered inferior to fish and domestic animals. Taboos have provided protection to some species, particularly the Endangered Indri, but we present evidence that this taboo is rapidly eroding. By considering a variety of potential influences on consumption in a single study we have improved understanding of who is eating bushmeat and why. Evidence that bushmeat species are not generally preferred meats suggest that projects which increase the availability of domestic meat and fish may have success at reducing demand. We also suggest that enforcement of existing wildlife and firearm laws should be a priority, particularly in areas undergoing rapid social change. The issue of hunting as an important threat to biodiversity in Madagascar is only now being fully recognised. Urgent action is required to ensure that heavily hunted species are adequately protected. PMID:22194787

  16. Comparison of Marine Spatial Planning Methods in Madagascar Demonstrates Value of Alternative Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Allnutt, Thomas F.; McClanahan, Timothy R.; Andréfouët, Serge; Baker, Merrill; Lagabrielle, Erwann; McClennen, Caleb; Rakotomanjaka, Andry J. M.; Tianarisoa, Tantely F.; Watson, Reg; Kremen, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value). The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the “strict protection” class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative approaches during initial stages of the planning process. Choosing an appropriate approach ultimately depends on scientific and political factors including representation targets, likelihood of adoption, and persistence goals. PMID:22359534

  17. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Farris, Zach J; Golden, Christopher D; Karpanty, Sarah; Murphy, Asia; Stauffer, Dean; Ratelolahy, Felix; Andrianjakarivelo, Vonjy; Holmes, Christopher M; Kelly, Marcella J

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting) affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar's largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar's largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana) occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica). Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (mean=90 individuals consumed/year), the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans) (mean=58 consumed/year), and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) (mean=31 consumed/year). Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest. These various anthropogenic pressures and their effects on carnivore populations, especially increases in exotic carnivores and hunting, have wide-ranging, global implications and demand effective management plans to target the influx of exotic carnivores and unsustainable hunting that is affecting carnivore populations across Madagascar and worldwide. PMID:26375991

  18. Analysis of patterns of bushmeat consumption reveals extensive exploitation of protected species in eastern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Richard K B; Keane, Aidan; Rakotoarivelo, Andrinajoro R; Rakotomboavonjy, Victor; Randrianandrianina, Felicien H; Razafimanahaka, H Julie; Ralaiarimalala, Sylvain R; Jones, Julia P G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of wild meat consumption from tropical forests is important for designing approaches to address this major threat to biodiversity and mitigate potential pathways for transmission of emerging diseases. Bushmeat consumption has been particularly poorly studied in Madagascar, one of the world's hottest biodiversity hotspots. Studying bushmeat consumption is challenging as many species are protected and researchers must consider the incentives faced by informants. Using interviews with 1154 households in 12 communes in eastern Madagascar, as well as local monitoring data, we investigated the importance of socio-economic variables, taste preference and traditional taboos on consumption of 50 wild and domestic species. The majority of meals contain no animal protein. However, respondents consume a wide range of wild species and 95% of respondents have eaten at least one protected species (and nearly 45% have eaten more than 10). The rural/urban divide and wealth are important predictors of bushmeat consumption, but the magnitude and direction of the effect varies between species. Bushmeat species are not preferred and are considered inferior to fish and domestic animals. Taboos have provided protection to some species, particularly the Endangered Indri, but we present evidence that this taboo is rapidly eroding. By considering a variety of potential influences on consumption in a single study we have improved understanding of who is eating bushmeat and why. Evidence that bushmeat species are not generally preferred meats suggest that projects which increase the availability of domestic meat and fish may have success at reducing demand. We also suggest that enforcement of existing wildlife and firearm laws should be a priority, particularly in areas undergoing rapid social change. The issue of hunting as an important threat to biodiversity in Madagascar is only now being fully recognised. Urgent action is required to ensure that heavily hunted species are adequately protected. PMID:22194787

  19. Tectonic significance of granitoid plutons from the Andasibe paragneiss belt, east-central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharimahefa, T.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the crustal evolution of the central Madagascar is of major significance in the study of the Precambrian basement of Madagascar and the greater Gondwana supercontinent. The study area, known as Andasibe paragneiss defines a fold belt that stretches from Ambatondrazaka to Soavina area in eastern Madagascar and is intruded by extensive granitoid intrusions. The western part of Andasibe paragneiss lies within the crustal scale Angavo shear zone, and is characterized by fine to medium-grained foliated paragneiss, which also include biotite-hornblende gneiss, migmatitic quartzofeldspathic gneiss, sillimanite-bearing gneiss, garnet-bearing gneiss, graphitic gneiss intercalates with schist, quartzite, muscovite-bearing gneiss and marble. Three samples of granitoid plutons intruding the Andasibe paragneiss yielded isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon ages of 801.2×3.8Ma, 776.5×4.4Ma and 772.1×4.2Ma. These dates are interpreted to represent the crystallization ages of these rocks and are comparable to other reported U-Pb emplacement ages for granitoid plutons within and along the north-central margin of the Angavo shear zone, which are suggested to be related to ca. 820 Ma successor-arc plutonism. These granitoids pre-dates the Angavo shear zone and folds affecting the plutons foliation are believed to have formed during the East-African Orogen, which in this part of the Malagasy Precambrian basement, is considered to have associated with Neoproterozoic extensive magmatism ca. 820 Ma to 540 Ma.

  20. Medicinal plants used by women from Agnalazaha littoral forest (Southeastern Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The country of Madagascar is renowned for its high level of biodiversity and endemism, as well as the overwhelming pressures and threats placed on the natural resources by a growing population and climate change. Traditional medicine plays an important role in the daily lives of the Malagasy for various reasons including limited access to healthcare, limited markets and traditional values. The objective of this study was to assess the modern utitilization of the Agnalazaha Forest by the local population in Mahabo-Mananivo, Madagascar, for medicinal plants used by women, and to establish a list of medicinal plants used by women sourced from Agnalazaha Forest. Methods Ethnobotanical studies were conducted over a period of five months in 2010 to determine the diversity of medicinal plants used by women in the commune of Mahabo-Mananivo. In all, 498 people were interviewed, both male and female ranging age from 15 to over 60 years old. Results 152 medicinal plants used by local people were collected during the ethnobotanical studies. Among the recorded species, eight native species are widely used by women. These species are known for their therapeutic properties in treating placental apposition and complications during childbirth as well as tropical illnesses such as malaria, filariasis, and sexual diseases like gonorrhea and syphilis. Conclusions Littoral forests are rare ecosystems that are highly threatened on the island nation of Madagascar. Our investigation into the use of medicinal plants sourced from and around the Agnalazaha Forest by the women of Mahabo-Mananivo reinforces the need for this natural resource as a first line of health care for rural families. PMID:24188563

  1. Structural mapping and analysis of a Madagascar Precambrian shear zone using enhanced Landsat Thematic Mapper Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kilmer, D.S.; Duncan, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Recently, the west coast of Madagascar has become a frontier region for petroleum exploration. Major structures in the Precambrian shield of Madagascar may have a strong control on the development of sedimentary basins, as has been documented in the Morondava basin. The 2.5-3.0+ Ga shield of Madagascar is an amphibolite- to granulite-grade metamorphic gneiss terrain, intruded by anorthosites and 550-Ma granites and pegmatites. Landsat Thematic Mapper data provides a cost-effective method for regional-scale structural mapping of this poorly known terrain. A five-component linear mixing model has been used to enhance the lithologic information in this six-band data. Lithologic component images thus produced utilize the full geologic spectral range of the data. A preliminary structural geologic map compiled from the component images has greater detail than existing maps at 1:100,000 scale, to which it has been compared. The Ankafotra-Saririaky shear zone has been identified as a north-northeast-trending, 15- to 20-km-wide region of appressed folds, attenuated layering, and subparallel faults on the western side of the shield. Two anorthosite massifs that occur within this shear zone have the structural characteristics of boudins in a ductile matrix. The shear deformed a preexisting terrain of poly-phase folding, characterized by tight folds and complex fold interference structures displayed by basins and domes on a scale of 10 km. Enhanced remote sensing data can be used to characterize the nature and mechanism of shear deformation in such zones.

  2. Holocene Indian Ocean Cosmic Impacts: The Megatsunami Chevron Evidence From Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, W.; Bryant, E.; Gusiakov, V.; Abbott, D.; Rambolamana, G.; Raza, H.; Courty, M.; Breger, D.; Gerard-Little, P.; Burckle, L.

    2006-12-01

    The 2.6 million year Quaternary period terrestrial physical record lacks definitive crater evidence for major regional catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets other than the 10.5-km diameter Botsumtwi structure in Ghana and the 14.0-km diameter Zhamanshin structure in Kazakhstan [1] dating between about 900 and 1100 kya. Current cosmic impact rate models suggest that an average of between 3-6 globally catastrophic impacts should have occurred on the Earth during the Quaternary, along with several additional significant regional impacts in addition to Zhamanshin and Botsumtwi. These models and data indicate that the great majority of the "missing" major impact locations would likely have occurred in poorly studied oceanic settings. Only recently have Late Quaternary and Holocene period coastal paleo-megatsunami chevron deposits been defined in the Caribbean and along the western coasts of Australia, along with the suggestion that some may have been created by oceanic cosmic impacts in distinction to those caused by landslips, eruptions, and seismic events. We investigate the possibility that many or most megatsunami chevrons occurring along the southern coast of Madagascar were caused by two or more major Holocene Indian Ocean cosmic impacts. This hypothesis is based on an initial study of the worldwide archaeological and anthropological record, and the preliminary study of satellite images of the chevrons, selected Indian Ocean deep-sea cores, sea-floor bathymetry, and physical examination of the Madagascar deposits themselves. Candidate Indian Ocean impact structures are identified and correlated with the southern Madagascar megatsunami chevron deposits. [1] Masse, W.B. 2007 The Archaeology and Anthropology of Quaternary Period Cosmic Impact. In Bobrowsky, P.T. & Rickman, H. (eds.)Comets/Asteroid Impacts and Human Society. Springer, Berlin (in press).

  3. Stone tools and foraging in northern Madagascar challenge Holocene extinction models

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Robert E.; Radimilahy, Chantal; Wright, Henry T.; Jacobs, Zenobia; Kelly, Gwendolyn O.; Berna, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Past research on Madagascar indicates that village communities were established about AD 500 by people of both Indonesian and East African heritage. Evidence of earlier visits is scattered and contentious. Recent archaeological excavations in northern Madagascar provide evidence of occupational sites with microlithic stone technologies related to foraging for forest and coastal resources. A forager occupation of one site dates to earlier than 2000 B.C., doubling the length of Madagascar’s known occupational history, and thus the time during which people exploited Madagascar’s environments. We detail stratigraphy, chronology, and artifacts from two rock shelters. Ambohiposa near Iharana (Vohémar) on the northeast coast, yielded a stratified assemblage with small flakes, microblades, and retouched crescentic and trapezoidal tools, probably projectile elements, made on cherts and obsidian, some brought more that 200 km. 14C dates are contemporary with the earliest villages. No food remains are preserved. Lakaton’i Anja near Antsiranana in the north yielded several stratified assemblages. The latest assemblage is well dated to A.D. 1050–1350, by 14C and optically stimulated luminescence dating and pottery imported from the Near East and China. Below is a series of stratified assemblages similar to Ambohiposa. 14C and optically stimulated luminescence dates indicate occupation from at least 2000 B.C. Faunal remains indicate a foraging pattern. Our evidence shows that foragers with a microlithic technology were active in Madagascar long before the arrival of farmers and herders and before many Late Holocene faunal extinctions. The differing effects of historically distinct economies must be identified and understood to reconstruct Holocene histories of human environmental impact. PMID:23858456

  4. New Material of Beelzebufo, a Hyperossified Frog (Amphibia: Anura) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Susan E.; Groenke, Joseph R.; Jones, Marc E. H.; Turner, Alan H.; Krause, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The extant anuran fauna of Madagascar is exceptionally rich and almost completely endemic. In recent years, many new species have been described and understanding of the history and relationships of this fauna has been greatly advanced by molecular studies, but very little is known of the fossil history of frogs on the island. Beelzebufo ampinga, the first named pre-Holocene frog from Madagascar, was described in 2008 on the basis of numerous disarticulated cranial and postcranial elements from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Maevarano Formation of Madagascar. These specimens documented the presence of a hyperossified taxon that differed strikingly from extant Malagasy frogs in its large size and heavy coarse cranial exostosis. Here we describe and analyse new, articulated, and more complete material of the skull, vertebral column, and hind limb, as well as additional isolated elements discovered since 2008. μCT scans allow a detailed understanding of both internal and external morphology and permit a more accurate reconstruction. The new material shows Beelzebufo to have been even more bizarre than originally interpreted, with large posterolateral skull flanges and sculptured vertebral spine tables. The apparent absence of a tympanic membrane, the strong cranial exostosis, and vertebral morphology suggest it may have burrowed during seasonally arid conditions, which have been interpreted for the Maevarano Formation from independent sedimentological and taphonomic evidence. New phylogenetic analyses, incorporating both morphological and molecular data, continue to place Beelzebufo with hyloid rather than ranoid frogs. Within Hyloidea, Beelzebufo still groups with the South American Ceratophryidae thus continuing to pose difficulties with both biogeographic interpretations and prior molecular divergence dates. PMID:24489877

  5. Monomia calla, a new species of swimming crab (Decapoda, Portunidae)
    from Madagascar and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Koch, Milan; Nguyen, Thanh Son; ?uriš, Zden?k

    2015-01-01

    A new species of portunid crab (Brachyura: Portunidae) from southern Madagascar and central Philippines is described. Monomia calla sp. nov. is most similar in morphology to M. lecromi (Moosa, 1996) from the Chesterfield Islands in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, and M. rubromarginata (Lanchester, 1900) from the South China Sea, Singapore, Malay Archipelago and the northern half of Australia. The new species can be easily distinguished from all congeners by the distinctive morphology of the male first gonopod. The number of species of the Indo-West Pacific genus Monomia now stands at 12. PMID:26250003

  6. Descriptions and biological notes on three unusual mantellid tadpoles (Amphibia: Anura: Mantellidae) from southeastern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Altig, R.; McDiarmid, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    The morphologies of three unusual tadpoles from slow-flowing, sandy-bottomed, rain forest streams in southeastern Madagascar are described. The large oral apparatus of the tadpole of Boophis picturatus Glaw, Vences, Andreone, and Vallan, 2001 lacks all keratinized structures and has an elaborately-folded lower labium with five, radially oriented, flattopped ridges. The tadpole of Mantidactylus guttulatus (Boulenger, 1881) lacks all keratinized mouthparts and has three immense papillae where the upper jaw normally occurs. The tadpole of Mantidactylus lugubris (Dumeril, 1853) has an ornate oral apparatus involving greatly hypertrophied derivatives of jaw serrations and unique structures on the lower labium that resemble labial teeth.

  7. Hypertension, a Neglected Disease in Rural and Urban Areas in Moramanga, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ratovoson, Rila; Rasetarinera, Ony Rabarisoa; Andrianantenaina, Ionimalala; Rogier, Christophe; Piola, Patrice; Pacaud, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is one of the main risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. In Madagascar, studies on hypertension in urban and rural communities are scarce. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and identify associated risk factors in adults living in a health and demographic system in Moramanga, Madagascar. Methods The study included people aged 15 years old and above living in a health and demographic system in Moramanga. A household census was performed in 2012 to enumerate the population in 3 communities in Moramanga. In addition to the questionnaire used in the initial census, a standardized questionnaire and blood pressure were taken twice after 5 and 10 minutes of rest. In urban areas, heights and weights were also measured to calculate the body mass index. Results There were 3621 and 4010 participants respectively in rural and urban areas. Prevalence of hypertension in rural population was 27.0% (IC95% [25.6–28.5]) and 29.7% (IC95% [28.3–31.1]) in urban population. Among hypertensive subjects, 1.7% (17/979) and 5.3% (64/1191) were on antihypertensive treatment for at least 1 month before the survey in rural and urban population, respectively. In rural areas, increasing age (65 years and older vs 18–25 years OR = 11.81, IC95% [7.79–18.07]), giving more than 3 positive responses to the usual risks factors of hypertension (OR = 1.67, IC95% [1.14–2.42]) and singles in comparison with married people (OR = 1.61, IC95% [1.20–2.17]) were associated to hypertension in a logistic regression model. In urban areas, increasing age (65 years and older vs 18–25 years OR = 37.54, IC95% [24.81–57.92]), more than 3 positive responses to the usual risks of hypertension (OR = 3.47, IC95% [2.58–4.67]) and obesity (OR = 2.45, IC95% [1.56–3.87]) were found as risk factors. Conclusion Hypertension is highly prevalent in rural areas although it is significantly less treated. As a result, a major epidemic of cardiovascular diseases is at risk in Madagascar’s progressively aging society. PMID:26355997

  8. Oxygen isotope systematics of gem corundum deposits in Madagascar: relevance for their geological origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Fallick, Anthony; Rakotondrazafy, Michel; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Andriamamonjy, Alfred; Ralantoarison, Théogène; Rakotosamizanany, Saholy; Razanatseheno, Marie; Offant, Yohann; Garnier, Virginie; Dunaigre, Christian; Schwarz, Dietmar; Mercier, Alain; Ratrimo, Voahangy; Ralison, Bruno

    2007-02-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of gem corundum was measured from 22 deposits and occurrences in Madagascar to provide a gemstone geological identification and characterization. Primary corundum deposits in Madagascar are hosted in magmatic (syenite and alkali basalt) and metamorphic rocks (gneiss, cordieritite, mafic and ultramafic rocks, marble, and calc-silicate rocks). In both domains the circulation of fluids, especially along shear zones for metamorphic deposits, provoked in situ transformation of the corundum host rocks with the formation of metasomatites such as phlogopite, sakenite, and corundumite. Secondary deposits (placers) are the most important economically and are contained in detrital basins and karsts. The oxygen isotopic ratios (18O/16O) of ruby and sapphire from primary deposits are a good indicator of their geological origin and reveal a wide range of ?18O (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) between 1.3 and 15.6‰. Metamorphic rubies are defined by two groups of ?18O values in the range of 1.7 to 2.9‰ (cordieritite) and 3.8 to 6.1‰ (amphibolite). “Magmatic” rubies from pyroxenitic xenoliths contained in the alkali basalt of Soamiakatra have ?18O values ranging between 1.3 and 4.7‰. Sapphires are classified into two main groups with ?18O in the range of 4.7 to 9.0‰ (pyroxenite and feldspathic gneiss) and 10.7 to 15.6‰ (skarn in marble from Andranondambo). The ?18O values for gem corundum from secondary deposits have a wide spread between -0.3 and 16.5‰. The ruby and sapphire found in placers linked to alkali basalt environments in the northern and central regions of Madagascar have consistent ?18O values between 3.5 and 6.9‰. Ruby from the placers of Vatomandry and Andilamena has ?18O values of 5.9‰, and between 0.5 and 4.0‰, respectively. The placers of the Ilakaka area are characterized by a huge variety of colored sapphires and rubies, with ?18O values between -0.3 and 16.5‰, and their origin is debated. A comparison with oxygen isotope data obtained on gem corundum from Eastern Africa, India, and Sri Lanka is presented. Giant placer deposits from Sri Lanka, Madagascar, and Tanzania have a large variety of colored sapphires and rubies with a large variation in ?18O due to mingling of corundum of different origin: mafic and ultramafic rocks for ruby, desilicated pegmatites for blue sapphire, syenite for yellow, green, and blue sapphire, and skarn in marbles for blue sapphire.

  9. Analyse macro-sociolinguistique d'une situation de diglossie: le cas de Madagascar (A Macro-Sociolinguistic Analysis of a Diglossic Situation: The Case of Madagascar). Publication H-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambelo, Michel

    The languages used in Madagascar are examined from the following perspectives: the linguistic varieties and functions socially recognized at the community level; the oppositions and complementarities that have become established between languages in contact; and the speakers' attitudes toward those varieties. The report focuses on the following…

  10. Isolation of 22 new Haliaeetus microsatellite loci and their characterization in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) and three other Haliaeetus eagle species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tingay, R.E.; Dawson, D.A.; Pandhal, J.; Clarke, M.L.; David, V.A.; Hailer, F.; Culver, M.

    2007-01-01

    We isolated a total of 22 microsatellite loci from two Haliaeetus species: the Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Five loci were monomorphic in both the Madagascar fish-eagle (n = 24-43) and the bald eagle (n = 2-8) but were found to be polymorphic in other Haliaeetus species. Haliaeetus loci have proved useful for investigating gene flow in Haliaeetus and Aquila eagles. Ten loci were polymorphic in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle and will be used to investigate the genetic population structure and mating system in this species. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  11. Well-Being Is a Process of Becoming: Respondent-Led Research with Organic Farmers in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnworth, Cathy Rozel

    2009-01-01

    Malagasy "players"--farmers, middle men, organic organisations and policy makers--see in export-orientated organic agriculture a way for Madagascar to build upon its historic export strengths: spices, essential oils, medicinal plants and tropical fruits. They point to the "de facto" organic status of most farming in the country and view organic…

  12. Setting Up a Bibliographic Database from National Inventory of Scientific and Technical Literature. The CIDST Experience in Madagascar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andriamparany, Louis Marius; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development of a bibliographic database in Madagascar through a national inventory of scientific and technical literature. The roles of the Ministry of Scientific and Technological Research for Development (MRSTD) and its information service, CIDST, are described; database products are discussed; and future prospects are suggested.…

  13. Well-Being Is a Process of Becoming: Respondent-Led Research with Organic Farmers in Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnworth, Cathy Rozel

    2009-01-01

    Malagasy "players"--farmers, middle men, organic organisations and policy makers--see in export-orientated organic agriculture a way for Madagascar to build upon its historic export strengths: spices, essential oils, medicinal plants and tropical fruits. They point to the "de facto" organic status of most farming in the country and view organic…

  14. Performance of a Receptive Language Test among Young Children in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ann M.; Fernald, Lia C. H.; Galasso, Emanuela; Ratsifandrihamanana, Lisy

    2015-01-01

    Language tests developed and validated in one country may lose their desired properties when translated for use in another, possibly resulting in misleading estimates of ability. Using Item Response Theory (IRT) methodology, we assess the performance of a test of receptive vocabulary, the U.S.-validated Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III), when translated, adapted, and administered to children 3 to 10 years of age in Madagascar (N = 1372), in the local language (Malagasy). Though Malagasy is considered a single language, there are numerous dialects spoken in Madagascar. Our findings were that test scores were positively correlated with age and indicators of socio-economic status. However, over half (57/96) of items evidenced unexpected response variation and/or bias by local dialect spoken. We also encountered measurement error and reduced differentiation among person abilities when we used the publishers’ recommended stopping rules, largely because we lost the original item ordering by difficulty when we translated test items into Malagasy. Our results suggest that bias and testing inefficiency introduced from the translation of the PPVT can be significantly reduced with the use of methods based on IRT at both the pre-testing and analysis stages. We explore and discuss implications for cross-cultural comparisons of internationally recognized tests, such as the PPVT. PMID:25830221

  15. Widespread presence of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild amphibian communities in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Bletz, Molly C.; Rosa, Gonçalo M.; Andreone, Franco; Courtois, Elodie A.; Schmeller, Dirk S.; Rabibisoa, Nirhy H. C.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana C. E.; Raharivololoniaina, Liliane; Vences, Miguel; Weldon, Ché; Edmonds, Devin; Raxworthy, Christopher J.; Harris, Reid N.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Crottini, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been a significant driver of amphibian declines. While globally widespread, Bd had not yet been reported from within Madagascar. We document surveys conducted across the country between 2005 and 2014, showing Bd's first record in 2010. Subsequently, Bd was detected in multiple areas, with prevalence reaching up to 100%. Detection of Bd appears to be associated with mid to high elevation sites and to have a seasonal pattern, with greater detectability during the dry season. Lineage-based PCR was performed on a subset of samples. While some did not amplify with any lineage probe, when a positive signal was observed, samples were most similar to the Global Panzootic Lineage (BdGPL). These results may suggest that Bd arrived recently, but do not exclude the existence of a previously undetected endemic Bd genotype. Representatives of all native anuran families have tested Bd-positive, and exposure trials confirm infection by Bd is possible. Bd's presence could pose significant threats to Madagascar's unique “megadiverse” amphibians. PMID:25719857

  16. Primates as Predictors of Mammal Community Diversity in the Forest Ecosystems of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Kathleen M.; Goodman, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The geographic distribution of species is the typical metric for identifying priority areas for conservation. Since most biodiversity remains poorly studied, a subset of charismatic species, such as primates, often stand as surrogates for total biodiversity. A central question is therefore, how effectively do primates predict the pooled species richness of other mammalian taxa? We used lemurs as indicator species to predict total non-primate mammal community richness in the forest ecosystems of Madagascar. We combine environmental and species occurrence data to ascertain the extent to which primate diversity can predict (1) non-primate mammal α-diversity (species richness), (2) non-primate complementarity, and (3) non-primate β-diversity (species turnover). Our results indicate that primates are effective predictors of non-primate mammal community diversity in the forest ecosystems of Madagascar after controlling for habitat. When individual orders of mammals are considered, lemurs effectively predict the species richness of carnivorans and rodents (but not afrosoricids), complementarity of rodents (but not carnivorans or afrosoricids), and all individual components of β-diversity. We conclude that lemurs effectively predict total non-primate community richness. However, surrogate species alone cannot achieve complete representation of biodiversity. PMID:26334525

  17. Interannual variability of South Equatorial Current bifurcation and western boundary currents along the Madagascar coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagami, Y.; Tozuka, T.

    2015-12-01

    The South Equatorial Current (SEC) in the southern Indian Ocean bifurcates at the east coast of Madagascar into the Northeast and Southeast Madagascar Currents (NEMC and SEMC, respectively). In observational and reanalysis data, interannual variations of the NEMC and SEMC transports are strongly correlated with those of the SEC transport, rather than those of the SEC bifurcation latitude (SBL). Their dynamical mechanisms are then examined based on the Time-Dependent Island Rule for the first time. It is shown that interannual anomalies of the SBL as well as the NEMC and SEMC transports are predominantly a response to the anomalous inflow from the ocean interior that is determined by the meridional interior transport. This, in turn, is a result of westward propagating Rossby waves induced by wind stress curl anomalies mainly in 60°E-90°E. The above mechanism is contrasted with that of the seasonal variation, where the local transport driven by wind stress around the island plays a role. Furthermore, the interannual variations of the SBL and the NEMC and SEMC transports are significantly correlated with the Niño 3.4 index with 5-15 months lag. It is suggested that diabatic heating anomalies associated with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) along with a local process in the southeastern Indian Ocean may generate wind stress curl anomalies over the southern Indian Ocean.

  18. DNA barcoding for effective biodiversity assessment of a hyperdiverse arthropod group: the ants of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Alex; Fisher, Brian L; Hebert, Paul D.N

    2005-01-01

    The role of DNA barcoding as a tool to accelerate the inventory and analysis of diversity for hyperdiverse arthropods is tested using ants in Madagascar. We demonstrate how DNA barcoding helps address the failure of current inventory methods to rapidly respond to pressing biodiversity needs, specifically in the assessment of richness and turnover across landscapes with hyperdiverse taxa. In a comparison of inventories at four localities in northern Madagascar, patterns of richness were not significantly different when richness was determined using morphological taxonomy (morphospecies) or sequence divergence thresholds (Molecular Operational Taxonomic Unit(s); MOTU). However, sequence-based methods tended to yield greater richness and significantly lower indices of similarity than morphological taxonomy. MOTU determined using our molecular technique were a remarkably local phenomenon—indicative of highly restricted dispersal and/or long-term isolation. In cases where molecular and morphological methods differed in their assignment of individuals to categories, the morphological estimate was always more conservative than the molecular estimate. In those cases where morphospecies descriptions collapsed distinct molecular groups, sequence divergences of 16% (on average) were contained within the same morphospecies. Such high divergences highlight taxa for further detailed genetic, morphological, life history, and behavioral studies. PMID:16214741

  19. Investigating Mantle Structure with Broadband Seismic Arrays in Madagascar and Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamanana, G.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty-one broadband seismometers were installed in Madagascar (25) and Mozambique (6) in 2011-2012 as part of the 2-year MACOMO project of the IRIS PASSCAL program. A major goal is to investigate the occurrence of hot spot intraplate volcanism in Madagascar and its possible connection to other African volcanic activity and the lower mantle LLSVP (large low shear-velocity province). The African LLSVP is the largest seismic anomaly within the earth, and as an enormous thermochemical boundary layer between the mantle and, it plays a vitally important role in controlling the nature of vertical mass flux within the mantle, and therefore both mantle convection and its manifestation at the surface as plate tectonics. The African LLSVP is thought to play an important role in the abundant occurrence of hot spot volcanism on the African plate, but the mechanism by which this occurs is not known due to the extremely limited data sampling available at this location in the Southern Hemisphere. These arrays on the world's 4th-largest island (the first such array of its kind) and in Mozambique, together with existing African Array stations and concurrent temporary installations of land and OBS stations by French and German projects, is providing unprecedented data that will allow us to seismically map (using velocity and attenuation seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting, and receiver function analysis for topography variations on mantle boundaries, and other methods) the connection between surface hot spot volcanism and other mantle seismic anomalies such as the LLSVP.

  20. Impact of the high topography of Madagascar on the structure of the Findlater Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. W. K.

    2013-05-01

    The cross-equatorial flow over the western Indian Ocean, known as the Findlater Jet, plays an important role in the monsoonal circulation of the region. During the boreal summer, there is southerly flow across the equator that is concentrated along the East African highlands. During the boreal winter, there is a reversal in wind direction across the equator. Madagascar, the world's fourth largest island, with heights in excess of 1 km represents a significant obstacle to the flow whose impact on this jet has not been fully characterized. Here we use diagnostic tools developed to investigate atmospheric flow distortion by Greenland's high topography to study this interaction. We show that there is a bifurcation of the Findlater Jet by Madagascar during the boreal summer and localized tip jets at the island's northern and southern ends. During the boreal winter, the northern tip jet reverses direction and weakens, while the southern tip jet maintains its direction and magnitude. We show that rotational effects are important for these interactions but not dominant and result in an enhancement of the northern tip jet; while allowing for existence of the southern tip jet. As will also be shown, this flow distortion has impacts on the meteorology and oceanography of the region including the forcing of oceanic eddies in the Mozambique Channel, a modulation of the southward displacement of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and a splitting of the boreal summer cross-equatorial mass transport associated with the Findlater Jet into two branches.

  1. Prevalence and correlates of tobacco use among school-going adolescents in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Veeranki, Sreenivas P; Mamudu, Hadii M; John, Rijo M; Ouma, Ahmed E O

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 90% of adults start smoking during adolescence, with limited studies conducted in low-and-middle-income countries where over 80% of global tobacco users reside. The study aims to estimate prevalence and identify predictors associated with adolescents' tobacco use in Madagascar. We utilized tobacco-related information of 1184 school-going adolescents aged 13-15 years, representing a total of 296,111 youth from the 2008 Madagascar Global Youth Tobacco Survey to determine the prevalence of tobacco use. Gender-wise multivariable logistic regression models were conducted to identify key predictors. Approximately 19% (30.7% males; 10.2% females) of adolescents currently smoke cigarettes, and 7% (8.5% males and 5.8% females) currently use non-cigarette tobacco products. Regardless of sex, peer smoking behavior was significantly associated with increased tobacco use among adolescents. In addition, exposures to tobacco industry promotions, secondhand smoke (SHS) and anti-smoking media messages were associated with tobacco use. The strong gender gap in the use of non-cigarette tobacco products, and the role of peer smoking and industry promotions in adolescent females' tobacco use should be of major advocacy and policy concern. A comprehensive tobacco control program integrating parental and peer education, creating social norms, and ban on promotions is necessary to reduce adolescents' tobacco use. PMID:26044844

  2. Widespread presence of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild amphibian communities in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Bletz, Molly C; Rosa, Gonçalo M; Andreone, Franco; Courtois, Elodie A; Schmeller, Dirk S; Rabibisoa, Nirhy H C; Rabemananjara, Falitiana C E; Raharivololoniaina, Liliane; Vences, Miguel; Weldon, Ché; Edmonds, Devin; Raxworthy, Christopher J; Harris, Reid N; Fisher, Matthew C; Crottini, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been a significant driver of amphibian declines. While globally widespread, Bd had not yet been reported from within Madagascar. We document surveys conducted across the country between 2005 and 2014, showing Bd's first record in 2010. Subsequently, Bd was detected in multiple areas, with prevalence reaching up to 100%. Detection of Bd appears to be associated with mid to high elevation sites and to have a seasonal pattern, with greater detectability during the dry season. Lineage-based PCR was performed on a subset of samples. While some did not amplify with any lineage probe, when a positive signal was observed, samples were most similar to the Global Panzootic Lineage (BdGPL). These results may suggest that Bd arrived recently, but do not exclude the existence of a previously undetected endemic Bd genotype. Representatives of all native anuran families have tested Bd-positive, and exposure trials confirm infection by Bd is possible. Bd's presence could pose significant threats to Madagascar's unique "megadiverse" amphibians. PMID:25719857

  3. Statut familial et inégalités face à la scolarisation à Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, Valérie; Gastineau, Bénédicte; Andriamaro, Frédérique

    2013-12-01

    The impact of family status in Madagascar on inequalities in schooling - In this article, in the context of generalised access to primary education and parity between girls and boys, we analyse data from the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) 2009 in Madagascar to examine inequalities in schooling related to children's status in the family. The results confirm the protective benefit for children of living with their biological parents. Fostered children are disadvantaged, especially and increasingly so depending on whether they live with an uncle or aunt, with a distant relative or a non-relative. Conversely, children who reside in the home of a brother or sister are not disadvantaged, a result which reflects the role of elder children in family education strategies. Grandparents play a moderately positive role in schooling. The death of the father is an important factor in dropping out. Finally, children whose parent or parents are not household heads are disadvantaged in terms of schooling compared to children of household heads.

  4. The Settlement of Madagascar: What Dialects and Languages Can Tell Us

    PubMed Central

    Serva, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The dialects of Madagascar belong to the Greater Barito East group of the Austronesian family and it is widely accepted that the Island was colonized by Indonesian sailors after a maritime trek that probably took place around 650 CE. The language most closely related to Malagasy dialects is Maanyan, but Malay is also strongly related especially for navigation terms. Since the Maanyan Dayaks live along the Barito river in Kalimantan (Borneo) and they do not possess the necessary skill for long maritime navigation, they were probably brought as subordinates by Malay sailors. In a recent paper we compared 23 different Malagasy dialects in order to determine the time and the landing area of the first colonization. In this research we use new data and new methods to confirm that the landing took place on the south-east coast of the Island. Furthermore, we are able to state here that colonization probably consisted of a single founding event rather than multiple settlements.To reach our goal we find out the internal kinship relations among all the 23 Malagasy dialects and we also find out the relations of the 23 dialects to Malay and Maanyan. The method used is an automated version of the lexicostatistic approach. The data from Madagascar were collected by the author at the beginning of 2010 and consist of Swadesh lists of 200 items for 23 dialects covering all areas of the Island. The lists for Maanyan and Malay were obtained from a published dataset integrated with the author's interviews. PMID:22363465

  5. Rural livelihoods and access to natural capital: Differences between migrants and non-migrants in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Nawrotzki, Raphael J.; Hunter, Lori M.; Dickinson, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although natural resources play a central role in rural livelihoods across the globe, little research has explored the relationship between migration and natural capital use, particularly in combination with other livelihood capitals (i.e., human, social, financial and physical). OBJECTIVE Grounded in the rural livelihood framework, this paper explores the association between the livelihood capital availability, especially natural capital, for migrants and non-migrants in rural Madagascar. METHODS Data from the 2008/2009 Demographic and Health Survey are used in combination with satellite imagery of vegetation coverage (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, NDVI) to proxy natural resources. Hierarchical multilevel models allow for inclusion of cross-level interactions between migrant status and proximate natural resources as determinants of the status of livelihood assets. RESULTS Three key findings emerge. First, higher levels of proximate natural resources are associated with greater financial, human, and social capital for both migrants and non-migrants. Second, migrants have, on average, greater financial, physical, human, and social capital than non-migrants, and urban-to-rural migrants do exceptionally well on all capital asset categories. Third, migrants residing in areas with higher levels of natural capital tend to have significantly higher levels of human capital (education). CONCLUSION Although we cannot examine livelihood strategies per se, the results suggest variation in livelihood potential among migrants and non-migrants in rural Madagascar, with migrants tending to have greater capital assets. In addition, access to natural resources is a central livelihood strategy. PMID:25364297

  6. The Role of Demography and Markets in Determining Deforestation Rates Near Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Christopher P.; Holmes, Christopher; Kramer, Karen; Barnett, Barry; Keitt, Timothy H.

    2009-01-01

    The highland forests of Madagascar are home to some of the world's most unique and diverse flora and fauna and to some of its poorest people. This juxtaposition of poverty and biodiversity is continually reinforced by rapid population growth, which results in increasing pressure on the remaining forest habitat in the highland region, and the biodiversity therein. Here we derive a mathematical expression for the subsistence of households to assess the role of markets and household demography on deforestation near Ranomafana National Park. In villages closest to urban rice markets, households were likely to clear less land than our model predicted, presumably because they were purchasing food at market. This effect was offset by the large number of migrant households who cleared significantly more land between 1989–2003 than did residents throughout the region. Deforestation by migrant households typically occurred after a mean time lag of 9 years. Analyses suggest that while local conservation efforts in Madagascar have been successful at reducing the footprint of individual households, large-scale conservation must rely on policies that can reduce the establishment of new households in remaining forested areas. PMID:19536282

  7. Miocene benthic foraminifera from Nosy Makamby and Amparafaka, Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N.; Andrianavalona, Tsiory H.; Razafimbelo, Rachel; Rahantarisoa, Lydia; Ali, Jason R.; Samonds, Karen E.

    2014-12-01

    Madagascar is well known for its fossil deposits and hosts one of the world's most important Upper Cretaceous terrestrial faunal sites (in the Mahajanga and Morondava Basins in the west and northwest of the island). Cenozoic marine fossils are also described from Madagascar, but these have received far less attention from the paleontological community, with most of this work dating from the 19th and early 20th centuries. Our study reports a new comprehensive microfossil assemblage from a Miocene sequence on the island of Nosy Makamby. After washing, sieving and sorting (∼30 kg), twenty-five genera of foraminifera were identified including Alveolina, Ammodiscus, Ammonia, Archaias, Bolivina, Borelis, Cassidulina, Cyclammina, Cycloforina, Dentalina, Elphidium, Hauerina, Lagena, Lepidocyclina, Nodosaria, Nonion, Nonionella, Peneroplis, Pyrgo, Quinqueloculina, Rhabdammina, Spirillina, Spirolina, Spiroloculina and Triloculina. Ostracods are found in association with the foraminifera, as well as many other macroinvertebrate fossils (including bivalves, gastropods, and echinoids) in addition to vertebrate fossils. Together, the assemblage indicates that during the late Miocene, Nosy Makamby was a tropical, near-shore environment, probably similar to that seen today. Furthermore, the existence of epiphytic foraminiferans (e.g., Elphidium) suggests that sea-grass beds were likely present.

  8. Primates as Predictors of Mammal Community Diversity in the Forest Ecosystems of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Kathleen M; Goodman, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The geographic distribution of species is the typical metric for identifying priority areas for conservation. Since most biodiversity remains poorly studied, a subset of charismatic species, such as primates, often stand as surrogates for total biodiversity. A central question is therefore, how effectively do primates predict the pooled species richness of other mammalian taxa? We used lemurs as indicator species to predict total non-primate mammal community richness in the forest ecosystems of Madagascar. We combine environmental and species occurrence data to ascertain the extent to which primate diversity can predict (1) non-primate mammal ?-diversity (species richness), (2) non-primate complementarity, and (3) non-primate ?-diversity (species turnover). Our results indicate that primates are effective predictors of non-primate mammal community diversity in the forest ecosystems of Madagascar after controlling for habitat. When individual orders of mammals are considered, lemurs effectively predict the species richness of carnivorans and rodents (but not afrosoricids), complementarity of rodents (but not carnivorans or afrosoricids), and all individual components of ?-diversity. We conclude that lemurs effectively predict total non-primate community richness. However, surrogate species alone cannot achieve complete representation of biodiversity. PMID:26334525

  9. [Madagascar: esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Descriptive analysis of 12,000 examinations and problems encountered in the tropics].

    PubMed

    Peghini, M; Rajaonarison, P; Pecarrere, J L; Razafindramboa, H; Andriantsoavina, H; Rakotomalala, M; Ramarokoto, N

    1996-01-01

    The experience of the Digestive Endoscopy Center of the Soavinandriana Hospital in Antananarivo provides insight into not only esogastroduodenal disease in Madagascar but also technical problems involved in performing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in tropical areas. From September 1990 to March 1995 a total of 12000 esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy procedures were performed without complication. The main finding was duodenal ulcer which observed in 3580 cases (29.8% of patients) followed by peptic esophagitis due to gastroesophageal reflux in 555 cases and gastric ulcer in 460 cases. Esophageal cancer was detected in 16 cases and malignant gastroduodenal tumor in 82 cases including 63 adenocarcinomas and 5 digestive lymphomas. Overall 4156 procedures (34.6%) were normal and 1130 procedures (9.4%) were performed to investigate digestive tract hemorrhage. These findings document the high incidence of duodenal ulcer in Madagascar where treatment of this condition is difficult due to the high cost. This study underlines the problems encountered in operating an endoscopy department in tropical areas especially with regard to desinfection of equipment and training of endoscopists. PMID:8767801

  10. [Rice: source of life and death on the plateaux of Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Laventure, S; Mouchet, J; Blanchy, S; Marrama, L; Rabarison, P; Andrianaivolambo, L; Rajaonarivelo, E; Rakotoarivony, I; Roux, J

    1996-01-01

    Since the 17th century, Europeans travelling in Madagascar described the contrast between the fever-free Plateau and the fever-ridden coasts. The former were inhabited by people of Asiatic origins and the latter by African migrants. At the end of the 18th century, "Merina" kings developed land irrigation and rice cultivation, using manpower from the coasts. Since then, rice has become a monoculture covering most of the arable lands of the Highlands. The first malaria epidemic occurred in the Tananarive area in 1878, and rapidly spread throughout the Plateau. The mortality rate was high. A second epidemic in 1895 may have been a resurgence of the previous one. Subsequently, malaria became meso-epidemic despite control measures, mainly consisting of larvivorous fishes, quinine treatment and prophylaxis. In 1949, an eradication program was launched based on DDT house-spraying and chloroquine prophylaxis in children. It was very successful on the Highlands where malaria disappeared, in 1962. Spraying was cancelled and only three small foci remained under surveillance. In 1987 and 1988, a malaria outbreak devastated the plateau. Subsequently, intensive spraying operations brought the situation under control by 1993. The main malaria vector on the Madagascar Highlands is An. funestus. More than 95% of its breeding sites are in the rice fields just before the harvest and afterwards in the fallow lands. The vector peak and the corresponding peak of malaria cases occur between February and May, depending on the farming calender. The second but less important vector, An. arabiensis, breeds in the rice fields just after seeding when the surface water is sunlit. Although rice fields remain the main source of this vector, it also breeds in rainwater pods and borow-pits. Malaria vectors on the plateau are products of human activities of rice cultivation, which is the basis of the economy. The epidemiological importance of rice fields varies greatly from one country to another. In Southeast Asia, the rice fields harbor several anopheline species most of which are only vectors of P. vivax. In West Africa where malaria is holoendemic, they produce large populations of An. gambiae; however, the malaria pattern is unaltered and remains at peak levels. In the dry areas of southern Madagascar, the vector An. funestus and meso-hyperendemic malaria are restricted to areas of cultivated rice. In West and Central Africa, An. funestus is never found in rice fields even though it is common in marshes. In Madagascar, this vector breeds in irrigated rice fields. Because it is practically impossible to control anophelines in rice fields by chemical, biological and ecological methods on the Highlands of Madagascar, house-spraying remains the best method for mass malaria control. Bed-nets impregnated with pesticides may offer an alternative, but their use is resisted by the local population. PMID:8705134

  11. In or Out-of-Madagascar?—Colonization Patterns for Large-Bodied Diving Beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bukontaite, Rasa; Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra; Randriamihaja, Jacquelin Herisahala; Bergsten, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    High species diversity and endemism within Madagascar is mainly the result of species radiations following colonization from nearby continents or islands. Most of the endemic taxa are thought to be descendants of a single or small number of colonizers that arrived from Africa sometime during the Cenozoic and gave rise to highly diverse groups. This pattern is largely based on vertebrates and a small number of invertebrate groups. Knowledge of the evolutionary history of aquatic beetles on Madagascar is lacking, even though this species-rich group is often a dominant part of invertebrate freshwater communities in both standing and running water. Here we focus on large bodied diving beetles of the tribes Hydaticini and Cybistrini. Our aims with this study were to answer the following questions 1) How many colonization events does the present Malagasy fauna originate from? 2) Did any colonization event lead to a species radiation? 3) Where did the colonizers come from—Africa or Asia—and has there been any out-of-Madagascar event? 4) When did these events occur and were they concentrated to any particular time interval? Our results suggest that neither in Hydaticini nor in Cybistrini was there a single case of two or more endemic species forming a monophyletic group. The biogeographical analysis indicated different colonization histories for the two tribes. Cybistrini required at least eight separate colonization events, including the non-endemic species, all comparatively recent except the only lotic (running water) living Cybister operosus with an inferred colonization at 29 Ma. In Hydaticini the Madagascan endemics were spread out across the tree, often occupying basal positions in different species groups. The biogeographical analyses therefore postulated the very bold hypothesis of a Madagascan origin at a very deep basal node within Hydaticus and multiple out-of-Madagascar dispersal events. This hypothesis needs to be tested with equally intense taxon sampling of mainland Africa as for Madagascar. PMID:25794184

  12. Endemism and diversification in freshwater insects of Madagascar revealed by coalescent and phylogenetic analysis of museum and field collections.

