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Sample records for magnet residual gas

  1. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  2. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  3. Gas dynamics in residual gas analyzer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Santeler, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers are used for measuring partial flow rates as well as for measuring partial pressures. The required calibration may also be obtained with either known flow rates or known pressures. The calibration and application procedures are straightforward when both are of the same type; however, substantial errors may occur if the two types are mixed. This report develops the basic equations required to convert between partial pressure calibrations and partial flow rate calibrations. It also discusses the question of fractionating and nonfractionating gas flow in various gas inlet and pumping systems.

  4. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  5. Process for treatment of residual gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nolden, K.

    1980-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

  6. Residual Field Correction of Pulsed Bending Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Junpei; Igarashi, Susumu; Kamikubota, Norihiko; Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Kenichi; Shirakata, Masashi; Yamada, Shuei

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) has an accelerator chain, Linac, Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), and Main Ring (MR). The RCS accelerates the proton beam up to 3 GeV every 40 msec. After the beam is extracted from the RCS, it is delivered to a beam transport line, which is 3NBT for the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF). Some bunches of the proton beam are bended from the 3NBT to another beam transport line, which is 3-50BT for the MR, by using a pulsed bending magnet (PB) [1]. However, the beam orbit in the 3NBT is kicked by the residual magnetic field of the PB. In order to correct the residual magnetic field, additional coils had been wound on the PB poles. As a result of scanning the current pattern of the correction coils, the orbit distortion in the 3NBT has been reduced.

  7. Magnetic octadecyl-based matrix solid-phase dispersion coupled with gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in a proof-of-concept determination of multi-class pesticide residues in carrots.

    PubMed

    Binellas, Charalampos S; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2015-10-01

    A novel procedure is put forward based on the combination of the well-established matrix solid-phase dispersion and the magnetic and sorption properties of magnetic octadecyl in the presence of n-octanol and was employed in a proof-of-concept sample preparation and determination of several classes of pesticide residues in carrots. The procedure does not require the transfer of blend to cartridge and subsequent packing, nor any co-sorbent for extract clean up. The hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles utilized as a sorbent, can be retrieved by n-octanol under the application of a magnetic field due to hydrophobic interactions. Elution of pesticide residues is then carried out with an organic solvent. A total of 26 pesticides were included in this procedure and the target compounds were analyzed using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selective ion monitoring mode. The average extraction recoveries obtained from carrot samples fortified at three different concentrations (20, 50, and 500 μg/kg) were 77-107%. The estimated limits of quantitation for most target analytes were in the low μg/kg level. The study demonstrates that the proposed extraction procedure is simple and effective, avoiding a clean-up step for the sample preparation of vegetable. PMID:26293342

  8. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  9. Utility pump truck; Residual gas problems reduced with innovative equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    Residual natural gas trapped in the ground after the repair of a distribution-system leak can be a headache for utility employees and customers. The pump truck, a unique approach to removing residual gas, is described in this paper. Natural gas is lighter than air and naturally tends to rise upward and dissipate in the atmosphere. However, pavement, buildings or soil conditions around a leaking pipe often cause gas to be trapped in the ground. In addition to removing trapped gas, the pump truck is used to help pinpoint leaks where the source is difficult to locate because of soil conditions.

  10. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyser Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1996-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGAs are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. A method was devised by the authors to present RGA data in a three-axis format, plotting atomic mass unit (AMU), ion concentration as a function of AMU, and time, to provide a clear graphic visualization ot trends in gas concentration changes and to initiate a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal-vacuum testing.

  11. Field emitter based extractor gauges and residual gas analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Changkun Dong; G. Rao Myneni

    1999-04-01

    Attempts at using the Spindt-type molybdenum field emitter arrays in the extractor gauges and a residual gas analyzer are presented in this article. The sensitivity of the fuel emitter gauge is as high as 11 Torr{sup -1}. The departure from linearity of the pressure versus ion current measurements did not exceed 10% over the pressure range of 10{sup -10} - 10{sup -6} Torr. Stable sensitivities for nitrogen, helium, and hydrogen were achieved below 10{sup -7} Torr with the field emitter residual gas analyzer. The slightly reduced emission current and sensitivity, after long-term operation, are of concern and need to be addressed. Residual gas spectra indicate that when using field emitters, the electron stimulated desorption ions (O{sup +}, F{sup +}, and Cl{sup +}) are reduced as compared to those made using a hot filament source.

  12. The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D.; Nevins, W. M.

    2013-11-15

    The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

  13. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  14. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1997-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGA's are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. This ion concentration information can be interpreted to be representative of the composition of the residual gas in the chamber at the instant of analysis. Typically, test personnel are most interested in tracking the time history of changes in the composition of chamber residual gas to determine the relative cleanliness and the clean-up rate of the test article under vacuum. However, displays of instantaneous RGA data cannot provide test personnel with the preferred time history information. In order to gain an understanding of gas composition trends, a series of plots of individual data snapshots must be analyzed. This analysis is cumbersome and still does not provide a very satisfactory view of residual gas composition trends. A method was devised by the authors to present RCA data in a three-axis format, plotting Atomic Mass Unit (AMU), the Ionization Signal Response (ISR) as amps/torr as a function of AMU, and Time, to provide a clear graphic visualization of trends of changes in ISR with respect to time and AMU (representative of residual gas composition). This graphic visualization method provides a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal vacuum tests. Raw RGA data was extracted from a series of delimited ASCII files and then converted to a data array in a spreadsheet. Consequently, using the 3-D plotting functionality provided by the spreadsheet program, 3-D plots were produced. After devising the data format conversion process, the authors began developing a program to provide real-time 3-D

  15. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6- and 4.3-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, respectively. However, this treatment could result in the presence of chloroxyanion residues, such as chloride (Cl(-)), chlorite (ClO2(-)), chlorate (ClO3(-)), and perchlorate (ClO4(-)), which, apart from chloride, are a toxicity concern. Radiolabeled chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This

  16. Minimizing Residual Pressure within a Windowless Gas Target System - JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Orlando; Browne, Justin; Kontos, Antonios; Montes, Fernando; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear reactions between light gases and radioactive isotope beams are essential to address open questions in nuclear structure and astrophysics. Pure light gas targets are critical for the measurements of proton- and alpha-induced reactions. J _ et E _ xperiments in N _ uclear S _ tructure and A _ strophysics (JENSA) is the world's most dense (~ 1019 atoms/cm2) windowless gas target system. Most of the gas flow is localized; however, escaping gas creates a pressure gradient which degrades experimental measurements and contaminates the beam line. JENSA contains a differential pumping system to maintain a vacuum. The previous design configuration was not optimized for experiments (pressure measurements 70 cm downstream from the jet were ~ 10-3 torr; optimal is less than 10-4 torr). We have altered the current differential pumping system to minimize the residual pressure profile. Several configurations of two gas-receiving catchers were tested, and the most efficient ones identified using Enhanced Pirani and Cold Cathode gauges. We have determined the 30 mm outer and 20 mm inner gas-receiving cones minimize JENSA central chamber pressure to 200 millitorr at 16,000 torr of discharge pressure. Altering the tubing configuration has additionally lowered the pressure 70 cm downstream to 10-5 torr. The new residual pressure allows operation of JENSA with planned expansion of a recoil mass separator SECAR.

  17. Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis of residual stress and carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. M.; Stevens, K. J.; Kaiser, A. B.

    2001-04-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis is an effective non-destructive testing technique for determining both residual stress and carburization, with potential for improving the accuracy of remaining-life estimates of critical components in operational plant such as that used in thermal power stations and the petrochemical industry. We have measured Barkhausen noise in magnetic Durehete 1055 samples under stress and in carburized ethylene pyrolysis tubes. The Barkhausen power as a function of applied field is modeled using Sablik's function for Barkhausen power as a function of irreversible differential permeability (μirr); the Jiles-Atherton model of hysteresis is used to determine μirr as a function of applied field.

  18. Coarse-fine residual gravity cancellation system with magnetic levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salcudean, S. E.; Davis, H.; Chen, C. T.; Goertz, D. E.; Tryggvason, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft flight along parabolic trajectories have been proposed and executed in order to achieve low cost, near free fall conditions of moderate duration. This paper describes a six degree of freedom experiment isolation system designed to cancel out residual accelerations due to mechanical vibrations and errors in aircraft trajectory. The isolation system consists of a fine motion magnetic levitator whose stator is transported by a conventional coarse motion stage. The levitator uses wide gap voice coil actuators and has the dual purpose of isolating the experiment platform from aircraft vibrations and actively cancelling residual accelerations through feedback control. The course motion stage tracks the levitated platform in order to keep the levitator's coils centered within their matching magnetic gaps. Aspects of system design, an analysis of the proposed control strategy and simulation results are presented. Feasibility experiments are also discussed.

  19. Venous gas embolism - Time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Luehr, S.; Katz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles after embolization with known amounts of venous air, using an N2O challenge technique. Attention was also given to the length of time that the venous gas emboli remained as discrete bubbles in the lungs with 100 percent oxygen ventilation. The data indicate that venous gas emboli can remain in the pulmonary vasculature as discrete bubbles for periods lasting up to 43 + or - 10.8 min in dogs ventilated with oxygen and nitrogen. With 100 percent oxygen ventilation, these values are reduced significantly to 19 + or - 2.5 min.

  20. Residual gas fluorescence monitor for relativistic heavy ions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, T.; Gassner, D.; Minty, M.

    2013-10-01

    A residual gas fluorescence beam profile monitor at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has successfully recorded beam images of various species of relativistic heavy ions during FY2012 operations. These fully striped ions include gold, copper, and uranium at 100, 99.9, and 96.4GeV/n, respectively. Their beam profiles give an independent measurement of the RHIC beam size and emittance. We estimated their corresponding fluorescence cross sections to be 2.1×10-16, 1.8×10-17, and 2.6×10-16cm2, and obtained their rms transverse beam sizes of 0.36, 0.37, 0.24 mm for gold, copper, and uranium ions, respectively. They are the smallest ion beam width, thus lowest beam emittance, ever produced at RHIC or any other high-energy heavy ion colliders. These extremely small beam sizes may have reached a fundamental limit to residual gas fluorescence based beam profile monitor. Nevertheless, this beam diagnostic technique, utilizing the beam-induced fluorescence from residual gas where hydrogen is still the dominant constituent in nearly all vacuum systems, represents a passive, robust, truly noninvasive, monitor for high-energy ion beams.

  1. Whistleron gas in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Tzenov, Stephan I.

    2005-07-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of whistler waves in magnetized plasmas is studied. Since the plasmas and beam-plasma systems considered here are assumed to be weakly collisional, the point of reference for the analysis performed in the present paper is the system of hydrodynamic and field equations. The renormalization group method is applied to obtain dynamical equations for the slowly varying amplitudes of whistler waves. Further, it has been shown that the amplitudes of eigenmodes satisfy an infinite system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. In this sense, the whistler eigenmodes form a sort of a gas of interacting quasiparticles, while the slowly varying amplitudes can be considered as dynamical variables heralding the relevant information about the system. An important feature of the approach is that whistler waves do not perturb the initial uniform density of plasma electrons. The plasma response to the induced whistler waves consists in velocity redistribution which follows exactly the behavior of the whistlers. In addition, selection rules governing the nonlinear mode coupling have been derived, which represent another interesting peculiarity of the description presented here.

  2. Three-dimensional graphene aerogel-supported iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction of organophosphorus pesticide residues in fruit juices followed by gas chromatographic determination.

    PubMed

    Mahpishanian, Shokouh; Sereshti, Hassan

    2016-04-22

    In this research, a magnetic three dimensional-graphene nanocomposite (3D-G-Fe3O4) was prepared, characterized and used as an effective nanoadsorbent in magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) from juice samples prior to gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection (GC-NPD). The properties and morphology of 3D-G-Fe3O4 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The main experimental parameters affecting extraction recoveries including extraction time, amount of adsorbent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration and desorption conditions were carefully studied and optimized. The results showed wide linear concentration ranges with determination coefficients between 0.9973 and 0.9999. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the method and limits of quantification (S/N=10) were from 1.2 to 5.1 ng L(-1) and 3.4-17.0 ng L(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 2.6-5.1% and 3.5-6.9%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of OPPs in fruit juices (apple, orange, grape, sour-cherry and apricot) with recoveries in range of 86.6-107.5%. The GC-NPD results were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results demonstrated that with combination of highly interconnected 3D network structure and magnetism property of adsorbent, 3D-G-Fe3O4 aerogel exhibited exceptional extraction ability towards the OPPs. PMID:27018186

  3. Residual aqueous ozone determination by gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, M.R.; Gordon, G.; Pacey, G.E.

    1985-08-01

    A method for the determination of residual aqueous ozone utilizing the technique of gas diffusion flow injection analysis and the redox reagents potassium indigo trisulfonate and bis(terpyridine)iron(II) is described. The system uses a commercially available gas diffusion cell fitted with a microporous Teflon membrane to significantly reduce or eliminate potential interferences such as chlorine and oxidized forms of manganese. Detection limits of 0.03 mg/L ozone are possible with sensitivities and linear ranges comparable to the manual method. Selectivity is significantly improved and chlorine interference is reduced to 0.008 mg/L of apparent ozone for each part per million of chlorine present while oxidized manganese interference is completely eliminated. This method provides a sample throughput of 65 samples per hour. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER.

    PubMed

    Younkin, T R; Biewer, T M; Klepper, C C; Marcus, C

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations. PMID:25430381

  5. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITERa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-01

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  6. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  7. User's guide to the Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, S.A.

    1988-08-04

    The Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA), a Model 100C UTI quadrupole mass spectrometer, measures the concentrations of selected masses in the Fusion Energy Division's (FED) Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The RGA software is a VAX FORTRAN computer program which controls the experimental apparatus, records the raw data, performs data reduction, and plots the data. The RGA program allows data to be collected from an RGA on ATF or from either of two RGAs in the laboratory. In the laboratory, the RGA diagnostic plays an important role in outgassing studied on various candidate materials for fusion experiments. One such material, graphite, is being used more often in fusion experiments due to its ability to withstand high power loads. One of the functions of the RGA diagnostic is aid in the determination of the best grade of graphite to be used in these experiments and to study the procedures used to condition it. A procedure of particular interest involves baking the graphite sample in order to remove impurities that may be present in it. These impurities can be studied while in the ATF plasma or while being baked and outgassed in the laboratory. The Residual Gas Analyzer is a quadrupole mass spectrometer capable of scanning masses ranging in size from 1 atomic mass unit (amu) to 300 amu while under computer control. The procedure for collecting data for a particular mass is outlined.

  8. Electrodeposition of low residual stress CoNiMnP hard magnetic thin films for magnetic MEMS actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shan; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2005-04-01

    A new technique for electrodeposition of CoNiMnP hard magnetic thin films is developed to provide thin films with low residual stress and magnetic properties useful for MEMS applications. Processing parameters including applied current density, film thickness, pH and temperature of the electrolyte are regulated in order to reduce residual stress of the film. In addition, a hybrid residual stress reliever composed of sodium saccharine and a rare-earth salts mixture of Ce 2(SO 4) 3 and Nd 2(SO 4) 3 is created to further reduce the residual stress, eliminate microcracks and improve surface morphology of the film. The effects of residual stress on the magnetic properties of electrodeposited CoNiMnP hard magnetic films such as coercivity, saturation and residual magnetization are reported in this paper.

  9. RESIDUAL-GAS-IONIZATION BEAM PROFILE MONITORS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    CONNOLLY, R.; MICHNOFF, R.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) in RHIC measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last three years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  10. Residual-gas-ionization beam profile monitors in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Fite, J.; Jao, S.; Trabocchi, C.

    2010-05-02

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) are in RHIC to measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings. These work by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last two years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  11. The emission of fluorine gas during incineration of fluoroborate residue.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuheng; Jiang, Xuguang; Chen, Dezhen

    2016-05-01

    The emission behaviors of wastes from fluorine chemical industry during incineration have raised concerns because multiple fluorine products might danger human health. In this study, fluorine emission from a two-stage incineration system during the combustion of fluoroborate residue was examined. In a TG-FTIR analysis BF3, SiF4 and HF were identified as the initial fluorine forms to be released, while fluorine gases of greenhouse effect such as CF4 and SF6 were not found. Below 700 °C, NaBF4 in the sample decomposed to generate BF3. Then part of BF3 reacted with SiO2 in the system to form SiF4 or hydrolyzed to HF. At higher temperatures, the NaF left in the sample was gradually hydrolyzed to form HF. A lab-scale two-stage tube furnace is established to simulate the typical two-stage combustion chamber in China. Experimental tests proved that HF was the only fluorine gas in the flue gas, and emissions of BF3 and SiF4 can be negligible. Thermodynamic equilibrium model predicted that all SiF4 would be hydrolyzed at 1100 °C in the secondary-chamber, which agreed well with the experimental results. PMID:26808247

  12. Tag gas capsule with magnetic piercing device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Ira V.

    1976-06-22

    An apparatus for introducing a tag (i.e., identifying) gas into a tubular nuclear fuel element. A sealed capsule containing the tag gas is placed in the plenum in the fuel tube between the fuel and the end cap. A ferromagnetic punch having a penetrating point is slidably mounted in the plenum. By external electro-magnets, the punch may be caused to penetrate a thin rupturable end wall of the capsule and release the tag gas into the fuel element. Preferably the punch is slidably mounted within the capsule, which is in turn loaded as a sealed unit into the fuel element.

  13. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Ramakrishnan; Kota, Arun; Anand, Gaurav

    2004-01-01

    Our long term goal has been to make detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Thus, the objective of the current project was to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. Our focus was on the influence of oxygen on indium antimonide on clean silica ("quartz"). The research was performed by three chemical engineering graduate students, the third of whom will complete his research in the summer of 2005. Originally, we had planned to use a sealed silica cell containing a zirconia electrochemical element to control the oxygen partial pressure. However, zirconia requires an operating temperature above the 530 C melting point of InSb and is difficult to form a gas-tight seal with silica. Thus, we decided instead to flow an oxygen-containing gas through the cell. A special apparatus was designed, built and perfected. A piece of InSb was placed on a horizontal silica plate in a quartz cell. High purity argon, helium or hydrogen-containing gas is passed continuously through the cell while the oxygen concentration in the effluent gas is measured. The shape of the resulting drop was used to determine contact angle and surface tension of Ga-doped and high purity InSb. Oxygen appeared to decrease the contact angle, and definitely did not increase it. The following section gives the background for the research. Section 2 summarizes the results obtained on Ga-doped InSb with relatively high oxygen concentrations. Section 3 describes recent improvements made to the apparatus and methods of analysis. Section 4 gives recent results for high-purity InSb at low oxygen concentrations. Final results will be obtained only this summer (2005). Each section

  14. Chloroxyanion residues in cantaloupe and tomatoes after chlorine dioxide gas sanitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but few data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tom...

  15. Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, C.; Carlomagno, G. M.; di Foggia, M.; Natale, O.

    2008-06-01

    A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in fact, the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and may cause difficulties in successive manufacturing. Therefore, it is important to have a non-destructive technique that must be capable of detecting tiny ceramic fragments in a fast and easy way. In this perspective, the suitability of infrared thermography was investigated within cooperation between the University of Naples and the Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A. (EMA). Several blades of three different types were inspected revealing that in many cases infrared thermography can discover small ceramic fragments which were missed by X-ray inspection. In addition, infrared thermography allows gaining of information about other types of anomalies (e.g., surface defects) during the same testing step (by eventually changing the test parameters) and then saving time and money. The obtained results look promising in view of introducing infrared thermography among industrial instrumentation as an alternative to, or integrated with, the most currently utilized non-destructive techniques.

  16. Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

    2010-09-01

    Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

  17. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Ramakrishnan, Suresh; Kota, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long-term goal is to make such detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Detached solidification is more likely when the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall is high, i.e. non-wetting. It has been claimed that impurities increase the contact angle. The objective of the current project is to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. We are focusing on determining the influence of oxygen on the contact angle of molten InSb on clean silica ('quartz'), including the advancing and retreating contact angles in addition to the usual equilibrium contact angle. We have created a gas flow system that allows us to control the oxygen partial pressure over a sessile drop of InSb on a horizontal quartz surface. The cell is slowly tilted while videotaping to reveal the contact angles on the two sides of the drop just prior to it rolling down the surface. Thus far, we have learned the following: (1) Molten InSb readily forms an oxide layer in the presence of the trace amounts of oxygen found in high purity argon; (2) This oxide contains a substantial amount of Ga, which presumably is a trace contaminant that is not detectable in the starting material; (3) The addition of 10% hydrogen to the argon gas is sufficient to reduce the oxide and produce a clean drop; (4) An infrared filter must precede the video camera in order to produce a sharp image of the drop for later image analysis; (5) Tilting the surface on which the drop rests causes the two sides

  18. Effect of improving flue gas cleaning on characteristics and immobilisation of APC residues from MSW incineration.

    PubMed

    Geysen, D; Vandecasteele, C; Jaspers, M; Brouwers, E; Wauters, G

    2006-01-16

    The flue gas cleaning system of a MSW incinerator with a capacity of 350 kt/year was changed to improve the HCl elimination efficiency. Instead of the semi-wet operating spray reactor and subsequent baghouse, a two-step wet flue gas cleaning was added behind the baghouse. Elemental composition, X-ray powder diffraction patterns and TGA measurements showed that the resulting APC residue was totally different from the former residue. As a consequence, leaching characteristics of both residues also differed and another treatment was required prior to disposal. For the former residue, mainly leaching of Pb (>100 mg/l), necessitated treatment prior to landfilling. The lower alkalinity of the new residue resulted in a leachate pH of 9.7 and a Pb concentration of 0.8 mg/l. The leachate pH of the former residue was 12.4. The leaching of Pb and Zn increased above 100 mg/l when immobilising the new residue with cement. Better results were obtained when immobilising with micro silica. The high CaCl2 x 2H2O content of the new residue brought along clogging of the bag filter system. Adding 1.4% of CaO (or 1.9% of Ca(OH)2) to the residue already improved these inconveniences but again significantly changed the leaching behaviour of the residue. PMID:16386367

  19. Chloroxyanion Residues in Cantaloupe and Tomatoes after Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sanitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Ernst, W; Herges, G R

    2015-11-01

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but little data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tomato and cantaloupe treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Treatments delivered 50 mg of chlorine dioxide gas per kg of tomato (2-h treatment) and 100 mg of gas per kg of cantaloupe (6-h treatment) in sealed, darkened containers. Chlorate residues in tomato and cantaloupe edible flesh homogenates were less than the LC-MS/MS limit of quantitation (60 and 30 ng/g respectively), but were 1319 ± 247 ng/g in rind + edible flesh of cantaloupe. Perchlorate residues in all fractions of chlorine dioxide-treated tomatoes and cantaloupe were not different (P > 0.05) than perchlorate residues in similar fractions of untreated tomatoes and cantaloupe. Data from this study suggest that chlorine dioxide sanitation of edible vegetables and melons can be conducted without the formation of unwanted residues in edible fractions. PMID:26496046

  20. Speciation, Characterization, And Mobility Of As, Se and Hg In Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue...

  1. Residual Gas Noise in the Test-mass Module for DECIGO Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutomi, K.; Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Nikaido, M.; Tanaka, N.; Torii, Y.; Sato, S.; Izumi, K.; Chen, D.

    2015-05-01

    DECIGO Pathfinder is the first milestone mission for DECIGO, a future gravitational wave antenna. In DPF, residual gas noise acting on the test mass is estimated to increase and exceed the requirement for force noise of 1 × 10-15 N/√Hz due to geometry of the test-mass module. We performed a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the residual gas noise and found that the engineering model of the test-mass module cannnot satisfy the requirement. To reduce the gas noise, we present revised geometry of the test-mass module using comb-like electrodes.

  2. Trap-depth determination from residual gas collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dongen, J.; Zhu, C.; Clement, D.; Dufour, G.; Madison, K. W.; Booth, J. L.

    2011-08-15

    We present a method for determining the depth of an atomic or molecular trap of any type. This method relies on a measurement of the trap loss rate induced by collisions with background gas particles. Given a fixed gas composition, the loss rate uniquely determines the trap depth. Because of the ''soft'' long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction, these collisions transfer kinetic energy to trapped particles across a broad range of energy scales, from room temperature to the microkelvin energy scale. The resulting loss rate therefore exhibits a significant variation over an enormous range of trap depths, making this technique a powerful diagnostic with a large dynamic range. We present trap depth measurements of a Rb magneto-optical trap using this method and a different technique that relies on measurements of loss rates during optical excitation of colliding atoms to a repulsive molecular state. The main advantage of the method presented here is its large dynamic range and applicability to traps of any type requiring only knowledge of the background gas density and the interaction potential between the trapped and background gas particles.

  3. Chloroxyanion residue quantification in cantaloupes treated with chlorine dioxide gas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes, results in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monoc...

  4. Bilinear and biquadratic interlayer exchange coupling in sputtered Co/Cu multilayers damaged with residual gas impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    The oscillatory indirect exchange coupling exhibited by magnetic/nonmagnetic metal multilayers is known to be highly sensitive to structural defects. We have measured the effects on coupling of residual gas atoms in sputtered Co/Cu multilayers. We have used a simple technique to selectively probe particular parts of the multilayer stack. A large reduction in the giant magnetoresistance has been observed when gas impurity atoms are introduced into the middle of the Cu spacer layers, with a corresponding increase in the remanence of the sample. These changes are shown to be consistent with overwhelmingly strong biquadratic coupling between the Co layers. This leads to the moments in adjacent layers being no longer collinear in zero applied field, which we have confirmed by other measurements. We discuss the applicability of the various theoretical models of biquadratic coupling to our observations.

