Science.gov

Sample records for magnesium 26 reactions

  1. Stretched-state excitations with the (neutron,proton) reaction at 278 MeV on carbon-14, magnesium-26 and silicon-30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Dong

    1997-11-01

    The reactions 12C(n,p)12B,/ 14C(n,p)14B,/ 16O(n,p)16N,/ 26Mg(n,p)26Na and 30Si(n,p)30Al were studied at a neutron energy of 278 MeV using the charge-exchange facility at the TRIUMF accelerator laboratory in Vancouver, Canada. Excitation-energy spectra and differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum-transfer range from 1.2 to 2.5 fm-1 (θlab in 19o,/ 23o,/ 27o,/ 31o and 35o). The primary goal of this work was the study of T = 2 'stretched' particle-hole states, more specifically (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- states excited in 14B,/ (/nu f7/2,/pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 26Na, and (/nu f7/2,/ /pi d5/2-1)/ 6/sp- states excited in 30Al. The identification of these states was based on: (1) comparison of the experimental cross section angular distribution with theoretical differential cross sections calculated with the distorted-wave-impulse approximation (DWIA); (2) comparison of the measured excitation energies with excitation energies of analog stretched states; and (3) comparison of the spectroscopic strength for these (n,p) reactions to (p,n) and (e,e') spectroscopic strengths. The T = 1 (/nu d5/2,/ /pi p3/2-1)/ 4/sp- 'stretched' states excited in 12B and 16N were also studied. For the 12C(n,p)12B reaction (on targets of CH2 and graphite), 4/sp- T = 1 strength at Ex = 4.25 MeV was observed and found to be consistent with previous measurements; this state was used for calibrating excitation-energy scales for the other targets and as a consistency check among the different experimental runs for this project.

  2. The magnesium isotope (δ26Mg) signature of dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, A.; Goldstein, R. H.; Mavromatis, V.; Richter, D. K.; Buhl, D.; Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Immenhauser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dolomite precipitation models and kinetics are debated and complicated due to the complex and temporally fluctuating fluid chemistry and different diagenetic environments. Using well-established isotope systems (δ18O, δ13C, 87Sr/86Sr), fluid inclusions and elemental data, as well as a detailed sedimentological and petrographic data set, we established the precipitation environment and subsequent diagenetic pathways of a series of Proterozoic to Pleistocene syn-depositional marine evaporative (sabkha) dolomites, syn-depositional non-marine evaporative (lacustrine and palustrine) dolomites, altered marine ("mixing zone") dolomites and late diagenetic hydrothermal dolomites. These data form the prerequisite for a systematic investigation of dolomite magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mgdol). Dolomite δ26Mg ratios documented here range, from -2.49‰ to -0.45‰ (δ26Mgmean = -1.75 ± 1.08‰, n = 42). The isotopically most depleted end member is represented by earliest diagenetic marine evaporative sabkha dolomites (-2.11 ± 0.54‰ 2σ, n = 14). In comparing ancient compositions to modern ones, some of the variation is probably due to alteration. Altered marine (-1.41 ± 0.64‰ 2σ, n = 4), and earliest diagenetic lacustrine and palustrine dolomites (-1.25 ± 0.86‰ 2σ, n = 14) are less negative than sabkha dolomites but not distinct in composition. Various hydrothermal dolomites are characterized by a comparatively wide range of δ26Mg ratios, with values of -1.44 ± 1.33‰ (2σ, n = 10). By using fluid inclusion data and clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) to represent temperature of precipitation for hydrothermal dolomites, there is no correlation between fluid temperature (∼100 to 180 °C) and dolomite Mg isotope signature (R2 = 0.14); nor is there a correlation between δ26Mgdol and δ18Odol. Magnesium-isotope values of different dolomite types are affected by a complex array of different Mg sources and sinks, dissolution/precipitation and non

  3. Magnesium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements are available? Magnesium is available in multivitamin-mineral supplements and other dietary supplements . Forms of magnesium ... higher intakes of magnesium have a higher bone mineral density , which is important in reducing the risk ...

  4. Reaction Mechanisms of Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Cement and its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Fei

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) is a kind of cementitious binder in which the chemical bond is formed via a heterogeneous acid-base reaction between dead burned magnesia powder and potassium phosphate solution at room temperature. Small amount of boron compounds can be incorporated in the cement as a setting retarder. The final reaction product of MgO-KH2PO4-H 2O ternary system is identified as magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate, MgKPO4·6H2O. However, the mechanisms and procedures through which this crystalline product is formed and the conditions under which the crystallization process would be influenced are not yet clear. Understanding of the reaction mechanism of the system is helpful for developing new methodologies to control the rapid reaction process and furthermore, to adjust the phase assemblage of the binder, and to enhance the macroscopic properties. This study is mainly focused on the examination of the reaction mechanism of MKPC. In addition, the formulation optimization, microstructure characterization and field application in rapid repair are also systematically studied. The chemical reactions between magnesia and potassium dihydrogen phosphate are essentially an acid-base reaction with strong heat release, the pH and temperature variation throughout the reaction process could provide useful information to disclose the different stages in the reaction. However, it would be very difficult to conduct such tests on the cement paste due to the limited water content and fast setting. In the current research, the reaction mechanism of MKPC is investigated on the diluted MKPC system through monitoring the pH and temperature development, identification of the solid phase formed, and measurement of the ionic concentration of the solution. The reaction process can be explained as follows: when magnesia and potassium phosphate powder are mixed with water, phosphate is readily dissolved, which is instantly followed by the dissociation of

  5. Vapor-phase reaction of acetophenone with methanol or dimethyl carbonate on magnesium oxide and magnesium phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Aramendia, M.A.; Borau, V.; Jimenez, C.; Marinas, J.M.; Romero, F.J.

    1999-04-01

    The vapor-phase reaction of acetophenone with methanol on magnesium oxide, various magnesium phosphates, and combinations of the two types of catalysts was studied. The process was found to involve the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reaction, aldol condensations, dehydrations, and hydrogenations. The presence of basic sites is indispensable for the reaction to develop; however, acid sites also play an active role. The selectivity for each reaction product depends on the particular catalyst used. The total conversion is maximal with the catalysts containing the largest populations of acid and basic sites. Also, catalysts with large numbers of acid sites exhibit an increased selectivity towards the corresponding alkenes. The use of dimethyl carbonate instead of methanol alters the reaction selectivity to an extent dependent on the particular catalyst and operating conditions. However, this also results in markedly decreased total conversion in some instances.

  6. Extractive separation of sodium 22 and aluminum 26 from cyclotron-irradiated magnesium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Iofa, B.Z.; Dzhigirkhanov, M.S.A.; Maklachkov, A.G.; Ovcharenko, V.P.; Sevast'yanov, Yu.G.; Silant'ev, A.I.

    1988-05-01

    An extraction procedure has been developed for the successive isolation of carrier-free sodium 22 and aluminum 26 from deuteron- (proton-) irradiated magnesium targets. The irradiated magnesium metal or alloy target is dissolved in sulfuric acid and the pH adjusted to 1.0-1.5 with ammonia. Sodium 22 is extracted with a chloroform solution of 15-crown-5 and picric acid and back-extracted with water in the presence of tetraphenylphosphonium chloride or a tetraalkylammonium chloride. Then aluminum 26 is extracted by trioctyl-ammonium oxalate in benzene (toluene) containing chloroform and back-extracted with 6M hydrochloric acid. The yields of sodium 22 and aluminum 26 are better than 95%.

  7. Impacts of diffusive transport on carbonate mineral formation from magnesium silicate-CO2-water reactions.

    PubMed

    Giammar, Daniel E; Wang, Fei; Guo, Bin; Surface, J Andrew; Peters, Catherine A; Conradi, Mark S; Hayes, Sophia E

    2014-12-16

    Reactions of CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals to precipitate magnesium carbonates can result in stable carbon sequestration. This process can be employed in ex situ reactors or during geologic carbon sequestration in magnesium-rich formations. The reaction of aqueous CO2 with the magnesium silicate mineral forsterite was studied in systems with transport controlled by diffusion. The approach integrated bench-scale experiments, an in situ spectroscopic technique, and reactive transport modeling. Experiments were performed using a tube packed with forsterite and open at one end to a CO2-rich solution. The location and amounts of carbonate minerals that formed were determined by postexperiment characterization of the solids. Complementing this ex situ characterization, (13)C NMR spectroscopy tracked the inorganic carbon transport and speciation in situ. The data were compared with the output of reactive transport simulations that accounted for diffusive transport processes, aqueous speciation, and the forsterite dissolution rate. All three approaches found that the onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation was spatially localized about 1 cm from the opening of the forsterite bed. Magnesite was the dominant reaction product. Geochemical gradients that developed in the diffusion-limited zones led to locally supersaturated conditions at specific locations even while the volume-averaged properties of the system remained undersaturated. PMID:25420634

  8. Constraining magnesium cycling in marine sediments using magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, J. A.; Schrag, D. P.

    2010-09-01

    Magnesium concentrations in deep-sea sediment pore-fluids typically decrease down core due to net precipitation of dolomite or clay minerals in the sediments or underlying crust. To better characterize and differentiate these processes, we have measured magnesium isotopes in pore-fluids and sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program sites (1082, 1086, 1012, 984, 1219, and 925) that span a range of oceanographic settings. At all sites, magnesium concentrations decrease with depth. At sites where diagenetic reactions are dominated by the respiration of organic carbon, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values increase with depth by as much as 2‰. Because carbonates preferentially incorporate 24Mg (low δ 26Mg), the increase in pore-fluid δ 26Mg values at these sites is consistent with the removal of magnesium in Mg-carbonate (dolomite). In contrast, at sites where the respiration of organic carbon is not important and/or weatherable minerals are abundant, pore-fluid δ 26Mg values decrease with depth by up to 2‰. The decline in pore-fluid δ 26Mg at these sites is consistent with a magnesium sink that is isotopically enriched relative to the pore-fluid. The identity of this enriched magnesium sink is likely clay minerals. Using a simple 1D diffusion-advection-reaction model of pore-fluid magnesium, we estimate rates of net magnesium uptake/removal and associated net magnesium isotope fractionation factors for sources and sinks at all sites. Independent estimates of magnesium isotope fractionation during dolomite precipitation from measured δ 26Mg values of dolomite samples from sites 1082 and 1012 are very similar to modeled net fractionation factors at these sites, suggesting that local exchange of magnesium between sediment and pore-fluid at these sites can be neglected. Our results indicate that the magnesium incorporated in dolomite is 2.0-2.7‰ depleted in δ 26Mg relative to the precipitating fluid. Assuming local exchange of magnesium is minor at the rest of the

  9. Magnesium basics

    PubMed Central

    Ketteler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    As a cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions, magnesium fulfils various intracellular physiological functions. Thus, imbalance in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesaemia as it is seen more often than hypermagnesaemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Measuring total serum magnesium is a feasible and affordable way to monitor changes in magnesium status, although it does not necessarily reflect total body magnesium content. The following review focuses on the natural occurrence of magnesium and its physiological function. The absorption and excretion of magnesium as well as hypo- and hypermagnesaemia will be addressed. PMID:26069819

  10. Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, H.; Bulian, W.; Bungardt, K.; Gürs, K.; Gürs, U.; Helling, W.; Kyri, H.; Laue, H. J.; Mahler, W.; Matting, A.; Meyer, F. R.; Mialki, W.; Ritter, F.; Ruge, J.; Saur, G.; Simon, W.; Strnat, K.; Weber, R.; Weigand, H. H.; Weik, H.; Ziesler, H.; Borchers, Heinz; Schmidt, Ernst

    Magnesium wird überwiegend durch Schmelzflußelektrolyse hergestellt. Das dabei anfallende Reinmagnesium hat einen Mg-Gehalt von etwa 99,9%. Hauptbeimengung ist das Eisen; Silizium und Aluminium sind nur in Spuren vorhanden. Der Anwendungsumfang des Reinmagnesiums ist gering; dagegen werden Magnesiumlegierungen zunehmend, insbesondere für den Druckguß verwendet. Neben den bis etwa zum Jahre 1950 allein gebräuchlichen Mg-Mn-, Mg-Al- und Mg-Al-Zn-Legierungen werden heute mehr und mehr die besonders warmfesten Legierungen mit Zusätzen von Zirkon, Thorium und Seltenen Erden hergestellt (siehe dazu auch Abschnitt Seltene Erden). Als Umhüllungsmaterial für Uranstäbe dient die Legierung Magnox A 12, die nach [H 3] neben 1 % Al noch geringe Mengen an Ca und Ba enthält. In den in Deutschland üblichen Kurzzeichen (DIN 1729) werden die chemischen Symbole und der ungefähre Gehalt der wichtigsten Legierungselemente angegeben. Gußlegierungen werden zusätzlich durch ein G (Sandguß oder Kokillenguß) oder ein D (Druckguß) gekennzeichnet (siehe Tab. 5).

  11. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  12. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  13. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  14. 26Al+p elastic and inelastic scattering reactions and galactic abundances of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, S. T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, C.; Matos, M.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Parker, P. D.; Peters, W. A.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    Galactic 26Al is the first radioactive nucleus to be positively identified by γ-ray astronomy with detection of the 1.809 MeV γ ray associated with its decay. This nucleus is destroyed in astrophysical environments in the 26Al(p,γ)27Si and inelastic 26Al+p scattering reactions where properties of 27Si levels determine reaction rates. To investigate these properties, elastic and inelastic 26Al+p scattering reactions were measured between Ec.m. = 0.5-1.5 MeV at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A candidate for a new resonance in the 26Al(p,γ)27Si reaction was identified. Upper limits were also set on the strengths of postulated resonances and on the cross section of the inelastic reaction, but there is little effect on current reaction rate calculations.

  15. Magnesium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - magnesium ... Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body. It helps to maintain normal ... There is ongoing research into the role of magnesium in preventing and managing disorders such as high ...

  16. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  17. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Ma, Qingxin

    2008-04-01

    The experimental determination of rate constants for atmospheric reactions and how these rate constants vary with temperature remain a crucially important part of atmosphere science. In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (COS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) has been investigated using a Knudsen cell reactor and a temperature-programmed reaction apparatus. We found that the adsorption and the heterogeneous reaction are sensitive to temperature. The initial uptake coefficients (gammat(Ini)) of COS on MgO decrease from 1.07 +/- 0.71 x 10-6 to 4.84 +/- 0.60 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 228 to 300 K, and the steady state uptake coefficients (gammat(SS)) increase from 5.31 +/- 0.06 x 10-8 to 1.68 +/- 0.41 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 240 to 300 K. The desorption rate constants (kdes) were also found to increase slightly with the enhancement of temperature. The empirical formula between the uptake coefficients, desorption rate constants and temperature described in the form of Arrhenius expression were obtained. The activation energies for the heterogeneous reaction and desorption of COS on MgO were measured to be 11.02 +/- 0.34 kJ.mol-1 and 6.30 +/- 0.81 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The results demonstrate that the initial uptake of COS on MgO is mainly contributed by an adsorption process and the steady state uptake is due to a catalytic reaction. The environmental implication was also discussed. PMID:18302353

  18. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  19. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,/sup 26/Mg,/sup 56/Fe(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/)/sup 13,14/O,/sup 26/Si,/sup 56/Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub ..pi../ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to /sup 14/O(0/sup +/, 5.92 MeV), /sup 14/O(2/sup +/, 7.77 MeV), /sup 56/Ni(gs), /sup 13/O(gs), and /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup ..pi../ = 1/2/sup -/. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub ..pi../ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references.

  20. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Alexander F.; Howard, Jack B.; Modestino, Anthony J.; Peters, William A.

    1998-01-01

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400.degree. C. or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products.

  1. Method for production of magnesium

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, A.F.; Howard, J.B.; Modestino, A.J.; Peters, W.A.

    1998-07-21

    A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400 C or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products. 12 figs.

  2. Intermolecular enantioselective dearomatization reaction of β-naphthol using meso-aziridine: a bifunctional in situ generated magnesium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongxu; Wang, Linqing; Han, Fengxia; Li, Dan; Zhao, Depeng; Wang, Rui

    2015-02-01

    A direct, facile, and highly diastereo- and enantioselective dearomatization reaction of β-naphthol derivatives with aziridines has been developed for the first time. A newly designed Box-OH ligand was employed for an in situ generated magnesium catalyst and proved to be efficient. The corresponding dearomatization product was transformed into a polycyclic scaffold and polyhydroxylated compound. (1) H NMR studies revealed the activation mode of the dearomatization process of β-naphthols, and a clear positive nonlinear effect was observed in the reaction, and provides insight into the coordination environment around the Mg(II) center and the possible active species. PMID:25589219

  3. Reactions of graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes with lithium and magnesium studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Li, Qianqian; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Rao, Qunli; Xu, Junming

    2016-02-01

    Reaction beyond intercalation and the utilization of metal ions beyond lithium-ions are two promising approaches for developing the next generation of high capacity and low cost energy storage materials. Here, we use graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes and study their reaction with lithium, magnesium and aluminum using in situ transmission electron microscopy. On lithiation, the Co3O4 nanocubes decompose to Co metal nanoparticles (2 to 3 nm) and embed in as-formed Li2O matrix; conversely, the CoO nanoparticles form on the Co site accompanying the decomposition of Li2O in the delithiation process. The lithiation process is dominated by surface diffusion of Li+, and graphene sheets enhance the Li+ diffusion. However, upon charge with magnesium, the Mg2+ diffusion is sluggish, and there is no sign of conversion reaction between Mg and Co3O4 at room temperature. Instead, a thin film consisting of metal Mg nanoparticles is formed on the surface of graphene due to a process similar to metal plating. The Al3+ diffusion is even more sluggish and no reaction between Al and Co3O4 is observed. These findings provide insights to tackle the reaction mechanism of multivalent ions with electrode materials.

  4. Reactions of graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes with lithium and magnesium studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Li, Qianqian; Dravid, Vinayak P; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R; Rao, Qunli; Xu, Junming

    2016-02-26

    Reaction beyond intercalation and the utilization of metal ions beyond lithium-ions are two promising approaches for developing the next generation of high capacity and low cost energy storage materials. Here, we use graphene supported Co3O4 nanocubes and study their reaction with lithium, magnesium and aluminum using in situ transmission electron microscopy. On lithiation, the Co3O4 nanocubes decompose to Co metal nanoparticles (2 to 3 nm) and embed in as-formed Li2O matrix; conversely, the CoO nanoparticles form on the Co site accompanying the decomposition of Li2O in the delithiation process. The lithiation process is dominated by surface diffusion of Li(+), and graphene sheets enhance the Li(+) diffusion. However, upon charge with magnesium, the Mg(2+) diffusion is sluggish, and there is no sign of conversion reaction between Mg and Co3O4 at room temperature. Instead, a thin film consisting of metal Mg nanoparticles is formed on the surface of graphene due to a process similar to metal plating. The Al(3+) diffusion is even more sluggish and no reaction between Al and Co3O4 is observed. These findings provide insights to tackle the reaction mechanism of multivalent ions with electrode materials. PMID:26808457

  5. Destruction of organohalides in water using metal particles: Carbon tetrachloride/water reactions with magnesium, tin and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Boronina, T.; Klabunde, K.J.

    1996-01-12

    As a possible method for degrading chlorocarbons in contaminated water supplies, the reactions of metallic magnesium, tin, and zinc with CCl4/H2O mixtures have been studied. In the case of Mg, oxidation by water overwhelmed the Mg-CCl4 reaction. However, Sn and Zn were successfully used to degrade CCl4. Sn and Zn behave quite differently with the final carbon-containing product, with Zn being CH4 but with Sn being CO2. This is rationalized by the competing reactions of a possible intermediate Cl3CMCl, which can be protonated by H2O to give CHCl2 or eliminate CCl2 (which subsequently reacts with water to form CO2 and HCl). Metal surface areas are also important, and the most active metal samples were prepared by a metal vapor-solvent codeposition method (SMAD cryo-particles). However, conventional Zn dust and Sn granules were also effective, only with lower reaction rates.