    PubMed

    Vuataz, Laurent; Sartori, Michel; Gattolliat, Jean-Luc; Monaghan, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    The biodiversity and endemism of Madagascar are among the most extraordinary and endangered in the world. This includes the island's freshwater biodiversity, although detailed knowledge of the diversity, endemism, and biogeographic origin of freshwater invertebrates is lacking. The aquatic immature stages of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) are widely used as bio-indicators and form an important component of Malagasy freshwater biodiversity. Many species are thought to be microendemics, restricted to single river basins in forested areas, making them particularly sensitive to habitat reduction and degradation. The Heptageniidae are a globally diverse family of mayflies (>500 species) but remain practically unknown in Madagascar except for two species described in 1996. The standard approach to understanding their diversity, endemism, and origin would require extensive field sampling on several continents and years of taxonomic work followed by phylogenetic analysis. Here we circumvent this using museum collections and freshly collected individuals in a combined approach of DNA taxonomy and phylogeny. The coalescent-based GMYC analysis of DNA barcode data (mitochondrial COI) revealed 14 putative species on Madagascar, 70% of which were microendemics. A phylogenetic analysis that included African and Asian species and data from two mitochondrial and four nuclear loci indicated the Malagasy Heptageniidae are monophyletic and sister to African species. The genus Compsoneuria is shown to be paraphyletic and the genus Notonurus is reinstalled for African and Malagasy species previously placed in Compsoneuria. A molecular clock excluded a Gondwanan vicariance origin and instead favoured a more recent overseas colonization of Madagascar. The observed monophyly and high microendemism highlight their conservation importance and suggest the DNA-based approach can rapidly provide information on the diversity, endemism, and origin of freshwater biodiversity. Our results underline the important role that museum collections can play in molecular studies, especially in critically endangered biodiversity hotspots like Madagascar where entire species or populations may go extinct very quickly. PMID:23261711

  13. In and out of Madagascar: Dispersal to Peripheral Islands, Insular Speciation and Diversification of Indian Ocean Daisy Trees (Psiadia, Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Strijk, Joeri S.; Noyes, Richard D.; Strasberg, Dominique; Cruaud, Corinne; Gavory, Fredéric; Chase, Mark W.; Abbott, Richard J.; Thébaud, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar is surrounded by archipelagos varying widely in origin, age and structure. Although small and geologically young, these archipelagos have accumulated disproportionate numbers of unique lineages in comparison to Madagascar, highlighting the role of waif-dispersal and rapid in situ diversification processes in generating endemic biodiversity. We reconstruct the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the genus Psiadia (Asteraceae), a plant genus with near equal numbers of species in Madagascar and surrounding islands. Analyzing patterns and processes of diversification, we explain species accumulation on peripheral islands and aim to offer new insights on the origin and potential causes for diversification in the Madagascar and Indian Ocean Islands biodiversity hotspot. Our results provide support for an African origin of the group, with strong support for non-monophyly. Colonization of the Mascarenes took place by two evolutionary distinct lineages from Madagascar, via two independent dispersal events, each unique for their spatial and temporal properties. Significant shifts in diversification rate followed regional expansion, resulting in co-occurring and phenotypically convergent species on high-elevation volcanic slopes. Like other endemic island lineages, Psiadia have been highly successful in dispersing to and radiating on isolated oceanic islands, typified by high habitat diversity and dynamic ecosystems fuelled by continued geological activity. Results stress the important biogeographical role for Rodrigues in serving as an outlying stepping stone from which regional colonization took place. We discuss how isolated volcanic islands contribute to regional diversity by generating substantial numbers of endemic species on short temporal scales. Factors pertaining to the mode and tempo of archipelago formation and its geographical isolation strongly govern evolutionary pathways available for species diversification, and the potential for successful diversification of dispersed lineages, therefore, appears highly dependent on the timing of arrival, as habitat and resource properties change dramatically over the course of oceanic island evolution. PMID:22900068

  14. In and out of Madagascar: dispersal to peripheral islands, insular speciation and diversification of Indian Ocean daisy trees (Psiadia, Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Strijk, Joeri S; Noyes, Richard D; Strasberg, Dominique; Cruaud, Corinne; Gavory, Fredéric; Chase, Mark W; Abbott, Richard J; Thébaud, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar is surrounded by archipelagos varying widely in origin, age and structure. Although small and geologically young, these archipelagos have accumulated disproportionate numbers of unique lineages in comparison to Madagascar, highlighting the role of waif-dispersal and rapid in situ diversification processes in generating endemic biodiversity. We reconstruct the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the genus Psiadia (Asteraceae), a plant genus with near equal numbers of species in Madagascar and surrounding islands. Analyzing patterns and processes of diversification, we explain species accumulation on peripheral islands and aim to offer new insights on the origin and potential causes for diversification in the Madagascar and Indian Ocean Islands biodiversity hotspot. Our results provide support for an African origin of the group, with strong support for non-monophyly. Colonization of the Mascarenes took place by two evolutionary distinct lineages from Madagascar, via two independent dispersal events, each unique for their spatial and temporal properties. Significant shifts in diversification rate followed regional expansion, resulting in co-occurring and phenotypically convergent species on high-elevation volcanic slopes. Like other endemic island lineages, Psiadia have been highly successful in dispersing to and radiating on isolated oceanic islands, typified by high habitat diversity and dynamic ecosystems fuelled by continued geological activity. Results stress the important biogeographical role for Rodrigues in serving as an outlying stepping stone from which regional colonization took place. We discuss how isolated volcanic islands contribute to regional diversity by generating substantial numbers of endemic species on short temporal scales. Factors pertaining to the mode and tempo of archipelago formation and its geographical isolation strongly govern evolutionary pathways available for species diversification, and the potential for successful diversification of dispersed lineages, therefore, appears highly dependent on the timing of arrival, as habitat and resource properties change dramatically over the course of oceanic island evolution. PMID:22900068

  15. Evolution of high-pressure mafic granulites and pelitic gneisses from NE Madagascar: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishwar-Kumar, C.; Sajeev, K.; Windley, B. F.; Kusky, T. M.; Feng, P.; Ratheesh-Kumar, R. T.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Jiang, X.; Razakamanana, T.; Yagi, K.; Itaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of high-pressure mafic-ultramafic bodies within major shear zones is one of the indicators of paleo-subduction. In mafic granulites of the Andriamena complex (north-eastern Madagascar) we document unusual textures including garnet-clinopyroxene-quartz coronas that formed after the breakdown of orthopyroxene-plagioclase-ilmenite. Textural evidence and isochemical phase diagram calculations in the Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-TiO2 system indicate a pressure-temperature (P-T) evolution from an isothermal (780 °C) pressure up to c. 24 kbar to decompression and cooling. Such a P-T trajectory is typically attained in a subduction zone setting where a gabbroic/ultramafic complex is subducted and later exhumed to the present crustal level during oceanic closure and final continental collision. The present results suggest that the presence of such deeply subducted rocks of the Andriamena complex is related to formation of the Betsimisaraka suture. LA-ICPMS U-Pb zircon dating of pelitic gneisses from the Betsimisaraka suture yields low Th/U ratios and protolith ages ranging from 2535 to 2625 Ma. A granitic gneiss from the Alaotra complex yields a zircon crystallization age of ca. 818 Ma and Th/U ratios vary from 1.08 to 2.09. K-Ar dating of muscovite and biotite from biotite-kyanite-sillimanite gneiss and garnet-biotite gneiss yields age of 486 ± 9 Ma and 459 ± 9 Ma respectively. We have estimated regional crustal thicknesses in NE Madagascar using a flexural inversion technique, which indicates the presence of an anomalously thick crust (c. 43 km) beneath the Antananarivo block. This result is consistent with the present concept that subduction beneath the Antananarivo block resulted in a more competent and thicker crust. The textural data, thermodynamic model, and geophysical evidence together provide a new insight to the subduction history, crustal thickening and evolution of the high-pressure Andriamena complex and its link to the terminal formation of the Betsimisaraka suture in north-eastern Madagascar.

  16. Combined teleseismic surface wave and receiver function analysis of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, M. J.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Shore, P.; Rambolamanana, G.; Tsiriandrimanana, R.; Andriampenomanana Ny Ony, F. S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The continental crust and upper mantle velocity structure beneath Madagascar remained poorly constrained until recent deployments of broadband seismic instrumentation across the island. The MACOMO (MAdagascar, COmoros and MOzambique), RHUM-RUM (Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel) and the Madagascar Seismic Profile experiments have opened up this region to be studied in detail for the first time. The island is an amalgamation of an Archean craton, associated with the Western Dhawar craton of southern India, and a series of Proterozoic terranes that comprise the backbone of the island (Tucker et al., 2010). A receiver-function analysis has provided both the first Moho depth measurements and spatially discrete 1-D shear velocity results that matched well with known tectonic regions. To provide a more continuous 2-D and 3-D velocity structure map, teleseismic surface wave analysis is employed. Using Helmholtz tomography as implemented by the ASWMS package (Ge, Gaherty and Hutko; 2014), we are able to map phase velocities from the cross-correlation of station pairs at periods 20-100 s. At periods 20-40 s our results compare well with ambient noise analysis results (see poster by Wysession et al. (this meeting)). The prominent features of these results are a distinct low phase-velocity sector beneath the central Itasy region, with a secondary low phase-velocity region to the north of the island. Both the central part of the island and the northern region have experienced geothermal activity in recent times as well as volcanic activity within the last 10,000 years. This may suggest that the crust and underlying mantle in these regions remains at relatively higher temperatures than the surrounding rock. Combining this information with receiver-function analysis, we jointly invert our data for the shear velocity structure. These analyses will constrain the upper mantle seismic velocities in the region, allowing further analysis from body waves to probe the transition zone and determine whether or not these low-velocity zones extend into the deep mantle.

  17. Cover sequences at the northern margin of the Antongil Craton, NE Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, W.; Walsh, G.J.; De Waele, B.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Bracciali, L.; Schofield, D.I.; Wollenberg, U.; Lidke, D.J.; Rasaona, I.T.; Rabarimanana, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The island of Madagascar is a collage of Precambrian, generally high-grade metamorphic basement domains, that are locally overlain by unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks and poorly understood low-grade metasediments. In the Antalaha area of NE Madagascar, two distinct cover sequences rest on high-grade metamorphic and igneous basement rocks of the Archaean Antongil craton and the Neoproterozoic Bemarivo belt. The older of these two cover sequences, the Andrarona Group, consists of low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The younger sequence, the newly defined Ampohafana Formation, consists of unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The Andrarona Group rests on Neoarchaean granites and monzogranites of the Antongil craton and consists of a basal metagreywacke, thick quartzites and an upper sequence of sericite-chlorite meta-mudstones, meta-sandstones and a volcaniclastic meta-sandstone. The depositional age of the volcaniclastic meta-sandstone is constrained in age by U–Pb laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of euhedral zircons to 1875 ± 8 Ma (2σ). Detrital zircons of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic age represent an input from the Antongil craton and a newly defined Palaeoproterozoic igneous unit, the Masindray tonalite, which underlies the Andrarona Group, and yielded a U–Pb zircon age of 2355 ± 11 Ma (2σ), thus constraining the maximum age of deposition of the basal part of the Andrarona Group. The Andrarona Group shows a low-grade metamorphic overprint in the area near Antalaha; illite crystallinity values scatter around 0.17°Δ2Θ CuKα, which is within the epizone. The Ampohafana Formation consists of undeformed, polymict conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone, and red mudstone. An illite crystallinity value of >0.25°Δ2Θ CuKα obtained from the rocks is typical of the diagenetic zone. Occurrences of rhyodacite pebbles in the Ampohafana Formation and the intrusion of a basaltic dyke suggest a deposition in a WSW-ENE-trending graben system during the opening of the Indian Ocean in the Upper Cretaceous, that was characterized by extensive rhyolitic to basaltic magmatism along Madagascar's eastern coast.

  18. Hydrogeology in The Semi-Arid South-West of Madagascar - a Multi-Scale Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Dworak, L.; Rasoloariniaina, J.; Brinkmann, K.; Kobbe, S.; Buerkert, A.

    2014-12-01

    The project „Sustainable Land Management" (SuLaMa) aims at the participatory development and implementation of alternative land-use management practices to protect the ecosystem and its biodiversity and improve the livelihood of the local population in a sustainable manner. One critical aspect within this project is the availability of sustainable water resources. To approach reliable estimates about the availability and dynamics of the water resources, we started a study to understand in detail the hydrogeology of the South-West of Madagascar. As this area has an extend of about 40000 square kilometers, the study is based on a multi-scale approach. Rough large scale estimates are utilized to develop a general understanding of the hydrogeology in the South-West of Madagascar, which allows for large scale estimates of hydrogeology under changing boundary conditions like climate change. Detailed investigations at target villages of the SuLaMa project, combined with boundary conditions derived from the large scale hydrogeological model, allows for estimates of the local hydrogeology under changing boundary conditions like enhanced water abstraction. Although several governmental and nongovernmental institutions have been working on the water resources of the South-West of Madagascar in the past, only few sources on the hydrogeology of this area can be found in literature. To improve the data base we installed five automatic loggers in the area to measure groundwater levels as function of time and investigated in detail about one hundred wells in terms of geometry, groundwater level, electrical conductivity and pH. First preliminary results of the study show that the hydrogeology in the study area is dominated by four major hydrogeological units (fractured crystalline basement, karstic plateau, porous perched aquifers and a porous coastal area) and can be analyzed effectively by assuming a radial symmetric geometry. Ongoing efforts are the development of a model for a spatially variable groundwater recharge estimates and advanced hydrogeological models. The latter consisting of high resolution small scale and low resolution large scale estimates. Based on these models, we will develop numerical flow models to evaluate water resources as function of changing boundary conditions at multiple scales.

  19. A multidisciplinary study on lavaka (gully erosion) formation in Central Highlands, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveloson, A.; Visnovitz, F.; Székely, B.; Molnár, G.; Udvardi, B.

    2012-04-01

    Madagascar is a very important place to study erosion. Due to some forms of gully erosion called lavaka the country is among the first regarding its erosion rate. Lavakas are very abundant in the highlands of Madagascar (they can reach up to 30/km2). Therefore they have been subject of many studies in the past 60 years. Lavaka formation seems to be triggered by many regional effects (thin laterite layer on thick saprolite layer, smoothly convex hills, climate) and local causes (rain attack, earth falls, lack of vegetation) both natural and anthropogenic (deforestation, roads, paths) but the real nature of these erosion features are not fully understood. Based on field surveys, photogrammetrical, geomorphological and lithological-sedimentological methods two different kinds of lavaka (toe-slope and mid-slope) were studied in Tsiafahy, Central Highlands. Our main goal was to understand the formation of lavakas in order to prevent their consequences such as the degradation of agricultural lands, villages and nearby roads. For this purpose we digitalized geological and hydrological maps of the country and compared them with maps showing the occurrence of lavakas in Madagascar. 3D (three-dimensional) modeling of the actual eroding surface was achieved with photogrammetric methods applying the few hundred photos we made during the field surveys. We tested several 3D modeling software and used the best ones (with higher accuracy and resolution) to model a toe-slope lavaka. In order to model a more complex mid-slope lavaka a new program has been developed in MATLAB as well. Such photogrammetric evaluation and 3D modeling of lavakas were achieved for the first time and therefore the results are yet preliminary. Sedimentological features (grain size distribution and mineral composition) of an active mid-slope lavaka were also investigated to define the difference between the lateritic and saprolitic layers of the lavaka. Preliminary results show that the most important causes of lavaka formation are the climate and the lithological features of these areas. According to our field surveys and analysis lavaka's saprolitic layer can be divided into two different units: a yellow colored saprolitic layer with smaller hydraulic conductivity and a reddish saprolitic layer which could be interpreted as the transition between the yellow saprolitic and the upper red lateritic layer. Field surveys and photos show that the complex structure of the lavakas strongly correlate to the distribution of these different saprolitic units. The understanding of 3D distribution of these material types is the key to the lavaka formation. Further studies will concentrate on improving the obtained models and using them for geomorphologic studies including calculating relief, aspects and volume.

  20. Malagasyprinus, a new genus of the Saprininae from Madagascar with description of two new species (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Saprininae) (First contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Based on the results of recent phylogenetic analysis of the higher taxa of the Saprininae as well as external morphological characters, especially the presence of deep and large prosternal foveae, and the shape and position of the sensory organs of the antennal club, the species Saprinus (s.str.) caeruleatus Lewis, 1905 is excluded from the genus Saprinus and a new genus Malagasyprinus, exclusive to Madagascar, is established for it. The new genus shows mainly characters that are apomorphic for the subfamily and contains another two, highly similar allopatric species Malagasyprinus perrieri sp. n., and Malagasyprinus diana sp. n., described herein. The three species are best separated from each other by the structure of the prosternum and male terminalia, especially the shape of the aedeagus. We re-describe Malagasyprinus caeruleatus comb. n. and provide Malagasyprinus perrieri and Malagasyprinus diana with brief differential diagnoses. All taxon descriptions are accompanied with color habitat photographs, SEM micrographs and drawings of their male genitalia. A key to the species of Malagasyprinus is given. Sensory structures of the antenna of Malagasyprinus caeruleatus comb. n. are likewise depicted herein. The systematic position of the newly erected genus is discussed. A lectotype of Saprinus caeruleatus Lewis, 1905 is designated. PMID:24146560

  1. Chemical composition of the essential oil from Croton kimosorum, an endemic species to Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rabehaja, Delphin J R; Ihandriharison, Harilala; Ramanoelina, Panja A R; Benja, Rakotonirina; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, Suzanne; Bighelli, Ange; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Croton kimosorum Leandri is an endemic species to Madagascar. The chemical composition of aerial parts, leaf and stem oils is reported for the first time. Analysis was carried out by combination of chromatographic (CC, GC), spectroscopic and spectrometric (MS, 13C NMR) techniques. In total, 76 compounds have been identified. Essential oil isolated from aerial parts contained mainly linalool (21.6%), sabinene (10.4%), 1,8-cineole (6.3%), beta-pinene (6.2%), (E)-beta-caryophyllene (5.9%), terpinen-4-ol (4.8%), geraniol (4,5%) and germacrene D (2.3%). In comparison with the first sample, the composition of leaf and stem oils varied slightly, while essential oil isolated by vapor distillation from a semi-industrial still exhibited similar composition. PMID:24660481

  2. Pilot survey of avahi population (woolly lemurs) in littoral forest fragments of southeast Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Norscia, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a pilot survey of the avahis (pair-living, nocturnal prosimians) living in threatened littoral forest fragments of southeastern Madagascar. In the period of October-December 2004, I evaluated the density of adult and newborn avahis (carried by the mothers) by counting the individuals encountered during 58 night walks in seven fragments of Sainte Luce and Mandena forests, along one trail/fragment. Along each trail, I used random plots (5 m2) for a preliminary characterization of the vegetation. The density of the population was not correlated with fragment size and number of plant morphospecies, while it was correlated with large tree availability. Possibly due to a low energy diet based on leaves and to specialized and energetically expensive vertical leaping, the loss of large trees by selective logging seems to affect avahi populations more than other variables. PMID:17805480

  3. [Evaluation of a supervision program of health centers at the district level in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Comolet, T M; Rakotomalala, R A; Rasolomahefa, D

    1997-01-01

    Poor supervision and follow-up have long been recognized as major weaknesses in the development of primary health care in many countries. A program has therefore been specifically developed to strengthen the supervision activities of 18 rural health centers in Madagascar. District health officers were appropriately trained and then conducted two-monthly supervision visits. The emphasis of the training program was on problem solving, program integration and on-site training. The effects of the supervision program was assessed quantitatively and objectively. Various activities of each health center were scored before intervention, and one year after implementation of the supervision program. The improvement in most health centers was substantial, both in quantitative coverage and qualitative practice. Nevertheless, some centers appear to have been resistant to change. PMID:9273116

  4. Linking coral river runoff proxies with climate variability, hydrology and land-use in Madagascar catchments.

    PubMed

    Maina, Joseph; de Moel, Hans; Vermaat, Jan E; Bruggemann, J Henrich; Guillaume, Mireille M M; Grove, Craig A; Madin, Joshua S; Mertz-Kraus, Regina; Zinke, Jens

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the linkages between coastal watersheds and adjacent coral reefs is expected to lead to better coral reef conservation strategies. Our study aims to examine the main predictors of environmental proxies recorded in near shore corals and therefore how linked near shore reefs are to the catchment physical processes. To achieve these, we developed models to simulate hydrology of two watersheds in Madagascar. We examined relationships between environmental proxies derived from massive Porites spp. coral cores (spectral luminescence and barium/calcium ratios), and corresponding time-series (1950-2006) data of hydrology, climate, land use and human population growth. Results suggest regional differences in the main environmental drivers of reef sedimentation: on annual time-scales, precipitation, river flow and sediment load explained the variability in coral proxies of river discharge for the northeast region, while El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and temperature (air and sea surface) were the best predictors in the southwest region. PMID:22853989

  5. Valuing tropical forests: Methodology and case study of madagascar. World Bank environment paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, R.A.; Sharma, N.; Munasinghe, M.

    1995-08-01

    The loss of large areas of tropical forests has become a major concern of the world community. Although there are many causes of tropical deforestation and forest degradation, an important cause appears to be undervaluation of forests by markets and governments. This volume examines some causes of tropical deforestation and explores forest valuation issues in the context of a protected area project. Part A (Chapters 1 and 2) sets out the context of tropical deforestation and loss of diodiversity and provides a framework for examining the economic value of forests. Part B (Chapter 3 to 8) is devoted to a detailed case study of Madagascar that illustrates the practical application of the techniques of analysis of the valuation of forests described earlier. Finally, the main findings and conclusions of this volume are summarized in Part C.

  6. A necessarily complex model to explain the biogeography of the amphibians and reptiles of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason L; Cameron, Alison; Yoder, Anne D; Vences, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Pattern and process are inextricably linked in biogeographic analyses, though we can observe pattern, we must infer process. Inferences of process are often based on ad hoc comparisons using a single spatial predictor. Here, we present an alternative approach that uses mixed-spatial models to measure the predictive potential of combinations of hypotheses. Biodiversity patterns are estimated from 8,362 occurrence records from 745 species of Malagasy amphibians and reptiles. By incorporating 18 spatially explicit predictions of 12 major biogeographic hypotheses, we show that mixed models greatly improve our ability to explain the observed biodiversity patterns. We conclude that patterns are influenced by a combination of diversification processes rather than by a single predominant mechanism. A 'one-size-fits-all' model does not exist. By developing a novel method for examining and synthesizing spatial parameters such as species richness, endemism and community similarity, we demonstrate the potential of these analyses for understanding the diversification history of Madagascar's biota. PMID:25297804

  7. [Premarital sex in Antananarivo (Madagascar): how are students freeing themselves from the norms?].

    PubMed

    Gastineau, Bénédicte; Binet, Clotilde

    2013-06-01

    This paper aims to analyze the representations of premarital sexuality among young people in a context where they are strongly encouraged not to engage in premarital sexual relations. This link between prevention messages, representations and behaviours has been studied among a student population in Madagascar. The analysis is based on a socio-demographic survey conducted in 2006. Results show that young men and women share the ideal of abstinence before marriage. The promotion of premarital sexual abstinence within AIDS programs reinforces gender differences. It is mainly young women who are urged to be abstinent, whereas young men have the means--condom use--to transgress the taboo of premarital sex and protect themselves against health risks. Thus, young men have a dual strategy. On the one hand, they attach great importance to premarital abstinence with their future wife; on the other hand, they can have sex with occasional partners and are then protected by condoms. PMID:24069762

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of a pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in a Madagascar ground boa (Boa madagascariensis).

    PubMed

    Steeil, James C; Schumacher, Juergen; Hecht, Silke; Baine, Katherine; Ramsay, Edward C; Ferguson, Sylvia; Miller, Debra; Lee, Nathan D

    2013-03-01

    A 15-yr-old female Madagascar ground boa (Boa madagascariensis) presented with a history of anorexia, wheezing, and occasional open-mouth breathing. On oral examination, a firm, caseous mass was noted in the right caudoventral pharyngeal region, which was confirmed as a carcinoma on incisional biopsy. Advanced imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) was performed to evaluate local tumor invasion and to plan for palliative radiation therapy. However, following the second treatment (10 Gy), the mass had increased in size, and the snake was euthanatized. Radiation-associated vasculitis was noted within the soft tissues surrounding the mass and within muscles and the lung, which was verified on histopathology. The squamous cell carcinoma of the snake in this report was resistant to palliative radiation therapy. PMID:23505715

  9. Genome assembly and annotation of a Drosophila simulans strain from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    PALMIERI, NICOLA; NOLTE, VIOLA; CHEN, JUN; SCHLÖTTERER, CHRISTIAN

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila simulans is a close relative of the genetic model D. melanogaster. Its worldwide distribution in combination with the absence of segregating chromosomal inversions makes this species an increasingly attractive model to study the molecular signatures of adaptation in natural and experimental populations. In an effort to improve the genomic resources for D. simulans, we assembled and annotated the genome of a strain originating from Madagascar (M252), the ancestral range of D. simulans. The comparison of the M252 genome to other available D. simulans assemblies confirmed its high quality, but also highlighted genomic regions that are difficult to assemble with NGS data. The annotation of M252 provides a clear improvement with alternative splicing for 52% of the multiple-exon genes, UTRs for 70% of the genes, 225 novel genes and 781 pseudogenes being reported. We anticipate that the M252 genome will be a valuable resource for many research questions. PMID:24961367

  10. Brown Algae (Phaeophyceae) from the Coast of Madagascar: preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Eight species of brown algae (Phaeophyceae) from the coast of Madagascar have been investigated for their chemical constituents. Fucosterol (3) was obtained as the most abundant compound. The brown alga Sargassum ilicifolium was the source for the first isolation of the terpenoid C27-alcohol 1,1',2-trinorsqualenol (1) from marine sources. From S. incisifolium we isolated the highly unsaturated glycolipid 1-O-palmitoyl-2-O-stearidonoyl-3-O-?-D-galactopyranosylglycerol (4) and we report the first full assignment of its (1)H and (13)C NMR data. Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone (8) along with 24-ketocholesterol (5), (22E)-3?-hydroxycholesta-5,22-dien-24-one (6), and saringosterol (7) were obtained from Turbinaria ornata. The crude extracts of all eight species of brown algae exhibited a pronounced antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26358714

  11. Morphometrics, sexual dimorphism, and growth in the Angonoka tortoise (Geochelone yniphora) of western Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Lora L.; Pedrono, Miguel; Dorazio, Robert M.; Bishko, Jack

    2001-01-01

    The most recent description of the morphology of the rare endemic Madagascar tortoise,Geochelone yniphora was based on fewer than 20 specimens. We collected morphological data for 200 free?ranging tortoises from five populations over a four?year period. Tortoises ranged in size from 43.5 mm carapace length at hatching to a maximum of 481 mm in an adult male. We were able to develop a logistic regression model to predict the sex of adult tortoises in one of the five populations using principal component analysis; the model correctly predicted the sex of 25 of 26 adult tortoises. Growth of 40 tortoises was monitored and as in other chelonians, the annual relative growth rate decreased with age. The relative growth rate in adults was approximately 5% per year as compared to approximately 16% in juveniles. Juvenile tortoises accrued one scute growth layer per year.

  12. Red Algae (Rhodophyta) from the Coast of Madagascar: Preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Andriamihaja, Bakolinirina; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-01

    Several species of red algae (Rhodophyta) from the coastal regions of Madagascar have been investigated for their natural products. The most abundant compound was cholesterol (5) in combination with a series of oxidized congeners. The brominated indoles 1-3 along with the sesquiterpene debilone (4) have been isolated from Laurencia complanata. For the first time, debilone (4) has been obtained from a marine plant. From the methanol extract of Calloseris sp., we have achieved the second isolation of the unusual A-ring contracted steroids (-)-2-ethoxycarbonyl-2?-hydroxy-A-nor-cholest-5-en-4-one (9) and phorbasterone B (10). The crude extracts of Laurencia complanata exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. PMID:26198236

  13. A new and aberrant species of Dugesia (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae) from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Stocchino, Giacinta Angela; Sluys, Ronald; Manconi, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we report a new species of Dugesia of the family Dugesiidae from Madagascar, representing the fourth species of freshwater planarian known from this global biodiversity hotspot. In some respects the new species is aberrant, when compared with its congeners, being characterized by a head with smoothly rounded auricles, a peculiar course of the oviducts, including the presence of a common posterior extension, and by the asymmetrical openings of the vasa deferentia at about halfway along the seminal vesicle. Further, it is characterized by a ventral course of the ejaculatory duct with a terminal opening, very long spermiducal vesicles and unstalked cocoons. Its diploid chromosome complement with 18 chromosomes represents an uncommon feature among fissiparous species of Dugesia. PMID:25147450

  14. Gold deposit styles and placer gold characterisation in northern and east-central Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitfield, Peter E. J; Styles, Michael T.; Taylor, Cliff D.; Key, Roger M.; Bauer, Wilfried; Ralison, A, Vonimanitra

    2009-01-01

    Microchemical characterisation of bedrock and placer gold grains from six gold districts within the Archaean domains and intervening Neoproterozoic Anaboriana-Manampotsy belt of northern and east-central Madagascar show few opaque inclusions (e.g pyrrhotite, Bi tellurides) but wide range of Ag contents (?40wt%). Some districts exhibit multiple source populations of grains. The ‘greenstone belt’ terranes have an orogenic gold signature locally with an intrusion-related to epithermal overprint. Proterozoic metasediments with felsic to ultramafic bodies yield dominantly intrusion-related gold. A high proportion of secondary gold (<0.5wt% Ag) is related to recycling of paleoplacers and erosion of post-Gondwana planation surfaces and indicates that some mesothermal gold systems were already partially to wholly removed by erosion by the PermoTriassic.

  15. Antiproliferative Diterpenes from a Malleastrum sp. from the Madagascar dry forest.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Wiedle, C Houston; Brodie, Peggy J; Callmander, Martin W; Rakotondrajaona, R; Rakotobe, Etienne; Rasamison, Vincent E; Kingston, David G I

    2015-09-01

    An ethanol extract of leaves of the plant species Malleastrum sp. collected in northern Madagascar afforded the new clerodane diterpene 18-oxo-cleroda-3,13-dien-16,15-olide (1), together with the three known clerodane diterpenes 16,18-dihydroxykolavenic acid lactone (2), solidagolactone (3) and (-)-kolavenol (4), and the known labdane diterpene 3-oxo-ent-Iabda-8(17),13-dien-15,16-olide (5). Compounds 1, 3, and 4 showed moderate antiproliferative activities against the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line, with the IC50 values of 3.01 ± 0.8, 7.84 ± 0.2, and 17.9 ± 3 µM, respectively. The structure elucidations of all compounds were carried out based on analysis of NMR and mass spectroscopic data. The relative stereochemistry of compound 1 was determined by NOESY NMR spectrum. PMID:26594745

  16. Red Algae (Rhodophyta) from the Coast of Madagascar: Preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Andriamihaja, Bakolinirina; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Several species of red algae (Rhodophyta) from the coastal regions of Madagascar have been investigated for their natural products. The most abundant compound was cholesterol (5) in combination with a series of oxidized congeners. The brominated indoles 1–3 along with the sesquiterpene debilone (4) have been isolated from Laurencia complanata. For the first time, debilone (4) has been obtained from a marine plant. From the methanol extract of Calloseris sp., we have achieved the second isolation of the unusual A-ring contracted steroids (?)-2-ethoxycarbonyl-2?-hydroxy-A-nor-cholest-5-en-4-one (9) and phorbasterone B (10). The crude extracts of Laurencia complanata exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. PMID:26198236

  17. A new genus and species of net-winged midge from Madagascar (Diptera: Blephariceridae: Blepharicerinae).

    PubMed

    Courtney, Gregory W

    2015-01-01

    Larvae of a species from the subfamily Blepharicerinae were first discovered in the 1950's, but the lack of additional records prevented description of the species. A recent study of important additional specimens from the late Brian Stuckenberg has provided the basis for describing this unusual fly. This paper provides a description of larvae, pupae, and adults of Aphromyia stuckenbergi gen. et sp. nov., and a brief discussion of its phylogenetic position within the family. The latter is confounded by marked adult colocephaly (reduction of the head) and concomitant reduction in mouthparts, and by lack of recent collections that would permit molecular analyses and further morphological study. Known from only two collections, the most recent nearly 60 years ago, this highly endemic and rare fly is arguably one the most endangered species in Madagascar. PMID:26624779

  18. New species of Blaesodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Tsingy karstic outcrops in Ankarana National Park, northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Jono, Teppei; Bauer, Aaron M; Brennan, Ian; Mori, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new gecko of the genus Blaesodactylus from a karstic outcrop in deciduous dry forest of Ankarana National Park, northern Madagascar. Blaesodactylus microtuberculatus sp. nov., the fifth recognized species of Blaesodactylus, is distinguished from all other congeners, B. ambonihazo, B. antongilensis, B. boivini and B. sakalava by a combination of small, homogeneous gular granules, unspotted venter and lack of tubercles on distal part of original tail. Mitochondrial (ND2 and ND4) and nuclear (RAG-1) DNA identify a consistent divergence between B. microtuberculatus and its allotopic sister species B. boivini. We highlight habitat partitioning in these allotopic congeners where Blaesodactylus microtuberculatus inhabits karstic outcrops in Tsingy massif, and B. boivini dwells on tree trunks in deciduous dry forest. PMID:26249960

  19. Antiproliferative and antimalarial anthraquinones of Scutia myrtina from the Madagascar forest1

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanpeng; Cao, Shugeng; Brodie, Peggy J.; Callmander, Martin W.; Ratovoson, Fidisoa; Rakotobe, Etienne; Rasamison, Vincent E.; Ratsimbason, Michel; Alumasa, John N.; Roepe, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an ethanol extract of a Madagascar collection of the bark of Scutia myrtina led to the isolation of three new anthrone-anthraquinones, scutianthraquinones A, B and C (1-3), one new bisanthrone-anthraquinone, scutianthraquinone D (4), and the known anthraquinone, aloesaponarin I (5). The structures of all compounds were determined using a combination of 1D and 2D NMR experiments, including COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY sequences, and mass spectrometry. All the isolated compounds were tested against the A2780 human ovarian cancer cell line for antiproliferative activities, and against the chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains Dd2 and FCM29 for antiplasmodial activities. Compounds 1, 2 and 4 showed weak antiproliferative activities against the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line, while compounds 1 – 4 exhibited moderate antiplasmodial activities against P. falciparum Dd2 and compounds 1, 2, and 4 exhibited moderate antiplasmodial activities against P. falciparum FCM29 PMID:19282186

  20. A new arboreal frog of the genus Guibemantis from the southeast of Madagascar (Anura: Mantellidae).

    PubMed

    Vences, Miguel; Jovanovic, Olga; Safarek, Goran; Glaw, Frank; Köhler, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new species of arboreal frog of the genus Guibemantis, subgenus Guibemantis, from low altitude rainforest in Manombo Special Reserve, south-eastern Madagascar. Previously published phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences have placed Guibemantis diphonus sp. nov. sister to G. timidus. The new species is distinguished from G. timidus and all other species in the subgenus by a substantial genetic differentiation (≥ 4.4% uncorrected p-distance in the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene), strongly divergent advertisement call, and some limited morphological differences. It is the smallest known species in the subgenus, with 34-36 mm snout-vent length in adult males. Its advertisement call is unique among other species in the subgenus in being composed of two distinctly different note types (only one note type in the other species). PMID:26701579

  1. Detection of a Novel DSPP Mutation by NGS in a Population Isolate in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Meyer, Julia; Geoffroy, Véronique; Razafindrakoto, Rabisoa W.; Ralison, Saholy N.; Randrianaivo, Jean-Claude; Ralison, Georgette; Andriamasinoro, Rija O.; Ramanampamaharana, Rija H.; Randrianazary, Solofomanantsoa E.; Richard, Béatrice; Gorry, Philippe; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Rakoto Alson, Simone; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    A large family from a small village in Madagascar, Antanetilava, is known to present with colored teeth. Through previous collaboration and 4 successive visits in 1994, 2004, 2005, and 2012, we provided dental care to the inhabitants and diagnosed dentinogenesis imperfecta. Recently, using whole exome sequencing we confirmed the clinical diagnosis by identifying a novel single nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of DSPP. This paper underlines the necessity of long run research, the importance of international and interpersonal collaborations as well as the major contribution of next generation sequencing tools in the genetic diagnosis of rare oro-dental anomalies. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials (https://clinicaltrials.gov) under the number NCT02397824. PMID:26973538

  2. Detection of a Novel DSPP Mutation by NGS in a Population Isolate in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Meyer, Julia; Geoffroy, Véronique; Razafindrakoto, Rabisoa W; Ralison, Saholy N; Randrianaivo, Jean-Claude; Ralison, Georgette; Andriamasinoro, Rija O; Ramanampamaharana, Rija H; Randrianazary, Solofomanantsoa E; Richard, Béatrice; Gorry, Philippe; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Rakoto Alson, Simone; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    A large family from a small village in Madagascar, Antanetilava, is known to present with colored teeth. Through previous collaboration and 4 successive visits in 1994, 2004, 2005, and 2012, we provided dental care to the inhabitants and diagnosed dentinogenesis imperfecta. Recently, using whole exome sequencing we confirmed the clinical diagnosis by identifying a novel single nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of DSPP. This paper underlines the necessity of long run research, the importance of international and interpersonal collaborations as well as the major contribution of next generation sequencing tools in the genetic diagnosis of rare oro-dental anomalies. This study is registered in ClinicalTrials (https://clinicaltrials.gov) under the number NCT02397824. PMID:26973538

  3. Vegetation cover degradation assessment in Madagascar savanna based on trend analysis of MODIS NDVI time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquin, Anne; Sheeren, David; Lacombe, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-01

    Like other African countries, Madagascar is concerned by vegetation cover degradation especially in savanna ecosystems. In this article, we describe an approach to quantify and localise savanna vegetation cover degradation. To this end, we analyse using STL decomposition method the trends measured between 2000 and 2007 of two phenological indicators which are derived from NDVI MODIS time series and characterizing vegetation activity during the growing season. Three types of trend were observed - null, positive or negative - over the study period with which we can associate a state of vegetation cover degradation. Future work will provide validation of this result. Next a comparison between the spatial variations of vegetation cover degradation and fire pressure for the same period should improve knowledge on the effect of fire on savanna vegetation activity. This information will be useful for local managers in order to implement savanna management strategies.

  4. The impact of malaria chemoprophylaxis in Africa with special reference to Madagascar, Cameroon, and Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Laing, A. B. G.

    1984-01-01

    Some past and present experiences in the use of antimalarial drugs, particularly for chemoprophylaxis, are reviewed. The failure in the long term of mass chemoprophylaxis with weekly chloroquine in children in Madagascar, Cameroon, and Senegal is discussed, the reasons for failure being an increasing lack of resources to ensure regular drug distribution and lack of supervision of dosage. The increasing number of reports confirming chloroquine resistance from East Africa over the last decade poses a serious threat to the future usefulness of chloroquine as an antimalarial agent in Africa. There is now an urgent need for extensive drug sensitivity tests, which should also include alternative antimalarial drugs. To rely on mass chemoprophylaxis as the main method of controlling malaria would appear to be no longer tenable. PMID:6397276

  5. Habituation of hissing by Madagascar hissing cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa): evidence of discrimination between humans?

    PubMed

    Davis, Hank; Heslop, Emily

    2004-11-30

    Anecdotal reports suggest that insects can be "tamed" with frequent human contact. In the present experiment, repeated handling of Madagascar hissing cockroaches by the same person resulted in habituation of the hissing response in ten of 12 subjects. These subjects were then handled by a novel person in order to determine whether habituation might be specific to a particular human. Four of ten "habituated" subjects immediately began to hiss in the presence of the novel handler, but again ceased hissing when contact with the familiar person was reestablished. Our results suggest that in some cases "taming" may be person-specific, rather than a generalized response to humans. These preliminary findings are the first evidence of discrimination between humans by an insect species, although comparable results are well documented in mammals and birds. PMID:15519003

  6. Anjozorobe Hantavirus, a New Genetic Variant of Thailand Virus Detected in Rodents from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Razafindralambo, Nadia Kaloina; Lacoste, Vincent; Olive, Marie-Marie; Barivelo, Tony Andrianaivo; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Lavergne, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Until now, there was only serological evidence that hantaviruses were circulating in rodents and infecting humans from Madagascar. To assess the presence of a hantavirus on the island, between October, 2008, and March, 2010, we sampled 585 rodents belonging to seven species in the Anjozorobe-Angavo forest corridor, 70?km north from the capital city Antananarivo. A hantavirus was detected from organs of the ubiquist roof rat (Rattus rattus) and of the endemic Major's tufted-tailed rat (Eliurus majori). Amazingly, sequence analysis of the S (small), M (medium), and L (large) coding DNA sequence of this virus showed that the Anjozorobe strain (proposed name) was a new genetic variant of Thailand virus (THAIV) that comprises other variants found in Southeast Asia. Because THAIV is suspected of causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans, ongoing studies are addressing the risk of infection by this new variant in the Malagasy population. PMID:24575755

  7. A Genome Sequence Resource for the Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a Nocturnal Lemur from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Reeves, Darryl; Melsted, Páll; Ratan, Aakrosh; Miller, Webb; Michelini, Katelyn; Louis, Edward E.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Mason, Christopher E.; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-coverage draft genome assembly of the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a highly unusual nocturnal primate from Madagascar. Our assembly totals ∼3.0 billion bp (3.0 Gb), roughly the size of the human genome, comprised of ∼2.6 million scaffolds (N50 scaffold size = 13,597 bp) based on short paired-end sequencing reads. We compared the aye-aye genome sequence data with four other published primate genomes (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and rhesus macaque) as well as with the mouse and dog genomes as nonprimate outgroups. Unexpectedly, we observed strong evidence for a relatively slow substitution rate in the aye-aye lineage compared with these and other primates. In fact, the aye-aye branch length is estimated to be ∼10% shorter than that of the human lineage, which is known for its low substitution rate. This finding may be explained, in part, by the protracted aye-aye life-history pattern, including late weaning and age of first reproduction relative to other lemurs. Additionally, the availability of this draft lemur genome sequence allowed us to polarize nucleotide and protein sequence changes to the ancestral primate lineage—a critical period in primate evolution, for which the relevant fossil record is sparse. Finally, we identified 293,800 high-confidence single nucleotide polymorphisms in the donor individual for our aye-aye genome sequence, a captive-born individual from two wild-born parents. The resulting heterozygosity estimate of 0.051% is the lowest of any primate studied to date, which is understandable considering the aye-aye's extensive home-range size and relatively low population densities. Yet this level of genetic diversity also suggests that conservation efforts benefiting this unusual species should be prioritized, especially in the face of the accelerating degradation and fragmentation of Madagascar's forests. PMID:22155688

  8. Landscape attributes driving avian influenza virus circulation in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Laure; Paul, Mathilde C; Leger, Lucas; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina R; Maminiaina, Olivier F; Jourdan, Marion; Molia, Sophie; Rakotondravao, René; Chevalier, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    While the spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus has been studied throughout Southeast Asia, little is known on the spatial risk factors for avian influenza in Africa. In the present paper, we combined serological data from poultry and remotely sensed environmental factors in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar to explore for any association between avian influenza and landscape variables. Serological data from cross-sectional surveys carried out on poultry in 2008 and 2009 were examined together with a Landsat 7 satellite image analysed using supervised classification. The dominant landscape features in a 1-km buffer around farmhouses and distance to the closest water body were extracted. A total of 1,038 individual bird blood samples emanating from 241 flocks were analysed, and the association between avian influenza seroprevalence and these landcape variables was quantified using logistic regression models. No evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 avian influenza subtypes was found, suggesting that only low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) circulated. Three predominant land cover classes were identified around the poultry farms: grassland savannah, rice paddy fields and wetlands. A significant negative relationship was found between LPAI seroprevalence and distance to the closest body of water. We also found that LPAI seroprevalence was higher in farms characterised by predominant wetlands or rice landscapes than in those surrounded by dry savannah. Results from this study suggest that if highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus were introduced in Madagascar, the environmental conditions that prevail in Lake Alaotra region may allow the virus to spread and persist. PMID:24893021

  9. Population Genetic Structure and Isolation by Distance of Helicobacter pylori in Senegal and Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Bodo; Vololonantenainab, Clairette Romaine Raharisolo; Seck, Abdoulaye; Carod, Jean-François; Dia, Daouda; Garin, Benoit; Ramanampamonjy, Rado Manitrala; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Raymond, Josette; Breurec, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has probably infected the human stomach since our origins and subsequently diversified in parallel with their human hosts. The genetic population history of H. pylori can therefore be used as a marker for human migration. We analysed seven housekeeping gene sequences of H. pylori strains isolated from 78 Senegalese and 24 Malagasy patients and compared them with the sequences of strains from other geographical locations. H. pylori from Senegal and Madagascar can be placed in the previously described HpAfrica1 genetic population, subpopulations hspWAfrica and hspSAfrica, respectively. These 2 subpopulations correspond to the distribution of Niger-Congo speakers in West and most of subequatorial Africa (due to Bantu migrations), respectively. H. pylori appears as a single population in Senegal, indicating a long common history between ethnicities as well as frequent local admixtures. The lack of differentiation between these isolates and an increasing genetic differentiation with geographical distance between sampling locations in Africa was evidence for genetic isolation by distance. The Austronesian expansion that started from Taiwan 5000 years ago dispersed one of the 10 subgroups of the Austronesian language family via insular Southeast Asia into the Pacific and Madagascar, and hspMaori is a marker for the entire Austronesian expansion. Strain competition and replacement of hspMaori by hpAfrica1 strains from Bantu migrants are the probable reasons for the presence of hspSAfrica strains in Malagasy of Southeast Asian descent. hpAfrica1 strains appear to be generalist strains that have the necessary genetic diversity to efficiently colonise a wide host spectrum. PMID:24498084

  10. Radiogenic heating to ultrahigh temperature: Geochronology and 4+ thermometry across southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, F.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    As zones of focused metamorphism, melting, and ductile deformation, hot crustal sections are especially important for understanding the evolution of the lower crust in convergent orogens, such as Tibet. One of the best exposed crustal sections that reached ultrahigh-temperature (UHT: >900° C) is in southern Madagascar. There, the association of UHT mineral assemblages with exceptionally high concentrations of radioactive heat-producing elements begs the question of whether radiogenic heating caused UHT. Partial melting, retrogression and rapid elemental diffusion at high temperature, however, have left a complex record of radiometric dates that span 150 Myr (~650-500 Ma), making it difficult to address this question. We apply laser-ablation split-stream ICPMS (LASS) petrochronology and 4+ cation thermometry to better constrain the lengthscales and timescales over which high temperatures were sustained in southern Madagascar. By deciphering complex intragrain (re)crystallization textures of zircon and monazite from a broad geographical area, we deduce that orogenesis lasted >60 Myr. Specifically, 600-540 Ma zircon and monazite with HREE depletion suggest (re)crystallization in the presence of garnet. All monazite show negative Eu anomalies (compatible with the presence of plagioclase), but ~570 to ~530 Ma monazite has more-pronounced anomalies. Ti-in-zircon and Zr-in-rutile thermometry confirm ultrahigh temperatures within a restricted area of ~100 x 200 km. These thermal and chronologic constraints allow us to evaluate the potential causes of heating. Measured K, Th, and U contents of rocks within the UHT domain indicate an average heat-production rate of >4 ?W/m3, sufficient to produce UHT metamorphism in 60-km thick crust within 60 Myr. We conclude that high concentrations of heat-producing elements caused focused heat production in young metasedimentary rocks that were sandwiched between older crustal domains. We speculate that ultrahigh temperatures caused by radiogenic heating led to preferential crustal melting within—and ductile extrusion of—the young metasediments.