  5. In-orbit offline estimation of the residual magnetic dipole biases of the POPSAT-HIP1 nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriani, S.; Brama, Y. L.; Gallina, P.; Manzoni, G.

    2016-05-01

    The nanosatellite POPSAT-HIP1 is a Cubesat-class spacecraft launched on the 19th of June 2014 to test cold-gas based micro-thrusters; it is, as of April 2015, in a low Earth orbit at around 600 km of altitude and is equipped, notably, with a magnetometer. In order to increment the performance of the attitude control of nanosatellites like POPSAT, it is extremely useful to determine the main biases that act on the magnetometer while in orbit, for example those generated by the residual magnetic moment of the satellite itself and those originating from the transmitter. Thus, we present a methodology to perform an in-orbit offline estimation of the magnetometer bias caused by the residual magnetic moment of the satellite (we refer to this as the residual magnetic dipole bias, or RMDB). The method is based on a genetic algorithm coupled with a simplex algorithm, and provides the bias RMDB vector as output, requiring solely the magnetometer readings. This is exploited to compute the transmitter magnetic dipole bias (TMDB), by comparing the computed RMDB with the transmitter operating and idling. An experimental investigation is carried out by acquiring the magnetometer outputs in different phases of the spacecraft life (stabilized, maneuvering, free tumble). Results show remarkable accuracy with an RMDB orientation error between 3.6 ° and 6.2 ° , and a module error around 7 % . TMDB values show similar coherence values. Finally, we note some drawbacks of the methodologies, as well as some possible improvements, e.g. precise transmitter operations logging. In general, however, the methodology proves to be quite effective even with sparse and noisy data, and promises to be incisive in the improvement of attitude control systems.

  6. Residual Gas X-ray Beam Position Monitor Development for PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Hahn, U.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Degenhardt, M.

    2007-01-19

    The development effort is driven by the need for a new type of x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM), which will detect the centre of gravity of the undulator beam. XBPMs based on the ionization of a residual gas are considered being the candidate for this future ''white'' undulator beam XBPMs. A number of residual gas XBPM prototypes for the PETRA III storage ring were developed and tested. Tests were performed at DESY and the ESRF, resolution of beam position up to 5 {mu}m is reported. The further development of the RGXBPMs will be focused on improvements of resolution, readout speed and reliability.

  7. Cracking blends of gas oil and residual oil

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.D.

    1988-03-01

    In a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking zone at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regeneration zone by burning coke of the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the cracking zone and the regeneration zone. The improvement is described for obtaining a naphtha product of improved octane number comprising introducing sufficient of a nickel and vanadium metals-containing heavy feedstock with the gas oil feed introduced into the cracking zone to deposit nickel and vanadium metals on the catalyst and raise the nickel and metals-content of the catalyst to a level ranging from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million of the metals expressed as equivalent nickel, based on the weight of the catalyst, and maintaining the nickel and vanadium metals level on the catalyst by withdrawing high nickel and vanadium metals containing catalyst and adding low nickel and vanadium metals-containing catalyst to the regeneration zone.

  8. Fast gas chromatography for pesticide residues analysis using analyte protectants.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Michal; Húsková, Renáta; Matisová, Eva; Mocák, Ján

    2008-04-01

    Fast GC-MS with narrow-bore columns combined with effective sample preparation technique (QuEChERS method) was used for evaluation of various calibration approaches in pesticide residues analysis. In order to compare the performance of analyte protectants (APs) with matrix-matched standards calibration curves of selected pesticides were searched in terms of linearity of responses, repeatability of measurements and reached limit of quantifications utilizing the following calibration standards in the concentration range 1-500 ng mL(-1)(the equivalent sample concentration 1-500 microg kg(-1)): in neat solvent (acetonitrile) with/without addition of APs, matrix-matched standards with/without addition of APs. For APs results are in a good agreement with matrix-matched standards. To evaluate errors of determination of concentration synthetic samples at concentration level of pesticides 50 ng mL(-1) (50 microg kg(-1)) were analyzed and quantified using the above given standards. For less troublesome pesticides very good estimation of concentration was obtained utilizing APs, while for more troublesome pesticides such as methidathion, malathion, phosalone and deltamethrin significant overestimation reaching up to 80% occurred. According to presented results APs can be advantegously used for "easy" pesticides determination. For "difficult" pesticides an alternative calibration approach is required for samples potentially violating MRLs. An example of real sample measurement is shown. In this paper also the use of internal standards (triphenylphosphate (TPP) and heptachlor (HEPT)) for peak areas normalization is discussed in terms of repeatability of measurements and quantitative data obtained. TPP normalization provided slightly better results than the use of absolute peak areas measurements on the contrary to HEPT. PMID:17920613

  9. Comparison of non-volatile bituminous residues and coal materials by pyrolysis gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.A.; Smiley, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of non-volatile bituminous residues and coal materials by pyrolysis gas chromatography was undertaken. The objective was to determine the coal and coke precursors in a residue from the co-processing of coal and bitumen. This was investigated by quantifying 8 model aromatic compounds and their co-eluting compound groups in the pyrolysis products. Five samples consisting of a coke obtained from hydroprocessing a bitumen, a sub-bituminous coal, pitch from the co-processing of the bitumen and the coal, THF insolubles of the pitch, and a residual coal from liquefaction were pyrolysed to 900 C and the volatile products were analysed by gas chromatography. Details of the results are given.

  10. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    We pursued advanced technology development of laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This new multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation-as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 129Xe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We pursued two technology development specific aims: (1) development of low-field (less than 0.01 T) noble gas MRI of humans; and (2) development of functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized noble gas and related techniques.

  11. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  12. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  13. Automatic segmentation of magnetic resonance images of the trans-femoral residual limb.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T S; Solomonidis, S E; Lee, V S; Spence, W D; Sandham, W A; Hadley, D M

    1998-12-01

    An automatic algorithm for the extraction of the skin and bone boundaries from axial magnetic resonance images of the residual limb of trans-femoral amputees is presented. The method makes use of K-means clustering and mathematical morphology. Statistical analysis of the results indicates that the computer-generated boundaries compare favourably to those drawn by human observers. The boundaries may be used in biomechanical modelling of the interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket. The limb/socket interface determines the quality of prosthetic fit, therefore knowledge of this interface is important for the improvement of socket design in order to achieve patient comfort and mobility. PMID:10223645

  14. Residual Gas in Closed Systems: Development of Gas in Silica Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amounts and composition of residual gases formed in sealed silica glass ampoules were investigated. The effect of the silica brand, outgassing and annealing conditions, system geometry, and a presence of graphite were determined and discussed.

  15. Residual Gas in Closed Systems. 1; Development of Gas in Silica Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amounts and composition of residual gases formed in sealed silica glass ampoules were investigated. The effect of the silica brand, outgassing and annealing conditions, system geometry, and presence of graphite are determined and discussed.

  16. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields and the distribution of tight sandstone gas in the eastern Ordos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bingqiang; Zhang, Huaan; Zhang, Chunguan; Xu, Haihong; Yan, Yunkui

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform gas exploration and determine the distribution pattern of gas in the Yanchang Oil Field in the eastern part of the North Shaanxi Slope, Ordos Basin, China, gravity and magnetic survey data were systemically collated, processed and interpreted in combination with the drilling data and recent seismic data. The genesis of gravity and magnetic anomalies and the relationship between the characteristics of the gravity and magnetic fields and known gas distribution were explored in order to predict the favourable exploration targets for gas. Gravity anomalies resulted both from the lateral variation in density of the basement rock and lateral lithologic transformation in the sedimentary cover. The regional magnetic anomalies were mainly caused by the basement metamorphic rocks and the residual magnetic anomalies may reflect the amount and general location of the volcanic materials in the overlying strata. The residual gravity and magnetic anomalies generated by high-density sandstone and high content of volcanics in the gas reservoir of the upper Paleozoic distorted and deformed the anomaly curves when they were stacked onto the primary background anomaly. The gas wells were generally found to be located in the anomaly gradient zones, or the distorted part of contour lines, and the flanks of high and low anomalies, or the transitional zones between anomaly highs and lows. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields provide significant information that can be used for guidance when exploring the distribution of gas. Based on these characteristics, five favourable areas for gas exploration were identified; these are quasi-equally spaced like a strip extending from the southeast to the northwest.

  17. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields and the distribution of tight sandstone gas in the Eastern Ordos Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingqiang, Yuan; Huaan, Zhang; Chunguan, Zhang; Haihong, Xu; Yunkui, Yan

    2016-02-01

    In order to perform gas exploration and determine the distribution pattern of gas in the Yanchang Oil Field in the eastern part of the North Shaanxi Slope, Ordos Basin, China, gravity and magnetic survey data were systemically collated, processed, and interpreted in combination with the drilling data and recent seismic data. The genesis of gravity and magnetic anomalies and the relationship between the characteristics of the gravity and magnetic fields and known gas distribution were explored in order to predict the favourable exploration targets for gas. Gravity anomalies resulted both from the lateral variation in density of the basement rock and lateral lithologic transformation in the sedimentary cover. The regional magnetic anomalies were mainly caused by the basement metamorphic rocks and the residual magnetic anomalies may reflect the amount and general location of the volcanic materials in the overlying strata. The residual gravity and magnetic anomalies generated by high-density sandstone and high content of volcanics in the gas reservoir of the upper Paleozoic distorted and deformed the anomaly curves when they were stacked onto the primary background anomaly. The gas wells were generally found to be located in the anomaly gradient zones, or the distorted part of contour lines, and the flanks of high and low anomalies, or the transitional zones between anomaly highs and lows. The characteristics of gravity and magnetic fields provide significant information that can be used for guidance when exploring the distribution of gas. Based on these characteristics, five favourable areas for gas exploration were identified; these are quasi-equally spaced like a strip extending from the southeast to the northwest.

  18. An assessment of radiolytic gas generation: Impacts from Rocky Flats Plant residue elimination alternatives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-26

    This report evaluates the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque analytical model that is used to support present wattage limit decisions for various matrix forms from the Residue Elimination Project for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant waste acceptability. This study includes (1) a comparison of the SNL-A model to Rocky Flats Plant models for consistency of assumptions and the phenomena considered in the models, and (2) an evaluation of the appropriateness of the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque model to Rocky Flats Plant residues, considering that the original intent was to model wastes rather than residues. The study draws the following conclusions: (1) only real-time gas generation testing of specific waste streams may provide a sound basis for an increase in the transportation wattage limit of specific waste streams, and (2) the radiolytic gas generation rate from Residue Elimination Project waste emplaced at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, under worst-case conditions, is not a significant factor in comparison to the total gas generation rate due to radiolysis, microbial degradation, and corrosion.

  19. Analysis of catalytic gas products using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis for operando transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-06-01

    Operando transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of catalytic reactions requires that the gas composition inside the TEM be known during the in situ reaction. Two techniques for measuring gas composition inside the environmental TEM are described and compared here. First, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, both in the low-loss and core-loss regions of the spectrum was utilized. The data were quantified using a linear combination of reference spectra from individual gasses to fit a mixture spectrum. Mass spectrometry using a residual gas analyzer was also used to quantify the gas inside the environmental cell. Both electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis were applied simultaneously to a known 50/50 mixture of CO and CO2, so the results from the two techniques could be compared and evaluated. An operando TEM experiment was performed using a Ru catalyst supported on silica spheres and loaded into the TEM on a specially developed porous pellet TEM sample. Both techniques were used to monitor the conversion of CO to CO2 over the catalyst, while simultaneous atomic resolution imaging of the catalyst was performed. PMID:24815065

  20. Headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detector method for organic solvent residue analysis in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mijeong Lee; Zahn, Michael; Trinh, Thao; Jia, Qi; Ma, Wenwen

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the identification and quantification of 20 organic solvent residues in dietary supplements. The method utilizes a headspace sampler interfaced with gas chromatography and flame ionization detection. With split injection (5:1) and a DB-624 column, most of the organic solvents are separated in 9 min. The method has been validated and was found to be relatively simple and fast, and it can be applied to most common organic solvent residues. With the mass detector, the method was able to identify organic solvents beyond the 20 standards tested. PMID:17225592

  1. Biomedical Investigations with Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (e.g., of lung ventilation) as well as studies of tissue perfusion. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (He-3 and Xe-129) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive detection, opening the door to practical MRI at very low magnetic fields with an open, lightweight, and low-power device. We are pursuing two specific aims in this research. The first aim is to develop a low-field (< 0.01 T) instrument for noble gas MRI of humans, and the second aim is to develop functional MRI of the lung using laser-polarized Xe-129 and related techniques.

  2. The magnetic field of Mars - Implications from gas dynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    On January 21, 1972, the Mars 3 spacecraft observed a variation in the magnetic field during its periapsis passage over the dayside of Mars that was suggestive of entry into a Martian magnetosphere. Original data and trajectory of the spacecraft have been obtained (Dolginov, 1983) and an attempt is made to simulate the observed variation of the magnetic field by using a gas dynamic simulation. In the gas dynamic model a flow field is generated and this flow field is used to carry the interplanetary magnetic field through the Martian magnetosheath. The independence of the flow field and magnetic field calculation makes it possible to converge rapidly on an IMF orientation that would result in a magnetic variation similar to that observed by Mars 3. There appears to be no need to invoke an entry into a Martian magnetosphere to explain these observations.

  3. The effect of residual gas scattering on Ga ion beam patterning of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, Nick F. W. E-mail: a.a.bol@tue.nl; Vervuurt, R. H. J.; Weber, J. W.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Bol, A. A. E-mail: a.a.bol@tue.nl; Mulders, J. J. L.

    2015-11-23

    The patterning of graphene by a 30 kV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam (FIB) is studied by in-situ and ex-situ Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the graphene surrounding the patterned target area can be damaged at remarkably large distances of more than 10 μm. We show that scattering of the Ga ions in the residual gas of the vacuum system is the main cause of the large range of lateral damage, as the size and shape of the tail of the ion beam were strongly dependent on the system background pressure. The range of the damage was therefore greatly reduced by working at low pressures and limiting the total amount of ions used. This makes FIB patterning a feasible alternative to electron beam lithography as long as residual gas scattering is taken into account.

  4. Evaluation of low cost residual gas analyzers for ultrahigh vacuum applications

    SciTech Connect

    M. Rao; D. Dong

    1996-10-01

    In recent years several low cost computer controlled residual gas analyzers (RGAs) have been introduced into the market place. It would be very useful to know the performance characteristics of these RGAs in order to make an informed selection for UHV applications. The UHV applications include extreme sensitivity helium leak detection and monitoring of the residual gas spectra in UHV systems. In this article, the sensitivity and linearity data for nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium are presented in the pressure range 10{sup {minus}8}---10{sup {minus}1} Pa. Further, the relationships between focus voltage and ion currents, relative sensitivity, and fragmentation factor are also included. A direct comparison method is used in obtaining this data. Spinning rotor and extractor gauges are the transfer standard gauges used in Jefferson Lab's vacuum calibration facility, with which all the reported measurements here were carried out.

  5. Speciation, characterization, and mobility of As, Se, and Hg in flue gas desulphurization residues.

    PubMed

    Al-Abed, Souhail R; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2008-03-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue. With increasing reuse of the FGD residues in beneficial applications, it is important to determine metal speciation and mobilityto understand the environmental impact of its reuse. In this paper, we report the solid phase speciation of As, Se, and Hg in FGD residues using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and sequential chemical extraction (SCE) techniques. The SCE results combined with XRF data indicated a strong possibility of As association with iron oxides, whereas Se was distributed among all geochemical phases. Hg appeared to be mainly distributed in the strong-complexed phase. XRF images also suggested a strong association of Hg with Fe oxide materials within FGD residues. XAS analysis indicated that As existed in its oxidized state (As(V)), whereas Se and Hg was observed in primarily reduced states as selenite (Se(IV)) and Hg(I), respectively. The results from the SCE and variable pH leaching tests indicated that the labile fractions of As, Se, and Hg were fairly low and thus suggestive of their stability in the FGD residues. However, the presence of a fine fraction enriched in metal content in the FGD residue suggested that size fractionation is important in assessing the environmental risks associated with their reuse. PMID:18441822

  6. Speciation, Characterization and Mobility of As, Se and Hg in Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Abed, S.R.; Jegadeesan, G.; Scheckel, K.G.; Tolaymat, T.

    2008-06-23

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue. With increasing reuse of the FGD residues in beneficial applications, it is important to determine metal speciation and mobility to understand the environmental impact of its reuse. In this paper, we report the solid phase speciation of As, Se, and Hg in FGD residues using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and sequential chemical extraction (SCE) techniques. The SCE results combined with XRF data indicated a strong possibility of As association with iron oxides, whereas Se was distributed among all geochemical phases. Hg appeared to be mainly distributed in the strong-complexed phase. XRF images also suggested a strong association of Hg with Fe oxide materials within FGD residues. XAS analysis indicated that As existed in its oxidized state (As(V)), whereas Se and Hg was observed in primarily reduced states as selenite (Se(IV)) and Hg(I), respectively. The results from the SCE and variable pH leaching tests indicated that the labile fractions of As, Se, and Hg were fairly low and thus suggestive of their stability in the FGD residues. However, the presence of a fine fraction enriched in metal content in the FGD residue suggested that size fractionation is important in assessing the environmental risks associated with their reuse.

  7. Speciation, characterization, and mobility of As, Se, and Hg in flue gas desulphurization residues

    SciTech Connect

    Souhail R. Al-Abed; Gautham Jegadeesan; Kirk G. Scheckel; Thabet Tolaymat

    2008-03-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile toxic trace elements such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg). The capture of these elements in the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in generation of a metal-laden residue. With increasing reuse of the FGD residues in beneficial applications, it is important to determine metal speciation and mobility to understand the environmental impact of its reuse. In this paper, we report the solid phase speciation of As, Se, and Hg in FGD residues using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and sequential chemical extraction (SCE) techniques. The SCE results combined with XRF data indicated a strong possibility of As association with iron oxides, whereas Se was distributed among all geochemical phases. Hg appeared to be mainly distributed in the strong-complexed phase. XRF images also suggested a strong association of Hg with Fe oxide materials within FGD residues. XAS analysis indicated that As existed in its oxidized state (As(V)), whereas Se and Hg was observed in primarily reduced states as selenite (Se(IV)) and Hg(I), respectively. The results from the SCE and variable pH leaching tests indicated that the labile fractions of As, Se, and Hg were fairly low and thus suggestive of their stability in the FGD residues. However, the presence of a fine fraction enriched in metal content in the FGD residue suggested that size fractionation is important in assessing the environmental risks associated with their reuse. 34 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Polypeptide Ions Via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O]+), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O]+ product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H]+). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to `label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  9. [Determination of organic residues in macroporous adsorption resins by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jia, Cunqin; Li, Yangchun; Tu, Pengfei; Zhang, Hongquan

    2005-11-01

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene, decane, diethylbenzene, undecane, divinylbenzene, dodecane and naphthalene residues in macroporous adsorption resins (MARs). The organic residues were extracted from resin samples by ultrasonic extraction with dichloromethane and analyzed by gas chromatography. The chromatographic conditions were as follows: a DB-624 capillary column (30 m x 0.32 mm i.d., 1.8 microm); carrier gas, nitrogen with a flow rate of 2.5 mL/min; column temperature, programmed from 40 degrees C to 200 degrees C at a rate of 14 degrees C /min and kept at 200 degrees C for 1 min; flame ionization detector temperature, 250 degrees C; injector temperature, 220 degrees C; splitless injection, 1 microL. All the 10 organic residues were separated well in 12 min. The recoveries for spiked standards (n = 3) were 73.8% - 107.9%. The relative standard deviations were 1.3% - 4.4%. The limits of detection were 0.007 - 0.03 mg/L. This method is sensitive, accurate and quick. Nine commercial MARs and their pretreated samples were assayed, and the results show that the contents of organic residues varied greatly in two kinds of samples. And the pretreated MARs can be used safely in the production of traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:16499000

  10. Thermal Photon and Residual Gas Scattering of the Electrons in the ILC RTML

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.M.; /SLAC

    2006-08-16

    The scattering of the primary beam electrons off of thermal photons and residual gas molecules in the projected International Linear Collider (ILC) is a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated downstream of the linac. In this report we give the analytic estimations of the individual input that each of the main scattering processes makes in the production of off-energy and large amplitude particles in the Damping Ring to Main Linac region (RTML).

  11. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Fernando Barbosa V. da; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  12. An accurate method for determining residual stresses with magnetic non-destructive techniques in welded ferromagnetic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourna, P.

    2016-03-01

    The scope of the present research work was to investigate the proper selection criteria for developing a suitable methodology for the accurate determination of residual stresses existing in welded parts. Magnetic non-destructive testing took place by the use of two magnetic non-destructive techniques: by the measurement of the magnetic Barkhausen noise and by the evaluation of the magnetic hysteresis loop parameters. The spatial distribution of residual stresses in welded metal parts by both non-destructive magnetic methods and two diffraction methods was determined. The conduction of magnetic measurements required an initial calibration of ferromagnetic steels. Based on the examined volume of the sample, all methods used were divided into two large categories: the first one was related to the determination of surface residual stress, whereas the second one was related to bulk residual stress determination. The first category included the magnetic Barkhausen noise and the X-ray diffraction measurements, while the second one included the magnetic permeability and the neutron diffraction data. The residual stresses determined by the magnetic techniques were in a good agreement with the diffraction ones.

  13. [Simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus by headspace gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chi, Shuyao; Wu, Dike; Sun, Jinhong; Ye, Ruhan; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    A headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents (petroleum ether (60-90 degrees C), acetone, ethyl acetate, methanol, methylene chloride, ethanol and butyl acetate) in bovis calculus artifactus. The DB-WAX capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) were used for the separation and detection of the residual solvents, and the internal standard method was used for the quantification. The chromatographic conditions, such as equilibrium temperature and equilibrium time, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, all of the seven residual solvents showed good linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (not less than 0.999 3) in the prescribed concentration range. At three spiked levels, the recoveries for the seven residual solvents were 94.7%-105.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.5%. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were 0.43-5.23 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 1.25-16.67 mg/L. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the simultaneous determination of the seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus. PMID:25185320

  14. Evaluation of residue management practices effects on corn productivity, soil quality, and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Jose German

    The removal of crop residues left after harvest is being considered as a potential feedstock source for bioethanol production which can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel use and net greenhouse gas (GHG). The objectives of this study were to: (i) examine how tillage, N fertilization rates, residue removal, and their interactions affect crop productivity, (ii) SOC and soil physical properties, and (iii) GHG emissions, and (iv) calculated a soil C budget to determine how much crop residue can be sustainably be removed in Central and Southwest Iowa. After three years of residue removal under different management practices, the findings of this study suggest that a portion of the corn residue that is left on the soil surface after harvest can be removed, with no negative impacts in the short term continuous corn yield in sites at Central and Southwest Iowa. However, significant decreases in SOC sequestration rates, microbial biomass-C, bulk density, soil penetration resistance, wet aggregate stability, and infiltration rates were observed, but varied with soil type and management practices. Additionally, soil surface CO2 and N2O emissions were responsive to management practices; primarily by altering soil temperature, soil water content, soil mineral N, and crop growth. Results from soil C budget show that in 2010 when corn growth was not water stressed (lack of moisture), approximately 35 and 30% of the residue could be sustainably removed in the Central and Southwest sites, respectively. In 2011, drier soil conditions resulted in approximately 2 and 49% of the residue could be sustainably removed in the Central and Southwest sites, respectively.

  15. Implications of Depth Determination from Second Moving Average Residual Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, K. S.; Kletetschka, G.

    2014-12-01

    Mars total magnetic data obtained by Mars Global Surveyor mission from 400 km altitude were processed using a second moving average method (SMAM) to estimate the depth of the buried sources. Five profiles were chosen across major magnetic areas. Each profile was subjected to a separation technique using the SMAM. Second moving average residual anomalies (SMARA) were obtained from magnetic data using filters of successive spacing. The depth estimate is monitored by the standard deviation of the depths determined from all SMARA for various value of the shape factor (SF) that includes dike, cylinder, and sphere. The standard deviation along with depth estimate is considered to be a new criterion for determining the correct depth and shape of the buried structures on Mars.

  16. Dating and sourcing fuel ash residues from Cladh Hallan, South Uist, Scotland, using magnetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Batt, C. M.

    Mineral magnetic and archaeomagnetic measurements have been carried out on fire ash deposits from a central hearth within a circular dwelling at the Late Bronze/Early Iron Age settlement site of Cladh Hallan on South Uist, Scotland. Archaeomagnetic methods date the hearths to 560-700 BC and 650-850 BC, the earliest archaeomagnetic dates produced for the Western Isles of Scotland. A range of mineral magnetic measurements have been carried out on a continually sampled profile through the hearths/ash build-ups displaying differences between the two main ash build-ups and floors. The mineral magnetic results have also been used to assess fuel sources through the application of techniques based on modern ash residues. The results show a marked change in fuel source from well-humified peat to a more mixed fuel, with a high proportion of fibrous-upper peat/peat turf.