  6. Magnesium absorption in human subjects from leafy vegetables, intrinsically labeled with stable 26Mg.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R; Spencer, H; Welsh, J J

    1984-04-01

    Collards, turnip greens, leaf lettuce, and spinach, grown in nutrient solution so that their Mg content was 80 to 90% 26Mg, were tested in ambulant male volunteers stabilized on a constant metabolic diet. The freeze-dried vegetables were incorporated in bran muffins in which the vegetables replaced part of the bran. Bran muffins without vegetables were consumed for breakfast each day. They were also used as a standard test meal to which the vegetable muffins were compared. All subjects participated in three consecutive isotope absorption tests: one of the standard test meal and two of the vegetables. The standard test was carried out after at least 30 days on the controlled diet. Subsequent tests of vegetables followed at 4-wk intervals. Each test meal contained 30 microCi 28MgCl2 and 50 mg stable 26Mg, the latter either as the intrinsic label of a test vegetable or as 26MgCl2 in solution taken with the standard bran muffins. Net absorption of both isotopes was measured to establish exchangeability and to determine relative Mg absorption from the vegetables. Exchangeability was 90% or higher from all meals tested. Relative Mg absorption was highest from collards and least from the standard test meal. Net absorption values ranged from 40 to 60%. PMID:6711467

  7. Magnesium absorption in human subjects from leafy vegetables, intrinsically labeled with stable /sup 26/Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.; Spencer, H.; Welsh, J.J.

    1984-04-01

    Collards, turnip greens, leaf lettuce, and spinach, grown in nutrient solution so that their Mg content was 80 to 90% /sup 26/Mg, were tested in ambulant male volunteers stabilized on a constant metabolic diet. The freeze-dried vegetables were incorporated in bran muffins in which the vegetables replaced part of the bran. Bran muffins without vegetables were consumed for breakfast each day. They were also used as a standard test meal to which the vegetable muffins were compared. All subjects participated in three consecutive isotope absorption tests: one of the standard test meal and two of the vegetables. The standard test was carried out after at least 30 days on the controlled diet. Subsequent tests of vegetables followed at 4-wk intervals. Each test meal contained 30 microCi /sup 28/MgCl2 and 50 mg stable /sup 26/Mg, the latter either as the intrinsic label of a test vegetable or as /sup 26/MgCl/sub 2/ in solution taken with the standard bran muffins. Net absorption of both isotopes was measured to establish exchangeability and to determine relative Mg absorption from the vegetables. Exchangeability was 90% or higher from all meals tested. Relative Mg absorption was highest from collards and least from the standard test meal. Net absorption values ranged from 40 to 60%.

  8. Study of astrophysically important resonant states in 26Si by the 28Si(4He,6He)26Si reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young Kwan; Lee, C. S.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Inafiki, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Fukijawa, H.; Amadio, G.; Khiem, L. H.; Tanaka, M.; Chen, A.; Kato, S.

    PoS(NIC-IX)024 , b, H. Yamaguchia, J. J. Hea , A. Saitoa , Y. Wakabayashia, H. Fujikawaa, G. The emission of 1.809 MeV gamma-ray from the first excited state of 26 Mg followed by beta- decay of 26 Al in its ground state (denoted as 26 Alg.s. ) has been identified by gamma-ray telescopes such the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) [1]. To resolve controversy over the pos- sible sources of the observational 1.809 MeV gamma-rays, one needs accurate knowledge of the production rate of 26 Al. The 25 Al(p,γ)26Si reaction which is the competition reaction for produc- tion of 26 Alg.s. is one of the important subjects to be investigated. In this work, the astrophysically important 26 Si states above the proton threshold were studied via the 28 Si(4 He,6 He)26 Si reaction. We have preformed an angular distribution measurement using the high resolution QDD spectro- graph (PA) at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo. The experimental results and data analysis will be presented.

  9. Magnesium Gluconate

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium gluconate is used to treat low blood magnesium. Low blood magnesium is caused by gastrointestinal disorders, prolonged vomiting or ... disease, or certain other conditions. Certain drugs lower magnesium levels as well.This medication is sometimes prescribed ...

  10. Magnesium and the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral and the second most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body. It is a required mineral that is involved in more than 300 metabolic reactions in the body. Magnesium helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function, heart rhythm (cardiac excitability), vasomotor tone, blood pressure, immune system, bone integrity, and blood glucose levels and promotes calcium absorption. Because of magnesium's role in energy production and storage, normal muscle function, and maintenance of blood glucose levels, it has been studied as an ergogenic aid for athletes. This article will cover the general roles of magnesium, magnesium requirements, and assessment of magnesium status as well as the dietary intake of magnesium and its effects on exercise performance. The research articles cited were limited from those published in 2003 through 2014. PMID:26166051

  11. REACTION MECHANISMS OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES WITH CARBON DIOXIDE IN MICROWAVE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    William B. White; Michael R. Silsbee; B. Joe Kearns

    2004-02-18

    The objective of the investigation was to determine whether microwave fields would enhance the reactions of CO{sub 2} with silicates that are relevant to the sequestration of carbon dioxide. Three sets of experiments were conducted. (1) Serpentine and CO{sub 2} were reacted directly at one atmosphere pressure in a microwave furnace. Little reaction was observed. (2) Serpentine was dehydroxylated in a microwave furnace. The reaction was rapid, reaching completion in less than 30 minutes. A detailed investigation of this reaction produced an S-shaped kinetics curve, similar to the kinetics from dehydroxylating serpentine in a resistance furnace, but offset to 100 C lower temperature. This set of experiments clearly demonstrates the effect of microwaves for enhancing reaction kinetics. (3) Reactions of serpentine with alkaline carbonates and in acid solution were carried out in a microwave hydrothermal apparatus. There was a greatly enhanced decomposition of the serpentine in acid solution but, at the temperature and pressure of the reaction chamber (15 bars; 200 C) the carbonates did not react. Overall, microwave fields, as expected, enhance silicate reaction kinetics, but higher CO{sub 2} pressures are needed to accomplish the desired sequestration reactions.

  12. Theoretical evaluation of the reaction rates for {sup 26}Al(n,p){sup 26}Mg and {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Oginni, B. M.; Iliadis, C.; Champagne, A. E.

    2011-02-15

    The reactions that destroy {sup 26}Al in massive stars have significance in a number of astrophysical contexts. We evaluate the reaction rates of {sup 26}Al(n,p){sup 26}Mg and {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na using cross sections obtained from the codes empire and talys. These have been compared to the published rates obtained from the non-smoker code and to some experimental data. We show that the results obtained from empire and talys are comparable to those from non-smoker. We also show how the theoretical results vary with respect to changes in the input parameters. Finally, we present recommended rates for these reactions using the available experimental data and our new theoretical results.

  13. In situ loading of well-dispersed silver nanoparticles on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide for real-time monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaige; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-10-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real-time monitoring of the catalytic reaction process of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol in an aqueous medium by observing the SERS signals of the reactant, intermediate and final products. The intrinsic reaction kinetics and reaction mechanism of this reaction were also investigated. This SERS-based synergy technique provides a novel approach for quantitative in situ monitoring of catalytic chemical reaction processes.The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn2+ linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real

  14. The 28Si(p,t)26Si*(p) reaction and implications for the astrophysical 25Al(p,gamma)26Si reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott

    2010-10-01

    Several resonances in 25Al(p, )26Si have been studied via the 28Si(p,t)26Si reaction. Triton energies and angular distributions were measured using a segmented annular detector array. An additional silicon detector array was used to simultaneously detect the coincident protons emitted from the decay of states in 26Si above the proton threshold, in order to determine branching ratios. A resonance at 5927 4 keV has been experimentally confirmed as the first = 0 state above the proton threshold, with a proton branching ratio consistent with one.

  15. The 25Al(p,g)26Si Reaction Rate in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, Dan; Blackmon, J. C.; Hix, W. R.; Liang, J. F.; Smith, M. S.; Howard, J. A.; Kozub, R. L.; Brune, C. R.; Chae, K. Y.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Scott, J. P.; Johnson, M. S.; Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Livesay, R. J.; Wisser, D. W.

    The production of 26Al in novae is uncertain, in part, because of the uncertain rate of the 25 Al(p,γ)26Si reaction at novae temperatures. This reaction is thought to be dominated by a long- sought 3+ level in 26Si, and the calculated reaction rate varies by orders of magnitude depending on the energy of this resonance. We present evidence concerning the spin of a level at 5.914 MeV in 26Si from the 28Si(p,t)26Si reaction studied at the Holifield Radioactive Beam Facility at ORNL. We find that the angular distribution for this level implies either a 2+ or 3+ assignment, with only a 3+ being consistent with the mirror nucleus, 26Mg. Additionally, we have used the updated 25Al(p,γ)26Si reaction rate in a nova nucleosynthesis calculation and have addressed the effects of the remaining uncertainties in the rate on 26Al production.

  16. In vivo assessment of the host reactions to the biodegradation of the two novel magnesium alloys ZEK100 and AX30 in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies on biodegradable magnesium implants published recently use magnesium-calcium-alloys or magnesium-aluminum-rare earth-alloys. However, since rare earths are a mixture of elements and their toxicity is unclear, a reduced content of rare earths is favorable. The present study assesses the in vivo biocompatibility of two new magnesium alloys which have a reduced content (ZEK100) or contain no rare earths at all (AX30). Methods 24 rabbits were randomized into 4 groups (AX30 or ZEK100, 3 or 6 months, respectively) and cylindrical pins were inserted in their tibiae. To assess the biodegradation μCT scans and histological examinations were performed. Results The μCT scans showed that until month three ZEK100 degrades faster than AX30, but this difference is leveled out after 6 months. Histology revealed that both materials induce adverse host reactions and high numbers of osteoclasts in the recipient bone. The mineral apposition rates of both materials groups were high. Conclusions Both alloys display favorable degradation characteristics, but they induce adverse host reactions, namely an osteoclast-driven resorption of bone and a subsequent periosteal formation of new bone. Therefore, the biocompatibility of ZEK100 and AX30 is questionable and further studies, which should focus on the interactions on cellular level, are needed. PMID:22429539

  17. Elastic scattering and neutron transfer of the 26Mg + 13C reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleskey, Matthew; Alharby, A.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    Direct proton capture on 26Si is of interest for its role in the destruction of 26Si that would otherwise be available to β+ decay into 26mAl. This is part of the network of reactions that influence the production and destruction of the important astrophysical observable 26Al. The 13C(26Mg,27Mg)12C reaction at 12 MeV/nucleon has been measured at Texas A &M University Cyclotron Institute with the aim to determine ANC for 27P <--> p + 26Si via mirror symmetry. Details of the experiment as well as preliminary results will be presented. Present address: Faculty of Sciences, Physics Department, Princess Nora University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  18. High-precision (p,t) reaction to determine {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Berg, G. P. A.; Couder, M.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Since the identification of ongoing {sup 26}Al production in the universe, the reaction sequence {sup 24}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 25}Al({beta}{sup +{nu}}){sup 25}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Al has been studied intensively. At temperatures where the radiative capture on {sup 25}Al (t{sub 1/2}=7.2 s) becomes faster than the {beta}{sup +} decay, the production of {sup 26}Al can be reduced due to the depletion of {sup 25}Al. To determine the resonances relevant for the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si bypass reaction, we measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with high-energy precision using the Grand Raiden spectrometer at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Several new energy levels were found above the p threshold and for known states excitation energies were determined with smaller uncertainties. The calculated stellar rates of the bypass reaction agree well with previous results, suggesting that these rates are well established.

  19. Reaction of zero-valent magnesium with water: Potential applications in environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Giehyeon; Park, Jaeseon

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the dissolution kinetics of granular zero-valent Mg (ZVMg) at pH 7 in water that was open to the atmosphere and buffered with 50 mM Na-MOPS. The oxidative dissolution of ZVMg was rapid; the initial amount of ZVMg (10-50 mg/L) dissolved completely within 200 min. The rate and extent of ZVMg dissolution was not affected by atmospheric oxygen. Although the oxidation of ZVMg is thermodynamically more feasible by dissolved oxygen or proton ions (H+), the primary oxidants are water molecules. The initial rate of ZVMg dissolution obeys first order kinetics with respect to ZVMg concentration with an observed rate constant, kMg,7 = 1.05 ± 0.06 × 10-2 min-1. Model calculations using the rate constant perfectly predict the extent of ZVMg dissolution for an extended time period at lower [Mg0]0 but underestimate at 50 mg/L [Mg0]0. The offset is likely attributed to the rapid dissolution of ZVMg particles, which could cause a substantial increase in the specific surface area. As to the reactivity of Mg-water system, we suggest that the hydrated electron (eaq-), the most powerful reducing agent, would probably be the major reactive entity under neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, we discuss briefly the factors affecting the rate and extent of the Mg-water reaction such as background electrolytes, ZVMg impurities, surface passivation, solution pH and temperature based on literature review.

  20. 23Na (α,p )26Mg Reaction Rate at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. M.; Munch, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Laursen, K. L.; Diget, C. Aa.; Hubbard, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of 26Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23Na (α,p )26Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of ˜40 . We present here differential cross sections for the 23Na (α,p )26Mg reaction measured in the energy range Ec .m .=1.7 - 2.5 MeV . Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalizations that are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions are measured for both p0 and p1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates by a factor of 40, impacting the 26Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of 3.

  1. Excited states of 26Al studied via the reaction 27Al(d,t)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Bhattacharya, C.; Rana, T. K.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, K.; Roy, P.; Pandey, R.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T. K.; Meena, J. K.; Roy, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Sinha, M.; Saha, A. K.; Asgar, Md. A.; Dey, A.; Roy, Subinit; Moin Shaikh, Md.

    2016-05-01

    The reaction 27Al(d,t) at 25 MeV was utilized to study the excited states of 26Al. The angular distributions of the observed excited states of 26Al were analyzed with zero range distorted wave Born approximation as well as by incorporating finite range correction parameters to extract spectroscopic factors. The two sets of extracted spectroscopic factors were compared with each other to see the effect of using finite range correction in the transfer form factor.

  2. Direct measurement of the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction cross section at energies relevant for the production of galactic (26)Al.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Calderon, S; Bertone, P F; Alcorta, M; Albers, M; Deibel, C M; Hoffman, C R; Jiang, C L; Marley, S T; Rehm, K E; Ugalde, C

    2014-04-18

    The 1809-keV γ ray from the decay of (26)Al(g) is an important target for γ-ray astronomy. In the convective C/Ne burning shell of massive presupernova stars, the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction directly influences the production of (26)Al. We have performed a direct measurement of the (23)Na(α,p)(26)Mg reaction cross section at the appropriate astrophysically important energies. The stellar rate calculated in the present work is larger than the recommended rate by nearly a factor of 40 and could strongly affect the production of (26)Al in massive stars. PMID:24785033

  3. Inverse Kinematic Study of the Alg26(d ,p )27Al Reaction and Implications for Destruction of 26Al in Wolf-Rayet and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, V.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Davinson, T.; Doherty, D. T.; Fallis, J.; Howell, D.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Mountford, D. J.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    In Wolf-Rayet and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the Alg26(p ,γ )27Si reaction is expected to govern the destruction of the cosmic γ -ray emitting nucleus 26Al. The rate of this reaction, however, is highly uncertain due to the unknown properties of key resonances in the temperature regime of hydrogen burning. We present a high-resolution inverse kinematic study of the Alg26(d ,p )27Al reaction as a method for constraining the strengths of key astrophysical resonances in the Alg26(p ,γ )27Si reaction. In particular, the results indicate that the resonance at Er=127 keV in 27Si determines the entire Alg26(p ,γ )27Si reaction rate over almost the complete temperature range of Wolf-Rayet stars and AGB stars.

  4. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect. PMID:21656589

  5. Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  6. Magnesium Oxide

    MedlinePlus

    ... repeatedly. Magnesium oxide also is used as a dietary supplement when the amount of magnesium in the diet ... any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each ...

  7. Role of Cellular Magnesium in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Samantha; Romani, Andrea MP

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is required for many of the major organs to function and plays a crucial role in human and mammalian physiology. Magnesium is essential for the structure of bones and teeth, acts as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes in the body, including binding to ATP for kinase reactions, and affects permeability of excitable membranes and neuromuscular transmission. Despite these essential roles, much is still unknown about magnesium physiology and homeostasis. Currently, nutritionists believe that the general population intakes insufficient magnesium daily through the diet. The effects of magnesium deficiency are, for the most part undetected, and simple, widespread assessments of magnesium intake remain unavailable for humans. Many of the patients admitted to hospitals or medical care facilities are unaware of their low magnesium levels. Moreover, because magnesium is predominantly an intracellular cation (>99%), serum magnesium levels remain a poor predictor of tissue magnesium content and availability. This review will discuss the effects of magnesium deficiency in various pathologies affecting the human population. The underlying causes for magnesium depletion in major physiological systems will be examined along with the involved signaling pathways and the main roles of magnesium homeostasis. Where possible (e.g. alcoholism), the implications of administering supplemental magnesium will be discussed. Ultimately, this review will advocate for the necessity of identifying easy and reproducible methods to assess serum and cellular magnesium levels and to identify magnesium deficiency in order to alleviate related pathological conditions. PMID:25839058

  8. Experimental Plan of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al Resonance Capture Reaction at Jinping Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. H.; Su, J.; Li, Y. J.; Guo, B.; Yan, S. Q.; Wang, Y. B.; Lian, G.; Zeng, S.; Zhang, Q. W.; He, G. Z.; Gan, L.; Zhou, C.; Liu, W. P.; Li, K. A.; Yu, X. Q.; Tang, X. D.; He, J. J.; Qian, Y. Z.

    The observation of 26Al is an useful tool for γ-ray astronomy and in studies of galactic chemical evolution. The most likely mechanism for 26A1 nucleosynthesis is in the hydrogen burning MgAl cycle, and the 26A1 production from the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al reaction at the important temperature range below T = 0.2 is still not well known. We present a proposal to measure the resonance strength of 58 keV resonance level of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al reaction, and the effective counting rate is estimated for the direct measurement at Jinping underground laboratory.

  9. Magnesium Catalysis for the Hydroboration of Carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Weetman, Catherine; Hill, Michael S; Mahon, Mary F

    2016-05-17

    A β-diketiminato magnesium alkyl complex, [CH{C(Me)NDipp}2 }MgnBu] (Dipp=2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 ), was shown to be an effective pre-catalyst for the first reported catalytic hydroboration of alkyl- and aryl-substituted carbodiimides with pinacol borane (HBpin). The catalytic reactions proceed under mild conditions to afford the corresponding N-borylated formamidine compounds in good yields. The reactions were observed to proceed through the intermediacy of magnesium amidinate and formamidinatoborate intermediates and an example of one of these latter species has been structurally characterised by an X-ray diffraction analysis. Crucially, no formation of the N-boryl formamidine products was observed in the absence of additional equivalents of the carbodiimide and HBpin substrates. This observation, supported by the evolution of a sigmoidal kinetic profile for the hydroboration of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, has been rationalised as the consequence of an allosteric effect of the pinacol borane and carbodiimide on the magnesium formamidinatoborate intermediates. PMID:27072429

  10. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  11. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  12. The Effects of Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Variations on 26Al Production in Massive Stars: A Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliadis, Christian; Champagne, Art; Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effects of thermonuclear reaction rate variations on 26Al production in massive stars. The dominant production sites in such events were recently investigated by using stellar model calculations: explosive neon-carbon burning, convective shell carbon burning, and convective core hydrogen burning. Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations are performed for each of these sites by adopting temperature-density-time profiles from recent stellar evolution models. For each profile, we individually multiplied the rates of all relevant reactions by factors of 10, 2, 0.5, and 0.1, and analyzed the resulting abundance changes of 26Al. In total, we performed ≈900 nuclear reaction network calculations. Our simulations are based on a next-generation nuclear physics library, called STARLIB, which contains a recent evaluation of Monte Carlo reaction rates. Particular attention is paid to quantifying the rate uncertainties of those reactions that most sensitively influence 26Al production. For stellar modelers our results indicate to what degree predictions of 26Al nucleosynthesis depend on currently uncertain nuclear physics input, while for nuclear experimentalists our results represent a guide for future measurements. We also investigate equilibration effects of 26Al. In all previous massive star investigations, either a single species or two species of 26Al were taken into account, depending on whether thermal equilibrium was achieved or not. These are two extreme assumptions, and in a hot stellar plasma the ground and isomeric states may communicate via γ-ray transitions involving higher-lying 26Al levels. We tabulate the results of our reaction rate sensitivity study for each of the three distinct massive star sites referred to above. It is found that several current reaction rate uncertainties influence the production of 26Al. Particularly important reactions are 26Al(n,p)26Mg, 25Mg(α,n)28Si, 24Mg(n,γ)25Mg, and 23Na(α,p)26Mg. These reactions

  13. The 26gAl(p,g)27Si reaction in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Chris; Parikh, A.; José, J.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Chen, A. A.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, H.; Davids, B.; D'Auria, J. M.; Davis, C.; Deibel, C.; Erikson, L.; Fogarty, L.; Frekers, D.; Greife, U.; Hussein, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Huyse, M.; Jewett, C.; Laird, A. M.; Lewis, R.; Mumby-Croft, P.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D. F.; Ouellet, C. V.; Parker, P.; Pearson, J.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Wrede, C.