  11. Geochronology and 4+ thermometry of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) metamorphism in southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, F.; Hacker, B. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) metamorphism--regional metamorphism at >900° C--in a collisional setting requires some combination of: i) unusually radiogenic crust, ii) advection of heat by magmatism, iii) conduction of mantle-derived heat, and iv) shear heating. The Neoproterozoic continental collision zone exposed in Madagascar provides a good opportunity to investigate these potential causes; we use three 4+ thermometers (Zr-in-rutile, Ti-in-zircon, and Ti-in-quartz) and U/Th-Pb geochronology of monazite and zircon to evaluate the magnitude, timing, and duration of UHT metamorphism in southern Madagascar. U-Pb dates from metamorphic monazite and zircon with complex intragrain (re)crystallization textures range from ~600 Ma to ~500 Ma. Zircon and monazite with HREE depletion and dates of 600-540 Ma suggest (re)crystallization in the presence of garnet. All monazite shows negative Eu anomalies (compatible with the presence of plagioclase), but monazite with dates from ~570 to ~530 Ma has more pronounced anomalies. Zr-in-rutile temperatures span 700 to 960° C and Ti-in-quartz temperatures span 600 to 950° C. The UHT metamorphism is assumed to postdate both the accretion of an arc terrane to West Gondwana at ~600 Ma and the suturing of East and West Gondwana prior to ~570 Ma. The 40 Myr between distinct episodes of alkali plutonism at ~570 Ma (deformed) and ~530 Ma (nondeformed) coincide with more-negative Eu anomalies in monazite, and may reflect the period of orogenesis associated with UHT metamorphism. The measured K, Th, and U contents of rocks within the UHT domain [GAF-BGR, 2008] indicate an average heat production of >5 ?W/m3. This is sufficient to produce UHT metamorphism in 60-km thick crust within 40 Myr.

  12. Forest Management Devolution: Gap Between Technicians' Design and Villagers' Practices in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rives, Fanny; Carrière, Stéphanie M.; Montagne, Pierre; Aubert, Sigrid; Sibelet, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    In the 1980s, tropical forest-management principles underwent a shift toward approaches giving greater responsibilities to rural people. One argument for such a shift were the long-term relations established between rural people and their natural resources. In Madagascar, a new law was drawn up in 1996 (Gelose law), which sought to integrate rural people into forest management. A gap was observed between the changes foreseen by the projects implementing the Gelose law and the actual changes. In this article, we use the concept of the social-ecological system (SES) to analyze that gap. The differences existing between the planned changes set by the Gelose contract in the village of Ambatoloaka (northwest of Madagascar) and the practices observed in 2010 were conceptualized as a gap between two SESs. The first SES is the targeted one (i.e., a virtual one); it corresponds to the designed Gelose contract. The second SES is the observed one. It is characterized by the heterogeneity of forest users and uses, which have several impacts on forest management, and by very dynamic social and ecological systems. The observed SES has been reshaped contingent on the constraints and opportunities offered by the Gelose contract as well as on other ecological and social components. The consequences and opportunities that such an SES reshaping would offer to improve the implementation of the Gelose law are discussed. The main reasons explaining the gap between the two SESs are as follows: (1) the clash between static and homogeneous perceptions in the targeted SES and the dynamics and heterogeneity that characterize the observed SES; and (2) the focus on one specific use of forest ecosystems (i.e., charcoal-making) in the targeted SES. Forest management in the observed SES depends on several uses of forest ecosystems.

  13. Madagascar Highland erosion: What can we learn from the archive precipitation data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imola Szabó, Amanda; Raveloson, Andrea; Székely, Balázs

    2014-05-01

    In Madagascar, soil erosion is significant even when it is compared to world averages, resulting in special geomorphic forms known as lavakas appearing in the Highland regions of the island. The development of these features is due to rather unique multifactorial environmental conditions. Among many factors (geology, soil composition, human influence, etc.) the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation is a key factor. The presence of the dry and wet season seems to be responsible for the enhanced generation of small cracks that might eventually lead to the development of a gully. However, the way of the development of such gully erosions are unknown. To what extent of the actual precipitation pattern to what extent the weather contributes to the aforementioned phenomenon has not yet been studied in great detail. The aim of our research is to study the climatic and weather conditions of lavaka-prone areas for the last decades. The typical cyclonal pattern affects the Madagascar Highlands in various ways. The precipitation and the soil moisture data show that the spatial distribution can be correlated with the appearance of lavakas to a given extent, however the local distribution cannot be explained only based on the precipitation pattern. The severity of the wet season varies strongly in the various decades leading to different precipitation maxima in January-March period. In general the effectiveness of the gully erosion is thought to be highly enhanced if the run-off of the area show large temporal variations. According to our studies this variability is quite high in certain seasons, and, despite of the low spatial resolution, related to the lavaka-prone areas. However, neither the amount of the precipitation, nor the variability alone cannot explain the high variation found in the spatial density and length distribution. Further multidisciplinary studies are necessary to draw conclusions about lavaka formation and describe the process of lavaka development. This is ILARG-contribution Nr. 11.

  14. The Burden of Acute Disease in Mahajanga, Madagascar – A 21 Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vijay C.; Andriamalala, Clara N.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop effective and regionally-appropriate emergency care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are hindered by a lack of data on both the burden of disease in the region and on the state of existing care delivery mechanisms. This study describes the burden of acute disease presenting to an emergency unit in Mahajanga, Madagascar. Methods and Findings Handwritten patient registries on all emergency department patients presenting between 1 January 2011 and 30 September 2012 were reviewed and data entered into a database. Data included age, sex, diagnosis, and disposition. We classified diagnoses into Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) multi-level categories. The population was 53.5% male, with a median age of 31 years. The five most common presenting conditions were 1) Superficial injury; contusion, 2) Open wounds of head; neck; and trunk, 3) Open wounds of extremities, 4) Intracranial injury, and 5) Unspecified injury and poisoning. Trauma accounted for 48%, Infectious Disease for 15%, Mental Health 6.1%, Noncommunicable 29%, and Neoplasms 1.2%. The acuity seen was high, with an admission rate of 43%. Trauma was the most common reason for admission, representing 19% of admitted patients. Conclusions This study describes the burden of acute disease at a large referral center in northern Madagascar. The Centre Hôpitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga sees a high volume of acutely ill and injured patients. Similar to other reports from the region, trauma is the most common pathology observed, though infectious disease was responsible for the majority of adult mortality. Typhoid fever other intestinal infections were the most lethal CCS-coded pathologies. By utilizing a widely understood classification system, we are able to highlight contrasts between Mahajanga’s acute and overall disease burden as well as make comparisons between this region and the rest of the globe. We hope this study will serve to guide the development of context-appropriate emergency medicine systems in the region. PMID:25738300

  15. Early-warning health and process indicators for sentinel surveillance in Madagascar 2007-2011

    PubMed Central

    Rajatonirina, Soatiana; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Razanajatovo, Norosoa Harline; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Ravolomanana, Lisette; Randrianarivo-Solofoniaina, Armand Eugène; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Piola, Patrice; Finlay-Vickers, Alyssa; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Richard, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemics pose major threats in resource-poor countries, and surveillance tools for their early detection and response are often inadequate. In 2007, a sentinel surveillance system was established in Madagascar, with the aim of rapidly identifying potential epidemics of febrile or diarrhoeal syndromes and issuing alerts. We present the health and process indicators for the five years during which this system was constructed, showing the spatiotemporal trends, early-warning sign detection capability and process evaluation through timely analyses of high-quality data. Methods: The Malagasy sentinel surveillance network is currently based on data for fever and diarrhoeal syndromes collected from 34 primary health centres and reported daily via the transmission of short messages from mobile telephones. Data are analysed daily at the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar to make it possible to issue alerts more rapidly, and integrated process indicators (timeliness, data quality) are used to monitor the system. Results: From 2007 to 2011, 917,798 visits were reported. Febrile syndromes accounted for about 11% of visits annually, but the trends observed differed between years and sentinel sites. From 2007 to 2011, 21 epidemic alerts were confirmed. However, delays in data transmission were observed (88% transmitted within 24 hours in 2008; 67% in 2011) and the percentage of forms transmitted each week for validity control decreased from 99.9% in 2007 to 63.5% in 2011. Conclusion: A sentinel surveillance scheme should take into account both epidemiological and process indicators. It must also be governed by the main purpose of the surveillance and by local factors, such as the motivation of healthcare workers and telecommunication infrastructure. Permanent evaluation indicators are required for regular improvement of the system. PMID:25598869

  16. Population genetic structure and isolation by distance of Helicobacter pylori in Senegal and Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Linz, Bodo; Vololonantenainab, Clairette Romaine Raharisolo; Seck, Abdoulaye; Carod, Jean-François; Dia, Daouda; Garin, Benoit; Ramanampamonjy, Rado Manitrala; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Raymond, Josette; Breurec, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has probably infected the human stomach since our origins and subsequently diversified in parallel with their human hosts. The genetic population history of H. pylori can therefore be used as a marker for human migration. We analysed seven housekeeping gene sequences of H. pylori strains isolated from 78 Senegalese and 24 Malagasy patients and compared them with the sequences of strains from other geographical locations. H. pylori from Senegal and Madagascar can be placed in the previously described HpAfrica1 genetic population, subpopulations hspWAfrica and hspSAfrica, respectively. These 2 subpopulations correspond to the distribution of Niger-Congo speakers in West and most of subequatorial Africa (due to Bantu migrations), respectively. H. pylori appears as a single population in Senegal, indicating a long common history between ethnicities as well as frequent local admixtures. The lack of differentiation between these isolates and an increasing genetic differentiation with geographical distance between sampling locations in Africa was evidence for genetic isolation by distance. The Austronesian expansion that started from Taiwan 5000 years ago dispersed one of the 10 subgroups of the Austronesian language family via insular Southeast Asia into the Pacific and Madagascar, and hspMaori is a marker for the entire Austronesian expansion. Strain competition and replacement of hspMaori by hpAfrica1 strains from Bantu migrants are the probable reasons for the presence of hspSAfrica strains in Malagasy of Southeast Asian descent. hpAfrica1 strains appear to be generalist strains that have the necessary genetic diversity to efficiently colonise a wide host spectrum. PMID:24498084

  17. [Cervical cancers diagnosed at the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar from 1992 to 2002].

    PubMed

    Raharisolo Vololonantenaina, C R; Rabarijaona, L P; Soares, J L; Rasendramino, M; Pécarrère, J L; Khun, H; Huerre, M

    2003-01-01

    In Madagascar, the epidemiological data actualized concerning the cancer of the collus of uterus are not available because of the absence of register of cancer. The objective of this study is to achieve a first assessment of the problem, to complete the epidemiological knowledge, to point out the tool of precoce detection of the precancerous lesions, to propose the measures aiming to improve the management of the patients and to contribute to the institution of a register of cancer. This is a retrospective survey on the frequency of the cancer of the cervix observed from 1992 to 2002 about 23,908 withdrawals addressed to the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar for anatomopathological exam and 12,605 cervical smears for cytological exam. In pathological anatomy, 2,621 (63.4%) of 4,136 cases of diagnosed cancer, have been observed in women. 687 cases (26.2%) of them were localized in the collus. The 3/4 of the cancers of the cervix is invasive and the mean age is 48.2 years old at the time of diagnosis. The cytology detects only 74 cases of invasive cancer of which most don't have an histological confirmation. 274 pre-lesions of cervix cancer were diagnosed for this period, the majority lesions are cytological diagnosis. In spite of a non representative recruitment of the general population, and by the number of withdrawals considered, these results may represent indicators of the epidemiological situation and justify the institution of program to detect the precancerous lesions in a national scale. PMID:15678821

  18. Melt-bearing shear zones: analogue experiments and comparison with examples from southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujic, Djordje; Mancktelow, Neil S.

    1998-06-01

    Analogue model experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of irregularly distributed weak sites in localising strain, as an aid to understanding shear zone development in partially molten rocks. The very weak inclusions consisted of Vaseline in a homogeneous matrix of paraffin wax, which has a power-law viscous rheology. Boundary conditions were those of pure shear at constant natural strain rate and confining stress ?3. The inclusions were initially perfect cylinders with axes parallel to the intermediate bulk strain axis Y. Conjugate shear zones nucleate on the inclusions and link up to form an anastomosing pattern of high strain zones of concentrated shear surrounding much more weakly deformed pods of near coaxial strain. The zones initiate at angles near 45° to the bulk shortening axis Z but stretch and rotate towards the X axis with increasing bulk strain. All inclusions nucleate shear zones, so that with increasing development of the anastomosing pattern, weak material occurs only within the high strain zones. The restriction of migmatite leucosomes to shear zones in natural examples could also reflect a corresponding control of melt on the sites of shear zone nucleation, rather than implying accumulation from the surrounding wall-rock. The model geometry is very similar to that observed in small-scale shear zones in migmatites of southern Madagascar. Elongate zones rich in weak inclusions, originally either perpendicular or at 45° to the Z axis, were also modelled for direct comparison with the regional-scale geometry of the Pan-African high-grade 'shear zones' on Madagascar.

  19. Introducing auto-disable syringes to the national immunization programme in Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K.; Ralaivao, Josoa S.; Rakotonandrasana, Alexander; Carnell, Mary A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and coverage benefits of auto-disable (AD) syringes, weighed against the financial and logis- tical costs, and to create appropriate health policies in Madagascar. METHODS: Fifteen clinics in Madagascar, trained to use AD syringes, were randomized to implement an AD syringe only, mixed (AD syringes used only on non-routine immunization days), or sterilizable syringe only (control) programme. During a five-week period, data on administered vaccinations were collected, interviews were conducted, and observations were recorded. FINDINGS: The use of AD syringes improved coverage rates by significantly increasing the percentage of vaccines administered on non-routine immunization days (AD-only 4.3%, mixed 5.7%, control 1.1% (P<0.05)). AD-only clinics eliminated sterilization sessions for vaccinations, whereas mixed clinics reduced the number of sterilization sessions by 64%. AD syringes were five times more expensive than sterilizable syringes, which increased AD-only and mixed clinics' projected annual injection costs by 365% and 22%, respectively. However, introducing AD syringes for all vaccinations would only increase the national immunization budget by 2%. CONCLUSION: The use of AD syringes improved vaccination coverage rates by providing ready-to-use sterile syringes on non-routine immunization days and decreasing the number of sterilization sessions, thereby improving injection safety. The mixed programme was the most beneficial approach to phasing in AD syringes and diminishing logistical complications, and it had minimal costs. AD syringes, although more expensive, can feasibly be introduced into a developing country's immunization programme to improve vaccination safety and coverage. PMID:14576886

  20. Lost in translation: conflicting views of deforestation, land use and identity in western Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Scales, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the interplay between environmental narratives, identity politics and the management of forest resources in Madagascar. While efforts to conserve the island's biological diversity have centred primarily on the designation of protected areas, policies have increasingly focused on local communities. The experiences of the last 20 years have shown that community-based approaches to conservation offer considerable challenges due to the complex politics of natural resource use, which involve multiple and diverse stakeholders, often with very different and sometimes conflicting values. In this paper, I focus on the environmental perceptions and values of two groups in the Central Menabe region of western Madagascar – conservation organisations and rural households – revealing a contrasting set of views regarding the region's forest. I show that the conservation discourse has changed over time, increasingly emphasising the biological diversity of the region's tropical dry-deciduous forest and prioritising non-consumptive uses of natural resources. Although policy has changed in response to changing values, I show that it has been underpinned by the notion that hatsake (‘slash-and-burn’ agriculture) is an irrational practice driven by necessity rather than choice. Policy has thus sought to provide livelihood alternatives, firstly through forestry, then through changes in cultivation and increasingly through tourism. This misunderstands the local view of the forest, which sees hatsake as a way to make the land productive, as long as it is carried out responsibly according to local fady (taboos). As well as facing problems of translating conservation goals into local values and misunderstanding the motives for forest clearance, policy has been based on a narrative that attaches particular land use practices to ethnic identities. I argue that this ignores the history and fluid reality of both identity and land use. PMID:22413174

  1. A genome sequence resource for the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a nocturnal lemur from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H; Reeves, Darryl; Melsted, Páll; Ratan, Aakrosh; Miller, Webb; Michelini, Katelyn; Louis, Edward E; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Mason, Christopher E; Gilad, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-coverage draft genome assembly of the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a highly unusual nocturnal primate from Madagascar. Our assembly totals ~3.0 billion bp (3.0 Gb), roughly the size of the human genome, comprised of ~2.6 million scaffolds (N50 scaffold size = 13,597 bp) based on short paired-end sequencing reads. We compared the aye-aye genome sequence data with four other published primate genomes (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and rhesus macaque) as well as with the mouse and dog genomes as nonprimate outgroups. Unexpectedly, we observed strong evidence for a relatively slow substitution rate in the aye-aye lineage compared with these and other primates. In fact, the aye-aye branch length is estimated to be ~10% shorter than that of the human lineage, which is known for its low substitution rate. This finding may be explained, in part, by the protracted aye-aye life-history pattern, including late weaning and age of first reproduction relative to other lemurs. Additionally, the availability of this draft lemur genome sequence allowed us to polarize nucleotide and protein sequence changes to the ancestral primate lineage-a critical period in primate evolution, for which the relevant fossil record is sparse. Finally, we identified 293,800 high-confidence single nucleotide polymorphisms in the donor individual for our aye-aye genome sequence, a captive-born individual from two wild-born parents. The resulting heterozygosity estimate of 0.051% is the lowest of any primate studied to date, which is understandable considering the aye-aye's extensive home-range size and relatively low population densities. Yet this level of genetic diversity also suggests that conservation efforts benefiting this unusual species should be prioritized, especially in the face of the accelerating degradation and fragmentation of Madagascar's forests. PMID:22155688

  2. Tracing Arab-Islamic Inheritance in Madagascar: Study of the Y-chromosome and Mitochondrial DNA in the Antemoro

    PubMed Central

    Capredon, Mélanie; Brucato, Nicolas; Tonasso, Laure; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Rakotondrabe, Andriamihaja Bakomalala; Ratolojanahary, Mamisoa Adelta; Randriamarolaza, Louis-Paul; Champion, Bernard; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Madagascar is located at the crossroads of the Asian and African worlds and is therefore of particular interest for studies on human population migration. Within the large human diversity of the Great Island, we focused our study on a particular ethnic group, the Antemoro. Their culture presents an important Arab-Islamic influence, but the question of an Arab biological inheritance remains unresolved. We analyzed paternal (n=129) and maternal (n=135) lineages of this ethnic group. Although the majority of Antemoro genetic ancestry comes from sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian gene pools, we observed in their paternal lineages two specific haplogroups (J1 and T1) linked to Middle Eastern origins. This inheritance was restricted to some Antemoro sub-groups. Statistical analyses tended to confirm significant Middle Eastern genetic contribution. This study gives a new perspective to the large human genetic diversity in Madagascar. PMID:24278350

  3. Tracing Arab-Islamic inheritance in Madagascar: study of the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA in the Antemoro.

    PubMed

    Capredon, Mélanie; Brucato, Nicolas; Tonasso, Laure; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Rakotondrabe, Andriamihaja Bakomalala; Ratolojanahary, Mamisoa Adelta; Randriamarolaza, Louis-Paul; Champion, Bernard; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Madagascar is located at the crossroads of the Asian and African worlds and is therefore of particular interest for studies on human population migration. Within the large human diversity of the Great Island, we focused our study on a particular ethnic group, the Antemoro. Their culture presents an important Arab-Islamic influence, but the question of an Arab biological inheritance remains unresolved. We analyzed paternal (n=129) and maternal (n=135) lineages of this ethnic group. Although the majority of Antemoro genetic ancestry comes from sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian gene pools, we observed in their paternal lineages two specific haplogroups (J1 and T1) linked to Middle Eastern origins. This inheritance was restricted to some Antemoro sub-groups. Statistical analyses tended to confirm significant Middle Eastern genetic contribution. This study gives a new perspective to the large human genetic diversity in Madagascar. PMID:24278350

  4. Newcastle Disease Virus in Madagascar: Identification of an Original Genotype Possibly Deriving from a Died Out Ancestor of Genotype IV

    PubMed Central

    Maminiaina, Olivier F.; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R.; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M.; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A.; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed. PMID:21085573

  5. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Kolby, Jonathan E.; Smith, Kristine M.; Ramirez, Sara D.; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease. Standardized population monitoring of key amphibian and reptile species should be established with urgency to enable early detection of potential impacts of disease emergence in this global biodiversity hotspot. PMID:26083349

  6. Phylogeography in Response to Reproductive Strategies and Ecogeographic Isolation in Ant Species on Madagascar: Genus Mystrium (Formicidae: Amblyoponinae)

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Natalie R.; Fisher, Brian L.; Girman, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    The bulk of models used to understand the species diversification on Madagascar have been constructed using vertebrate taxa. It is not clear how these models affect less vagile species that may interact at a variety of spatial scales. Several studies on vertebrates have divided Madagascar into east-west bioclimatic regions, suggesting there is a fundamental division between eastern wet-adapted and western dry-adapted taxa. An alternative model of ecogeographic constraints shows a north-south division. We test whether the diversification in a small arthropod with variable degrees of dispersal conform to either model of ecogeographic constraints proposed for vertebrate taxa. We employ a molecular taxonomic dataset using ~2 kilobases nuDNA (Wg, LW Rh, Abd-A, 28s) and 790 basepairs mtDNA (CO1), along with geographic and habitat data, to examine the diversification patterns of the ant genus Mystrium Roger, 1862, (Subfamily Amblyoponinae) from Madagascar. The nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenies were both congruent with morphospecies as indicated in a recent revision of the genus. Species of Mystrium practice different colony reproductive strategies (winged queens vs non-winged queens). Alternate reproductive strategies led to inequalities in female dispersal ability among species, providing an additional layer for examination of the impacts of vagility on divergence, especially when measured using a maternally inherited locus. Mystrium species distribution patterns support these models of ecogeographic constraints. Reproductive strategy effected how Mystrium mtDNA lineages were associated with large-scale habitat distinctions and various topographical features. Furthermore, in some cases we find microgeographic population structure which appears to have been impacted by localized habitat differences (tsingy limestone formations, littoral forest) on a scale much smaller than that found in vertebrates. The current system offers a finer scale look at species diversification on the island, and helps achieve a more universal understanding of the generation of biodiversity on Madagascar. PMID:26800442

  7. Systematics of the Madagascar Anelosimus spiders: remarkable local richness and endemism, and dual colonization from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Jencik, Brian B; Veve, Giselle M; Hanitriniaina, Sahondra; Agostini, Diego; Goh, Seok Ping; Pruitt, Jonathan; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Despite the alarming rates of deforestation and forest fragmentation, Madagascar still harbors extraordinary biodiversity. However, in many arthropod groups, such as spiders, this biodiversity remains mostly unexplored and undescribed. The first subsocial Madagascan species of the theridiid spider genus Anelosimus were described in 2005 when six new species were found to coexist in the Périnet forest fragment within Andasibe-Mantadia NP. However, this discovery was based only on a few specimens and the extent of this Madagascan radiation has remained unknown. We here report on a thorough survey of >350 colonies from Périnet, and three pilot surveys into additional Madagascar forests (Ambohitantely, Ranamofana, and Montagne d'Ambre). The morphological, molecular and natural history data from these surveys facilitated a revised taxonomy and phylogenetic hypothesis of Madagascan Anelosimus. This subsocial clade currently comprises six previously known (Anelosimusandasibe Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimusmay Agnarsson, 2005, Anelosimusnazariani Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimussallee Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimussalut Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimusvondrona Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005) and 10 new species: Anelosimusata sp. n., Anelosimusbuffoni sp. n., Anelosimusdarwini sp. n., Anelosimushookeri sp. n., Anelosimushuxleyi sp. n., Anelosimuslamarcki sp. n., Anelosimusmoramora sp. n., Anelosimustita sp. n., Anelosimustorfi sp. n., Anelosimuswallacei sp. n.. With the exception of Anelosimusmay and Anelosimusvondrona, all other species appear to be single forest endemics. While additional sampling is necessary, these data imply a much higher local richness and endemism in Madagascan forests than in any other comparable area globally. The phylogenetic results establish a sister clade relationship between the subsocial Anelosimus in Madagascar and the American 'eximius group', and between the solitary Anelosimusdecaryi on Madagascar and a solitary American clade. These findings imply duplicate colonizations from America, an otherwise rare biogeographical pattern, calling for more detailed investigation of Anelosimus biogeography. PMID:26175602

  8. Systematics of the Madagascar Anelosimus spiders: remarkable local richness and endemism, and dual colonization from the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Agnarsson, Ingi; Jencik, Brian B.; Veve, Giselle M.; Hanitriniaina, Sahondra; Agostini, Diego; Goh, Seok Ping; Pruitt, Jonathan; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the alarming rates of deforestation and forest fragmentation, Madagascar still harbors extraordinary biodiversity. However, in many arthropod groups, such as spiders, this biodiversity remains mostly unexplored and undescribed. The first subsocial Madagascan species of the theridiid spider genus Anelosimus were described in 2005 when six new species were found to coexist in the Périnet forest fragment within Andasibe-Mantadia NP. However, this discovery was based only on a few specimens and the extent of this Madagascan radiation has remained unknown. We here report on a thorough survey of >350 colonies from Périnet, and three pilot surveys into additional Madagascar forests (Ambohitantely, Ranamofana, and Montagne d’Ambre). The morphological, molecular and natural history data from these surveys facilitated a revised taxonomy and phylogenetic hypothesis of Madagascan Anelosimus. This subsocial clade currently comprises six previously known (Anelosimus andasibe Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus may Agnarsson, 2005, Anelosimus nazariani Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus sallee Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus salut Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005, Anelosimus vondrona Agnarsson & Kuntner, 2005) and 10 new species: Anelosimus ata sp. n., Anelosimus buffoni sp. n., Anelosimus darwini sp. n., Anelosimus hookeri sp. n., Anelosimus huxleyi sp. n., Anelosimus lamarcki sp. n., Anelosimus moramora sp. n., Anelosimus tita sp. n., Anelosimus torfi sp. n., Anelosimus wallacei sp. n.. With the exception of Anelosimus may and Anelosimus vondrona, all other species appear to be single forest endemics. While additional sampling is necessary, these data imply a much higher local richness and endemism in Madagascan forests than in any other comparable area globally. The phylogenetic results establish a sister clade relationship between the subsocial Anelosimus in Madagascar and the American ‘eximius group’, and between the solitary Anelosimus decaryi on Madagascar and a solitary American clade. These findings imply duplicate colonizations from America, an otherwise rare biogeographical pattern, calling for more detailed investigation of Anelosimus biogeography. PMID:26175602

  9. Two new species of the genus Proboscidopirates (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Enicocephalidae) from Madagascar with a list of the species.

    PubMed

    Ba?a?, Petr; Štys, Pavel; Rahanitriniaina, Sahondra Lalao; Rabotoson, Marie Estherine

    2015-01-01

    Two new species Proboscidopirates ericguilberti sp. nov. Ba?a? & Štys and Proboscidopirates rugulosus sp. nov. Ba?a? & Štys are described from central-east Madagascar. A list of Proboscidopirates species is given. Potential thelytoky of this endemic Madagascan genus, some of its generic and species-specific dignostic characters and its distribution relative to that of Oncylocotis Stål species are discussed.  PMID:25661203

  10. The structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath Mozambique and Madagascar from combined surface wave and ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, P.; Aleqabi, G. I.; Wysession, M. E.; Pratt, M. J.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.; Rambolamana, G.; Rakotondraibe, T.; Sy Tanjona Andriampenomanana ny Ony, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present results based on applying the two-plane wave method to the observed amplitude and phase of fundamental mode surface waves from the NSF-funded MACOMO IRIS PASSCAL broadband seismometer deployment in Madagascar and Mozambique. The two-plane wave method (Forsyth and Li, 2005) involves modeling arriving surface waves by a two-plane-wave field. Combining this method with ambient noise will allow the joint inversion of phase velocities from 5 to 180 s, to generate a high-resolution 3-D shear wave velocity model from the surface to a depth of ~200 km beneath Madagascar, Mozambique and the surrounding regions. Using the two-plane wave method, the phase and amplitude of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves from distant earthquakes recorded at MACOMO are inverted for 2-D phase velocity maps at periods from 18 to 180 s. The ambient noise method (a separate study) is limited to short periods and therefore it is sensitive only to the crust and uppermost mantle structure. The 3-D shear-wave velocity structure beneath East Africa (Mozambique and Madagascar) where the East African Orogeny was instrumental in the amalgamation of Gondwana (~540 Ma) is investigated by using the implicit relation between phase-velocity dispersion and shear-wave structure. The phase velocities, at selected periods and at each node of the phase velocity maps, are inverted for a 1-D structure; the 1-D models at each node form the 3-D shear-wave model. Phase-velocity tomographic images show 2-D lateral variations in phase velocities at each period. Preliminary results show that above periods of 124 sec we noticed a rapid vertical transition to low phase velocities beneath southern Madagascar.

  11. Low-temperature evolution of the Morondava rift basin shoulder in western Madagascar: An apatite fission track study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, JöRg; Seward, Diane; Schreurs, Guido

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of the rift shoulder and the sedimentary sequence of the Morondava basin in western Madagascar was mainly influenced by a Permo-Triassic continental failed rift (Karroo rift), and the early Jurassic separation of Madagascar from Africa. Karroo deposits are restricted to a narrow corridor along the basement-basin contact and parts of this contact feature a steep escarpment. Here, apatite fission track (AFT) analysis of a series of both basement and sediment samples across the escarpment reveals the low-temperature evolution of the exhuming Precambrian basement in the rift basin shoulder and the associated thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. Seven basement and four Karroo sediment samples yield apparent AFT ages between ˜330 and ˜215 Ma and ˜260 and ˜95 Ma, respectively. Partially annealed fission tracks and thermal modeling indicate post-depositional thermal overprinting of both basement and Karroo sediment. Rocks presently exposed in the rift shoulder indicate temperatures of >60°C associated with this reheating whereby the westernmost sample in the sedimentary plain experienced almost complete resetting of the detrital apatite grains at temperatures of about ˜90-100°C. The younging of AFT ages westward indicates activity of faults, re-activating inherited Precambrian structures during Karroo sedimentation. Furthermore, our data suggest onset of final cooling/exhumation linked to (1) the end of Madagascar's drift southward relative to Africa during the Early Cretaceous, (2) activity of the Marion hot spot and associated Late Cretaceous break-up between Madagascar and India, and (3) the collision of India with Eurasia and subsequent re-organization of spreading systems in the Indian Ocean.

  12. Phylogeography in Response to Reproductive Strategies and Ecogeographic Isolation in Ant Species on Madagascar: Genus Mystrium (Formicidae: Amblyoponinae).

    PubMed

    Graham, Natalie R; Fisher, Brian L; Girman, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    The bulk of models used to understand the species diversification on Madagascar have been constructed using vertebrate taxa. It is not clear how these models affect less vagile species that may interact at a variety of spatial scales. Several studies on vertebrates have divided Madagascar into east-west bioclimatic regions, suggesting there is a fundamental division between eastern wet-adapted and western dry-adapted taxa. An alternative model of ecogeographic constraints shows a north-south division. We test whether the diversification in a small arthropod with variable degrees of dispersal conform to either model of ecogeographic constraints proposed for vertebrate taxa. We employ a molecular taxonomic dataset using ~2 kilobases nuDNA (Wg, LW Rh, Abd-A, 28s) and 790 basepairs mtDNA (CO1), along with geographic and habitat data, to examine the diversification patterns of the ant genus Mystrium Roger, 1862, (Subfamily Amblyoponinae) from Madagascar. The nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenies were both congruent with morphospecies as indicated in a recent revision of the genus. Species of Mystrium practice different colony reproductive strategies (winged queens vs non-winged queens). Alternate reproductive strategies led to inequalities in female dispersal ability among species, providing an additional layer for examination of the impacts of vagility on divergence, especially when measured using a maternally inherited locus. Mystrium species distribution patterns support these models of ecogeographic constraints. Reproductive strategy effected how Mystrium mtDNA lineages were associated with large-scale habitat distinctions and various topographical features. Furthermore, in some cases we find microgeographic population structure which appears to have been impacted by localized habitat differences (tsingy limestone formations, littoral forest) on a scale much smaller than that found in vertebrates. The current system offers a finer scale look at species diversification on the island, and helps achieve a more universal understanding of the generation of biodiversity on Madagascar. PMID:26800442

  13. High Prevalence of West Nile Virus in Domestic Birds and Detection in 2 New Mosquito Species in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Maquart, Marianne; Boyer, Sébastien; Rakotoharinome, Vincent Michel; Ravaomanana, Julie; Tantely, Michael Luciano; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Cardinale, Eric

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus is an arthropod-borne zoonosis transmitted by a large number of mosquito species, and birds play a key role as reservoir of the virus. Its distribution is largely widespread over Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe. Since 1978, it has frequently been reported in Madagascar. Studies described a high seroprevalence level of the virus in humans in different areas of the island and a human fatal case of WNV infection was reported in 2011. Despite these reports, the epidemiology of WNV in Madagascar, in particular, viral circulation remains unclear. To explore the transmission of WNV in two rural human populations of Madagascar, we investigated local mosquitoes and poultry for evidence of current infections, and determined seroprevalence of candidate sentinel species among the local poultry. These 2 areas are close to lakes where domestic birds, migratory wild birds and humans coexist. Serological analysis revealed WNV antibodies in domestic birds (duck, chicken, goose, turkey and guinea fowl) sampled in both districts (Antsalova 29.4% and Mitsinjo 16.7%). West Nile virus nucleic acid was detected in one chicken and in 8 pools of mosquitoes including 2 mosquito species (Aedeomyia madagascarica and Anopheles pauliani) that have not been previously described as candidate vectors for WNV. Molecular analysis of WNV isolates showed that all viruses detected were part of the lineage 2 that is mainly distributed in Africa, and were most closely matched by the previous Malagasy strains isolated in 1988. Our study showed that WNV circulates in Madagascar amongst domestic birds and mosquitoes, and highlights the utility of poultry as a surveillance tool to detect WNV transmission in a peri-domestic setting. PMID:26807720

  14. High Prevalence of West Nile Virus in Domestic Birds and Detection in 2 New Mosquito Species in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoharinome, Vincent Michel; Ravaomanana, Julie; Tantely, Michael Luciano; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Cardinale, Eric

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus is an arthropod-borne zoonosis transmitted by a large number of mosquito species, and birds play a key role as reservoir of the virus. Its distribution is largely widespread over Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe. Since 1978, it has frequently been reported in Madagascar. Studies described a high seroprevalence level of the virus in humans in different areas of the island and a human fatal case of WNV infection was reported in 2011. Despite these reports, the epidemiology of WNV in Madagascar, in particular, viral circulation remains unclear. To explore the transmission of WNV in two rural human populations of Madagascar, we investigated local mosquitoes and poultry for evidence of current infections, and determined seroprevalence of candidate sentinel species among the local poultry. These 2 areas are close to lakes where domestic birds, migratory wild birds and humans coexist. Serological analysis revealed WNV antibodies in domestic birds (duck, chicken, goose, turkey and guinea fowl) sampled in both districts (Antsalova 29.4% and Mitsinjo 16.7%). West Nile virus nucleic acid was detected in one chicken and in 8 pools of mosquitoes including 2 mosquito species (Aedeomyia madagascarica and Anopheles pauliani) that have not been previously described as candidate vectors for WNV. Molecular analysis of WNV isolates showed that all viruses detected were part of the lineage 2 that is mainly distributed in Africa, and were most closely matched by the previous Malagasy strains isolated in 1988. Our study showed that WNV circulates in Madagascar amongst domestic birds and mosquitoes, and highlights the utility of poultry as a surveillance tool to detect WNV transmission in a peri-domestic setting. PMID:26807720

  15. Rapid Response to Evaluate the Presence of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) and Ranavirus in Wild Amphibian Populations in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Kolby, Jonathan E; Smith, Kristine M; Ramirez, Sara D; Rabemananjara, Falitiana; Pessier, Allan P; Brunner, Jesse L; Goldberg, Caren S; Berger, Lee; Skerratt, Lee F

    2015-01-01

    We performed a rapid response investigation to evaluate the presence and distribution of amphibian pathogens in Madagascar following our identification of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) and ranavirus in commercially exported amphibians. This targeted risk-based field surveillance program was conducted from February to April 2014 encompassing 12 regions and 47 survey sites. We simultaneously collected amphibian and environmental samples to increase survey sensitivity and performed sampling both in wilderness areas and commercial amphibian trade facilities. Bd was not detected in any of 508 amphibian skin swabs or 68 water filter samples, suggesting pathogen prevalence was below 0.8%, with 95% confidence during our visit. Ranavirus was detected in 5 of 97 amphibians, including one adult Mantidactylus cowanii and three unidentified larvae from Ranomafana National Park, and one adult Mantidactylus mocquardi from Ankaratra. Ranavirus was also detected in water samples collected from two commercial amphibian export facilities. We also provide the first report of an amphibian mass-mortality event observed in wild amphibians in Madagascar. Although neither Bd nor ranavirus appeared widespread in Madagascar during this investigation, additional health surveys are required to disentangle potential seasonal variations in pathogen abundance and detectability from actual changes in pathogen distribution and rates of spread. Accordingly, our results should be conservatively interpreted until a comparable survey effort during winter months has been performed. It is imperative that biosecurity practices be immediately adopted to limit the unintentional increased spread of disease through the movement of contaminated equipment or direct disposal of contaminated material from wildlife trade facilities. The presence of potentially introduced strains of ranaviruses suggests that Madagascar's reptile species might also be threatened by disease. Standardized population monitoring of key amphibian and reptile species should be established with urgency to enable early detection of potential impacts of disease emergence in this global biodiversity hotspot. PMID:26083349

  16. Nesogordonia tricarpellata (Dombeyaceae), a new species from Madagascar that compels modification of the morphological circumscription of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Skema, Cynthia; Dorr, Laurence J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nesogordonia tricarpellata Skema & Dorr, sp. nov., a new species from southeastern Madagascar, is described and illustrated. It differs from all other species of Nesogordonia Baill. in having 6–9 stamens, 3 staminodes, a 3-carpellate ovary, and a 3-valved capsule. These androecial and gynoecial characters require modification of the long-standing circumscription of the genus. The new species also has the southernmost geographic range of any species in the genus. PMID:22171171

  17. Genetic evidence for Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Madagascar resulting from virus introductions from the East African mainland rather than enzootic maintenance.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Serena A; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Khristova, Marina L; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Rollin, Pierre E; Nichol, Stuart T

    2011-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne phlebovirus, has been detected in Madagascar since 1979, with occasional outbreaks. In 2008 to 2009, a large RVFV outbreak was detected in Malagasy livestock and humans during two successive rainy seasons. To determine whether cases were due to enzootic maintenance of the virus within Madagascar or to importation from the East African mainland, nine RVFV whole genomic sequences were generated for viruses from the 1991 and 2008 Malagasy outbreaks. Bayesian coalescent analyses of available whole S, M, and L segment sequences were used to estimate the time to the most recent common ancestor for the RVFVs. The 1979 Madagascar isolate shared a common ancestor with strains on the mainland around 1972. The 1991 Madagascar isolates were in a clade distinct from that of the 1979 isolate and shared a common ancestor around 1987. Finally, the 2008 Madagascar viruses were embedded within a large clade of RVFVs from the 2006-2007 outbreak in East Africa and shared a common ancestor around 2003 to 2004. These results suggest that the most recent Madagascar outbreak was caused by a virus likely arriving in the country some time between 2003 and 2008 and that this outbreak may be an extension of the 2006-2007 East African outbreak. Clustering of the Malagasy sequences into subclades indicates that the viruses have continued to evolve during their short-term circulation within the country. These data are consistent with the notion that RVFV outbreaks in Madagascar result not from emergence from enzootic cycles within the country but from recurrent virus introductions from the East African mainland. PMID:21507967

  18. Does Diversity Matter In Modeling? Testing A New Version Of The FORMIX3 Growth Model For Madagascar Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A. H.; Fischer, R.; Shugart, H. H.; Huth, A.

    2012-12-01

    Ecological forecasting has become an essential tool used by ecologists to understand the dynamics of growth and disturbance response in threatened ecosystems such as the rainforests of Madagascar. In the species rich tropics, forest conservation is often eclipsed by anthropogenic factors, resulting in a heightened need for accurate assessment of biomass before these ecosystems disappear. The objective of this study was to test a new Madagascar rainforest specific version of the FORMIX3 growth model (Huth and Ditzer, 2000; Huth et al 1998) to assess how accurately biomass can be simulated in high biodiversity forests using a method of functional type aggregation in an individual-based model framework. Rainforest survey data collected over three growing seasons, including 265 tree species, was aggregated into 12 plant functional types based on size and light requirements. Findings indicated that the forest study site compared best when the simulated forest reached mature successional status. Multiple level comparisons between model simulation data and survey plot data found that though some features, such as the dominance of canopy emergent species and relative absence of small woody treelets are captured by the model, other forest attributes were not well reflected. Overall, the ability to accurately simulate the Madagascar rainforest was slightly diminished by the aggregation of tree species into size and light requirement functional type groupings.

  19. Hibernation in the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus): multiday torpor in primates is not restricted to Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Ruf, Thomas; Streicher, Ulrike; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Nadler, Tilo; Walzer, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation and short daily torpor are states of energy conservation with reduced metabolism and body temperature. Both hibernation, also called multiday torpor, and daily torpor are common among mammals and occur in at least 11 orders. Within the primates, there is a peculiar situation, because to date torpor has been almost exclusively reported for Malagasy lemurs. The single exception is the African lesser bushbaby, which is capable of daily torpor, but uses it only under extremely adverse conditions. For true hibernation, the geographical restriction was absolute. No primate outside of Madagascar was previously known to hibernate. Since hibernation is commonly viewed as an ancient, plesiomorphic trait, theoretically this could mean that hibernation as an overwintering strategy was lost in all other primates in mainland Africa, Asia, and the Americas. However, we hypothesized that a good candidate species for the use of hibernation, outside of Madagascar should be the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), a small primate inhabiting tropical forests. Here, we show that pygmy slow lorises exposed to natural climatic conditions in northern Vietnam during winter indeed undergo torpor lasting up to 63?h, that is, hibernation. Thus, hibernation has been retained in at least one primate outside of Madagascar. PMID:26633602

  20. Retrospective study of methylmercury and other metal(loid)s in Madagascar unpolished rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Mgutshini, Nomathamsanqa L; Bizimis, Michael; Johnson-Beebout, Sarah E; Ramanantsoanirina, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The rice ingestion rate in Madagascar is among the highest globally; however studies concerning metal(loid) concentrations in Madagascar rice are lacking. For Madagascar unpolished rice (n = 51 landraces), levels of toxic elements (e.g., total mercury, methylmercury, arsenic and cadmium) as well as essential micronutrients (e.g., zinc and selenium) were uniformly low, indicating potentially both positive and negative health effects. Aside from manganese (Wilcoxon rank sum, p < 0.01), no significant differences in concentrations for all trace elements were observed between rice with red bran (n = 20)and brown bran (n = 31) (Wilcoxon rank sum, p = 0.06-0.91). Compared to all elements in rice,rubidium (i.e., tracer for phloem transport) was most positively correlated with methylmercury (Pearson'sr = 0.33, p < 0.05) and total mercury (r = 0.44, p < 0.05), while strontium (i.e., tracer for xylemtransport) was least correlated with total mercury and methylmercury (r < 0.01 for both), suggesting inorganic mercury and methylmercury were possibly more mobile in phloem compared to xylem. PMID:25463705

  1. The Hippoboscidae (Insecta: Diptera) from Madagascar, with new records from the “Parc National de Midongy Befotaka”

    PubMed Central

    Rahola, N.; Goodman, S.M.; Robert, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Hippoboscidae or “louse-flies” is a family of pupiparous Diptera, which in their adult stage are ectoparasites of mammals and birds. This paper presents a comprehensive review of Malagasy Hippoboscidae. In total, amongst the 213 species of this family known worldwide, 14 have been reported in Madagascar, among which six are considered as endemic to the Malagasy region. In addition, data are presented from a collection of 17 Hippoboscidae obtained from seven species of forest-dwelling birds in the “Parc National de Midongy Befotaka”, southeastern Madagascar, in 2003. The flies in this collection belong to three different species: Icosta malagasii (one), Ornithoica podicipis (ten) and Ornithoctona laticornis (six). The two former species were previously only known from single specimens in museum collections; the later species is distributed across much of the Afrotropical region and the records presented herein are the first for Madagascar. All the seven bird species are new hosts for hippoboscids. We present the first description of the male of Icosta malagasii. An illustrated dichotomous determination key of the 14 Malagasy species, based on morphological criteria only, is presented. PMID:21678788

  2. Stable carbon isotope values document how a Late Holocene expansion in grasslands impacted vertebrates in northwestern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. E.; Samonds, K.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is home to some of the world's most distinctive plants and animals. Unfortunately, forest loss and habitat degradation has had a dramatic impact on both floral and faunal communities. Here we use carbon isotope values in radiocarbon-dated bones to examine how the vertebrate community at Anjohibe Cave, northwestern Madagascar, responded to a Late Holocene increase in C4 grass abundance. Our data demonstrate that major changes in the vegetation and animal community are recent phenomena at Anjohibe. Extinct lemurs and hippopotamuses were present until ca. 1500 years ago. These taxa relied exclusively on C3 resources. Locally extirpated fauna were present until 300 years ago. The majority of these species also relied on C3 resources. Their presence strongly suggests that the region surrounding the cave was more wooded than it is now, possibly as recently as 300 years ago. All introduced individuals are modern. Rats (Rattus sp.), shrews (Suncus murinus), and the giant frog Hoplobatrachus cf. tigrinus, have remarkably high carbon isotope values, implicating substantial ingestion of C4 foods. It is possible that grass abundance has increased dramatically in the past 100 years. Alternatively, opportunistically granivorous rats and shrews may selectively consume seeds from C4 grasses. In agreement with previous studies, stable isotope data reveal details of vegetation and faunal turnover in Northwestern Madagascar. Grasses have increased, forest dwelling species have vanished, and introduced taxa are exploiting a novel niche.