  17. Synthesis and surface engineering of magnetic nanoparticles for environmental cleanup and pesticide residue analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ranjeet; Hasan, Abshar; Iqbal, Nusrat; Alam, Samsul; Saini, Mahesh Kr; Raza, Syed Kalbe

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, water pollution and pesticide accumulation in the food chain have become a serious environmental and health hazard problem. Direct determination of these contaminants is a difficult task due to their low concentration level and the matrix interferences. Therefore, an efficient separation and preconcentration procedure is often required prior to the analysis. With the advancement in nanotechnology, various types of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles have successfully been synthesized and received considerable attention as sorbents for decontamination of diverse matrices. Magnetic core-shell nanoparticles with surface modifications have the advantages of large surface-area-to-volume ratio, high number of surface active sites, no secondary pollutant, and high magnetic properties. Due to their physicochemical properties, surface-modified magnetic core-shell nanoparticles exhibit high adsorption efficiency, high rate of removal of contaminants, and easy as well as rapid separation of adsorbent from solution via external magnetic field. Such facile separation is essential to improve the operation efficiency. In addition, reuse of nanoparticles would substantially reduce the treatment cost. In this review article, we have attempted to summarize recent studies that address the preconcentration methods of pesticide residue analysis and removal of toxic contaminants from aquatic systems using magnetic core-shell nanoparticles as adsorbents. PMID:24777942

  18. MAGNETICALLY REGULATED GAS ACCRETION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Birnboim, Yuval

    2009-09-10

    Disk galaxies are in hydrostatic equilibrium along their vertical axis. The pressure allowing for this configuration consists of thermal, turbulent, magnetic, and cosmic-ray components. For the Milky Way the thermal pressure contributes {approx}10% of the total pressure near the plane, with this fraction dropping toward higher altitudes. Out of the rest, magnetic fields contribute {approx}1/3 of the pressure to distances of {approx}3 kpc above the disk plane. In this Letter, we attempt to extrapolate these local values to high-redshift, rapidly accreting, rapidly star-forming disk galaxies and study the effect of the extra pressure sources on the accretion of gas onto the galaxies. In particular, magnetic field tension may convert a smooth cold-flow accretion to clumpy, irregular star formation regions and rates. The infalling gas accumulates on the edge of the magnetic fields, supported by magnetic tension. When the mass of the infalling gas exceeds some threshold mass, its gravitational force cannot be balanced by magnetic tension anymore, and it falls toward the disk's plane, rapidly making stars. Simplified estimations of this threshold mass are consistent with clumpy star formation observed in SINS, UDF, GOODS, and GEMS surveys. We discuss the shortcomings of pure hydrodynamic codes in simulating the accretion of cold flows into galaxies, and emphasize the need for magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  19. Using noble gas tracers to estimate residual CO2 saturation in the field: results from the CO2CRC Otway residual saturation and dissolution test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Residual CO2 saturation is a critically important parameter in CO2 storage as it can have a large impact on the available secure storage volume and post-injection CO2 migration. A suite of single-well tests to measure residual trapping was conducted at the Otway test site in Victoria, Australia during 2011. One or more of these tests could be conducted at a prospective CO2 storage site before large-scale injection. The test involved injection of 150 tonnes of pure carbon dioxide followed by 454 tonnes of CO2-saturated formation water to drive the carbon dioxide to residual saturation. This work presents a brief overview of the full test sequence, followed by the analysis and interpretation of the tests using noble gas tracers. Prior to CO2 injection krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) tracers were injected and back-produced to characterise the aquifer under single-phase conditions. After CO2 had been driven to residual the two tracers were injected and produced again. The noble gases act as non-partitioning aqueous-phase tracers in the undisturbed aquifer and as partitioning tracers in the presence of residual CO2. To estimate residual saturation from the tracer test data a one-dimensional radial model of the near-well region is used. In the model there are only two independent parameters: the apparent dispersivity of each tracer and the residual CO2 saturation. Independent analysis of the Kr and Xe tracer production curves gives the same estimate of residual saturation to within the accuracy of the method. Furthermore the residual from the noble gas tracer tests is consistent with other measurements in the sequence of tests.

  20. Technical assessment of synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from agriculture residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guohui; Feng, Fei; Xiao, Jun; Shen, Laihong

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents thermodynamic evaluations of the agriculture residual-to-SNG process by thermochemical conversion, which mainly consists of the interconnected fluidized beds, hot gas cleaning, fluidized bed methanation reactor and Selexol absorption unit. The process was modeled using Aspen Plus software. The process performances, i.e., CH4 content in SNG, higher heating value and yield of SNG, exergy efficiencies with and without heat recovery, unit power consumption, were evaluated firstly. The results indicate that when the other parameters remain unchanged, the steam-to-biomass ratio at carbon boundary point is the optimal value for the process. Improving the preheating temperatures of air and gasifying agent is beneficial for the SNG yield and exergy efficiencies. Due to the effects of CO2 removal efficiency, there are two optimization objectives for the SNG production process: (I) to maximize CH4 content in SNG, or (II) to maximize SNG yield. Further, the comparison among different feedstocks indicates that the decreasing order of SNG yield is: corn stalk > wheat straw > rice straw. The evaluation on the potential of agriculture-based SNG shows that the potential annual production of agriculture residual-based SNG could be between 555×108 ˜ 611×108 m3 with utilization of 100% of the available unexplored resources. The agriculture residual-based SNG could play a significant role on solving the big shortfall of China's natural gas supply in future.

  1. Estimation of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin residues in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jyot, Gagan; Mandal, Kousik; Battu, R S; Singh, Balwinder

    2013-07-01

    Dissipation of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin in chilli was studied following three applications of a combination formulation of Nurelle-D 505 (chlorpyriphos 50% + cypermethrin 5%) at 1 and 2 L ha(-1) at an interval of 15 days. Residues of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin in chilli were estimated by gas-liquid chromatography and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Half-life periods for chlorpyriphos were found to be 4.43 and 2.01 days, whereas for cypermethrin these values were observed to be 2.51 and 2.64 days at single and double the application rates, respectively. Residues of chlorpyriphos dissipated to more than 80% after 10 days at both the dosages. However, residues of cypermethrin dissipated to the extent of more than 70% in 7 days. Soil samples collected after 15 days of the last application did not show the presence of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin at their respective determination limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1). The use of chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin mixture at the recommended dosage does not seem to pose any hazards to the consumers, and a waiting period of 1 day is suggested to reduce the risk before consumption of green chilli. PMID:23114920

  2. Sequestration of flue gas CO₂ by direct gas-solid carbonation of air pollution control system residues.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo

    2012-12-18

    Direct gas-solid carbonation reactions of residues from an air pollution control system (APCr) were conducted using different combinations of simulated flue gas to study the impact on CO₂ sequestration. X-ray diffraction analysis of APCr determined the existence of CaClOH, whose maximum theoretical CO₂ sequestration potential of 58.13 g CO₂/kg APCr was calculated by the reference intensity ratio method. The reaction mechanism obeyed a model of a fast kinetics-controlled process followed by a slow product layer diffusion-controlled process. Temperature is the key factor in direct gas-solid carbonation and had a notable influence on both the carbonation conversion and the CO₂ sequestration rate. The optimal CO₂ sequestrating temperature of 395 °C was easily obtained for APCr using a continuous heating experiment. CO₂ content in the flue gas had a definite influence on the CO₂ sequestration rate of the kinetics-controlled process, but almost no influence on the final carbonation conversion. Typical concentrations of SO₂ in the flue gas could not only accelerate the carbonation reaction rate of the product layer diffusion-controlled process, but also could improve the final carbonation conversion. Maximum carbonation conversions of between 68.6% and 77.1% were achieved in a typical flue gas. Features of rapid CO₂ sequestration rate, strong impurities resistance, and high capture conversion for direct gas-solid carbonation were proved in this study, which presents a theoretical foundation for the applied use of this encouraging technology on carbon capture and storage. PMID:23181908

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stresses in case hardened steels by magnetic anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on a recent study aimed at developing the stress-induced magnetic anisotropy (SMA) technique for characterizing residual stresses in case hardened steel components. The results of SMA measurements performed on flat induction hardened steel discs with different case depths confirm the feasibility of detecting principal stress axes by measuring the angular variation of magnetic permeability. The permeability signals along the principal axes were found to vary monotonically with the residual stresses measured by XRD, but the signals are in general smaller for samples with a larger case depth. The magnetomechanical properties of the martensitic case and ferritic/pearlitic core of the induction hardened sample were studied by measuring magnetostriction curves from strip samples that were cut from the case and core regions, respectively. The case strip shows a significantly lower magnetostriction than the core strip, indicating a weaker stress dependence of magnetic properties for the martensitic case than for the ferritic/pearlitic bulk of the case hardened samples.

  4. Brake Failure from Residual Magnetism in the Mars Exploration Rover Lander Petal Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandura, Louise

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft arrived at Mars. Each safely delivered an identical rover to the Martian surface in a tetrahedral lander encased in airbags. Upon landing, the airbags deflated and three Lander Petal Actuators opened the three deployable Lander side petals enabling the rover to exit the Lander. Approximately nine weeks prior to the scheduled launch of the first spacecraft, one of these mission-critical Lander Petal Actuators exhibited a brake stuck-open failure during its final flight stow at Kennedy Space Center. Residual magnetism was the definitive conclusion from the failure investigation. Although residual magnetism was recognized as an issue in the design, the lack of an appropriately specified lower bound on brake drop-out voltage inhibited the discovery of this problem earlier in the program. In addition, the brakes had more unit-to-unit variation in drop-out voltage than expected, likely due to a larger than expected variation in the magnetic properties of the 15-5 PH stainless steel brake plates. Failure analysis and subsequent rework of two other Lander Petal Actuators with marginal brakes was completed in three weeks, causing no impact to the launch date.

  5. An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Daniel J.; Jansen, Mark J.; Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the magnetic bearing and its use in exotic applications has been conceptualized for many years, over a century, in fact. Patented, passive systems using permanent magnets date back over 150 years. More recently, scientists of the 1930s began investigating active systems using electromagnets for high-speed ultracentrifuges. However, passive magnetic bearings are physically unstable and active systems only provide proper stiffness and damping through sophisticated controllers and algorithms. This is precisely why, until the last decade, magnetic bearings did not become a practical alternative to rolling element bearings. Today, magnetic bearing technology has become viable because of advances in micro-processing controllers that allow for confident and robust active control. Further advances in the following areas: rotor and stator materials and designs which maximize flux, minimize energy losses, and minimize stress limitations; wire materials and coatings for high temperature operation; high-speed micro processing for advanced controller designs and extremely robust capabilities; back-up bearing technology for providing a viable touchdown surface; and precision sensor technology; have put magnetic bearings on the forefront of advanced, lubrication free support systems. This paper will discuss a specific joint program for the advancement of gas turbine engines and how it implies the vitality of magnetic bearings, a brief comparison between magnetic bearings and other bearing technologies in both their advantages and limitations, and an examination of foreseeable solutions to historically perceived limitations to magnetic bearing.

  6. Determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garrigós, M C; Marín, M L; Cantó, A; Sánchez, A

    2004-12-24

    Polystyrene is widely used in formulations intended for children use. The main problem with this plastic is the residual styrene, which can migrate from the product, and therefore, be in contact with children. The acute toxicity of styrene is well known, raising the need of an efficient and fast method of analysis for this compound. Several extraction methods have been evaluated and compared for the determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules used in toys: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), Soxhlet extraction, headspace emission and dissolution-precipitation. The analyte was subsequently detected by gas chromatography (GC) with MS detection. The results indicated that the most efficient method was dissolution-precipitation giving even higher extraction efficiency than SFE. For validating the method, PS samples spiked with known quantities of styrene at three concentration levels were prepared to calculate the extraction recovery. The founded validation data proved the suitability of the proposed method. PMID:15641364

  7. Determination of pyrethroid residues in tobacco and cigarette smoke by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jibao; Liu, Baizhan; Zhu, Xiaolan; Su, Qingde

    2002-07-26

    The extraction of fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin from tobacco (Nicotina tobaccum) and cigarette smoke condensate with acetone, followed by partition of resulting acetone mixture with petroleum ether, was investigated and found suitable for capillary gas chromatography (GC) residue analysis. Florisil column clean-up was found to provide clean-up procedure for tobacco and cigarette smoke condensate permitting analysis to < or = 0.01 microgram.g-1 for most of the pyrethroids by GC with a 63Ni electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Quantitative determination was obtained by the method of external standards. Cigarettes made from flue-cured tobacco spiked with different amounts of pyrethroids were used and the pyrethroid levels in mainstream smoke were determined. For all the pyrethroid residues, 1.51-15.50% were transferred from tobacco into cigarette smoke. PMID:12198849

  8. Natural Gas Residual Fluids: Sources, Endpoints, and Organic Chemical Composition after Centralized Waste Treatment in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Getzinger, Gordon J; O'Connor, Megan P; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Drollette, Brian D; Karatum, Osman; Deshusses, Marc A; Ferguson, P Lee; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-07-21

    Volumes of natural gas extraction-derived wastewaters have increased sharply over the past decade, but the ultimate fate of those waste streams is poorly characterized. Here, we sought to (a) quantify natural gas residual fluid sources and endpoints to bound the scope of potential waste stream impacts and (b) describe the organic pollutants discharged to surface waters following treatment, a route of likely ecological exposure. Our findings indicate that centralized waste treatment facilities (CWTF) received 9.5% (8.5 × 10(8) L) of natural gas residual fluids in 2013, with some facilities discharging all effluent to surface waters. In dry months, discharged water volumes were on the order of the receiving body flows for some plants, indicating that surface waters can become waste-dominated in summer. As disclosed organic compounds used in high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) vary greatly in physicochemical properties, we deployed a suite of analytical techniques to characterize CWTF effluents, covering 90.5% of disclosed compounds. Results revealed that, of nearly 1000 disclosed organic compounds used in HVHF, only petroleum distillates and alcohol polyethoxylates were present. Few analytes targeted by regulatory agencies (e.g., benzene or toluene) were observed, highlighting the need for expanded and improved monitoring efforts at CWTFs. PMID:26147419

  9. Effect of argon gas pressure on residual stress, microstructure evolution and electrical resistivity of beryllium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bing-Chi; Li, Kai; Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Wu, Wei-Dong; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2016-02-01

    The residual stress in beryllium films fabricated on K9 substrates by using magnetron sputtering deposition is measured by using a curvature method and is theoretically estimated by using the Nix and Clemens (NC) model. The experimental results indicate that the 1.3-μm-thick film is always in a tensile state for pressure variations in the range from 0.4 to 1.2 Pa. When the sputtering gas pressure is increased, the average stress increases at first, after which it decreases by a remarkable amount. The observed descending trend of the tensile stress when the sputtering gas pressure is beyond 0.6 Pa is mainly attributed to the grain size in the film being larger than that in the film when the pressure is below 0.6 Pa. The maximal residual stress of 552 MPa at a sputtering gas pressure of 0.6 Pa is close to the tensile strength (550 MPa) of the corresponding beryllium bulk material and is about 8 times smaller than that calculated by using the N-C model. In addition, the surface morphologies of the as-fabricated films reveal fibrous grains while the cross-sectional morphologies are characterized by a coarsening of columnar grains. The measured electric resistivity of each film strongly depends on its porosity and the sizes of its grains.

  10. Magnetic coupling in the disks around young gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T. E-mail: mhlee@hku.hk

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior 'dead zone'. Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  11. Magnetic Coupling in the Disks around Young Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior "dead zone." Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  12. Capillary gas chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-cheng; Li, Qi-wan; Tang, Li-bin

    2007-01-01

    Simple procedures for extraction and chromatographic determination of dimethachlon residues in fresh tobacco leaves and cut-tobacco are described. The determination was carried out by capillary gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD) and confirmed by GC-MS. The mean recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) were 93.2%~112.9% and 3.5%~6.7%, respectively at levels ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg. The limit of determination was 0.001 mg/kg. Tobacco samples in routine check were successfully analyzed using the proposed method. PMID:17444603

  13. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise and Neutron Diffraction Techniques for the Study of Intergranular Residual Strains in Mild Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hutanu, Roxana; Clapham, Lynann; Rogge, Ronald

    2004-02-26

    Intergranular residual stresses (IS) are microscopic residual stresses which have been found to accumulate along the <100> direction in steels. The <100> direction is also the magnetic easy axis direction in steel. This work involved Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) studies on steel samples, deformed uniaxially to increasing levels of strain. The MBN results indicated that a bulk magnetic easy axis was produced by the deformation process, and neutron diffraction experiments showed that this easy axis was correlated with the tensile strain in grains oriented in the <100> direction.

  14. Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

    1983-01-01

    Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

  15. Design of a diagnostic residual gas analyzer for the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Biewer, T. M.; Graves, Van B; Andrew, P.; Marcus, Chris; Shimada, M.; Hughes, S.; Boussier, B.; Johnson, D. W.; Gardner, W. L.; Hillis, D. L.; Vayakis, G.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the ITER diagnostics having reached an advanced design stage is a diagnostic RGA for the divertor, i.e. residual gas analysis system for the ITER divertor, which is intended to sample the divertor pumping duct region during the plasma pulse and to have a response time compatible with plasma particle and impurity lifetimes in the divertor region. Main emphasis is placed on helium (He) concentration in the ducts, as well as the relative concentration between the hydrogen isotopes (H2, D2, T2). Measurement of the concentration of radiative gases, such as neon (Ne) and nitrogen (N2), is also intended. Numerical modeling of the gas flow from the sampled region to the cluster of analysis sensors, through a long (~8m long, ~110mm diameter) sampling pipe terminating in a pressure reducing orifice, confirm that the desired response time (~1s for He or D2) is achieved with the present design.

  16. Residual Separation of Magnetic Fields Using a Cellular Neural Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albora, A. M.; Özmen, A.; Uçan, O. N.

    - In this paper, a Cellular Neural Network (CNN) has been applied to a magnetic regional/residual anomaly separation problem. CNN is an analog parallel computing paradigm defined in space and characterized by the locality of connections between processing neurons. The behavior of the CNN is defined by the template matrices A, B and the template vector I. We have optimized weight coefficients of these templates using Recurrent Perceptron Learning Algorithm (RPLA). The advantages of CNN as a real-time stochastic method are that it introduces little distortion to the shape of the original image and that it is not effected significantly by factors such as the overlap of power spectra of residual fields. The proposed method is tested using synthetic examples and the average depth of the buried objects has been estimated by power spectrum analysis. Next the CNN approach is applied to magnetic data over the Golalan chromite mine in Elazig which lies East of Turkey. This area is among the largest and richest chromite masses of the world. We compared the performance of CNN to classical derivative approaches.

  17. Core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers as sorbent for sulfonylurea herbicide residues.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shan Shan; Wu, Mei Sheng; Zuo, Hai Gen; Jiang, Chen; Jin, She Feng; Lu, Yi Chen; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-15

    Sulfonylurea herbicides are widely used at lower dosage for controlling broad-leaf weeds and some grasses in cereals and economic crops. It is important to develop a highly efficient and selective pretreatment method for analyzing sulfonylurea herbicide residues in environments and samples from agricultural products based on magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The MIPs were prepared by a surface molecular imprinting technique especially using the vinyl-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticle as the supporting matrix, bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) as the template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as a cross-linker, and azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator. The MIPs show high affinity, recognition specificity, fast mass transfer rate, and efficient adsorption performance toward BSM with the adsorption capacity reaching up to 37.32 mg g(-1). Furthermore, the MIPs also showed cross-selectivity for herbicides triasulfuron (TS), prosulfuron (PS), and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl (PSE). The MIP solid phase extraction (SPE) column was easier to operate, regenerate, and retrieve compared to those of C18 SPE column. The developed method showed highly selective separation and enrichment of sulfonylurea herbicide residues, which enable its application in the pretreatment of multisulfonylurea herbicide residues. PMID:25797565

  18. [Determination of cyflufenamid residue in carrots by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Weijian; Zhao, Zengyun; Xu, Jinzhong; Shen, Chongyu; Wu, Bin

    2008-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of cyflufenamid residue in carrots by solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-NCI/MS). Cyflufenamid residue was extracted with ethyl acetate from carrots. The extract was cleaned-up by an active carbon SPE column connected to a neutral alumina SPE column. The analysis was carried out by the GC-NCI/MS with selected ion monitoring mode. The recoveries of cyflufenamid in carrot samples were in the range from 74.9% to 94.6% at four spiked levels, 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04 mg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSD) were less than 9.7% for inter-days. The linearity of the method was good in the range from 10 to 1000 ng/mL, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.001 mg/kg, and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 0.005 mg/kg. The method is selective without interference and is suitable for the determination and confirmation of cyflufenamid residue in carrots. PMID:18959256

  19. Hematite nanoplates: Controllable synthesis, gas sensing, photocatalytic and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hongying; Sun, Dandan; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guoying; Sun, Yaqiu; Gao, Dongzhao

    2016-01-15

    Uniform hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoplates exposing {001} plane as basal planes have been prepared by a facile solvothermal method under the assistance of sodium acetate. The morphological evolution of the nanoplates was studied by adjusting the reaction parameters including the solvent and the amount of sodium acetate. The results indicated that both the adequate nucleation/growth rate and selective adsorption of alcohol molecules and acetate anions contribute to the formation of the plate-like morphology. In addition, the size of the nanoplates can be adjusted from ca. 180nm to 740nm by changing the reaction parameters. Three nanoplate samples with different size were selected to investigate the gas sensing performance, photocatalytic and magnetic properties. As gas sensing materials, all the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates exhibited high gas sensitivity and stability toward n-butanol. When applied as photocatalyst, the α-Fe2O3 nanoplates show high photodegradation efficiency towards RhB. Both the gas sensing performance and the photocatalytic property of the products exhibit obvious size-dependent effect. Magnetic measurements reveal that the plate-like α-Fe2O3 particles possess good room temperature magnetic properties. PMID:26476200

  20. [Simultaneous determination of triazine herbicide residues in maize by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingbo; Jiang, Wenfeng; Dong, Zhenlin; Zhao, Shoucheng; Wei, Feng

    2006-11-01

    A gas chromatographic method was developed for the determination of simeton, simazine, atrazine, propazine, terbumeton, terbuthylazine, cyprazine, simetryn, prometryn, terbutryn, methoprotryne, hexazinone residues in maize. The triazine herbicide residues were extracted with acetonitrile by blender and then cleaned up on a strong cation-exchange (SCX) solid-phase extraction cartridge. The SCX cartridge was conditioned with acetone, methylene chloride, washed with methylene chloride, acetone and eluted with methanol-water (9: 1, v/v) solution saturated potassium chloride. As a result, most interfering impurities were removed in the SPE cleanup procedure. The gas chromatographic analysis was performed on a capillary column (DB-5, 30 m x 0.25 mm i. d. x 0.25 microm) and determined by nitrogen phosphorus detector (NPD). Twelve triazine herbicides were effectively separated on this column. Diazinon was used as the internal standard for the determination. Linear correlation coefficients of the 12 herbicides were higher than 0.998 in the range of 0.01 to 2.0 mg/L. The limits of quantitation of the method were 0.01 mg/kg for these compounds. Average recoveries of these herbicides from spiked samples ranged from 84.0% to 106.8% at fortification levels of 0.01 - 0.5 mg/kg and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 0.9% and 4.7%. The method is suitable for the simultaneous determination of a wide range of triazine herbicides in maize in commodities inspection. PMID:17288154

  1. [Determination of endosulfan pesticide residues in Litopenaeus vannamai by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaosong; Huang, Daxin; Lu, Shengyu

    2007-05-01

    A method is described for the determination of endosulfan pesticide residues in Litopenaeus vannamai by capillary gas chromatography. The residues of alpha-endosulfan and beta-endosulfan were extracted from the sample with ethyl acetate, and the extract was cleaned up using a neutral alumina column and an active carbon column after concentrated and then eluted with a mixture of n-hexane-ethyl acetate (1 : 1, v/v). During the process of purification, the flow rate of eluent was controlled within 3 mL/min. The eluate was collected and evaporated to 1 mL for analysis. The determination was performed on a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. The retention time was used for qualification and the external calibration standard was used for quantitation. The results obtained showed that the recoveries were 80.5% - 97.3% for alpha-endosulfan and 81.1% - 109.5% for beta-endosulfan. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0. 002 mg/kg, and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 0. 007 mg/kg for both. The precision of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation for the within-laboratory repeatability, was generally below 8.5%. The method was used for the analysis of Litopenaeus vannamai samples from Guangxi Province, a Litopenaeus vannamai aquiculture area in south China. PMID:17679437

  2. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, A. A.; Chaudhuri, P.; Khirwadkar, S.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Reddy, D. Chenna; Saxena, Y. C.

    2008-05-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles.