    The 26gAl(p,γ)27Si Reaction in Novae PoS(NIC-IX)004 1 TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3, Canada 2 Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Conneticut 06520-8124, USA 3 Dept. de Física í Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain 4 Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Barcelona, Spain 5 McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 481, Canada 6 Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada 7 Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA 8 National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland 9 Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Willhelms-Universität Münster, 48149 Münster, Germany 10 University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada 11 Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium 12 Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom The 184 keV resonance strength in the 26gAl(p,γ)27Si reaction was measured in inverse kinematics using the DRAGON facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. We obtain a value of ωγ=35±7 μeV for the strength and ER=184±1 keV for the resonance energy. These values are consistent with p-wave capture into the 7652(3) keV state in 27Si. We discuss the implications of these results for 26gAl nucleosynthesis in a typical O-Ne white dwarf nova.

  14. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals. PMID:25428098

  15. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Schmidt, Joachim; Kisters, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. It has been recognized as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, where it is crucial for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) metabolism. Magnesium is required for DNA and RNA synthesis, reproduction, and protein synthesis. Moreover, magnesium is essential for the regulation of muscular contraction, blood pressure, insulin metabolism, cardiac excitability, vasomotor tone, nerve transmission and neuromuscular conduction. Imbalances in magnesium status—primarily hypomagnesemia as it is seen more common than hypermagnesemia—might result in unwanted neuromuscular, cardiac or nervous disorders. Based on magnesium’s many functions within the human body, it plays an important role in prevention and treatment of many diseases. Low levels of magnesium have been associated with a number of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke), migraine headaches, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26404370

  16. Magnesium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mg; Mag Formal name: Magnesium Related tests: Calcium , Potassium , Phosphorus , PTH , Vitamin D At a Glance Test ... can, over time, cause persistently low calcium and potassium levels, it may be checked to help diagnose ...

  17. Structure of resonances in the Gamow burning window for the 25Al(p ,γ )26Si reaction in novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, D. T.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; David, H. M.; Harker, J. L.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kankainen, A.; Lederer, C.; Zhu, S.

    2015-09-01

    A γ -ray spectroscopy study of excited states in 26Si has been performed by using the 24Mg(3He ,n ) reaction at a beam energy of 10 MeV. In particular, states have been studied above the proton threshold relevant for burning in the 25Al(p ,γ )26Si reaction in novae. This reaction influences the amount of 26Al injected into the interstellar medium by novae, which contributes to the overall flux of cosmic γ -ray emission from 26Al observed in satellite missions. The present results point strongly to the existence of a 0+ state at an excitation energy of 5890 keV lying within the Gamow burning window, which raises questions about the existence and properties of another, higher-lying state reported in previous experimental work. The existence of two such states within this excitation energy region cannot be understood within the framework of s d -shell-model calculations.

  18. Investigation on the thermo-chemical reaction mechanism between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong-Bo; Wang, Bin-Yi; Cao, Jian; Song, Guan-Yu; Liu, Juan-Bo

    2015-03-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coat play a very important role in advanced turbine blades by considerably increasing the engine efficiency and improving the performance of highly loaded blades. However, at high temperatures, environment factors result in the failure of TBCs. The influence of calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) is one of environment factors. Although thermo-physical effect is being paid attention to, the thermo-chemical reaction becomes the hot-spot in the research area of TBCs affected by CMAS. In this paper, traditional twolayered structured TBCs were prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) as the object of study. TBCs coated with CMAS were heated at 1240°C for 3 h. Additionally, 15 wt.% simulated molten CMAS powder and YSZ powder were mixed and heated at 1240°C or 1350°C for 48 h. SEM and EDS were adopted to detect morphology and elements distribution. According to XRD and TEM results, it was revealed that CMAS react with YSZ at high temperature and form ZrSiO4, Ca0.2Zr0.8O1.8 and Ca0.15Zr0.85O1.85 after reaction, as a result, leading to the failure of TBCs and decreasing the TBC lifetime.

  19. Surprisingly Different Reaction Behavior of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Bis(trimethylsilyl)amides toward Bulky N-(2-Pyridylethyl)-N'-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)pivalamidine.

    PubMed

    Kalden, Diana; Oberheide, Ansgar; Loh, Claas; Görls, Helmar; Krieck, Sven; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2016-07-25

    N-(2,6-Diisopropylphenyl)-N'-(2-pyridylethyl)pivalamidine (Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N(H)-C2 H4 -Py) (1), reacts with metalation reagents of lithium, magnesium, calcium, and strontium to give the corresponding pivalamidinates [(tmeda)Li{Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N-C2 H4 -Py}] (6), [Mg{Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N-C2 H4 -Py}2 ] (3), and heteroleptic [{(Me3 Si)2 N}Ae{Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N-C2 H4 -Py}], with Ae being Ca (2 a) and Sr (2 b). In contrast to this straightforward deprotonation of the amidine units, the reaction of 1 with the bis(trimethylsilyl)amides of sodium or potassium unexpectedly leads to a β-metalation and an immediate deamidation reaction yielding [(thf)2 Na{Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N(H)}] (4 a) or [(thf)2 K{Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N(H)}] (4 b), respectively, as well as 2-vinylpyridine in both cases. The lithium derivative shows a similar reaction behavior to the alkaline earth metal congeners, underlining the diagonal relationship in the periodic table. Protonation of 4 a or the metathesis reaction of 4 b with CaI2 in tetrahydrofuran yields N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)pivalamidine (Dipp-N=C(tBu)-NH2 ) (5), or [(thf)4 Ca{Dipp-N=C(tBu)-N(H)}2 ] (7), respectively. The reaction of AN(SiMe3 )2 (A=Na, K) with less bulky formamidine Dipp-N=C(H)-N(H)-C2 H4 -Py (8) leads to deprotonation of the amidine functionality, and [(thf)Na{Dipp-N=C(H)-N-C2 H4 -Py}]2 (9 a) or [(thf)K{Dipp-N=C(H)-N-C2 H4 -Py}]2 (9 b), respectively, are isolated as dinuclear complexes. From these experiments it is obvious, that β-metalation/deamidation of N-(2-pyridylethyl)amidines requires bases with soft metal ions and also steric pressure. The isomeric forms of all compounds are verified by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis and are maintained in solution. PMID:27355970

  20. Role of magnesium ions in the reaction mechanism at the interface between Tm1631 protein and its DNA ligand.

    PubMed

    Ogrizek, Mitja; Konc, Janez; Bren, Urban; Hodošček, Milan; Janežič, Dušanka

    2016-01-01

    A protein, Tm1631 from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima belongs to a domain of unknown function protein family. It was predicted that Tm1631 binds with the DNA and that the Tm1631-DNA complex is an endonuclease repair system with a DNA repair function (Konc et al. PLoS Comput Biol 9(11): e1003341, 2013). We observed that the severely bent, strained DNA binds to the protein for the entire 90 ns of classical molecular dynamics (MD) performed; we could observe no significant changes in the most distorted region of the DNA, where the cleavage of phosphodiester bond occurs. In this article, we modeled the reaction mechanism at the interface between Tm1631 and its proposed ligand, the DNA molecule, focusing on cleavage of the phosphodiester bond. After addition of two Mg(2+) ions to the reaction center and extension of classical MD by 50 ns (totaling 140 ns), the DNA ligand stayed bolted to the protein. Results from density functional theory quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations suggest that the reaction is analogous to known endonuclease mechanisms: an enzyme reaction mechanism with two Mg(2+) ions in the reaction center and a pentacovalent intermediate. The minimum energy pathway profile shows that the phosphodiester bond cleavage step of the reaction is kinetically controlled and not thermodynamically because of a lack of any energy barrier above the accuracy of the energy profile calculation. The role of ions is shown by comparing the results with the reaction mechanisms in the absence of the Mg(2+) ions where there is a significantly higher reaction barrier than in the presence of the Mg(2+) ions.Graphical abstractA protein, Tm1631 from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima belongs to a domain of unknown function protein family. We modeled the reaction mechanism at the interface between Tm1631 and its proposed ligand, the DNA molecule, focusing on cleavage of the phosphodiester bond. PMID:27398092

  1. The Production of (26)Al in the Early Solar System by the (16)O((16)O, X)(26)Al(Gs) and (14)N((16)O, X)(26)Al(Gs) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Kazim Orhan

    1998-12-01

    The astrophysically short half life (0.74 Myr) of 26Al isotope makes it one of the more important extinct nuclides whose abundances in the early solar system can be used as a probe of the environment in which the solar system formed. The abundance of 26Al in the present galaxy deduced from the gamma ray observations ( (Mah84) and (Die95)) is about an order of magnitude lower than its meteoritic abundances measured in the form of an enhancement in the abundance of 26Mg (daughter of 26Al) over the solar system level (Was85). The existence of 26Al in the meteorites is an indication that some sort of nucleosynthesis event occurred less than a few million years before the collapse of the proto-solar cloud, perhaps during that collapse. The most widely accepted explanation is that a nearby stellar explosion (such as a supernova) injected large amounts of 26Al and some other extinct nuclides into the proto-solar cloud, possibly triggering the collapse of the cloud in the process (e.g., (Cam77), (Cam92) and (Cam95)). Motivated by the COMPTEL observation (Blo94) of unexpectedly high fluxes of gamma rays in the energy range of 3-7 MeV from the direction of the Orion complex, Clayton and Jin ( (Cla94), (Cla95a) and (Cla95b)) proposed several cosmic-ray scenarios for the production of 26Al in the early solar system. One of their scenarios is that the meteoritic 26Al was produced by the irradiation of the proto-solar material by oxygen-rich cosmic rays (with energies up to 10 MeV/nucleon) through the 12C(16O,x)26Algs reaction. In order to test this proposal Bateman et al. (Bat96b) measured the yield of the 12C(16O,x)26Al reaction and determined that the yield of this reaction alone is not large enough to produce the meteoritic abundances of 26Al. Even though Clayton and Jin (Cla95a) assumed the contribution to the yield from the 16O(16O,x)26Algs would not be significant, the yield of this reaction was measured in the experimental work of this thesis. Due to higher solar system

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of magnesium ferrite nanoparticles prepared via EDTA-based sol-gel reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Shaban I.; Elkady, Ashraf S.; Rashad, M. M.; Mostafa, A. G.; Megahid, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nanoparticles have been prepared, for the first time, by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-based sol-gel combustion method. The prepared ferrite system is calcined at 400, 500 and 600 °C. Thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) were applied for elucidating the structural and magnetic properties of the prepared system. XRD patterns revealed that the prepared system have two spinel MgFe2O4 structures, namely cubic and tetragonal phases that are dependent on calcination temperature (Tc). The crystallite sizes varied from 8.933 to 41.583 nm, and from 1.379 to 292.565 nm for the cubic and tetragonal phases respectively depending on Tc. The deduced lattice parameters for the cubic and (tetragonal) systems are a=8.368, 8.365 and 8.377 and (a=7.011, 5.922, 5.908 and c=6.622, 8.456, 8.364) Å at Tc=400, 500 and 600 °C respectively. While the cation distribution of the cubic phase is found to be mixed spinel and Tc-dependent, it is an inverse spinel in the tetragonal phase where the Fe3+ ions occupy both the tetrahedral A- and octahedral B-sites in almost equal amount; the Mg2+ ions are found to occupy only the B-sites. The HRTEM and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) revealed the detailed morphology of the nanoparticles, and confirmed their crystalline spinel structure. VSM indicated the existence of an appreciable fraction of superparamagnetic particles at room temperature, with pure superparamagnetic behavior observed for samples calcined at 400 °C. Besides, the magnetic properties are found to change by thermal treatment as a result of the varied phase concentration, cation distribution and lattice parameters. Thus, the new synthesis route used in this study by applying EDTA as an organic precursor for preparing MgFe2O4 nanoparticles at

  3. Production of magnesium metal

    DOEpatents

    Blencoe, James G.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Palmer, Donald A.; Beard, James S.

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  4. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  5. Solvent Influences on the Molecular Aggregation of Magnesium Aryloxides

    SciTech Connect

    ZECHMANN,CECILIA A.; BOYLE,TIMOTHY J.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; KEMP,RICHARD A.

    2000-07-14

    Magnesium aryloxides were prepared in a variety of solvents through the reaction of dibutyl magnesium with sterically varied aryl alcohols: 2,6-dimethylphenol (H-DMP), 2,6-diisopropylphenol (H-DIP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (H-TCP). Upon using a sufficiently strong Lewis-basic solvent, the monomeric species Mg(DMP){sub 2}(py){sub 3} (1, py = pyridine), Mg(DIP){sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, (2a, THF = tetrahydrofuran) Mg(TCP){sub 2}(THF){sub 3} (3) were isolated. Each of these complexes possesses a five-coordinate magnesium that adopts a trigonal bipyramidal geometry. In the absence of a Lewis base, the reaction with H-DIP yields a soluble trinuclear complex, [Mg(DIP){sub 2}]{sub 3} (2b). The Mg metal centers in 2b adopt a linear arrangement with a four-coordinate central metal while the outer metal centers are reduced to just three-coordinate. Solution spectroscopic methods suggest that while 2b remains intact, the monomeric species (1, 2a, and 3) are involved in equilibria, which facilitate intermolecular ligand transfer.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  10. High-precision {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction to determine {sup 22}Mg({alpha},p){sup 25}Al reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Matic, A.; Berg, A. M. van den; Harakeh, M. N.; Woertche, H. J.; Beard, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.

    2011-08-15

    The rise time of stellar x-ray bursts is a signature of thermonuclear runaway processes in the atmosphere of neutron stars and is highly sensitive to a series of ({alpha},p) reactions via high-lying resonances in sd-shell nuclei. Lacking data for the relevant resonance levels, the stellar reaction rates have been calculated using statistical, Hauser-Feshbach models, assuming a high-level density. This assumption may not be correct in view of the selectivity of the ({alpha},p) reaction to natural parity states. We measured the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction with a high-resolution spectrometer to identify resonance levels in {sup 26}Si above the {alpha}-emission threshold at 9.164 MeV excitation energy. These resonance levels are used to calculate the stellar reaction rate of the {sup 22}Mg({alpha},p){sup 25}Al reaction and to test the validity of the statistical assumption.

  11. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of <150 micron fines from ten sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform (RN) and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). One was drilled from the Windjana (WJ) site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation. Four were drilled from sites Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP) and Buckskin (BK) of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp. Two were drilled from sandstones of the Stimson formation targeting relatively unaltered (Big Sky, BY) and then altered (Greenhorn, GH) material associated with a light colored fracture zone. CheMin analyses provided quantitative sample mineralogy. SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases. This contribution will focus on evolved SO2. All samples evolved SO2 above 500 C. The shapes of the SO2 evolution traces with temperature vary between samples but most have at least two "peaks' within the wide high temperature evolution, from approx. 500-700 and approx. 700-860 C (Fig. 1). In many cases, the only sulfur minerals detected with CheMin were Ca sulfates (e.g., RN and GH), which should thermally decompose at temperatures above those obtainable by SAM (>860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose

  12. Heterogeneous-phase reactions of nitrogen dioxide with vermiculite-supported magnesium oxide (as applied to the control of jet engine test cell emissions). Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kimm, L.T.

    1995-11-01

    Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) from a non-steady-state stationary source like a jet engine test cell (JETC) requires a method that is effective over a wide range of conditions. A heterogeneous, porous, high surface area sorbent material comprised of magnesium oxide powder attached to a vermiculite substrate has been commercially developed for this purpose. Data from extensive laboratory testing of this material in a packed-bed flow system are presented. NO2 removal efficiencies, kinetics, and proposed NO2 removal mechanisms over a range of representative JETC exhaust gas characteristics are described. Exhaust gas variables evaluated included: NO2 concentration, temperature, flow rate (retention time), oxygen content, and moisture content. Availability of water and oxygen were found to be important variables. It is probable that water is necessary for the conversion of MgO to Mg(OH)2, which is a more reactive compound having thermal stability over the range of temperatures evaluated. Gaseous oxygen serves to oxidize NO to NO2, the latter being more readily removed from the gas stream. The presence of oxygen also serves to offset thermal decomposition of NO2 or surface nitrite/nitrate. Effective `lifetime` and regenerability of the exposed sorbent material were also evaluated. NO2 removal efficiencies were found to greatly exceed those for NO, with a maximum value greater than 90 percent. The effective conversion of NO to NO2 is a crucial requirement for removal of the former. The reaction between NO2 and MgO-vermiculite is first-order with respect to NO2.

  13. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  15. Inverse Kinematic Study of the (26g)Al(d,p)(27)Al Reaction and Implications for Destruction of (26)Al in Wolf-Rayet and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars.

    PubMed

    Margerin, V; Lotay, G; Woods, P J; Aliotta, M; Christian, G; Davids, B; Davinson, T; Doherty, D T; Fallis, J; Howell, D; Kirsebom, O S; Mountford, D J; Rojas, A; Ruiz, C; Tostevin, J A

    2015-08-01

    In Wolf-Rayet and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the (26g)Al(p,γ)(27)Si reaction is expected to govern the destruction of the cosmic γ-ray emitting nucleus (26)Al. The rate of this reaction, however, is highly uncertain due to the unknown properties of key resonances in the temperature regime of hydrogen burning. We present a high-resolution inverse kinematic study of the (26g)Al(d,p)(27)Al reaction as a method for constraining the strengths of key astrophysical resonances in the (26g)Al(p,γ)(27)Si reaction. In particular, the results indicate that the resonance at E(r)=127  keV in (27)Si determines the entire (26g)Al(p,γ)(27)Si reaction rate over almost the complete temperature range of Wolf-Rayet stars and AGB stars. PMID:26296114

  16. Low magnesium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low magnesium level is a condition in which the amount of magnesium in the blood is lower than normal. The medical ... that convert or use energy ( metabolism ). When the level of magnesium in the body drops below normal, ...

  17. Graphitic encapsulation of MgO and Fe{sub 3}C nanoparticles in the reaction of iron pentacarbonyl with magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Dyjak, Sławomir; Cudziło, Stanisław; Polański, Marek; Budner, Bogusław; Bystrzycki, Jerzy

    2013-07-15

    A simple method to produce highly ordered carbon nanostructures by combustion synthesis is presented. Graphite-encapsulated magnesium oxide, iron carbide nanoparticles and carbon nanobelts were synthesized by the one-step reduction of iron pentacarbonyl with magnesium. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the products revealed nanocrystalline MgO and Fe{sub 3}C particles surrounded by a well-crystallized, tight graphite film. The possible formation mechanism is presented and discussed. - Highlights: • We present a simple method to produce highly ordered carbon nanostructures by combustion synthesis. • The cubic MgO particles are completely coated by tight graphitic shells. • The mechanism of formation a distant carbon film on MgO surface has been discussed. • The presented method can be applied to synthesis of other core-shell structures.