  3. How to use local resources to fight malnutrition in Madagascar? A study combining a survey and a consumer test.

    PubMed

    Ramaroson Rakotosamimanana, Vonimihaingo; Valentin, Dominique; Arvisenet, Gaëlle

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to understand consumers' habits and belief structures concerning local food products and to develop a new snack as a way to fight against children malnutrition in Madagascar. A large variety of natural food resources grow in Madagascar, like Moringa oleifera (MO) which leaves are rich in nutrients but not consumed. First, a survey conducted in four areas of Madagascar revealed that MO leaves are known for their health benefits but infrequently consumed, probably because of their low satiating power and strong odor. In the studied areas, different levels of consumption were observed, which may be linked to varying levels of familiarity with MO by the local populations, this in turn resulting from different situations regarding geographical and historical availability. In contrary, resources such as cassava are perceived as having negative effects on health but are widely consumed because they are cheap, liked by children and satiating. The second step in the study aimed to propose products that could increase MO consumption without completely changing food practices. The acceptability of snacks associating cassava roots and MO was evaluated by means of hedonic tests performed by children. Between the snacks tested, the preferred snack contained the highest quantity of MO and was sweetened. There was no effect of area on the acceptance of the formulated snacks. This work is an evaluation of the potential of MO in the diet of malnourished population. PMID:26297469

  4. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF METHYLMERCURY AND OTHER METAL(LOID)S IN MADAGASCAR UNPOLISHED RICE (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; Mgutshini, Noma L.; Bizimis, Michael; Johnson-Beebout, Sarah E.; Ramanantsoanirina, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The rice ingestion rate in Madagascar is among the highest globally; however studies concerning metal(loid) concentrations in Madagascar rice are lacking. For Madagascar unpolished rice (n=51 landraces), levels of toxic elements (e.g., total mercury, methylmercury, arsenic and cadmium) as well as essential micronutrients (e.g., zinc and selenium) were uniformly low, indicating potentially both positive and negative health effects. Aside from manganese (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.01), no significant differences in concentrations for all trace elements were observed between rice with red bran (n=20) and brown bran (n=31) (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.06–0.91). Compared to all elements in rice, rubidium (i.e., tracer for phloem transport) was most positively correlated with methylmercury (Pearson's r=0.33, p<0.05) and total mercury (r=0.44, p<0.05), while strontium (i.e., tracer for xylem transport) was least correlated with total mercury and methylmercury (r<0.01 for both), suggesting inorganic mercury and methylmercury were possibly more mobile in phloem compared to xylem. PMID:25463705

  5. Hibernation in the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus): multiday torpor in primates is not restricted to Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Thomas; Streicher, Ulrike; Stalder, Gabrielle L.; Nadler, Tilo; Walzer, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation and short daily torpor are states of energy conservation with reduced metabolism and body temperature. Both hibernation, also called multiday torpor, and daily torpor are common among mammals and occur in at least 11 orders. Within the primates, there is a peculiar situation, because to date torpor has been almost exclusively reported for Malagasy lemurs. The single exception is the African lesser bushbaby, which is capable of daily torpor, but uses it only under extremely adverse conditions. For true hibernation, the geographical restriction was absolute. No primate outside of Madagascar was previously known to hibernate. Since hibernation is commonly viewed as an ancient, plesiomorphic trait, theoretically this could mean that hibernation as an overwintering strategy was lost in all other primates in mainland Africa, Asia, and the Americas. However, we hypothesized that a good candidate species for the use of hibernation, outside of Madagascar should be the pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), a small primate inhabiting tropical forests. Here, we show that pygmy slow lorises exposed to natural climatic conditions in northern Vietnam during winter indeed undergo torpor lasting up to 63 h, that is, hibernation. Thus, hibernation has been retained in at least one primate outside of Madagascar. PMID:26633602

  6. “Tazomoka Is Not a Problem”. Local Perspectives on Malaria, Fever Case Management and Bed Net Use in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Raboanary, Emma; Kesteman, Thomas; Piola, Patrice; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Rogier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Background Although its incidence has been decreasing during the last decade, malaria is still a major public health issue in Madagascar. The use of Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLIN) remains a key malaria control intervention strategy in Madagascar, however, it encounters some obstacles. The present study aimed to explore the local terminology related to malaria, information channels about malaria, attitude towards bed nets, and health care seeking practices in case of fever. This article presents novel qualitative findings about malaria. Until now, no such data has been published for Madagascar. Methods A comparative qualitative study was carried out at four sites in Madagascar, each differing by malaria epidemiology and socio-cultural background of the populations. Seventy-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with biomedical and traditional caregivers, and members of the local population. In addition, observations of the living conditions and the uses of bed net were conducted. Results Due to the differences between local and biomedical perspectives on malaria, official messages did not have the expected impact on population in terms of prevention and care seeking behaviors. Rather, most information retained about malaria was spread through informal information circulation channels. Most interviewees perceived malaria as a disease that is simple to treat. Tazomoka (“mosquito fever”), the Malagasy biomedical word for malaria, was not used by populations. Tazo (“fever”) and tazomahery (“strong fever”) were the terms more commonly used by members of the local population to refer to malaria related symptoms. According to local perceptions in all areas, tazo and tazomahery were not caused by mosquitos. Each of these symptoms required specific health recourse. The usual fever management strategies consisted of self-medication or recourse to traditional and biomedical caregivers. Usage of bed nets was intermittent and was not directly linked to protection against malaria in the eyes of most Malagasy people. Conclusions This article highlights the conflicting understanding of malaria between local perceptions and the biomedical establishment in Madagascar. Local perceptions of malaria present a holistic vision of the disease that includes various social and cultural dimensions, rather than reflecting one universal understanding, as in the biomedical image. The consideration of this “holistic vision” and other socio-cultural aspects surrounding the understanding of malaria is essential in implementing successful control intervention strategies. PMID:26943672

  7. Deforestation and Rice: Using Methods in Modeling and Remote Sensing to Project Patterns of Forest Change in Eastern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A. H.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Fischer, R.; Huth, A.; Shugart, H. H.

    2013-12-01

    In the species rich tropics, forest conservation is often eclipsed by anthropogenic disturbance, resulting in a heightened need for an accurate assessment of biomass and the gaining of predictive capability before these ecosystems disappear. The combination of multi-temporal remote sensing data, field data and forest growth modeling to quantify carbon stocks and flux is therefore of great importance. In this study, we utilize these methods to (1) improve forest biomass and carbon flux estimates for the study region in Eastern Madagascar, and (2) initialize an individual-based growth model that incorporates the anthropogenic factors causing deforestation to project ecosystem response to future environmental change. Recent studies have shown that there is a direct correlation between the international rice market and rates of deforestation in tropical countries such as Madagascar (see Minten et al., 2006). Further, although law protects the remaining forest areas, dictatorships and recent political unrest have lead to poor or non-existent enforcement of precious wood and forest protection over the past 35 years. Our approach combined multi-temporal remote sensing analysis and ecological modeling using a theoretical and mathematical approach to assess biomass change and to understand how tree growth and life history (growth response patterns) relate to past and present economic variability in Madagascar forests of the eastern Toamasina region. We measured rates of change of deforestation with respect to politics and the price of rice by classifying and comparing biomass using 30m Landsat during 5 political regime time periods (1985-1992, 1993-1996, 1997-2001, 2002-2008, 2009 to present). Forest biomass estimations were calibrated using forest inventory data collected over 3 growing seasons over the study region (130 small circular plots in primary forest). This information was then built into the previously parameterized (Armstrong et al., in prep and Fischer et al in review) Madagascar FORMIX3 Model (see Huth and Ditzer, 2000) by incorporating rice economy, selective logging and political stability modules into the model to control certain species groups (i.e. selective harvest) and fire frequency (encroachment). The improved FORMIX3 model was then used to investigate and project forest growth response to a variety of impact scenarios ranging from an increase in overall deforestation to a decrease in deforestation and increase in protection enforcement. Our findings showed a significant positive correlation between increasing deforestation rates and higher local rice prices due to political regime and international market factors. This research resulted in the first quantitative analysis of the relationship between the international rice market and local land-use in terms of slash and burn agriculture, illegal logging of precious hardwood in Madagascar.

  8. Genetic data suggest a natural prehuman origin of open habitats in northern Madagascar and question the deforestation narrative in this region.

    PubMed

    Quéméré, Erwan; Amelot, Xavier; Pierson, Julie; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-08-01

    The impact of climate change and anthropogenic deforestation on biodiversity is of growing concern worldwide. Disentangling how past anthropogenic and natural factors contributed to current biome distribution is thus a crucial issue to understand their complex interactions on wider time scales and to improve predictions and conservation strategies. This is particularly important in biodiversity hotspots, such as Madagascar, dominated by large open habitats whose origins are increasingly debated. Although a dominant narrative argues that Madagascar was originally entirely covered by woodlands, which were destroyed by humans, a number of recent studies have suggested that past climatic fluctuations played a major role in shaping current biome distributions well before humans arrived. Here, we address the question of the origin of open habitats in the Daraina region in northern Madagascar, using a multiproxy approach combining population genetics modeling and remote-sensing analyses. We show that (i) contrary to most regions of Madagascar, the forest cover in Daraina remained remarkably stable over the past 60 y, and (ii) the golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli), a forest-dwelling lemur, underwent a strong population contraction before the arrival of the first humans, hence excluding an anthropogenic cause. Prehuman Holocene droughts may have led to a significant increase of grasslands and a reduction in the species' habitat. This contradicts the prevailing narrative that land cover changes are necessarily anthropogenic in Madagascar but does not preclude the later role played by humans in other regions in which recent lemur bottlenecks have been observed. PMID:22826244

  9. Genetic data suggest a natural prehuman origin of open habitats in northern Madagascar and question the deforestation narrative in this region

    PubMed Central

    Quéméré, Erwan; Amelot, Xavier; Pierson, Julie; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-01-01

    The impact of climate change and anthropogenic deforestation on biodiversity is of growing concern worldwide. Disentangling how past anthropogenic and natural factors contributed to current biome distribution is thus a crucial issue to understand their complex interactions on wider time scales and to improve predictions and conservation strategies. This is particularly important in biodiversity hotspots, such as Madagascar, dominated by large open habitats whose origins are increasingly debated. Although a dominant narrative argues that Madagascar was originally entirely covered by woodlands, which were destroyed by humans, a number of recent studies have suggested that past climatic fluctuations played a major role in shaping current biome distributions well before humans arrived. Here, we address the question of the origin of open habitats in the Daraina region in northern Madagascar, using a multiproxy approach combining population genetics modeling and remote-sensing analyses. We show that (i) contrary to most regions of Madagascar, the forest cover in Daraina remained remarkably stable over the past 60 y, and (ii) the golden-crowned sifaka (Propithecus tattersalli), a forest-dwelling lemur, underwent a strong population contraction before the arrival of the first humans, hence excluding an anthropogenic cause. Prehuman Holocene droughts may have led to a significant increase of grasslands and a reduction in the species’ habitat. This contradicts the prevailing narrative that land cover changes are necessarily anthropogenic in Madagascar but does not preclude the later role played by humans in other regions in which recent lemur bottlenecks have been observed. PMID:22826244

  10. Preparer une firme-reseau dans le transport routier des hydrocarbures le cas de TOTAL Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razakamanifidiny, Patrick Dany

    2009-12-01

    In a dynamic context, a network firm is more and more suggested in scientific writings as a prevalent strategy to develop several firms in subcontracting link in order to satisfy the needs of their customers asking for products which are complex to manufacture. However, due to lack of sufficient preparation, most of network organizations fail. That's why it seems legitimate to explore an avenue of research on the preparation step of a network firm. How a third intermediary can develop and try out a change process in order to stimulate the commitment of films to organize themselves in network? This study is developed inside the framework of an intervention-research applied to the case of the oil distribution company TOTAL Madagascar. 71 weeks of intervention actions carried out with 27 subcontracting firms of hydrocarbon road transport located to Antananarivo are recorded within this framework. One of the critical elements in the oil distribution in Madagascar is the scarcity of the subcontracting firms of hydrocarbon road transport which are able to meet the required quality criterions. A lack of management standards observed in several small and medium enterprises of hydrocarbon road transport, a growth of the number of tankers accidents, and an insufficiency of individual resources to develop competences constitute the main reasons which explain this scarcity. By this way, a preparation step of a network firm was developed in order to increase the management competences of the subcontracting firms of hydrocarbon road transport, and to develop their capacity of collective learning. This step comes from the evolutionary perspective which consists in elaborating and implementing uprooting, movement and rooting activities related to a change implementation model taking reactions of the participating enterprises into consideration, through a change understanding process from objection to exploration until engagement. The realization of theses activities had been allowed: 44 managers of 27 participating firms to be trained, certified and sensitized with the network firm practice, 78% of the participating firms to be enthusiastic to pass to the creation of a network firm, and the enterprise pivot TOTAL Madagascar to record a significant diminution of the number of tankers accidents which is passed from 10 (77% of the total number of the tankers accidents) at the beginning of the process in 2003 to 5 (36%) at the end of this process in 2005 and to 3 (27%) in 2007. These tangible and positive results seem to prove the commitment of firms participating in the preparation step of the network firm. In this way, it is appropriate to put the hypothesis according to the experience done within the framework of this study that could be considered as a learning trajectory type of the preparation step which efficiently stimulates the intention of the participating firms to be organized in network. This present case, through these results, strengthens the consideration according to the success of the network firm which depends in the efficiency of the change process related to its preparation. Thus, a main scientific contribution of this present step rely on its originality which is the integration of two change models (implementation and understanding) inside the same research conceptual framework. In a managerial side, the essential of this step may be transferable to the other contexts which look upon the determinant role of the researcher acting as a change co-leader. That shows the utility of this step within the framework of a doctorate applied in administration. Keywords: Subcontracting -- Change -- Network firm -- Hydrocarbon Road Transport -- Small and Medium Enterprises

  11. Sedimentological features of lateritic and saprolitic horizons in a mid-slope lavaka, Central Highlands, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udvardi, B.; Raveloson, A.; Visnovitz, F.; Szabó, Cs.; Kovács, I.; Székely, B.

    2012-04-01

    Madagascar is characterized by a world-record erosion rate, especially in the Central Highlands and the vicinity of Lake Alaotra. As a consequence of the high erosion rate several specific erosional landforms develop in the area. Among them an inverted teardrop-shaped geomorphic feature, the lavaka, meaning 'hole' in Malagasy, is very typical in the hilly landscape. These unique features are widespread in Madagascar though somewhat similar patterns can also be found in Congo, South Africa and Brazil. In these areas, material from the lavakas is washed down from the hillsides into the streams and rivers after every heavy rain (1500-1800 mm/yr). The high sediment load from the eroded lavakas can damage the infrastructure (collapses roads, bridges and buildings) and may destroy agricultural land (swamp fields). The distribution of lavakas is very diverse: despite the same climatologic, geological environment and anthropogenic effects a large difference in density of lavakas can be observed. For this reason it cannot be fully constrained how lavakas form and develop. Their formation is affected by natural factors (hydrological and climatic effects, geology, tectonics, vegetation, etc.) and also by anthropogenic influences (deforestation, grassland burning, overgrazing). The basic condition for the formation of lavakas often includes the petrographic characteristics of the area. Lavaka-generating substrates can be separated into two main weathered units: thin upper laterite (less than one meter) and thicker deeper saprolite (several tens of meters) on the crystalline basement. This study focuses on a mid-slope lavaka, in the area of Tsiafahy, in Madagascar's Central Highlands. To ascertain the composition of the material and to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of the lateritic and saprolitic profile on precambrian magmatic basement, we investigated the grain size distribution and mineral composition of an active lavaka. Our results show the significance of water on slope stability. The calculated hydraulic conductivity values from laterite indicate (at least one order of magnitude) higher value than in the saprolite, but each layer have very low hydraulic conductivity. In the saprolite can be also identified two separated horizons. The difference between laterite and saprolite are reflected also in the mineralogical compositions, primarily through the presence of gibbsite in the lateritic profile. In the total profile quartz and kaolinite are predominant. The observed features can be interpreted as an indication for ferrallitization which generates a deep weathered ferralsol zone. The preferable leakage in the saprolite is enhanced by the higher modal abundance of the coarser grains relative to the laterite. The coarser grains are cemented by kaolinite, iron-oxihidroxide and calcite. These minerals are dominant in the fine-grained fraction which may be easily mobilized by water causing high erodibility that facilitates headward erosion of deeper saprolitic horizon. Due to its low hydraulic conductivity the penetration of the rainfall through the laterite is a slow process. Thus, the top layer protects the lower strata from erosional removal; however, presence of cracks in the lateritic horizon may speed up the removal of the top layer paving the way to reach the lower, more erodible saprolite.

  12. Imaging the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary beneath South Africa and Madagascar using S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Kaestle, E.; Kind, R.

    2012-12-01

    South Africa's lithosphere preserves a nearly un-interrupted geological history of more than 3.5 billion years. It was formed during the break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana over a period of 80 million years and therefore is the longest, best-preserved geological record of the planet Earth. Investigation of the thickness of continental roots, which migrate coherently with plates, therefore belongs to the most systematic keys in order to understand the continental evolution. This goal will be achieved using the novel technique of S receiver function. This technique employing S-to-P conversions appears promising for detecting the LAB and has already proven its power for mapping the LAB in the tectonically different regions. We used the available data from more than 85 temporary and permanent broadband stations in South Africa and Madagascar to detect the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Our results obtain detailed images of the LAB with improved resolution. S receiver functions clearly resolve the Moho boundary at depths ranging between 35 and 45 km beneath South Africa in good agreement with the previous studies. Even though we can not find any correlation between the crustal thickness and the age of the terrains. Deeper structure can be also well imaged by S receiver functions. Our results clearly show the presence of more than one negative converted phase beneath Kalahari Craton. On the other hand, they reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the South African continent. The first discontinuity can be seen at depths ranging between 160-220 km beneath the Archean Cratons and surrounding Phanerozoic belts, whereas the deeper discontinuity at about 300 km can be only imaged beneath the Archean Cratons. We interpret the deeper boundary at 300 km as the LAB of the old Archean Craton beneath South Africa. The shallower discontinuity at 160-220 km depth may show a mid-lithospheric boundary, which probably reveals a relict of the old mantle lithosphere. Our results obtained from the stations located in Madagascar can only confirm the presence of the mid-lithopheric boundary at 170 km depth.

  13. Imaging the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary beneath South Africa and Madagascar using S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodoudi, F.; Kaestle, E.; Kind, R.

    2012-04-01

    South Africa's lithosphere preserves a nearly un-interrupted geological history of more than 3.5 billion years. It was formed during the break-up of the supercontinent Gondwana over a period of 80 million years and therefore is the longest, best-preserved geological record of the planet Earth. Investigation of the thickness of continental roots, which migrate coherently with plates, therefore belongs to the most systematic keys in order to understand the continental evolution. This goal will be achieved using the novel technique of S receiver function. This technique employing S-to-P conversions appears promising for detecting the LAB and has already proven its power for mapping the LAB in the tectonically different regions. We used the available data from more than 85 temporary and permanent broadband stations in South Africa and Madagascar to detect the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Our results obtain detailed images of the LAB with improved resolution. S receiver functions clearly resolve the Moho boundary at depths ranging between 35 and 45 km beneath South Africa in good agreement with the previous studies. Even though we can not find any correlation between the crustal thickness and the age of the terrains. Deeper structure can be also well imaged by S receiver functions. Our results clearly show the presence of more than one negative converted phase beneath Kalahari Craton. On the other hand, they reveal the presence of two distinct lithospheric layers throughout the stable part of the South African continent. The first discontinuity can be seen at depths ranging between 160-230 km beneath the Archean Cratons and surrounding Phanerozoic belts, whereas the deeper discontinuity at 300 km can be only imaged beneath the Archean Cratons. We interpret the deeper boundary at 300 km as the LAB of the old Archean Craton beneath South Africa. The shallower discontinuity at 160-230 km depth may show a mid-lithospheric boundary, which probably reveals a relict of the old mantle lithosphere. Our results obtained from the stations located in Madagascar can only confirm the presence of the mid-lithopheric boundary at 170 km depth.

  14. Campylobacter infection in a cohort of rural children in Moramanga, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Campylobacter infection is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in developing countries, including Madagascar. Reports of pathogenicity have not been consistent and repeated exposures over time seem to lead to the development of protective immunity in developing areas. We conducted this study to support evidence for these hypotheses by exploring the association between infection and age, the reoccurrence of infection and the pathogenicity of Campylobacter. Methods We carried out a community-based longitudinal study of children under the age of 24 months in two rural villages in Moramanga, Madagascar. Children were visited twice a week and a stool specimen was collected in cases of diarrhoea. Stools specimens were collected bimonthly from all children enrolled, regardless of symptoms. Children were followed-up until the age of 36 months. Results Between January 2010 and May 31st 2012, 508 children were included in the cohort. We detected 319 episodes of Campylobacter infection in total, and 43.3% (n?=?220) of the children had at least one episode of intestinal Campylobacter infection. The rate of Campylobacter isolation from stool specimens was 9.3%. The annual incidence rate for symptomatic Campylobacter infection was 0.05 episodes/child. The probability of Campylobacter infection was highest between the ages of six and 23 months. Taking children under six months of age as the reference group, the age-specific odds ratio for the association was 5.0 (95% CI: 2.9-8.6) for children aged six to 11 months, 5.7 (95% CI: 3.3-10.0) for children aged 12 to 17 months and 3.3 (95% CI: 1.8-5.8) for children aged 18 to 23 months. A second episode of infection occurred 63 days after the first episode in children with primary infections, and after 137 days in children with multiple infections (p?

  15. Bartonella spp. in Fruit Bats and Blood-Feeding Ectoparasites in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Cara E.; Bai, Ying; Dobson, Andrew P.; Osikowicz, Lynn M.; Ranaivoson, Hafaliana C.; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    We captured, ectoparasite-combed, and blood-sampled cave-roosting Madagascan fruit bats (Eidolon dupreanum) and tree-roosting Madagascan flying foxes (Pteropus rufus) in four single-species roosts within a sympatric geographic foraging range for these species in central Madagascar. We describe infection with novel Bartonella spp. in sampled Eidolon dupreanum and associated bat flies (Cyclopodia dubia), which nest close to or within major known Bartonella lineages; simultaneously, we report the absence of Bartonella spp. in Thaumapsylla sp. fleas collected from these same bats. This represents the first documented finding of Bartonella infection in these species of bat and bat fly, as well as a new geographic record for Thaumapsylla sp. We further relate the absence of both Bartonella spp. and ectoparasites in sympatrically sampled Pteropus rufus, thus suggestive of a potential role for bat flies in Bartonella spp. transmission. These findings shed light on transmission ecology of bat-borne Bartonella spp., recently demonstrated as a potentially zoonotic pathogen. PMID:25706653

  16. Treatment of an amelanotic melanoma using radiation therapy in a lesser Madagascar hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Dominguez, Pedro; Hanzlik, Kim; Sikarskie, James G; Agnew, Dalen; Bergin, Ingrid; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Kitchell, Barbara E; McNiel, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    A 15-yr-old, male lesser Madagascar hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi) presented with a mass caudal to the right ear. Cytology suggested a sarcoma. Surgical removal was attempted. Histology was consistent with a soft tissue sarcoma. The mass recurred within 331 days post operation. Radiation therapy was initiated. Computed tomography was used for staging in conjunction with three-dimensional computerized treatment planning software to permit accurate lesion localization and to optimize normal tissue sparing. A total dose of 6,480 cGy was administered in 24 fractions over 46 days. Transient hind limb paresis developed during the course of the radiation therapy, but resolved after 7 days with prednisone treatment. Minimal acute radiation toxicity was observed. The mass responded with at least a 90% reduction in volume following radiation treatment. The animal survived 266 days from the initiation of treatment. On necropsy, a small mass and granulation tissue were found at the site of the initial neoplasm, indicating good regional control of the tumor; however, extensive metastases to the spleen and liver were present. Immunohistochemically, the original, recurrent, and metastatic populations were strongly positive for HMB 45 and weakly positive for S-100, and the final diagnosis was metastatic amelanotic melanoma. PMID:20722271

  17. Seroprevalence of malaria in inhabitants of the urban zone of Antananarivo, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Domarle, Olivier; Razakandrainibe, Romy; Rakotomalala, Emma; Jolivet, Laurence; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Ramarokoto, Charles Emile; Soares, Jean-Louis; Ariey, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Background Antananarivo, the capital of Madagascar, is located at an altitude of over 1,200 m. The environment at this altitude is not particularly favourable to malaria transmission, but malaria nonetheless remains a major public health problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate exposure to malaria in the urban population of Antananarivo, by measuring the specific seroprevalence of Plasmodium falciparum. Methods Serological studies specific for P. falciparum were carried out with an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). In a representative population of Antananarivo, 1,059 healthy volunteers were interviewed and serum samples were taken. Results The seroprevalence of IgG+IgA+IgM was 56.1% and that of IgM was 5.9%. The major risk factor associated with a positive IgG+IgA+IgM IFAT was travel outside Antananarivo, whether in the central highlands or on the coast. The abundance of rice fields in certain urban districts was not associated with a higher seroprevalence. Conclusion Malaria transmission levels are low in Antananarivo, but seroprevalence is high. Humans come into contact with the parasite primarily when travelling outside the city. Further studies are required to identify indigenous risk factors and intra-city variations more clearly. PMID:17096830

  18. Temporal patterns in a fish assemblage of a semiarid mangrove zone in Madagascar

    PubMed

    Laroche; Baran; Rasoanandrasana

    1997-07-01

    Gillnet sampling was conducted for a year in a tropical mangrove creek (SW Madagascar), characterized by a limited freshwater influence, a high turbidity and a tidal range up to 3 m. Sixty species of juvenile fishes were caught, 44 species being of commercial interest. Catches were dominated by Gerreidae (27% of total abundance), Teraponidae (16%), Carangidae (13%) and Sparidae (12%). The temporary resident fishes in the mangrove zone represented 50% of the species and 97% of the total abundance, the other species being rare (less than five individuals). The species richness, abundance and biomass per netting were low in the middle of the cool season (July-August). Monthly changes in the fish assemblage were particularly complex, with three species groups displaying a clear seasonal pattern, some species succeeding one another in a rather unstructured way, and three species abundant throughout the year. There was no clear structuring effect of temperature, salinity and turbidity on the fish assemblage. However, tidal, lunar and diel effects on the composition of the fish assemblage were evident. The species overlap between the Sarodrano mangrove fauna and the adjacent coral reef fauna is particularly weak with six species in common and shows that the mangrove plays only a very limited nursery role for coral reef species. PMID:9236084

  19. Etiologies des pleurésies exsudatives: à propos de 424 cas à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rakotoson, Joëlson Lovaniaina; Andrianasolo, Radonirina Lazasoa; Rakotomizao, Robert Jocelyn; Vololontiana, Marie Danielle Hanta; Ravahatra, Kiady; Rajaoarifetra, Jobeline; Andrianarisoa, Christophe Félix Ange

    2011-01-01

    Introduction La pleurésie constitue un motif fréquent de consultation en pneumologie. Notre travail a pour objectif de déterminer les étiologies des pleurésies exsudatives afin d'en faciliter les démarches étiologiques. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective réalisée chez des patients ayant une pleurésie exsudative et bénéficiant une biopsie pleurale à l'aveugle à l'aide de l'aiguille de Castelain, pendant une période de 5 ans (2005 à 2009). Résultats Parmi les 424 patients inclus, 259 hommes (61,08%) et 165 femmes (38,91%) étaient individualisés. Les pleurésies étaient d'origine tuberculeuse dans 298 cas (70, 28%), métastatique dans 63 cas (14,85%), inflammation non spécifique dans 51 cas (12,02%). Des fibres musculaires striées étaient biopsiées dans 12 cas (2,83%). Conclusion La biopsie pleurale occupe une place prépondérante dans la recherche étiologique des pleurésies d'exsudatives à Madagascar où la tuberculose sévit encore en mode endémique. PMID:22145067

  20. Gastro-intestinal parasites of red-fronted lemurs in Kirindy Forest, western Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Clough, Dagmar

    2010-04-01

    Although parasites are important regulatory factors in animal populations, basic knowledge on their fauna in many vertebrate taxa is lacking. In particular, parasite infections of primate species have gained little attention. Here, I present data on the gastro-intestinal fauna of a population of wild red-fronted lemurs ( Eulemur fulvus rufus; Primates: Lemuriformes) monitored over a total of 8 mo during 2 consecutive field seasons in 2006 and 2007 in Kirindy Forest, western Madagascar. Using fecal samples for parasite analyses, I identified 10 parasite species, including 6 nematodes (Lemuricola vauceli, Trichuris sp., 2 species of Callistoura, 1 trichostrongylid, and 1 strongyloid), 1 anoplocephalid cestode, a dicrocoeliid trematode, as well as 2 protozoans (Entamoeba sp. and Balantidium coli). The population in Kirindy Forest had the highest prevalence and number of parasite species ever recorded for species of lemurs. Additionally, prevalence of some parasite species differed between the social groups studied. These findings lead to 2 conclusions. First, it is important to extend a parasitological study to several social groups of a host population, since groups may differ in parasite fauna as a result of minor microclimatic or habitat parameters, and, second, short-term assessments of lemur health might underestimate the real parasite burden. PMID:19954263

  1. High resolution regional soil carbon mapping in Madagascar : towards easy to update maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinand, Clovis; Dessay, Nadine; Razafimbelo, Tantely; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitoaina; Albrecht, Alain; Vaudry, Romuald; Tiberghien, Matthieu; Rasamoelina, Maminiaina; Bernoux, Martial

    2013-04-01

    The soil organic carbon plays an important role in climate change regulation through carbon emissions and sequestration due to land use changes, notably tropical deforestation. Monitoring soil carbon emissions from shifting-cultivation requires to evaluate the amount of carbon stored at plot scale with a sufficient level of accuracy to be able to detect changes. The objective of this work was to map soil carbon stocks (30 cm and 100 cm depths) for different land use at regional scale using high resolution satellite dataset. The Andohahela National Parc and its surroundings (South-Est Madagascar) - a region with the largest deforestation rate in the country - was selected as a pilot area for the development of the methodology. A three steps approach was set up: (i) carbon inventory using mid infra-red spectroscopy and stock calculation, (ii) spatial data processing and (iii) modeling and mapping. Soil spectroscopy was successfully used for measuring organic carbon in this region. The results show that Random Forest was the inference model that produced the best estimates on calibration and validation datasets. By using a simple and robust method, we estimated uncertainty levels of of 35% and 43% for 30-cm and 100-cm carbon maps respectively. The approach developed in this study was based on open data and open source software that can be easily replicated to other regions and for other time periods using updated satellite images.

  2. A-type stratoid granites of Madagascar: evidence of Rodinia rifting at ca 790 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelec, Anne; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    The so-called stratoid granites are sheet-like granites emplaced as conformable sills in the Precambrian basement of central Madagascar. Most of them have A-type affinities (Nédélec et al. 1995). They are everywhere characterized by the same structural pattern evidencing two stages of deformation. The first one (foliations mildly dipping to the west and lineations trending WSW) is regarded as the consequence of synkinematic magma emplacement. The second stage, characterized by interference folds, steeply dipping foliations and subhorizontal lineations trending to the north, corresponds to a more or less pronounced reworking in ductile conditions, regarded as the result of Late Pan-African transcurrent tectonics. To the north of Antananarivo, the stratoid granites are associated with comagmatic quartz-syenites. New U-Pb zircons ages obtained by in situ analyses reveal two group of ages: upper intercept ages of ca 790 Ma, and younger ages of ca 550 Ma corresponding to crystal rims. These new data question the geological significance of former TIMS ages of ca 630 Ma formerly obtained from the same rocks (Paquette & Nédélec 1998). It is suggested that the stratoid granites and syenites were emplaced during a crustal thinning event corresponding to an early Rodinia rifting stage. The Pan-African imprint on these rocks is therefore limited to reheating, tectonic reworking and deep fluid transfer in the vicinity of Late-Neoproterozoic shear zones at ca 550 Ma (Nédélec et al. 2014).

  3. Geometry and kinematics of the late Proterozoic Angavo Shear Zone, Central Madagascar: Implications for Gondwana Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharimahefa, Tsilavo; Kusky, Timothy M.; Toraman, Erkan; Rasoazanamparany, Christine; Rasaonina, Imboarina

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the 20 to 60 km wide N-S trending Angavo Shear Zone (ASZ) in central Madagascar and its tectonic implications by examining its structural styles, kinematics and geometry. Our study indicates that the ASZ is characterized by at least two ductile Late Proterozoic deformation events (D1 and D2) followed by a brittle neotectonic deformation (D3). The early D1 event produced a regionally extensive S1 foliation, stretching/flattening mineral lineation L1 and symmetrical structural fabrics such as recumbent and isoclinal intra-folial folds (F1), implying a flattening deformation. D1 deformational fabrics are locally overprinted by D2 structures. D2 is characterized by a penetrative S2 foliation, shallow south plunging L2 lineation, asymmetric and sheath folds (F2) consistent with a right lateral sense of movement exhibited by delta- and sigma-type porphyroclast systems and asymmetric boudinage fabrics. D2 represents a non-coaxial flow regime formed in a dextral west over east shear zone during a partitioned transpression in response to east-west-directed compression during the assembly of Gondwana. A close resemblance with the Achankovil shear zone in India is noticed; however the continuation of the ASZ in Africa is uncertain.

  4. Profil épidemio-clinique et radiologique des atteintes ostéo-articulaires des hémophiles à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Narindra, Lova Hasina Rajaonarison Ny Ony; Rabemanorintsoa, Feno Hasina; Randrianantenaina, Faralahy Ravelonarivo; Rakoto, Olivat Alson Aimée; Ahmad, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Déterminer le profil épidémio-clinique et radiologique des atteintes ostéo-articulaires des hémophiles malagasy. Méthodes Une étude prospective, descriptive portant sur 25 patients hémophiles venant de tout Madagascar a été réalisée. Des radiographies numérisées des genoux, des chevilles et des coudes en incidence de face et de profil ainsi qu'une échographie des hanches, des genoux, des chevilles et des coudes ont été réalisées chez ces patients. Le type et la sévérité de la maladie ainsi que l'aspect de la cavité articulaire, la synoviale, les noyaux épiphysaires et les surfaces articulaires ont été analysés. Résultats Soixante-huit pourcent des patients étaient hémophiles de type A et 32 % de type B. Quarante pourcent étaient classés sévères, 28 % modérés et 32 % mineurs. Les atteintes ostéo-articulaires ont été retrouvées chez 56 % des patients. Il n'existait pas de prédominance d'atteinte selon le type ni la sévérité de la maladie. Les plus jeunes étaient les plus atteints et l'articulation du genou et de la cheville étaient les plus touchées. Conclusion Les complications ostéo-articulaire de l'hémophilie sont graves et ne dépendent pas du type ni de la sévérité de l'affection. Elles touchent surtout les enfants d'âge scolaire. Le couple radiographie-échographie permet de diagnostiquer et de surveiller ces lésions. PMID:25870742

  5. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A; von Reden, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old. PMID:26760300

  6. Assessing hygienic behavior of Apis mellifera unicolor (Hymenoptera: Apidae), the endemic honey bee from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rasolofoarivao, H; Delatte, H; Raveloson Ravaomanarivo, L H; Reynaud, B; Clémencet, J

    2015-01-01

    Hygienic behavior (HB) is one of the natural mechanisms of honey bee for limiting the spread of brood diseases and Varroa destructor parasitic mite. Objective of our study was to measure HB of Apis mellifera unicolor colonies (N = 403) from three geographic regions (one infested and two free of V. destructor) in Madagascar. The pin-killing method was used for evaluation of the HB. Responses were measured from 3 h 30 min to 7 h after perforation of the cells. Colonies were very effective in detecting perforated cells. In the first 4 h, on average, they detected at least 50% of the pin-killed brood. Six hours after cell perforation, colonies tested (N = 91) showed a wide range of uncapped (0 to 100%) and cleaned cells (0 to 82%). Global distribution of the rate of cleaned cells at 6 h was multimodal and hygienic responses could be split in three classes. Colonies from the three regions showed a significant difference in HB responses. Three hypotheses (geographic, genetic traits, presence of V. destructor) are further discussed to explain variability of HB responses among the regions. Levels of HB efficiency of A. mellifera unicolor colonies are among the greatest levels reported for A. mellifera subspecies. Presence of highly hygienic colonies is a great opportunity for future breeding program in selection for HB. PMID:26125787

  7. Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

  8. Phytochemical genomics of the Madagascar periwinkle: Unravelling the last twists of the alkaloid engine.

    PubMed

    Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Clastre, Marc; Besseau, Sébastien; Oudin, Audrey; Burlat, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Papon, Nicolas; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Courdavault, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle produces a large palette of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids (MIAs), a class of complex alkaloids including some of the most valuable plant natural products with precious therapeutical values. Evolutionary pressure on one of the hotspots of biodiversity has obviously turned this endemic Malagasy plant into an innovative alkaloid engine. Catharanthus is a unique taxon producing vinblastine and vincristine, heterodimeric MIAs with complex stereochemistry, and also manufactures more than 100 different MIAs, some shared with the Apocynaceae, Loganiaceae and Rubiaceae members. For over 60 years, the quest for these powerful anticancer drugs has inspired biologists, chemists, and pharmacists to unravel the chemistry, biochemistry, therapeutic activity, cell and molecular biology of Catharanthus roseus. Recently, the "omics" technologies have fuelled rapid progress in deciphering the last secret of strictosidine biosynthesis, the central precursor opening biosynthetic routes to several thousand MIA compounds. Dedicated C. roseus transcriptome, proteome and metabolome databases, comprising organ-, tissue- and cell-specific libraries, and other phytogenomic resources, were developed for instance by PhytoMetaSyn, Medicinal Plant Genomic Resources and SmartCell consortium. Tissue specific library screening, orthology comparison in species with or without MIA-biochemical engines, clustering of gene expression profiles together with various functional validation strategies, largely contributed to enrich the toolbox for plant synthetic biology and metabolic engineering of MIA biosynthesis. PMID:25146650

  9. Carcinome basocellulaire de la face: à propos de quatre cas rapportés à Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Razafindrakoto, Rex Mario; Razafindranaivo, Mananjara Nandrianina; Schammirah, Mahamad Rojovolaarivony; Randriamboavonjy, Rado

    2015-01-01

    Les carcinomes basocellulaires, fréquemment rencontrés dans la race blanche, sont plus rares chez les sujets de race noire. Les zones exposées de la tête sont des sites préférentiels, et une intense exposition aux rayons solaires ultraviolets a été évoquée dans leur étiopathogénie. Les métastases sont exceptionnelles. Les objectifs ont été de démontrer l'existence de carcinomes basocellulaires à Madagascar et d'en évaluer la prise en charge. Les auteurs ont rapporté quatre cas de carcinomes basocellulaires faciaux vus au service d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo, avec deux hommes et deux femmes, âgés entre 46 et 70 ans (âge moyen= 53,5 ans). Une exérèse chirurgicale a été pratiquée chez trois patients tandis qu'un patient albinos a été traité par radiothérapie. L’épidémiologie, l’étiologie, l'anatomie pathologique et le traitement des carcinomes basocellulaires de la face ont été discutées à travers une revue de la littérature. PMID:26848344

  10. Recurrent ecological adaptations revealed through a molecular analysis of the secretive cophyline frogs of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Andreone, Franco; Vences, Miguel; Vieites, David R; Glaw, Frank; Meyer, Axel

    2005-02-01

    The cophyline microhylid frogs of Madagascar show a wide range of habitat specialization, ranging from terrestrial/burrowing and semi-arboreal to entirely arboreal species. The classification of these frogs is thus far mainly based upon morphological, largely osteological, characters that might be homoplastic. Using 1173 bp of DNA sequences from the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes, we here present a molecular phylogeny for 28 species of all known genera, except for the genus Madecassophryne. The resulting maximum likelihood tree contained four major clades: one represented by the genus Anodonthyla, the second by Cophyla and Platypelis, the third by several terrestrial and semi-arboreal species of the genus Plethodontohyla, and the fourth by species of the genera Stumpffia, Plethodontohyla, and Rhombophryne. The results confirm that several cophyline lineages adapted independently to similar habitats, with multiple shifts among terrestriality and arboreality. The direction of these shifts cannot be ascertained due to unclarified relationships among the most basal lineages, but for one terrestrial species (Anodonthyla montana), it is most parsimonious to assume that it evolved from arboreal ancestors. Our results suggest that the genus Plethodontohyla is probably paraphyletic, and that the classification of this and of the genus Rhombophryne needs to be re-assessed. PMID:15619444

  11. Polyphase Neoproterozoic orogenesis within the east Africa- Antarctica orogenic belt in central and northern Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Key, R.M.; Pitfield, P.E.J.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Goodenough, K.M.; Waele, D.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Horstwood, M.S.A.; Styles, M.T.; Conrad, J.; Encarnacion, J.; Lidke, D.J.; O'connor, E. A.; Potter, C.; Smith, R.A.; Walsh, G.J.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.

    2011-01-01

    Our recent geological survey of the basement of central and northern Madagascar allowed us to re-evaluate the evolution of this part of the East Africa-Antarctica Orogen (EAAO). Five crustal domains are recognized, characterized by distinctive lithologies and histories of sedimentation, magmatism, deformation and metamorphism, and separated by tectonic and/or unconformable contacts. Four consist largely of Archaean metamorphic rocks (Antongil, Masora and Antananarivo Cratons, Tsaratanana Complex). The fifth (Bemarivo Belt) comprises Proterozoic meta-igneous rocks. The older rocks were intruded by plutonic suites at c. 1000 Ma, 820-760 Ma, 630-595 Ma and 560-520 Ma. The evolution of the four Archaean domains and their boundaries remains contentious, with two end-member interpretations evaluated: (1) all five crustal domains are separate tectonic elements, juxtaposed along Neoproterozoic sutures and (2) the four Archaean domains are segments of an older Archaean craton, which was sutured against the Bemarivo Belt in the Neoproterozoic. Rodinia fragmented during the early Neoproterozoic with intracratonic rifts that sometimes developed into oceanic basins. Subsequent Mid- Neoproterozoic collision of smaller cratonic blocks was followed by renewed extension and magmatism. The global 'Terminal Pan-African' event (560-490 Ma) finally stitched together the Mid-Neoproterozoic cratons to form Gondwana. ?? The Geological Society of London 2011.