  3. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  4. Understanding the residual patterns of timing solutions of radio pulsars with a model of magnetic field oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Yi, Shu-Xu; Xie, Yi; Fu, Jian-Ning

    2016-06-01

    We explain some phenomena existing generally in the timing residuals: amplitude and sign of the second derivative of a pulsar's spin-frequency (ddot{ν }), some sophisticated residual patterns, which also change with the time span of data segments. The sample is taken from Hobbs et al., in which the pulsar's spin-frequency and its first derivative have been subtracted from the timing solution fitting. We first classify the timing residual patterns into different types based on the sign of ddot{ν }. Then we use the magnetic field oscillation model developed in our group to fit successfully the different kinds of timing residuals with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Finally, we simulate the spin evolution over 20 years for a pulsar with typical parameters and analyse the data with the conventional timing solution fitting. By choosing different segments of the simulated data, we find that most of the observed residual patterns can be reproduced successfully. This is the first time that the observed residual patterns are fitted by a model and reproduced by simulations with very few parameters. From the distribution of the different residual patterns in the P-dot{P} diagram, we argue that (1) a single magnetic field oscillation mode exists commonly in all pulsars throughout their lifetimes; (2) there may be a transition period over the lifetimes of pulsars, in which multiple magnetic field oscillation modes exist.

  5. Nonequilibrium Quantum Magnetism in a Dipolar Lattice Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paz, A.; Sharma, A.; Chotia, A.; Maréchal, E.; Huckans, J. H.; Pedri, P.; Santos, L.; Gorceix, O.; Vernac, L.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the realization of quantum magnetism using a degenerate dipolar gas in an optical lattice. Our system implements a lattice model resembling the celebrated t-J model. It is characterized by a nonequilibrium spinor dynamics resulting from intersite Heisenberg-like spin-spin interactions provided by nonlocal dipole-dipole interactions. Moreover, due to its large spin, our chromium lattice gases constitute an excellent environment for the study of quantum magnetism of high-spin systems, as illustrated by the complex spin dynamics observed for doubly occupied sites.

  6. Nonequilibrium quantum magnetism in a dipolar lattice gas.

    PubMed

    de Paz, A; Sharma, A; Chotia, A; Maréchal, E; Huckans, J H; Pedri, P; Santos, L; Gorceix, O; Vernac, L; Laburthe-Tolra, B

    2013-11-01

    We report on the realization of quantum magnetism using a degenerate dipolar gas in an optical lattice. Our system implements a lattice model resembling the celebrated t-J model. It is characterized by a nonequilibrium spinor dynamics resulting from intersite Heisenberg-like spin-spin interactions provided by nonlocal dipole-dipole interactions. Moreover, due to its large spin, our chromium lattice gases constitute an excellent environment for the study of quantum magnetism of high-spin systems, as illustrated by the complex spin dynamics observed for doubly occupied sites. PMID:24237534

  7. Non-interacting Fermi gas in a magnetic quadrupole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, To Chun Johnathan; Goulko, Olga; Chevy, Frédéric; Lobo, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    A non-interacting gas of spin polarised 6Li Fermi gas in a magnetic quadrupole trap which is not in thermal equilibrium can nevertheless show thermal signatures in some cases. This puzzling behaviour can be seen by measuring the doubly integrated momentum distribution along a particular axis. This distribution can be extremely close to a Gaussian from which we can extract a temperature. However, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations that the temperature thus measured is generally different along different axes. We provide a general explanation of this phenomenon based on ergodicity and check it with further simulations.

  8. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kuchler, F.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Sharma, S.; Burghoff, M.; Fan, I.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  9. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarev, I.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

    2014-07-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  10. DID THE INFANT R136 AND NGC 3603 CLUSTERS UNDERGO RESIDUAL GAS EXPULSION?

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-02-10

    Based on kinematic data observed for very young, massive clusters that appear to be in dynamical equilibrium, it has recently been argued that such young systems are examples of where the early residual gas expulsion did not happen or had no dynamical effect. The intriguing scenario of a star cluster forming through a single starburst has thereby been challenged. Choosing the case of the R136 cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud, the most cited one in this context, we perform direct N-body computations that mimic the early evolution of this cluster including the gas-removal phase (on a thermal timescale). Our calculations show that under plausible initial conditions which are consistent with observational data, a large fraction (>60%) of a gas-expelled, expanding R136-like cluster is bound to regain dynamical equilibrium by its current age. Therefore, the recent measurements of velocity dispersion in the inner regions of R136, which indicate that the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium, are consistent with an earlier substantial gas expulsion of R136 followed by a rapid re-virialization (in Almost-Equal-To 1 Myr). Additionally, we find that the less massive Galactic NGC 3603 Young Cluster (NYC), with a substantially longer re-virialization time, is likely to be found to have deviated from dynamical equilibrium at its present age ( Almost-Equal-To 1 Myr). The recently obtained stellar proper motions in the central part of the NYC indeed suggest this and are consistent with the computed models. This work significantly extends previous models of the Orion Nebula Cluster which already demonstrated that the re-virialization time of young post-gas-expulsion clusters decreases with increasing pre-expulsion density.

  11. Did the Infant R136 and NGC 3603 Clusters Undergo Residual Gas Expulsion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-02-01

    Based on kinematic data observed for very young, massive clusters that appear to be in dynamical equilibrium, it has recently been argued that such young systems are examples of where the early residual gas expulsion did not happen or had no dynamical effect. The intriguing scenario of a star cluster forming through a single starburst has thereby been challenged. Choosing the case of the R136 cluster of the Large Magellanic Cloud, the most cited one in this context, we perform direct N-body computations that mimic the early evolution of this cluster including the gas-removal phase (on a thermal timescale). Our calculations show that under plausible initial conditions which are consistent with observational data, a large fraction (>60%) of a gas-expelled, expanding R136-like cluster is bound to regain dynamical equilibrium by its current age. Therefore, the recent measurements of velocity dispersion in the inner regions of R136, which indicate that the cluster is in dynamical equilibrium, are consistent with an earlier substantial gas expulsion of R136 followed by a rapid re-virialization (in ≈1 Myr). Additionally, we find that the less massive Galactic NGC 3603 Young Cluster (NYC), with a substantially longer re-virialization time, is likely to be found to have deviated from dynamical equilibrium at its present age (≈1 Myr). The recently obtained stellar proper motions in the central part of the NYC indeed suggest this and are consistent with the computed models. This work significantly extends previous models of the Orion Nebula Cluster which already demonstrated that the re-virialization time of young post-gas-expulsion clusters decreases with increasing pre-expulsion density.

  12. A magnonic gas sensor based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, D; Kolokoltsev, O V; Qureshi, N; Mejía-Uriarte, E V; Saniger, J M

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative, simple and inexpensive gas sensor based on the variation in the magnetic properties of nanoparticles due to their interaction with gases. To measure the nanoparticle response a magnetostatic spin wave (MSW) tunable oscillator has been developed using an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) epitaxial thin film as a delay line (DL). The sensor has been prepared by coating a uniform layer of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles on the YIG film. The unperturbed frequency of the oscillator is determined by a bias magnetic field, which is applied parallel to the YIG film and perpendicularly to the wave propagation direction. In this device, the total bias magnetic field is the superposition of the field of a permanent magnet and the field associated with the layer of magnetic nanoparticles. The perturbation produced in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle layer due to its interaction with gases induces a frequency shift in the oscillator, allowing the detection of low concentrations of gases. In order to demonstrate the ability of the sensor to detect gases, it has been tested with organic volatile compounds (VOCs) which have harmful effects on human health, such as dimethylformamide, isopropanol and ethanol, or the aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene and xylene more commonly known by its abbreviation (BTX). All of these were detected with high sensitivity, short response time, and good reproducibility. PMID:25952501

  13. A magnonic gas sensor based on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matatagui, D.; Kolokoltsev, O. V.; Qureshi, N.; Mejía-Uriarte, E. V.; Saniger, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative, simple and inexpensive gas sensor based on the variation in the magnetic properties of nanoparticles due to their interaction with gases. To measure the nanoparticle response a magnetostatic spin wave (MSW) tunable oscillator has been developed using an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) epitaxial thin film as a delay line (DL). The sensor has been prepared by coating a uniform layer of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles on the YIG film. The unperturbed frequency of the oscillator is determined by a bias magnetic field, which is applied parallel to the YIG film and perpendicularly to the wave propagation direction. In this device, the total bias magnetic field is the superposition of the field of a permanent magnet and the field associated with the layer of magnetic nanoparticles. The perturbation produced in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle layer due to its interaction with gases induces a frequency shift in the oscillator, allowing the detection of low concentrations of gases. In order to demonstrate the ability of the sensor to detect gases, it has been tested with organic volatile compounds (VOCs) which have harmful effects on human health, such as dimethylformamide, isopropanol and ethanol, or the aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene and xylene more commonly known by its abbreviation (BTX). All of these were detected with high sensitivity, short response time, and good reproducibility.

  14. Mobilization of waterflood residual oil by gas injection for water-wet conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Billiotte, J. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that mechanisms by which waterflood residual oil is mobilized and recovered during tertiary gasflooding at quasistatic rates and strongly water-wet conditions were investigated with 2D glass micromodels. Two three-phase oil/water/gas systems were used in the displacement experiments. One system had a positive spreading coefficient, the other a negative coefficient. Results for the two systems were compared to determine the differences in displacement mechanisms and oil recovery efficiency. Displacement in both systems proceeds by a double-drainage mechanism where a gas/oil displacement is always associated with an oil/water displacement. The oil/water displacement leads to coalescence and reconnection of oil blobs. Oil recovery was significantly higher for the positive spreading system. The higher displacement efficiency resulted from flow through thin but continuous oil films that always separated the oil and water phases in the positive spreading system. The absence of oil films and the possibility of direct gas/water displacements reduced oil recovery for the negative spreading system.

  15. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Starsich, Fabian H L; Hirt, Ann M; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2014-12-19

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields. PMID:25422410

  16. Optical beam profile monitor and residual gas fluorescence at the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized hydrogen jet.

    PubMed

    Tsang, T; Bellavia, S; Connolly, R; Gassner, D; Makdisi, Y; Russo, T; Thieberger, P; Trbojevic, D; Zelenski, A

    2008-10-01

    A gas fluorescence beam profile monitor has been implemented at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) using the polarized atomic hydrogen gas jet, which is part of the polarized proton polarimeter. RHIC proton beam profiles in the vertical plane of the accelerator are obtained as well as measurements of the width of the gas jet in the beam direction. For gold ion beams, the fluorescence cross section is sufficiently large so that profiles can be obtained from the residual gas alone, albeit with long light integration times. We estimate the fluorescence cross sections that were not known in this ultrarelativistic regime and calculate the beam emittance to provide an independent measurement of the RHIC beam. This optical beam diagnostic technique, utilizing the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas, offers a noninvasive particle beam characterization and provides visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. PMID:19044742

  17. The influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure of non-oriented silicon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hao, Linpo; Yi, Jingwen; Zhang, Xianglin; Luo, Zhonghan; Chen, Shenglin; Li, Rongfeng

    2016-05-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of punching process on residual stress and magnetic domain structure. The residual stress in non-oriented silicon steel after punching process was measured by nanoindentation. The maximum depth was kept constant as 300 nm during nanoindentation. The material around indentation region exhibited no significant pile-up deformation. The calculation of residual stress was based on the Suresh theoretical model. Our experimental results show that residual compressive stress was generated around the sheared edge after punching. The width of residual stress affected zone by punching was around 0.4-0.5 mm. After annealing treatment, the residual stress was significantly decreased. Magnetic domain structure was observed according to the Bitter method. The un-annealed sample exhibited complicated domain patterns, and the widths of the magnetic domains varied between 3 μm and 8 μm. Most of the domain patterns of the annealed sample were 180°-domains and 90°-domains, and the widths of the domains decreased to 1-3 μm.

  18. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging of gas-liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Christoph; Penn, Alexander; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2015-03-01

    Gas-liquids flows are commonly encountered in nature and industry. Experimental measurements of gas-liquid flows are challenging since such systems can be visually opaque and highly dynamic. Here we report the implementation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategies allowing us to probe the dynamics (voidage and velocity measurements) of gas-liquid flows with ultra-fast acquisition speeds. Specifically, parallel MRI which exploits the spatial encoding capabilities of multiple receiver coils was implemented. To this end a tailored, 16 channels MR receive array was constructed and employed in the MR acquisition. A magnetic susceptibility matched gas-liquid system was set-up and used to probe the motion, splitting and coalescence of bubbles. The temporal and spatial resolution of our acquired data was 5 ms and 3.5 mm x 3.5 mm, respectively. The total field of view was 200 mm x 200 mm. We will conclude with an outlook of further possible advances in MRI that have the potential to reduce substantially the acquisition time, providing flexible gains in temporal and spatial resolution.

  19. Induction of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells by manufactured gas residues

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, R.; Levine, G.; Leadon, S.A.; Chaloupka, K.; Safe, S.

    1994-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the non-genotoxic effects of manufactured gas plant residues which present complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effect of these residues on benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism in human mammary epithelial cells was studied. Cells were preincubated with hexane-extractable coal tar material for 16 hr, then incubated with {sup 3}H-BaP for 2 hr and the amount of BaP metabolites in cell extracts was determined by HPLC. An up to 5-fold increase over control in BaP metabolites was seen after preincubation with 0.2 {mu}g/ml coal tar material (a oncytotoxic dose). Coal tar extracts were equally effective as pure BaP in inducing BaP metabolism. As BaP constitutes less than 1% of the coal tar, other components in the coal tar mixtures appear to be even more potent than BaP in inducing the enzyme system responsible for BaP metabolism. The increase in BaP metabolites was accompanied by a proportional increase in P4501A1 mRNA as measured by Northern blotting, and resulted in an increase of BaP adducts to DNA. These results show that coal tars and other P450-inducting compounds can act as cocarcinogens by enhancing the genotoxic effects of compounds metabolized by the P4501A1 enzyme.

  20. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural gas.

    PubMed

    Gieg, Lisa M; Duncan, Kathleen E; Suflita, Joseph M

    2008-05-01

    World requirements for fossil energy are expected to grow by more than 50% within the next 25 years, despite advances in alternative technologies. Since conventional production methods retrieve only about one-third of the oil in place, either large new fields or innovative strategies for recovering energy resources from existing fields are needed to meet the burgeoning demand. The anaerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes to methane gas has now been documented in a few studies, and it was speculated that this process might be useful for recovering energy from existing petroleum reservoirs. We found that residual oil entrained in a marginal sandstone reservoir core could be converted to methane, a key component of natural gas, by an oil-degrading methanogenic consortium. Methane production required inoculation, and rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.40 micromol/day/g core (or 11 to 31 micromol/day/g oil), with yields of up to 3 mmol CH(4)/g residual oil. Concomitant alterations in the hydrocarbon profile of the oil-bearing core revealed that alkanes were preferentially metabolized. The consortium was found to produce comparable amounts of methane in the absence or presence of sulfate as an alternate electron acceptor. Cloning and sequencing exercises revealed that the inoculum comprised sulfate-reducing, syntrophic, and fermentative bacteria acting in concert with aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Collectively, the cells generated methane from a variety of petroliferous rocks. Such microbe-based methane production holds promise for producing a clean-burning and efficient form of energy from underutilized hydrocarbon-bearing resources. PMID:18378655

  1. Trace gas and particle emissions from open burning of three cereal crop residues: Increase in residue moistness enhances emissions of carbon monoxide, methane, and particulate organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Ono, Keisuke; Kajiura, Masako; Sudo, Shigeto; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Saitoh, Katsumi; Fujitani, Yuji; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    We determined emission factors for open burning of straw of rice, wheat, and barley, as well as rice husks, and we incorporated the effects of moisture content on the emission factors for the straw. A closed system that simulated on-site backfiring of residues on the soil surface under moderate wind conditions was used to measure the gas and particle emissions from open burning of the residues on an upland field. Two moisture content conditions were evaluated: a dry condition (air-dried residues, 11-13% by weight) and a moist condition (20%). When a linear regression model with the initial moisture content of the residue as the explanatory variable showed good correlation between the primary emission data of a substance and the moisture content, the regression model was adopted as a function to give the emission factors. Otherwise, the unmodified primary data were used as the emission factors. The magnitudes of the gas and particle emissions differed among the residue types. For example, carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from straw of rice, wheat, and barley and rice husks burned under the dry condition were 27.2 ± 1.7, 41.8 ± 24.2, 46.9 ± 2.1, and 66.1 g kg-1 dry matter, and emissions of methane (CH4) were 0.75 ± 0.01, 2.01 ± 0.93, 1.47 ± 0.06, and 5.81 g kg-1 dry matter, respectively (n = 2 for straw with the standard deviation; n = 1 for husks). Emissions of carbon-containing gases and particles (e.g., CO, CH4, and particulate organic carbon) were higher under the moist condition than under the dry condition, which suggests that emission factors for open burning should incorporate the effects of moisture content except open burning performed in the dry season or arid zones.

  2. Effect of residual strain in Fe-based amorphous alloys on field induced magnetic anisotropy and domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2013-05-01

    Field induced magnetic anisotropy in two Fe-based amorphous alloys with different saturation induction levels (1.56 T and 1.64 T) was investigated by varying magnetic field strength and annealing temperature and domain images were taken on these samples. Residual strain was evaluated by measuring coercivities of the materials after stress-relief annealing. These results are discussed, clarifying the difference between the two Fe-based amorphous alloys.

  3. Strongly magnetized cold degenerate electron gas: Mass-radius relation of the magnetized white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-08-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate electron gas at zero temperature under the influence of a strong, uniform, static magnetic field, neglecting any form of interactions. Since the density of states for the electrons changes due to the presence of the magnetic field (which gives rise to Landau quantization), the corresponding equation of state also gets modified. In order to investigate the effect of very strong magnetic field, we focus only on systems in which a maximum of either one, two, or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. This is important since, if a very large number of Landau levels are filled, it implies a very low magnetic field strength which yields back Chandrasekhar’s celebrated nonmagnetic results. The maximum number of occupied Landau levels is fixed by the correct choice of two parameters, namely, the magnetic field strength and the maximum Fermi energy of the system. We study the equations of state of these one-level, two-level, and three-level systems and compare them by taking three different maximum Fermi energies. We also find the effect of the strong magnetic field on the mass-radius relation of the underlying star composed of the gas stated above. We obtain an exciting result that it is possible to have an electron-degenerate static star, namely, magnetized white dwarfs, with a mass significantly greater than the Chandrasekhar limit in the range 2.3-2.6M⊙, provided it has an appropriate magnetic field strength and central density. In fact, recent observations of peculiar type Ia supernovae—SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg—seem to suggest super-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs with masses up to 2.4-2.8M⊙ as their most likely progenitors. Interestingly, our results seem to lie within these observational limits.

  4. Capillary gas chromatographic assay of residual methenamine hippurate in equipment cleaning validation swabs.

    PubMed

    Mirza, T; George, R C; Bodenmiller, J R; Belanich, S A

    1998-02-01

    A capillary gas chromatographic method is described for the determination of methenamine hippurate residue in swabs collected from manufacturing equipment surfaces. Any residual methenamine hippurate remaining on process equipment after cleaning is removed by swabbing with one wet polyester Absorbond swab (4" x 4") pre-moistened with water followed by a dry Absorbond swab. The residual methenamine hippurate is chromatographed on a 30 x 0.32 mm (i.d.) Supelcowax-10 capillary column of 0.25-micron film thickness. The amount of residual methenamine hippurate is determined by comparing the ratio of methenamine hippurate peak area response to that of p-cresol (internal standard) obtained for the sample to a linear calibration curve obtained for a series of standard solutions. The method is demonstrated to be sufficiently linear, accurate, precise, sensitive and rugged for the determination of low levels of methenamine hippurate on equipment surfaces. Using this method, the mean recovery of methenamine hippurate from spiked Absorbond swab samples contained in high density polyethylene bottles was 105.2%, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of +/- 7.1% (n = 25). The mean recoveries of methenamine hippurate from spiked test plates for '180 Grit' Stainless Steel, Teflon and WARCO White (neoprene and PVC) gasket material were 77.2, 96.1 and 50.6%, with RSDs of +/- 9.4 (n = 25), +/- 4.3 (n = 25) and +/- 36% (n = 20), respectively. Recovery correction factors have been incorporated into the method. The method was successfully applied to the assay of actual equipment cleaning validation swab samples. Stability studies demonstrate that methenamine hippurate is not very stable on the equipment surfaces or in the swabs. It is recommended that the surfaces be swabbed immediately after cleaning and the swabs analyzed within 24 h after sample collection. The results demonstrate that in order to fully validate the cleaning procedures, it is not only necessary to investigate the

  5. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in

  6. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  7. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯ρ=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  8. Studies on the practical application of producer gas from agricultural residues as supplementary fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, I.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gasification of various agricultural residues in down-draft, fixed bed gas producers and the utilization of the gas in small diesel engines converted for dual-fuel operation were studied at the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines. Such agricultural residues as coconut shells, wood waste, rice hulls and corn cobs were readily gasified in gas producers of simple design. Cleaning of the gas before its use in diesel engines presented some problems. Use of charcoal in the gas producers to provide gas to a 5-brake horsepower single cylinder engine and a 65-brake horsepower six cylinder engine proved satisfactory. With charcoal as fuel, the percentage of the total energy from diesel oil replaced by producer gas and utilized in the single cylinder engine was higher (79%) compared to that in the six cylinder engine (73%). The thermal efficiency of the bigger gas producer, however was significantly better (85%) compared to the smaller gas producer (70%). The total gasification rate of the bigger reactor (20 kg/h) was 8 times that (2.5 kg/h) of the smaller reactor.

  9. Status of the design of the Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer System for ITER first plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Devan, B.; Graves, V.; Marcus, C.; Younkin, T.; Andrew, P.; Johnson, D. W.

    2013-10-01

    Among the ITER procurements awarded to the US ITER Domestic Agency, and subsequently to the ORNL Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, is the design and fabrication of the Diagnostc Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) system. The DRGA system reached the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in Spring 2013, and has transitioned into the Final Design phase. As a result of the PDR, and ITER systems design evolutions, several design changes have been incorporated into the DRGA system. The design effort has focused on the vacuum and mechanical interface of the DRGA gas sampling tube with the ITER vacuum vessel and cyrostat. Moreover, R&D tasks to demonstrate the 3-sensor instrumentation design (quadrupole mass spectrometer, ion-trap mass spectrometer, and optical Penning gauge) are maturing through the construction and testing of a DRGA prototype at ORNL. Results will be presented at this poster along with the DRGA design overview. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  10. Selective Gas-Phase Oxidation and Localization of Alkylated Cysteine Residues in Polypeptide Ions via Ion/Ion Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    The thiol group in cysteine residues is susceptible to several post-translational modifications (PTMs), including prenylation, nitrosylation, palmitoylation, and the formation of disulfide bonds. Additionally, cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds are commonly reduced and alkylated prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Several of these cysteine modifications, specifically S-alkyl modifications, are susceptible to gas-phase oxidation via selective ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Multiply protonated peptides containing modified cysteine residues undergo complex formation upon ion/ion reaction with periodate anions. Activation of the ion/ion complexes results in oxygen transfer from the reagent to the modified sulfur residue to create a sulfoxide functionality. Further activation of the sulfoxide derivative yields abundant losses of the modification with the oxidized sulfur as a sulfenic acid (namely, XSOH) to generate a dehydroalanine residue. This loss immediately indicates the presence of an S-alkyl cysteine residue, and the mass of the loss can be used to easily deduce the type of modification. An additional step of activation can be used to localize the modification to a specific residue within the peptide. Selective cleavage to create c- and z-ions N-terminal to the dehydroalanine residue is often noted. As these types of ions are not typically observed upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), they can be used to immediately indicate where in the peptide the PTM was originally located. PMID:27476698

  11. Magnetic fields and the survival of infalling gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Alex S.

    2015-08-01

    The short depletion time in galaxies over redshifts ~0-2 suggests that some form of inflow is required to sustain the observed star formation rates. The cosmic star formation rate is thus likely to be approximately the infall rate. However, the physical mechanism by which infalling gas travels from the galaxy's virial radius to the midplane is unclear, since numerical work generally indicates that infalling gas traveling through galactic halos should be disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and feedback from massive stars before it reaches the disk. Some High velocity clouds (HVCs) around the Milky Way trace this infall. I will present measurements of a >~ 6 microgauss magnetic field in the Smith Cloud HVC, strong enough to stabilize the cloud against disruption. I will also present magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling clouds interacting with the ISM in the halo and entering a star-forming disk driven by feedback from massive stars. These simulations will allow numerical tests of the ability of infalling magnetized gas to condense and join the disk.

  12. Magnetic field dependence of the product yields of cycloheptanone photolysis in the dilute gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, E. M.; Baumeister, W. F.; Huber, J. Robert

    1984-07-01

    The product yields of the gas-phase photolysis of cycloheptanone were measured in magnetic fields up to 10 kG. The magnetic-field effect is explained in terms of the radical pair model. A reaction mechanism is proposed that explains the magnetic field dependence, pressure dependence, and excitation enegy dependence of the gas-phase photochemistry of cycloheptanone.