  18. Angle-integrated measurements of the 26Al (d, n)27Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P. J.; Nunes, F.; Langer, C.; Schatz, H.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Browne, J.; Doherty, D. T.; Estrade, A.; Gade, A.; Kontos, A.; Lotay, G.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Noji, S.; Perdikakis, G.; Pereira, J.; Recchia, F.; Redpath, T.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Stevens, J.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Zegers, R.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in 27Si have been performed studying the 26Al ( d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ -decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the 26Al ( p, γ) 27Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment.

  19. One-pot multiple reactions: asymmetric synthesis of 2,6-cis-disubstituted piperidine alkaloids from chiral aziridine.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Nagendra Nath; Choi, Jihye; Ha, Hyun-Joon

    2016-07-01

    A divergent, new, and highly stereoselective synthesis of cis-2,6-disubstituted piperidine natural products including isosolenopsins, deoxocassine, and spectaline was achieved from chiral aziridine decorated with appropriate alkyl chains for isosolenopsins or alkynyl groups for deoxocassine and spectaline at C2. The characteristic feature of this synthesis is one-pot sequential reactions under atmospheric hydrogen including the reduction of alkyne (for deoxocassine and spectaline), reductive ring-opening of aziridine, debenzylation, and intramolecular reductive amination in high yields. The prerequisite aziridines were elaborated from commercially available (2S)-hydroxymethylaziridine through oxidation, Wittig olefination, and the Grignard reaction for isosolenopsins or substrate-controlled lithium alkynylate addition for deoxocassine and spectaline. PMID:27189444

  20. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  1. Magnesium and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Leary, W P; Reyes, A J

    1983-10-22

    Magnesium deficiency may result from reduced dietary intake of the ion or increased losses in sweat, urine or faeces. Stress potentiates magnesium deficiency, and an increased incidence of sudden death associated with ischaemic heart disease is found in some areas in which soil and drinking water lack magnesium. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated experimentally that reduction of the plasma magnesium level is associated with arterial spasm. Careful studies are required to assess the clinical importance of magnesium and the benefits of magnesium supplementation in man. PMID:6353622

  2. Absolute Determination for the Sodium-22(p,gamma)Magnesium-23 Reaction Rate: Consequences for Nucleosynthesis of Sodium-22 in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaska, Anne L.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations of classical novae on ONe white dwarfs predict substantial production of 22Na. Observation of 22Na decay should be correlated with the corresponding nova because the half life of 22Na is only 2.6 years. The 1275-keV gamma ray from the beta decay of 22Na is, therefore, an excellent diagnostic for the nova phenomenon and a long-sought target of gamma-ray telescopes. Nova simulations determine the maximum 22Na-detection distance to be < 1 kpc for the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, consistent with its non-observation to date. However, model estimates are strongly dependent on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p, gamma)23Mg reaction, which is the main destruction mechanism of 22Na in novae. The 22Na(p,gamma)23Mg rate is expected to be dominated by narrow, isolated resonances with Ep < 300 key. The currently employed rate is based on a single set of absolute resonance-strength measurements with Ep ≥ 290 keV, and one relative measurement of resonances with Ep ≥ 214 keV. Recently, a new level has been found in 23Mg which would correspond to a resonance at Ep = 198 keV that might dominate the reaction rate at nova temperatures. We have measured the 22Na(p, gamma) 23Mg resonance strengths directly and absolutely, in addition to resonance energies and branches. Proton beams were produced at the University of Washington and delivered to a specially designed beam line that included rastering and cold vacuum protection of the 22Na-implanted targets (fabricated at TRIUMF-ISAC). Two high-purity germanium detectors were employed and surrounded by anticoincidence shields to reduce cosmic backgrounds. Measurements were made on known 22Na+p resonances, which we observed at laboratory energies Ep = 213, 288, 454, 610 keV and on proposed resonances at Ep = 198, 209, and 232 key. The proposed resonances were not observed, and the upper limit placed on the 198-keV resonance strength indicates that the resonance at Ep = 213 keV still dominates the reaction rate

  3. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    MedlinePlus

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  4. IWTS metal-water reaction rate evaluation (Fauske and Associates report 99-26)

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-29

    The report presents a thermal stability analysis of partially metallic particulate in two IWTS components, the knock out pot and settlers. Particulate in the knock out pot is thermally stable for combinations of average particle size and metal mass fraction which appear realistic. Particulate in the settlers is thermally stable when a realistic account of particle reactions over time, metal fraction, and size distribution is considered.

  5. Magnesium and Space Flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4-6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4-6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  6. Magnesium and Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female; 47 ± 5 years old, mean ± SD) before, during, and after 4–6-month space missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight (head-down-tilt bed rest; n = 27 (17 male, 10 female), 35 ± 7 years old). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-h urinary excretion of magnesium, along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-day space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4–6-month space missions. PMID:26670248

  7. Magnesium and Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in astronauts before, during, and after space missions, in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female) on 4-6 month space flight missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight, (head-down tilt bed rest, n=27, 35 +/- 7 y). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-hour urinary excretion of magnesium along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-d space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4- to 6-month space missions.

  8. A link between magnesium-chelatase H subunit and sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 in Arabidopsis guard cell signalling in response to abscisic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shan; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Bi, Chao; Xin, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium-chelatase H subunit [CHLH/putative abscisic acid (ABA) receptor ABAR] positively regulates guard cell signalling in response to ABA, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. A member of the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2 family, SnRK2.6/open stomata 1 (OST1)/SRK2E, which plays a critical role in ABA signalling in Arabidopsis guard cells, interacts with ABAR/CHLH. Neither mutation nor over-expression of the ABAR gene affects significantly ABA-insensitive phenotypes of stomatal movement in the OST1 knockout mutant allele srk2e. However, OST1 over-expression suppresses ABA-insensitive phenotypes of the ABAR mutant allele cch in stomatal movement. These genetic data support that OST1 functions downstream of ABAR in ABA signalling in guard cells. Consistent with this, ABAR protein is phosphorylated, but independently of the OST1 protein kinase. Two ABAR mutant alleles, cch and rtl1, show ABA insensitivity in ABA-induced reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, as well as in ABA-activated phosphorylation of a K+ inward channel KAT1 in guard cells, which is consistent with that observed in the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant of the well-characterized ABA receptor PYR/PYL/RCAR family acting upstream of OST1. These findings suggest that ABAR shares, at least in part, downstream signalling components with PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors for ABA in guard cells; though cch and rtl1 show strong ABA-insensitive phenotypes in both ABA-induced stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, while the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant shows strong ABA insensitivity only in ABA-induced stomatal closure. These data establish a link between ABAR/CHLH and SnRK2.6/OST1 in guard cell signalling in response to ABA. PMID:26175350

  9. A link between magnesium-chelatase H subunit and sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 in Arabidopsis guard cell signalling in response to abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shan; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Bi, Chao; Xin, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium-chelatase H subunit [CHLH/putative abscisic acid (ABA) receptor ABAR] positively regulates guard cell signalling in response to ABA, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. A member of the sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2 family, SnRK2.6/open stomata 1 (OST1)/SRK2E, which plays a critical role in ABA signalling in Arabidopsis guard cells, interacts with ABAR/CHLH. Neither mutation nor over-expression of the ABAR gene affects significantly ABA-insensitive phenotypes of stomatal movement in the OST1 knockout mutant allele srk2e. However, OST1 over-expression suppresses ABA-insensitive phenotypes of the ABAR mutant allele cch in stomatal movement. These genetic data support that OST1 functions downstream of ABAR in ABA signalling in guard cells. Consistent with this, ABAR protein is phosphorylated, but independently of the OST1 protein kinase. Two ABAR mutant alleles, cch and rtl1, show ABA insensitivity in ABA-induced reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production, as well as in ABA-activated phosphorylation of a K(+) inward channel KAT1 in guard cells, which is consistent with that observed in the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant of the well-characterized ABA receptor PYR/PYL/RCAR family acting upstream of OST1. These findings suggest that ABAR shares, at least in part, downstream signalling components with PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors for ABA in guard cells; though cch and rtl1 show strong ABA-insensitive phenotypes in both ABA-induced stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, while the pyr1 pyl1 pyl2 pyl4 quadruple mutant shows strong ABA insensitivity only in ABA-induced stomatal closure. These data establish a link between ABAR/CHLH and SnRK2.6/OST1 in guard cell signalling in response to ABA. PMID:26175350

  10. Monitoring Biodegradation of Magnesium Implants with Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Daoli; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Xuefei; Kuhlmann, Julia; Doepke, Amos; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Heineman, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys exhibit properties such as high strength, light weight, and in vivo corrosion that make them promising candidates for the development of biodegradable metallic implant materials for bone repair, stents and other medical applications. Sensors have been used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium and its alloys by measuring the concentrations of the following corrosion products: magnesium ions, hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. The corrosion characterization system with home-made capillary pH and Mg2+ microsensors has been developed for real-time detection of magnesium corrosion in vitro. A hydrogen gas sensor was used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium by measuring the concentration of the hydrogen gas reaction product in vivo. The high permeability of hydrogen through skin allows transdermal monitoring of the biodegradation of a magnesium alloy implanted beneath the skin by detecting hydrogen gas at the skin surface. The sensor was used to map hydrogen concentration in the vicinity of an implanted magnesium alloy.

  11. Magnesium industry overview

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, B.B.

    1996-10-01

    Magnesium products provide an excellent strength-to-weight ratio, good fatigue strength, high impact strength, good corrosion resistance, high-speed machinability, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. As a result, applications are expanding in almost every industry. Dozens of automotive components are now made of magnesium, including steering wheels, valve covers, and seat frames. Magnesium alloys are also used in computer housings, in-line roller skates, golf clubs, tennis racquets, and baseball bats. Good strength and stiffness at both room and elevated temperatures make magnesium alloys especially valuable for aerospace applications. This article presents an overview of magnesium technology, world production, increasing demand, and recycling.

  12. Two Stereoisomers of Spheroidene in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 Reaction Center: A DFT Analysis of Resonance Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, A. C.; van Hemert, M. C.; Lugtenburg, J.; Frank, H. A.; Groenen, E. J. J.

    2007-01-01

    From a theoretical analysis of the resonance Raman spectra of 19 isotopomers of spheroidene reconstituted into the reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26, we conclude that the carotenoid in the RC occurs in two configurations. The normal mode underlying the resonance Raman transition at 1239 cm−1, characteristic for spheroidene in the RC, has been identified and found to uniquely refer to the cis nature of the 15,15′ carbon-carbon double bond. Detailed analysis of the isotope-induced shifts of transitions in the 1500–1550 cm−1 region proves that, besides the 15,15′-cis configuration, spheroidene in the RC adopts another cis-configuration, most likely the 13,14-cis configuration. PMID:17617552

  13. Impact of a Revised 25Mg(p, γ)26Al Reaction Rate on the Operation of the Mg-Al Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straniero, O.; Imbriani, G.; Strieder, F.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Cristallo, S.; DiLeva, A.; Formicola, A.; Elekes, Z.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Limata, B.; Marta, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Piersanti, L.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H.-P.

    2013-02-01

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H-burning regions. In particular, low-energy nuclear resonances in the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al reaction affect the production of radioactive 26Algs as well as the resulting Mg/Al abundance ratio. Reliable estimations of these quantities require precise measurements of the strengths of low-energy resonances. Based on a new experimental study performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, we provide revised rates of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Algs and the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al m reactions with corresponding uncertainties. In the temperature range 50-150 MK, the new recommended rate of 26Al m production is up to five times higher than previously assumed. In addition, at T = 100 MK, the revised total reaction rate is a factor of two higher. Note that this is the range of temperature at which the Mg-Al cycle operates in a H-burning zone. The effects of this revision are discussed. Due to the significantly larger 25Mg(p, γ)26Al m rate, the estimated production of 26Algs in H-burning regions is less efficient than previously obtained. As a result, the new rates should imply a smaller contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars to the galactic 26Al budget. Similarly, we show that the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extra-mixing scenario does not appear able to explain the most extreme values of 26Al/27Al, i.e., >10-2, found in some O-rich presolar grains. Finally, the substantial increase of the total reaction rate makes the hypothesis of self-pollution by massive AGBs a more robust explanation for the Mg-Al anticorrelation observed in globular-cluster stars.

  14. Magnesium stable isotope fractionation in marine biogenic calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wombacher, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Böhm, F.; Gussone, N.; Regenberg, M.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Rüggeberg, A.

    2011-10-01

    This survey of magnesium stable isotope compositions in marine biogenic aragonite and calcite includes samples from corals, sclerosponges, benthic porcelaneous and planktonic perforate foraminifera, coccolith oozes, red algae, and an echinoid and brachiopod test. The analyses were carried out using MC-ICP-MS with an external repeatability of ±0.22‰ (2SD for δ 26Mg; n = 37), obtained from a coral reference sample (JCp-1). Magnesium isotope fractionation in calcitic corals and sclerosponges agrees with published data for calcitic speleothems with an average Δ 26Mg calcite-seawater = -2.6 ± 0.3‰ that appears to be weakly related to temperature. With one exception ( Vaceletia spp.), aragonitic corals and sclerosponges also display uniform Mg isotope fractionations relative to seawater with Δ 26Mg biogenic aragonite-seawater = -0.9 ± 0.2. Magnesium isotopes in high-Mg calcites from red algae, echinoids and perhaps some porcelaneous foraminifera as well as in all low-Mg calcites (perforate foraminifera, coccoliths and brachiopods) display significant biological influences. For planktonic foraminifera, the Mg isotope data is consistent with the fixation of Mg by organic material under equilibrium conditions, but appears to be inconsistent with Mg removal from vacuoles. Our preferred model, however, suggests that planktonic foraminifera synthesize biomolecules that increase the energetic barrier for Mg incorporation. In this model, the need to remove large quantities of Mg from vacuole solutions is avoided. For the high-Mg calcites from echinoids, the precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate may be responsible for their weaker Mg isotope fractionation. Disregarding superimposed biological effects, it appears that cation light isotope enrichments in CaCO 3 principally result from a chemical kinetic isotope effect, related to the incorporation of cations at kink sites. In this model, the systematics of cation isotope fractionations in CaCO 3 relate to the

  15. Experimental determination of the {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na reaction cross section and calculation of the Maxwellian averaged cross section at stellar temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smet, L. de; Wagemans, C.; Wagemans, J.; Heyse, J.; Gils, J. van

    2007-10-15

    The {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na reaction cross section has been studied at the linear accelerator GELINA of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements in Geel, Belgium, and has been determined up to a neutron energy of about 100 keV using the time-of-flight technique. Six resonances could be observed in this energy region, whereas before only one had been identified experimentally. For four of them, resonance parameters such as resonance energy, total width, area, and spin of the state could be determined. From the obtained {sup 26}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 23}Na cross section data, Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) values were calculated by numerical integration. Since neutron induced reactions are among the major destruction mechanisms of {sup 26}Al in our Galaxy, these new MACS values contribute to a better understanding of the observed {sup 26}Al abundance.

  16. Magnesium in depression.

    PubMed

    Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wlaź, Piotr; Nowak, Gabriel; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Skalski, Michał; Poleszak, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium is one of the most essential mineral in the human body, connected with brain biochemistry and the fluidity of neuronal membrane. A variety of neuromuscular and psychiatric symptoms, including different types of depression, was observed in magnesium deficiency. Plasma/serum magnesium levels do not seem to be the appropriate indicators of depressive disorders, since ambiguous outcomes, depending on the study, were obtained. The emergence of a new approach to magnesium compounds in medical practice has been seen. Apart from being administered as components of dietary supplements, they are also perceived as the effective agents in treatment of migraine, alcoholism, asthma, heart diseases, arrhythmias, renal calcium stones, premenstrual tension syndrome etc. Magnesium preparations have an essential place in homeopathy as a remedy for a range of mental health problems. Mechanisms of antidepressant action of magnesium are not fully understood yet. Most probably, magnesium influences several systems associated with development of depression. The first information on the beneficial effect of magnesium sulfate given hypodermically to patients with agitated depression was published almost 100 years ago. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies confirmed the initial observations as well as demonstrated the beneficial safety profile of magnesium supplementation. Thus, magnesium preparations seem to be a valuable addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for management of depression. PMID:23950577

  17. Magnesium in disease

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Although the following text will focus on magnesium in disease, its role in healthy subjects during physical exercise when used as a supplement to enhance performance is also noteworthy. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension; consequently, some individuals benefit from magnesium supplementation: increasing magnesium consumption appears to prevent high blood pressure, and higher serum magnesium levels are associated with a lower risk of developing a metabolic syndrome. There are, however, conflicting study results regarding magnesium administration with myocardial infarction with and without reperfusion therapy. There was a long controversy as to whether or not magnesium should be given as a first-line medication. As the most recent trials have not shown any difference in outcome, intravenous magnesium cannot be recommended in patients with myocardial infarction today. However, magnesium has its indication in patients with torsade de pointes and has been given successfully to patients with digoxin-induced arrhythmia or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Magnesium sulphate as an intravenous infusion also has an important established therapeutic role in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia as it decreases the risk of eclamptic seizures by half compared with placebo. PMID:26069818

  18. Decomposition reactions of magnesium sulfate hydrates and phase equilibria in the MgSO 4-H 2O and Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O systems with implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Michael; Linnow, Kirsten; Ehrhardt, Dorothee; Rohde, Mandy

    2011-06-01

    We report new measurements of equilibrium relative humidities for stable and metastable hydration-dehydration equilibria involving several magnesium sulfates in the MgSO 4· nH 2O series. We also report a comprehensive thermodynamic treatment of the system including solution properties and experimental data from the published literature, i.e. solubilities, heat capacities and additional decomposition humidities. While for some magnesium sulfate hydrates solubility data in the binary system MgSO 4-H 2O are sparse, there is a reasonable database of solubility measurements of these hydrates in the ternary MgCl 2-MgSO 4-H 2O and the quaternary reciprocal Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O systems. To make these data suitable for the determination of solubility products, we parameterized a Pitzer ion interaction model for the calculation of activity coefficients and water activities in mixed solutions of these systems and report the ion interaction parameters for the Na +-Mg 2+-Cl --SO 42--H 2O system. The model predicted solubilities in the reciprocal system are in very good agreement with experimental data. Using all available experimental data and the solution model an updated phase diagram of the MgSO 4-H 2O system covering the whole temperature range from about 170 to 473 K is established. This treatment includes MgSO 4·H 2O (kieserite), MgSO 4·4H 2O (starkeyite), MgSO 4·5H 2O (pentahydrite), MgSO 4·6H 2O (hexahydrite), MgSO 4·7H 2O (epsomite) and MgSO 4·11H 2O (meridianiite). It is shown that only kieserite, hexahydrite, epsomite and meridianiite show fields of stable existence while starkeyite and pentahydrite are always metastable. Due to sluggish kinetics of kieserite formation, however, there is a rather extended field of metastable existence of starkeyite which makes this solid a major product in dehydration reactions. The model predicted behavior of the magnesium sulfates is in excellent agreement with observations reported in the literature under terrestrial

  19. Regioselective synthesis of isotopically labeled Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A-D3) by reaction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D3 with magnesium methyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Roth, Nadine; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Müller, Michael; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-10-10

    For the reliable quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in biological matrices by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS(/MS), an isotopically labeled internal standard was synthesized starting from Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D(3) (THC-D(3)). Synthesis strategy was based on a method reported by Mechoulam et al. in 1969 using magnesium methyl carbonate (MMC) as carboxylation reagent for the synthesis of cannabinoid acids. Preliminary experiments with THC to optimize yield of the product (THCA-A) resulted in the synthesis of the positional isomer tetrahydrocannabinolic acid B (THCA-B) as a byproduct. Using the optimized conditions for the desired isomer, THCA-A-D(3) was prepared and isolated with a yield of approx. 10% after two synthesis cycles. Isotope purity was estimated to be >99% by relative abundance of the molecular ions. The synthesized compound proved to be suitable as an internal standard for quantification of THCA-A in serum and hair samples of cannabis consumers. PMID:22921834