  12. Quantifying the Short-Term Costs of Conservation Interventions for Fishers at Lake Alaotra, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrea P C; Milner-Gulland, E J; Jones, Julia P G; Bunnefeld, Nils; Young, Richard; Nicholson, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal fisheries are a key source of food and income for millions of people, but if poorly managed, fishing can have declining returns as well as impacts on biodiversity. Management interventions such as spatial and temporal closures can improve fishery sustainability and reduce environmental degradation, but may carry substantial short-term costs for fishers. The Lake Alaotra wetland in Madagascar supports a commercially important artisanal fishery and provides habitat for a Critically Endangered primate and other endemic wildlife of conservation importance. Using detailed data from more than 1,600 fisher catches, we used linear mixed effects models to explore and quantify relationships between catch weight, effort, and spatial and temporal restrictions to identify drivers of fisher behaviour and quantify the potential effect of fishing restrictions on catch. We found that restricted area interventions and fishery closures would generate direct short-term costs through reduced catch and income, and these costs vary between groups of fishers using different gear. Our results show that conservation interventions can have uneven impacts on local people with different fishing strategies. This information can be used to formulate management strategies that minimise the adverse impacts of interventions, increase local support and compliance, and therefore maximise conservation effectiveness. PMID:26107284

  13. Elephantis, a new genus for Caridina natalensis Bouvier, 1925 from eastern rivers of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Castelin, Magalie; Marquet, Gerard; Klotz, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Elephantis, new genus, is established for Caridina natalensis Bouvier, 1925 hitherto known only from South Africa with one male specimen. Recently, three surveys by electric fishing (2004, 2008 and 2010) of some eastern rivers from Madagascar have permitted to discover numerous specimens of this species. Caridina natalensis is different from all other known species of Caridina by its remarkably broad endopod of the male first pleopod, a long clubbed appendix masculina on the male second pleopod reaching beyond distal end of endopod and strong third pereiopods. Therefore a new genus name is proposed for this species. In addition to detailed description of diagnostic morphological characters, molecular sequences obtained from mitochondrial 16S gene are provided for six specimens of this species. These DNA sequences are integrated to the 16S molecular phylogeny of atyid freshwater shrimps recently published by von Rintelen et al. (2012). Elephantis natalensis comb. nov. sequences formed a divergent group supported in maximum likelihood analysis. The availability of DNA samples could be used as reference and integrated in further phylogenetic studies on atyid freshwater shrimps. PMID:26146747

  14. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A.; von Reden, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old. PMID:26760300

  15. Vinca drug components accumulate exclusively in leaf exudates of Madagascar periwinkle.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Jonathan; Salim, Vonny; Wu, Maggie; Thamm, Antje M K; Murata, Jun; Ploss, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2010-08-24

    The monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) continue to be the most important source of natural drugs in chemotherapy treatments for a range of human cancers. These anticancer drugs are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline to yield powerful dimeric MIAs that prevent cell division. However the precise mechanisms for their assembly within plants remain obscure. Here we report that the complex development-, environment-, organ-, and cell-specific controls involved in expression of MIA pathways are coupled to secretory mechanisms that keep catharanthine and vindoline separated from each other in living plants. Although the entire production of catharanthine and vindoline occurs in young developing leaves, catharanthine accumulates in leaf wax exudates of leaves, whereas vindoline is found within leaf cells. The spatial separation of these two MIAs provides a biological explanation for the low levels of dimeric anticancer drugs found in the plant that result in their high cost of commercial production. The ability of catharanthine to inhibit the growth of fungal zoospores at physiological concentrations found on the leaf surface of Catharanthus leaves, as well as its insect toxicity, provide an additional biological role for its secretion. We anticipate that this discovery will trigger a broad search for plants that secrete alkaloids, the biological mechanisms involved in their secretion to the plant surface, and the ecological roles played by them. PMID:20696903

  16. Extreme vulnerability of smallholder farmers to agricultural risks and climate change in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Celia A.; Rakotobe, Zo Lalaina; Rao, Nalini S.; Dave, Radhika; Razafimahatratra, Hery; Rabarijohn, Rivo Hasinandrianina; Rajaofara, Haingo; MacKinnon, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Across the tropics, smallholder farmers already face numerous risks to agricultural production. Climate change is expected to disproportionately affect smallholder farmers and make their livelihoods even more precarious; however, there is limited information on their overall vulnerability and adaptation needs. We conducted surveys of 600 households in Madagascar to characterize the vulnerability of smallholder farmers, identify how farmers cope with risks and explore what strategies are needed to help them adapt to climate change. Malagasy farmers are particularly vulnerable to any shocks to their agricultural system owing to their high dependence on agriculture for their livelihoods, chronic food insecurity, physical isolation and lack of access to formal safety nets. Farmers are frequently exposed to pest and disease outbreaks and extreme weather events (particularly cyclones), which cause significant crop and income losses and exacerbate food insecurity. Although farmers use a variety of risk-coping strategies, these are insufficient to prevent them from remaining food insecure. Few farmers have adjusted their farming strategies in response to climate change, owing to limited resources and capacity. Urgent technical, financial and institutional support is needed to improve the agricultural production and food security of Malagasy farmers and make their livelihoods resilient to climate change. PMID:24535397

  17. Ecological divergence and speciation between lemur (Eulemur) sister species in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Blair, M E; Sterling, E J; Dusch, M; Raxworthy, C J; Pearson, R G

    2013-08-01

    Understanding ecological niche evolution over evolutionary timescales is crucial to elucidating the biogeographic history of organisms. Here, we used, for the first time, climate-based ecological niche models (ENMs) to test hypotheses about ecological divergence and speciation processes between sister species pairs of lemurs (genus Eulemur) in Madagascar. We produced ENMs for eight species, all of which had significant validation support. Among the four sister species pairs, we found nonequivalent niches between sisters, varying degrees of niche overlap in ecological and geographic space, and support for multiple divergence processes. Specifically, three sister-pair comparisons supported the null model that niches are no more divergent than the available background region. These findings are consistent with an allopatric speciation model, and for two sister pairs (E. collaris-E. cinereiceps and E. rufus-E. rufifrons), a riverine barrier has been previously proposed for driving allopatric speciation. However, for the fourth sister pair E. flavifrons-E. macaco, we found support for significant niche divergence, and consistent with their parapatric distribution on an ecotone and the lack of obvious geographic barriers, these findings most strongly support a parapatric model of speciation. These analyses thus suggest that various speciation processes have led to diversification among closely related Eulemur species. PMID:23865477

  18. Effective Stimulus Parameters for Directed Locomotion in Madagascar Hissing Cockroach Biobot

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jonathan C.; Shingiro, Aristide; Bowen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Swarms of insects instrumented with wireless electronic backpacks have previously been proposed for potential use in search and rescue operations. Before deploying such biobot swarms, an effective long-term neural-electric stimulus interface must be established, and the locomotion response to various stimuli quantified. To this end, we studied a variety of pulse types (mono- vs. bipolar; voltage- vs. current-controlled) and shapes (amplitude, frequency, duration) to parameters that are most effective for evoking locomotion along a desired path in the Madagascar hissing cockroach (G. portentosa) in response to antennal and cercal stimulation. We identified bipolar, 2 V, 50 Hz, 0.5 s voltage controlled pulses as being optimal for evoking forward motion and turns in the expected contraversive direction without habituation in ≈50% of test subjects, a substantial increase over ≈10% success rates previously reported. Larger amplitudes for voltage (1–4 V) and current (50–150 μA) pulses generally evoked larger forward walking (15.6–25.6 cm; 3.9–5.6 cm/s) but smaller concomitant turning responses (149 to 80.0 deg; 62.8 to 41.2 deg/s). Thus, the radius of curvature of the initial turn-then-run locomotor response (≈10–25 cm) could be controlled in a graded manner by varying the stimulus amplitude. These findings could be used to help optimize stimulus protocols for swarms of cockroach biobots navigating unknown terrain. PMID:26308337

  19. [Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of severe malaria in adults in hospital in Antananarivo, Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Rakotoarivelo, R A; Raveloson, H F R; Andrianasolo, R; Razafimahefa, S H; Randria, M J D

    2009-10-01

    Few data are available about severe malaria in Madagascar. Our aims were to describe epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of severe malaria in patients in Antananarivo. We conducted a retrospective study from 1 March 2006 to 31 March 2008 at the infectious disease department. We recorded 61 cases of severe malaria among 1,803 in patients. Sex ratio was 2 and average age was 35.3 years old. Three pregnant women were recorded among women (15.8%). Self-medication was registered in 23%. Among 35 patients who received first medical care, no one had parasitological examination. The treatment was inadequate for all patients (n = 19). Conscience impairment (65.6%), jaundice (24.6%), seizure (18%) and prostration (14.8%) were the major severe signs. Diagnosis was made 6.54 days after the onset of the disease. Mortality rate was 11.5%. Self-medication, inappropriate primary care and delayed diagnosis represented risk factors for severe malaria in our cohort. PMID:19950535

  20. Extreme vulnerability of smallholder farmers to agricultural risks and climate change in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Celia A; Rakotobe, Zo Lalaina; Rao, Nalini S; Dave, Radhika; Razafimahatratra, Hery; Rabarijohn, Rivo Hasinandrianina; Rajaofara, Haingo; Mackinnon, James L

    2014-04-01

    Across the tropics, smallholder farmers already face numerous risks to agricultural production. Climate change is expected to disproportionately affect smallholder farmers and make their livelihoods even more precarious; however, there is limited information on their overall vulnerability and adaptation needs. We conducted surveys of 600 households in Madagascar to characterize the vulnerability of smallholder farmers, identify how farmers cope with risks and explore what strategies are needed to help them adapt to climate change. Malagasy farmers are particularly vulnerable to any shocks to their agricultural system owing to their high dependence on agriculture for their livelihoods, chronic food insecurity, physical isolation and lack of access to formal safety nets. Farmers are frequently exposed to pest and disease outbreaks and extreme weather events (particularly cyclones), which cause significant crop and income losses and exacerbate food insecurity. Although farmers use a variety of risk-coping strategies, these are insufficient to prevent them from remaining food insecure. Few farmers have adjusted their farming strategies in response to climate change, owing to limited resources and capacity. Urgent technical, financial and institutional support is needed to improve the agricultural production and food security of Malagasy farmers and make their livelihoods resilient to climate change. PMID:24535397

  1. Bartonella spp. in fruit bats and blood-feeding Ectoparasites in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Brook, Cara E; Bai, Ying; Dobson, Andrew P; Osikowicz, Lynn M; Ranaivoson, Hafaliana C; Zhu, Qiyun; Kosoy, Michael Y; Dittmar, Katharina

    2015-02-01

    We captured, ectoparasite-combed, and blood-sampled cave-roosting Madagascan fruit bats (Eidolon dupreanum) and tree-roosting Madagascan flying foxes (Pteropus rufus) in four single-species roosts within a sympatric geographic foraging range for these species in central Madagascar. We describe infection with novel Bartonella spp. in sampled Eidolon dupreanum and associated bat flies (Cyclopodia dubia), which nest close to or within major known Bartonella lineages; simultaneously, we report the absence of Bartonella spp. in Thaumapsylla sp. fleas collected from these same bats. This represents the first documented finding of Bartonella infection in these species of bat and bat fly, as well as a new geographic record for Thaumapsylla sp. We further relate the absence of both Bartonella spp. and ectoparasites in sympatrically sampled Pteropus rufus, thus suggestive of a potential role for bat flies in Bartonella spp. transmission. These findings shed light on transmission ecology of bat-borne Bartonella spp., recently demonstrated as a potentially zoonotic pathogen. PMID:25706653

  2. Quantifying the Short-Term Costs of Conservation Interventions for Fishers at Lake Alaotra, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Andrea P. C.; Milner-Gulland, E. J.; Jones, Julia P. G.; Bunnefeld, Nils; Young, Richard; Nicholson, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal fisheries are a key source of food and income for millions of people, but if poorly managed, fishing can have declining returns as well as impacts on biodiversity. Management interventions such as spatial and temporal closures can improve fishery sustainability and reduce environmental degradation, but may carry substantial short-term costs for fishers. The Lake Alaotra wetland in Madagascar supports a commercially important artisanal fishery and provides habitat for a Critically Endangered primate and other endemic wildlife of conservation importance. Using detailed data from more than 1,600 fisher catches, we used linear mixed effects models to explore and quantify relationships between catch weight, effort, and spatial and temporal restrictions to identify drivers of fisher behaviour and quantify the potential effect of fishing restrictions on catch. We found that restricted area interventions and fishery closures would generate direct short-term costs through reduced catch and income, and these costs vary between groups of fishers using different gear. Our results show that conservation interventions can have uneven impacts on local people with different fishing strategies. This information can be used to formulate management strategies that minimise the adverse impacts of interventions, increase local support and compliance, and therefore maximise conservation effectiveness. PMID:26107284

  3. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum', a novel taxon associated with virescence and phyllody of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus).

    PubMed

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Davis, Robert E; Harrison, Nigel A; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Dickinson, Matthew; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Zhao, Yan

    2013-02-01

    This study addressed the taxonomic position and group classification of a phytoplasma responsible for virescence and phyllody symptoms in naturally diseased Madagascar periwinkle plants in western Malaysia. Unique regions in the 16S rRNA gene from the Malaysian periwinkle virescence (MaPV) phytoplasma distinguished the phytoplasma from all previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Pairwise sequence similarity scores, calculated through alignment of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that the MaPV phytoplasma 16S rRNA gene shared 96.5 % or less sequence similarity with that of previously described 'Ca. Phytoplasma' species, justifying the recognition of the MaPV phytoplasma as a reference strain of a novel taxon, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum'. The 16S rRNA gene F2nR2 fragment from the MaPV phytoplasma exhibited a distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profile and the pattern similarity coefficient values were lower than 0.85 with representative phytoplasmas classified in any of the 31 previously delineated 16Sr groups; therefore, the MaPV phytoplasma was designated a member of a new 16Sr group, 16SrXXXII. Phytoplasmas affiliated with this novel taxon and the new group included diverse strains infecting periwinkle, coconut palm and oil palm in Malaysia. Three phytoplasmas were characterized as representatives of three distinct subgroups, 16SrXXXII-A, 16SrXXXII-B and 16SrXXXII-C, respectively. PMID:22523165

  4. Status and distribution of the angonoka tortoise (Geochelone yniphora) of western Madagascar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Lora L.; Reid, Don; Robert, Bourou; Joby, Mahatoly; Clement, Sibo

    1999-01-01

    From 1993 to 1995, field surveys were conducted in western Madagascar to assess the current status of the angonoka tortoise (Geochelone yniphora) in the wild. Tortoise presence was documented at 10 of 11 localities surveyed. These localities represent at least five populations, all within a 30-km radius of Baly Bay, near the town of Soalala. The populations occur on fragments of habitat ranging from <50 to 4–6000 ha in size. One hundred and forty-five tortoises were marked in the five populations. Hatchling or juvenile tortoises were observed in all populations, indicating that reproduction was occurring. Most of the 145 tortoises (68%) were marked on Cape Sada, where monthly surveys were conducted. The tortoise density on the c. 150 ha peninsula was 0.66 tortoises/ha. The remains of 22 dead juveniles were found on Cape Sada over the 2-year period. This evidence, combined with the low number of juveniles in intermediate size classes in the Cape Sada population suggests that juvenile mortality may be high.

  5. Vinca drug components accumulate exclusively in leaf exudates of Madagascar periwinkle

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Jonathan; Salim, Vonny; Wu, Maggie; Thamm, Antje M. K.; Murata, Jun; Ploss, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) continue to be the most important source of natural drugs in chemotherapy treatments for a range of human cancers. These anticancer drugs are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline to yield powerful dimeric MIAs that prevent cell division. However the precise mechanisms for their assembly within plants remain obscure. Here we report that the complex development-, environment-, organ-, and cell-specific controls involved in expression of MIA pathways are coupled to secretory mechanisms that keep catharanthine and vindoline separated from each other in living plants. Although the entire production of catharanthine and vindoline occurs in young developing leaves, catharanthine accumulates in leaf wax exudates of leaves, whereas vindoline is found within leaf cells. The spatial separation of these two MIAs provides a biological explanation for the low levels of dimeric anticancer drugs found in the plant that result in their high cost of commercial production. The ability of catharanthine to inhibit the growth of fungal zoospores at physiological concentrations found on the leaf surface of Catharanthus leaves, as well as its insect toxicity, provide an additional biological role for its secretion. We anticipate that this discovery will trigger a broad search for plants that secrete alkaloids, the biological mechanisms involved in their secretion to the plant surface, and the ecological roles played by them. PMID:20696903

  6. Distribution and Abundance of the World's Smallest Primate, Microcebus berthae, in Central Western Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Schäffler, Livia; Kappeler, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of most recently discovered or described lemur species remains poorly known, but many appear to have small geographical ranges, making them vulnerable to extinction. Research can contribute to future conservation actions on behalf of these species by providing accurate information on local distribution and abundance. The distribution of the world's smallest primate, the endangered Madame Berthe's mouse lemur (Microcebus berthae), is limited to the Menabe Central region of western Madagascar. This species was discovered in the 1990s, but many fundamental aspects of its ecology remain unknown. The aims of our study were therefore to determine the actual distribution of Microcebus berthae across the forests of this region, to estimate population density, and to examine the species' response to anthropogenic activities. We established 35 1-km line transects across Menabe Central, on which we surveyed mouse lemurs by distance sampling and live trapping. Microcebus berthae does not occur in all remaining forests of this small region and its population density is highly heterogeneous, both across its geographic range and locally. Within its area of occupancy, the population of Microcebus berthae not only was distributed according to spatial heterogeneities of the habitat, but also responded to anthropogenic disturbances and varied seasonally. Our results indicate that Microcebus berthae is susceptible to habitat degradation and avoids human environments spatially. As none of the forest remnants in which the species still occurs were officially protected until recently, immediate conservation actions should focus on effectively protecting Kirindy and Ambadira forests. PMID:24719496

  7. Comparative and population mitogenomic analyses of Madagascar's extinct, giant 'subfossil' lemurs.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Logan; Ratan, Aakrosh; Godfrey, Laurie R; Crowley, Brooke E; Hughes, Cris E; Lei, Runhua; Cui, Yinqiu; Wood, Mindy L; Muldoon, Kathleen M; Andriamialison, Haingoson; McGraw, John J; Tomsho, Lynn P; Schuster, Stephan C; Miller, Webb; Louis, Edward E; Yoder, Anne D; Malhi, Ripan S; Perry, George H

    2015-02-01

    Humans first arrived on Madagascar only a few thousand years ago. Subsequent habitat destruction and hunting activities have had significant impacts on the island's biodiversity, including the extinction of megafauna. For example, we know of 17 recently extinct 'subfossil' lemur species, all of which were substantially larger (body mass ?11-160 kg) than any living population of the ?100 extant lemur species (largest body mass ?6.8 kg). We used ancient DNA and genomic methods to study subfossil lemur extinction biology and update our understanding of extant lemur conservation risk factors by i) reconstructing a comprehensive phylogeny of extinct and extant lemurs, and ii) testing whether low genetic diversity is associated with body size and extinction risk. We recovered complete or near-complete mitochondrial genomes from five subfossil lemur taxa, and generated sequence data from population samples of two extinct and eight extant lemur species. Phylogenetic comparisons resolved prior taxonomic uncertainties and confirmed that the extinct subfossil species did not comprise a single clade. Genetic diversity estimates for the two sampled extinct species were relatively low, suggesting small historical population sizes. Low genetic diversity and small population sizes are both risk factors that would have rendered giant lemurs especially susceptible to extinction. Surprisingly, among the extant lemurs, we did not observe a relationship between body size and genetic diversity. The decoupling of these variables suggests that risk factors other than body size may have as much or more meaning for establishing future lemur conservation priorities. PMID:25523037

  8. Biomedical evaluation of Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) from Kirindy Mitea National Park in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Junge, Randall E; Lewis, Rebecca J

    2014-06-01

    Evaluation of the health, prevalence, and incidence of diseases in wild populations is a critical component of wildlife management. In addition, the establishment of reference physiologic parameters can Verreaux's sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) from Kirindy Mitea National Park, Madagascar, during two field captures incontribute to the assessment of population risks. Complete medical evaluations were performed on 33 wild June 2010 and June 2011. Each animal received a complete physical examination: weight, body temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate were recorded, and ectoparasites collected. Blood samples were collected for complete blood cell count, differential white blood cell count, hemoparasite examination, serum biochemical profile, fat-soluble vitamin analysis, trace mineral analysis, and toxoplasmosis and viral serology. Fecal samples were collected for bacterial culture and endoparasite examination. Significant differences exist between age classes for neutrophil and lymphocyte count, alkaline phosphatase, and creatinine values. Parasites detected were Callistoura sp., Bertiella lemuriformis, and Dipetalonema petteri. This publication reports the first complete biomedical evaluation of the P. verreauxi and provides a basis for hematologic and biochemical comparisons of P. verreauxi in the wild. PMID:25000684

  9. Predicting plant diversity patterns in Madagascar: understanding the effects of climate and land cover change in a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kerry A; Parks, Katherine E; Bethell, Colin A; Johnson, Steig E; Mulligan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Climate and land cover change are driving a major reorganization of terrestrial biotic communities in tropical ecosystems. In an effort to understand how biodiversity patterns in the tropics will respond to individual and combined effects of these two drivers of environmental change, we use species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated for recent climate and land cover variables and projected to future scenarios to predict changes in diversity patterns in Madagascar. We collected occurrence records for 828 plant genera and 2186 plant species. We developed three scenarios, (i.e., climate only, land cover only and combined climate-land cover) based on recent and future climate and land cover variables. We used this modelling framework to investigate how the impacts of changes to climate and land cover influenced biodiversity across ecoregions and elevation bands. There were large-scale climate- and land cover-driven changes in plant biodiversity across Madagascar, including both losses and gains in diversity. The sharpest declines in biodiversity were projected for the eastern escarpment and high elevation ecosystems. Sharp declines in diversity were driven by the combined climate-land cover scenarios; however, there were subtle, region-specific differences in model outputs for each scenario, where certain regions experienced relatively higher species loss under climate or land cover only models. We strongly caution that predicted future gains in plant diversity will depend on the development and maintenance of dispersal pathways that connect current and future suitable habitats. The forecast for Madagascar's plant diversity in the face of future environmental change is worrying: regional diversity will continue to decrease in response to the combined effects of climate and land cover change, with habitats such as ericoid thickets and eastern lowland and sub-humid forests particularly vulnerable into the future. PMID:25856241

  10. Microscopic and molecular characterization of Hepatozoon domerguei (Apicomplexa) and Foleyella furcata (Nematoda) in wild endemic reptiles from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Maia, João P.; Crottini, Angelica; Harris, David James

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world’s top twelve “megadiversity” hot spots hosting unique and threatened flora and fauna. Parasites are a major component of biodiversity but remain largely uncharacterized in wildlife. In this study we combine microscopic and molecular assessment of hemoparasites in endemic reptile species from Madagascar. We detected three distinct parasites: the apicomplexans Hepatozoon and Sarcocystis, and filarial nematodes. The prevalence and intensity of these apicomplexans were low overall, while microfilarial infections in chameleons were relatively high. We detected mixed infections of two Hepatozoon haplotypes in Madagascarophis colubrinus, and of Hepatozoon and microfilariae in a Furcifer sp. Phylogenetic analyses of Hepatozoon showed evidence of prey-predator transmission, with identical sequences found in the snakes M. colubrinus and Ithycyphus oursi, and their prey Furcifer sp. Based on previous studies regarding the life cycle of Hepatozoon domerguei Landau, Chabaud, Michel, and Brygoo, 1970 in these hosts and due to their morphological similarity, we propose that this Hepatozoon haplotype is Hepatozoon domerguei. Future studies, including the examination of invertebrate hosts, are needed to verify this preliminary taxonomic identification. A distinct hemogregarine haplotype was found in Oplurus sp., which displayed morphologically different gametocytes, some of which were apparently inside leukocytes. The Sarcocystis identified from Tracheloptychus petersi was identical to that reported in a North African snake, indicating that the same lineage is found in geographically distinct regions. By combining morphological and genetic information, Foleyella furcata (Linstow, 1899) filarial nematodes were identified in several Furcifer chameleons. This study provides insights into the distribution, diversity and host-parasite interactions of hemoparasites in wild reptile populations from Madagascar. PMID:25224723

  11. Towards unravelling the Mozambique Ocean conundrum using a triumvirate of zircon isotopic proxies on the Ambatolampy Group, central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Donnelly B.; Collins, Alan S.; Foden, John D.; Payne, Justin L.; Taylor, Richard; Holden, Peter; Razakamanana, Théodore; Clark, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Madagascar occupies an important location within the East African Orogen (EAO), which involves a collection of Neoproterozoic microcontinents and arc terranes lodged between older cratonic units during the final assembly of the supercontinent Gondwana. The detrital zircon record of Proterozoic metasedimentary rock packages within the Antananarivo Domain (the Ambatolampy, Manampotsy, Vondrozo, Itremo and Ikalamavony Groups) is used to identify pre-orogenic tectonic affiliations of the region-affiliations that control interpretations of the evolution of the Mozambique Ocean and the formation of this part of central Gondwana. Here we focus on the Ambatolampy Group, a previously poorly known group of high-grade siliciclastic metasedimentary rocks, and compare these data to similar data from the other sedimentary packages in central Madagascar (the Vondrozo, Sofia, Manampotsy, Itremo, Molo, Ikalamavony, Androyen, Ambodiriana, Iakora and Maha Groups). New U-Pb (SHRIMP) zircon data for the Ambatolampy Group yield detrital age maxima of ~ 3000 Ma, ~ 2800-2700 Ma, ~ 2500 Ma, ~ 2200-2100 Ma and ~ 1800 Ma. The youngest near-concordant detrital zircon age is 1836 ± 25 Ma, which we suggest represents the maximum depositional age of the Ambatolampy Group, in contrast to younger ages reported elsewhere. The detrital spectra are very similar to those from the Itremo Group and we suggest that they correlate with each other. Metamorphic zircons and zircon rims constrain the minimum depositional age to be ~ 540 Ma; the interpreted age of metamorphism. New ?18O data (SHRIMP-SI) and hafnium (MC-LA-ICP-MS) isotopic data complement the U-Pb data and provide new constraints on the age, geochemistry and provenance of the metasedimentary rocks. We suggest that central Madagascar contained a Mesoproterozoic (to possibly Tonian) siliciclastic sedimentary basin, within which the Ambatolampy Group, and the Itremo and Maha Groups (and possibly part of the Iakora Groups) were deposited. Later sedimentary systems are represented by the Ikalamavony, Ambodiriana, Manampotsy and Molo Groups.

  12. Top soil radioactivity assessment in a high natural radiation background area: the case of Vinaninkarena, Antsirabe-Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rabesiranana, Naivo; Rasolonirina, Martin; Terina, Franck; Solonjara, Asivelo F; Andriambololona, Raoelina

    2008-11-01

    The village of Vinaninkarena, Antsirabe, Madagascar (47 degrees 02'40''E, 19 degrees 57'17''S) is located in a high natural radioactivity area. In order to evaluate the natural radionuclide content in soil, sampling was done on-site by the transect method (85 soil samples) and off-site through transects across and beyond the region (up to a range of 100 km), to determine the natural radioactivity variation within vs. outside the region, and to detect significant differences, taking into account spatial variability. PMID:18502647

  13. Biogeography of the two major arbovirus mosquito vectors, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera, Culicidae), in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the past ten years, the Indian Ocean region has been the theatre of severe epidemics of chikungunya and dengue. These outbreaks coincided with a high increase in populations of Aedes albopictus that outcompete its sister taxon Aedes aegypti in most islands sampled. The objective of this work was to update the entomological survey of the two Aedes species in the island of Madagascar which has to face these arboviroses. Methods The sampling of Aedes mosquitoes was conducted during two years, from October 2007 to October 2009, in fifteen localities from eight regions of contrasting climates. Captured adults were identified immediately whereas immature stages were bred until adult stage for determination. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using two mtDNA genes, COI and ND5 and trees were constructed by the maximum likelihood (ML) method with the gene time reversible (GTR) model. Experimental infections with the chikungunya virus strain 06.21 at a titer of 107.5 pfu/mL were performed to evaluate the vector competence of field-collected mosquitoes. Disseminated infection rates were measured fourteen days after infection by immunofluorescence assay performed on head squashes. Results The species Aedes aegypti was detected in only six sites in native forests and natural reserves. In contrast, the species Aedes albopictus was found in 13 out of the 15 sites sampled. Breeding sites were mostly found in man-made environments such as discarded containers, used tires, abandoned buckets, coconuts, and bamboo cuts. Linear regression models showed that the abundance of Ae. albopictus was significantly influenced by the sampling region (F = 62.00, p < 2.2 × 10-16) and period (F = 36.22, p = 2.548 × 10-13), that are associated with ecological and climate variations. Phylogenetic analysis of the invasive Ae. albopictus distinguished haplotypes from South Asia and South America from those of Madagascar, but the markers used were not discriminant enough to discern Malagasy populations. The experimental oral infection method showed that six Ae. albopictus populations exhibited high dissemination infection rates for chikungunya virus ranging from 98 to 100%. Conclusion In Madagascar, Ae. albopictus has extended its geographical distribution whereas, Ae. aegypti has become rare, contrasting with what was previously observed. Changes are predominantly driven by human activities and the rainfall regime that provide suitable breeding sites for the highly anthropophilic mosquito Ae. albopictus. Moreover, these populations were found to be highly susceptible to chikungunya virus. In the light of this study, Ae. albopictus may have been involved in the recent outbreaks of chikungunya and dengue epidemics in Madagascar, and consequently, control measures should be promoted to limit its current expansion. PMID:22433186

  14. Extinction vulnerability of tropical montane endemism from warming and upslope displacement: a preliminary appraisal for the highest massif in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    RAXWORTHY, CHRISTOPHER J; PEARSON, RICHARD G; RABIBISOA, NIRHY; RAKOTONDRAZAFY, ANDRY M; RAMANAMANJATO, JEAN-BAPTISTE; RASELIMANANA, ACHILLE P; WU, SHENGHAI; NUSSBAUM, RONALD A; STONE, DÁITHÍ A

    2008-01-01

    One of the predicted biological responses to climate warming is the upslope displacement of species distributions. In the tropics, because montane assemblages frequently include local endemics that are distributed close to summits, these species may be especially vulnerable to experiencing complete habitat loss from warming. However, there is currently a dearth of information available for tropical regions. Here, we present a preliminary appraisal of this extinction threat using the herpetological assemblage of the Tsaratanana Massif in northern Madagascar (the island's highest massif), which is rich with montane endemism. We present meteorological evidence (individual and combined regional weather station data and reanalysis forecast data) for recent warming in Madagascar, and show that this trend is consistent with recent climate model simulations. Using standard moist adiabatic lapse rates, these observed meteorological warming trends in northern Madagascar predict upslope species displacement of 17–74 m per decade between 1993 and 2003. Over this same period, we also report preliminary data supporting a trend for upslope distribution movements, based on two surveys we completed at Tsaratanana. For 30 species, representing five families of reptiles and amphibians, we found overall mean shifts in elevational midpoint of 19–51 m upslope (mean lower elevation limit 29–114 m; mean upper elevation limit ?8 to 53 m). We also found upslope trends in mean and median elevational observations in seven and six of nine species analysed. Phenological differences between these surveys do not appear to be substantial, but these upslope shifts are consistent with the predictions based on meteorological warming. An elevational range displacement analysis projects complete habitat loss for three species below the 2 °C ‘dangerous’ warming threshold. One of these species is not contracting its distribution, but the other two were not resampled in 2003. A preliminary review of the other massifs in Madagascar indicates potential similar vulnerability to habitat loss and upslope extinction. Consequently, we urgently recommend additional elevational surveys for these and other tropical montane assemblages, which should also include, when possible, the monitoring of local meteorological conditions and habitat change.

  15. Rainforest Pharmacopeia in Madagascar Provides High Value for Current Local and Prospective Global Uses

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Christopher D.; Rasolofoniaina, B. J. Rodolph; Anjaranirina, E. J. Gasta; Nicolas, Lilien; Ravaoliny, Laurent; Kremen, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Botanical diversity provides value to humans through carbon sequestration, air and water purification, and the provisioning of wild foods and ethnomedicines. Here we calculate the value of botanical ethnomedicines in a rainforest region of Madagascar, the Makira Protected Area, using a substitution method that combines replacement costs and choice modeling. The Makira watershed may comprise approximately 0.8% of global botanical diversity and possesses enormous value both in its ability to provision botanical ethnomedicines to local people and as a source of potentially novel pharmaceutical drugs for society as a whole. Approximately 241 locally-recognized species are used as ethnomedicines, including 113 agricultural or weed species. We equated each ethnomedicinal treatment to the monetary value of a comparable pharmaceutical treatment adjusted by personal preferences in perceived efficacy (rather than from known or assumed medicinal equivalency). The benefit value of these botanical ethnomedicines per individual is $5.40–7.90 per year when using the value of highly subsidized Malagasy pharmaceuticals and $100.60–287.40 when using the value of American pharmaceuticals. Using local pharmaceuticals as substitutes, the value per household is $30.24–44.30 per year, equivalent to 43–63% of median annual household income, demonstrating their local importance. Using the value of American pharmaceuticals, the amount is equivalent to 22–63% of the median annual health care expenditures for American adults under 45 in 2006. The potential for developing novel biomedicines from the Makira watershed’s unique flora ranges in untapped benefit value from $0.3–5.7 billion for American pharmaceutical companies, non-inclusive of the importance of providing novel medicines and improved healthcare to society. This study provides evidence of the tremendous current local and prospective global value of botanical ethnomedicines and furthers arguments for the conservation of tropical forests for sustainable use. Botanique de la diversité apporte de la valeur à l’homme par la séquestration du carbone, de l’air et de purification de l’eau, et le provisionnement des aliments sauvages et ethnomedicines. Ici, nous calculons la valeur de ethnomedicines botaniques dans une région de forêt de Madagascar, la zone protégée de Makira, en utilisant une méthode de substitution qui combine les coûts de remplacement et la modélisation des choix. Le bassin versant de Makira peut comprendre environ 0,8% de la diversité botanique mondiale et possède une valeur énorme à la fois dans sa capacité à fournir ethnomedicines botaniques à la population locale et en tant que source de nouveaux médicaments potentiellement pharmaceutiques pour la société dans son ensemble. Environ 241 espèces localement reconnus sont utilisés comme ethnomedicines, y compris 113 espèces d’agricoles ou de mauvaises herbes. Nous assimilé chaque traitement ethnomédicales à la valeur monétaire d’un traitement comparable pharmaceutique ajusté en fonction des préférences personnelles en matière d’efficacité perçue (plutôt que de l’équivalence médicament connu ou supposé). La valeur de l’avantage de ces ethnomedicines botaniques par individu est de $5,40 à 7.90 par année lors de l’utilisation de la valeur des produits pharmaceutiques malgaches fortement subventionnés et de $100,60 à 287,40 lors de l’utilisation de la valeur des produits pharmaceutiques américains. Utilisation de produits pharmaceutiques locales comme des substituts, la valeur par ménage est de $30.24 à 44.30 par an, équivalent à 43–63% du revenu médian des ménages annuelle, ce qui démontre leur importance locale. Utilisation de la valeur des produits pharmaceutiques

  16. Epidemiology of Pathogenic Enterobacteria in Humans, Livestock, and Peridomestic Rodents in Rural Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Bublitz, DeAnna C.; Wright, Patricia C.; Bodager, Jonathan R.; Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T.; Bliska, James B.; Gillespie, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the families of enteric bacteria are globally important diarrheal agents. Despite their potential for zoonotic and environmental transmission, few studies have examined the epidemiology of these pathogens in rural systems characterized by extensive overlap among humans, domesticated and peridomestic animals. We investigated patterns of infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, and Yersinia spp. (enterocolitica, and pseudotuberculosis) in Southeastern Madagascar where the potential for the aforementioned interactions is high. In this pilot project we conducted surveys to examine behaviors potentially associated with risk of infection and if infection with specific enterobacteria species was associated with diarrheal disease. Methodology/Principal Findings PCR was conducted on DNA from human, livestock, and rodent fecal samples from three villages. Overall, human prevalence was highest (77%), followed by rodents (51%) and livestock (18%). Rodents were ∼2.8 times more likely than livestock to carry one of the bacteria. The incidence of individual species varied between villages, with the observation that, E. coli and Shigella spp. were consistently associated with co-infections. As an aggregate, there was a significant risk of infection linked to a water source in one village. Individually, different pathogens were associated with certain behaviors, including: those who had used medication, experienced diarrhea in the past four weeks, or do not use toilets. Conclusions/Significance Different bacteria were associated with an elevated risk of infection for various human activities or characteristics. Certain bacteria may also predispose people to co-infections. These data suggest that a high potential for transmission among these groups, either directly or via contaminated water sources. As these bacteria were most prevalent in humans, it is possible that they are maintained in humans and that transmission to other species is infrequent. Further studies are needed to understand bacterial persistence, transmission dynamics, and associated consequences in this and similar systems. PMID:24983990

  17. The importance of taboos and social norms to conservation in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julia P G; Andriamarovololona, Mijasoa M; Hockley, Neal

    2008-08-01

    Informal institutions governing the use of wild species are present in many societies. A system of prohibitions known as fady is central to Malagasy culture. We examined whether fady that relate to the use of natural resources in the eastern rainforests of Madagascar play an important conservation role. Prohibitions ranged from strict taboos in which a species or area was forbidden by the ancestors to social norms that concerned acceptable behavior when harvesting wild species. Strict taboos offered real protection to threatened species, such as the lemur Propithecus edwardsi and the carnivore Cryptoprocta ferox. Taboos also reduced pressure on some economically important endemic species by preventing their sale or limiting the harvest season. Despite their value for conservation, the taboos did not appear to originate from attempts to sustainably manage resources. Nevertheless, social norms, in which the sanction was social disapproval rather than supernatural retribution, encouraged sustainable harvesting practices for tenrecs (Tenrec ecudatus) and pandans (Pandanus spp.). Unfortunately, the social norms concerning methods of harvesting pandans appeared to be breaking down in villages surrounding Ranomafana National Park, and we suggest that the imposition of external conservation rules is weakening traditional management. Informal institutions are important to conservation because they suggest ways of improving cultural understanding and conservation communication. Food taboos influence societal preferences, which affect the wider demand for a species. Most important, where capacity to enforce external conservation rules is limited, informal institutions may provide the only effective regulations. Informal institutions should receive greater attention from conservation biologists so that local people's conservation roles can be acknowledged fairly and so that potential synergies with conservation objectives can be realized. PMID:18616743

  18. Comparing Methods for Prioritising Protected Areas for Investment: A Case Study Using Madagascar's Dry Forest Reptiles.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Charlie J; Raxworthy, Christopher J; Metcalfe, Kristian; Raselimanana, Achille P; Smith, Robert J; Davies, Zoe G

    2015-01-01

    There are insufficient resources available to manage the world's existing protected area portfolio effectively, so the most important sites should be prioritised in investment decision-making. Sophisticated conservation planning and assessment tools developed to identify locations for new protected areas can provide an evidence base for such prioritisations, yet decision-makers in many countries lack the institutional support and necessary capacity to use the associated software. As such, simple heuristic approaches such as species richness or number of threatened species are generally adopted to inform prioritisation decisions. However, their performance has never been tested. Using the reptile fauna of Madagascar's dry forests as a case study, we evaluate the performance of four site prioritisation protocols used to rank the conservation value of 22 established and candidate protected areas. We compare the results to a benchmark produced by the widely-used systematic conservation planning software Zonation. The four indices scored sites on the basis of: i) species richness; ii) an index based on species' Red List status; iii) irreplaceability (a key metric in systematic conservation planning); and, iv) a novel Conservation Value Index (CVI), which incorporates species-level information on endemism, representation in the protected area system, tolerance of habitat degradation and hunting/collection pressure. Rankings produced by the four protocols were positively correlated to the results of Zonation, particularly amongst high-scoring sites, but CVI and Irreplaceability performed better than Species Richness and the Red List Index. Given the technological capacity constraints experienced by decision-makers in the developing world, our findings suggest that heuristic metrics can represent a useful alternative to more sophisticated analyses, especially when they integrate species-specific information related to extinction risk. However, this can require access to, and understanding of, more complex species data. PMID:26162073

  19. Land cover effects on infiltration and preferential flow pathways in the high rainfall zone of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwartendijk, Bob; van Meerveld, Ilja; Ravelona, Maafaka; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitohaina; Ghimire, Chandra; Bruijnzeel, Sampurno; Jones, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Shortened slash-and-burn cycles exhaust agricultural land and have resulted in extensive tracts of highly degraded land across the tropics. Land degradation typically results in decreased rainfall infiltration due to a reduced field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil because of a progressive decline in soil organic matter, exposure to raindrop impact, surface sealing and compaction. This results, in turn, in enhanced surface runoff and erosion, and consequently less subsurface flow and groundwater recharge. On the other hand, natural vegetation regrowth or active reforestation can lead to a renewed accumulation of soil organic matter, macropore development and increased infiltration rates. As part of the P4GES project (Can Paying 4 Global Ecosystem Services values reduce poverty?; www.p4ges.org), we study the effects of land use change and reforestation on water resources in the Corridor Ankeniheny-Zahamena (CAZ) in eastern Madagascar. In this poster, we present the results of infiltration and preferential flow measurements in four different land uses in the southern part of the CAZ: (i) closed canopy forest, (ii) 3-14 year-old regrowth on fallow land (savokas), (iii) exhausted and severely degraded land (tany maty), and (iv) recently reforested sites (6-8 years old). The results show that infiltrability increases significantly after several years of forest regrowth after land abandonment, but it remains unclear whether active replanting decreases the time required for restoration of soil hydrological functioning. Preferential flow pathways differed strikingly between the respective land cover types: infiltration in mature forests was predominantly characterized by macropore flow (preferential flow pathways), whereas infiltration in exhausted agricultural land was dominated by matrix flow (few preferential flow pathways). Occurrence of preferential flow pathways in reforestation and fallow sites varied considerably. These results suggest that land cover significantly affects hydrological flow pathways and that natural regeneration and active reforestation of degraded land can result in increased infiltration and a reduced likelihood for surface runoff.

  20. Omura’s whales (Balaenoptera omurai) off northwest Madagascar: ecology, behaviour and conservation needs

    PubMed Central

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Andrianantenaina, Boris; Lindsay, Alec; Rekdahl, Melinda; Andrianarivelo, Norbert; Rasoloarijao, Tahina

    2015-01-01

    The Omura’s whale (Balaenoptera omurai) was described as a new species in 2003 and then soon after as an ancient lineage basal to a Bryde’s/sei whale clade. Currently known only from whaling and stranding specimens primarily from the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans, there exist no confirmed field observations or ecological/behavioural data. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first genetically confirmed documentation of living Omura’s whales including descriptions of basic ecology and behaviour from northwestern Madagascar. Species identification was confirmed through molecular phylogenetic analyses of biopsies collected from 18 adult animals. All individuals shared a single haplotype in a 402 bp sequence of mtDNA control region, suggesting low diversity and a potentially small population. Sightings of 44 groups indicated preference for shallow-water shelf habitat with sea surface temperature between 27.4°C and 30.2°C. Frequent observations were made of lunge feeding, possibly on zooplankton. Observations of four mothers with young calves, and recordings of a song-like vocalization probably indicate reproductive behaviour. Social organization consisted of loose aggregations of predominantly unassociated single individuals spatially and temporally clustered. Photographic recapture of a female re-sighted the following year with a young calf suggests site fidelity or a resident population. Our results demonstrate that the species is a tropical whale without segregation of feeding and breeding habitat, and is probably non-migratory; our data extend the range of this poorly studied whale into the western Indian Ocean. Exclusive range restriction to tropical waters is rare among baleen whale species, except for the various forms of Bryde’s whales and Omura’s whales. Thus, the discovery of a tractable population of Omura’s whales in the tropics presents an opportunity for understanding the ecological factors driving potential convergence of life-history patterns with the distantly related Bryde’s whales. PMID:26587244

  1. A 12-month survey of gastrointestinal helminth infections of lemurs kept in two zoos in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Junge, Randall E

    2010-12-01

    Infections with gastrointestinal parasites may be a major threat to lemurs kept in captivity, as they are a common cause of diarrhea. In this study, fecal egg count patterns and clinical signs associated with gastrointestinal nematodes were assessed for 12 mo in 40 lemurs kept under different husbandry and climatic conditions at two sites in Madagascar. Involved species were black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata), eastern grey bamboo lemurs (Hapalemur griseus), greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus), red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer), common brown lemurs (Eulemurfulvus), crowned lemurs (Eulemur coronatus), and Sclater's black lemurs (Eulemur macaco flavifrons). At site 1 (Tsimbazaza Zoological Park), lemurs were kept in small enclosures with daily cleaning of the cement soiling and without routine anthelmintic program, whereas at site 2 (Ivoloina Zoological Park), lemurs received routine anthelmintic prophylaxis and were housed in small enclosure with daily cleaning of sandy soil enclosures. A total of five genera of nematode eggs from the orders Strongylida, Oxyurida, and Enoplida were recovered and identified from 198 out of 240 samples (83%) at site 1 and 79% (189 out of 240) at site 2 with the use of a modified McMaster technique. Significant differences were found for parasites from the order Strongylida between the two sites. The differences may be due to climate conditions and the presumed life cycle of these parasites. No significant differences were found for parasites from the other orders. No significant differences were noted between sexes or between seasons. No clinical signs of parasitic gastroenteritis were seen in either lemur collection. PMID:21370644

  2. Spatial linkages between coral proxies of terrestrial runoff across a large embayment in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, C. A.; Zinke, J.; Scheufen, T.; Maina, J.; Epping, E.; Boer, W.; Randriamanantsoa, B.; Brummer, G.-J. A.

    2012-03-01

    Coral cores provide vital climate reconstructions for site-specific temporal variability in river flow and sediment load. Yet, their ability to record spatial differences across multiple catchments is relatively unknown. Here, we investigate spatial linkages between four coral proxies of terrestrial runoff and their relationships between sites. Coral cores were drilled in and around Antongil Bay, the largest bay in Madagascar, and individually analysed for fifteen years of continuous luminescence (G/B), Ba/Ca, ?18Osw and ?13C data. Each coral core was drilled close to individual river mouths (? 7 km), and proxy data was compared to modelled river discharge and sediment runoff data for the three corresponding catchments. A reasonable agreement between terrestrial runoff proxies with modelled river discharge and sediment yield was observed. Some inconsistencies between proxy and modelled data we relate to proxy behaviour, watershed size and local environmental physiochemical parameters. In general, the further a coral resided from its river source, the weaker the proxy relationship was with modelled data and other corals, due to mixing gradients and currents. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that two coral Ba/Ca and luminescence (G/B) records influenced by the same watershed are reproducible. Furthermore, a strong Ba/Ca relationship was observed between two cores from distant watersheds, with baseline averages in agreement with modelled sediment runoff data. As humic acids behave conservatively in the water column, luminescence (G/B) data gave the highest regional correlations between cores, and most coherence with site specific modelled discharge. No statistical relationship was observed between cores in terms of interannual ?18Osw and ?13C, meaning corals were recording a localised signal at their respective sites. Comparing proxy baseline averages and mean seasonal cycles provided a good overview of the runoff dynamics of the bay system.

  3. Petrology of ultramafic xenoliths in Cenozoic alkaline rocks of northern Madagascar (Nosy Be Archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Ivana; Lustrino, Michele; Zanetti, Alberto; Morra, Vincenzo; Melluso, Leone

    2013-01-01

    Late Miocene basanites of Nosy Be and Nosy Sakatia islands (Nosy Be Archipelago, northern Madagascar) carry spinel-facies anhydrous ultramafic xenoliths (lherzolites, harzburgites and wehrlites). Geothermobarometric estimates indicate that these xenoliths derive from shallow mantle depths of 35-40 km, with those from Nosy Be island showing equilibration T (averages in the range of 945-985 °C) lower than the Nosy Sakatia analogues (averages ranging from 1010 to 1110 °C). One Nosy Sakatia mantle xenolith exhibits relatively fertile lherzolite composition, with trace and major element mineral chemistry consistent with a residual character after low degrees (1-2%) of mafic melt extraction. We interpret this composition as that resembling a depleted mantle (DM)-like lithospheric composition before metasomatic overprints. The other lherzolites and harzburgites display petrochemical characters consistent with variable extent of partial melting (up to 18%), associated with pronounced metasomatic overprints caused by migrating melts, as highlighted by enrichments in highly incompatible trace elements (e.g. light rare earth elements, LREE and Sr), together with the abundant occurrence of wehrlitic lithologies. The variability of petrochemical features points to different styles of metasomatism and metasomatic agents. The estimated composition of the parental melts of wehrlites matches that of host basanites. The combination of this evidence with the petrographic features, characterized by coarse-granular to porphyroclastic textures and by the presence of olivine without kink-banding, suggests that wehrlites are veins or pockets of high pressure cumulates within the mantle peridotite. The same melts also metasomatized via porous-flow percolation some lherzolites and harzburgites. Distinctly, a group of lherzolites and harzburgites was metasomatized by a different alkaline melt having markedly lower incompatible trace element contents. Late infiltration of metasomatic fluids is responsible for the spongy texture of some clinopyroxenes of lherzolites, harzburgites and wehrlites.

  4. Physical influence on biological production along the western shelf of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pripp, T.; Gammelsrød, T.; Krakstad, J. O.

    2014-02-01

    In September 2009, the R.V. Dr. Fridtjof Nansen surveyed the western coast of Madagascar. Environmental parameters of temperature, salinity, fluorescence and oxygen were profiled with a CTD probe and continuously underway at 5 m utilising a thermosalinograph equipped with a fluorescence sensor. A ship mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) provided current profiles down to 250 m, while estimates of biomass were obtained from acoustics and trawling was used for species identification. In addition, visual whale observations were conducted. The survey revealed three areas that were identified as upwelling regions, namely the Southern Coast (26°S), offshore from Cap St. André (16°S) and near Nosy Be Island (13°S). In these upwelling regions, acoustic estimates, trawling and whale observations indicated high biological productivity. The total acoustic estimate for the whole western coast was as low as 62 000 t, typical for tropical waters. In addition to the upwelling areas, high biological productivity was also found outside river mouths. Ship born wind measurements, as well as re-analysed wind fields, indicated that the southern coast upwelling cell was wind-driven and had a larger extent than reported earlier. The wind conditions were not favourable for upwelling in the two northernmost upwelling cells. Here the ADCP showed high bottom velocities (>1 m s-1) oriented northeast. These currents were probably forced by the migrating eddies in the area as indicated by the remotely sensed Sea Level Anomaly (SLA). Such currents induce bottom friction layer transport oriented towards the coast, thus driving upwelling, although not necessarily penetrating all the way to the surface layer as was the case near Cap St. André.

  5. Spatial linkages between coral proxies of terrestrial runoff across a large embayment in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, C. A.; Zinke, J.; Scheufen, T.; Maina, J.; Epping, E.; Boer, W.; Randriamanantsoa, B.; Brummer, G.-J. A.

    2012-08-01

    Coral cores provide vital climate reconstructions for site-specific temporal variability in river flow and sediment load. Yet, their ability to record spatial differences across multiple catchments is relatively unknown. Here, we investigate spatial linkages between four coral proxies of terrestrial runoff and their relationships between sites. Coral cores were drilled in and around Antongil Bay, the largest bay in Madagascar, and individually analysed for fifteen years of continuous luminescence (G / B), Ba / Ca, ?18Osw and ?13C data. Each coral core was drilled close to individual river mouths (? 7 km), and proxy data were compared to modelled river discharge and sediment runoff data for the three corresponding catchments. A reasonable agreement between terrestrial runoff proxies with modelled river discharge and sediment yield was observed. Some inconsistencies between proxy and modelled data are likely linked to proxy behaviour, watershed size and local environmental physiochemical parameters. In general, the further a coral resided from its river source, the weaker the proxy relationship was with modelled data and other corals, due to mixing gradients and currents. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that two coral Ba / Ca and luminescence (G / B) records influenced by the same watershed are reproducible. Furthermore, a strong Ba / Ca relationship was observed between two cores from distant watersheds, with baseline averages in agreement with modelled sediment runoff data. As humic acids behave conservatively in the water column, luminescence (G / B) data gave the highest regional correlations between cores, and showed the most consistent relationship with site specific modelled discharge. No statistical relationship was observed between cores in terms of interannual ?18Osw and ?13C, meaning corals were recording a localised signal at their respective sites, confounded by vital effects. Comparing proxy baseline averages and mean seasonal cycles provided a good overview of the runoff dynamics of the bay system.