  13. Apparent diffusion coefficient of hyperpolarized (3)He with minimal influence of the residual gas in small animals.

    PubMed

    Carrero-González, L; Kaulisch, T; Ruiz-Cabello, J; Pérez-Sánchez, J M; Peces-Barba, G; Stiller, D; Rodríguez, I

    2012-09-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of hyperpolarized (HP) gases is a parameter that reflects changes in lung microstructure. However, ADC is dependent on many physiological and experimental variables that need to be controlled or specified in order to ensure the reliability and reproducibility of this parameter. A single breath-hold experiment is desirable in order to reduce the amount of consumed HP gas. The application of a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes an increase in the residual gas volume. Depending on the applied PEEP, the ratio between the incoming and residual gas volumes will change and the ADC will vary, as long as both gases do not have the same diffusion coefficient. The most standard method for human applications uses air for breathing and a bolus of pure HP (3)He for MRI data acquisition. By applying this method in rats, we have demonstrated that ADC values are strongly dependent on the applied PEEP, and therefore on the residual gas volume in the lung. This outcome will play an important role in studies concerning certain diseases, such as emphysema, which is characterized by an increase in the residual volume. Ventilation with an oxygen-helium mixture (VOHeM) is a proposed single breath-hold method that uses two different gas mixtures (O(2)-(4)He for ventilation and HP (3)He-N(2) for imaging). The concentration of each gas in its respective mixture was calculated in order to obtain the same diffusion coefficient in both mixtures. ADCs obtained from VOHeM are independent of PEEP, thus minimizing the effect of the different residual volumes. PMID:22275333

  14. Gas-liquid chromatographic and gas-liquid-mass spectometric determination of fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissue samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Kolbe, E.J.; Stafford, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for determining fenvalerate and permethrin residues in grasshoppers and duck tissues. Samples are Soxhlet-extracted with hexane and cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography with an in-line alumina column. Samples are analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography with electron capture detection, and confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The average recovery from fortified tissues was 97%.

  15. Gas Dynamics and Magnetic Fields in Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, T.

    2016-05-01

    Almost two decades ago, the discovery of a handful of Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) heralded a new avenue for exploring the elusive early phases of massive star formation (Egan et al. 1998). Since then tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of these clouds. It is now well established that IRDCs are ubiquitous and harbor a broad spectrum of star forming stages. Thus studies of star formation and IRDCs are intricately tied together. I summarize some of the recent progress in understanding the magnetic field structure and gas dynamics in IRDCs in the context of high-mass star formation formation.

  16. A generic static headspace gas chromatography method for determination of residual solvents in drug substance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chang; Liu, Shaorong; Mueller, Bradford J; Yan, Zimeng

    2010-10-01

    In order to increase productivity of drug analysis in the pharmaceutical industry, an efficient and sensitive generic static headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) method was successfully developed and validated for the determination of 44 classes 2 and 3 solvents of International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guideline Q3C, as residual solvents in drug substance. In order to increase the method sensitivity and efficiency in sample equilibration, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) was selected as the sample diluent based on its high capacity of dissolving drug substance, stability and high boiling point. The HS sample equilibration temperature and equilibration time are assessed in ranges of 125-150°C and 8-15 min, respectively. The results indicate that the residual solvents in 200mg of drug substance can be equilibrated efficiently in HS sampler at 140°C for 10 min. The GC parameters, e.g. sample split ratio, carrier flow rate and oven temperature gradient are manipulated to enhance the method sensitivity and separation efficiency. The two-stage gradient GC run from 35 to 240°C, using an Agilent DB-624 capillary column (30 m long, 0.32 mm I.D., 1.8 μm film thickness), is suitable to determine 44 ICH classes 2 and 3 solvents in 30 min. The method validation results indicate that the method is accurate, precise, linear and sensitive for solvents assessed. The recoveries of most of these solvents from four drug substances are greater than 80% within the method determination ranges. However, this method is not suitable for the 10 remaining ICH classes 2 and 3 solvents, because they are too polar (e.g. formic acid and acidic acid), or have boiling points higher than 150°C, (e.g. anisol and cumene). In comparison with the previous published methods, this method has a much shorter sample equilibration time, a better separation for many solvents, a higher sensitivity and a broader concentration range. PMID:20801455

  17. Evaluation of nutritive value and in vitro rumen fermentation gas accumulation of de-oiled algal residues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Algae are widely recognized for their high oil content and for exponentially accumulating biomass with particular potential to provide single cell protein for human consumption or animal feed. It is believed that along with biodiesel from algae, the high protein de-oiled algal residue may become an alternative feed supplement option in the future. This study was conducted to investigate de-oiled algal residue obtained from the common Chlorella species, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Selenarstrum capricornutum, Scenedesmus sp., and Scenedesmus dimorphus for assessment as potential feed supplements for ruminants by comparing with soybean (Glycine max) meal and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hay. Results With the exception of T. weissflogii, algal residue had higher concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mn and lower concentration of Ca, Mg, and K than soybean meal and alfalfa hay. The algal residue CP (crude protein) concentrations ranged from 140 to 445 g/kg DM and varied among the de-oiled residues. In vitro rumen fermentation gas accumulation curves indicated that algal biomass degradation potential was less than that of soybean meal or alfalfa hay by up to 41.7%. The gas production curve, interpreted with a dual pool logistic model, confirmed that the fraction sizes for fast fermenting and slow fermenting of de-oiled algal residues were smaller than those in soybean meal and alfalfa hay, and the fermenting rate of the fractions was also low. Conclusions Inferior in vitro rumen gas accumulation from the five de-oiled algal residues suggests that these algal byproducts are less degradable in the rumen. PMID:25093078

  18. Effect of residual gas on cathode photoelectric emission life in generation III L-L-L tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiangtao; Yang, Xiaojun; Chen, Chang; Xu, Ke; Liu, Beibei; Li, Min; Shi, Hongli

    2015-04-01

    In order to solve the sensitivity's degression in the GaAs NEA photocathode, our crew dissected the Gen. III Low-Light-Level ?L-L-L? tube and analyzed the residual gas from the tub e while functionally operating via mass spectrometer. The photoemission-harmful gas like C?CO?CO2 were the principal reason cause the photocathode sensitivity to drop most. Applying the theory of dipole layer, this paper had this thorough discussion over the impact the residual pernicious gas had upon the photocathode. The residual gas on the emission layer enlarged the interface barrier and dwindled the chance of overflow about the same time.There were none photoemission when the single molecule gas were all over the emission layer, and so the life-span has came to an end as well. Our crew bring forward "carbon-contamination precaution measure" on account of lo wering potential barrier, which resolve problems like unstable photocathode sensitivity and limited life-span.

  19. Residual Gas Analysis of Samples Formed from the UV Irradiation of Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, C. K.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of complex organics, including nucleic acids, amino acids, sugars, and other molecules of prebiotic interest, in an interstellar environment is an important field of modern astrochemistry research. In a typical experiment, we perform a controlled deposition of a known mixture of gas onto a cold finger while irradiating the sample to simulate the conditions of cold interstellar grains (Bernstein et al., 1995, 2002; Muñoz Caro et al., 2002; Nuevo et al., 2008, 2009, 2010). After the deposition is complete, the sample is warmed and recovered for analysis. Our traditional analysis methods have made extensive use of HPLC with UV-visible detection, GC-MS, and IR spectroscopy when appropriate. While these techniques provide significant insight into the photo-processing of our ices, they invariably lead to the loss of some volatiles during the warm-up, which may be of interest. In order to learn more about the volatiles lost during the warm-up we have installed a residual gas analyzer (RGA) mass spec device on one of our vacuum systems. With this tool, we can perform controlled warm-ups of our samples and monitor the composition of outgassing volatiles as a function of temperature change. Knowledge of the composition of these volatiles could prove invaluable in two ways. First, we may observe important chemical species, which we are unable to detect with our other methods because they are either lost during the warm-up, or cannot be detected using our GC-MS protocol. Second, even compounds which are mundane in and of themselves, may provide important clues about the type of chemistry occurring within the rest of the ice. We are currently using the RGA to study the formation of pyrimidine-based nucleobases from in interstellar ice analogs. In the future we will expand our studies to purines-based nucleic acids, amino acids, and other prebiotic organics.

  20. Magnetic Field Generation and Zonal Flows in the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, L.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2013-12-01

    The surface dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn is dominated by a banded system of fierce zonal winds. The depth of these winds remains unclear but they are thought to be confined to the very outer envelopes where hydrogen remains molecular and the electrical conductivity is negligible. The dynamo responsible for the dipole dominated magnetic fields of both Gas Giants, on the other hand, likely operates in the deeper interior where hydrogen assumes a metallic state. We present numerical simulations that attempt to model both the zonal winds and the interior dynamo action in an integrated approach. Using the anelastic version of the MHD code MagIC, we explore the effects of density stratification and radial electrical conductivity variations. The electrical conductivity is assumed to remain constant in the thicker inner metallic region and decays exponentially towards the outer boundary throughout the molecular envelope. Our results show that the combination of stronger density stratification (Δρ≈55) and a weaker conducting outer layer is essential for reconciling dipole dominated dynamo action and a fierce equatorial zonal jet. Previous simulations with homogeneous electrical conductivity show that both are mutually exclusive, with solutions either having strong zonal winds and multipolar magnetic fields or weak zonal winds and dipole dominated magnetic fields. The particular setup explored here allows the equatorial jet to remain confined to the weaker conducting region where is does not interfere with the deeper seated dynamo action. The equatorial jet can afford to remain geostrophic and reaches throughout the whole shell. This is not an option for the additional mid to higher latitude jets, however. In dipole dominated dynamo solutions, appropriate for the Gas Giants, zonal flows remain very faint in the deeper dynamo region but increase in amplitude in the weakly conducting outer layer in some of our simulations. This suggests that the mid to high latitude jets

  1. Magnetic "one-step" quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe method for the fast determination of pesticide residues in freshly squeezed juice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao-Bo; Ding, Jun; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-06-12

    A "one-step" quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) method was proposed for pesticide residue analysis in freshly squeezed juice of fruits and vegetables. In this method, a new magnetic adsorbent prepared by simple physical blending was adopt, which could endow the sample mixture with magnetic separability. To achieve the best performance of the modified QuEChERS towards target analytes, the amounts of adsorbents were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a simple, rapid and sensitive method for the determination of 11 pesticide residues in freshly squeezed juice was established by coupling modified QuEChERS to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for 11 pesticides ranged from 2.0 to 49.6ng/g. Good linearities (R value ≥0.9993) were achieved at different concentration ranges, and acceptable method reproducibility was obtained by evaluating intra- and inter-day precisions with the relative standard deviations being less than 8.5% and 13.5%, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 70.3-114.1% at different concentrations for real samples. Compared with the traditional QuEChERS methods, extraction/partitioning and purification were integrated into one step in the proposed method, which thus was time-saving (within 3.5min) with keeping good clean-up performance. PMID:25935797

  2. Gas chromatographic determination of residual solvents in lubricating oils and waxes

    SciTech Connect

    De Andrade Bruening, I.M.R.

    1983-10-01

    A direct gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of residual solvents is described, using tert-butylbenzene as an internal standard. The lube oils and waxes were prevented from contaminating the chromatographic column by injecting the samples directly into a precolumn containing a silicone stationary phase. The samples of lube oils and waxes were injected directly into the chromatographic column containing another stationary phase, 1,2,3-tris(2-cyanoethoxy)propane. (The waxy samples were dissolved in a light neutral oil). With proper operating conditions, analysis time was 7 min. The procedure has been applied in the control of a lube oil dewaxing plant; the chromatographic column showed no sign of deterioration after 1 h when the precolumn was removed. Known amounts of toluene and methylethyl ketone were added to the solvent-free lubricating oils and wax, and these mixtures were analyzed to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure. Precision and accuracy of these data are comparable to those of methods previously described. 1 figure, 1 table.

  3. Removal of element mercury by medicine residue derived biochars in presence of various gas compositions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Shen, Boxiong; Li, Yongwang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Fumei; He, Chuan; Wang, Yinyin; Zhang, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pyrolyzed biochars from an industrial medicinal residue waste were modified by microwave activation and NH4Cl impregnation. Mercury adsorption of different modified biochars was investigated in a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg(0) occurred on the surface of M6WN5 which was modified both microwave and 5wt.% NH4Cl loading, and exothermic chemisorption process was a dominant route for Hg(0) removal. Microwave activation improved pore properties and NH4Cl impregnation introduced good active sites for biochars. The presence of NO and O2 increased Hg(0) adsorption whereas H2O inhibited Hg(0) adsorption greatly. A converse effect of SO2 was observed on Hg(0) removal, namely, low concentration of SO2 promoted Hg(0) removal obviously whereas high concentration of SO2 suppressed Hg(0) removal. The Hg(0) removal by M6WN5 was mainly due to the reaction of the C−Cl with Hg(0) to form HgCl2, and the active state of C−Cl(*) groups might be an intermediate group in this process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that mercury adsorption by the biochars was exothermic process and apparent adsorption energy was 43.3 kJ/mol in the range of chemisorption. In spite of low specific surface area, M6WN5 proved to be a promising Hg(0) sorbent in flue gas when compared with other sorbents. PMID:26051992

  4. Compact permanent magnet H+ ECR ion source with pulse gas valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Y.; Tongu, H.; Fuwa, Y.; Ichikawa, M.

    2016-02-01

    Compact H+ ECR ion source using permanent magnets is under development. Switching the hydrogen gas flow in pulse operations can reduce the gas loads to vacuum evacuation systems. A specially designed piezo gas valve chops the gas flow quickly. A 6 GHz ECR ion source equipped with the piezo gas valve is tested. The gas flow was measured by a fast ion gauge and a few ms response time is obtained.

  5. Synchrotron X-ray measurement and finite element analysis of residual strain in tungsten inert gas welded aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R. V.; Shercliff, H. R.; Withers, P. J.; Hughes, D. J.; Smith, S. D.; Webster, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    Residual strains have been measured in a tungsten inert gas (TIG) butt-welded 2024 aluminum alloy plate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Novel two-dimensional strain maps spanning the entire plate reveal steep gradients in residual stress and provide detailed validation data for finite element (FE) analysis. Two variants of a FE model have been used to predict the residual strain distributions, incorporating different levels of plate constraint. The model uses decoupled thermal and elastic-plastic mechanical analyses and successfully predicts the longitudinal and transverse residual strain field over the entire weld. For butt weld geometries, the degree of transverse constraint is shown to be a significant boundary condition, compared to simpler bead-on-plate analyses. The importance of transverse residual strains for detailed model validation is highlighted, together with the need for care in selecting the location for line scans. The residual stress is largest in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), being equal to the local postweld yield stress, though the strength increases subsequently by natural aging. In addition, a halving of the diffraction line width has been observed local to the weld, and this correlates with the microstructural changes in the region.

  6. Characterization and comparative study of coal combustion residues from a primary and additional flue gas secondary desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Evrard, O.; Pellissier, C.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive characterization and comparative study was done on two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues derived from the same coal. LR residues (originated from Loire/Rhone in the south of Lyon, France) are obtained after a primary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is trapped by reaction with CaO at a temperature of about 1100 C), and LM residues (originating from La Maxe, near Metz in the east of France) are obtained after an additional secondary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is removed further by reaction with Ca(OH){sub 2} at a temperature of about 120 C). Various and complementary investigation methods were used to determine their chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties: x-ray fluorescence and diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry analysis, granulometric distribution, pycnometric density, BET specific surface area and pH, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis of their insoluble fraction. The FGD residues contain basically two main components: a silico-aluminous fly ash part and calcic FGD phases. In the LR residues the two components can be considered as independent, whereas they are linked in the LM residues because chemical reactions have occurred, leading to the formation of silico-calcic gel CSH, hydrated aluminate AFm, and AFt phases.

  7. Tunable Circularly Polarized Terahertz Radiation from Magnetized Gas Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-06-26

    It is shown, by simulation and theory, that circularly or elliptically polarized terahertz radiation can be generated when a static magnetic (B) field is imposed on a gas target along the propagation direction of a two-color laser driver. The radiation frequency is determined by √[ω(p)(2)+ω(c)(2)/4]+ω(c)/2, where ω(p) is the plasma frequency and ω(c) is the electron cyclotron frequency. With the increase of the B field, the radiation changes from a single-cycle broadband waveform to a continuous narrow-band emission. In high-B-field cases, the radiation strength is proportional to ω(p)(2)/ω(c). The B field provides a tunability in the radiation frequency, spectrum width, and field strength. PMID:26197126

  8. Greenhouse gas reductions through enhanced use of residues in the life cycle of Malaysian palm oil derived biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sune Balle; Olsen, Stig Irving; Ujang, Zaini

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, which can be achieved by optimizing the use of residues in the life cycle of palm oil derived biodiesel. This is done through compilation of data on existing and prospective treatment technologies as well as practical experiments on methane potentials from empty fruit bunches. Methane capture from the anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent was found to result in the highest GHG reductions. Among the solid residues, energy extraction from shells was found to constitute the biggest GHG savings per ton of residue, whereas energy extraction from empty fruit bunches was found to be the most significant in the biodiesel production life cycle. All the studied waste treatment technologies performed significantly better than the conventional practices and with dedicated efforts of optimized use in the palm oil industry, the production of palm oil derived biodiesel can be almost carbon neutral. PMID:22137753

  9. MECHANISM FOR EXCITING PLANETARY INCLINATION AND ECCENTRICITY THROUGH A RESIDUAL GAS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuanyuan; Liu Huigen; Zhao Gang; Zhou Jilin E-mail: zhoujl@nju.edu.cn

    2013-05-20

    According to the theory of Kozai resonance, the initial mutual inclination between a small body and a massive planet in an outer circular orbit is as high as {approx}39. Degree-Sign 2 for pumping the eccentricity of the inner small body. Here we show that with the presence of a residual gas disk outside two planetary orbits, the inclination can be reduced to as low as a few degrees. The presence of the disk changes the nodal precession rates and directions of the planet orbits. At the place where the two planets achieve the same nodal processing rate, vertical secular resonance (VSR) occurs so that the mutual inclination of the two planets will be excited, which might further trigger the Kozai resonance between the two planets. However, in order to pump an inner Jupiter-like planet, the conditions required for the disk and the outer planet are relatively strict. We develop a set of evolution equations, which can fit the N-body simulation quite well but can be integrated within a much shorter time. By scanning the parameter spaces using the evolution equations, we find that a massive planet (10 M{sub J} ) at 30 AU with an inclination of 6 Degree-Sign to a massive disk (50 M{sub J} ) can finally enter the Kozai resonance with an inner Jupiter around the snowline. An inclination of 20 Degree-Sign of the outer planet to the disk is required for flipping the inner one to a retrograde orbit. In multiple planet systems, the mechanism can happen between two nonadjacent planets or can inspire a chain reaction among more than two planets. This mechanism could be the source of the observed giant planets in moderate eccentric and inclined orbits, or hot Jupiters in close-in, retrograde orbits after tidal damping.

  10. Synthesis and application of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic adsorbent for sensitive analysis of salbutamol residues in pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hua; Wang, Chaozhan; Wei, Yinmao

    2015-12-01

    Salbutamol (SAL) is the most widely used β2 -agonist drug for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary patients, but it is also often abused as feed additive. In recent years, the abuse of SAL has led to a large number of food safety incidents. Therefore, the monitoring of SAL residues in animal products is very important. A highly selective boronate affinity magnetic adsorbent was synthesized and developed for detection of trace levels of SAL residues in pig tissue samples. The obtained Fe3O4@SiO2@FPBA(4-formylphenylboronic acid) magnetic adsorbent showed good adsorption ability to catechol and SAL, and then it was successfully applied as special magnetic solid-phase phase extraction adsorbent coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for simultaneous isolation and determination of cis-diol compounds. The binding capacity of catechol and SAL reached 96 and 50 µmol/g, respectively. The method was successfully established for the detection of trace levels of SAL in pig tissue samples. The linear range extended from 0.32 to 800 µg/kg (R(2) = 0.9994). The limit of detection of SAL was 0.19 µg/kg. The recoveries were satisfactory (89.5-108.0%) at three spiked levels with RSD between 2.1 and 11.3%. These results indicated that the method has potential for enrichment and detection of trace levels of SAL residual in animal food products. PMID:26061980

  11. Finite-element analysis of a magnetic sensor to detect permeability changes due to residual stresses in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, Madhav R.; Katragadda, Gopichand; Wallace, John L.

    1998-03-01

    High strength steel alloys (such as 300 M) used in naval aircraft engine and landing gear components are subjected to cyclic loading in service and found to be highly susceptible to fatigue cracking. There is a critical need for nondestructive evaluation techniques which can detect both cracking and potential crack nucleation sites within these components. An innovative electromagnetic technology called the stress induced-magnetic-anisotropy (SMA) technique has been proposed to be used to detect and evaluate residual stresses. SMA measures residual stresses by sensing the changes in magnetic flux induced in directions parallel and perpendicular to the stress. A novel probe and instrumentation is being developed to simultaneously detect both subsurface residual stresses and stress-induced cracking in coated and uncoated ferromagnetic structures. Finite element analysis has been used to determine the distribution of magnetic flux density and inductance of the probe under varying AC fields. Using ANSYSTM EMAG, the effect of varying frequency of the excitation field, permeability and dimensions of the core have been analyzed. The paper describes how finite element analysis can be used in design and development of the probe and in understanding its behavior.

  12. Leak rate measurements for satellite subsystems and residual gas analysis during space environment tests. [thermal vacuum and solar simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The measuring and evaluation procedure for the determination of leak rates of satellite subsystems with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and the results of the residual gas analysis are described. The method selected for leak rate determination was placing the system into a vacuum chamber and furnishing the chamber with a mass spectrometer and calibrated leaks. The residual gas of a thermal vacuum test facility, in which the thermal balance test radiation input was simulated by a heated canister, was analyzed with the mass spectrometer in the atomic mass unit range up to 300 amu. In addition to the measurements during the space environment tests, mass spectrometric studies were performed with samples of spacecraft materials. The studies were carried out during tests for the projects HELIOS, AEROS B and SYMPHONIE.

  13. Derivatization and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection of anabolic steroid residues isolated from edible muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Daeseleire, E; De Guesquière, A; Van Peteghem, C

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of anabolic steroid residues in edible muscle tissues. After enzymic digestion of the tissue and purification on disposable C18 solid-phase extraction columns, the extract was injected onto a C18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic column. Three fractions or windows were collected, each containing specific analytes. After evaporation to dryness, the residues were subjected to a derivatization procedure which yielded suitable derivatives. After gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis, both gas chromatographic retention data and mass spectral data were used for the detection and identification of nortestosterone, testosterone, estradiol, ethinylestradiol, trenbolone, methyltestosterone, chlormadinone acetate, medroxyprogesterone acetate and megestrol acetate. PMID:2026730

  14. Determination of Trichlorfon Pesticide Residues in Milk via Gas Chromatography with μ-Electron Capture Detection and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Hem, Lina; Khay, Sathya; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Morgan, E D; Abd El-Aty, A M; Shim, Jae-Han

    2010-06-01

    The pesticide trichlorfon is readily degraded under experimental conditions to dichlorvos. A method has therefore been developed by which residues of trichlorfon in milk are determined as dichlorvos, using gas chromatography with μ-electron capture detection. The identification of dichlorvos was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Milk was extracted with acetonitrile followed by centrifugation, freezing lipid filtration, and partitioning into dichloromethane. The residue after partitioning of dichloromethane was dissolved in ethyl acetate for gas chromatography. Recovery concentration was determined at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 of times the maximum permitted residue limits (MRLs) for trichlorfon in milk. The average recoveries (n = 6) ranged from 92.4 to 103.6%. The repeatability of the measurements was expressed as relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 3.6%, to 6.7%. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 3.7 and 11.1 μg/l, respectively. The accuracy and precision (expressed as RSD) were estimated at concentrations from 25 to 250 μg/l. The intra- and inter-day accuracy (n = 6) ranged from 89.2%to 91% and 91.3% to 96.3%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were lower than 8%. The developed method was applied to determine trichlorfon in real samples collected from the seven major cities in the Republic of Korea. No residual trichlorfon was detected in any samples. PMID:24278518

  15. Pesticide residue determination in vegetables from western China applying gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guofu; Zou, Keting; Li, Yongbo; Chen, Yan; He, Fengrui; Ding, Guirong

    2016-09-01

    In this study,an effort has been made to evaluate the pesticide residues in vegetables from western China. Fifty-one pesticides, including organophosphorus, organochlorine, carbamate and pyrethroid, were detected in 369 commonly used vegetables by GC-MS. Concentrations of organophosphorus pesticides were detected ranging from 0.0008 to 18.8200 mg/kg, among which organophosphorus pesticide concentrations exceeded their maximum residue levels (MRLs) in five samples. Carbamate and organochlorine pesticides were determined to have concentrations in the range of 0.0012-0.7928 mg/kg. The residual concentrations of carbamate pesticides in six samples and organochlorine pesticides in four samples exceeded their MRLs. The residual concentrations of five pyrethroid pesticides were within the range of 0.0016-6.0827 mg/kg and the pyrethroid residues in two samples exceeded their MRLs. The results revealed that pesticide residues in 70.73% of the vegetables samples were not detected, while in the rest of vegetables there were one or more pesticide residues and some even exceeded their MRLs, which would threaten the health of consumers. Our work provides significant information for the food safety regulations to control the excessive use of some pesticides on those kinds of vegetables from western China. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26864471

  16. Green house gas emissions from open field burning of agricultural residues in India.

    PubMed

    Murali, S; Shrivastava, Rajnish; Saxena, Mohini

    2010-10-01

    In India, about 435.98 MMT of agro-residues are produced every year, out of which 313.62 MMT are surplus. These residues are either partially utilized or un-utilised due to various constraints. To pave the way for subsequent season for agriculture activity, the excess crop residues are burnt openly in the fields, unmindful of their ill effects on the environment. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the severity of air pollution through emission of green house gases (GHGs) due to open field burning of agro-residues in India. Open field burning of surplus agro-residues in India results in the emission of GHG. Emissions of CH4 and N2O in 1997-98 and 2006-07 have been 3.73 and 4.06 MMT CO2 equivalent, which is an increase of 8.88% over a decade. About three-fourths of GHG emissions from agro-residues burning were CH4 and the remaining one-fourth were N2O. Burning of wheat and paddy straws alone contributes to about 42% of GHGs. These GHG emissions can be avoided once the agro-residues are employed for sustainable, cost-effective and environment- friendly options like power generation. PMID:22312795

  17. Onsager's symmetry relation and the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a magnetized plasma with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yang Wang, Shaojie

    2014-09-15

    The physics of the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a rotating plasma with electrostatic turbulence is explicitly identified by using the transport formulation of the gyrokinetic turbulence. It is clarified that the residual stress consists of four terms, among which are the cross terms due to the pressure gradient and the temperature gradient and the terms related to the turbulent acceleration impulse and the turbulent heating rate. The last two terms are identified for the first time, and are shown to cause analogous residual term in the heat flux. Meanwhile, the transport matrix reveals diffusion in the phase space. The transport matrix is demonstrated to satisfy the Onsager's symmetry relation.