  20. Enhanced Bacterial α(2,6)-Sialyltransferase Reaction through an Inhibition of Its Inherent Sialidase Activity by Dephosphorylation of Cytidine-5'-Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Yeon; Lim, Se-Jong; Kwon, Ohsuk; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Ha Hyung; Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α(2,6)-sialyltransferases (STs) from Photobacterium damsela, Photobacterium sp. JT-ISH-224, and P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and their ST activities were compared directly using a galactosylated bi-antennary N-glycan as an acceptor substrate. In all ST reactions, there was an increase of sialylated glycans at shorter reaction times and later a decrease in prolonged reactions, which is related with the inherent sialidase activities of bacterial STs. These sialidase activities are greatly increased by free cytidine monophosphate (CMP) generated from a donor substrate CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) during the ST reactions. The decrease of sialylated glycans in prolonged ST reaction was prevented through an inhibition of sialidase activity by simple treatment of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which dephosphorylates CMP to cytidine. Through supplemental additions of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac to the reaction using the recombinant α(2,6)-ST from P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 (P145-ST), the content of bi-sialylated N-glycan increased up to ~98% without any decrease in prolonged reactions. This optimized P145-ST reaction was applied successfully for α(2,6)-sialylation of asialofetuin, and this resulted in a large increase in the populations of multi-sialylated N-glycans compared with the reaction without addition of AP and CMP-Neu5Ac. These results suggest that the optimized reaction using the recombinant P145-ST readily expressed from E. coli has a promise for economic glycan synthesis and glyco-conjugate remodeling. PMID:26231036

  1. Magnesium in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Lynne M; Ní Fhloinn, Deirdre M; Gaydadzhieva, Gergana T; Mazurkiewicz, Ola M; Leeson, Heather; Wright, Ciara P

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium deficiency is prevalent in women of childbearing age in both developing and developed countries. The need for magnesium increases during pregnancy, and the majority of pregnant women likely do not meet this increased need. Magnesium deficiency or insufficiency during pregnancy may pose a health risk for both the mother and the newborn, with implications that may extend into adulthood of the offspring. The measurement of serum magnesium is the most widely used method for determining magnesium levels, but it has significant limitations that have both hindered the assessment of deficiency and affected the reliability of studies in pregnant women. Thus far, limited studies have suggested links between magnesium inadequacy and certain conditions in pregnancy associated with high mortality and morbidity, such as gestational diabetes, preterm labor, preeclampsia, and small for gestational age or intrauterine growth restriction. This review provides recommendations for further study and improved testing using measurement of red cell magnesium. Pregnant women should be counseled to increase their intake of magnesium-rich foods such as nuts, seeds, beans, and leafy greens and/or to supplement with magnesium at a safe level. PMID:27445320

  2. The association of different detergents with the photosynthetic reaction center protein of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 and the effects on its photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gast, P; Hemelrijk, P W; Van Gorkom, H J; Hoff, A J

    1996-08-01

    Detergent-free reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 were used to study the solubilization of reaction centers in various detergents and their effects on reaction center photochemistry. 500 +/- 100 n-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside or 51 +/- 5 Triton X-100 molecules were associated with one reaction center. For N.N-alkylamine N-oxide detergents with chain lengths in the range from 8-13 carbon atoms, the number of detergent molecules associated with the reaction centers increased with decreasing chain length. The amount of detergent molecules associated with the reaction centers decreased almost tenfold if the pH was increased from pH 6 to pH 10. The addition of 5% 1,2,3-heptanetriol to various detergents lowered the detergent/reaction center ratio by a factor of two compared to that for the pure detergent. The detergent concentration at which solubilization of the reaction center occurs was close to the critical micelle concentration for all detergents studied. The absorption band at 865 nm of the primary donor in the reaction center shifts to 846 nm when detergent was removed from the reaction center; upon resolubilization with various detergents, this band shifts back to 865 nm. In 80-90% of the detergent-free reaction centers, the secondary electron transfer from QA to QB was inhibited: this electron transfer was restored after re-addition of detergent. PMID:8774729

  3. The anticarcinogenic effect of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Blondell, J M

    1980-08-01

    Evidence is reviewed supporting a hypothesis of an anticarcinogenic effect of magnesium. Animal studies reported increased cancer in rodents maintained on magnesium deficient diets and a preventive effect for rodents fed excess levels of magnesium. Epidemiologic evidence is presented that magnesium levels in water, food, and air are inversely related to cancer mortality. Magnesium may also have a role in the reduced cancer mortality experienced by people living at high altitudes. Two biologically plausible mechanisms are considered by which magnesium could prevent carcinogenesis. Intracellular magnesium may enhance the fidelity of DNA replication or magnesium on the cell membrane may prevent changes which trigger the carcinogenic process. PMID:7442590

  4. Kinetic studies of the reverse reaction catalysed by adenosine triphosphate–creatine phosphotransferase. The inhibition by magnesium ions and adenosine diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J. F.; O'Sullivan, W. J.

    1965-01-01

    1. Kinetic investigations of the reaction catalysed by ATP–creatine phosphotransferase have been carried out. 2. No firm conclusions could be reached about the reaction of Mg2+ at the nucleotide-binding site of the enzyme. The value of the kinetic constant for this reaction depends on the value used for the apparent stability constant of the metal ion–nucleotide complex and, to a smaller extent, on the method of plotting the results. 3. At higher concentrations Mg2+ is a non-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to both MgADP− and phosphocreatine. 4. ADP3− is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to MgADP− and a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to phosphocreatine. 5. The concentration of phosphocreatine has little, if any, effect on the kinetic constants for the nucleotide reactants. PMID:14342234

  5. ESR in zero field of the photoinduced triplet state in isolated reaction centers of rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26 detected by the singlet ground-state absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Blanken, H. J.; Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Hoff, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured zero-field resonance transitions of the triplet state of the primary donor monitoring the transmittance at 890 nm at 1.2 K in isolated reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. The transitions correspond to a decrease in transmittance, confirming the energy transfer model for the transitions detected via the antenna fluorescence in whole cells.

  6. Laser-induced magnesium production from magnesium oxide using reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. S.; Yabe, T.; Baasandash, C.; Sato, Y.; Mori, Y.; Shi-Hua, Liao; Sato, H.; Uchida, S.

    2008-12-01

    Experiments for laser induced production of magnesium (Mg) from magnesium oxide (MgO) using reducing agents (R) were conducted. In these experiments, continuous wave CO{sub 2} focused laser is focused on a mixture of magnesium oxide and reducing agent. High power density of focused laser leads to high temperature and the reduction reaction resulting in Mg production. The resultant vapor is collected on a copper plate and analyzed in terms of magnesium deposition efficiency. Deposition efficiencies with various reducing agents such as Zr, C, and Si have been measured to be 60, 9.2, and 12.1 mg/kJ respectively. An excess addition of reducing agent over their corresponding reaction stoichiometric amounts is found to be optimum condition for the most of performed laser induced reactions. In addition, utilizing solar-pumped laser in Mg production with reducing agent will reduce CO{sub 2} emission and produce magnesium with high-energy efficiency and large throughput.

  7. Magnesium deficiency: what's our status?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low magnesium intake has been implicated in a broad range of cardiometabolic conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Dietary magnesium and total body magnesium status have a widely-used but imperfect biomarker in serum magnesium. Despite serum magnesium’s limitation...

  8. Magnesium battery disposal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Louis; Atwater, Terrill

    1994-12-01

    This study assesses the disposal characteristics of U.S. Army procured military magnesium batteries under current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste identification regulations administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Magnesium batteries were tested at 100, 50, 10 and 0 percent remaining state of charge. Present findings indicate that magnesium batteries with less than 50 percent remaining charge do not exceed the federal regulatory limit of 5.0 mg/L for chromium. All other RCRA contaminates were below regulatory limits at all levels of remaining charge. Assay methods, findings, disposal requirements and design implications are discussed.

  9. Lithium and magnesium isotopes fractionation by zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. V.; Egorov, N. B.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Pustovalova, M. P.; Podoinikov, I. R.

    2016-06-01

    The process of changing isotopic composition of the lithium and magnesium salts was studied by using the process of zone melting. It was founded in the paper that the process of separation of the lithium isotopes is more effective than for magnesium isotopes when the conditions of process were the same. The coefficients of isotopes separation were calculated and have the next value: α = 1.006 for 26Mg isotope and α = 1.0022 for 6Li isotope.

  10. Thermal Stability of Magnesium Silicide/Nickel Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boor, J.; Droste, D.; Schneider, C.; Janek, J.; Mueller, E.

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium silicide-based materials are a very promising class of thermoelectric materials with excellent potential for thermoelectric waste heat recovery. For the successful application of magnesium silicide-based thermoelectric generators, the development of long-term stable contacts with low contact resistance is as important as material optimization. We have therefore studied the suitability of Ni as a contact material for magnesium silicide. Co-sintering of magnesium silicide and Ni leads to the formation of a stable reaction layer with low electrical resistance. In this paper we show that the contacts retain their low electrical contact resistance after annealing at temperatures up to 823 K for up to 168 h. By employing scanning electron microscope analysis and time-of-flight (ToF)-secondary ion mass spectrometry, we can further show that elemental diffusion is occurring to a very limited extent. This indicates long-term stability under practical operation conditions for magnesium silicide/nickel contacts.

  11. Magnesium isotopic composition of achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghatpour, Fatemeh; Teng, Fang-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium isotopic compositions of 22 well-characterized differentiated meteorites including 7 types of achondrites and pallasite meteorites were measured to estimate the average Mg isotopic composition of their parent bodies and evaluate Mg isotopic heterogeneity of the solar system. The δ26Mg values are -0.236‰ and -0.190‰ for acapulcoite-lodranite and angrite meteorites, respectively and vary from -0.267‰ to -0.222‰ in the winonaite-IAB-iron silicate group, -0.369‰ to -0.292‰ in aubrites, -0.269‰ to -0.158‰ in HEDs, -0.299‰ to -0.209‰ in ureilites, -0.307‰ to -0.237‰ in mesosiderites, and -0.303‰ to -0.238‰ in pallasites. Magnesium isotopic compositions of most achondrites and pallasite meteorites analyzed here are similar and reveal no significant isotopic fractionation. However, Mg isotopic compositions of D‧Orbigny (angrite) and some HEDs are slightly heavier than chondrites and the other achondrites studied here. The slightly heavier Mg isotopic compositions of angrites and some HEDs most likely resulted from either impact-induced evaporation or higher abundance of clinopyroxene with the Mg isotopic composition slightly heavier than olivine and orthopyroxene. The average Mg isotopic composition of achondrites (δ26Mg = -0.246 ± 0.082‰, 2SD, n = 22) estimated here is indistinguishable from those of the Earth (δ26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.07‰; 2SD, n = 139), chondrites (δ26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06‰; 2SD, n = 38), and the Moon (δ26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.16‰; 2SD, n = 47) reported from the same laboratory. The chondritic Mg isotopic composition of achondrites, the Moon, and the Earth further reflects homogeneity of Mg isotopes in the solar system and the lack of Mg isotope fractionation during the planetary accretion process and impact events.

  12. Magnesium for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    VanFleteren, R.

    1996-05-01

    Die cast magnesium parts are rapidly replacing steel and aluminum structural components in automotive applications, as design engineers seek to reduce assembly costs, raise fuel efficiency, and improve safety. Dozens of automotive components are now die cast from magnesium alloys, including seat stanchions, valve covers, steering wheels, and a variety of steering column components. Because of their excellent castability, complex magnesium die castings can sometimes consolidate several components and eliminate assembly steps. Highly ductile magnesium alloys such as AM60B (6% aluminum) and AM50A (5% aluminum) are important in helping to meet automotive industry crash-energy requirements for car seating and steering components. AZ91D (9% aluminum, 1% zinc) alloys are making removable rear seats in new minivans much easier to handle.

  13. Low magnesium level

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body that convert or use energy ( metabolism ). When the level of magnesium in the body ... Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  14. Magnesium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  15. Angular correlations between heavy and light fragments in the reaction sup 32 S+ sup 26 Mg at E sub lab =163. 5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S. ); Prete, G. ); Viesti, G. )

    1990-04-01

    Angular correlation measurements between heavy residues ({ital Z}{sub {ital R}}=23--13) and light fragments ({ital Z}{sub {ital L}}=2--10) have been performed for the reaction {sup 32}S+{sup 26}Mg at {ital E}{sub lab}=163.5 MeV. The binary nature of the mechanisms competing with fusion-evaporation is evidenced. Linear momentum analysis and velocity plots indicate contributions of binary reactions also for those elements that are generally believed to be produced by fusion-evaporation mechanisms.

  16. Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

  17. Interstellar magnesium abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, M. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; York, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An improved evaluation of the Mg II 1240 A doublet oscillator strength is used in conjunction with recently published Copernicus observations to derive accurate Mg II column densities toward 74 stars. These imply an average of 40 percent of interstellar magnesium is in the gaseous phase. Magnesium depletion is examined as a function of various interstellar extinction and density parameters, and the results are briefly discussed in terms of current depletion theories.

  18. Magnesium for Future Autos

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Luo, Alan A.; Sadayappan, Kumar; Shi, Wenfang

    2008-10-01

    In the quest for better fuel economy and improved environmental performance, magnesium may well become a metal of choice for constructing lighter, more efficient vehicles. Magnesium is the lightest structural metal, yet it has a high strength-to-weight ratio makes it comparable to steel in many applications. The world’s automakers already use magnesium for individual components. But new alloys and processing methods are needed before the metal can become economically and technologically feasible as a major automotive structural material. This article will explore the formation, challenges and initial results of an international collaboration—the Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project—that is leveraging the expertise and resources of Canada, China and the United States to advance the creation of magnesium-intensive vehicles. The MFERD project aims to develop the enabling technologies and knowledge base that will lead to a vehicles that are 50-60 percent lighter, equally affordable, more recyclable and of equal or better quality when compared to today’s vehicles. Databases of information also will be captured in models to enable further alloy and manufacturing process optimization. Finally, a life-cycle analysis of the magnesium used will be conducted.

  19. Direct total cross section measurement of the 16O(α,γ)20Ne reaction at Ec.m.=2.26 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Brown, J. R.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2011-08-01

    In stellar helium burning, 16O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne at Ec.m.=2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  20. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1988-10-18

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/alumnum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  1. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  2. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1988-01-01

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  3. Magnesium and metabolic syndrome: The role of magnesium in health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of conditions associated with elevated risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Magnesium, the fourth most abundant cation in the human body and required in over 300 enzymatic reactions, has been shown in experimental, observational, and clinical studies to ...

  4. Preparation and characterization of magnesium borate for special glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Lishuang; Zhong, Jianchu; Wang, Hongzhi

    2010-05-01

    Magnesium borate with a variety of B2O3/MgO molar ratios, which can be applied for special glass, has been prepared through the reaction of light-burned magnesia with boric acid by a hydrothermal method. The effects of the B2O3/MgO molar ratio of raw materials, reaction time, temperature and liquid to solid ratio (ml g-1) on the synthetic product are investigated. The XRD and TG-DTG analyses indicate that the prepared magnesium borate is a mixture of magnesium hexaborate hydrate and ascharite. The results show that high B2O3/MgO molar ratios of raw materials and low reaction liquid-solid ratios favour the product with a high B2O3/MgO molar ratio and vice versa. There exists free MgO in the product when the reaction temperature is below 140 °C or the reaction time is not enough, because of the incomplete reaction of magnesium oxide with boric acid. The process of fractional crystallization for the magnesium borate mixture is also discussed.

  5. Lectin-dependent inhibition of antigen-antibody reaction: application for measuring α2,6-sialylated glycoforms of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Kyoka; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nara, Kiyomitsu; Ito, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Kana; Nagae, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Madoka; Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime; Kuno, Atsushi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Shirotani, Keiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-01

    We developed a high-throughput Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring α2,6-sialylated transferrin (Tf), based on inhibition of anti-Tf antibody binding to α2,6-sialylated Tf by a lectin, Sambucus sieboldiana Agglutinin (SSA). The inhibition was not observed with other glycoforms, such as periodate-treated, sialidase-treated and sialidase/galactosidase-treated Tf, suggesting that the assay was glycoform specific. This finding was applied to an automated latex-agglutination immunoassay, using SSA lectin as an inhibitor (SSA-ALI). The concentration of α2,6-sialylated Tf measured by SSA-ALI in human cerebrospinal fluid was correlated with that of ELISA (r2 = 0.8554), previously developed for measuring α2,6-sialylated Tf. PMID:23921500

  6. Borosilicate glass alteration driven by magnesium carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debure, M.; Frugier, P.; De Windt, L.; Gin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The alteration of simplified synthetic glass, representative of the French reference nuclear glass R7T7, in presence of hydromagnesite has been experimentally investigated and modeled. Magnesium in solution is known to potentially enhance glass alteration; nuclear glass clayed host rocks contain magnesium and can dissolve to maintain the concentration of magnesium in solution. For modeling purposes, it was suitable to study a simple system. Hydromagnesite was therefore chosen as a simple model mineral in order to check the influence of an Mg-rich mineral on glass alteration. Since the models use thermodynamic and kinetic parameters measured in pure water and pH-buffered solutions, changing the solution composition or adding minerals is a key step towards the validation of the modeling assumptions before using the model for predictive purposes. Experiments revealed that glass alteration is enhanced in presence of hydromagnesite. Modeling was performed using the GRAAL model implemented within the CHESS/HYTEC reactive transport code. Modeling proved useful both for explaining the mechanisms involved and quantifying the impact on glass alteration: Mg coming from hydromagnesite dissolution reacts with Si provided by the glass in order to form magnesium silicates. This reaction decreases the pH down to neutral conditions where magnesium silicates are more soluble than at the natural alkali pH imposed by glass or hydromagnesite dissolution. The driving force of the magnesium silicate precipitation is eventually the interdiffusion of alkali within the altered amorphous glass layer as this mechanism consumes protons. The model's ability to describe the concentrations of elements in solution and formed solids whatever the glass/hydromagnesite ratio strongly supports the basic modeling hypothesis.

  7. Magnesium hydroxide extracted from a magnesium-rich mineral for CO{sub 2} sequestration in a gas-solid system

    SciTech Connect

    Pao-Chung Lin; Cheng-Wei Huang; Ching-Ta Hsiao; Hsisheng Teng

    2008-04-15

    Magnesium hydroxide extracted from magnesium-bearing minerals is considered a promising agent for binding CO{sub 2} as a carbonate mineral in a gas-solid reaction. An efficient extraction route consisting of hydrothermal treatment on serpentine in HCl followed by NaOH titration for Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation was demonstrated. The extracted Mg(OH){sub 2} powder had a mean crystal domain size as small as 12 nm and an apparent surface area of 54 m{sup 2}/g. Under one atmosphere of 10 vol% CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, carbonation of the serpentine-derived Mg(OH){sub 2} to 26% of the stoichiometric limit was achieved at 325{sup o}C in 2 h; while carbonation of a commercially available Mg(OH){sub 2}, with a mean crystal domain size of 33 nm and an apparent surface area of 3.5 m{sup 2}/g, reached only 9% of the stoichiometric limit. The amount of CO{sub 2} fixation was found to be inversely proportional to the crystal domain size of the Mg(OH){sub 2} specimens. The experimental data strongly suggested that only a monolayer of carbonates was formed on the crystal domain boundary in the gas-solid reaction, with little penetration of the carbonates into the crystal domain. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  9. Absorption of magnesium from orally administered magnesium sulfate in man.