  6. Phase equilibrium modeling of Pan-African incipient charnockite from southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Endo, Takahiro; Santosh, Mw; Thierry Rakotonandrasana, N. O.; Shaji, Erath; Rambeloson, Roger A.

    2013-04-01

    Dark brownish patches and/or veins of coarse-grained orthopyroxene-bearing felsic granulite (charnockite) within foliated amphibolite-facies gneiss/migmatite, are considered as examples of 'metamorphic' charnockite, and represent the transformation of amphibolite-facies rocks to dry granulites on a local scale. Such 'incipient' charnockites have been reported so far from many localities in southern India and Sri Lanka which corresponds to the central part of the East African - Antarctic Orogenic Belt related to the assembly of the Gondwana Supercontinent. Detailed petrological investigations of incipient charnockites therefore provide important insights into granulite-forming processes in the lower crust during Neoproterozoic to Cambrian. Here, we report the first occurrence of incipient charnockite from Ihosy area in southern Madagascar, and discuss the petrogenesis of granulite formation in an arrested stage on the basis of petrography, geothermobarometry, fluid inclusion study, and mineral equilibrium modeling. In the study area, patches of brownish charnockite (Pl+ Qtz + Kfs + Bt + Grt + Opx + Ilm + Mag) of about 20 to 50 cm in length occur within host orthopyroxene-free garnet-biotite gneiss (Pl + Qtz + Kfs + Bt + Grt + Ilm + Mag). The application of mineral equilibrium modeling on charnockite assemblage in NCKFMASHTO system to constrain the conditions of charnockitization defines a P - T range of 8-10.5 kbar and 820-880° C, which is broadly consistent with the results from the conventional geothermobarometry (820-880° C at 9 kbar) on Grt-Bt gneiss. The result of T versus mole H2O (M(H2O)) modeling demonstrated that orthopyroxene-free assemblage in Grt-Bt gneiss is stable only at M(H2O) >0.1 mol.%, while orthopyroxene in charnockite occurs as a stable mineral at very low M(H2O) condition of

  7. Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Dynamic Support From River Profiles: A Framework for Madagascar and Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G. G.; White, N.

    2012-04-01

    It is generally accepted that the surface topography of Africa is a manifestation of convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. Here, we present an inverse method whereby longitudinal river profiles are interrogated to extract quantitative estimates of spatial and temporal variations in the rate of tectonic uplift. Surface processes can provide an important window into transient convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. River profiles act as 'tectonic tape recorders': we assume the generation of broad, convex-upward knickzones to represent the effect of tectonic uplift shifting the river system into a state of disequilibrium. Profiles evolve through time primarily via the headward retreat of these knickzones. We use a conjugate gradient inverse algorithm to minimise the misfit between observed river profiles - derived from a regional Digital Elevation Model (DEM) - and calculated profiles obtained by varying the uplift rate history. We jointly invert a total of 98 Malagasy and 570 African river profiles to obtain a history of the cumulative tectonic uplift through geological time. We show that Africa has undergone two phases of rapid uplift: first in Eocene times; secondly, since 10 Ma. While the first gave rise to broad, long wavelength topography, the second led to more localised domal swells of high relief. We propose the existence of two wavelengths of dynamic support, reflecting a change in the style of convection in the upper mantle since 50 Ma. Our results correlate strongly with independent geological estimates of uplift across Africa and Madagascar, while our calculated landscape surface following 50 Myr of uplift corresponds closely to a surface fit across present-day drainage divides. Finally we calculate the solid sediment flux delivered to major African deltas as a function of time. This onshore record provides an important indirect constraint on the history of vertical motions at the surface, and agrees well with the offshore flux record, obtained from mapping the thickness of chronostratigraphic sediment packages at the deltas.

  8. Omura's whales (Balaenoptera omurai) off northwest Madagascar: ecology, behaviour and conservation needs.

    PubMed

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Andrianantenaina, Boris; Lindsay, Alec; Rekdahl, Melinda; Andrianarivelo, Norbert; Rasoloarijao, Tahina

    2015-10-01

    The Omura's whale (Balaenoptera omurai) was described as a new species in 2003 and then soon after as an ancient lineage basal to a Bryde's/sei whale clade. Currently known only from whaling and stranding specimens primarily from the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans, there exist no confirmed field observations or ecological/behavioural data. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first genetically confirmed documentation of living Omura's whales including descriptions of basic ecology and behaviour from northwestern Madagascar. Species identification was confirmed through molecular phylogenetic analyses of biopsies collected from 18 adult animals. All individuals shared a single haplotype in a 402 bp sequence of mtDNA control region, suggesting low diversity and a potentially small population. Sightings of 44 groups indicated preference for shallow-water shelf habitat with sea surface temperature between 27.4°C and 30.2°C. Frequent observations were made of lunge feeding, possibly on zooplankton. Observations of four mothers with young calves, and recordings of a song-like vocalization probably indicate reproductive behaviour. Social organization consisted of loose aggregations of predominantly unassociated single individuals spatially and temporally clustered. Photographic recapture of a female re-sighted the following year with a young calf suggests site fidelity or a resident population. Our results demonstrate that the species is a tropical whale without segregation of feeding and breeding habitat, and is probably non-migratory; our data extend the range of this poorly studied whale into the western Indian Ocean. Exclusive range restriction to tropical waters is rare among baleen whale species, except for the various forms of Bryde's whales and Omura's whales. Thus, the discovery of a tractable population of Omura's whales in the tropics presents an opportunity for understanding the ecological factors driving potential convergence of life-history patterns with the distantly related Bryde's whales. PMID:26587244

  9. Semi-quantitative tests of cyanide in foods and excreta of Three Hapalemur species in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Nayuta; Tan, Chia L; Vinyard, Christopher J; Williams, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Three sympatric Hapalemur species (H. g. griseus, H. aureus, and H. (Prolemur) simus) in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar are known to eat bamboo food parts that contain cyanide. How these lemurs avoid cyanide poisoning remains unknown. In this study, we tested for the presence/absence of cyanide in bamboo lemur foods and excreta to (1) document patterns of cyanide consumption among species with respect to diet, (2) identify routes of elimination of cyanide from the gastrointestinal tract, and (3) determine whether cyanide is absorbed from the diet. We tested 102 food, urine, and fecal samples for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) during two "pre-dry" seasons (April 2006, May 2007) using commercially available Cyantesmo test strips. The test strips changed color in the presence of HCN, and we recorded color change on a scale of 0 (no change) to 5 (cobalt) at preset intervals with a final score taken at 24 hr. We detected cyanide in bamboo food parts and urine of all three Hapalemur species. Time to color change of the test strips ranged from almost instantaneous to >12 hr incubation. Of the foods tested, only bamboo contained cyanide, but results differed among bamboo species and plant parts of the same species. Specifically, branch shoot and culm pith of the giant bamboo produced strong, immediate reactions to the test paper, whereas parts of liana bamboos produced either weak or no color change. Cyanide was present in almost all urine samples but rarely in fecal samples. This suggests that dietary cyanide is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract of the Hapalemur species and excreted, at least in part, by the kidneys. Samples from H. griseus exhibited lower, though still detectable, cyanide levels compared with H. simus and H. aureus. Differences among lemur species appear to be related to the specific bamboo parts consumed. PMID:19790190

  10. [Psychiatric disorders in Madagascar: clinical study of 376 cases registered in Mahajanga].

    PubMed

    Andriantseheno, L M; Andrianasy, T E; Andriambao, D S

    2004-05-01

    Epidemiological and clinical data on psychiatric disorders from Madagascar are rare, particularly those issued from the coastal provinces. This retrospective study of cases, registered in the hospital of Mahajanga, from January 1st 1998 to December 31st 2000, gives a general scope on their frequency, their distribution and their features in this North Western littoral of the island. Concurrent resorts (traditional and religious healers) may reduce hospitalisation rate, by filtering minor and brief mental disorders at their level, but they delay the accurate management of severe or complicated cases, and enhance their frequency. The features of depression, the first cause of referrals (136/376), are characterized by the predominance of somatic complaints (89/136) over psychic symptoms (47/136), by that of persecutory ideas on self culpabilization and loss of self esteem, which accounts for the rarity of suicide (only 4/136 cases). Patients are sensitive to lower dose of antidepressant drugs, compared with patients from occidental countries. Psychosis, the second cause of medical resort (95/376), are essentially represented by schizophrenia (57/95), which involves males more than females (sex ratio 2), and displays more hebephrenic symptoms (31/57) than paranoid's (24/57). In spite of serious economical constraints, family dismissal is rare. Implementation of an accurate drug policy (long acting neuroleptics supply), along with this family support, may enhance patients' reintegration. Addictive (drugs, alcohol) and anxiety disorders seem to be underrepresented. In conclusion, the same pathologies reported in western literatures are encountered, but their features are sometimes modified by cultural particularities. A recent general population survey has brought complementary data, but this clinical study needs reproduction in other provinces, to be representative of the whole island. PMID:15255357

  11. A refined chronology of prehistoric Madagascar and the demise of the megafauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Brooke E.

    2010-09-01

    The vertebrate community of Madagascar is one of the most unique and diverse on Earth, yet faunal diversity today is just a fraction of that present in the Pleistocene and Early Holocene. An understanding of the chronology of extinction relative to climate change and anthropogenic factors is essential to test hypotheses for extinction. Here, I combine over 200 new radiocarbon dates with published 14C dates from extinct and extant subfossil vertebrates. These new data provide evidence for the prolonged existence of both extant and extinct endemic terrestrial vertebrate species well before human arrival, with habitation of some localities extending back before the Last Glacial Maximum. I analyze the data for patterns among body sizes and ecoregions in relation to four major historical events: human arrival (ca 2500 years ago), establishment of human settlements (ca 1500 years ago), Late Holocene aridification (peaking ca 1000 years ago), and European arrival (ca 500 years ago). Patterns in endemic species abundance after human arrival differ depending on body size and geographic location. Within the first 500 years after human arrival, there were population declines in (1) very large species (>150 kg) and large species (10-150 kg) in the Dry Deciduous Forest, (2) large species in the Central Highlands, and (3) very large species in the Spiny Thicket. This first pulse of declines was likely triggered by human predation. Large species continued to be well represented in the Spiny Thicket and Succulent Woodland until ca 1000 years ago, when their populations plummeted. This second pulse of declines may have been solely triggered by continued human predation, or it may have resulted from a combination of increasing Late Holocene aridity and human impacts in the form of hunting and habitat modification. The abundance of endemic animals weighing <10 kg increased dramatically in the aftermath of the decline in large-bodied species.

  12. A Decade of Plague in Mahajanga, Madagascar: Insights into the Global Maritime Spread of Pandemic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Amy J.; Chan, Fabien; Nottingham, Roxanne; Andersen, Genevieve; Drees, Kevin; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Wagner, David M.; Chanteau, Suzanne; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A cluster of human plague cases occurred in the seaport city of Mahajanga, Madagascar, from 1991 to 1999 following 62 years with no evidence of plague, which offered insights into plague pathogen dynamics in an urban environment. We analyzed a set of 44 Mahajanga isolates from this 9-year outbreak, as well as an additional 218 Malagasy isolates from the highland foci. We sequenced the genomes of four Mahajanga strains, performed whole-genome sequence single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery on those strains, screened the discovered SNPs, and performed a high-resolution 43-locus multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis of the isolate panel. Twenty-two new SNPs were identified and defined a new phylogenetic lineage among the Malagasy isolates. Phylogeographic analysis suggests that the Mahajanga lineage likely originated in the Ambositra district in the highlands, spread throughout the northern central highlands, and was then introduced into and became transiently established in Mahajanga. Although multiple transfers between the central highlands and Mahajanga occurred, there was a locally differentiating and dominant subpopulation that was primarily responsible for the 1991-to-1999 Mahajanga outbreaks. Phylotemporal analysis of this Mahajanga subpopulation revealed a cycling pattern of diversity generation and loss that occurred during and after each outbreak. This pattern is consistent with severe interseasonal genetic bottlenecks along with large seasonal population expansions. The ultimate extinction of plague pathogens in Mahajanga suggests that, in this environment, the plague pathogen niche is tenuous at best. However, the temporary large pathogen population expansion provides the means for plague pathogens to disperse and become ecologically established in more suitable nonurban environments. PMID:23404402

  13. Systemic effects of Leucaena leucocephala ingestion on ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) at Berenty Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Graham; Puschner, Birgit; Affolter, Verena; Stalis, Ilse; Davidson, Autumn; Baker, Tomas; Tahara, John; Jolly, Alison; Ostapak, Susan

    2015-06-01

    Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala) is a leguminous tree that is nutritious forage for domestic livestock when ingested in limited amounts. Unfortunately, leucaena contains mimosine, a plant amino acid, that can be toxic when ingested at higher concentrations. Reported toxic effects include alopecia (fur loss), poor body condition, infertility, low birth weight, thyroid gland dysfunction, and organ toxicity. Originally native to Mexico and Central America, leucaena has been introduced throughout the tropics, including Berenty Reserve, Madagascar where it was planted as supplemental browse for livestock. In Berenty, a seasonal syndrome of alopecia in ringtailed lemurs (Lemur catta) is associated with eating leucaena. Although much is known about the toxic effects of leucaena and mimosine on domestic animals and humans, the systemic effects on wildlife had not been studied. In a comparison of lemurs that include leucaena in their diet and those that do not, we found that animals that ingest leucaena absorb mimosine but that ingestion does not affect body condition, cause kidney or liver toxicity, or affect the intestinal tract. Alopecia is due to mimosine's interference of the hair follicle cycle. Leucaena ingestion is associated with higher serum albumin, α-tocopherol, and thyroxine concentrations, suggesting that leucaena may provide some nutritional benefit and that lemurs can detoxify and convert mimosine to a thyroid stimulating metabolite. The primary conservation consequence of leucaena ingestion at Berenty may be increased infant mortality due to the infants' inability cling to their alopecic mothers. The widespread introduction of leucaena throughout the tropics and its rapid spread in secondary forest conditions mean that many other leaf-eating mammals may be including this tree in their diet. Thus, exposure to leucaena should be considered when wildlife health is being evaluated, and the potential effects on wildlife health should be considered when contemplating leucaena introduction into or near wildlife habitat. PMID:25809223

  14. The ranging behavior of Lemur catta in the region of Cap Sainte-Marie, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Large home ranges and extreme flexibility in ranging behaviors characterize most subarid dwelling haplorhines. However, the most comparable extant strepsirhine, Lemur catta, is characterized as having small home ranges with consistent boundaries. Since ranging studies on this species have been limited to gallery forest habitat, the author's goal is to identify ecological factors that affect range use of L. catta in one of the most resource-limited environments of its distribution. To conduct this study, ranging and behavioral data were collected on two nonoverlapping groups through all-day follows in the semidesert scrub environment of Cap Sainte-Marie (CSM), Madagascar. Data were collected from August 2007 through July 2008. Home range areas and day range lengths were generated using ArcGIS(®) 9.3. Other variables measured were habitat composition, diet richness, daily activity, and microclimate. Home range areas of CSM L. catta were very large relative to those of gallery forest L. catta, and there was great monthly variation. In contrast, day range lengths at CSM were either smaller than or approximated the size of comparative gallery forest groups. Temperature, sunning, and diet richness were associated with day range length for one but not for both groups and appear to be related to energy management needs. Based on these findings, the author suggests that L. catta is capable of extensive behavioral and ranging flexibility in the extremes of its environment. However, physiological constraints impose limitations that can interfere with its ability to adapt to even seemingly minor variations in microclimate and habitat structure within the same site. PMID:23180618

  15. Study on the movement of Rattus rattus and evaluation of the plague dispersion in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Duplantier, Jean Marc; Ratovonjato, Jocelyn; Ramilijaona, Olga; Ratsimba, Mamy; Rahalison, Lila

    2010-01-01

    Plague affects mainly the rural areas in the central highlands of Madagascar. Rattus rattus is the main rodent host of Yersinia pestis in these localities. Since the introduction of plague, endemic foci have continued to expand, and spatiotemporal variability in the distribution of human plague has been observed. To assess the movements of R. rattus and evaluate the risk of dispersion of the disease, a field study at the scale of the habitats (houses, hedges of sisals, and rice fields) in the plague villages was carried out during high and low seasons of plague transmission to humans. The systemic oral marker Rhodamine B was used to follow rats' movements. Baits were placed in different habitats, and trapping success was carried out once a month for 3 months after the bait distribution. Plague indicators (reservoirs' abundance, flea index, Y. pestis prevalence in fleas, and Y. pestis antibody prevalence in rats) were determined. The highest abundance of rats and marking efficiency were observed in the sisal hedges and the rice fields. Marked rats were captured most commonly near the points where baits were initially placed. The main movements of rats were observed between the houses and sisal hedges. Major differences were observed between the seasons of high and low plague transmission. During the season of low plague transmission, rats were more abundant in the sisal hedges and rice fields, with rats moving from the houses to the rice fields. During the high plague transmission season, rats moved from the hedges of sisal to the rice fields. Important indicators of vector abundance and plague transmission were higher during the high plague transmission season. The three study habitats were the risk areas for plague transmission, but the risk appeared highest in the houses and sisals. Rats' movements according to the season were likely directed by the availability of food. PMID:20158335

  16. Symbolic capital and health: the case of women's sex work in Antananarivo, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Stoebenau, Kirsten

    2009-06-01

    Public health research on sex work has been criticized both for representing sex work as a monolithic entity and for focusing only on individual behavioral determinants of health. When broader determinants are acknowledged, they are often described in solely economic terms (ie, comparing health risks of higher class versus lower class sex workers). Drawing from Pierre Bourdieu, I describe women's sex work in Antananarivo, Madagascar as a social 'field' and demonstrate that this field is both highly complex and highly structured. Fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork (December 2002-December 2003; May-June 2004) in Antananarivo with women sex workers (n approximately 60) and community members (n approximately 85) informed a description of the community's understanding of the sex work field and its contrast to the lived experience of key informant sex workers. Women who sell sex were categorized by their communities into three social positions--ambony (high), antonony (middle) and ambany (low)--which were differentiated by economic capital (earnings per sexual exchange) and symbolic capital (prestige associated with race, ethnicity and moral demeanor). Women who occupied the antonony social position held the greatest volumes of symbolic capital both because they were identified as belonging to the local dominant ethnic group, and because they demonstrated discretion and shame in their sex work practice. Alternatively, women who occupied the ambony and ambany positions openly practiced their sex work and were associated with ethnic or racial minority identities, contributing to their lower volumes of symbolic capital. Symbolic capital influenced unique health vulnerabilities, such as to sexually transmitted disease, by social position through mechanisms operating from the institutional to the interpersonal level. This analysis illustrates the value of examining sex work as a social field, specifically the importance of capturing more than economic capital in order to understand sex workers' unique health vulnerabilities and concerns. PMID:19362403

  17. Food mechanical properties in three sympatric species of Hapalemur in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Nayuta; Vinyard, Christopher J; Tan, Chia L

    2009-07-01

    We investigated mechanical dietary properties of sympatric bamboo lemurs, Hapalemur g. griseus, H. aureus, and H. (Prolemur) simus, in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. Each lemur species relies on bamboo, though previous behavioral observations found that they specialize on different parts of a common resource (Tan: Int J Primatol 20 1999 547-566; Tan: PhD dissertation 2000 State University of New York, Stony Brook). On the basis of these earlier behavioral ecology studies, we hypothesized that specialization on bamboo is related to differences in mechanical properties of specific parts. We quantified mechanical properties of individual plant parts from the diets of the bamboo lemur species using a portable tester. The diets of the Hapalemur spp. exhibited high levels of mechanical heterogeneity. The lemurs, however, could be segregated based on the most challenging (i.e., mechanically demanding) foods. Giant bamboo culm pith was the toughest and stiffest food eaten, and its sole lemur consumer, H. simus, had the most challenging diet. However, the mechanical dietary properties of H. simus and H. aureus overlapped considerably. In the cases where lemur species converged on the same bamboo part, the size of the part eaten increased with body size. Plant parts that were harvested orally but not necessarily masticated were the most demanding, indicating that food preparation may place significant loads on the masticatory apparatus. Finally, we describe how mechanical properties can influence feeding behavior. The elaborate procurement processes of H. simus feeding on culm pith and H. griseus and H. aureus feeding on young leaf bases are related to the toughnesses of protective coverings and the lemurs' exploitation of mechanical vulnerabilities in these plants. PMID:19115398

  18. Patterns of Loss and Regeneration of Tropical Dry Forest in Madagascar: The Social Institutional Context

    PubMed Central

    Elmqvist, Thomas; Pyykönen, Markku; Tengö, Maria; Rakotondrasoa, Fanambinantsoa; Rabakonandrianina, Elisabeth; Radimilahy, Chantal

    2007-01-01

    Loss of tropical forests and changes in land-use/land-cover are of growing concern worldwide. Although knowledge exists about the institutional context in which tropical forest loss is embedded, little is known about the role of social institutions in influencing regeneration of tropical forests. In the present study we used Landsat images from southern Madagascar from three different years (1984, 1993 and 2000) and covering 5500 km2, and made a time-series analysis of three distinct large-scale patterns: 1) loss of forest cover, 2) increased forest cover, and 3) stable forest cover. Institutional characteristics underlying these three patterns were analyzed, testing the hypothesis that forest cover change is a function of strength and enforcement of local social institutions. The results showed a minor decrease of 7% total forest cover in the study area during the whole period 1984–2000, but an overall net increase of 4% during the period 1993–2000. The highest loss of forest cover occurred in a low human population density area with long distances to markets, while a stable forest cover occurred in the area with highest population density and good market access. Analyses of institutions revealed that loss of forest cover occurred mainly in areas characterized by insecure property rights, while areas with well-defined property rights showed either regenerating or stable forest cover. The results thus corroborate our hypothesis. The large-scale spontaneous regeneration dominated by native endemic species appears to be a result of a combination of changes in precipitation, migration and decreased human population and livestock grazing pressure, but under conditions of maintained and well-defined property rights. Our study emphasizes the large capacity of a semi-arid system to spontaneously regenerate, triggered by decreased pressures, but where existing social institutions mitigate other drivers of deforestation and alternative land-use. PMID:17476324

  19. Large-Scale Habitat Corridors for Biodiversity Conservation: A Forest Corridor in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ramiadantsoa, Tanjona; Ovaskainen, Otso; Rybicki, Joel; Hanski, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity conservation, habitat corridors are assumed to increase landscape-level connectivity and to enhance the viability of otherwise isolated populations. While the role of corridors is supported by empirical evidence, studies have typically been conducted at small spatial scales. Here, we assess the quality and the functionality of a large 95-km long forest corridor connecting two large national parks (416 and 311 km2) in the southeastern escarpment of Madagascar. We analyze the occurrence of 300 species in 5 taxonomic groups in the parks and in the corridor, and combine high-resolution forest cover data with a simulation model to examine various scenarios of corridor destruction. At present, the corridor contains essentially the same communities as the national parks, reflecting its breadth which on average matches that of the parks. In the simulation model, we consider three types of dispersers: passive dispersers, which settle randomly around the source population; active dispersers, which settle only in favorable habitat; and gap-avoiding active dispersers, which avoid dispersing across non-habitat. Our results suggest that long-distance passive dispersers are most sensitive to ongoing degradation of the corridor, because increasing numbers of propagules are lost outside the forest habitat. For a wide range of dispersal parameters, the national parks are large enough to sustain stable populations until the corridor becomes severely broken, which will happen around 2065 if the current rate of forest loss continues. A significant decrease in gene flow along the corridor is expected after 2040, and this will exacerbate the adverse consequences of isolation. Our results demonstrate that simulation studies assessing the role of habitat corridors should pay close attention to the mode of dispersal and the effects of regional stochasticity. PMID:26200351

  20. A TAXONOMIC REVISION OF GOUANIA (RHAMNACEAE) IN MADAGASCAR AND THE OTHER ISLANDS OF THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN (THE COMORO AND MASCARENE ISLANDS, AND THE SEYCHELLES)1

    PubMed Central

    Buerki, Sven; Phillipson, Peter B.; Callmander, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Gouania Jacq. (Rhamnaceae) is presented for Madagascar and the other western Indian Ocean islands. Seventeen species are recognized, of which nine are described and published as new (all endemic to Madagascar): G. ambrensis Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. callmanderi Buerki, G. cupreifolia Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. cupuliflora Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. gautieri Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. perrieri Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. phillipsonii Buerki, G. taolagnarensis Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., and G. zebrifolia Buerki, Phillipson & Callm. Sixteen species occur in Madagascar, of which 13 are endemic and three are common to Madagascar and one or more of the smaller Indian Ocean islands. The latter include G. laxiflora Tul., a species which is also present on mainland Africa. One species, G. mauritiana Lam., is endemic to Réunion Island. We recognize two subspecies within G. scandens (Gaertn.) R. B. Drumm.: G. scandens subsp. scandens and G. scandens subsp. glandulosa (Boivin ex Tul.) Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., the latter transferred from G. glandulosa Boivin ex Tul. Past confusion about the identity of this species is discussed. Five names are lectotypified: G. aphrodes Tul., G. glandulosa [= G. scandens subsp. glandulosa], G. laxiflora, G. lineata Tul., and G. tiliifolia Lam. Both lectotype and epitype are designated for G. mauritiana. Conservation assessments are provided for all species within their primary areas of occurrence. PMID:22053117

  1. Developpement, amenagement linguistique et terminologie: Un mythe? L'exemple de la malgachisation (Development, Language Planning, and Terminology: A Myth? The Example of Madagascar).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulanger, Jean-Claude

    1989-01-01

    The French language provides a context for comparison of the modernization efforts of Quebec and Madagascar, looking at the following issues: the beginning role of the language in the society, political influences, language needs for technology transfer and the introduction of terminology in societies with well-documented and poorly-documented…

  2. Look at That!: Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Develop and Enhance the Scientific Inquiry Skill of Observation in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Middle school students can develop and enhance their observation skills by participating in teacher-guided scientific inquiry (NRC 1996) activities where they observe animals that tend to act in known, predictable ways. Madagascar hissing cockroaches ("Gromphadorhina portentosa") are one such animal. This article presents beginning, intermediate,…

  3. "Even with Higher Education You Remain a Woman": A Gender Perspective on Higher Education and Social Change in the Toliara Region of Madagascar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skjortnes, Marianne; Zachariassen, Heidi Holt

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates some issues related to gender and education based on a qualitative, empirical study of women in higher education in the Toliara region of Madagascar. The focus is on how women's participation in higher education has created changes in gender relations, and how these women have succeeded in achieving higher education. In…

  4. Volatiles from steam-distilled leaves of some plant species from Madagascar and New Zealand and evaluation of their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rosaria; Pizzimenti, Francesco; Marotta, Francesca; Dugo, P; Santi, Luca; Mondello, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    Steam-distilled aerial parts of Ravensara aromatica and Cinnamomum camphora from Madagascar and Leptospermum scoparium from New Zealand have been subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis by means of GC techniques. This allowed the elucidation of conflicting data present in the available literature for these species. Also, the biological activity in vitro was evaluated by measuring MICs and GIZs. PMID:21213986

  5. Look at That!: Using Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to Develop and Enhance the Scientific Inquiry Skill of Observation in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Middle school students can develop and enhance their observation skills by participating in teacher-guided scientific inquiry (NRC 1996) activities where they observe animals that tend to act in known, predictable ways. Madagascar hissing cockroaches ("Gromphadorhina portentosa") are one such animal. This article presents beginning, intermediate,…

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Testicular Self- examination among Male University Students from Bangladesh, Madagascar, Singapore, South Africa and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitude and practice of testicular self-examination (TSE) among male university students from low income (Bangladesh, Madagascar), middle income (South Africa, Turkey) and emerging economy (Singapore) countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 2,061 male undergraduate university students aged 16-30 (mean age 21.4, SD=2.4) from 5 universities in 5 countries across Asia and Africa. Overall, 17.6% of the male students indicated that they knew how to perform TSE; this knowledge proportion was above 20% in Bangladesh and Singapore, while it was the lowest (12.2%) in Madagascar. Among all men, 86.4% had never practiced TSE in the past 12 months, 7.1% 1-2 times, 3.5% 3-10 times, and monthly TSE was 3.1%. The proportion of past 12 month TSE was the highest (17.6%) among male university students in South Africa and the lowest (7.3%) among students in Singapore. Logistic regression found that TSE importance or positive attitude was highly associated with TSE practice. TSE practices were found to be inadequate and efforts should be made to develop programmes that can increase knowledge related to testicular cancer as well as the practice of testicular self-examination. PMID:26107234

  7. Molecular evidence for the monophyly of tenrecidae (mammalia) and the timing of the colonization of Madagascar by Malagasy Tenrecs.

    PubMed

    Douady, Christophe J; Catzeflis, Francois; Kao, Diana J; Springer, Mark S; Stanhope, Michael J

    2002-03-01

    Tenrecs are a diverse family of insectivores, with an Afro-Malagasian biogeographic distribution. Three subfamilies (Geogalinae, Oryzorictinae, Tenrecinae) are restricted to Madagascar and one subfamily, the otter shrews (Potamogalinae), occurs on the mainland. Morphological studies have generated conflicting hypotheses according to which both tenrecids and Malagassy tenrecs are either monophyletic or paraphyletic. Competing hypotheses have different implications for the biogeographic history of Tenrecidae. At present, there are no molecular studies that address these hypotheses. The present study provides sequences of a nuclear protein-coding gene (vWF) and the mitochondrial 12S rRNA, tRNA valine, and 16S rRNA genes from a potamogaline (Micropotamogale). New sequences of these genes are also reported for the tenrecine, Tenrec ecaudatus. The 12S sequences from these taxa were combined with data already available for this locus from two other tenrecids (Echinops telfairi, subfamily Tenrecinae and Oryzorictes talpoides, subfamily Oryzorictinae). Phylogenetic analyses provided strong bootstrap support for the monophyly of Tenrecidae and Malagasy tenrecs. The majority of statistical tests rejected morphological claims for both a Tenrecinae--Chrysochloridae clade and an Oryzorictinae--Potamogalinae clade. Molecular clock estimates suggest a split of otter shrews and Malagasy tenrecs at approximately 53 MYA. We estimate that the ancestor of Malagasy tenrecs dispersed to Madagascar subsequent to this split but prior to about 37 MYA. PMID:11884160

  8. Resolving an enigma by integrative taxonomy: Madagascarophis fuchsi (Serpentes: Lamprophiidae), a new opisthoglyphous and microendemic snake from northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Glaw, Frank; Kucharzewski, Christoph; Köhler, Jörn; Vences, Miguel; Nagy, Zoltán T

    2013-01-01

    Herpetological surveys in the dry forests of the limestone massif Montagne des Français in the far north of Madagascar have recently yielded a number of undescribed reptile species. Here we describe an additional new and potentially microendemic species of the snake genus Madagascarophis (Squamata: Serpentes: Pseudoxyrhophiinae) which lives in this massif syntopically with M. colubrinus septentrionalis and differs distinctly from M. colubrinus and M. meridionalis in its mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Morphologically Madagascarophis fuchsi sp. nov. is characterized by a broad contact between the posterior inframaxillaries (genials), 25 dorsal scale rows at midbody, and a low number of ventrals (171-172). We redescribe the holotype of M. ocellatus and present new data on the morphological variation of the northern subspecies M. c. septentrionalis and M. c. citrinus. Although Montagne des Français has recently been included into the network of nature reserves in Madagascar, continuous deforestation is strongly threatening this important center of reptile endemism. In line with the assessment of other microendemic reptiles of this massif we suggest to consider the new species as Critically Endangered according to the IUCN criteria and encourage new efforts to protect this area more efficiently. PMID:26131514

  9. Genome-wide evidence of Austronesian–Bantu admixture and cultural reversion in a hunter-gatherer group of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Pagani, Luca; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Antao, Tiago; Capredon, Mélanie; Sambo, Clément; Radimilahy, Chantal; Rakotoarisoa, Jean-Aimé; Blench, Roger M.; Letellier, Thierry; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural evidence suggest that Madagascar was the final point of two major dispersals of Austronesian- and Bantu-speaking populations. Today, the Mikea are described as the last-known Malagasy population reported to be still practicing a hunter-gatherer lifestyle. It is unclear, however, whether the Mikea descend from a remnant population that existed before the arrival of Austronesian and Bantu agriculturalists or whether it is only their lifestyle that separates them from the other contemporary populations of South Madagascar. To address these questions we have performed a genome-wide analysis of >700,000 SNP markers on 21 Mikea, 24 Vezo, and 24 Temoro individuals, together with 50 individuals from Bajo and Lebbo populations from Indonesia. Our analyses of these data in the context of data available from other Southeast Asian and African populations reveal that all three Malagasy populations are derived from the same admixture event involving Austronesian and Bantu sources. In contrast to the fact that most of the vocabulary of the Malagasy speakers is derived from the Barito group of the Austronesian language family, we observe that only one-third of their genetic ancestry is related to the populations of the Java-Kalimantan-Sulawesi area. Because no additional ancestry components distinctive for the Mikea were found, it is likely that they have adopted their hunter-gatherer way of life through cultural reversion, and selection signals suggest a genetic adaptation to their new lifestyle. PMID:24395773

  10. First description of autumn migration of Sooty Falcon Falco concolor from the United Arab Emirates to Madagascar using satellite telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Javed, Salim; Douglas, David C.; Khan, Shahid Noor; Nazeer Shah, Junid; Ali Al Hammadi, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    The movement and migration pattern of the 'Near Threatened' Sooty Falcon Falco concolor is poorly known. Sooty Falcons breed on the islands of the Arabian Gulf after arriving from their non-breeding areas that are mainly in Madagascar. In the first satellite tracking of the species we fitted a 9.5 g Argos solar powered transmitter on an adult breeding Sooty Falcon off the western coast of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The bird successfully undertook autumn migration to Madagascar, a known wintering area for the species. We document the Sooty Falcon's autumn migration route and stop-over sites. The adult Sooty Falcon initiated its migration at night and with tailwinds, and travelled mainly during daytime hours for 13 days over an inland route of more than 5,656 km. The three stop-over sites in East Africa were characterised by moderate to sparse shrub cover associated with potential sources of water. We discuss the migration pattern of the tracked bird in relation to importance of non-breeding areas for Sooty Falcons and recent declines in numbers in their breeding range.

  11. The Use of an Invasive Species Habitat by a Small Folivorous Primate: Implications for Lemur Conservation in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Eppley, Timothy M.; Donati, Giuseppe; Ramanamanjato, Jean-Baptiste; Randriatafika, Faly; Andriamandimbiarisoa, Laza N.; Rabehevitra, David; Ravelomanantsoa, Robertin; Ganzhorn, Jörg U.

    2015-01-01

    The lemurs of Madagascar are among the most threatened mammalian taxa in the world, with habitat loss due to shifting cultivation and timber harvest heavily contributing to their precarious state. Deforestation often leads to fragmentation, resulting in mixed-habitat matrices throughout a landscape where disturbed areas are prone to invasion by exotic plants. Our study site, the Mandena littoral forest (southeast Madagascar), is a matrix of littoral forest, littoral swamp, and Melaleuca swamp habitats. Here, Melaleuca quinquenervia has invaded the wetland ecosystem, creating a mono-dominant habitat that currently provides the only potential habitat corridor between forest fragments. We sought to understand the role of this invasive Melaleuca swamp on the behavioral ecology of a threatened, small-bodied folivore, the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). We collected botanical and behavioral data on four groups of H. meridionalis between January and December 2013. Our results confirm Melaleuca swamp as an important part of their home range: while lemurs seasonally limited activities to certain habitats, all groups were capable of utilizing this invasive habitat for feeding and resting. Furthermore, the fact that Hapalemur use an invasive plant species as a dispersal corridor increases our knowledge of their ecological flexibility, and may be useful in the conservation management of remaining threatened populations. PMID:26536667

  12. Age and geochemistry of Early Cambrian post-collisional granites from the Ambatondrazaka area in east-central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiu-Long; Rasoamalala, V.; Razoeliarimalala, M.; Ralison, B.; Luo, Zhao-Hua

    2015-06-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data are presented on Early Cambrian granites from the Ambatondrazaka area in east-central Madagascar. U-Pb zircon dating reveals that these granites were emplaced at ?520 Ma within a post-collisional setting. They are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and enriched in large ion lithophile elements. Using zircon Ce anomalies as proxy, it is indicated that they crystallized under moderately reduced conditions with an oxygen fugacity of FMQ+0.75/NNO-0.09. Their low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.706715 and 0.706869) and notably negative ?Nd(t) values (-24.1 and -23.4) imply a magma source of mafic continental crustal material, probably analogous to the Neoarchean mafic gneisses of the Tsaratanana Complex. The low zircon ?Hf(t) values (-16.4 to -12.9) further support a mafic crustal source with a 176Lu/177Hf ratio of ?0.017. On the other hand, their depletion in HREE and slight depletion in Nb help constrain the melting pressure between ?10 and 13 kbar. Taken together, a mafic lower crustal source is favored for these granites. Our results demonstrate the role of crustal anatexis in the origin of Late Ediacaran-Early Cambrian post-collisional magmatism in Madagascar.

  13. Spatial and temporal arrival patterns of Madagascar's vertebrate fauna explained by distance, ocean currents, and ancestor type

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Karen E.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Ali, Jason R.; Goodman, Steven M.; Vences, Miguel; Sutherland, Michael R.; Irwin, Mitchell T.; Krause, David W.

    2012-01-01

    How, when, and from where Madagascar's vertebrates arrived on the island is poorly known, and a comprehensive explanation for the distribution of its organisms has yet to emerge. We begin to break that impasse by analyzing vertebrate arrival patterns implied by currently existing taxa. For each of 81 clades, we compiled arrival date, source, and ancestor type (obligate freshwater, terrestrial, facultative swimmer, or volant). We analyzed changes in arrival rates, with and without adjusting for clade extinction. Probability of successful transoceanic dispersal is negatively correlated with distance traveled and influenced by ocean currents and ancestor type. Obligate rafters show a decrease in probability of successful transoceanic dispersal from the Paleocene onward, reaching the lowest levels after the mid-Miocene. This finding is consistent with a paleoceanographic model [Ali JR, Huber M (2010) Nature 463:653–656] that predicts Early Cenozoic surface currents periodically conducive to rafting or swimming from Africa, followed by a reconfiguration to present-day flow 15–20 million years ago that significantly diminished the ability for transoceanic dispersal to Madagascar from the adjacent mainland. PMID:22431643

  14. Genome-wide evidence of Austronesian-Bantu admixture and cultural reversion in a hunter-gatherer group of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Pierron, Denis; Razafindrazaka, Harilanto; Pagani, Luca; Ricaut, François-Xavier; Antao, Tiago; Capredon, Mélanie; Sambo, Clément; Radimilahy, Chantal; Rakotoarisoa, Jean-Aimé; Blench, Roger M; Letellier, Thierry; Kivisild, Toomas

    2014-01-21

    Linguistic and cultural evidence suggest that Madagascar was the final point of two major dispersals of Austronesian- and Bantu-speaking populations. Today, the Mikea are described as the last-known Malagasy population reported to be still practicing a hunter-gatherer lifestyle. It is unclear, however, whether the Mikea descend from a remnant population that existed before the arrival of Austronesian and Bantu agriculturalists or whether it is only their lifestyle that separates them from the other contemporary populations of South Madagascar. To address these questions we have performed a genome-wide analysis of >700,000 SNP markers on 21 Mikea, 24 Vezo, and 24 Temoro individuals, together with 50 individuals from Bajo and Lebbo populations from Indonesia. Our analyses of these data in the context of data available from other Southeast Asian and African populations reveal that all three Malagasy populations are derived from the same admixture event involving Austronesian and Bantu sources. In contrast to the fact that most of the vocabulary of the Malagasy speakers is derived from the Barito group of the Austronesian language family, we observe that only one-third of their genetic ancestry is related to the populations of the Java-Kalimantan-Sulawesi area. Because no additional ancestry components distinctive for the Mikea were found, it is likely that they have adopted their hunter-gatherer way of life through cultural reversion, and selection signals suggest a genetic adaptation to their new lifestyle. PMID:24395773

  15. Spread and strain determination of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Madagascar since its first report in 2010.

    PubMed

    Rasolofoarivao, Henriette; Clémencet, Johanna; Ravaomanarivo, Lala Harivelo Raveloson; Razafindrazaka, Dimby; Reynaud, Bernard; Delatte, Hélène

    2013-08-01

    Varroa destructor is a major pest in world beekeeping. It was first detected in Madagascar in 2010 on the endemic honeybee Apis mellifera unicolor. To evaluate V. destructor spread dynamics in Madagascar a global survey was conducted in 2011-2012. A total of 695 colonies from 30 districts were inspected for the presence of mites. 2 years after its introduction, nine districts were found infested. Varroa destructor spread was relatively slow compared to other countries with a maximum progression of 40 km per year, the five newly infested districts being located next to the first infested ones. The incidence of mite infestation was also investigated by monitoring 73 colonies from five apiaries during 1 year (2011-2012). Sixty percent of local colony mortality was recorded after 1 year of survey. Varroa destructor strain determination was done by partial sequencing of the cytochrome oxidase I gene of 13 phoretic mites sampled in five districts. A single V. destructor mitochondrial haplotype was detected, the Korean type, also present in the closest African countries. A global pathogen survey was also conducted on the colonies inspected for mite presence. The greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella has been found in all colonies all over the country. Two other pathogens and morphological abnormalities in workers, such as deformed wings, were found associated with only V. destructor presence. A prevention management plan must be implemented to delimit mite spread across the island. PMID:23325416

  16. The Use of an Invasive Species Habitat by a Small Folivorous Primate: Implications for Lemur Conservation in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Timothy M; Donati, Giuseppe; Ramanamanjato, Jean-Baptiste; Randriatafika, Faly; Andriamandimbiarisoa, Laza N; Rabehevitra, David; Ravelomanantsoa, Robertin; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2015-01-01

    The lemurs of Madagascar are among the most threatened mammalian taxa in the world, with habitat loss due to shifting cultivation and timber harvest heavily contributing to their precarious state. Deforestation often leads to fragmentation, resulting in mixed-habitat matrices throughout a landscape where disturbed areas are prone to invasion by exotic plants. Our study site, the Mandena littoral forest (southeast Madagascar), is a matrix of littoral forest, littoral swamp, and Melaleuca swamp habitats. Here, Melaleuca quinquenervia has invaded the wetland ecosystem, creating a mono-dominant habitat that currently provides the only potential habitat corridor between forest fragments. We sought to understand the role of this invasive Melaleuca swamp on the behavioral ecology of a threatened, small-bodied folivore, the southern bamboo lemur (Hapalemur meridionalis). We collected botanical and behavioral data on four groups of H. meridionalis between January and December 2013. Our results confirm Melaleuca swamp as an important part of their home range: while lemurs seasonally limited activities to certain habitats, all groups were capable of utilizing this invasive habitat for feeding and resting. Furthermore, the fact that Hapalemur use an invasive plant species as a dispersal corridor increases our knowledge of their ecological flexibility, and may be useful in the conservation management of remaining threatened populations. PMID:26536667

  17. Mesoscale eddy variability in the southern extension of the East Madagascar Current: Seasonal cycle, energy conversion terms, and eddy mean properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halo, Issufo; Penven, Pierrick; Backeberg, Björn; Ansorge, Isabelle; Shillington, Frank; Roman, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we used more than 17 years of satellite altimetry observations and output from an ocean model to investigate the mesoscale eddy variability and forcing mechanisms to the south of Madagascar. Analysis of energy conversion terms in the model has shown seasonality on eddy formation, both by barotropic and baroclinic instabilities: maximum in winter (JJA) and minimum in summer (DJF). The eddies were mainly formed in the upper ocean (0-300 m) and at intermediate depths (800-2000 m) by barotropic and baroclinic instabilities, respectively. The former dominated in the southeastern margin of Madagascar, and the latter to the southwest, where the South-East Madagascar Current (SEMC) separates from the continental shelf. Seasonality of the eddy formation appeared linked with the seasonal intensification of the SEMC. The energy conversion terms indicated that the eddies have a significant contribution to the large-scale circulation, but not being persistent throughout the year, occurring mainly during the fall season (MAM). Eddy demography from altimetry and model provided information on eddy preferential sites for birth, annual occurrence (6-13 per year), eddy mean diameter (124-178 km), mean amplitude (9-28 cm), life-time (90-183 days), and maximum traveling distances (325-1052 km). Eddies formed to the southwest of Madagascar exhibited distinct characteristics from those formed in the southeast. Nevertheless, all eddies were highly nonlinear, suggesting that they are potential vectors of connectivity between Madagascar and Africa. This may have a significant impact on the ecology of this region.