  18. (210)Pb content in natural gas pipeline residues ("black-powder") and its correlation with the chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Godoy, José Marcus; Carvalho, Franciane; Cordilha, Aloisio; Matta, Luiz Ernesto; Godoy, Maria Luiza

    2005-01-01

    The present work was carried out to assess the (210)Pb content in "black-powder" found in pigging operations on gas pipelines in Brazil, in particular, on the Campos Basin gas pipeline. Additionally, the chemical composition of such deposits was determined and an eventual correlation with (210)Pb concentration evaluated. Typical "black-powder" generated in the natural gas pipeline from Campos Basin oilfield contains mainly iron oxide ( approximately 81%) and residual organic matter ( approximately 9%). The (210)Pb content ranges from 4.9 to 0.04k Bqkg(-1) and seems to be inversely correlated with the distance to the platforms. On the other hand, (226)Ra concentration is higher on the pipeline branch between the platform and the onshore installations. (228)Ra was only observed in few samples, in particular, in the samples with the highest (226)Ra content. PMID:15885858

  19. RESIDUAL GAS MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM AND BIAS IN HYDROSTATIC MEASUREMENTS OF MASS PROFILES OF CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Erwin T.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2009-11-10

    We present analysis of bulk and random gas motions in the intracluster medium using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations of 16 simulated clusters, including both very relaxed and unrelaxed systems and spanning a virial mass range of 5 x 10{sup 13} - 2 x 10{sup 15} h{sup -1} M-odot. We investigate effects of the residual subsonic gas motions on the hydrostatic estimates of mass profiles and concentrations of galaxy clusters. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the gas motions contribute up to approx5%-15% of the total pressure support in relaxed clusters with contribution increasing with the cluster-centric radius. The fractional pressure support is higher in unrelaxed systems. This contribution would not be accounted for in hydrostatic estimates of the total mass profile and would lead to systematic underestimate of mass. We demonstrate that total mass can be recovered accurately if pressure due to gas motions measured in simulations is explicitly taken into account in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Given that the underestimate of mass is increasing at larger radii, where gas is less relaxed and contribution of gas motions to pressure is larger, the total density profile derived from hydrostatic analysis is more concentrated than the true profile. This may at least partially explain some high values of concentrations of clusters estimated from hydrostatic analysis of X-ray data.

  20. A general static-headspace gas chromatographic method for determination of residual benzene in oral liquid pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Tang, Qinglin; Markovich, Robert J; Rustum, Abu M

    2011-01-25

    Sodium benzoate is used in oral liquid pharmaceutical products for its anti-microbial properties. The benzoate salts present in liquid pharmaceutical products can potentially generate residual levels of free benzene during manufacturing of the drug product and or during the shelf-life of the product under its storage conditions. To ensure the safety and quality of the pharmaceutical products (containing benzoate in the formulation), a selective and sensitive analytical method is required to monitor residual benzene in oral liquid pharmaceutical products. In this paper, we report the development and validation of a general static-headspace gas chromatographic (SH-GC) method to determine residual benzene in oral liquid pharmaceutical products. The liquid pharmaceutical drug product sample is dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in a GC headspace vial. A DB-624 capillary column (30 m x 0.32 mm I.D. and 1.8 μm film thickness) was used under isothermal conditions with a flame ionization detection (FID). The benzene peak was well separated from all other volatile compounds that are present in the formulation of a number of liquid drug products. This method was successfully validated using a representative oral liquid pharmaceutical drug product. The limit of detection of the method for benzene is 0.5 ppm which met the 2 ppm limit of current ICH guideline for residual benzene in pharmaceutical products. PMID:20926217

  1. Determination of 23 pesticide residues in leafy vegetables using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and analyte protectants.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Rosa Ma; Rial-Otero, Raquel; Cancho-Grande, Beatriz; Simal-Gándara, Jesús

    2008-07-01

    A gas chromatographic method was developed for simultaneously determining residues of 12 insecticides (acrinathrin, bifenthrin, carbofuran, cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, chlorfenvinphos, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenamiphos, methiocarb and tau-fluvalinate) and 11 fungicides (cyprodinil, fludioxonil, iprodione, metalaxyl, penconazole, pyrimethanil, procymidone tebuconazole, triadimefon, triadimenol and vinclozolin) in leafy vegetables. Samples were extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned-up with graphitized carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA) solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges using acetonitrile:toluene (3:1, v/v) as eluent. The eluate was finally evaporated and redissolved with 0.5 mL of acetone containing the internal standards (pentachlorobenzene and fenpropathrin) and three analyte protectants (3-ethoxy-1,2-propanediol, d-sorbitol and l-gulonic acid gamma-lactone). The addition of analyte protectants allows to avoid the matrix-induced response enhancement effect on quantitation process with absolute recoveries ca. 100%. Precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) was lower than 10% for all pesticides and finally, limits of detection were also 10-20 times lower than maxima residue levels (MRLs) established by European Regulation. The proposed method was applied to determine pesticide residues in commercial leafy vegetables (lettuce, Swiss chard and spinach) purchased from markets in Orense (NW Spain). Pesticide residues were detected in 84% of the total samples (63 from 75 samples) and pesticide concentrations were higher than MRL in 18 samples. PMID:18343389

  2. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor. PMID:25940479

  3. Development, validation and determination of multiclass pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas chromatography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zainudin, Badrul Hisyam; Salleh, Salsazali; Mohamed, Rahmat; Yap, Ken Choy; Muhamad, Halimah

    2015-04-01

    An efficient and rapid method for the analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans using gas and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed, validated and applied to imported and domestic cocoa beans samples collected over 2 years from smallholders and Malaysian ports. The method was based on solvent extraction method and covers 26 pesticides (insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides) of different chemical classes. The recoveries for all pesticides at 10 and 50 μg/kg were in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations of less than 20%. Good selectivity and sensitivity were obtained with method limit of quantification of 10 μg/kg. The expanded uncertainty measurements were in the range of 4-25%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the routine analysis of pesticide residues in cocoa beans via a monitoring study where 10% of them was found positive for chlorpyrifos, ametryn and metalaxyl. PMID:25442595

  4. Confirmation of clorsulon residues in cattle kidney by capillary gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wehner, T A; Wood, J S; Walker, R; Downing, G V; Vandenheuvel, W J

    1987-07-24

    A confirmatory assay for residues of the anthelmintic agent clorsulon [4-amino-6-(trichloroethenyl)-1,3-benzenedisulfonamide] in cattle kidney tissue has been developed. The assay involves isolation of a drug-containing fraction by solvent extraction, methylation of the analyte, and fused-silica capillary column gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry of the pentamethyl derivative of clorsulon. The intensities of four negative ions [m/z 406 and 408 (trichloro species) and m/z 413 and 415 (dichloro species)] are monitored. Confirmation of the presence of drug in an analyte requires that all four ions appear at the appropriate retention time with their intensity ratios within 10-15% of those arising from analysis of the reference standard, methylated clorsulon; the lower limit of detection is 3 ppb. Quantification of the drug is based on the intensity of the m/z 406 ion. Identification and quantification of residues by the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay gave results in good agreement with those obtained with an electron-capture gas chromatographic assay. PMID:3654857

  5. Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier.

    PubMed

    Seggiani, Maurizia; Puccini, Monica; Raggio, Giovanni; Vitolo, Sandra

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH(3), HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H(2)S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was within the limits for landfilling inert residues. On the other hand, sulfate and chloride releases were found to comply with the limits for non-hazardous residues. PMID:22658685

  6. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Detailed economic feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    An economic evaluation of the application of the multi-solid fluid reactor design to wood gasification was completed. The processing options examined include plant capacity, production of a high-Btu (1006 Btu/SCF HHV) gas versus an intermediate-Btu gas (379 Btu/SCF HHV), and operating pressure. 9 figs., 29 tabs.

  7. Speciation, Characterization, And Mobility Of As, Se, and Hg In Flue Gas Desulphurization Residues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile elements, such as arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg), which could lead to serious environmental health risks. The capture of these toxic elements in the scrubber with a flue gas desulphurization (FGD...

  8. Residual Gas in Closed Systems. 2; Formation of Gases from the Source Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amount and composition of residual gases formed in sealed ampoules loaded with different elements or binary II-VI or IV-VI compounds and subjected to various thermal processings, annealing and/or resublimation conducted under different conditions were investigated. The results of these experiments are discussed in terms of the procedural, thermochemical, and kinetic limitations to the process.

  9. Residual Gas in Closed Systems. 2; Formation of Gases from the Source Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amount and composition of residual gases formed in sealed ampoules loaded with different elements or binary II-VI or IV-VI compounds were investigated. The source materials underwent different thermal processings, annealing and/or resublimation conducted under different conditions. The results of these experiments are discussed in terms of the procedural, thermochemical, and kinetic limitations to the process.

  10. JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Patton

    2006-12-31

    The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues using temperature modulated SnO(2) gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Pi, Zongxin; Yu, Zengliang

    2004-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues (acephate and trichlorphon) using temperature modulated SnO(2) gas sensor were studied. The testing method employed only a single SnO(2)-based gas sensor in a rectangular temperature mode to perform the qualitative analysis of pure pesticide vapor and a binary vapor mixture in the air. Experimental results showed that in the range 250-300 degrees C and at the modulating frequency of 20mHz the high selectivity of the sensor could be achieved. The quantitative analysis of the pure pesticide vapor and their mixture were performed by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). The higher harmonics of the FFT characterized the non-linear properties of the response at the sensor surface. The amplitudes of the higher harmonics exhibited characteristic variations that depend on the concentration and the kinetics of pesticide species on the sensor surface. PMID:18969637

  12. Effects of strong magnetic fields on the electron distribution and magnetisability of rare gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagola, G. I.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2004-12-01

    Strong uniform static magnetic fields compress the electronic distribution of rare gas atoms and cause a 'spindle effect', which can be illustrated by plotting charge-density functions which depend quadratically on the flux density of the applied field. The fourth rank hypermagnetisabilities of He, Ne, Ar and Kr are predicted to have small positive values. Accordingly, the diamagnetism of rare gas atoms diminishes by a very little amount in the presence of intense magnetic field.

  13. The effects of rape residue mulching on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from no-tillage paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha(-1)) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0-20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) to 1654 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9-30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33-71% and GHGI by 35-72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China. PMID:25140329

  14. The Effects of Rape Residue Mulching on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from No-Tillage Paddy Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha−1) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0–20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha−1 season−1 to 1654 kg C ha−1 season−1 than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9–30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33–71% and GHGI by 35–72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China. PMID:25140329

  15. Nanocomposite exchange-spring magnet synthesized by gas phase method: From isotropic to anisotropic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqi; He, Shihai; Qiu, Jiao-Ming; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2011-05-01

    The fabrication of anisotropic nanocomposite exchange-spring magnets is demonstrated experimentally by using a gas-phase nanoparticle deposition technique. High resolution transmission electron microscopy images prove the experimental easy-axis definition of embedded hard magnetic nanoparticles in soft magnetic matrix. Exchange coupling between the hard and soft phases is confirmed by measuring recoil loops and δ M-H curve of the anisotropic FePt/Fe0.8Ni0.2 nanocomposite. The magnetic energy product for the anisotropic exchange-spring magnet is 224% higher than the isotropic case.

  16. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by1h and13c nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    ??? Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 13C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The 1H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between St. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to ???28 ??g/L. Concentrations based on 1H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 ??g/L.

  17. Detection of poly(ethylene glycol) residues from nonionic surfactants in surface water by sup 1 H and sup 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R.L.; Brown, P.A.; Noyes, T.I. )

    1991-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) residues were detected in organic solute isolates from surface water by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, and colorimetric assay. PEG residues were separated from natural organic solutes in Clear Creek, CO, by a combination of methylation and chromatographic procedures. The isolated PEG residues, characterized by NMR spectrometry, were found to consist of neutral and acidic residues that also contained poly(propylene glycol) moieties. The {sup 1}H NMR and the colorimetric assays for poly(ethylene glycol) residues were done on samples collected in the lower Mississippi River and tributaries between S. Louis, MO, and New Orleans, LA, in July-August and November-December 1987. Aqueous concentrations for poly(ethylene glycol) residues based on colorimetric assay ranged from undetectable to {approximately}28 {mu}g/L. Concentrations based on {sup 1}H NMR spectrometry ranged from undetectable to 145 {mu}g/L.

  18. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for residual solvent assessment in seized cocaine and heroin.

    PubMed

    Cabarcos, Pamela; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Álvarez-Freire, Iván; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2016-09-01

    A simple sample pre-treatment method based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized and validated for the assessment of 15 residual solvents (2-propanol, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, acetone, ethyl acetate, benzene, hexane, methylcyclohexane, methylcyclopentane, m-xylene, propyl acetate, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, dichloromethane, and ethylbenzene) in seized illicit cocaine and heroin. DMSO and DMF as sample diluents were found to offer the best residual solvent transference to the head space for further adsorption onto the SPME fiber, and the developed method therefore showed high sensitivity and analytical recovery. Variables affecting SPME were fully evaluated by applying an experimental design approach. Best conditions were found when using an equilibration time of 5 min at 70 °C and headspace sampling of residual solvents at the same temperature for 15 min. Method validation, performed within the requirements of international guidelines, showed excellent sensitivity, as well as intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The proposed methodology was applied to 96 cocaine samples and 14 heroin samples seized in Galicia (northwestern Spain) within 2013 and 2014. PMID:27405875

  19. On the possibility of magnetic nano-markers use for hydraulic fracturing in shale gas mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Jaroslaw; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Recently shale gas production became essential for the global economy, thanks to fast advances in shale fracturing technology. Shale gas extraction can be achieved by drilling techniques coupled with hydraulic fracturing. Further increasing of shale gas production is possible by improving the efficiency of hydraulic fracturing and assessing the spatial distribution of fractures in shale deposits. The latter can be achieved by adding magnetic markers to fracturing fluid or directly to proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. After that, the range of hydraulic fracturing can be assessed by measurement of vertical and horizontal component of earth's magnetic field before and after fracturing. The difference in these components caused by the presence of magnetic marker particles may allow to delineate spatial distribution of fractures. Due to the fact, that subterranean geological formations may contain minerals with significant magnetic properties, it is important to provide to the markers excellent magnetic properties which should be also, independent of harsh chemical and geological conditions. On the other hand it is of great significance to produce magnetic markers at an affordable price because of the large quantities of fracturing fluids or proppants used during shale fracturing. Examining the properties of nano-materials, it was found, that they possess clearly superior magnetic properties, as compared to the same structure but having a larger particle size. It should be then possible, to use lower amount of magnetic marker, to obtain the same effect. Although a research on properties of new magnetic nano-materials is very intensive, cheap magnetic nano-materials are not yet produced on a scale appropriate for shale gas mining. In this work we overview, in detail, geological, technological and economic aspects of using magnetic nano-markers in shale gas mining. Acknowledgment This work was supported by the NCBiR under Grant "Electromagnetic method to

  20. Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Seggiani, Maurizia; Puccini, Monica; Raggio, Giovanni

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was

  1. Analysis of pesticide residues in tobacco with online size exclusion chromatography with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiyun; Bian, Zhaoyang; Tang, Gangling; Wang, Deguo; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-07-01

    An ultrasensitive method for the simultaneous analysis of pesticides residues in tobacco was developed with online size exclusion chromatography with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Tobacco samples were extracted with the solvent mixture of cyclohexane and acetone (7:3, v/v) and centrifuged. Then, the supernatant liquors were injected directly into the online size exclusion chromatography with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry without any other purification procedures after being filtered with a 0.22 μm organic phase filter. The matrix interferences were effectively removed and recoveries of most pesticides were in the range of 72-121%. Especially, for chlorothalonil, the analysis efficiency of this method was much more favorable than that of the general method, in which dispersive solid-phase extraction was used as an additional purified procedure. In addition, the limits of quantitation of this method were from 1 to 50 μg/kg. Therefore, a rapid, cost-effective, labor-saving method was proposed in the present work, which was suitable for the analysis of 41 pesticide residues in tobacco. PMID:27197809

  2. Gas residues of engine starting fluid in postmortem sample from an arsonist.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, J

    1997-01-01

    Diethyl ether was found in samples of the blood, urine, and lung from a fire victim. Because the lung also carried a number of low-boiling paraffins, it was inferred that the detected compounds came from engine starting fluid, which the victim apparently had been exposed to while be intentionally used it as an accelerant to start the fire. The reported death illustrates the value of searching post mortem samples for highly volatile residues of possible arson accelerants. PMID:8988590

  3. [Determination of pentachlorophenol residues in textiles and leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Mou, J; Chen, M; Zou, M

    1999-07-01

    A method for determination of pentachlorophenol residues in textiles and leather and leather products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed. The pentachlorophenol residues in samples was acidified with sulphuric acid solution (6 mol/L) and extracted with n-hexane. After the n-hexane layer was washed with sodium sulphate solution (20 g/L)until it was clear, determination was made by means of a gas chromatograph equipped with MSD, using external standard method. A DB-17 fused silica capillary column (30 m x 0.25 mm i.d.; 0.25 micron film thickness) was employed in the analysis, The column temperature program included a 2 min isothermal period at 50 degrees C, temperature increased at a rate of 30 degrees C/min to 220 degrees C, and hold for 1 min; temperature increased of at a rate 6 degrees C/min to 260 degrees C, and hold for 1 min. Mass spectra were obtained by electron impact at 70 eV and the determination was made by means of SIM mode, selected monitoring ion (m/z) was 264 amu. The detection limit was 0.02 mg/kg. The average recovery was from 86.7% to 93.1% and CV (n = 10) is from 4.1% to 5.9%. This method was already used to determine the mass concentration of pentachlorophenol residues in raw cotton, towel, shirt, leather gloves, leather watchguard. The method is simple, rapid and accurate. PMID:12552858

  4. Validation of a QuEChERS-based gas chromatographic method for analysis of pesticide residues in Cassia angustifolia (senna).

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Vandana; Saha, Ajoy; Patel, Dilipkumar J; Basak, B B; Shah, Paresh G; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-08-01

    A simple multi-residue method based on modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) approach was established for the determination of 17 organochlorine (OC), 15 organophosphorous (OP) and 7 synthetic pyrethroid (SP) pesticides in an economically important medicinal plant of India, Senna (Cassia angustifolia), by gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and flame thermionic detectors (GC/ECD/FTD) and confirmation of residues was done on gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The developed method was validated by testing the following parameters: linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), matrix effect, accuracy-precision and measurement uncertainty; the validation study clearly demonstrated the suitability of the method for its intended application. All pesticides showed good linearity in the range 0.01-1.0 μg mL(-1) for OCs and OPs and 0.05-2.5 μg mL(-1) for SPs with correlation coefficients higher than 0.98. The method gave good recoveries for most of the pesticides (70-120%) with intra-day and inter-day precision < 20% in most of the cases. The limits of detection varied from 0.003 to 0.03 mg kg(-1), and the LOQs were determined as 0.01-0.049 mg kg(-1). The expanded uncertainties were <30%, which was distinctively less than a maximum default value of ±50%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine pesticide residues in 12 commercial market samples obtained from different locations in India. PMID:27153296

  5. [Determination of organic phosphorus pesticide residues in scallion by gas chromatography coupled with microwave clean-up].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Li, An; Li, Haiyan; Tong, Kexing; Zhou, Lili; Zhou, Huimin; Zhao, Tong

    2007-05-01

    A method for the determination of organic phosphorus pesticide residues is described. It covers 25 residues in scallion including dichlorvos, ethoprophos, phorate, diazinon, disulfoton, dimethoate, pirimiphos-methyl, chlorpyrifos, malathion, fenitrothion, parathion, chlorfenvinphos, ethion, EPN, dyfonate, chlorpyrifos-methyl, parathion-methyl, fenthion, quinalphos, gardona, methidathion, carbophenothion, phosmet, phosalone, and coumaphos. After the scallion samples were heated for 30 s in microwave oven, the residues were extracted with acetonitrile, and then the organic phase was salted out from the matrix. As a result, most of the interfering impurities were abolished in the heating process. In this study, these pesticides were categorized into two groups for analysis. The gas chromatographic analysis was performed on a capillary column (DB-1701, 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm) and determined with a flame photometric detector. Linear correlation coefficients of the 25 organic phosphorus pesticides were not lower than 0.991 0 and the linear ranges for most of the compounds were between 0.1 to 5.0 mg/L. The detection limits were between 0.025 and 0.200 mg/L. In recovery study, average recoveries ranged from 85.2% to 119.6% at the fortification levels of 0.05, 0.2 and 0.5 mg/kg and the relative standard deviations were in the range of 2.1% and 14.8%. The method is a simple, rapid and highly efficient one to determine organic phosphorus pesticide residues in scallion. PMID:17679438

  6. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.; Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O.

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50 s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5 kΩ to 39 kΩ. Moreover, an additional 500 s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5 kΩ to 13.9 kΩ. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8 nm and 12.8 nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20 nm.

  7. Temporal Behavior of the Pump Pulses, Residual Pump Pulses, and THz Pulses for D2O Gas Pumped by a TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhai, Yusheng; Su, Yuling; Zhou, Fanghua; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-08-01

    Temporal behavior of the pump pulses, residual pump pulses, and THz pulses for optically pumped D2O gas molecules was investigated by using a tunable TEA CO2 laser as the pumping source. The pulse profiles of pump laser pulses, residual pump pulses, and the THz output pulses were measured, simultaneously, at several different gas pressures. For THz pulse, the pulse delay between the THz pulse and the pump pulse was observed and the delay time was observed to increase from 40 to 70 ns with an increase in gas pressure from 500 to 1700 Pa. Both THz pulse broadening and compression were observed, and the pulse broadening effect transformed to the compression effect with increasing the gas pressure. For the residual pump pulse, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main pulse decreased with increasing gas pressure, and the main pulse disappeared at high gas pressures. The secondary pulses were observed at high gas pressure, and the time intervals of about 518 and 435 ns were observed between the THz output pulse and the secondary residual pump pulse at the pressure of 1400 Pa and 1700 Pa, from which the vibrational relaxation time constants of about 5.45 and 5.55 μs Torr were obtained.