    PubMed

    Morris, M E; LeRoy, S; Sutton, S C

    1987-01-01

    The use of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) as a cathartic in patients with impaired renal function can lead to severe toxicity due to hypermagnesemia. Although toxicity is uncommon in healthy subjects, little is known concerning the extent of absorption of magnesium after a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. The bioavailability of magnesium following a large oral dose of magnesium sulfate in normal volunteers was examined in the present investigation. Baseline 24-hour urinary excretion rates of magnesium and creatinine were determined over 3 consecutive days in 6 healthy men. The oral administration of 13.9 g (56.5 mmoles) magnesium sulfate U.S.P., in 4 equal hourly increments, resulted in the urinary excretion (corrected for baseline excretion rate) of 4.0 +/- 2.9% (mean +/- SD) of the dose of magnesium during the first 24 hours and 6.9 +/- 7.0% of the dose during a 72-hour interval. Magnesium sulfate administration had no effect on the 24-hour urinary excretion rate of creatinine. The baseline excretion rate of magnesium was significantly correlated with that of creatinine (r = 0.875) and inorganic sulfate (r = 0.921). All of the subjects experienced mild or moderate diarrhea. Therefore, magnesium is absorbed to a limited and variable extent in healthy adults following a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. PMID:3430654

  10. [Photometric method of the detection of magnesium oxide in the working zone air after using magnesium caustic dust].

    PubMed

    Putilina, O N; Makarevskaia, V V

    1991-01-01

    The contributors proposed a new highly sensitive selective technique of magnesium oxide detection, based on the Congo red and salicylic acid reaction. The minimal detection level is 0.25 mg of magnesium oxide in the analyzed sample volume. The range of measured concentrations varies from 0.01 to 0.4 mcg/ml. The express technique is simple and selective with Ca (II), Fe (III), AI (III). PMID:2060814

  11. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  12. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  13. Volume contraction on photoexcitation of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26: internal probe of dielectrics.

    PubMed Central

    Mauzerall, D C; Gunner, M R; Zhang, J W

    1995-01-01

    Reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides undergo a approximately 20 A3/mole volume contraction in < 50 ns after excitation. The rapid volume change is tentatively assigned to electrostriction. From its magnitude, we infer that the effective dielectric coefficient is 10-15 if the compressibility of the reaction center is similar to that of globular proteins. The volume contraction is not sensitive to replacement of the natural ubiquinone at the QA site by other quinones or to the occupancy of the QB site. The quenching caused by pressure on the reaction centers most likely occurs on a faster time scale than that of electron transfer. PMID:7711251

  14. Corrosion in Magnesium and a Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akavipat, Sanay

    Magnesium and a magnesium alloy (AZ91C) have been ion implanted over a range of ions energies (50 to 150 keV) and doses (1 x 10('16) to 2 x 10('17) ions/cm('2)) to modify the corrosion properties of the metals. The corrosion tests were done by anodic polarization in chloride -free and chloride-containing aqueous solutions of a borated -boric acid with a pH of 9.3. Anodic polarization measurements showed that some implantations could greatly reduce the corrosion current densities at all impressed voltages and also increased slightly the pitting potential, which indicated the onset of the chloride attack. These improvements in corrosion resistance were caused by boron implantations into both types of samples. However, iron implantations were found to improve only the magnesium alloy. To study the corrosion in more detail, Scanning Auger Microprobe Spectrometer (SAM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an X-ray Energy Spectrometry (XES) attachment, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) measurements were used to analyze samples before, after, and at various corrosion stages. In both the unimplanted pure magnesium and AZ91C samples, anodic polarization results revealed that there were three active corrosion stages (Stages A, C, and E) and two passivating stages (Stages B and D). Examination of Stages A and B in both types of samples showed that only a mild, generalized corrosion had occurred. In Stage C of the TD samples, a pitting breakdown in the initial oxide film was observed. In Stage C of the AZ91C samples, galvanic and intergranular attack around the Mg(,17)Al(,12) intermetallic islands and along the matrix grain boundaries was observed. Stage D of both samples showed the formation of a thick, passivating oxygen containing, probably Mg(OH)(,2) film. In Stage E, this film was broken down by pits, which formed due to the presence of the chloride ions in both types of samples. Stages A through D of the unimplanted samples were not seen in the boron or iron

  15. Fusion and binary reactions in the collision of /sup 32/S on /sup 26/Mg at /ital E//sub lab/=163. 5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.; Zhi, Y. S.; Prete, G.; Viesti, G.

    1989-07-01

    Measurements of heavy fragments produced in the interaction of /sup 32/S with /sup 26/Mg at /ital E//sub lab/=163.5 MeV have been performed to study the interplay of the fusion reaction and binary processes. Experimental angular distributions, velocity spectra, and angle-integrated cross sections of detected heavy fragments have been compared with predictions of statistical models. The comparison shows that complete fusion exhausts the production of residues in the range /ital Z/=26--22. For fragments with atomic number /ital Z/=21 and /ital Z/=20 some other mechanism is also present. The analysis of energy spectra, angular distributions, and total kinetic energy of projectile-like fragments (/ital Z/=19--6) shows that the main process to limit fusion is an inelastic mechanism with large energy damping.

  16. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  17. Direct Total Cross Section Measurement of the 16O(α,γ)20Ne Reaction at Ec.m. = 2.26 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Ulrike; Brown, James R.; Buchmann, Lothar R.; Carmona-Gallardo, Mariano; Erikson, Luke E.; Fallis, Jennifer S.; Greife, Uwe; Hutcheon, Dave; Ottewell, Dave; Ruiz, Chris; Sjue, Sky; Vockenhuber, Cristof

    2011-08-23

    In stellar helium burning, (16)O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of (16)O(alpha,gamma)(20)Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of (16)O(alpha,gamma)(20)Ne at E(c.m.) = 2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  18. Magnesium Research and Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joost, William; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-30

    The Magnesium Research and Technical Development (MR&TD) project supports efforts to increase using magnesium in automotive applications, including improving technology, lowering costs and increasing the knowledge needed to enable alloy and manufacturing process optimization. MR&TD supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project in collaboration with China and Canada. The MR&TD projects also maintains the magnesium bibliographic database at magnesium.pnl.gov.

  19. Observation of the 3n evaporation channel in the complete hot-fusion reaction 26Mg + 248Cm leading to the new superheavy nuclide 271Hs.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, J; Brüchle, W; Chelnokov, M; Düllmann, Ch E; Dvorakova, Z; Eberhardt, K; Jäger, E; Krücken, R; Kuznetsov, A; Nagame, Y; Nebel, F; Nishio, K; Perego, R; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Schimpf, E; Schuber, R; Semchenkov, A; Thörle, P; Türler, A; Wegrzecki, M; Wierczinski, B; Yakushev, A; Yeremin, A

    2008-04-01

    The analysis of a large body of heavy ion fusion reaction data with medium-heavy projectiles (6 < or = Z < or = 18) and actinide targets suggests a disappearance of the 3n exit channel with increasing atomic number of the projectile. Here, we report a measurement of the excitation function of the reaction (248)Cm ((26)Mg,xn)(274-x)Hs and the observation of the new nuclide (271)Hs produced in the 3n evaporation channel at a beam energy well below the Bass fusion barrier with a cross section comparable to the maxima of the 4n and 5n channels. This indicates the possible discovery of new neutron-rich transactinide nuclei using relatively light heavy ion beams of the most neutron-rich stable isotopes and actinide targets. PMID:18517941

  20. Synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by periclase and alumina chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Orosco, Pablo; Barbosa, Lucía; Ruiz, María del Carmen

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel. • The reagents used were alumina, periclase and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in air and Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} flows. • The chlorination produced magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C. • Selectivity of the chlorination reaction to obtain spinel is very high. - Abstract: A pyrometallurgical route for the synthesis of magnesium aluminate spinel by thermal treatment of a mechanical mixture containing 29 wt% MgO (periclase) and 71 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (alumina) in chlorine atmosphere was developed and the results were compared with those obtained by calcining the same mixture of oxides in air atmosphere. Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in an experimental piece of equipment adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. Both reagents and products were analyzed by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Thermal treatment in Cl{sub 2} atmosphere of the MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture produces magnesium aluminate spinel at 700 °C, while in air, magnesium spinel is generated at 930 °C. The synthesis reaction of magnesium aluminate spinel was complete at 800 °C.

  1. Photochemical intracomplex reaction between [beta]-cyclodextrin and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid disodium salt in water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. S.; Kruppa, A. I.; Leshina, T. V.

    2005-05-01

    1D and 2D 1H NMR studies of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid disodium salt in the β-cyclodextrin solution have identified the inclusion complex formation. The association constant of AQDS-β-CD inclusion complex was determined as 800 ± 100 M -1. The selective intra-complex photo-oxidation of β-cyclodextrin at C6 position was detected by CIDNP method.

  2. Oral magnesium supplementation in type II diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Solati, Mehrdad; Ouspid, Elham; Hosseini, Saeedeh; Soltani, Nepton; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Dehghani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation. It plays an important role in insulin homeostasis and glucose metabolism through multiple enzymatic reactions. With increasing data on magnesium deficiency in diabetic patients and epidemiological studies demonstrating magnesium deficiency as a risk factor for diabetes, it is logical to search for its possible beneficial effects on diabetes control and prevention. We aimed to determine whether oral magnesium supplementation improves metabolic control, lipid profile and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Fifty four patients with type II diabetes were included in a randomized double blind placebocontrolled clinical trial.Patients received either placebo or 300 mg elemental magnesium (as magnesium sulfate -MgSo4-) daily, for 3 months. Metabolic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, magnesium status, hepatic enzymes, hemoglobin concentration, and anthropometric indices were determined in the beginning and at the end of the study. Results: Daily administration of 300 mg elemental magnesium for 3 months, significantly improved fasting blood glucose (183.9±15.43 to 125.8±6.52 vs. 196.5±28.12 to 136.5±7.94, p< 0.0001), 2-hour post prandial glucose (239.1±74.75 to 189.1±60mg/dl vs. 246.4±97.37 to 247.8±86.74mg/dl, p< 0.01), lipid profile, blood pressure and hepatic enzymes. Conclusion: Oral magnesium supplementation with proper dosage has beneficial effects on blood glucose, lipid profile, and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes. PMID:25405132

  3. Magnesium Isotopic Composition of CAIs and Chondrules from CBb Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounelle, M.; Young, E. D.; Shahar, A.; Kearsley, A.

    2006-03-01

    We measured magnesium isotope ratios in 17 chondrules and 3 CAIs from the CBb chondrites HH 237 and QUE 94411 by LA-MC-ICPMS. We find no detectable 26Al excesses in the three CAIs and approximately normal (chondritic) d25Mg in CAIs and chondrules.

  4. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  5. Mechanisms and regulation of renal magnesium transport.

    PubMed

    Houillier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium's most important role is in the release of chemical energy. Although most magnesium is stored outside of the extracellular fluid compartment, the regulated value is blood magnesium concentration. Cellular magnesium and bone magnesium do not play a major role in the defense of blood magnesium concentration; the major role is played by the kidney, where the renal tubule matches the urinary magnesium excretion and the net entry of magnesium into the extracellular fluid. In the kidney, magnesium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Magnesium absorption is mainly paracellular in the proximal tubule and in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, whereas it is transcellular in the distal convoluted tubule. Several hormones and extracellular magnesium itself alter the distal tubular handling of magnesium, but the hormone(s) regulating extracellular magnesium concentration remains unknown. PMID:24512082

  6. Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pearce, Christopher R.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Bundeleva, Irina A.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Benezeth, Pascale; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrous magnesium carbonates, nesquehonite (MgCO 3·3H 2O) and dypingite (Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·5(H 2O)), were precipitated at 25 °C in batch reactors from aqueous solutions containing 0.05 M NaHCO 3 and 0.025 M MgCl 2 and in the presence and absence of live photosynthesizing Gloeocapsa sp. cyanobacteria. Experiments were performed under a variety of conditions; the reactive fluid/bacteria/mineral suspensions were continuously stirred, and/or air bubbled in most experiments, and exposed to various durations of light exposure. Bulk precipitation rates are not affected by the presence of bacteria although the solution pH and the degree of fluid supersaturation with respect to magnesium carbonates increase due to photosynthesis. Lighter Mg isotopes are preferentially incorporated into the precipitated solids in all experiments. Mg isotope fractionation between the mineral and fluid in the abiotic experiments is identical, within uncertainty, to that measured in cyanobacteria-bearing experiments; measured δ 26Mg ranges from -1.54‰ to -1.16‰ in all experiments. Mg isotope fractionation is also found to be independent of reactive solution pH and Mg, CO 32-, and biomass concentrations. Taken together, these observations suggest that Gloeocapsa sp. cyanobacterium does not appreciably affect magnesium isotope fractionation between aqueous fluid and hydrous magnesium carbonates.

  7. Oral administration of lithium increases tissue magnesium contents but not plasma magnesium level in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Hordyjewska, Anna; Boguszewska, Anna; Lewandowska, Anna; Pasternak, Kazimierz

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the influence of different doses of lithium on magnesium concentration in plasma and tissues of rats. For a period of eight weeks rats had been provided with aqueous solutions of Li(2)CO(3) whose concentrations were established as follows: 0.7; 1.4; 2.6; 3.6; 7.1; 10.7 mmol Li(+)/l. Magnesium concentration was determined in plasma and tissue supernatants. Lithium caused no changes in magnesium concentration in plasma, whereas Mg concentration in tissues was found to be enhanced, although the degree of the increment depended on the studied tissue. In the liver, brain and heart muscle, the increase was statistically insignificant vs. control. In the kidney, the higher Li doses were required to result in the significant Mg enhancement, whereas in femoral muscle all the used doses caused well-marked Mg increase vs. control. Positive correlations between average daily Li intake and tissue Mg concentration in the kidney (r = 0.650) and femoral muscle (r = 0.696) were found. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the different Li doses disturbed tissue homeostasis of magnesium. The increase in Mg tissue concentration, observed in groups receiving higher Li doses can influence nervous-muscular excitability. PMID:17652829

  8. Highly Soluble Alkoxide Magnesium Salts for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chen; Guo, Bingkun; Jiang, Deen; Custelcean, Radu; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A unique class of air-stable and non-pyrophoric magnesium electrolytes has been developed based on alkoxide magnesium compounds. The crystals obtained from this class of electrolytes exhibit a unique structure of tri-magnesium cluster, [Mg3Cl3(OR)2(THF)6]+ [(THF)MgCl3] . High reversible capacities and good rate capabilities were obtained in Mg-Mo6S8 batteries using these new electrolytes at both 20 and 50 oC.

  9. Nondestructive spot test method for magnesium and magnesium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method for spot test identification of magnesium and various magnesium alloys commonly used in aerospace applications is described. The spot test identification involves color codes obtained when several drops of 3 M hydrochloric acid are placed on the surface to be tested. After approximately thirty seconds, two drops of this reacted acid is transferred to each of two depressions in a spot plate for additions of other chemicals with subsequent color changes indicating magnesium or its alloy.

  10. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; McKenzie, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  11. CELLULAR MAGNESIUM HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Andrea M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg2+ homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg2+ in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. PMID:21640700

  12. Time-resolved electrochromism associated with the formation of quinone anions in the rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Vazquez, J.; Cordova, J.; Marone, P.A.

    1996-08-20

    The bacterial photosynthetic reaction center contains bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriopheophytin (Bph) cofactors that provide natural probes of electrostatic fields within this protein. We have examined the electrochromic responses of these cofactors, resolved during the lifetimes of the quinone anion states, P{sup +}Q{sub A}{sup -Q}{sub B} and P{sup +}Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup -}, and measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide information on the time-dependent variation in electrostatic field strength on the Bchl and Bph cofactors. Measurements in the near-infrared absorbance bands are described. 60 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mineral of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration averaging 0.13 percent. Magnesium is found in over 60 minerals, and also is recovered from seawater, wells, and lake brines and bitterns.

  14. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  15. Molecular basis of the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase reaction of PFKFB3: Transition state and the C-terminal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Kim, Song-Gun; Neau, David; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2012-03-22

    The molecular basis of fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (F-2,6-P{sub 2}ase) of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFKFB) was investigated using the crystal structures of the human inducible form (PFKFB3) in a phospho-enzyme intermediate state (PFKFB3-P {center_dot} F-6-P), in a transition state-analogous complex (PFKFB3 {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}), and in a complex with pyrophosphate (PFKFB3 {center_dot} PP{sub i}) at resolutions of 2.45, 2.2, and 2.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Trapping the PFKFB3-P {center_dot} F-6-P intermediate was achieved by flash cooling the crystal during the reaction, and the PFKFB3 {center_dot} AlF{sub 4} and PFKFB3 {center_dot} PP{sub i} complexes were obtained by soaking. The PFKFB3 {center_dot} AlF{sub 4} and PFKFB3 {center_dot} PP{sub i} complexes resulted in removing F-6-P from the catalytic pocket. With these structures, the structures of the Michaelis complex and the transition state were extrapolated. For both the PFKFB3-P formation and break down, the phosphoryl donor and the acceptor are located within {approx}5.1 {angstrom}, and the pivotal point 2-P is on the same line, suggesting an 'in-line' transfer with a direct inversion of phosphate configuration. The geometry suggests that NE2 of His253 undergoes a nucleophilic attack to form a covalent N-P bond, breaking the 2O-P bond in the substrate. The resulting high reactivity of the leaving group, 2O of F-6-P, is neutralized by a proton donated by Glu322. Negative charges on the equatorial oxygen of the transient bipyramidal phosphorane formed during the transfer are stabilized by Arg252, His387, and Asn259. The C-terminal domain (residues 440-446) was rearranged in PFKFB3 {center_dot} PP{sub i}, implying that this domain plays a critical role in binding of substrate to and release of product from the F-2,6-P{sub 2}ase catalytic pocket. These findings provide a new insight into the understanding of the phosphoryl transfer reaction.

  16. Magnesium metabolism: a brief review.

    PubMed Central

    Paymaster, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The important role played by the magnesium ion in the body is not generally recognized. The action of numerous enzyme systems critical to cellular metabolism is regulated by it and it contributes importantly to macromolecular structure. Magnesium defiency occurs more often than is generally suspected; magnesium excess, though uncommon, is of special interest to the anaesthetist because it produces a curare-like effect on neuromuscular transmission. It is hoped that this brief review of magnesium metabolism will draw attention to its importance and relevance in everyday practice. PMID:942168

  17. Sol - Gel synthesis and characterization of magnesium peroxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaison, J.; Ashok raja, C.; Balakumar, S.; Chan, Y. S.

    2015-04-01

    Magnesium peroxide is an excellent source of oxygen in agriculture applications, for instance it is used in waste management as a material for soil bioremediation to remove contaminants from polluted underground water, biological wastes treatment to break down hydrocarbon, etc. In the present study, sol-gel synthesis of magnesium peroxide (MgO2) nanoparticles is reported. Magnesium peroxide is odourless; fine peroxide which releases oxygen when reacts with water. During the sol-gel synthesis, the magnesium malonate intermediate is formed which was then calcinated to obtain MgO2 nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using Thermo gravimetric -Differential Thermal Analysis (TG- DTA), X-Ray Diffraction studies (XRD) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM). Our study provides a clear insight that the formation of magnesium malonate during the synthesis was due to the reaction between magnesium acetate, oxalic acid and ethanol. In our study, we can conclude that the calcination temperature has a strong influence on particle size, morphology, monodispersity and the chemistry of the particles.

  18. Production and Refining of Magnesium Metal from Turkey Originating Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Yeliz; Yücel, Onuralp

    2012-06-01

    In this study crown magnesium produced from Turkish calcined dolomite by the Pigeon Process was refined and corrosion tests were applied. By using factsage thermodynamic program metalothermic reduction behavior of magnesium oxide and silicate formation structure during this reaction were investigated. After thermodynamic studies were completed, calcination of dolomite and it's metalothermic reduction at temperatures of 1473 K, 1523 K and within a vacuum (varied from 20 to 200 Pa) and refining of crown magnesium was studied. Different flux compositions consisting of MgCl2, KCl, CaCl2, MgO, CaF2, NaCl, and SiO2 with and without B2O3 additions were selected for the refining process. These tests were carried out at 963 K for 15, 30 and 45 minutes setting time. Considerable amount of iron was transferred into the sludge phase and its amount decreased from 0.08% to 0.027%. This refined magnesium was suitable for the production of various magnesium alloys. As a result of decreasing iron content, minimum corrosion rate of refined magnesium was obtained 2.35 g/m2/day. The results are compared with previous studies.