  18. Consuming sex: the association between modern goods, lifestyles and sexual behaviour among youth in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnographic evidence suggests that transactional sex is sometimes motivated by youth’s interest in the consumption of modern goods as much as it is in basic survival. There are very few quantitative studies that examine the association between young people’s interests in the consumption of modern goods and their sexual behaviour. We examined this association in two regions and four residence zones of Madagascar: urban, peri-urban and rural Antananarivo, and urban Antsiranana. We expected risky sexual behaviour would be associated with interests in consuming modern goods or lifestyles; urban residence; and socio-cultural characteristics. Methods We administered a population-based survey to 2, 255 youth ages 15–24 in all four residence zones. Focus group discussions guided the survey instrument which assessed socio-demographic and economic characteristics, consumption of modern goods, preferred activities and sexual behaviour. Our outcomes measures included: multiple sexual partners in the last year (for men and women); and ever practicing transactional sex (for women). Results Overall, 7.3% of women and 30.7% of men reported having had multiple partners in the last year; and 5.9% of women reported ever practicing transactional sex. Bivariate results suggested that for both men and women having multiple partners was associated with perceptions concerning the importance of fashion and a series of activities associated with modern lifestyles. A subset of lifestyle characteristics remained significant in multivariate models. For transactional sex bivariate results suggested perceptions around fashion, nightclub attendance, and getting to know a foreigner were key determinants; and all remained significant in multivariate analysis. We found peri-urban residence more associated with transactional sex than urban residence; and ethnic origin was the strongest predictor of both outcomes for women. Conclusions While we found indication of an association between sexual behaviour and interest in modern goods, or modern lifestyles, such processes did not single-handedly explain risky sexual behaviour among youth; these behaviours were also shaped by culture and conditions of economic uncertainty. These determinants must all be accounted for when developing interventions to reduce risky transactional sex and vulnerability to HIV. PMID:23510104

  19. Study of the BCG Vaccine-Induced Cellular Immune Response in Schoolchildren in Antananarivo, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ranaivomanana, Paulo; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Dubois, Patrice M.; Richard, Vincent; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) protects young children against serious forms of TB, protection against pulmonary TB is variable. We assessed BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune responses and determined for how long they could be detected during childhood in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Methods We assessed BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune responses by TST and IGRA (in-house ELISPOT assay) using BCG and PPD as stimulation antigen, and compared results between vaccinated and non-vaccinated schoolchildren of two age groups, 6-7 and 13-14 years old. Results Three hundred and sixty-three healthy schoolchildren were enrolled. TST was performed on 351 children and IGRA on 142. A high proportion (66%; 229/343) of the children had no TST reactivity (induration size 0 mm). TST-positive responses (≥15 mm) were more prevalent among 13-14 year-old (31.7%) than 6-7 year old (16.5%) children, both in the non-vaccinated (43% vs. 9%, p<0.001) and vaccinated (29% vs. 13%, p=0.002) subgroups. There were no significant differences in TST responses between vaccinated and non-vaccinated children in either of the age groups. The IGRA response to BCG and to PPD stimulation was not significantly different according to BCG vaccination record or to age group. A high rate (15.5%; 22/142) of indeterminate IGRA responses was observed. There was very poor agreement between TST and IGRA-PPD findings (k= 0.08) and between TST and IGRA-BCG findings (k= 0.02) Conclusion Analysis of TST and IGRA response to stimulation with BCG and PPD revealed no difference in immune response between BCG-vaccinated and non-vaccinated children; also no decrease of the BCG vaccine-induced cellular immune response over time was observed. We conclude that TST and IGRA have limitations in assessing a role of BCG or tuberculosis-related immunity. PMID:26214514

  20. Ethnobotanical and economic value of Ravenala madagascariensis Sonn. in Eastern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Known worldwide as the “traveler’s tree”, the Malagasy endemic species Ravenala madagascariensis Sonn. (Strelitziaceae) is considered as an iconic symbol of Madagascar. It is a widespread species in the eastern part of the country with four different varieties which are well represented in Ambalabe community. All of them are used for different purposes and the species represents an important cultural value in the lives of the local population. However, uses of Ravenala are only generally well known by local population. Thus, in this study, we report on the different uses of Ravenala and its importance to the Ambalabe local people. Methods Semi-structured interviews among 116 people, 59 men and 57 women with ages ranging from 17 to 84 years old, free listing and market surveys were conducted in order to collect the vernacular names, the uses of Ravenala madagascariensis and the price of plant parts sold in local market. Then, the uses were categorized according to Cámara-Leret et al. classification. Results Different parts of the plant are currently used by local population, which are grouped as heart, trunk, leaves, petioles and rachis. Seven categories of use were recorded, most cited include: human food, utensils and tools, and house building. The most commonly used parts are trunk, heart, leaves and petioles for which the price varies between $3-15. Uses mentioned for construction (floor, roofs and wall), human food and utensils and tools are the most frequent and salient for local population. But the use of the plant as first materials for house building is revealed to be the most important for them. Conclusions Ravenala madagascariensis is very important to the Ambalabe communities because for local population, it represents the Betsimisaraka cultural and traditional use of the plant for house building. Moreover, none of its parts are discarded. The harvest and sale of R. madagascariensis for building materials can also provide an additional source of income to the family. Besides, using Ravenala in house construction reduces the use of slow growing trees and contributes to the sustainable use of natural forest resources. PMID:25027625

  1. The epidemiological transition in Antananarivo, Madagascar: an assessment based on death registers (1900–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Masquelier, Bruno; Waltisperger, Dominique; Ralijaona, Osée; Pison, Gilles; Ravélo, Arsène

    2014-01-01

    Background Madagascar today has one of the highest life expectancies in sub-Saharan Africa, despite being among the poorest countries in the continent. There are relatively few detailed accounts of the epidemiological transition in this country due to the lack of a comprehensive death registration system at the national level. However, in Madagascar’s capital city, death registration was established around the start of the 20th century and is now considered virtually complete. Objective We provide an overview of trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Antananarivo to document the timing and pace of the mortality decline and the changes in the cause-of-death structure. Design Death registers covering the period 1976–2012 were digitized and the population at risk of dying was estimated from available censuses and surveys. Trends for the period 1900–1976 were partly reconstructed from published sources. Results The crude death rate stagnated around 30‰ until the 1940s in Antananarivo. Mortality declined rapidly after the World War II and then resurged again in the 1980s as a result of the re-emergence of malaria and the collapse of Madagascar’s economy. Over the past 30 years, impressive gains in life expectancy have been registered thanks to the unabated decline in child mortality, despite political instability, a lasting economic crisis and the persistence of high rates of chronic malnutrition. Progress in adult survival has been more modest because reductions in infectious diseases and diseases of the respiratory system have been partly offset by increases in cardiovascular diseases, neoplasms, and other diseases, particularly at age 50 years and over. Conclusions The transition in Antananarivo has been protracted and largely dependent on anti-microbial and anti-parasitic medicine. The capital city now faces a double burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases. The ongoing registration of deaths in the capital generates a unique database to evaluate the performance of the health system and measure intervention impacts. PMID:24848650

  2. Risk factors for avian influenza and Newcastle disease in smallholder farming systems, Madagascar highlands.

    PubMed

    Rasamoelina Andriamanivo, H; Lancelot, R; Maminiaina, O F; Rakotondrafara, T F; Jourdan, M; Renard, J F; Gil, P; Servan de Almeida, R; Albina, E; Martinez, D; Tillard, E; Rakotondravao, R; Chevalier, V

    2012-04-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) and avian influenza (AI) are issues of interest to avian producers in Madagascar. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the major constraint for village aviculture, and avian influenza viruses type A (AIAV) are known to circulate in bird flocks. This study aims at classifying smallholder poultry farms, according to the combination of risk factors potentially associated with NDV and AIAV transmission and to assess the level of infection for each farm class. Two study sites, Lake Alaotra and Grand Antananarivo, were chosen with respect to their differences in terms of agro-ecological features and poultry productions. A typology survey involving 526 farms was performed to identify possible risk factors for (i) within-village, and (ii) between-village virus transmission. A cross-sectional serological study was also carried out in 270 farms to assess sero-prevalences of NDV and AIAV for each farm class and the link between them and risk factor patterns. For within-village transmission, four classes of farms were identified in Grand Antananarivo and five in Lake Alaotra. For between-village virus transmission, four classes of farms were identified for each site. In both sites, NDV sero-prevalence was higher than for AIAV. There was no evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 subtypes of AIAV. Sero-prevalences were significantly higher in Lake Alaotra than in Grand Antananarivo for both viruses (OR=2.4, p=0.02 for NDV, and OR=9.6, p<0.0001 for AIAV). For within-village NDV transmission in Grand Antananarivo, backyard chicken farms (OR=3.6, p<0.001), and chicken farms with biosecurity awareness (OR=3.4, p<0.01) had greater odds of having antibodies against NDV than the others. For between-village virus transmission, farms with multiple external contacts, and farms using many small markets had greater odds of having antibodies against NDV than the others (OR=5.4, p<0.01). For AIAV, there were no differences in sero-prevalences among farm classes. In Lake Alaotra, the observed high density of palmipeds and widespread rice paddies were associated with high sero-prevalences for both viruses, and a homogeneous risk of virus transmission between the different farm classes. In Grand Antananarivo, farm visits by collectors or animal health workers, and farm contacts with several markets were identified as potential risk factors for NDV transmission. Further studies are needed to identify the circulating virus genotypes, model their transmission risk, and provide adapted control measures. PMID:22130311

  3. Lavaka, the unusual gullies of Madagascar: A review for improved data collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveloson, Andrea; Szabó, Amanda I.; Ludván, Brigitta; Székely, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    Land degradation in Madagascar is a complex challenge due to the spectacular gullies (called lavaka) that have a number of undesirable effects. These hillslope gullies have been observed for a long time, but the causes of lavakization are still controversial and many questions remain unanswered. Our aim is to assemble and review lavaka researches since 1953 to understand why these didn't lead to success. Exact location of the field surveys, cited triggering factors and results of these scientific papers have been studied in detail. An overview of the many contributing factors is given in order to better understand lavaka formation and distribution. A review is also given on our 3 years work that included the evaluation of lavaka distribution and evolution using satellite images, investigation of the role of the different factors contributing to lavakas formation (concentrating first of all on geology, topography and climatology) and classification done based on earlier studies and satellite images. We conclude that most of the lavaka researches have been achieved along the main roads and therefore are restricted to the middle part of the Malagasy Highland. The study areas designated by different researchers have similar properties in term of soils, climate, and vegetation leading mainly to the same conclusions and although lithology and climatic conditions are mentioned as key factors, their effect on lavaka density and characteristics have not been revealed in details yet. Our studies based on field survey, remote sensing and GIS showed a strong relationship between gully presence, vegetation cover, elevation, relief and slope angle. Geology, soil and precipitation seem to be less important in a medium scales notwithstanding with the fact that many studies dealing with lavaka emphasize their importance in lavakization process. Gully abundance maps showed that lavaka can also occur at lower topographic levels, gentle slopes and sandy sediments notwithstanding with the fact that previous studies emphasize the importance of elevated topography, steep slope and lateritic soils as preconditions in lavakization. BS contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow. This is ILARG contribution Nr 15.

  4. Proximal and distal styles of pegmatite-related metasomatic emerald mineralization at Ianapera, southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianjakavah, Prosper Rakotovao; Salvi, Stefano; Béziat, Didier; Rakotondrazafy, Michel; Giuliani, Gaston

    2009-10-01

    The Ianapera emerald deposit is located in the Neoproterozoic Vohibory Block of southern Madagascar. The local geology consists of intercalated migmatitic gneissic units and calcareous metasedimentary rocks, containing boudinaged metamorphosed mafic/ultramafic lenses, all intruded by pegmatite veins. These units occur near the hinge of the tightly folded Ianapera antiform, within a few kilometers of the Ampanihy shear zone. Emerald mineralization is hosted by metasomatic phlogopite veins, and bodies developed within the mafic/ultramafic rocks. Based on field and textural relationships, we distinguish proximal and distal styles of mineralization. Proximal mineralization occurs at the contact of pegmatite veins with mafic/ultramafic units; in the distal style, pegmatites are not observed. Three types of emeralds could be distinguished, mainly on the basis of color and mineral zoning. Some of these emeralds have the most Al-depleted and Cr-rich composition ever recorded. Another characteristic feature to the Ianapera deposit and, to our knowledge, yet unreported, is the association of some emeralds with scapolite in metasomatised mafic rocks. Mineral inclusions are common in most emeralds and include phlogopite, carbonates, barite, K-feldspar, quartz, pyrite, zircon, monazite, bastnaesite, phenakite, plus Fe and Cr oxides. However, feldspar and rare earth element-bearing minerals occur predominantly in proximal emeralds, which also have a more incompatible trace-element signature than distal emeralds. We propose a model related to syn- to post-tectonic magmatic-hydrothermal activity. Pegmatitic bodies intruded units of the Ianapera antiform probably during tectonic relaxation. Exsolution of fluids rich in halogens and incompatible elements from the cooling pegmatites caused hydrothermal metasomatism of Cr-bearing mafic/ultramafic rocks in direct contact with the pegmatites. Local fracturing favored fluid infiltration, permitting the formation of distal mineralization. Emerald composition was controlled by the chemistry of the host rock. The presence of carbonate mineral inclusions in the emeralds and the high F-activity indicated by elevated F-contents in newly formed minerals suggest transport of Be as a fluoride-carbonate complex. It seems likely that beryl formation was triggered by precipitation of F-rich phlogopite, which removed the complexing ligand from the fluid.

  5. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Zach J.; Golden, Christopher D.; Karpanty, Sarah; Murphy, Asia; Stauffer, Dean; Ratelolahy, Felix; Andrianjakarivelo, Vonjy; Holmes, Christopher M.; Kelly, Marcella J.

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting) affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar’s largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar’s largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana) occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica). Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (x¯ = 90 individuals consumed/year), the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans) (x¯ = 58 consumed/year), and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) (x¯ = 31 consumed/year). Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest. These various anthropogenic pressures and their effects on carnivore populations, especially increases in exotic carnivores and hunting, have wide-ranging, global implications and demand effective management plans to target the influx of exotic carnivores and unsustainable hunting that is affecting carnivore populations across Madagascar and worldwide. PMID:26375991

  6. Dietary modification by common brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus) during seasonal drought conditions in western Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroki; Ichino, Shinichiro; Hanya, Goro

    2013-11-12

    Primates often modify dietary composition in relation to seasonal changes in food availability or climate conditions. We studied the feeding patterns of a troop of common brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus), a semi-frugivorous strepsirhine, in a dry forest in northwestern Madagascar. To understand the mechanism of dietary modification, we recorded daily feeding times of diet items during 101 full-day observations over 1 year, and then conducted a linear model analysis to examine the effects of fruiting tree density in the forest, daily ambient temperature, and weekly rainfall (index of water retained in the forest) on the lemurs' daily feeding time. The lemurs spent dramatically more time on leaf-eating as well as total feeding time, and less time on fruit-eating during the late dry season (total 152 min/day, frugivory 56 min/day, folivory 77 min/day), as compared with other seasons when the diet was highly frugivorous (total 96 min/day, frugivory 81 min/day, folivory 8 min/day). Folivory increased as temperatures rose under the condition of low weekly rainfall, whereas frugivory was unrelated to fruiting tree density. Most (97.4 %) diurnal folivory during the late dry season was spent consuming Lissochilus rutenbergianus, chewing the succulent leaves and licking the juice. Because the nutritional analysis showed that L. rutenbergianus is rich in water (80.1 % of fresh weight) but poor in protein and nonstructural carbohydrates, its increased use was probably for rehydration. We conducted 13 full-night observations, because brown lemurs increase nocturnal activities during the dry season. At nighttime, the lemurs tended to spend more time eating fruit in the late dry season (32 min/night) than in the early dry season (14 min/night), and never consumed L. rutenbergianus. Fruits rich in nonstructural carbohydrates can be energy sources for Eulemur. They likely engaged in additional nocturnal frugivory for energy compensation. Brown lemurs have a flexible strategy of modifying their diet and feeding activities to cope with environmental stresses. PMID:24217743

  7. Early initiation of and exclusive breastfeeding in large-scale community-based programmes in Bolivia and Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Baker, Elizabeth Jean; Sanei, Linda C; Franklin, Nadra

    2006-12-01

    About one-fourth to one-half of all infant deaths in developing countries occur in the first week of life. Immediate breastfeeding within the first hour, followed by early exclusive breastfeeding, improves the health and survival status of newborns. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that breastfeeding practices, crucial to infant health, can be improved at scale in developing countries. During 1999-2003, the LINKAGES Project, funded by the United States Agency for International Development, implemented its community-based model to bring about rapid change in individual behaviours and community norms regarding early and exclusive breastfeeding, at a scale [LINKAGES' definition of 'scale' was adapted from a CORE Group background paper on 'Scaling-up' maternal, newborn, and child health services, 11 July 2005] that could achieve significant public-health impact. 'Scale' was defined as bringing improved infant-feeding practices to more people over a wider geographic area, more quickly, more equitably, and with sustainability as a goal. During this time, country-specific programmes were designed and implemented in Bolivia and Madagascar, with catchment populations of one million and six million respectively. These country programmes were implemented with multiple local government, private voluntary organizations, and partners of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) through existing health and nutrition activities. Breastfeeding was an entry point to work at all levels of the healthcare system and, within communities, using policy/advocacy and training for healthcare workers, with a particular emphasis on front-line health workers and community members. Harmonized messages and materials, including mass media, were developed and used by partners. Timely initiation of breastfeeding was one indicator measured. Data collected through rapid assessment surveys showed statistically significant increases (p<0.001) in timely initiation of breastfeeding in both the countries. In Bolivia, timely initiation of breastfeeding went from 56% in 2000 to 69% in 2001 and reached 74% by the end of 2003. In Madagascar, the initiation rate went from 34% at baseline in 2000 to 69% in 2001, 76% in 2002, and rose to 78% in 2004. Exclusive breastfeeding during the first month of life was also measured. At baseline in Bolivia, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding for the first month of life was 81% (2000), decreased slightly in 2001, and then increased to 88% by the end of the Project in 2003. In Madagascar, it started high at 86% in 2000, increased during the implementation of the programme, and by 2004, was 91%. These results were achieved quickly and sustained over the course of the intervention. PMID:17591350

  8. Un nouvel exemple de magmatisme potassique à ultrapotassique : les syénites de l'Andringitra (Madagascar)A new example of potassic to ultrapotassic magmatism: the Andringitra syenites (Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédélec, Anne; Grujic, Djordje

    2001-06-01

    The Andringitra Range (Madagascar) is made of potassic to ultrapotassic syenites (K 2O=8-11 weight%; K 2O/Na 2O=2-8). It is a new example of this rare type of magmatism, here related to the Late Precambrian Panafrican orogeny. In the Pic Boby area, the main rock type contains pyroxene (diopside) and amphibole (edenite), and is nearly silica-saturated. A subordinate type is an undersaturated diopside- and phlogopite-bearing syenite. Very high K, Ba, Rb, Sr and LREE contents, together with moderate to high Mg# (33-54), suggest a parental magma derived from the enriched (metasomatized) lithospheric mantle. Fractional crystallisation and crustal assimilation may be responsible for the most evolved compositions.

  9. A new genus and species (Cornucollis gen. n. masoalensis sp. n.) of praying mantis from northern Madagascar (Mantodea, Iridopterygidae, Tropidomantinae)

    PubMed Central

    Brannoch, Sydney K.; Svenson, Gavin J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An examination of Malagasy specimens accessed within the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, France, produced a praying mantis (Insecta: Mantodea) of an undescribed genus and species. An investigation of the internal and external morphology, in addition to its collection locality, revealed that this specimen belongs to the Iridopterygidae subfamily Tropidomantinae. Furthermore, the specimen’s unique combination of characters justified the creation of a new genus. Geographic distributional records and external morphological character evidence are presented for Cornucollis gen. n. masoalensis sp. n. We provide a dichotomous key of the Tropidomantinae and Nilomantinae genera distributed within Madagascar. High-resolution images, illustrations of morphological characters, natural history information, and measurement data are presented. PMID:26877694

  10. Comparative analysis of active constituents in Centella asiatica samples from Madagascar: application for ex situ conservation and clonal propagation.

    PubMed

    Randriamampionona, Denis; Diallo, Billo; Rakotoniriana, Francisco; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Cheuk, Kiban; Corbisier, Anne-Marie; Mahillon, Jacques; Ratsimamanga, Suzanne; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2007-12-01

    A comparative quantitative analysis of the active triterpenoids in Centella asiatica samples collected in different locations in Madagascar was carried out to evaluate the natural variability in triterpenoid content and to select elite samples for further ex situ germplasm conservation and clonal propagation. The highest asiaticoside content (6.42%) was measured in samples collected in Mangoro region. In vitro propagation of C. asiatica was successfully achieved in hormone-free medium. Although lower asiaticoside content was detected in 8-week-old vitro plants, the Mangoro sample still showed the highest content in this triterpenoid constituent (1.78%). Acetoxycentellynol, a C(15)-polyacetylene, was found to be accumulated up to 18 times more in in vitro plants as compared to plant material collected in situ. PMID:17560738

  11. A Fatal Neuroinvasive West Nile Virus Infection in a Traveler Returning from Madagascar: Clinical, Epidemiological and Veterinary Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Sophie; Cardinale, Eric; Ocquidant, Philippe; Roger, Matthieu; Lepec, Richard; Delatte, Hélène; Camuset, Guillaume; Desprès, Philippe; Brottet, Elise; Charlin, Cyril; Michault, Alain

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman living in Reunion Island and returning from Madagascar was hospitalized for neuroinvasive encephalitis and died 1 month later. West Nile virus (WNV) infection was biologically confirmed by detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) reactive with WNV antigens in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and weak neutralizing activity was also detected. A veterinary survey performed in her traveling area showed a seroprevalence of WNV of 28.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.1–36.3) in adult poultry, confirming an active circulation of the virus. Development of a severe form could be related to a weak antibody response, because the patient presented low IgM and IgG titers. This case report underlines the constant risk of emergence of West Nile in Indian Ocean territories, including Reunion Island where competent vectors are widely present during the whole year. PMID:23751400

  12. Comparison of biomedical evaluation for white-fronted brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus albifrons) from four sites in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Junge, Randall E; Dutton, Christopher J; Knightly, Felicia; Williams, Cathy V; Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Louis, Edward E

    2008-12-01

    Health and nutritional assessments of wildlife are important management tools and can provide a means to evaluate ecosystem health. Such examinations were performed on 37 white-fronted brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus albifrons) from four sites in Madagascar. Comparison of health parameters between sites revealed statistically significant differences in body weight, body temperature, respiratory rate, hematology parameters (white cell count, hematocrit, segmented neutrophil count, and lymphocyte count), serum chemistry parameters (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, serum alkaline phosphatase, total protein, albumin, phosphorus, calcium, sodium, chloride, and creatinine phosphokinase), and nutrition parameters (copper, zinc, ferritin, retinol, tocopherol, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol). Two of 10 lemurs tested were positive for toxoplasmosis; none of 10 were positive for Cryptosporidium or Giardia. Enteric bacteria and endo- and ectoparasites were typical. Statistically different values in hematology and chemistry values probably do not reflect clinically significant differences, whereas nutrition parameter differences are likely related to season, soil, and forage availability. PMID:19110698

  13. Formation and preservation of biotite-rich microdomains in high-temperature rocks from the Antananarivo Block, Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Berger, Alfons; Gueydan, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Highly restitic rocks from the Antananarivo Block in northern Madagascar are investigated in this study in order to unravel processes of H2O-rich biotite formation in HT rocks. Polyphase metamorphism and melt migration occurred at 0.6 GPa and 850 °C. Biotite remains stable together with orthopyroxene and makes up to 45 vol% of the rock. In addition, three well-characterised and delimited microdomains having different textural, chemical and petrological characteristics are preserved. Thermodynamic models using the specific bulk compositions of the domains are in agreement with petrological observations. These rocks provide evidence that the lower crust may be strongly heterogeneous, locally associated to the formation of hydrous restites controlled by episodes of melt production and melt escape. This has significant consequences for understanding of the lower crust.

  14. Netamines O-S, Five New Tricyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from the Madagascar Sponge Biemna laboutei, and Their Antimalarial Activities.

    PubMed

    Gros, Emmanuelle; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Sorres, Jonathan; Moriou, Céline; Vacelet, Jean; Frederich, Michel; Aknin, Maurice; Kashman, Yoel; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne; Al-Mourabit, Ali

    2015-11-01

    In our continuing program to isolate new compounds from the Madagascar sponge Biemna laboutei, five new tricyclic guanidine alkaloids, netamines O - S (1-5, resp.), have been identified together with the known compounds netamine E (6) and mirabilin J (7). The structures of all new netamines were assigned on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. Their relative configurations were established by analysis of ROESY data and comparison with literature data. Netamines O, P, and Q, which were isolated in sufficient quantities, were tested for their cytotoxic activities against KB cells and their activities against the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Netamines O and Q were found to be moderately cytotoxic. Netamines O, P, and Q exhibited antiplasmodial activities with IC?? values of 16.99 ± 4.12, 32.62 ± 3.44, and 8.37 ± 1.35??M, respectively. PMID:26567950

  15. A new genus and species (Cornucollis gen. n. masoalensis sp. n.) of praying mantis from northern Madagascar (Mantodea, Iridopterygidae, Tropidomantinae).

    PubMed

    Brannoch, Sydney K; Svenson, Gavin J

    2016-01-01

    An examination of Malagasy specimens accessed within the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, France, produced a praying mantis (Insecta: Mantodea) of an undescribed genus and species. An investigation of the internal and external morphology, in addition to its collection locality, revealed that this specimen belongs to the Iridopterygidae subfamily Tropidomantinae. Furthermore, the specimen's unique combination of characters justified the creation of a new genus. Geographic distributional records and external morphological character evidence are presented for Cornucollis gen. n. masoalensis sp. n. We provide a dichotomous key of the Tropidomantinae and Nilomantinae genera distributed within Madagascar. High-resolution images, illustrations of morphological characters, natural history information, and measurement data are presented. PMID:26877694

  16. In vitro biological activities of the essential oil from the 'resurrection plant' Myrothamnus moschatus (Baillon) Niedenzu endemic to Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Marcello; Maggi, Filippo; Papa, Fabrizio; Vittori, Sauro; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Lupidi, Giulio; Petrelli, Dezemona; Vitali, Luca A; Ralaibia, Ermenegilde; Rasoanaivo, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The essential oil of the 'resurrection plant' Myrothamnus moschatus (Baillon) Niedenzu endemic to Madagascar, where it is used in traditional medicine, was investigated for the first time for some biological activities. GC-FID and GC-MS analyses revealed trans-pinocarveol (35.6%), pinocarvone (20.0%), ?-selinene (8.5%) and perillyl acetate (6.0%) as the major essential oil constituents. The oil strongly inhibited MDA-MB 231 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cells, with an IC(50) of 15 µg mL(-1), and the growth of Candida albicans, with an inhibition diameter of 18 mm, while its antioxidant activity, measured by DPPH and ABTS assay, proved to be negligible. PMID:22376220

  17. More about the geographical pattern of distribution of the genus Pseudouroplectes Lourenço, 1995 (Scorpiones: Buthidae) from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Wilson R; Wilmé, Lucienne; Waeber, Patrick O

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pseudouroplectes Lourenço, 1995 (Buthidae) remains among the less speciose Malagasy genera and all the known species are extremely rare. A new species is described from the dry forests in the Tsingy formations of the National Park Bemaraha, extending the distribution of the genus further north. Once again, the single holotype specimen was obtained by extraction with the use of Berlese system. With the description of the new species, the distributional pattern of this genus is confirmed for dry forest formations from the south to the middle of the island; however, for the first time the group's distribution overlaps that of another micro-scorpion genus, Microcharmus Lourenço, 1995. The distribution patterns of the humicolous micro-scorpions endemic to Madagascar are considered to further explore the "Neogrosphus rule" as a possible explanation of global species distribution patterns in changing environments. PMID:26751250

  18. Isolation of a non-haemadsorbing, non-cytopathic strain of African swine fever virus in Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzague, M.; Roger, F.; Bastos, A.; Burger, C.; Randriamparany, T.; Smondack, S.; Cruciere, C.

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) suspected clinically in Madagascar (1998-9) was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide sequencing, following virus isolation. No haemadsorption or cytopathic effect could be detected following leukocyte inoculation, but viral growth in cells was confirmed by PCR. Detection of ASF virus genome was carried out by amplification of a highly conserved region coding for the p72 protein. Nucleotide sequencing of the amplicon revealed 99.2% nucleotide identity between the recent Malagasy strains and a virus recovered from the 1994 outbreak in Mozambique (SPEC265). A serological survey performed on 449 sera, revealed that only 5.3% of the sera taken from pigs between 1998 and 1999 were positive. PMID:11467803

  19. Forecasting deforestation and carbon emissions in tropical developing countries facing demographic expansion: a case study in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Vieilledent, Ghislain; Grinand, Clovis; Vaudry, Romuald

    2013-06-01

    Anthropogenic deforestation in tropical countries is responsible for a significant part of global carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere. To plan efficient climate change mitigation programs (such as REDD+, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation), reliable forecasts of deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions are necessary. Although population density has been recognized as a key factor in tropical deforestation, current methods of prediction do not allow the population explosion that is occurring in many tropical developing countries to be taken into account. Here, we propose an innovative approach using novel computational and statistical tools, including R/GRASS scripts and the new phcfM R package, to model the intensity and location of deforestation including the effect of population density. We used the model to forecast anthropogenic deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions in five large study areas in the humid and spiny-dry forests of Madagascar. Using our approach, we were able to demonstrate that the current rapid population growth in Madagascar (+3.39% per year) will significantly increase the intensity of deforestation by 2030 (up to +1.17% per year in densely populated areas). We estimated the carbon dioxide emissions associated with the loss of aboveground biomass to be of 2.24 and 0.26 tons per hectare and per year in the humid and spiny-dry forest, respectively. Our models showed better predictive ability than previous deforestation models (the figure of merit ranged from 10 to 23). We recommend this approach to reduce the uncertainty associated with deforestation forecasts. We also underline the risk of an increase in the speed of deforestation in the short term in tropical developing countries undergoing rapid population expansion. PMID:23789079

  20. An Unexpected Recurrent Transmission of Rift Valley Fever Virus in Cattle in a Temperate and Mountainous Area of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Veronique; Rakotondrafara, Toky; Jourdan, Marion; Heraud, Jean Michel; Andriamanivo, Harena Rasamoelina; Durand, Benoit; Ravaomanana, Julie; Rollin, Pierre E.; Rakotondravao, René

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is an acute, zoonotic viral disease of domestic ruminants, caused by a phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae family). A large outbreak occurred in Madagascar in 2008–2009. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the point prevalence of antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV) in cattle in the Anjozorobe district, located in the wet and temperate highland region of Madagascar and yet heavily affected by the disease, and analyse environmental and trade factors potentially linked to RVFV transmission. A serological study was performed in 2009 in 894 bovines. For each bovine, the following variables were recorded: age, location of the night pen, minimum distance from the pen to the nearest water point and the forest, nearest water point type, and herd replacement practices. The serological data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. The overall anti-RVFV IgG seroprevalence rate was 28% [CI95% 25–31]. Age was statistically linked to prevalence (p = 10−4), being consistent with a recurrent RVFV circulation. Distance from the night pen to the nearest water point was a protective factor (p = 5.10−3), which would be compatible with a substantial part of the virus transmission being carried out by nocturnal mosquito vectors. However, water point type did not influence the risk of infection: several mosquito species are probably involved. Cattle belonging to owners who purchase animals to renew the herd were significantly more likely to have seroconverted than others (p = 0.04): cattle trade may contribute to the introduction of the virus in this area. The minimum distance of the night pen to the forest was not linked to the prevalence. This is the first evidence of a recurrent transmission of RVFV in such an ecosystem that associates a wet, temperate climate, high altitude, paddy fields, and vicinity to a dense rain forest. Persistence mechanisms need to be further investigated. PMID:22206026

  1. Tick (Amblyomma chabaudi) infestation of endemic tortoises in southwest Madagascar and investigation of tick-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Julian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U; Silaghi, Cornelia; Krüger, Andreas; Pothmann, Daniela; Yedidya Ratovonamana, R; Veit, Alexandra; Keller, Christian; Poppert, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the role of endemic ticks as vectors for bacterial and protozoan pathogens for animals and humans in Madagascar and their interaction in anthropogenic habitats where humans, their livestock and native Malagasy species (vectors and hosts) come into more frequent contact than in natural forest ecosystems. The aims of the study were (1) to test whether habitat degradation is associated with increased infestation of tortoises by ticks and (2) to investigate whether ticks carried Babesia, Borrelia or Rickettsia species that might be pathogenic for humans and livestock. We studied hard ticks of two endemic Malagasy tortoises, Astrochelys radiata and Pyxis arachnoides in March and April 2013 in southwest Madagascar. Two tortoise habitats were compared, the National Park of Tsimanampetsotsa and the adjacent degraded pasture and agricultural land at the end of the wet season. Ticks were screened for protozoan and bacterial pathogens via PCR on DNA isolated from ticks using genus-specific primers. Only one out of 42 A. radiata collected from both habitats had ticks. The low prevalence did not allow further analyses of the effect of habitat degradation. Forty-two P. arachnoides were found in the anthropogenic habitat and 36 individuals in the national park. Tick infestation rates of P. arachnoides differed significantly between the two study sites. Tortoises inside the park had lower tick prevalence than outside (8 of 36 (22%) versus 32 of 42 individuals (76%)) and infected animals tended to have fewer ticks inside than outside the park. All ticks collected in both habitats were adults of the ixodid tick Amblyomma chabaudi, which is supposed to be a host-specific tick of P. arachnoides. Screening for Borrelia sp. and Babesia sp. was negative in all ticks. But all A. chabaudi ticks were infected with Rickettsia africae, known to cause spotted fever in humans. Thus, habitat degradation seems to be linked to higher infestation of tortoises with ticks with possible consequences for humans and their livestock. PMID:26724898

  2. A new leaf-tailed gecko of the Uroplatus ebenaui group (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Madagascar's central eastern rainforests.

    PubMed

    Ratsoavina, Fanomezana Mihaja; Ranjanaharisoa, Fiadanantsoa Andrianja; Glaw, Frank; Raselimanana, Achille P; Miralles, Aurélien; Vences, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new leaf-tailed gecko species of the Uroplatus ebenaui group from the eastern central rainforests of Madagascar, which had previously been considered as a confirmed candidate species. Our description of Uroplatus fiera sp. nov. relies on integrating evidence from molecular and morphological characters and is based on newly collected material from two localities. A phylogenetic analysis based on multiple mitochondrial DNA fragments places the new species as sister to a lineage of uncertain status (Uroplatus ebenaui [Ca8]), and the clade consisting of these two lineages is sister to a further undescribed candidate species (U. ebenaui [Ca1]). This entire clade is sister to U. phantasticus plus another candidate species. The new species differs from these close relatives, and all other congenerics, by strong differences in DNA sequences of mitochondrial genes (>8.5% uncorrected p-distance in 16S rDNA to all nominal species of the genus) and lacks shared alleles with any of the nominal species in the nuclear CMOS gene. From its closest relatives the new species further differs in its much smaller tail size (relative to U. phantasticus), and a narrower tail, fewer supralabials, and more toe lamellae (relative to U. ebenaui [Ca1]). Morphologically the new species is most similar to U. ebenaui but differs in its larger body size and unpigmented oral mucosa. Given its distribution in central eastern Madagascar, with records from near Fierenana and Ambatovy, its range overlaps with that of U. phantasticus. Based on examination of the U. phantasticus holotype, we confirm that this latter has a blackish pigmented oral mucosa as do those specimens typically attributed to this nomen, thereby confirming its distinctness from U. fiera sp. nov., in which the mucosa is unpigmented. PMID:26623762

  3. Rivaling the World's Smallest Reptiles: Discovery of Miniaturized and Microendemic New Species of Leaf Chameleons (Brookesia) from Northern Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Glaw, Frank; Köhler, Jörn; Townsend, Ted M.; Vences, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background One clade of Malagasy leaf chameleons, the Brookesia minima group, is known to contain species that rank among the smallest amniotes in the world. We report on a previously unrecognized radiation of these miniaturized lizards comprising four new species described herein. Methodology/Principal Findings The newly discovered species appear to be restricted to single, mostly karstic, localities in extreme northern Madagascar: Brookesia confidens sp. n. from Ankarana, B. desperata sp. n. from Forêt d'Ambre, B. micra sp. n. from the islet Nosy Hara, and B. tristis sp. n. from Montagne des Français. Molecular phylogenetic analyses based on one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes of all nominal species in the B. minima group congruently support that the four new species, together with B. tuberculata from Montagne d'Ambre in northern Madagascar, form a strongly supported clade. This suggests that these species have diversified in geographical proximity in this small area. All species of the B. minima group, including the four newly described ones, are characterized by very deep genetic divergences of 18–32% in the ND2 gene and >6% in the 16S rRNA gene. Despite superficial similarities among all species of this group, their status as separate evolutionary lineages is also supported by moderate to strong differences in external morphology, and by clear differences in hemipenis structure. Conclusion/Significance The newly discovered dwarf chameleon species represent striking cases of miniaturization and microendemism and suggest the possibility of a range size-body size relationship in Malagasy reptiles. The newly described Brookesia micra reaches a maximum snout-vent length in males of 16 mm, and its total length in both sexes is less than 30 mm, ranking it among the smallest amniote vertebrates in the world. With a distribution limited to a very small islet, this species may represent an extreme case of island dwarfism. PMID:22348069

  4. Forecasting deforestation and carbon emissions in tropical developing countries facing demographic expansion: a case study in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Vieilledent, Ghislain; Grinand, Clovis; Vaudry, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic deforestation in tropical countries is responsible for a significant part of global carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere. To plan efficient climate change mitigation programs (such as REDD+, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation), reliable forecasts of deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions are necessary. Although population density has been recognized as a key factor in tropical deforestation, current methods of prediction do not allow the population explosion that is occurring in many tropical developing countries to be taken into account. Here, we propose an innovative approach using novel computational and statistical tools, including R/GRASS scripts and the new phcfM R package, to model the intensity and location of deforestation including the effect of population density. We used the model to forecast anthropogenic deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions in five large study areas in the humid and spiny-dry forests of Madagascar. Using our approach, we were able to demonstrate that the current rapid population growth in Madagascar (+3.39% per year) will significantly increase the intensity of deforestation by 2030 (up to +1.17% per year in densely populated areas). We estimated the carbon dioxide emissions associated with the loss of aboveground biomass to be of 2.24 and 0.26 tons per hectare and per year in the humid and spiny-dry forest, respectively. Our models showed better predictive ability than previous deforestation models (the figure of merit ranged from 10 to 23). We recommend this approach to reduce the uncertainty associated with deforestation forecasts. We also underline the risk of an increase in the speed of deforestation in the short term in tropical developing countries undergoing rapid population expansion. PMID:23789079

  5. Petrogenesis and Nd-, Pb-, Sr-isotope geochemistry of the Cenozoic olivine melilitites and olivine nephelinites (“ankaratrites”) in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melluso, Leone; le Roex, Anton P.; Morra, Vincenzo

    2011-12-01

    The Cenozoic ankaratrites of the Alaotra, Takarindoha-Vatomandry and Votovorona (NE Ankaratra) volcanic fields, Madagascar, range from olivine (± monticellite) melilitites, through olivine-melilite nephelinites to olivine (± leucite) nephelinites. The rocks show significant compositional ranges in their coexisting magmatic minerals (olivine-group minerals, melilite, clinopyroxene, nepheline, leucite, Ba-phlogopite, perovskite, ilmenite, spinels, apatite), and evidence of distinct parental magmas, often in different facies of the same vent. Primitive compositions (high Mg#, Cr and Ni concentrations) are found in each volcanic district, and a few lavas contain mantle xenoliths or xenocrysts. The rocks show enrichment in the most strongly incompatible elements (e.g., Ba and Nb up to 200 times primitive mantle, La/Ybn = 24 to 40), with troughs at K and smooth, decreasing patterns towards the least incompatible elements in mantle-normalized diagrams. The Nd-Pb-Sr isotope geochemistry indicates a marked heterogeneity of the mantle sources of the various districts (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 18.68-18.77, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.704011-0.704207 for the Alaotra-Votovorona districts; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.04-19.14, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.703544-0.704017 for the Takarindoha-Vatomandry districts), with significant differences to other Cenozoic mafic volcanic rocks of northern Madagascar. The genesis of the Madagascan ankaratrites is related to rifting events which triggered low-degree partial melting of a garnet peridotite enriched in dolomite and incompatible-element-rich phases, in the lowermost lithosphere. Despite marked geochemical similarities, the source of the Madagascan melilitites bears no isotopic similarity to the HIMU-related sources of melilitites of eastern and southern Africa.

  6. Stratigraphic Analysis of Upper Cretaceous Rocks in the Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar: Implications for Ancient and Modern Faunas.

    PubMed

    Rogers; Hartman; Krause

    2000-05-01

    Upper Cretaceous strata of the Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar, yield some of the most significant and exquisitely preserved vertebrate fossils known from Gondwana. The sedimentology of these strata and their stratigraphic relations have been the focus of renewed geological investigations during the course of five expeditions since 1993. We here designate stratotypes and formalize the terrestrial Maevarano Formation, with three new members (Masorobe, Anembalemba, Miadana), and the overlying marine Berivotra Formation. The Maevarano Formation accumulated on a broad, semiarid alluvial plain bounded to the southeast by crystalline highlands and to the northwest by the Mozambique Channel. The Berivotra Formation was deposited in an open marine setting that evolved from a clastic- to a carbonate-dominated shelf, resulting in deposition of the overlying Betsiboka limestone of Danian age. New stratigraphic data clearly indicate that the Maevarano Formation correlates, at least in part, with the Maastrichtian Berivotra Formation, and this in turn indicates that the most fossiliferous portions of the Maevarano Formation are Maastrichtian in age, rather than Campanian as previously reported. This revised age for the Maevarano vertebrate assemblage indicates that it is approximately contemporaneous with the vertebrate fauna recovered from the Deccan basalt volcano-sedimentary sequence of India. The comparable age of these two faunas is significant because the faunas appear to be more similar to one another than either is to those from any other major Gondwanan landmass. The revised age of the Maevarano Formation, when considered in the light of our recent fossil discoveries, further indicates that the ancestral stocks of Madagascar's overwhelmingly endemic modern vertebrate fauna arrived on the island in post-Mesozoic times. The basal stocks of the modern vertebrate fauna are conspicuously absent in the Maevarano Formation. Finally, the revised age of the Maevarano Formation serves to expand our global perspective on the K/T event by clarifying the age of a diverse, and arguably the best preserved, sample of Gondwanan vertebrates from the terminal Cretaceous. PMID:10769157

  7. Predicting Plant Diversity Patterns in Madagascar: Understanding the Effects of Climate and Land Cover Change in a Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kerry A.; Parks, Katherine E.; Bethell, Colin A.; Johnson, Steig E.; Mulligan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Climate and land cover change are driving a major reorganization of terrestrial biotic communities in tropical ecosystems. In an effort to understand how biodiversity patterns in the tropics will respond to individual and combined effects of these two drivers of environmental change, we use species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated for recent climate and land cover variables and projected to future scenarios to predict changes in diversity patterns in Madagascar. We collected occurrence records for 828 plant genera and 2186 plant species. We developed three scenarios, (i.e., climate only, land cover only and combined climate-land cover) based on recent and future climate and land cover variables. We used this modelling framework to investigate how the impacts of changes to climate and land cover influenced biodiversity across ecoregions and elevation bands. There were large-scale climate- and land cover-driven changes in plant biodiversity across Madagascar, including both losses and gains in diversity. The sharpest declines in biodiversity were projected for the eastern escarpment and high elevation ecosystems. Sharp declines in diversity were driven by the combined climate-land cover scenarios; however, there were subtle, region-specific differences in model outputs for each scenario, where certain regions experienced relatively higher species loss under climate or land cover only models. We strongly caution that predicted future gains in plant diversity will depend on the development and maintenance of dispersal pathways that connect current and future suitable habitats. The forecast for Madagascar’s plant diversity in the face of future environmental change is worrying: regional diversity will continue to decrease in response to the combined effects of climate and land cover change, with habitats such as ericoid thickets and eastern lowland and sub-humid forests particularly vulnerable into the future. PMID:25856241

  8. Assessing Water Management of Mining Effluent Using Temporal and Spatial Hydrologic Analyses: The Case of QIT Madagascar Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Associated with the commencement of any water-intensive mining operation is the formation of a set of policies, standards, and sampling protocols that guide the management of all water resources connected to the mining facility, surrounding environment, and affected communities. This study explores the interface between corporate water management and hydrologic methods by evaluating changes in water quality over the course of the mining cycle at QIT Madagascar Minerals (QMM) in Tolagnaro, Madagascar. Sampling and lab research of processed water were conducted following established QMM procedures and then analyzed in conjunction with the complete QMM water quality database. Water quality was analyzed spatially to exhibit how processed water changes as it moves throughout the mining cycle before release into the environment. Graphical representation of the spatial changes in various parameters exhibit deterioration in water quality relative to the source, improvement in quality before being released as effluent, and natural remediation by wetlands before discharge into the Mandromondromotra River. In addition, water quality parameters were evaluated temporally, using data supplied by QMM's Service de l'Eau et Déchets. Yearly and monthly comparisons of hydrological parameters highlight data gaps, the effects of seasonality, and the evolution of water quality monitoring at QMM. Technical evaluation of processed water as it flows through the mining system provides insight into how water monitoring and management can best be adapted at the corporate level to prevent negative impacts on the environment. Water quality data for various parameters from April 2013 at each of the sampling locations. The graphs highlight spatial changes in parameters as water moves from the sources (WD90, Paddock 3), to sites on the mine (500M, Basmin, SCC2), to release points (WMC703, WMC803), to discharge points into the MMM River.

  9. An unexpected recurrent transmission of Rift Valley fever virus in cattle in a temperate and mountainous area of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Veronique; Rakotondrafara, Toky; Jourdan, Marion; Heraud, Jean Michel; Andriamanivo, Harena Rasamoelina; Durand, Benoit; Ravaomanana, Julie; Rollin, Pierre E; Rakotondravao, René

    2011-12-01

    Rift Valley fever is an acute, zoonotic viral disease of domestic ruminants, caused by a phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae family). A large outbreak occurred in Madagascar in 2008-2009. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the point prevalence of antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV) in cattle in the Anjozorobe district, located in the wet and temperate highland region of Madagascar and yet heavily affected by the disease, and analyse environmental and trade factors potentially linked to RVFV transmission. A serological study was performed in 2009 in 894 bovines. For each bovine, the following variables were recorded: age, location of the night pen, minimum distance from the pen to the nearest water point and the forest, nearest water point type, and herd replacement practices. The serological data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. The overall anti-RVFV IgG seroprevalence rate was 28% [CI95% 25-31]. Age was statistically linked to prevalence (p = 10(-4)), being consistent with a recurrent RVFV circulation. Distance from the night pen to the nearest water point was a protective factor (p = 5.10(-3)), which would be compatible with a substantial part of the virus transmission being carried out by nocturnal mosquito vectors. However, water point type did not influence the risk of infection: several mosquito species are probably involved. Cattle belonging to owners who purchase animals to renew the herd were significantly more likely to have seroconverted than others (p = 0.04): cattle trade may contribute to the introduction of the virus in this area. The minimum distance of the night pen to the forest was not linked to the prevalence. This is the first evidence of a recurrent transmission of RVFV in such an ecosystem that associates a wet, temperate climate, high altitude, paddy fields, and vicinity to a dense rain forest. Persistence mechanisms need to be further investigated. PMID:22206026

  10. Late Quaternary history of the Vakinankaratra volcanic field (central Madagascar): insights from luminescence dating of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufer, Daniel; Preusser, Frank; Schreurs, Guido; Gnos, Edwin; Berger, Alfons

    2014-05-01

    The Quaternary Vakinankaratra volcanic field in the central Madagascar highlands consists of scoria cones, lava flows, tuff rings, and maars. These volcanic landforms are the result of processes triggered by intracontinental rifting and overlie Precambrian basement or Neogene volcanic rocks. Infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating was applied to 13 samples taken from phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in the Antsirabe-Betafo region with the aim of constraining the chronology of the volcanic activity. Establishing such a chronology is important for evaluating volcanic hazards in this densely populated area. Stratigraphic correlations of eruption deposits and IRSL ages suggest at least five phreatomagmatic eruption events in Late Pleistocene times. In the Lake Andraikiba region, two such eruption layers can be clearly distinguished. The older one yields ages between 109 ± 15 and 90 ± 11 ka and is possibly related to an eruption at the Amboniloha volcanic complex to the north. The younger one gives ages between 58 ± 4 and 47 ± 7 ka and is clearly related to the phreatomagmatic eruption that formed Lake Andraikiba. IRSL ages of a similar eruption deposit directly overlying basement laterite in the vicinity of the Fizinana and Ampasamihaiky volcanic complexes yield coherent ages of 68 ± 7 and 65 ± 8 ka. These ages provide the upper age limit for the subsequently developed Iavoko, Antsifotra, and Fizinana scoria cones and their associated lava flows. Two phreatomagmatic deposits, identified near Lake Tritrivakely, yield the youngest IRSL ages in the region, with respective ages of 32 ± 3 and 19 ± 2 ka. The reported K-feldspar IRSL ages are the first recorded numerical ages of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in Madagascar, and our results confirm the huge potential of this dating approach for reconstructing the volcanic activity of Late Pleistocene to Holocene volcanic provinces.