  8. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency

  9. Research of the acoustic influence on residual magnetization of rocks containing magnetite from the various geological structures of the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirova, Anzhela

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study is influence of acoustic waves on the magnetization of rocks of Kola Peninsula under different experimental parameters. The results and further research in this field are of interest in the development of problems of nonlinear geophysics, as well as address some issues in materials science. To study the acoustic influence on the residual magnetization of rocks we used the samples of magnetite-calcite rocks with a high content of magnetite from the Kovdor massif, and weakly magnetic rocks: (a) ultramafic rock of the Kola composite terrane; (b) gabbro-norite from layered intrusions of Pana; c) metagabbro-norite of the Belomorsky mobile belt. The samples previously demagnetized by the time-variable magnetic field, subjected to three cycles of ultrasonic influence with increasing time of influence and further measurement of the residual magnetization. The dependence of the residual magnetization of the magnetite-calcite rock from the time of testing is determined. As a result of multiple influences on the samples of gabbro-norit, ultramafic rock and metagabbro-norit was obtained a weak change of the vector of the residual magnetization. Thus the study of the residual magnetization of the samples with different content of ferromagnetic mineral found a significant difference in the nature of the magnetic response of rocks. So the high magnetic magnetite-calcite rock from the Kovdor massif detects a significant increase of the magnetization from the first seconds of the ultrasound influence. The magnetic response of other rocks to external influence is weaker. The dependence of the residual magnetization of these rocks from the time of influence either not observed or observed on the last cycle of the experiment in terms of a significant increase of time of the acoustic influence. Magnetic properties of rocks associated with the ferromagnetic minerals. These minerals are usually dispersed in the form of small grains in total dia - and paramagnetic

  10. Evidence for a palaeo-oil column and alteration of residual oil in a gas-condensate field: Integrated oil inclusion and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Julien; Burruss, Robert C.; Chou, I.-Ming; Kempton, Richard; Liu, Keyu; Hung, Nguyen Viet

    2014-10-01

    In the Phuong Dong gas condensate field, Cuu Long Basin, Vietnam, hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz trapped a variety of petroleum fluids in the gas zone. Based on the attributes of the oil inclusion assemblages (fluorescence colour of the oil, bubble size, presence of bitumen), the presence of a palaeo-oil column is inferred prior to migration of gas into the reservoir. When a palaeo-oil column is displaced by gas, a residual volume fraction of oil remains in pores. If the gas does not completely mix with the oil, molecular partitioning between the residual oil and the new gas charge may change the composition and properties of the residual oil (gas stripping or gas washing). To simulate this phenomenon in the laboratory, we sealed small amounts of crude oil (42 and 30 °API) and excess pure gas (methane, ethane, or propane) in fused silica capillary capsules (FSCCs), with and without water. These mixtures were characterized with the same methods used to characterize the fluid inclusions, heating and cooling stage microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, synchrotron FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, mixtures of ethane and propane with the 30 °API oil formed a new immiscible fluorescent liquid phase with colour that is visually more blue than the initial oil. The fluorescence of the original oil phase shifted to yellow or disappeared with formation of semi-solid residues. The blue-shift of the fluorescence of the immiscible phases and strong CH stretching bands in FT-IR spectra are consistent with stripping of hydrocarbon molecules from the oil. In experiments in FSCCs with water solid residues are common. At elevated temperature, reproducing geologic reservoir conditions, the fluorescence changes and therefore the molecular fractionation are enhanced. However, the precipitation of solid residues is responsible of more complex changes. Mixing experiments with the 42 °API oil do not form a new immiscible hydrocarbon liquid although the fluorescence

  11. Residue placement and rate, crop species, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High variability due to soil heterogeneity and climatic conditions challenge measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as influenced by management practices in the field. To reduce this variability, we examined the effect of management practices on CO2, N2O, and CH4 fluxes and soil temperature a...

  12. Emissions tradeoffs among alternative marine fuels: total fuel cycle analysis of residual oil, marine gas oil, and marine diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Corbett, James J; Winebrake, James J

    2008-04-01

    Worldwide concerns about sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships are motivating the replacement of marine residual oil (RO) with cleaner, lower-sulfur fuels, such as marine gas oil (MGO) and marine diesel oil (MDO). Vessel operators can use MGO and MDO directly or blended with RO to achieve environmental and economic objectives. Although expected to be much cleaner in terms of criteria pollutants, these fuels require additional energy in the upstream stages of the fuel cycle (i.e., fuel processing and refining), and thus raise questions about the net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions (primarily carbon dioxide [CO2]) because of production and use. This paper applies the Total Energy and Environmental Analysis for Marine Systems (TEAMS) model to conduct a total fuel cycle analysis of RO, MGO, MDO, and associated blends for a typical container ship. MGO and MDO blends achieve significant (70-85%) SOx emissions reductions compared with RO across a range of fuel quality and refining efficiency assumptions. We estimate CO2 increases of less than 1% using best estimates of fuel quality and refinery efficiency parameters and demonstrate how these results vary based on parameter assumptions. Our analysis suggests that product refining efficiency influences the CO2 tradeoff more than differences in the physical and energy parameters of the alternative fuels, suggesting that modest increases in CO2 could be offset by efficiency improvements at some refineries. Our results help resolve conflicting estimates of greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with fuel switching and other emissions control policies. PMID:18422040

  13. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  14. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, H.G.; Paisley, M.A.; Appelbaum, H.R.

    1986-03-01

    A process is being developed that produces a fuel gas with a heating value of 500 Btu/SCF from diverse forms of biomass, including shredded bark, wood chips, and sawdust. The system uses a high throughput, non-oxygen gasifier that employs sand circulation to supply process heat. Results obtained with a 10-inch I.D. gasifier are presented and compared with those in a 6-inch I.D. reactor. Feed rates up to 12 tons/day (dry) have been achieved corresponding to a specific wood throughput of 2000 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr. Gas compositions in the two reactors are in excellent agreement and performance in the larger reactor, as measured by carbon conversion, is significantly improved. Cost projections comparing this process with direct combustion are presented that indicate gasification technology should have very significant cost advantages for both generation of plant steam and cogeneration of electricity. 5 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. [Determination of sulfur dioxide residues in sulfur fumigated Chinese herbs with headspace gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zheng-Wei; Mao, Bei-Ping; Miao, Shui; Mao, Xiu-Hong; Ji, Shen

    2014-02-01

    This paper aims to establish a method for the determination of sulfur dioxide in sulfur fumigation Chinese herbs. Sample powder and hydrochloric acid solution were isolated by paraffin layer in order to avoid early reactions, with the generation of sulfur dioxide, headspace with airtight needle was used to transfer sulfur dioxide into gas chromatograph, and detected with thermal conductivity detector. The analytical performance was demonstrated by the analysis of 12 herbs, spiked at four concentration levels. In general, the recoveries ranging from 70% to 110%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) within 15%, were obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) was below 10 mg x kg(-1). Standard addition can be used for low recovery samples. The method is simple, less time-consuming, specific and sensitive. Methods comparison revealed that gas chromatography is better than traditional titration in terms of method operability, accuracy and specificity, showing good application value. PMID:24761623

  16. Recycling of Zinc- and Lead-Bearing Residues with Pyrolysis Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, C.; Antrekowitsch, J.

    2015-09-01

    Efforts in the metallurgical industry for an approximation to the zero waste concept has led to many different investigations. Together with the greenhouse effect, CO2 emissions have caused additional costs for different process steps in the industry. For this reason, alternative carbon carriers have been sought, and charcoal was found to be an ideal substitute, due to its CO2 neutrality. In order to use it in the metallurgical industry, an optimization of the charcoal production through a carbonization process must be carried out. Beside the charcoal, pyrolysis gas also occurs during the heating of wood or agricultural wastes under the exclusion of air. Because of combustible compounds in this gas, it is possible to use it as a reduction agent instead of fossil carbon carriers. Together with the idea of preventing landfilling of metallurgical by-products, an investigation was carried out to treat zinc- and lead-containing materials. For this issue a special process concept was designed and developed. The main aspect was to recycle the zinc- and lead-containing Waelz slag, which results from the processing of steel mill dusts, in a vertical retort. Two different sizes of facilities were constructed to perform the reaction system of the solid Waelz slag with the gaseous reduction agent of pyrolysis gas.

  17. Stripping of H- beams by residual gas in the linac at the Los Alamos neutron science center

    SciTech Connect

    Mccrady, Rodney C; Ito, Takeyasu; Cooper, Martin D; Alexander, Saunders

    2010-09-07

    The linear accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerates both protons and H{sup -} ions using Cockroft-Walton-type injectors, a drift-tube linac and a coupled-cavity linac. The vacuum is maintained in the range of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} Torr; the residual gas in the vacuum system results in some stripping of the electrons from the H{sup -} ions resulting in beam spill and the potential for unwanted proton beams delivered to experiments. We have measured the amount of fully-stripped H{sup -} beam (protons) that end up at approximately 800 MeV in the beam switchyard at LANSCE using image plates as very sensitive detectors. We present here the motivation for the measurement, the measurement technique and results.

  18. Study of composition change and agglomeration of flue gas cleaning residue from a fluidized bed waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Lievens, P; Verbinnen, B; Bollaert, P; Alderweireldt, N; Mertens, G; Elsen, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-10-01

    Blocking of the collection hoppers of the baghouse filters in a fluidized bed incinerator for co-incineration of high calorific industrial solid waste and sludge was observed. The composition of the flue gas cleaning residue (FGCR), both from a blocked hopper and from a normal hopper, was investigated by (differential) thermogravimetric analysis, quantitative X-ray powder diffraction and wet chemical analysis. The lower elemental carbon concentration and the higher calcium carbonate concentration of the agglomerated sample was the result of oxidation of carbon and subsequent reaction of CO2 with CaO. The evolved heat causes a temperature increase, with the decomposition of CaOHCl as a consequence. The formation of calcite and calcium chloride and the evolution of heat caused agglomeration of the FGCR. Activated lignite coke was replaced by another adsorption agent with less carbon, so the auto-ignition temperature increased; since then no further block formation has occurred. PMID:22329155

  19. Hot gas and magnetic arms of NGC 6946: Indications for reconnection heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weżgowiec, M.; Ehle, M.; Beck, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The grand-design face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6946 is remarkable because of its high star formation activity, the massive northern spiral arm, and the magnetic arms, which are observed in polarized radio synchrotron emission and are located between the optical arms and possibly are magnetic reconnection regions. Aims: We used electron densities and temperatures in star-forming (active) and less active regions and compared them to findings from the analysis of the radio data to study the energy budget of NGC 6946. The hot gas above the magnetic arms between the optical arms might suggest gas heating by reconnection. We also study the population of point sources in NGC 6946, including the origin of the puzzling ultra-luminous emission complex MF16. Methods: X-ray observations of NGC 6946 performed with XMM-Newton were used to study the emission from X-ray point sources and diffuse hot gas, including the magnetic arms and the halo. Spectral fitting of the diffuse X-ray emission allowed us to derive temperatures of the hot gas. With assumptions about the emission volume, this allowed us to estimate gas densities, masses, and cooling times. Results: To explain the X-ray emission from the spiral arms of NGC 6946 two-temperature plasma models are needed to account for the disk and halo emission. The interarm regions show only one thermal component. We observe that the temperature of the hot gas in and above the magnetic arm regions increases slightly when compared to the average temperatures in the areas in and above the spiral arms. For the southwestern part of the disk, which is depolarized in the radio range by Faraday rotation, we find more efficient mixing of disk and halo gas. Conclusions: We propose magnetic reconnection in the magnetic arm regions of NGC 6946 as the possible cause of the additional heating of the gas and ordering of the magnetic fields. In the southwestern part of the galactic disk we observed indications of a possible faster outflow of the

  20. Electronic Relaxation of the Phenylalanine Residue in Gas Phase Peptides: Role of the Neighbouring Amide Groups in the Photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loquais, Y.; Biswal, H. S.; Tardivel, B.; Brenner, V.; Mons, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Jouvet, C.; Broquier, M.; Malis, M.; Ljubic, I.; Doslic, N.

    2012-06-01

    Protein absorption in the near UV is mainly due to the presence of aromatic systems on the side chain of three residues: phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. It is generally expected that the photophysics of these UV chromophores depends on their immediate environment within the molecule and thus on the conformation of these flexible molecules. This property may in particular be used as an optical diagnostic of the conformational state of the peptide chain. The structure of peptide chains isolated in the gas phase can be characterized by UV and IR laser spectroscopy. These measurements allow us to distinguish the spectral contributions of the different conformers and thus provide us with an elegant way to address the issue of the conformational dependence on the photophysics. For this purpose, the dynamics of relaxation of the ππ* excited state of several peptides containing a phenylalanine residue have been studied using two-colour resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) in the ns time scale at CEA and ps at CLUPS and laser-induced fluorescence as well. The lifetime of the ππ* excited state is found to strongly depend on the conformation adopted by the molecule and on the excess energy in the excited state, with measured lifetimes ranging from 1 ns to 80 ns. W. Chin; F. Piuzzi; I. Dimicoli and M. Mons, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, pp 1033-1048 (2006)

  1. [Determination of 213 pesticide residues in milk and milk power by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Ai, Lianfeng; Ma, Yusong; Zhang, Haichao; Li, Wei; Yu, Meng

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of the optimization of solid phase extraction adsorbent, eluting solvent types and amounts, a gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method was established for the determination of 213 pesticide residues in milk and milk power. The samples were extracted by acetonitrile, cleaned-up with an ENVI-Carb/NH2 solid-phase extractant, and determined by GC-MS/MS using external standard method. The linear ranges were from 10 to 1 000 μg/L for 197 pesticides, from 50 to 1 000 μg/L for the other 16 pesticides with the correlation coefficients higher than 0.99. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) varied over the range of 0.03 to 7.59 μg/kg, and limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) ranged from 0.10 to 21.94 μg/kg. The average recoveries in different matrices were in the range of 66.9% - 120.1% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.23% - 17.6%. This method is simple, rapid, sensitive and reliable for meeting the requirements for the simultaneous identification and quantification of the multi-residues in milk and milk power. PMID:26939364

  2. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  3. Authigenesis of magnetic minerals in gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kars, Myriam; Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-03-01

    Gas hydrate occurrence is one of the possible mechanisms invoked for iron sulfide formation. A high-resolution rock magnetic study was conducted in IODP Expedition 316 Hole C0008C located in the Megasplay Fault Zone of the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. In this particular zone, no bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), indicating the base of the gas hydrate stability field, have been identified. Two hundred and eighteen Pleistocene samples were collected from 70 to 110 m CSF in order to document the changes in the concentration, grain size, and rock magnetic parameters of magnetic minerals, through the gas hydrate-bearing horizons. Two different populations of magnetic grains are recognized in the pseudosingle domain range. Three types of magnetic mineral assemblages are identified: iron oxides (magnetite), ferrimagnetic iron sulfides (greigite and pyrrhotite), and their mixture. Greigite and pyrrhotite are authigenic and constitute six layers, called IS1-IS6. IS1, IS3, IS4, and IS6 are associated with pore water anomalies, suggesting the occurrence of gas hydrates and anoxic conditions. IS2 and IS5 are probable gas hydrates horizons, although there is no independent data to confirm it. The remaining intervals are mainly composed of detrital iron oxides and paramagnetic iron sulfides. Two scenarios based on different diagenetic stages are proposed to explain the variations in the magnetic properties and mineralogy over the studied interval. The results suggest that rock magnetism appears useful to better constrain the gas hydrate distribution in Hole C0008C, and counterbalances the low resolution of pore water analyses and the absence of a BSR.

  4. Preparation of a modified flue gas desulphurization residue and its effect on pot sorghum growth and acidic soil amelioration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Xu, Peizhi; Xie, Kaizhi; Tang, Shuanhu; Li, Yongli

    2011-09-15

    A modified flue gas desulphurization residue (MFGDR) was prepared and its effects on sorghum growth and acidic soil amelioration were evaluated in this paper. The MFGDR was prepared by calcining a mixture of dry/semi-dry flue gas desulphurization (FGD) residue from a coal-fired power plant, sorted potash feldspar and/or limestone powder. The available nutrients from the MFGDR were determined with 4.91 wt% K(+), 1.15 wt% Mg(2+), 22.4 wt% Ca(2+), 7.01 wt% Si(4+) and 2.07 wt% SO(4)(2-)-S in 0.1 mol L(-1) citric acid solution. Its pH value was held at 9.60 displaying slightly alkaline. The results of sorghum pot growth in both red and crimson acidic soil for 30 days indicated that adding the MFGDR at a dosage of 2 g kg(-1) in total soil weight would increase the growth rate of biomass by 24.3-149% (wet weight basis) and 47.3-157% (dry weight), the stem length and thickness increase by 5.75-22.1% and 4.76-30.9% in contrast with CK treatment for two test cuttings, respectively. The effect on sorghum growth was attributed to the increase of available nutrients, the enhancement of soil pH value and the reduction of aluminum toxicity in acidic soil due to the addition of the MFGDR. The experimental results also suggested that the MFGDR could be effectively used to ameliorate the acidic soil which is widely distributed throughout the southern China. PMID:21763070

  5. Characterization of flue gas cleaning residues from European solid waste incinerators: assessment of various Ca-based sorbent processes.

    PubMed

    Bodénan, F; Deniard, Ph

    2003-05-01

    For the first time, a set of samples of European flue gas cleaning residues, mainly from the incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW), has undergone a mineralogical study. The residues are the result of the neutralization of acid flue gases by lime, the predominant method adopted in Europe, using dry and semi-dry washing processes. The study protocol combines physico-chemical analytical techniques (XRD, FTIR, DSC/TGA) and global chemical analysis enabling identification of the chemical composition of the main constituents, particularly chlorinated Ca-based phases, as well as establishment of modal distributions of the represented phases, both crystalline and amorphous. The samples are slightly hydrated and values vary for trapped Cl, S and even CO(2). The main crystalline phases are NaCl, KCl, CaSO(4), CaCO(3), Ca(OH)(2) and calcium hydroxychloride CaOHCl. CaOHCl is the main chlorine phase, regardless of the treatment process, filtration mode, and specific surface of the Ca-based sorbent. This phase develops during neutralization of HCl by excess lime present according to the reaction Ca(OH)(2)+HCl-->CaOHCl+H(2)O, to the detriment of a complete yield involving the two lime OH groups with formation of CaCl(2).2H(2)O. In addition, it seems that gas temperatures above 150 degrees C increase competition between lime-based neutralization of HCl, SO(2) acid flue gases and CO(2) trapping, thus reducing washing efficiency. PMID:12597999

  6. Quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of mobile residues in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.L.; Oldfield, E.

    1988-07-12

    The authors have used quantitative carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study the dynamic structure of the backbone of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R/sub 1/ and JW-3. NMR experiments were performed using an internal sucrose quantitation standard on purple membranes in which one of the following /sup 13/C'-labeled amino acids had been biosynthetically incorporated: glycine, isoleucine, lysine, phenylalanine, and valine. The results suggest that the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain backbone, and possibly one of the connecting loops, undergoes rapid, large angle fluctuations. The results are compared with previous NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic data obtained on bacteriorhodopsin.

  7. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  8. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Storace, A.F.; Sood, D.; Lyons, J.P.; Preston, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust-to-weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies and the test hardware currently in place for verifying the performance of advanced magnetic actuators, power electronics, and digital controls. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load-carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  9. Gas-liquid chromatographic determination of 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol residues in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Sills, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of 3-mftuormethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in fish tissues is described. Homogenized tissues are extracted with hexane-ethyl ether; the extract is cleaned up by partitioning the TFM from the extracting solvent into O.IN NaOB, acidifying the aqueous solution, and partitioning again with hexaneethyl ether. The TFM is methylated with diazomethane and analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, using electron capture detection. Recoveries ranged from 75 to 1000/., from fish muscles that were spiked with 0.01-2.00 JA#g TFM/g.

  10. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  11. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  12. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields.

  13. Simultaneous determination of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Chen, D; Yu, G; Yu, H; Pan, Y; Wang, Y; Huang, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-02-01

    A new multi-dimensional analytical method using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for qualitative and quantitative measurement of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in food animal tissues. This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The analytes were extracted by phosphate buffer with trichloroacetic acid deproteinization and clean-up by C₁₈ solid-phase extraction (SPE) adding dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pair reagent. The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatised with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for GC-NPD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. Parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, clean-up, derivatisation and analysis procedure were optimised. The method was validated in muscle, kidney and liver of swine, bovine with a low concentration (limit of quantification) of 16.4 and 21.4 µg kg⁻¹ for these two analytes using GC-NPD. For GC-MS, the limits of quantification were 4.1 and 5.6 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 20 to 200 µg kg⁻¹ were found to be between 73% and 99% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 17% in GC-NPD. For GC-MS, levels from 5 to 20 µg kg⁻¹ had between 70% and 93% with an RSD of less than 21%. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterisation and quantification of residues of lincomycin and spectinomycin in animal tissues. PMID:21240824

  14. Au(III)-promoted magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanospheres for electrochemical determination of streptomycin residues in food.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqian; Tang, Dianping; Zhang, Bing; Que, Xiaohua; Yang, Huanghao; Chen, Guonan

    2013-03-15

    Redox-active magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (mMIP) nanospheres were first synthesized and functionalized with streptomycin templates for highly efficient electrochemical determination of streptomycin residues (STR) in food by coupling with bioelectrocatalytic reaction of enzymes for signal amplification. The mMIP nanospheres were synthesized by using Au(III)-promoted molecularly imprinted polymerization with STR templates on magnetic beads. Based on extraction of template molecules from the mMIP surface, the imprints toward STR templates were formed. The assay was implemented with a competitive-type assay format. Upon addition of streptomycin, the analyte competed with glucose oxidase-labeled streptomycin (GOX-STR) for molecular imprints on the mMIP nanospheres. With the increasing streptomycin in the sample, the conjugation amount of GOX-STR on the mMIP nanospheres decreased, leading to the change in the bioelectrocatalytic current relative to glucose system. Under optimal conditions, the catalytic current was proportional to STR level in the sample, and exhibited a dynamic range of 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 10 pg mL(-1) STR (at 3s(B)). Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were below 12%. The assayed results for STR spiked samples including milk and honey with the mMIP-based sensor were received a good accordance with the results obtained from the referenced high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. PMID:23058661

  15. Residual capacitive coupling and the measurement of permittivity in magnetic induction tomography.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, H; Gough, W; Watson, S; Williams, R J

    2007-07-01

    In an ideal magnetic induction tomography (MIT) system, the coupling between the coils and the sample is entirely by the magnetic field. In a practical system, unwanted electric-field (capacitive) coupling can also exist and cause large errors in the MIT measurements unless the hardware is designed carefully. A series of tests was carried out to assess the magnitude of capacitive coupling present in a 10 MHz MIT system designed for biomedical use and other applications involving low-conductivity samples (

  16. Gas-phase reactivity and molecular modeling studies on triply protonated dodecapeptides that contain four basic residues.

    PubMed

    Cassady, C J

    1998-07-01

    Gas-phase deprotonation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions for ions from three model dodecapeptides were studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Molecular dynamics calculations were employed to provide information on conformations and Coulomb energies. The peptides, (KGG)4, (K2G4)2, and K4G8, each contain four high basicity lysine residues and eight low basicity glycine residues; however, in the present work only three lysine residues were protonated. Proton transfer reactions with a series of reference amines revealed apparent gas-phase acidities in a narrow range of 207.3-209.6 kcal/mol, with deprotonation efficiencies following the order [K4G8 + 3H]3+ > [(KGG)4 + 3H]3+ > [(K2G4)2 + 3H]3+. The three ions also react similarly with d4-methanol: each exchanged a maximum of 23-25 of their 25 labile hydrogens, with the first 15-17 exchanges occurring at rate constants of (1.6-2.6) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The experimental results agree with molecular modeling findings of similar conformations and Coulomb energies for the three peptide ions. The [M + 3H]3+ data are compared to data obtained previously in our laboratory for the "fully" protonated [M + 4H]4+ (Zhang, X.; Ewing, N. P.; Cassady, C. J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Phys., in press). For (KGG)4 and (K2G4)2, there is a marked difference in H/D exchange reactivity between 3+ ions and 4+ ions. The 4+ ions, which have diffuse conformations, slowly exchange only 14 hydrogens, whereas their more compact 3+ counterparts exchange 23-25 hydrogens at a 5-times greater rate. In contrast, the 3+ and 4+ ions of K4G8 have similar compact conformations and exchange reactivity. The results indicate that a multiply hydrogen-bonded intermediate between the deuterating reagent and the peptide ion is necessary for facile H/D exchange. The slower, incomplete H/D exchange of [(KGG)4 + 4H]4+ and [(K2G4)2 + 4H]4+ is attributed to the inability of their protonated lysine n

  17. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5-250 μg kg(-1). The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC

  18. Sloshing of the Magnetized Cool Gas in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray observations of many clusters of galaxies reveal the presence of edges in surface brightness and temperature, known as "cold fronts". In relaxed clusters with cool cores, these edges have been interpreted as evidence for the "sloshing" of the core gas in the cluster's gravitational potential. The smoothness of these edges has been interpreted as evidence for the stabilizing effect of magnetic fields "draped" around the front surfaces. To check this hypothesis, we perform high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetized gas sloshing in galaxy clusters initiated by encounters with subclusters. We go beyond previous works on the simulation of cold fronts in a magnetized intracluster medium by simulating their formation in realistic, idealized mergers with high resolution ((Delta)x approx. 2 kpc). Our simulations sample a parameter space of plausible initial magnetic field strengths and field configurations. In the simulations, we observe strong velocity shears associated with the cold fronts amplifying the magnetic field along the cold front surfaces, increasing the magnetic field strength in these layers by up to an order of magnitude, and boosting the magnetic pressure up to near-equipartition with thermal pressure in some cases. In these layers, the magnetic field becomes strong enough to stabilize the cold fronts against Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, resulting in sharp, smooth fronts as those seen in observations of real clusters. These magnetic fields also result in strong suppression of mixing of high and low-entropy gas in the cluster, seen in our simulations of mergers in the absence of a magnetic field. As a result, the heating of the core due to sloshing is very modest and is unable to stave off a cooling catastrophe.