  19. Redox Reactions of Reduced Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN), Riboflavin (RBF), and Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Ferrihydrite and Lepidocrocite

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-09-17

    Flavins are secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella and can function as endogenous electron transfer mediators (ETM). In order to assess the potential importance of flavins in Fe(III) bioreduction, we investigated the redox reaction kinetics of reduced flavins (FMNH2 and RBFH2) with ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. The organic reductants rapidly reduced and dissolved ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite in the pH range 4-8. The rate constant k for 2-line ferrihydrite reductive dissolution by FMNH2 was 87.5 ± 3.5 M-1∙s-1 at pH 7.0 in batch reactors, and the k was similar for RBFH2. For lepidocrocite, the k was 500 ± 61 M-1∙s-1 for FMNH2, and 236 ± 22 M-1∙s-1 for RBFH2. The surface area normalized initial reaction rates (ra) were between 0.08 and 77 μmoles∙m-2∙s-1 for various conditions in stopped-flow experiments. Initial rates (ro) were first-order with respect to Fe(III) oxide concentration, and ra increased with decreasing pH. Poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite yielded the highest ra, followed by more crystalline 6-line ferrihydrite, and crystalline lepidocrocite. Compared to a previous whole-cell study with Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, our findings suggest that ETM reduction by the Mtr pathway coupled to lactate oxidation are rate limiting, rather than heterogeneous electron transfer to the Fe(III) oxide.

  20. Rate constant and secondary organic aerosol yields for the gas-phase reaction of hydroxyl radicals with syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Seydi, Abdoulaie

    2012-08-01

    Syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol) is a potential marker compound for wood smoke emissions in the atmosphere. To investigate the atmospheric reactivity of this compound, the rate constant for its reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) has been determined in a simulation chamber (8 m3) at 294 ± 2 K, atmospheric pressure and low relative humidity (2-4%) using the relative rate method. The syringol and reference compound concentrations were followed by GC/FID (Gas chromatography/Flame Ionization Detection). The determined rate constant (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) is ksyringol = (9.66 ± 1.11) × 10-11. The calculated atmospheric lifetime for syringol is 1.8 h, indicating that it is too reactive to be used as a tracer for wood smoke emissions. Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation from the OH reaction with syringol was also investigated. The initial mixing ratios for syringol were in the range 495-3557 μg m-3. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer). The SOA yields (Y) were determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (M0) to the total reacted syringol concentration assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. The aerosol formation yield increases as the initial syringol concentration increases, and leads to aerosol yields ranging from 0.10 to 0.36. Y is a strong function of M0 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. To our knowledge, this work represents the first investigation of the rate constant and SOA formation for the reaction of syringol with OH radicals. The atmospheric implications of this reaction are also discussed.

  1. [sup 26]Mg([sup 6]L[rvec i],[sup 7]Li)[sup 25]Mg reaction at 60 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.P.; Clarke, N.M. School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT ); Pearce, K.I.; Pinder, C.N. ); Blyth, C.O.; Choi, H.D.; Dee, P.R.; Roman, S.; Tungate, G. ); Davis, N.J. )

    1995-03-01

    Angular distributions of differential cross section and vector analyzing power have been measured for the [sup 26]Mg([sup 6]L[rvec i],[sup 7]Li)[sup 25]Mg reaction at 60 MeV bombarding energy. Finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were found to reproduce much of the structure of the data, although the predictions were approximately 3[degree] out of phase with the data. Finite-range coupled-channels Born approximation calculations including inelastic excitations in [sup 6]Li and [sup 7]Li, using coupling schemes derived from elastic scattering analyses, modified the predictions only slightly and did not remove the phase discrepancy.

  2. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-20

    In the system MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, three compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10}(also expressed as-Mg{sub 0.4}Al{sub 2.4}O{sub 4}) and MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} were formed in a single step, while MgAl{sub 26}O{sub 40} was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} by rare earth ions like Ce{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} and ns{sup 2} ion Pb{sup 2+} could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl{sub 6}O{sub 10} are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  3. Combustion Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, M. A.; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    In the system MgO-Al2O3, three compounds MgAl2O4, MgAl6O10 (also expressed as- Mg0.4Al2.4O4) and MgAl26O40 are well known. Importance of the first two is well established. Magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel is a technologically important material due to its interesting thermal properties. The MgAl2O4 ceramics also find application as humidity sensors. Apart from the luminescence studies, the interest in MgAl2O4 is due to various applications such as humidity-sensing and PEM fuel cells, TL/OSL dosimetry of the ionizing radiations, white light source. Interest in the MgAl6O10 has aroused due to possible use as a substrate for GaN growth. Attempt was made to synthesize these compounds by the combustion synthesis using metal nitrates as oxidizer and urea as a fuel. Compounds MgAl2O4 and MgAl6O10 were formed in a single step, while MgAl26O40 was not formed by this procedure. Activation of MgAl6O10 by rare earth ions like Ce3+, Eu3+ and Tb3+ and ns2 ion Pb2+ could be achieved. Excitation bands for MgAl6O10 are at slightly shorter wavelengths compared to those reported for MgAl2O4.

  4. 12C(16O, α)24Mg* reaction in the energy region Ec.m.=26.6 to 42.9 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, M. J.; Lazzarini, A. J.; Ledoux, R. J.; Cosman, E. R.

    1983-04-01

    The 12C+16O resonance structure in the 28Si nucleus is examined by means of the 12C(16O, α)24Mg reaction excitation functions in the energy range Ec.m.=26.6 to 42.9 MeV in 430 keV steps at θlab=7.5°. We could identify 64 discrete states in 24Mg up to 31.7 MeV of excitation energy. The excitation functions show abundant structure over the entire energy range. The summed excitation functions, which tend to average out statistical fluctuations, show pronounced intermediate structure enhancement in the cross section at Ec.m.~=29.5, 32.2, and 35 MeV and indicate the presence of a smaller peak at 37.3 MeV. The widths of these structures are about 1 MeV, which is intermediate between the value expected from ion-ion potential resonances and statistical fluctuations. The nonstatistical character of these structures is reinforced by some statistical tests and by the correlations in energy and width found in several exit channels. Our data also suggest a possible structural relationship between the 28Si resonances and certain 24Mg final states. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 12C(16O, α)24Mg* measured σ(E) to states up to 31.7 MeV of excitation energy for Ec.m.=26.6 to 42.9 MeV in 430 keV steps, θlab=7.5°. Nonstatistical structure observed.

  5. Structure of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26: protein-cofactor (quinones and Fe2+) interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J P; Feher, G; Yeates, T O; Komiya, H; Rees, D C

    1988-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been determined by x-ray diffraction to a resolution of 2.8 A with an R value of 24%. The interactions of the protein with the primary quinone, QA, secondary quinone, QB, and the nonheme iron are described and compared to those of RCs from Rhodopseudomonas viridis. Structural differences between the QA and QB environments that contribute to the function of the quinones (the electron transfer from QA- to QB and the charge recombination of QA-, QB- with the primary donor) are delineated. The protein residues that may be involved in the protonation of QB are identified. A pathway for the doubly reduced QB to dissociate from the RC is proposed. The interactions between QB and the residues that have been changed in herbicide-resistant mutants are described. The environment of the nonheme iron is compared to the environments of metal ions in other proteins. Images PMID:3054889

  6. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  7. Determination of Total Antioxidant Capacity of Commercial Beverage Samples by Capillary Electrophoresis via in-line Reaction with 2,6 – Dichlorophenolindophenol

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Emily T.; Catherman, Adam D.; Yehl, Jenna B.; Strein, Timothy G.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate proof-of-concept for the use of electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA) as a new approach to the determination of total antioxidant capacity (TAC). EMMA is a low volume, high efficiency capillary electrophoretic technique that has to date been underutilized for small molecule reactions. Here, nanoliter volumes of 2,6 – dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP) reagent solution are mixed with an antioxidant containing sample within the confines of a narrow bore capillary tube. The mixing is accomplished by exploiting differential migration rates of the reagents when a voltage field applied across the length of the capillary tube. The ensuing electron transfer reaction between DCIP and the antioxidant(s) is then used as a quantitative measure of the TAC of the sample. Linear calibration using either redox form of DCIP is accomplished with standard solutions of ascorbic acid. Several commercial beverage samples are analyzed, and the TAC values obtained with the reported methodology are compared to results obtained with the widely used ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) spectroscopic method. For the analysis of real samples of unknown ionic strength, the method of standard additions is shown to be superior to the use of external calibration. This easily automated EMMA method may represent a useful new approach to TAC determination. PMID:19572646

  8. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    irritation study. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate and Sodium Magnesium Silicate caused minimal eye irritation in a Draize eye irritation test. Bentonite caused severe iritis after injection into the anterior chamber of the eyes of rabbits and when injected intralamellarly, widespread corneal infiltrates and retrocorneal membranes were recorded. In a primary eye irritation study in rabbits, Hectorite was moderately irritating without washing and practically nonirritating to the eye with a washout. Rats tolerated a single dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect on nidation or on maternal or fetal survival in rabbits. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate had neither a teratogenic nor adverse effects on the mouse fetus. Female rats receiving a 20% Kaolin diet exhibited maternal anemia but no significant reduction in birth weight of the pups was recorded. Type A Zeolite produced no adverse effects on the dam, embryo, or fetus in either rats or rabbits at any dose level. Clinoptilolite had no effect on female rat reproductive performance. These ingredients were not genotoxic in the Ames bacterial test system. In primary hepatocyte cultures, the addition of Attapulgite had no significant unscheduled DNA synthesis. Attapulgite did cause significant increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat pleural mesothelial cells, but no significant increase in sister chromosome exchanges were seen. Zeolite particles (<10 microm) produced statistically significant increase in the percentage of aberrant metaphases in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and cells collected by peritoneal lavage from exposed mice. Topical application of Magnesium Aluminum Silicate to human skin daily for 1 week produced no adverse effects. Occupational exposure to mineral dusts has been studied extensively. Fibrosis and pneumoconiosis have been documented in workers involved in the mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate

  9. Evidence for magnesium deficiency in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).

    PubMed

    Caddell, J L

    1996-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has been defined as a requirement for oxygen for more than 28 days because of chronic pulmonary changes, usually in a premature infant. About 50 per cent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants who weigh 1 kg at birth and who survive 28 days will develop BPD. Since 80 per cent of fetal accretion of magnesium occurs during the third trimester, this population is also at risk for magnesium deficiency. This paper reviews evidence for a role of magnesium deficiency in the pathogenesis of BPD. Pathology in BPD that may be caused or aggravated by magnesium deficiency is noted. Agents or mediators that are increased in BPD and in BPD include: oxygen free radicals; the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha; vaso- and bronchoconstrictors thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and serotonin: vasoconstrictor, endothelin-1 (ET-1); and bronchoconstrictor, histamine. Magnesium deficiency increases the susceptibility of cells and tissues to peroxidation, worsens the inflammatory reaction, reduces the immune response, exaggerates catecholamine release in stress, and diminishes energy metabolism. Possibly because of the danger of magnesium toxicity and the difficulty in studying the preterm VLBW neonate, little is known about magnesium supplementation in this group. Such information must be gained through controlled studies on the effect of antepartum exposure to maternally administered magnesium sulphate on the VLBW infant, through carefully monitored postnatal administration of magnesium in an intensive care setting, or through evaluations of combined pre- and postnatal supplementation. PMID:9140865

  10. Functionalization of heterocyclic compounds using polyfunctional magnesium and zinc reagents

    PubMed Central

    Schade, Matthias A; Bernhardt, Sebastian; Manolikakes, Georg; Metzger, Albrecht; Piller, Fabian M; Rohbogner, Christoph J; Mosrin, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Summary In this review we summarize the most important procedures for the preparation of functionalized organzinc and organomagnesium reagents. In addition, new methods for the preparation of polyfunctional aryl- and heteroaryl zinc- and magnesium compounds, as well as new Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, are reported herein. Experimental details are given for the most important reactions in the Supporting Information File 1 of this article. PMID:21977211

  11. Ignition Temperature of Magnesium Powder and Pyrotechnic Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen-Guang; Wang, Hai-Zhen; Min, Li

    2014-07-01

    Using potassium nitrate, strontium nitrate, and potassium perchlorate as the oxidizing agents, the ignition and combustion behaviors of magnesium powders with different specific surface area were studied. The ignition temperature (Te) was extrapolated using a differential thermal analyzer, and the pyrotechnic spontaneous reaction temperature (Ts) was inferred from the temperature curve by inflection point analysis. The results showed that Ts has much better reproducibility than the extrapolated Te in characterizing the ignition of the pyrotechnic formulations. Increasing the specific surface area of the magnesium powder resulted in decreased Ts of the pyrotechnics.

  12. Synthesis of micromesoporous magnesium oxide cubes with nanograin structures in a supercritical carbon dioxide/ethanol solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Deok; Kim, Young Do; Kim, Sang Woo

    2011-07-01

    Micromesoporous magnesium oxide architectures with cubic morphologies were prepared via the chemical reaction of magnesium hydroxide in a supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2)-ethanol system, and via the sequential thermal combustion of the reaction products. The morphological change to the cube shape from an irregular form was induced by the dehydoxylation-carbonation reaction of magnesium hydroxide with supercritical CO2 at a reaction temperature of 150 degrees C, which leads to the greatly improved carbonation efficiency of magnesium hydroxide to magnesium carbonate. The precursor cubes with 3-5 microm sizes were decarbonized and transformed into the nanocrystalline MgO phase with pore sizes of 1.3-6 nm after calcining at 600 degrees C. The micromesoporous cube with high surface area of 117.5 m2/g was obtained by the thermal decarbonation with phase transition from rhombohedral to cubic phase. As a result, nanograined magnesium oxide cubes with micromesoporous structures and high specific surface areas were formed by the carbonation reaction of the magnesium hydroxide with the supercritical CO2, and the subsequent thermal decomposition of the magnesium carbonate cubes. PMID:22121614

  13. Synthesis of magnesium diboride by magnesium vapor infiltration process (MVIP)

    DOEpatents

    Serquis, Adriana C.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Mueller, Frederick M.; Peterson, Dean E.; Liao, Xiao Zhou

    2003-01-01

    A process of preparing superconducting magnesium diboride powder by heating an admixture of solid magnesium and amorphous boron powder or pellet under an inert atmosphere in a Mg:B ratio of greater than about 0.6:1 at temperatures and for time sufficient to form said superconducting magnesium diboride. The process can further include exposure to residual oxygen at high synthesis temperatures followed by slow cooling. In the cooling process oxygen atoms dissolved into MgB.sub.2 segregated to form nanometer-sized coherent Mg(B,O) precipitates in the MgB.sub.2 matrix, which can act as flux pinning centers.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles from magnesium.

    PubMed

    Baidukova, Olga; Skorb, Ekaterina V

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation in water provides special kinetic and thermodynamic conditions for chemical synthesis and nanostructuring of solids. Using cavitation phenomenon, we obtained magnesium hydroxide from pure magnesium. This approach allows magnesium hydroxide to be synthesized without the requirement of any additives and non-aqueous solvents. Variation of sonochemical parameters enabled a total transformation of the metal to nanosized brucite with distinct morphology. Special attention is given to the obtaining of platelet-shaped, nanometric and de-agglomerated powders. The products of the synthesis were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). PMID:26964968

  15. Magnesium and calcium sulfate stabilities and the water budget of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Seal, R.R., II

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate probably plays a dominant role in the water cycle of Mars away from the polar ice caps through hydration and dehydration reactions. This prominence is due to its abundance, its occurrence in numerous hydration states, and its ability to hydrate and dehydrate rapidly. New experimental studies on the metastable reaction between hexahydrite (MgSO4??6H2O) and starkeyite (MgSO4-4H2O) as a function of temperature and relative humidity, supplemented by recent investigations of the stable reaction between epsomite (MgSO4??7H2O) and hexahydrite and by phase equilibrium calculations, suggest that the most important magnesium sulfate phases involved in the Martian water cycle are MgSO4??11 H2O, epsomite, starkeyite, and possibly kieserite (MgSO4??H2O). Hexahydrite is not predicted to be stable on the surface of Mars. During diurnal variations in temperature and relative humidity, 1 kg of MgSO4 can release or remove from the atmosphere 1.5 kg of H2O by cycling between kieserite and MgSO4??11 H2O. Despite subequal abundances of calcium sulfate, calcium sulfates are not likely to be important in the water cycle of the planet because of sluggish rates of hydration and dehydration and a more limited range of H2O concentrations per kilogram of CaSO4 (0.00 to 0.26 kg kg-1). Modern or recent erosion on Mars attributed to liquid water may be due to the dehydration Of MgSO4??11 H2O because of the inferred abundance and likelihood of occurrence of this phase and its limited stability relative to known variations in temperature and relative humidity.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or...

  20. Mineral resource of the month: magnesium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium is the eighthmost abundant element in Earth’s crust, and the second-most abundant metal ion in seawater. Although magnesium is found in more than 60 minerals, only brucite, dolomite, magnesite and carnallite are commercially important for their magnesium content. Magnesium and its compounds also are recovered from seawater, brines found in lakes and wells, and bitterns (salts).

  1. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... salt or by hydration of reactive grades of magnesium oxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No... light magnesium oxide. Heating the salts under more rigorous conditions (1200 °C for 12 hours)...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to crystallization... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O,...

  4. Triplet energy transfer between the primary donor and carotenoids in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporated with spheroidene analogs having different extents of pi-electron conjugation.

    PubMed

    Farhoosh, R; Chynwat, V; Gebhard, R; Lugtenburg, J; Frank, H A

    1997-07-01

    Three carotenoids, spheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, having 8, 9 and 10 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, respectively, were incorporated into Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers. The extents of binding were found to be 95 +/- 5% for spheroidene, 65 +/- 5% for 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and 60 +/- 10% for 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. The dynamics of the triplet states of the primary donor and carotenoid were measured at room temperature by flash absorption spectroscopy. The carotenoid, spheroidene, was observed to quench the primary donor triplet state. The triplet state of spheroidene that was formed subsequently decayed to the ground state with a lifetime of 7.0 +/- 0.5 microseconds. The primary donor triplet lifetime in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers lacking carotenoids was 60 +/- 5 microseconds. Quenching of the primary donor triplet state by the carotenoid was not observed in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers containing 3,4-dihydrospheroidene nor in the R-26.1 reaction centers containing 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. Triplet-state electron paramagnetic resonance was also carried out on the samples. The experiments revealed carotenoid triple-state signals in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporated with spheroidene, indicating that the primary donor triplet is quenched by the carotenoid. No carotenoid signals were observed from Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporating 3,4-dihydrospheroidene nor in reaction centers incorporating 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. Circular dichroism, steady-state absorbance band shifts accompanying the primary photochemistry in the reaction center and singlet energy transfer from the carotenoid to the primary donor confirm that the carotenoids are bound in the reaction centers and interacting with the primary donor. These studies provide a systematic approach to exploring the effects of carotenoid structure and excited

  5. Retrosynthetic approach to the design of molybdenum-magnesium oxoalkoxides.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Denis A; Fedyanin, Ivan V; Lyssenko, Konstantin A; Bazhenova, Tamara A

    2014-09-14

    The reaction of MoCl5 methanolysis in the presence of magnesium ions was shown to produce an extensive row of heterobimetallic Mg-Mo(V, VI) oxomethoxides of different nuclearity ranging from 4 for [Mg2(CH3OH)4Mo2O2(OCH3)10] (1) to 26 for [Mg(DMF)3(CH3OH)3]2[Mo22Mg4O48(OCH3)28(DMF)6] (2) with the latter possessing a ring morphology. Examination of [Mo6O12(OCH3)16Mg4(CH3OH)6] (3), [Mo6O12(OCH3)12Mg2(DMF)4] (4a), and [Mo6O16(OCH3)4Mg2(DMF)8] (5a) X-ray structures revealed the presence of the well known tetranuclear core {Mo4O8(OCH3)2}(2+) thus similar reactivity patterns leading to their formation were assumed. For convenient synthesis of such heterobimetallic oxoalkoxides, the retrosynthetic approach based on speculative deconstruction of a target molecule onto simpler fragments was suggested and successfully employed. Namely, the reaction of the stoichiometric amounts of appropriately chosen Mo(V), Mo(VI) and Mg(2+) synthons led to their assembling resulting in the formation of heterometallic clusters 3, 5a and [Mo6O12(OCH3)12Mg2(CH3OH)4]·2CH3OH (4b) characterized by means of elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. PMID:25019529

  6. Magnesium: Engineering the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. B.; Yang, H. Y.; Abbott, T. B.; Easton, M. A.; Birbilis, N.