  11. Microstructural evidences of garnet plasticity in the continental crust. New example from south Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamoud, Karim; Martelat, Jean-Emmanuel; Cordier, Patrick; Schulmann, Karel; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc

    2010-05-01

    Garnet mechanical behaviour is of great importance to understand the rheological evolution of rocks within the mantle and the lower crust. Well-constrained natural examples of plastically deformed garnets are scarce; consequently their identification and the physical parameters controlling their occurrence are still debated. In southern Madagascar, a granulitic metamorphic event has developed during a late Panafrican - Cambrian, east-west shortening (570 Ma). This has led to the development of vertical transpressive shear zones. Within these zones, we identified variations in garnet microstructure following the deformation sequence. In order to understand this evolution, we carried out a thorough microstructural description of samples using the following techniques: optical microscopy and SEM imaging, EBSD technique (localized lattice-preferred orientation), TEM for dislocation density, EMP for chemical analyses, as well as crystal size distribution, statistic grain boundary and shapes analyses (Lexa et al., 2005). The hand samples were quartzites or two-feldspars quartzo- feldsphatic rocks bearing 10 modal percent of garnet. As strain increases, various garnet textures were observed: Type 1) millimetre-sized rounded garnets bearing two types of inclusions, i.e. elongated quartz ribbons and well oriented sillimanite parallel to the lineation; Type 2) elliptic very elongated and lobed garnets (1 to 8 aspect ratio); Type 3) smaller elongated pinch and swell garnets (1 to 3 aspect ratio); and finally Type 4) rounded small garnets (300 microns in diameter). Type 1 textures are due to multiple nucleation garnets and coalescence controlled by aluminous aggregates (biotite and sillimanite). As strain increases, these large skeleton garnets start to re-crystallise preferentially at the tip of lenticular quartz inclusions, giving Type 2 very elongated garnets with unique CPO. The latter then continues to re-crystallise by sub-grain rotation as underlined by the CPO in situ measurements of new re-orientated grains (Type 3). In the type 4, few large garnets remain and only smaller-sized rounded garnets are left. In these highly deformed rocks, fine sillimanite needles are locally preserved and tilted with respect to the main foliation. All garnets from Type 2 to 4 textures are chemically homogeneous. Data from garnets, quartz, and feldspars are compared for each microstructural type and progressive deformation. The observed microstructures are in accordance with garnet ductility coeval with the deformation of quartz K-feldspar and plagioclase and showing mixing of all phases (random distribution) as well as constant grain size (average diameter 200 microns). Our analyses show that under the high-temperature and dry conditions (850°C) all phases are mechanically active. This indicates convergence of strength minerals marked by contrasting (laboratory derived) rheologies. Lexa, O., Štípská, P., Schulmann, K., Baratoux, L., Kröner, A., 2005. Contrasting textural record of two distinct metamorphic events of similar P-T conditions and different durations. Journal of Metamorphic Geology 23. 649-666. http://petrol.natur.cuni.cz/~ondro/polylx:home

  12. Preliminary study of a radiological survey in an abandoned uranium mining area in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Rabesiranana; M, Rasolonirina; F, Solonjara A.; Andriambololona., Raoelina; L, Mabit

    2010-05-01

    The region of Vinaninkarena located in central Madagascar (47°02'40"E, 19°57'17"S), is known to be a high natural radioactive area. Uranium ore was extracted in this region during the 1950s and the early 1960s. In the mid-1960s, mining activities were stopped and the site abandoned. In the meantime, the region, which used to be without any inhabitants, has recently been occupied by new settlers with presumed increase in exposure of the local population to natural ionizing radiation. In order to assess radiological risk, a survey to assess the soil natural radioactivity background was conducted during the year 2004. This study was implemented in the frame of the FADES Project SP99v1b_21 entitled: Assessment of the environmental pollution by multidisciplinary approach, and the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Cooperation Project MAG 7002 entitled: Effects of air and water pollution on human health. Global Positioning System (GPS) was used to determine the geographical coordinates of the top soil samples (0-15cm) collected. The sampling was performed using a multi integrated scale approach to estimate the spatial variability of the parameters under investigation (U, Th and K) using geo-statistical approach. A total of 205 soil samples was collected in the study site (16 km2). After humidity correction, the samples were sealed in 100 cm3 cylindrical air-tight plastic containers and stored for more than 6 months to reach a secular equilibrium between parents and short-lived progeny (226Ra and progeny, 238U and 234Th). Measurements were performed using a high-resolution HPGe Gamma-detector with a 30% relative efficiency and an energy resolution of 1.8 keV at 1332.5 keV, allowing the determination of the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In case of secular equilibrium, a non-gamma-emitting radionuclide activity was deduced from its gamma emitting progeny. This was the case for 238U (from 234Th), 226Ra (from 214Pb and 214Bi) and 232Th (from 228Ac, 212Pb or 208Tl). Furthermore, in order to assess the radiological effect, the kerma rate in the air at 1 m above ground level was calculated for each sampled points using standard activity-kerma rate conversion coefficients for uranium, thorium series and potassium. Geostatistical interpolation tools (e.g. Inverse Distance Weighting power 2 and Ordinary Kriging) were used to optimize the data set mapping. The measured Potassium-40 activity was 333 Bq kg-1 ± 95% (Mean ± Coefficient of Variation), the Uranium activity was 195 Bq kg-1 ± 53% and the Thorium activity was 139 Bq kg-1 ± 29%. The world average concentrations are reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as 400 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 35 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 30 Bq kg-1 for 232Th. The results show that generally, 40K concentrations in soils of the area are slightly lower than the world average value, whereas uranium and thorium series activities are noticeably higher. On average the kerma rate reaches 143 nGy h-1 with a standard deviation of 41 nGy h-1 and a coefficient of variation of 28%. The information obtained was mapped and the dose exposition was also assessed for the local settlers. Key-words: soil contamination, environmental radioactivity, radioecology, dose exposure.

  13. Nouvelles données pétrographiques et structurales sur le magmatisme du Sud du bassin de Morondava (Sud-Ouest de Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioan, Pierre; Rasendrasoa, Josephine; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Rasamimanana, Georges

    1996-05-01

    New petrological and geochemical data are presented on basic igneous rocks from the south of the Morondova basin located in the southwestern part of Madagascar. The structural setting is well defined and, with the aid of a schematic map, the spatial relationships between the magmatic centres and major faults can be deduced from seismic data. On the other hand, new petrographic and geochemical data enable the different types of basaltic magmatism manifested in this area to be distinguished. It appears that tholeiitic magmatism evolved towards transitional magmatism from the south to the north of the Morondava basin. This geochemical evolution of basaltic magmatism can be linked to the initiation of rifting between Madagascar and Africa along the Mozambique channel and the length of the Davie ridge associated with the opening of the Indian ocean. These observations, together with structural data and recently obtained geochronological data, contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism and evolution of Madagascan rifting.

  14. Mountain Refugia Play a Role in Soil Arthropod Speciation on Madagascar: A Case Study of the Endemic Giant Fire-Millipede Genus Aphistogoniulus

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Thomas; Raupach, Michael J.; Decker, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate the speciation mechanisms prevalent within hotspots of biodiversity, and the evolutionary processes behind the rise of their species-rich and endemic biota, we investigated the phylogeny of the giant fire-millipede genus Aphistogoniulus Silvestri, 1897, a Malagasy endemic. This study is the first comprehensive (molecular and morphological) phylogenetic study focusing on millipede (class Diplopoda) speciation on Madagascar. The morphological analysis is based on 35 morphological characters and incorporates ten described as well as two newly described species (A. rubrodorsalis n. sp. and A. jeekeli n. sp.) of Aphistogoniulus. The molecular analysis is based on both mitochondrial (COI and 16S), and nuclear genes (complete 18S rDNA), together comprised of 3031 base pairs, which were successfully sequenced for 31 individual specimens and eight species of Aphistogoniulus. In addition to the null-model (speciation by distance), two diversification models, mountain refugia and ecotone shift, were discovered to play a role in the speciation of soil arthropods on Madagascar. Mountain refugia were important in the speciation of the A. cowani clade, with three species occurring in the Andringitra and Ranomafana Mountains in the southeast (A. cowani), the Ambohijanahary and Ambohitantely Mountains in the mid-west (A. sanguineus), and the Marojejy Mountain in the northeast (A. rubrodorsalis n. sp.). An ecotone shift from the eastern rainforest to the unique subarid spiny forest of Mahavelo was discovered in the A. vampyrus - A. aridus species-pair. In the monophyletic A. diabolicus clade, evidence for divergent evolution of sexual morphology was detected: species with greatly enlarged gonopods are sister-taxa to species with normal sized gonopods. Among the large-bodied Spirobolida genera of Madagascar, Colossobolus and Sanguinobolus were found to be close sister-genera to Aphistogoniulus. Forest destruction has caused forest corridors between populations to disappear, which might limit the possible resolution of biogeographic analyses on Madagascar. PMID:22162998

  15. A new species of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) from the Sahamalaza Peninsula, northwest Madagascar, with acoustic monitoring of its nocturnal calling activity

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Samuel G.; Andreone, Franco; Crottini, Angelica; Holderied, Marc W.; Rakotozafy, Lovasoa Sylviane; Schwitzer, Christoph; Rosa, Gonçalo M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of treefrog of the Boophis rappiodes group (Anura, Mantellidae) is described from the Sahamalaza – Iles Radama National Park in northwest Madagascar. This new species is green in colour with bright red speckling across its head and dorsum; similar in morphology to other species of this group including: B. bottae, B. rappiodes, B. erythrodactylus and B. tasymena. The new species can be distinguished by its advertisement call and by a genetic divergence of more than 4.9% in the analysed mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene fragment. Its call consists of two note types: a trill and a click; although similar sounding to B. bottae, the trill note of the new species has a faster pulse rate while the click note is predominantly two-pulsed rather than three. All individuals were detected from the banks of two streams in Ankarafa Forest. The new species represents the only member of the B. rappiodes group endemic to Madagascar’s western coast, with the majority of other members known from the eastern rainforest belt. Despite its conspicuous call, it has not been detected from other surveys of northwest Madagascar and it is likely to be a local endemic to the peninsula. The ranges of two other amphibian species also appear restricted to Sahamalaza, and so the area seems to support a high level of endemicity. Although occurring inside a National Park, this species is highly threatened by the continuing decline in the quality and extent of its habitat. Due to these threats it is proposed that this species should be classified as Critically Endangered according to the IUCN Red List criteria. PMID:25152689

  16. High detection rate of Rickettsia africae in Amblyomma variegatum but low prevalence of anti-rickettsial antibodies in healthy pregnant women in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christian; Krüger, Andreas; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael; Rakotondrainiarivelo, Jean Philibert; Razafindrabe, Tsiry; Derschum, Henri; Silaghi, Cornelia; Pothmann, Daniela; Veit, Alexandra; Hogan, Benedikt; May, Jürgen; Girmann, Mirko; Kramme, Stefanie; Fleischer, Bernhard; Poppert, Sven

    2016-02-01

    Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsioses are emerging infectious diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Madagascar, the endemicity of tick-borne rickettsiae and their vectors has been incompletely studied. The first part of the present study was conducted in 2011 and 2012 to identify potential anthropophilic tick vectors for SFG rickettsiae on cattle from seven Malagasy regions, and to detect and characterize rickettsiae in these ticks. Amblyomma variegatum was the only anthropophilic tick species found on 262 cattle. Using a novel ompB-specific qPCR, screening for rickettsial DNA was performed on 111 A. variegatum ticks. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 96 of 111 ticks studied (86.5%). Rickettsia africae was identified as the only infecting rickettsia using phylogenetic analysis of ompA and ompB gene sequences and three variable intergenic spacers from 11 ticks. The second part of the study was a cross-sectional survey for antibodies against SFG rickettsiae in plasma samples taken from healthy, pregnant women at six locations in Madagascar, two at sea level and four between 450 and 1300m altitude. An indirect fluorescent antibody test with Rickettsia conorii as surrogate SFG rickettsial antigen was used. We found R. conorii-seropositives at all altitudes with prevalences between 0.5% and 3.1%. Our results suggest that A. variegatum ticks highly infected with R. africae are the most prevalent cattle-associated tick vectors for SFG rickettsiosis in Madagascar. Transmission of SFG rickettsiosis to humans occurs at different altitudes in Madagascar and should be considered as a relevant cause of febrile diseases. PMID:26318262

  17. Description of a new species of the Miniopterus aelleni group (Chiroptera: Miniopteridae) from upland areas of central and northern Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Steven M; Ramasindrazana, Beza

    2015-01-01

    Recent molecular genetic work, combined with morphological comparisons, on Malagasy members of the bat genus Miniopterus (Family Miniopteridae), has uncovered a number of cryptic species. Based on recently collected specimens and associated tissues, we examine patterns of variation in M. aelleni, the holotype of which comes from Ankarana in northern Madagascar. Using molecular genetic (mitochondrial cytochrome b) and morphological characters we describe a new species, M. ambohitrensis sp. nov. In northern Madagascar, M. ambohitrensis and M. aelleni are allopatric, but occur in relatively close geographical contact (approximately 40 km direct line distance) with M. ambohitrensis found at Montagne d'Ambre in montane humid forest and M. aelleni sensu stricto at Ankarana in dry deciduous forest. Morphologically, this new taxon is differentiated from M. aelleni based on pelage coloration, external measurements, craniodental differences, and tragus shape. Comparisons using 725 bp of cytochrome b found a divergence of 1.1% within M. aelleni sensu stricto, 0.8% within M. ambohitrensis, and 3.3% between these two clades. The two sister species do not demonstrate acoustical differences based on recordings made in a flight cage. Miniopterus ambohitrensis is known from four localities in the northern and central portions of Madagascar, all from montane regions and across an elevational range from about 800 to 1600 m; its calculated "Extent of occurrence" is 15,143 km2. It is possible that this species is at least partially migratory. PMID:25947452

  18. The Fleas of Endemic and Introduced Small Mammals in Central Highland Forests of Madagascar: Faunistics, Species Diversity, and Absence of Host Specificity.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Steven M; Randrenjarison Andriniaina, H Rico; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude

    2015-09-01

    Data are presented on the flea species of the genera Paractenopsyllus (Ceratophyllidae, Leptopsyllinae) and Synopsyllus (Pulicidae, Xenopsyllinae) obtained from small mammals during two 2014 seasonal surveys at a montane humid forest site (Ambohitantely) in the Central Highlands of Madagascar. The mammal groups included the endemic family Tenrecidae (tenrecs) and subfamily Nesomyinae (rodents) and two introduced families Muridae (rodents) and Soricidae (shrews); no fleas were recovered from the latter family. The surveys were conducted at the end of the wet and dry seasons with 288 individual small mammals captured, including 12 endemic and four introduced species. These animals yielded 344 fleas, representing nine species endemic to Madagascar; no introduced species was collected. Some seasonal variation was found in the number of trapped small mammals, but no marked difference was found in species richness. For flea species represented by sufficient samples, no parasite-host specificity was found, and there is evidence for considerable lateral exchange in the local flea fauna between species of tenrecs and the two rodent families (endemic and introduced). The implications of these results are discussed with regards to small mammal species richness and community structure, as well as a possible mechanism for the maintenance of sylvatic cycles of bubonic plague in the montane forests of Madagascar. PMID:26336252

  19. Vertebrate time-tree elucidates the biogeographic pattern of a major biotic change around the K–T boundary in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Crottini, Angelica; Madsen, Ole; Poux, Celine; Strauß, Axel; Vieites, David R.; Vences, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The geographic and temporal origins of Madagascar's biota have long been in the center of debate. We reconstructed a time-tree including nearly all native nonflying and nonmarine vertebrate clades present on the island, from DNA sequences of two single-copy protein-coding nuclear genes (BDNF and RAG1) and a set of congruent time constraints. Reconstructions calculated with autocorrelated or independent substitution rates over clades agreed in placing the origins of the 31 included clades in Cretaceous to Cenozoic times. The two clades with sister groups in South America were the oldest, followed by those of a putative Asian ancestry that were significantly older than the prevalent clades of African ancestry. No colonizations from Asia occurred after the Eocene, suggesting that dispersal and vicariance of Asian/Indian groups were favored over a comparatively short period during, and shortly after, the separation of India and Madagascar. Species richness of clades correlates with their age but those clades that have a large proportion of species diversity in rainforests are significantly more species-rich. This finding suggests an underlying pattern of continuous speciation through time in Madagascar's vertebrates, with accelerated episodes of adaptive diversification in those clades that succeeded radiating into the rainforests. PMID:22431616

  20. Generic delimitations, biogeography and evolution in the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), endemic to Madagascar and the smaller islands of the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Callmander, Martin W; Phillipson, Peter B; Plunkett, Gregory M; Edwards, Molly B; Buerki, Sven

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the most complete generic phylogenetic framework to date for the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), which is endemic to Madagascar and the other smaller islands in the western part of the Indian Ocean. The study is based on plastid and nuclear DNA regions and includes 47 species representing the five currently recognized genera (including all the species occurring in the western Indian Ocean region). Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses supported (i) the monophyly of the tribe, (ii) the monophyly of Phylloctenium, Phyllarthron and Rhodocolea and (iii) the paraphyly of Colea due to the inclusion of species of Ophiocolea. The latter genus was also recovered paraphyletic due to the inclusion of two species of Colea (C. decora and C. labatii). The taxonomic implications of the mutual paraphyly of these two genera are discussed in light of morphological evidence, and it is concluded that the two genera should be merged, and the necessary new nomenclatural combinations are provided. The phylogenetic framework shows Phylloctenium, which is endemic to Madagascar and restricted to dry ecosystems, as basal and sister to the rest of the tribe, suggesting Madagascar to be the centre of origin of this clade. The remaining genera are diversified mostly in humid ecosystems, with evidence of multiple dispersals to the neighboring islands, including at least two to the Comoros, one to Mauritius and one to the Seychelles. Finally, we hypothesize that the ecological success of this tribe might have been triggered by a shift of fruit-dispersal mode from wind to lemur. PMID:26712485

  1. Redescription of 'Polyzonium' malagassum, a new synonym of Rhinotus purpureus (Pocock, 1894), with notes about the occurrence of the order Polyzoniida on Madagascar (Diplopoda).

    PubMed

    Wesener, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Polyzonium malagassum de Saussure & Zehntner, 1902, the only indigenous record of the order Polyzoniida from Madagascar, is redescribed after a study of the type specimens. The only male specimen is selected as the lectotype and illustrated. P. malagassum is discovered to be a synonym of the widespread tropical tramp species Rhinotus purpureus (Pocock, 1894). A mapping of additional locality data of R. pupureus shows that the species is widespread in Malagasy rainforests and montane rainforests, and occurs locally in high densities. Seven potentially indigenous Polyzoniida morphospecies also occur on Madagascar, but these undescribed species are more localized and show a lower abundance than R. purpureus. Brief notes, locality data, and Museum acronyms are given for the undescribed Polyzoniida species, which will hopefully assist future studies on Malagasy representatives of this little-known but biogeographically interesting order. With the discovery of the ubiquitous presence of R. purpureus on Madagascar, the similarity of the defense secretions of South American and of endemic Malagasy poison dart frogs (family Mantellidae) might derive from the fact that both groups prey on and sequester alkaloids from the same species of millipede.  PMID:24869890

  2. Vertebrate time-tree elucidates the biogeographic pattern of a major biotic change around the K-T boundary in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Crottini, Angelica; Madsen, Ole; Poux, Celine; Strauss, Axel; Vieites, David R; Vences, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The geographic and temporal origins of Madagascar's biota have long been in the center of debate. We reconstructed a time-tree including nearly all native nonflying and nonmarine vertebrate clades present on the island, from DNA sequences of two single-copy protein-coding nuclear genes (BDNF and RAG1) and a set of congruent time constraints. Reconstructions calculated with autocorrelated or independent substitution rates over clades agreed in placing the origins of the 31 included clades in Cretaceous to Cenozoic times. The two clades with sister groups in South America were the oldest, followed by those of a putative Asian ancestry that were significantly older than the prevalent clades of African ancestry. No colonizations from Asia occurred after the Eocene, suggesting that dispersal and vicariance of Asian/Indian groups were favored over a comparatively short period during, and shortly after, the separation of India and Madagascar. Species richness of clades correlates with their age but those clades that have a large proportion of species diversity in rainforests are significantly more species-rich. This finding suggests an underlying pattern of continuous speciation through time in Madagascar's vertebrates, with accelerated episodes of adaptive diversification in those clades that succeeded radiating into the rainforests. PMID:22431616

  3. The influence of certain taxonomic and environmental parameters on biomass production and triterpenoid content in the leaves of Centella asiatica (L.) Urb. from Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rahajanirina, Voninavoko; Raoseta, Soaharin'ny Ony Rakotondralambo; Roger, Edmond; Razafindrazaka, Harena; Pirotais, Sarah; Boucher, Marie; Danthu, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    Centella asiatica (Apiaceae family; Talapetraka in Malagasy) is a tropical and subtropical plant with leaves containing glycotriterpenoids (asiaticosides) used in traditional and modern medicine. C. asiatica is collected exclusively in natural stands. It is Madagascar's second most important indigenous plant export. The objective in this study is to provide data which will make it possible to optimize the harvest and thus effectively develop this resource. Two foliar morphotypes were identified: morphotype A with small reniform leaves (leaf area ca. 4.5 cm(2) ), found in the east of Madagascar, and morphotype B with large round leaves (up to 7.5 cm(2) ) found in the west, with sympatric zones in the central part of the island. Morphotype A produces a higher biomass, and is twice as rich in asiaticosides as morphotype B. Significant variations in biomass yield and asiaticoside content are observed depending on the date of collection: higher during the rainy season (December to April) and lower during the dry season (June to August). Inter-annual variations are also observed. Populations located at around 800-1400 m altitude on the eastern side of Madagascar, in a sub-humid climate, appeared to be more productive. These results provide more precise information to the economic sector, which confirms the empirical choices made by collectors. They represent the first elements towards sustainable management of the resource, and maybe even domestication. PMID:22344906

  4. First Isolation and Direct Evidence for the Existence of Large Small-Mammal Reservoirs of Leptospira sp. in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Léon, Albertine; Harstskeerl, Rudy A.; Sertour, Natacha; Ahmed, Ahmed; Raharimanana, Claudine; Ferquel, Elisabeth; Garnier, Martine; Chartier, Loïc; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Rahalison, Lila; Cornet, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis has long been a major public health concern in the southwestern Indian Ocean. However, in Madagascar, only a few, old studies have provided indirect serological evidence of the disease in humans or animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a large animal study focusing on small-mammal populations. Five field trapping surveys were carried out at five sites, from April 2008 to August 2009. Captures consisted of Rattus norvegicus (35.8%), R. rattus (35.1%), Mus musculus (20.5%) and Suncus murinus (8.6%). We used microbiological culture, serodiagnosis tests (MAT) and real-time PCR to assess Leptospira infection. Leptospira carriage was detected by PCR in 91 (33.9%) of the 268 small mammals, by MAT in 17 of the 151 (11.3%) animals for which serum samples were available and by culture in 9 of the 268 animals (3.3%). Rates of infection based on positive PCR results were significantly higher in Moramanga (54%), Toliara (48%) and Mahajanga (47.4%) than in Antsiranana (8.5%) and Toamasina (14%) (p = 0.001). The prevalence of Leptospira carriage was significantly higher in R. norvegicus (48.9%), S. murinus (43.5%) and R. rattus (30.8%) than in M. musculus (9.1%) (p<0.001). The MAT detected antibodies against the serogroups Canicola and Icterohaemorrhagiae. Isolates were characterized by serology, secY sequence-based phylogeny, partial sequencing of rrs, multi-locus VNTR analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The 10 isolates obtained from nine rats were all identified as species L. interrogans serogroup Canicola serovar Kuwait and all had identical partial rrs and secY sequences. Conclusions/Significance We present here the first direct evidence of widespread leptospiral carriage in small mammals in Madagascar. Our results strongly suggest a high level of environmental contamination, consistent with probable transmission of the infection to humans. This first isolation of pathogenic Leptospira strains in this country may significantly improve the detection of specific antibodies in human cases. PMID:21124843

  5. Nonradioactive heteroduplex tracking assay for the detection of minority-variant chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Jonathan J; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin; Ariey, Frédéric; Mwapasa, Victor; Meshnick, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Background Strains of Plasmodium falciparum genetically resistant to chloroquine (CQ) due to the presence of pfcrt 76T appear to have been recently introduced to the island of Madagascar. The prevalence of such resistant genotypes is reported to be low (< 3%) when evaluated by conventional PCR. However, these methods are insensitive to low levels of mutant parasites present in patients with polyclonal infections. Thus, the current estimates may be an under representation of the prevalence of the CQ-resistant P. falciparum isolates on the island. Previously, minority variant chloroquine resistant parasites were described in Malawian patients using an isotopic heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), which can detect pfcrt 76T-bearing P. falciparum minority variants in individual patients that were undetectable by conventional PCR. However, as this assay required a radiolabeled probe, it could not be used in many resource-limited settings. Methods This study describes a digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled chemiluminescent heteroduplex tracking assay (DIG-HTA) to detect pfcrt 76T-bearing minority variant P. falciparum. This assay was compared to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and to the isotopic HTA for detection of genetically CQ-resistant parasites in clinical samples. Results Thirty one clinical P. falciparum isolates (15 primary isolates and 16 recurrent isolates) from 17 Malagasy children treated with CQ for uncomplicated malaria were genotyped for the pfcrt K76T mutation. Two (11.7%) of 17 patients harboured genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains after therapy as detected by HTA. RFLP analysis failed to detect any pfcrt K76T-bearing isolates. Conclusion These findings indicate that genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum are more common than previously thought in Madagascar even though the fitness of the minority variant pfcrt 76T parasites remains unclear. In addition, HTAs for malaria drug resistance alleles are promising tools for the surveillance of anti-malarial resistance. The use of a non-radioactive label allows for the use of HTAs in malaria endemic countries. PMID:19291288

  6. Hydraulique des unités d'interfluves et de bas-fond tourbeux: un exemple en zone de socle altéré (Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillot, J. C.; Dussarrat, B.

    1992-07-01

    The hydrodynamics of the groundwater system of the upland granito-gneissic plateau of Madagascar is governed by the structure of the underlying aquifer. In the alteritic interfluves, the aquifer has two layers; the peat aquifer is multilayered. Groundwater levels and spring discharges observed over 3 successive years distinguish between two different types of hydraulic behaviour. (1) Under the interfluves, unconfined conditions are found in allochtonous weathered material, and semi-confined conditions in the autochtonous weathered basement. These two systems are separated by a semi-permeable clay layer. The first system responds rapidly to rainfall (approximately 15 days) whereas the second system responds more slowly (approximately 3 months). This leads to a vertical flux between the two aquifers, the direction of which depends on the season; at the beginning of the wet season the flux is downwards, but during the later part of the season the direction reverses. (2) In the low-lying regions, where sequences are superimposed, the direction of the vertical flow changes several times over a year. At the beginning of the wet season the flux is downwards, it reverses at the end of the season. A downwards flux is then observed towards the second part of the dry season. Such behaviour is only observed in the lowest third of the catchment where permeable silts take the place of less permeable peat. This pattern of fluxes suggests a close relationship between surface water and groundwater regimes, and has a major influence on the individual water balances of the two systems.

  7. [Resurgence of the plague in the Ikongo district of Madagascar in 1998. 1. Epidemiological aspects in the human population].

    PubMed

    Migliani, R; Ratsitorahina, M; Rahalison, L; Rakotoarivony, I; Duchemin, J B; Duplantier, J M; Rakotonomenjanahary, J; Chanteau, S

    2001-05-01

    Between the 20th October and the 18th November 1998, an outbreak of bubonic plague was declared in a hamlet in the Ikongo district of Madagascar. We conducted an epidemiological survey because of the re-emergence of the disease in this area (the last cases had been notified in 1965) and because of the low altitude compared to the classical Malagasy foci. The outbreak had been preceded by an important rat epizootics during September. A total of 21 cases were registered with an attack rate of 16.7% (21/126) and a lethality rate of 33% (7/21). The disease was more prevalent in males (66% of cases) and children aged < 15 years, as observed in general throughout the country. The anti-F1 seroprevalence among the contact population was 13.5% (13/96), probably attributable to subclinical infection by Yersinia pestis. No rodent was trapped during the survey, but an endemic hedgehog (Tenrec ecaudatus) was highly seropositive, suggesting a recent transmission of the plague bacillus among this species. The small mammals and vectors possibly involved in these new foci were investigated in May 1999. PMID:11475028

  8. The impacts of logging on the microhabitats used by two species of couas in the western forest of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Chouteau, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    Habitat structure is important to consider in all ecological studies considering the relationships between animals and their environment. Habitat structure can be studied at different scales, from landscape to microhabitat. I studied here the response of two endemic terrestrial birds living in the dry forest of Madagascar. These birds belong to the genus Coua. The study is made at the microhabitat scale in a gallery forest, which has been logged selectively in order to limit the degradation of the forest. Selective logging is promoted to be respectful of the environment by allowing us to exploit the forest without destroying it and the wildlife encountered here. At the microhabitat scale, I underline that selective logging does not affect the Coquerel's coua, which can exploit new microhabitats and increase its density. On the other hand, the giant coua was affected by the restriction of optimal microhabitats for foraging. This species could be adapted to the new habitat by modifying its favourite foraging sites, but by decreasing also the population density. This species was affected by forest degradation, even considered as not destroying. At last, I considered how Coquerel's coua could be used as umbrella species for the endangered mesite. PMID:15656358

  9. How reliable are surveys of client satisfaction with healthcare services? Evidence from matched facility and household data in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Glick, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Client satisfaction surveys in developing countries are increasingly being promoted as a means of understanding healthcare service quality and the demand for these services. However, concerns have been raised about the reliability of responses in such surveys: for example, 'courtesy bias' may lead clients, especially if interviewed upon exiting clinics, to provide misleadingly favorable responses. This study investigates this and other issues using unusual data from Madagascar in which identical questions about satisfaction with local health care centers were asked in user exit surveys and in a population-based household survey, the latter being less contaminated by courtesy bias as well as changes in provider behavior in response to being observed. The findings suggest that reported satisfaction in exit surveys is biased strongly upward for subjective questions regarding (for example) treatment by staff and consultation quality, but not for relatively objective questions about facility condition and supplies. The surveys do provide useful information on the determinants of consumer satisfaction with various dimensions of provider quality. Still, to obtain reliable estimates of consumer perceptions of health service quality, household-based sampling is strongly preferred. PMID:19027216

  10. Biomedical evaluation of free-ranging red ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra) within the Masoala National Park, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Christopher J; Junge, Randall E; Louis, Edward E

    2008-03-01

    Complete health assessments were performed on 22 adult red ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra), comprising nine males and 13 females, found within the Masoala National Park in northeast Madagascar. Each animal was anesthetized using tiletamine and zolazepam and underwent a thorough physical examination, including measurement of its weight and vital signs; blood collection for hematology, plasma total protein concentration, serum chemistries, fat-soluble vitamins, trace minerals, assessment of iron metabolism, toxoplasmosis serology, viral serologies, and examination for hemoparasites; fecal collection for bacterial culture and parasite examination; and collection of a representative number of any ectoparasites. Comparison of blood values with those of captive lemurs demonstrated a number of significant differences thought to be associated with physiologic state (e.g., reproductive stage and stress), hydration, and diet. There was no evidence of serious infectious diseases, and hemoparasites were not detected. The enteric flora appeared unremarkable; however, results may have been skewed toward more cold-tolerant bacteria. The fecal parasite burden was low. Lemurostrongylus spp. was identified in two of the lemurs, and there were moderate numbers of Laelapidae mites present on approximately one third of the lemurs. This study demonstrated the substantial amount of data that can be collected from free-ranging populations, considered invaluable in the management of captive populations, in reducing the incidence of captivity-related diseases, and in the risk assessment associated with reintroduction programs. PMID:18432099

  11. Biomedical evaluation of free-ranging ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) in Tsimanampetsotsa Strict Nature Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Christopher J; Junge, Randall E; Louis, Edward E

    2003-03-01

    Complete health assessments were performed on 20 adult ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), 10 males and 10 females, free ranging within the Tsimanampetsotsa Strict Nature Reserve in southwest Madagascar. Each animal was anesthetized using tiletamine and zolazepam, weighed, and given a thorough physical examination. Blood was collected for hematology, determination of plasma total protein concentration, serum chemistry, determination of fat-soluble vitamin and trace mineral concentrations, assessment of iron metabolism, toxoplasmosis and viral serologies, and examination for parasites. Feces were collected for bacterial culture and parasite examination, and representative numbers of ectoparasites were collected. Blood values differed significantly in a number of ways from values in captive lemurs, possibly associated with recent food consumption, hydration, and diet. There was no evidence of serious infectious disease and no hemoparasites. The enteric flora appeared unremarkable, although results may have been skewed toward cold-tolerant bacteria. The fecal parasite burden was low, but there were large numbers of ectoparasites (mites) present. Our study demonstrated that a substantial amount of data can be collected from free-ranging populations, information that is invaluable in the management of captive populations, particularly with regard to disease, and in assessing risks associated with reintroduction programs. PMID:12723796

  12. A 7-Deoxyloganetic Acid Glucosyltransferase Contributes a Key Step in Secologanin Biosynthesis in Madagascar Periwinkle[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Keisuke; Salim, Vonny; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Edmunds, Elizabeth; Nagatoshi, Mai; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Mizukami, Hajime; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Iridoids form a broad and versatile class of biologically active molecules found in thousands of plant species. In addition to the many hundreds of iridoids occurring in plants, some iridoids, such as secologanin, serve as key building blocks in the biosynthesis of thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) and many quinoline alkaloids. This study describes the molecular cloning and functional characterization of three iridoid glucosyltransfeases (UDP-SUGAR GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE6 [UGT6], UGT7, and UGT8) from Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) with remarkably different catalytic efficiencies. Biochemical analyses reveal that UGT8 possessed a high catalytic efficiency toward its exclusive iridoid substrate, 7-deoxyloganetic acid, making it better suited for the biosynthesis of iridoids in periwinkle than the other two iridoid glucosyltransfeases. The role of UGT8 in the fourth to last step in secologanin biosynthesis was confirmed by virus-induced gene silencing in periwinkle plants, which reduced expression of this gene and resulted in a large decline in secologanin and MIA accumulation within silenced plants. Localization studies of UGT8 using a carborundum abrasion method for RNA extraction show that its expression occurs preferentially within periwinkle leaves rather than in epidermal cells, and in situ hybridization studies confirm that UGT8 is preferentially expressed in internal phloem associated parenchyma cells of periwinkle species. PMID:24104568

  13. DNA barcoding assessment of genetic variation in two widespread skinks from Madagascar, Trachylepis elegans and T. gravenhorstii (Squamata: Scincidae).

    PubMed

    Vences, Miguel; Lima, Alexandra; Miralles, Aurélien; Glaw, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Trachylepis elegans and T. gravenhorstii are two of the most widespread reptiles in Madagascar, inhabiting a wide variety of habitats. Previous studies have indicated a considerable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation within these species, but the geographic distribution of the major haplotype lineages is poorly known. Herein we analyse the phylogeography of these lizards based on 107 sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene, 101 of which newly determined. As in previous mtDNA assessments, T. elegans and T. gravenhorstii were not reciprocally monophyletic, although recent analyses including nuclear markers indicated their probable monophyly, respectively. The main lineages within T. gravenhorstii were found in strict allopatry and could be divided into a subclade of roughly northern and eastern distribution (lineages 1 and 2) and a subclade of roughly southern and western distribution (lineages 3, 4a, 4b, and 5, plus T. elegans). Our data serve to identify more precisely the probable contact zones among T. gravenhorstii lineages. The two main mtDNA clades (represented by lineages 2 and 3, respectively) can be expected to come into close contact in the area of the upper Mangoro river and Alaotra Lake, and (lineages 2 and 4a) in the Southern Central East between Mananjary and Ranomafana. Future studies intensively sampling these contact zones have the potential to assess hybridization and admixture among these lineages, and to test whether they are deep conspecific lineages of T. gravenhorstii as currently understood, or might represent distinct species. PMID:24869835

  14. The age and petrogenesis of alkaline magmatism in the Ampasindava Peninsula and Nosy Be archipelago, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, C.; Tucker, R. D.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.

    2015-05-01

    The Ampasindava alkaline province consists of a series of circular and elliptical intrusions, lava flows, dyke swarms and plugs of Cenozoic age emplaced into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Antsiranana basin (NW Madagascar) and above the crystalline basement. The magmatism in the Ampasindava region is linked to a NW-SE trending extensional tectonic setting. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on feldspar separate of alkali granites and basaltic dykes yielded ages of 18.01 ± 0.36 Ma and 26 ± 7 Ma, respectively. Alkali basalts and basanites, nepheline syenites and phonolites, and silica saturated-to-oversaturated syenites, trachytes, granites and rhyolites are the main outcropping lithologies. These rocks have sodic affinity. The felsic rocks are dominant, and range from peraluminous to peralkaline. The mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns of the mafic lavas match those of Na-alkaline lavas in within-plate rift settings. The patterns are identical in shape and absolute concentrations to those of the Bobaomby (Cap d'Ambre) and Massif d'Ambre primitive volcanic rocks. These geochemical features are broadly compatible with variable degrees of partial melting of incompatible element-enriched mantle sources. The mineralogical and geochemical variations are consistent with fractional crystallization processes involving removal of olivine, feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. Removal of small amount of titanite explains the concave upward lanthanide pattern in the evolved nepheline syenites and phonolites, which are additionally rich in exotic silicates typical of agpaitic magmas (eudialyte, F-disilicates).

  15. Seroepidemiological Study of Interepidemic Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection Among Persons with Intense Ruminant Exposure in Madagascar and Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gray, Gregory C; Anderson, Benjamin D; LaBeaud, A Desirée; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Fèvre, Eric M; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Cook, Elizabeth A J; Dahir, Saidi; de Glanville, William A; Heil, Gary L; Khan, Salah U; Muiruri, Samuel; Olive, Marie-Marie; Thomas, Lian F; Merrill, Hunter R; Merrill, Mary L M; Richt, Juergen A

    2015-12-01

    In this cross-sectional seroepidemiological study we sought to examine the evidence for circulation of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) among herders in Madagascar and Kenya. From July 2010 to June 2012, we enrolled 459 herders and 98 controls (without ruminant exposures) and studied their sera (immunoglobulin G [IgG] and IgM through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and plaque reduction neutralization test [PRNT] assays) for evidence of previous RVFV infection. Overall, 59 (12.9%) of 459 herders and 7 (7.1%) of the 98 controls were positive by the IgG ELISA assay. Of the 59 ELISA-positive herders, 23 (38.9%) were confirmed by the PRNT assay (21 from eastern Kenya). Two of the 21 PRNT-positive study subjects also had elevated IgM antibodies against RVFV suggesting recent infection. Multivariate modeling in this study revealed that being seminomadic (odds ratio [OR] = 6.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1-15.4) was most strongly associated with antibodies against RVFV. Although we cannot know when these infections occurred, it seems likely that some interepidemic RVFV infections are occurring among herders. As there are disincentives regarding reporting RVFV outbreaks in livestock or wildlife, it may be prudent to conduct periodic, limited, active seroepidemiological surveillance for RVFV infections in herders, especially in eastern Kenya. PMID:26458775

  16. Species Diversity, Abundance, and Host Preferences of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Two Different Ecotypes of Madagascar With Recent RVFV Transmission.

    PubMed

    Jean Jose Nepomichene, Thiery Nirina; Elissa, Nohal; Cardinale, Eric; Boyer, Sebastien

    2015-09-01

    Mosquito diversity and abundance were examined in six Madagascan villages in either arid (Toliary II district) or humid (Mampikony district) ecotypes, each with a history of Rift Valley fever virus transmission. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps without CO2 (LT) placed near ruminant parks and animal-baited net trap (NT) baited with either zebu or sheep/goat were used to sample mosquitoes, on two occasions between March 2011 and October 2011. Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Giles) was the most abundant species, followed by Culex antennatus (Becker) and Anopheles squamosus/cydippis (Theobald/de Meillon). These three species comprised more than half of all mosquitoes collected. The NT captured more mosquitoes in diversity and in abundance than the LT, and also caught more individuals of each species, except for An. squamosus/cydippis. Highest diversity and abundance were observed in the humid and warm district of Mampikony. No host preference was highlighted, except for Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presenting a blood preference for zebu baits. The description of species diversity, abundance, and host preference described herein can inform the development of control measures to reduce the risk of mosquito-borne diseases in Madagascar. PMID:26336259

  17. Isolation and structural elucidation of cytotoxic compounds from the root bark of Diospyros quercina (Baill.) endemic to Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Ruphin, Fatiany Pierre; Baholy, Robijaona; Emmanuel, Randrianarivo; Amelie, Raharisololalao; Martin, Marie-Therese; Koto–te-Nyiwa, Ngbolua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To isolate and characterize the cytotoxic compounds from Diospyros quercina (Baill.) G.E. Schatz & Lowry (Ebenaceae). Methods An ethno-botanical survey was conducted in the south of Madagascar from July to August 2010. Bio-guided fractionation assay was carried out on the root bark of Diospyros quercina, using cytotoxicity bioassay on murine P388 leukemia cell lines as model. The structures of the cytotoxic compounds were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Results Biological experiments resulted in the isolation of three bioactive pure compounds (named TR-21, TR-22, and TR-23) which exhibited very good in vitro cytotoxic activities with the IC50 values of (0.017 5±0.0060) µg/mL, (0.089±0.005) µg/mL and (1.027±0.070) µg/mL respectively. Thus, they support the claims of traditional healers and suggest the possible correlation between the chemical composition of this plant and its wide use in Malagasy folk medicine to treat cancer. Conclusions The ability of isolated compounds in this study to inhibit cell growth may represent a rational explanation for the use of Diospyros quercina root bark in treating cancer by Malagasy traditional healers. Further studies are, therefore, necessary to evaluate the in vivo anti-neoplastic activity of these cytotoxic compounds as effective anticancer drugs. PMID:25182433

  18. Seroepidemiological Study of Interepidemic Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection among Persons with Intense Ruminant Exposure in Madagascar and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Gregory C.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; LaBeaud, A. Desirée; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Fèvre, Eric M.; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Cook, Elizabeth A. J.; Dahir, Saidi; de Glanville, William A.; Heil, Gary L.; Khan, Salah U.; Muiruri, Samuel; Olive, Marie-Marie; Thomas, Lian F.; Merrill, Hunter R.; Merrill, Mary L. M.; Richt, Juergen A.

    2015-01-01

    In this cross-sectional seroepidemiological study we sought to examine the evidence for circulation of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) among herders in Madagascar and Kenya. From July 2010 to June 2012, we enrolled 459 herders and 98 controls (without ruminant exposures) and studied their sera (immunoglobulin G [IgG] and IgM through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and plaque reduction neutralization test [PRNT] assays) for evidence of previous RVFV infection. Overall, 59 (12.9%) of 459 herders and 7 (7.1%) of the 98 controls were positive by the IgG ELISA assay. Of the 59 ELISA-positive herders, 23 (38.9%) were confirmed by the PRNT assay (21 from eastern Kenya). Two of the 21 PRNT-positive study subjects also had elevated IgM antibodies against RVFV suggesting recent infection. Multivariate modeling in this study revealed that being seminomadic (odds ratio [OR] = 6.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1–15.4) was most strongly associated with antibodies against RVFV. Although we cannot know when these infections occurred, it seems likely that some interepidemic RVFV infections are occurring among herders. As there are disincentives regarding reporting RVFV outbreaks in livestock or wildlife, it may be prudent to conduct periodic, limited, active seroepidemiological surveillance for RVFV infections in herders, especially in eastern Kenya. PMID:26458775

  19. Identification of nasal colonization with β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in patients, health care workers and students in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Micheel, Volker; Hogan, Benedikt; Rakotoarivelo, Rivo Andry; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael; Razafimanatsoa, Fetra; Razafindrabe, Tsiriniaina; Rakotondrainiarivelo, Jean Philibert; Crusius, Sabine; Poppert, Sven; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; May, Jürgen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the nasal occurrence of β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae both in patients in a hospital department of infectious diseases at admission and in healthy Madagascan students and health care workers. Nasal swabs from 681 students, 824 health care workers, and 169 patients were obtained in Antananarivo, Madagascar, and transferred to Germany. Screening for β-lactamase (ESBL, ampC) producing Enterobacteriaceae was performed by cultural and molecular approaches, comprising Brilliance ESBL agar, E-testing, ABCD-testing, and commercial hyplex ESBL and SuperBug ID PCR. Regarding ESBL-positive strains and strains with resistance against at least three out of the four tested bactericidal antibiotic drugs, 0.3% (five out of 1541) of the students and health care workers group showed nasal colonization, whereas colonization was observed in 7.1% (12 out of 169) of the hospitalized patients at admission. No appreciably reduced detection rates after sample storage and intercontinental transport were observed. A considerable proportion of nasal colonization with cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae was demonstrated in Madagascan hospital patients at admission, posing a risk of developing future endogenous infections. The nasal colonization of healthy individuals was negligible. Good storage and transport stability of Enterobacteriaceae will allow for future studies even in areas difficult to access. PMID:25908994

  20. Comportement piezometrique des nappes d'alterites en zone intertropicale humide d'altitude (hauts plateaux de Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillot, J. C.; Raunet, M.; Ferry, L.

    1990-12-01

    The behaviour of rice-cultivated peaty valley-bottoms on a weathered crystalline schist, located in a high altitude humid intertropical zone (Madagascar) is under study to define the water and mineral balance of these areas with an economic objective. Analysis of the groundwaters' piezometric level on a reference site allowed the differentiation of inflows and outflows and enabled us to specify the hydraulics of the media. (1) The clay alteration products form a free aquifer broken up by the morphology of the land (valleys, surrounding interfluves); this aquifer discharges by outlets located in the lowlands and thus contributes to the prolonged flooding (nine months a year) of rice-fields; recharge depends on the spatial variability of local precipitation. (2) The granite-gneiss basement constitutes a regional aquifer; the groundwater is semi-confined and outcrops in large valleys with free water-tables draining to the low coastal plains of the island; for the most part its recharge is ensured by discontinuous outcrops (residual ridges); it remains confined for several months after the rainy season. (3) In the lowlands, underlying sands are also water bearing, recharged from superficial flows. The groundwater is confined during the rainy season, which favours ascending flows towards the rice rooting zone.