  19. GC-MS identification of MIC trimer: a constituent of tank residue in preserved autopsy blood of Bhopal gas victims.

    PubMed

    Chandra, H; Rao, G J; Saraf, A K; Sharma, V K; Jadhav, R K; Sriramachari, S

    1991-10-01

    Based on the external and internal findings of Bhopal gas disaster victims, it was apparent that the gases and particulate matter came out as an aerosol. This was possibly the pyrolysed, reformulated, reconjugated suspension of constituents of the tank E-610 of Union Carbide India Limited, Bhopal, while it was claimed to be methyl isocyanate (MIC) only. It was postulated by the manufacturer of MIC, that the material inhaled by the victims of the Bhopal gas disaster does not cross the lung barrier (UCC press conference on 14th December 1984). It was observed that the more the victims ran, the more aerosol they inhaled and the fatalities were observed in such victims. The tissues, which were preserved in the deep freeze, were randomly selected and analysed by GC coupled with MS (ITD) Finnigan MAT, UK. 14 out of 34 autopsy cases showed MIC trimer peak in extracts of blood. This was one of the constituents of the aerosol and was also located in the tank residue, thereby proving that the trimer had passed the lung barrier. PMID:1795611

  20. Strongly magnetized cold electron degenerate gas: Mass-radius relation of the collapsed star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-07-01

    We consider a relativistic, degenerate electron gas at zero-temperature under the influence of a strong, uniform, static magnetic field, neglecting any form of interactions. Since the density of states for the electrons changes due to the presence of the magnetic field (which gives rise to Landau quantization), the corresponding equation of state also gets modified. In order to investigate the effect of very strong magnetic field, we focus only on systems in which a maximum of either one, two or three Landau level(s) is/are occupied. This is important since, if a very large number of Landau levels are filled, it implies a very low magnetic field strength which yields back Chandrasekhar's celebrated non-magnetic results. The maximum number of Landau levels occupied is fixed by the correct choice of two parameters, namely the magnetic field strength and the maximum Fermi energy of the system. We study the equations of state of these one-level, two-level and three-level systems and compare them by taking three different maximum Fermi energies. We also find the effect of the strong magnetic field on the mass-radius relation of the underlying star composed of the gas stated above. We obtain an interesting theoretical result that, it is possible to have an electron degenerate static star with a mass significantly greater than the Chandrasekhar limit, provided it has an appropriate magnetic field strength and central density.

  1. New measurements of multilayer insulation at variable cold temperature and elevated residual gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Th; Haberstroh, Ch

    2015-12-01

    New MLI measurements at the TU Dresden flow type calorimeter have been carried out. Specimens of 20 layer double side aluminized polyester film were tested. A cylindrical cold surface of 0.9 m2 is held at the desired cold boundary temperature between approximately 30 K and 300 K. The heat transfer through the MLI is measured by recording the mass flow as well as the inlet and the outlet temperature of the cooling fluid. Measurements at varied cold boundary temperatures have been performed. Moreover the effect of an additional vacuum degradation - as it might occur by decreasing getter material performance in real systems at elevated temperatures - is studied by a controlled inlet of nitrogen gas. Thus the vacuum pressure was varied over a range of 10-7 mbar to 10-2 mbar. Different cold boundary temperatures between 35 K and 110 K were investigated. Test results for 20 layer MLI are presented.

  2. Determination of dithiocarbamates and milneb residues in foods by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Munetomo; Noda, Satoko; Kosugi, Masaki; Ishiduka, Noriko; Mizukoshi, Kazushi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Nemoto, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    A highly sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed for dithiocarbamates (DTCs) and milneb in foods. DTCs and milneb were extracted from foods with cysteine-EDTA solution as sodium salts, and methylated with methyl iodide. Methyl derivatives of DTCs and milneb were cleaned up on a neutral alumina mini column and determined by GC-MS. The mean recoveries of DTCs and milneb were in the range of 72-120%, except for methiram. The quantification limits were 0.01 mg/kg (as CS(2)) in foods except tea (0.1 mg/kg as CS(2)). The developed method was applied to 10 compounds (4 dimethyldithiocarbamates, 3 ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, polycarbamates, propineb and milneb). PMID:21071904

  3. Simultaneous determination of 50 residual pesticides in Flos Chrysanthemi using accelerated solvent extraction and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xinghui; Lu, Xiaotong; Tian, Huaiping; Xu, Ajing; Liu, Yan; Jian, Zhang

    2014-09-15

    A gas chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of 50 organochlorine (OCP) and pyrethroid (PP) pesticides in Flos Chrysanthemi was established. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) technique was used to extract the target compounds, cleaned with alumina neutral-florisil column, and eluted by mixed solvents of ethyl acetate and hexane (15:85, v/v). Selected pesticides were identified using HP-5 and DB1701 capillary dual column and detected by electron-capture detector. Quantitative analysis was performed using an external standard by HP-5 capillary column. Results showed that recoveries were 73.4-120.1%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 1.6-12.4%. The limits of detection of the method were 0.0021-0.0069 mg/kg, and the limits of quantity were 0.0064-0.0210 mg/kg. PMID:25062509

  4. Differential Rotation and Magnetic Field Generation in Giant Gas Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of the zonal winds and magnetic fields on the surfaces of giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn beg the questions of what flows and fields exist well below their surfaces and how they are maintained. In roughly four years, NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter and the Cassini Solstice mission at Saturn will provide near-surface measurements of the magnetic fields of these giant planets that will help to answer these questions. Until then, theoretical models and computer simulations continue to provide predictions for what the NASA missions at Jupiter and Saturn will discover. A major question is how deep below the surface do the latitudinally-banded zonal winds extend, i.e., what is the subsurface differential rotation. If the zonal winds are maintained only within the shallow Jovian atmosphere, they should play no significant role in the dynamo mechanism because the dynamo operates well below the surface where the electrical conductivity is high. On the other hand, latitudinally banded magnetic field structures measured by Juno at Jupiter and Cassini at Saturn would support the prediction that the zonal winds on these giant planets extend deep below their surfaces. Computer simulations of convective dynamos with electrical conductivity increasing by several orders of magnitude with depth are presented. Examples are shown of how the magnetic field structures, for different simulated patterns of differential rotation, would appear as a function of the eccentric orbital radius of the spacecraft.

  5. Weak and electromagnetic mechanisms of neutrino-pair photoproduction in a strongly magnetized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. V.; Kerimov, B. K.; Sizin, P. E.

    2012-11-15

    Expressions for the power of neutrino radiation from a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field are derived for the case of neutrino-pair photoproduction via the weak and electromagnetic interaction mechanisms (it is assumed that the neutrino possesses electromagnetic form factors). It is shown that the neutrino luminosity of a medium in the electromagnetic reaction channel may exceed substantially the luminosity in the weak channel. Relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment are obtained.

  6. Magnetic properties of a two-dimensional electron gas strongly coupled to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, K.; Kibis, O. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Considering the quantum dynamics of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) exposed to both a stationary magnetic field and an intense high-frequency electromagnetic wave, we found that the wave decreases the scattering-induced broadening of Landau levels. Therefore, various magnetoelectronic properties of two-dimensional nanostructures (density of electronic states at Landau levels, magnetotransport, etc.) are sensitive to irradiation by light. Thus, the elaborated theory paves the way for optically controlling the magnetic properties of 2DEG.

  7. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  8. Intense velocity-shears, magnetic fields and filaments in diffuse gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falgarone, Edith; Hily-Blant, Pierre; Levrier, François; Berthet, Manuel; Bastien, Pierre; Clemens, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The dissipation of turbulence is a key process in the evolution of diffuse gas towards denser structures. The vast range of coupled scales and the variety of dissipative processes in interstellar turbulence make it a complex system to analyze. Observations now provide powerful statistics of the gas velocity field, density and magnetic field orientations, opening a rich field of investigation. On-going comparisons of the orientation of intense velocity-shears, magnetic field and tenuous filaments of matter in a turbulent high-latitude cloud are promising.

  9. On the equation of state for an electron gas in an intense magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Tsiang, E.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper we derive the equation of state for a relativistic electron gas imbedded in a static homogeneous magnetic field of arbitrary strength. The derivation is based on the evaluation of the energy-momentum tensor and the use of Dirac's equation for such a problem. Contrary to a derivation presented several years ago, the present derivation is completely gauge-invariant. We also show how to recover, in an exact manner, the perfect gas law for the case of weak magnetic fields.

  10. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  11. Fuel-Specific Effect of Exhaust Gas Residuals on HCCI Combustion: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P

    2008-01-01

    A modeling study was performed to investigate fuel-specific effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) components on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion at conditions relevant to the negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy using CHEMKIN-PRO. Four single-component fuels with well-established kinetic models were chosen: n-heptane, iso-octane, ethanol, and toluene. These fuels were chosen because they span a wide range of fuel chemistries, and produce a wide compositions range of complete stoichiometric products (CSP). The simulated engine conditions combined a typical spark ignition engine compression ratio (11.34) and high intake charge temperatures (500-550 K) that are relevant to NVO HCCI. It was found that over the conditions investigated, all the fuels had overlapping start of combustion (SOC) phasing, despite the wide range in octane number (RON = 0 to 120). The effect of the EGR components CO2 and H2O was to suppress the compression temperature because of their higher heat capacities, which retarded SOC. For a concentration of O2 higher than the stoichiometric amount, or excess O2, there was an effect of advancing SOC for n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, but SOC for ethanol was not advanced. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) for n-heptane was also found to be highly dependent on excess O2, and mild endothermic reaction was observed for cases when excess O2 was not present.

  12. Persistent Photoconductivity in A Magnetic Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, O.; Smorchkova, I. P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) based on modulation-doped (Zn,Cd,Mn)Se/ZnSe heterostructures are of current interest because of their novel transport properties (PRL 78, 3571 (1997)). Here, we examine the phenomenon of persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in these structures, with the aim of understanding the nature of defects and their role in limiting the 2DEG mobility. We have observed significant PPC at high temperatures in modulation doped magnetic 2DEGs. The clear presence of a deep trap responsible for the observed PPC is established through temperature-dependent photoconductivity, photoluminescence, deep level transient fourier spectroscopy and photo induced current transient spectroscopy. An analysis of these experiments will be presented, summarizing the specific characteristics and possible origins of this deep level.

  13. Variability of matrix effects in liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pesticide residues after QuEChERS sample preparation of different food crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC) coupled to sophisticated mass spectrometry (MS) instruments are among the most powerful analytical tools currently available to monitor pesticide residues in food, among other applications. However, both GC-MS and LC-MS are susceptible to matrix effects whi...

  14. Simultaneous multi-determination and transfer of eight pesticide residues from green tea leaves to infusion using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon-Kil; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shim, Jae-Han

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining eight pesticide (cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, fenitrothion, EPN, bifenthrin, difenoconazole, triflumizole, and azoxystrobin) residues in made green tea as well as a tea infusion (under various brewing water temperatures; 60, 80, and 100°C) using gas chromatography (GC) micro-electron capture detector (μECD) was developed and validated. The extraction method adopted the relatively commonly used approach of solid sample hydration, with the green tea hydrated before being extracted through salting out with acetonitrile followed by a cleanup procedure. The analytes were confirmed using GC-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) with a triple quadrupole. The linearity of the calibration curves yielded determination coefficients (R(2)) >0.995. Recoveries were carried out using blank samples spiked with all analytes at two levels. The results demonstrated that all pesticides were recovered within the range of 77-116% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) ⩽14%. The quantification limits of 0.015-0.03 mg/kg were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) set by the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) for all analytes (0.05-10mg/kg). The infusion study indicated that cyhalothrin, flufenoxuron, and bifenthrin did not infuse into the tea brew from the made tea. Increases in brewing time resulted in increased transfer of azoxystrobin, fenitrothion, and difenoconazole from the made tea to the brew; however, this was not the case with triflumizole or EPN. We conclude that transfer of pesticides appeared to be dependent on their water solubilities and drinking a cup of tea is recommended to be at a water temperature of 60°C. PMID:25038708

  15. [Simultaneous determination of 57 residual volatile organic solvents in honey by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongming; Ge, Na; Wang, Fei; Li, Jin; Wu, Yanping; Huang, Xuezhe; Cao, Yanzhong

    2012-08-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 57 residual volatile organic solvents (including several alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ketones, esters and ethers) in honey by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS). The honey sample was dissolved with water in a headspace vial, and the equilibration of the sample in the headspace vessel was achieved at 80 degrees C in 30 min. A DB-624 capillary chromatographic column (60 m x 0.25 mm x 1.40 mm) was used for the separation of 57 volatile organic solvents, and the analysis was performed by GC/MS. The external calibrations were used for the quantification. The linear ranges of the method were 0.005 - 0.2 microg for the alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers, 0.05 - 2.0 microg for the esters, 0.5 - 20 microg for the ketones, 2.5 - 100 microg for the alcohols. The correlation coefficients were more than 0.996 for all the volatile organic solvents. The recoveries and the relative standard deviations were from 61.0% to 113.1% and 1.9% to 9.8%, respectively, at the spiked levels of 1.0 - 20 microg/kg for the alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers, 10 - 200 microg/kg for the esters, 100 - 2 000 microg/kg for the ketones, 500 - 10 000 microg/kg for the alcohols. The limits of detection were 1.0 microg/kg for the alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers, 10 microg/kg for the esters, 100 microg/kg for the ketones, 500 microg/kg for the alcohols. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and can be used for the simultaneous determination of residual volatile organic solvents in honey samples. PMID:23256380

  16. Gas chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of pesticides residues in produce using concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection.

    PubMed

    Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2012-01-27

    In the present work, the feasibility of the combined use of concurrent solvent recondensation-large volume injection (CSR-LVI) and interspersed calibration for pesticide residue analysis was investigated. Splitless injections of 5-20 μL extracts containing 0.25-1g sample per mL(-1) were made into a Carbofrit packed liner and a 0.53 mm I.D., uncoated and deactivated retention gap. The determination was achieved by gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS). The evaluation of the proposed approach was based on analysis of real samples representing a diverse range of commodities such as apples, barley malt, blackcurrants, carrots, clemetines, grapes, leek, plums, rapeseed (green plants) rucola, strawberries and tomatoes. The samples contained a total of 36 different incurred pesticides at different concentration levels. Also, analyses were carried out of artificial samples representing six differing matrices (apples, blackcurrants, carrots, huckleberry, strawberry and tomatoes) which were spiked with pesticides at known concentrations before proceeding with the extraction. When using 15 and 20 μL CSR-LVI injection, a decrease of about 30% in peak heights compared with injection of 5 μL was observed. In the case of 5 and 10 μL injections, no significant difference was observed when employing to the quantification of the incurred and spiked pesticide residues. In the evaluated experimental variants, overall recoveries of the pesticides were 92 ± 5% with relative standard deviations of 12 ± 4% on average. All individual recoveries were in the range between 72 and 103 with RSD between 4 and 21%. About 15% of the instrument run time was saved by the application of interspersed calibration with standards injected between sample extracts. PMID:22204933

  17. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  18. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  19. Does gasification and biochar amendment provide a viable solution to balance greenhouse gas emissions, energy requirements and orchard residue management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Engil; Suddick, Emma; Six, Johan

    2015-04-01

    By converting biomass residue to biochar, we can generate power cleanly and sequester carbon resulting in overall greenhouse gas (GHG) savings when compared to typical fossil fuel burning and waste disposal. This on-farm research study provides a long-term and high frequency assessment of GHG emissions from biochar amended-soils in an organic walnut orchard in the Central Valley of California, USA. We also estimated the GHG offsets from the conversion of walnut residue into energy through gasification at the on-site walnut processing plant. Soil fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were monitored over 29 months in a 3.6 ha walnut orchard following management and precipitation events. We compared four treatments: control, biochar, compost, and biochar combined with compost. Events involving resource inputs such as fertilization or cover crop mowing induced the largest N2O peaks with average 0.13 kg N2O-N ha-1 day-1, while precipitation events produced the highest CO2 fluxes in average 0.124 Mg CO2-C ha-1 day-1. Biochar alone decreased N2O fluxes in two out of 23 measured events, however, not with enough significant magnitude to modify annual or seasonal totals. This indicates that biochar-induced decreases in N2O fluxes may occasionally occur without significant changes in total emissions. Additionally, biochar alone or in combination with compost did not alter annual or seasonal cumulative CO2 emissions. For this particular study, the conversion of orchard waste into energy and C sequestration through biochar amendment offset 100.3 Mg CO2-Ceq year-1. Thus, given that biochar did not alter cumulative GHG emissions from soils, we conclude that, in the scenario of this study, the use of biochar as a strategy to decrease farm-level GHG emissions is obtained through the gasification of orchard residue into energy and through biochar C sequestration, and not as a tool to decrease soil CO2 and N2O emissions.

  20. Phases of a polar spin-1 Bose gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis-Szabó, Krisztián; Szépfalusy, Péter; Szirmai, Gergely

    2007-05-01

    The two Bose Einstein condensed phases of a polar spin-1 gas at nonzero magnetizations and temperatures are investigated. The Hugenholtz Pines theorem is generalized to this system. Crossover to a quantum phase transition is also studied. Results are discussed in a mean field approximation.

  1. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  2. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, J.; Borges de Sousa, P.; Martins, D.; Kar, S.; Bonfait, G.; Catarino, I.

    2015-12-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported.

  3. Rapid gas chromatographic method for the determination of famoxadone, trifloxystrobin and fenhexamid residues in tomato, grape and wine samples.

    PubMed

    Likas, D T; Tsiropoulos, N G; Miliadis, G E

    2007-05-25

    Trifloxystrobin, fenhexamid and famoxadone belong to the generation of fungicides acting against a broad spectrum of fungi and widely used in Integrated Pest Management strategies in different agricultural crops but mainly in viticulture. In the present work, a gas chromatographic (GC) method for their determination was developed and validated on tomato, grape and wine matrices. The method was based on a simple one step liquid-liquid microextraction with cyclohexane/dichloromethane (9+1, v/v) and determination of fungicides by gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorous (NP-) and electron capture (EC-) detection, and ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) for confirmation. The method was validated by recovery experiments, assessment of matrix effect and calculation of the associated uncertainty. Recoveries for GC-NPD and GC-ECD were found in the range of 81-102% with RSD <12%, while matrix-matched calibration solutions were imposed for quantification. LOQs ranged from 0.005 to 0.05 mg/kg and 0.01 to 0.10 mg/kg for the GC-ECD and GC-NPD, respectively, depending on the sensitivity of each compound with trifloxystrobin being the most sensitive. The expanded uncertainty, calculated for a sample concentration of 0.10 mg/kg, ranged from 4.8 to 13% for the GC-ECD and from 5.4 to 29% for the GC-NPD. The concentration levels for famoxadone residues found in tomato and grape samples from field experiments were clearly below the EU established MRL values, thus causing no problems in terms of food safety. PMID:16950327

  4. Termination of a Magnetized Plasma on a Neutral Gas: The End of the Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Gekelman, W.

    2013-06-01

    Experiments are performed at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device at UCLA to study the neutral boundary layer (NBL) between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas along the direction of a confining magnetic field. This is the first experiment to measure plasma termination within a neutral gas without the presence of a wall or obstacle. A magnetized, current-free helium plasma created by a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode terminates entirely within a neutral helium gas. The plasma is weakly ionized (ne/nn˜1%) and collisional λn≪Lplasma. The NBL occurs where the plasma pressure equilibrates with the neutral gas pressure, consistent with a pressure balance model. It is characterized by a field-aligned ambipolar electric field, developing self-consistently to maintain a current-free termination of the plasma on the neutral gas. Probes are inserted into the plasma to measure the plasma density, flow, temperature, current, and potential. These measurements confirm the presence of the ambipolar field and the pressure equilibration model of the NBL.

  5. Rock magnetism of gas hydrate-bearing rocks in the Nankai Trough, offshore SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kars, M. A.; Kodama, K.

    2013-12-01

    For the last decade, focus on gas hydrates has been increasing because of their potential value as an energy resource and their possible impact on climate change. Convergent margins, such as the Cascadia Margin (offshore Oregon, USA) and the Nankai Trough (offshore SW Japan) are favorable locations for the formation of gas hydrates. High amplitude bottom simulating reflectors (BSR) are often considered to be indicators of the presence of gas hydrates. Rock magnetism has also appeared to be a suitable approach. Here we focus on gas hydrate-bearing rocks from hole C0008C drilled in 2008 during the IODP Expedition 316, part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Experiment Zone (NanTroSEIZE) drilling project. Site C0008 is located at the slope basin seaward of the splay fault. In hole C0008C, seven gas hydrates occurrences were identified by local Cl minima from ~70 to ~170 m CSF (core depth below seafloor). We conducted a high-resolution rock magnetic study from ~70 to ~110 m CSF in order to determine the nature, size and concentration of the magnetic minerals present in the cores. As a preliminary study, about 200 discrete samples were analyzed. In addition, comparison with geochemical data and scanning electron microscope observations were made.

  6. An Approach Using Gas Monitoring to Find the Residual TCE Location in the Unsaturated Zone of Woosan Industrial Complex (WIC), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Y.; Lee, S.; Yang, J.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    An area accommodating various industrial facilities has fairly high probability of groundwater contamination with multiple chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and chloroform (CF). Source tracing of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone is an essential procedure for the management and remediation of contaminated area. From the previous study on seasonal variations in hydrological stresses and spatial variations in geologic conditions on a TCE plume, the existence of residual DNAPLs at or above the water table has proved. Since TCE is one of the frequently detected VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in groundwater, residual TCE can be detected by gas monitoring. Therefore, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in the gas phase TCE contaminant at an industrial complex in Wonju, Korea, were used to find the residual TCE locations. As pilot tests, TCE gas samples collected in the unsaturated zone at 4 different wells were analyzed using SPME (Solid Phase MicroExtraction) fiber and Gas Chromatography (GC). The results indicated that detecting TCE in gas phase was successful from these wells and TCE analysis on gas samples, collected from the unsaturated zone, will be useful for source area characterization. However, some values were too high to doubt the accuracy of the current method, which needs a preliminary lab test with known concentrations. The modified experiment setups using packer at different depths are in process to find residual TCE locations in the unsaturated zone. Meanwhile, several PVD (polyethylene-membrane Passive Vapor Diffusion) samplers were placed under water table to detect VOCs by equilibrium between air in the vial and VOCs in pore water.

  7. On the equilibrium structures of self-gravitating masses of gas containing axisymmetric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Low, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    The general equations describing the equilibrium shapes of self-gravitating gas clouds containing axisymmetric magnetic fields are presented. The general equations admit of a large class of solutions. It is shown that if one additional (ad hoc) asumption is made that the mass be spherically symmetrically distributed, then the gas pressure and the boundary conditions are sufficiently constraining that the general topological structure of the solution is effectively determined. The further assumption of isothermal conditions for this case demands that all solutions possess force-free axisymmetric magnetic fields. It is also shown how the construction of aspherical (but axisymmetric) configurations can be achieved in some special cases, and it is demonstrated that the detailed form of the possible equilibrium shapes depends upon the arbitrary choice of the functional form of the variation of the gas pressure along the field lines.

  8. Tuning of magnetization dynamics in sputtered CoFeB thin film by gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Huang, Qijun; Liao, Zhiqin; Li, Shandong; Ong, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    The influences of sputtering gas pressure on the high-frequency magnetization dynamics of as-sputtered CoFeB thin films are studied with permeability spectra based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. Results show that with the pressure increasing, both the anisotropy field and resonance frequency have minimums, while the initial permeability shows a maximum. The damping factor deceases monotonously with the pressure increasing, similar as with the coercivity. The high tunability of the damping factor indicates that controlling sputtering gas pressure could be an effective method in tuning the magnetization dynamics. All these dependences on gas pressure are suggested to be related to the inner stress of these sputtered films.

  9. Study of the Behaviors of Gunshot Residues from Spent Cartridges by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-07-01

    Gunshot residues, produced after shooting activity, have acquired their importance in analysis due to the notoriety of firearms-related crimes. In this study, solid-phase microextraction was performed to extract the headspace composition of spent cartridges using 85-μm polyacrylate fiber at 66°C for 21 min. Organic compounds, that is, naphthalene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, and dibutyl phthalate were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. Evaluation of chromatograms for diphenylamine, dibutyl phthalate, and naphthalene indicates the period after a gunshot was discharged, whether it was 1 days, 2-4 days, <5 days, 10 days, 20 days, or more than 30 days ago. This study revealed the potential effects of environmental factors such as occasional wind blow and direct sunlight on the estimation of time after spent cartridges were discharged. In conclusion, we proposed reliable alternative in analyzing the headspace composition of spent cartridges in a simulated crime scene. PMID:25771708

  10. Rapid Determination of Dichlofluanid Residues in Vegetables Using Dispersive-SPE Sample Preparation Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Cao, Shurui; Li, Xianliang; Xi, Cunxian; Ding, Xiaowen; Xu, Fen; Hu, Jiangtao; Chen, Zhiqiong

    2016-05-01

    A method for rapid determination of dichlofluanid residue in vegetables using dispersive solid-phase extraction (dispersive-SPE) sample preparation combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. Samples were extracted with actone-ethyl acetate (1:1, V/V), and then detected by GC-MS with an external standard method after being purified by optimized primary secondary amine, graphitized carbon black and anhydrous magnesium sulphate (MgSO4). It turned out that dichlofluanid showed a good linearity (y= 2.7E+ 5x- 2710.5) over the range of 0.02-2.00 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The limit of detection was 0.13 μg/kg (S/N = 3) and the limit of quantification was 0.43 µg/kg (S/N = 10). The recoveries of the dichlofluanid were in the range of 73.3-106.7, 83.3-116.7 and 83.3∼106.7% with the spiked levels of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg, and the relative standard deviations were in the range of 4.1-22.3%. Compared with the reported literature, the method is more simple, rapid, sensitive, reliable and can be applied to many vegetables. PMID:26921896