    2012-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys provide numerous benefits as lightweight materials; however, industrial deployment of Mg in most instances requires anticorrosion coatings. Engineering the Mg surface is an area that has been undergoing intense research recently. Surface engineering commences with the "pretreatment" step, which can be used to modify the surface composition and morphology, resulting in surface enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Following this, electrochemical plating (including electro- and electroless plating) and conversion coatings have emerged as common means of coating Mg. In this study, we present the key aspects relating to the science and technology associated with pretreatment, electrochemical plating, and conversion coatings. This is followed by experimental examples of engineered surfaces of industrial relevance.

  7. Magnesium and hearing.

    PubMed

    Cevette, Michael J; Vormann, Jürgen; Franz, Kay

    2003-01-01

    The last several decades have revealed clinical and experimental data regarding the importance of magnesium (Mg) in hearing. Increased susceptibility to noise damage, ototoxicity, and auditory hyperexcitability are linked to states of Mg deficiency. Evidence for these processes has come slowly and direct effects have remained elusive because plasma Mg levels do not always correlate with its deficiency. Despite the major progress in the understanding of cochlear mechanical and auditory nerve function, the neurochemical and pharmacologic role of Mg is not clear. The putative mechanism suggests that Mg deficiency may contribute to a metabolic cellular cascade of events. Mg deficiency leads to an increased permeability of the calcium channel in the hair cells with a consequent over influx of calcium, an increased release of glutamate via exocytosis, and over stimulation of NMDA receptors on the auditory nerve. This paper provides a current overview of relevant Mg metabolism and deficiency and its influence on hearing. PMID:12940704

  8. Formation and characterization of magnesium bisozonide and carbonyl complexes in solid argon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanjun; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Qingqing; Zhou, Mingfei

    2010-10-14

    The reactions of magnesium atoms with dioxygen and dioxygen/carbon monoxide mixture have been investigated by matrix isolation infrared absorption spectroscopy. Magnesium atoms react with dioxygen in solid argon to form the inserted MgO(2) molecules under UV excitation, which were previously characterized. Annealing allows the dioxygen molecules to diffuse and to react with MgO(2) and form the magnesium bisozonide complex, Mg(O(3))(2), which is proposed to be coordinated by two argon atoms in solid argon matrix. The Mg(O(3))(2)(Ar)(2) complex is characterized to have two equivalent side-on bonded ozonide ligands with a D(2h) symmetry. The coordinated argon atoms can be replaced by carbon monoxide to give the magnesium bisozonide dicarbonyl complex, Mg(O(3))(2)(CO)(2), a neutral magnesium carbonyl complex with CO binding to the Mg(2+) center. PMID:20857987

  9. 26 CFR 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... after August 16, 1954; and (ii) The percentage rates set forth in 26 CFR (1939) 39.23(m)-5 (Regulations.... Limestone. Magnesite. Magnesium carbonates Marble. Mica Phosphate rock. Potash. Quartzite. Slate....

  10. 26 CFR 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... after August 16, 1954; and (ii) The percentage rates set forth in 26 CFR (1939) 39.23(m)-5 (Regulations.... Limestone. Magnesite. Magnesium carbonates Marble. Mica Phosphate rock. Potash. Quartzite. Slate....

  11. 26 CFR 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... after August 16, 1954; and (ii) The percentage rates set forth in 26 CFR (1939) 39.23(m)-5 (Regulations.... Limestone. Magnesite. Magnesium carbonates Marble. Mica Phosphate rock. Potash. Quartzite. Slate....

  12. 26 CFR 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... after August 16, 1954; and (ii) The percentage rates set forth in 26 CFR (1939) 39.23(m)-5 (Regulations.... Limestone. Magnesite. Magnesium carbonates Marble. Mica Phosphate rock. Potash. Quartzite. Slate....

  13. 26 CFR 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... after August 16, 1954; and (ii) The percentage rates set forth in 26 CFR (1939) 39.23(m)-5 (Regulations.... Limestone. Magnesite. Magnesium carbonates Marble. Mica Phosphate rock. Potash. Quartzite. Slate....

  14. Study of the e+e-→K+K- reaction in the energy range from 2.6 to 8.0 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The e+e-→K+K- cross section and charged-kaon electromagnetic form factor are measured in the e+e- center-of-mass energy range (E ) from 2.6 to 8.0 GeV using the initial-state radiation technique with an undetected photon. The study is performed using 469 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II2 e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV. The form factor is found to decrease with energy faster than 1 /E2 and approaches the asymptotic QCD prediction. Production of the K+K- final state through the J /ψ and ψ (2 S ) intermediate states is observed. The results for the kaon form factor are used together with data from other experiments to perform a model-independent determination of the relative phases between electromagnetic (single-photon) and strong amplitudes in J /ψ and ψ (2 S )→K+K- decays. The values of the branching fractions measured in the reaction e+e-→K+K- are shifted relative to their true values due to interference between resonant and nonresonant amplitudes. The values of these shifts are determined to be about ±5 % for the J /ψ meson and ±15 % for the ψ (2 S ) meson.

  15. Magnesium status and digoxin toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I S; Goh, E M; McKillop, U H; Stanford, C F; Nicholls, D P; Trimble, E R

    1991-01-01

    1. Eighty-one hospital patients receiving digoxin were separated into groups with and without digoxin toxicity using clinical criteria. Serum digoxin, sodium, potassium, calcium, creatinine, magnesium and monocyte magnesium concentrations were compared. 2. Subjects with digoxin toxicity had impaired colour vision (P less than 0.0001, Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test) and increased digoxin levels (1.89 (1.56-2.21) vs 1.34 (1.20-1.47) nmol l-1, P less than 0.01) (mean (95% confidence limits], though there was considerable overlap between two groups. 3. Subjects with digoxin toxicity had lower levels of serum magnesium (0.80 (0.76-0.84) vs 0.88 (0.85-0.91) mmol l-1, P less than 0.01) and monocyte magnesium (6.40 (5.65-7.16) vs 8.76 (7.81-9.71) mg g-1 DNA, P less than 0.01), but there were no significant differences in other biochemical parameters. A greater proportion of toxic subjects were receiving concomitant diuretic therapy (20/21 vs 37/60, P less than 0.05). 4. Magnesium deficiency was the most frequently identified significant electrolyte disturbance in relation to digoxin toxicity. In the presence of magnesium deficiency digoxin toxicity developed at relatively low serum digoxin concentrations. PMID:1768564

  16. The effect of dissolved magnesium on diffusion creep in calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Xiao, Xiaohui; Evans, Brian

    2003-07-01

    We experimentally tested a series of synthetic calcite marbles with varying amounts of dissolved magnesium in a standard triaxial deformation machine at 300 MPa confining pressure, temperatures between 700 and 850°C, stresses between 2 and 100 MPa, and strain rates between 10 -7 and 10 -3 s -1. The samples were fabricated by hot isostatic pressing of a mixture of calcite and dolomite at 850°C and 300 MPa. The fabrication protocol resulted in a homogeneous, fine-grained high-magnesian calcite aggregate with minimal porosity and with magnesium contents between 0.07 and 0.17 mol% MgCO 3. At stresses below 40 MPa the samples deformed with linear viscosity that depended inversely on grain size to the 3.26±0.51 power, suggesting that the mechanisms of deformation were some combination of grain boundary diffusion and grain boundary sliding. Because small grain sizes tended to occur in the high-magnesium calcite, the strength also appeared to vary inversely with magnesium content. However, the strength at constant grain size does not depend on the amount of dissolved magnesium, and thus, the impurity effect seems to be indirect. At stresses higher than 40 MPa, the aggregates become non-linearly viscous, a regime we interpret to be dislocation creep. The transition between the two regimes depends on grain size, as expected. The activation energy for diffusion creep is 200±30 kJ/mol and is quite similar to previous measurements in natural and synthetic marbles deformed at similar conditions with no added magnesium.

  17. [Magnesium deficiency and stress: Issues of their relationship, diagnostic tests, and approaches to therapy].

    PubMed

    Tarasov, E A; Blinov, D V; Zimovina, U V; Sandakova, E A

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium plays an important role in the functions of the central nervous system. It takes part in the regulation of the cell membrane, the transmembrane transport of calcium and sodium ions, and metabolic reactions that produce, accumulate, transfer, and utilize energy, free radicals, and their oxidation products. The magnesium-containing substances include many sequestered antigens, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein, S100, and neuron-specific enolase; magnesium may act as a neuroprotector that is able to modulate the regulation of blood-brain barrier permeability. Investigations have demonstrated a relationship between the manifestations of stress reactions (anxiety, autonomic dysfunction, and maladjustment) and magnesium deficiency (MD). Thus, mental and physical stresses cause an increase in magnesium elimination from the body. MD in turn enhances a response to stress, by paradoxically aggravating its sequels. Compensation for MD increases the ability of the nervous system to resist stress. The valid diagnosis of MD present difficulties; namely, a blood magnesium concentration decrease below 0.8 mmol/l is evidence of MD; but the constant blood level of magnesium may be long maintained due to its release from the bone tissue depot. So it is necessary to keep in mind the clinical manifestations of MD. The authors have developed and tested a simple rapid MD assessment test and a stress resistance self-rating test. The proposed tests will help to screen stress resistance and MD in outpatient settings. PMID:26591563

  18. Magnesium and fetal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, K.

    1988-01-01

    Fetal growth retardation and premature labor are major problems in perinatal medicine today and account for a great deal of the observed fetal morbidity. While the neonatal death rate has steadily declined over the past decade, there has been a lack of concommitant decrease in these two leading problems. Magnesium (Mg/sup ++/) plays a major role in both of these areas of concern. The fact that it is used as a treatment for premature labor has led investigators to look at low Mg/sup ++/ as a possible cause of this poorly understood phenomenon. The second major cause of small for gestational age infants is intrauterine growth retardation, a condition which may be of either fetal or maternal origin. In either case, Mg/sup ++/ may be implicated since it exerts a strong influence on the underlying pathophysiology of placental failure and maternal hypertension. Both of these conditions are mediated by vascular and platelet hyperactivity as well as by and increase in the ration of thromboxane to prostacyclin. Studies in both the human and animal species are beginning to show how Mg/sup ++/ interacts in these conditions to produce such a damaging fetal outcome. The recent use of Doppler velocimetry of the developing fetus has shown reduced fetal vascular and maternal uterine vascular compliance as early as 14 weeks of gestation in those who would be so affected.

  19. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  20. Differences in the binding of the primary quinone receptor in Photosystem I and reaction centres of Rhodobacter sphaeroides-R26 studied with transient EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Est, A.; Sieckmann, I.; Lubitz, W.; Stehlik, D.

    1995-05-01

    The binding of the primary quinone acceptor, Q, in Photosystem I (PS I) and reaction centres (RC's) of Rhodobacter Sphaeroide-R26 in which, the non-heme iron has been replaced by zinc (Zn-bRC's) is studied using transient EPR spectroscopy. In PS I, Q is phylloquinone (vitamin K 1, VK 1) and is referred to as A 1. In Zn-bRC's, it is ubiquinone-10 (UQ 10) and called Q A. Native samples of the two RC's as well as those in which A 1 and Q A have been replaced by perdeuterated napthoquinone (NQ- d6) and duroquinone (DQ- d12) are compared. The spin polarized K-band (24 GHz) spectra of the charge separated state P +.Q -. (P = primary chlorophyll donor) in Zn-bRC's show that substitution of Q A, with NQ- d6 and DQ- d12 does not have a measurable effect on the quinone orientation in the Q A site. In contrast, large differences in the orientation of VK 1, NQ- d6 and DQ- d12 in the A 1 site in PS I are found. In addition, all three quinones in PS I are oriented differently than Q A in Zn-bRC's. Further, the x and y principal values of the g-tensors of VK 1-., NQ -. and DQ -. in PS I are shown to be significantly larger than in frozen alcohol and Zn-bRC's. It is suggested that the differences in the orientation and a g-values of the quinones in the two RC's arise from a weaker binding to the protein in PS I.

  1. Prototype systems for rechargeable magnesium batteries.

    PubMed

    Aurbach, D; Lu, Z; Schechter, A; Gofer, Y; Gizbar, H; Turgeman, R; Cohen, Y; Moshkovich, M; Levi, E

    2000-10-12

    The thermodynamic properties of magnesium make it a natural choice for use as an anode material in rechargeable batteries, because it may provide a considerably higher energy density than the commonly used lead-acid and nickel-cadmium systems. Moreover, in contrast to lead and cadmium, magnesium is inexpensive, environmentally friendly and safe to handle. But the development of Mg batteries has been hindered by two problems. First, owing to the chemical activity of Mg, only solutions that neither donate nor accept protons are suitable as electrolytes; but most of these solutions allow the growth of passivating surface films, which inhibit any electrochemical reaction. Second, the choice of cathode materials has been limited by the difficulty of intercalating Mg ions in many hosts. Following previous studies of the electrochemistry of Mg electrodes in various non-aqueous solutions, and of a variety of intercalation electrodes, we have now developed rechargeable Mg battery systems that show promise for applications. The systems comprise electrolyte solutions based on Mg organohaloaluminate salts, and Mg(x)Mo3S4 cathodes, into which Mg ions can be intercalated reversibly, and with relatively fast kinetics. We expect that further improvements in the energy density will make these batteries a viable alternative to existing systems. PMID:11048714

  2. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nmmore » to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.« less

  3. Deuterium storage in nanocrystalline magnesium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checchetto, R.; Bazzanella, N.; Miotello, A.; Brusa, R. S.; Zecca, A.; Mengucci, A.

    2004-02-01

    Nanocrystalline magnesium deuteride thin films with the β-MgD2 structure were prepared by vacuum evaporation of hexagonal magnesium (h-Mg) samples and thermal annealing in 0.15 MPa D2 atmosphere at 373 K. Thermal desorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the rate-limiting step in the deuterium desorption was given by the thermal decomposition of the deuteride phase. The activation energy Δg of the β-MgD2→h-Mg+D2 reaction scaled from 1.13±0.03 eV in 650-nm-thick films to 1.01±0.02 eV in 75-nm-thick films most likely as consequence of different stress and defect level. Positron annihilation spectroscopy analysis of the thin-film samples submitted to deuterium absorption and desorption cycles reveal the presence of a high concentration of void-like defects in the h-Mg layers after the very first decomposition of the β-MgD2 phase, the presence of these open volume defects reduces the D2 absorption capacity of the h-Mg thin film.

  4. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-18

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Furthermore, experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  5. Synthesis of nanoscale magnesium diboride powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnemore, D. K.; Marzik, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    A procedure has been developed for the preparation of small grained magnesium diboride (MgB2) powder by reacting nanometer size boron powder in a magnesium vapor. Plasma synthesized boron powder that had particle sizes ranging from 20 to 300nm was mixed with millimeter size chunks of Mg by rolling stoichiometric amounts of the powders in a sealed cylindrical container under nitrogen gas. This mixture then was placed in a niobium reaction vessel, evacuated, and sealed by e-beam welding. The vessel was typically heated to approximately 830°C for several hours. The resulting MgB2 particles have a grain size in the 200 nm to 800 nm range. Agglomerates of loosely bound particles could be broken up by light grinding in a mortar and pestle. At 830°C, many particles are composed of several grains grown together so that the average particle size is about twice the average grain size. Experiments were conducted primarily with undoped boron powder, but carbon-doped boron powder showed very similar results.

  6. Fabrication of multilayer pancakelike basic magnesium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinhe; Jia, Yongzhong; Yan Jing; Yao, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The properties of nanomaterials was strongly affected by their microstructures. Here Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 x 4H2O multilayer pancakelike structures were fabricated successfully by reaction of MgCl2 and Na2CO3 in aqueous solution at 363 K. The growth process of nanostructures was observed by XRD and SEM. Several transition states of multilayer pancakelike basic magnesium carbonates were observed, which help to understand better the formation process of this hierarchical nanostructures. The formation mechanism of Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 x 4H2O multilayer pancakelike structures was discussed and helical growth was proposed. The amorphous nanoparticles were formed firstly. Then nanopartilces aggregated and oriented assembly under the direction of chemical bonds with the help of water molecules. The multilayer pancakelike basic magnesium carbonates was formed by helical growth of wafers along (100) and (001) direction. The diameter and volume decreased with the increasing concentration of reactants. PMID:25942931

  7. Indirect determination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) after dechlorination with magnesium/palladium bimetallic particles and potentiometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Maria Amélia A; SouzaDe, Jurandir R; Dias, Sílvia C L; Dórea, José G

    2010-05-01

    Determination of chlorine ions of pesticides was performed after dechlorination reaction using a palladium/magnesium system. Chlorine ions were quantified by potentiometry with ion-specific electrode. Rates of dechlorination of 100 microg of DDT as a function of reaction time and percent (wt/wt) of palladium deposited on the magnesium particles were determined. The best reaction conditions to DDT dechlorination were achieved with an acetone/water (1:1) solution and DDT reaction with a 0.27% (wt/wt) palladium/magnesium bimetallic system at room temperature for 10 min. The detection limit was of 0.24 microg/mL. This low cost method showed an efficiency of 92% in determining chlorine ions derived from DDT, it is fast, requiring no specialized laboratory equipment. PMID:20419289

  8. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  9. Lightweight magnesium-lithium alloys show promise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. T.; Cataldo, C. E.

    1964-01-01

    Evaluation tests show that magnesium-lithium alloys are lighter and more ductile than other magnesium alloys. They are being used for packaging, housings, containers, where light weight is more important than strength.

  10. Magnesium/Calcium Competition at Excitable Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Fry, Panni

    1998-01-01

    Considers some consequences of altering intracellular calcium supply by magnesium concentration changes. Focuses on using this procedure as an exercise with allied health students as they witness therapeutic uses of magnesium and other calcium entry inhibitors. (DDR)

  11. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by the addition of...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425... GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium carbonate hydroxide. It is a...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  16. Solid-state rechargeable magnesium battery

    DOEpatents

    Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Tianbiao; Li, Guosheng

    2016-09-06

    Embodiments of a solid-state electrolyte comprising magnesium borohydride, polyethylene oxide, and optionally a Group IIA or transition metal oxide are disclosed. The solid-state electrolyte may be a thin film comprising a dispersion of magnesium borohydride and magnesium oxide nanoparticles in polyethylene oxide. Rechargeable magnesium batteries including the disclosed solid-state electrolyte may have a coulombic efficiency .gtoreq.95% and exhibit cycling stability for at least 50 cycles.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium carbonate. 184.1425 Section 184.1425 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Magnesium carbonate (molecular formula approximately (MgCO3)4·Mg(OH)2·5H2O, CAS Reg. No. 39409-82-0) is also known as magnesium...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate...

  19. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  20. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  19. Magnesium, Inflammation, and Obesity in Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 60% of U.S. adults do not consume the Estimated Average Intake for magnesium, but widespread pathological conditions attributed to magnesium deficiency have not been reported. However, low magnesium status has been associated with numerous pathological conditions characterized as having a chr...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1425 - Magnesium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium carbonate. 582.1425 Section 582.1425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1425 Magnesium carbonate. (a) Product. Magnesium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  10. Synthesis of superconducting magnesium diboride objects

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Canfield, Paul C.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Petrovic, Cedomir; Cunningham, Charles E.; Lapertot, Gerard

    2003-08-15

    A process to produce magnesium diboride objects from boron objects with a similar form is presented. Boron objects are reacted with magnesium vapor at a predetermined time and temperature to form magnesium diboride objects having a morphology similar to the boron object's original morphology.