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Sample records for magnet weight supports

  1. Sliding weight supports for W7-X magnet system: structural aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, V.; Fellinger, J.; Egorov, K.; Schauer, F.; Köppen, M.; Jenzsch, H.

    2015-05-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator is presently under commissioning at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Greifswald. The coil system consisting of 70 superconducting coils of seven different types is supported by a massive central support structure (CSS), and thermally protected by the cryostat. The magnet system weight is borne by supports which are bolted to the cold CSS. These ten so-called cryo-legs penetrate through the cryostat wall to the warm machine base. The design of the cryo-legs incorporates glass-reinforced plastic tubes to guarantee relatively small thermal conductivity. In order to ensure free thermal shrinkage of the magnet system and to reduce stresses in the cryo-legs, sliding and rotating bearings are used as interfaces to the machine base. Tie-rods between the machine base and the warm ends of the cryo-legs prevent toroidal rotation of the magnet system, as well as any other horizontal shifts due to asymmetric loads. The assembly of the magnet system introduced some vertical imperfections in the cryo-leg positions causing considerable additional internal stresses which were not considered during the design stage. In addition, originally not planned trim coils induce unsymmetrical cyclic loads. Therefore, the previously used method to analyse one magnet system module with periodical boundary conditions is not applicable. Consequently, a model of the complete magnet system, including all five modules, was created and analysed. Fatigue analyses of the cryo-legs under the new cyclic loads, applied on top of the approximately 100 t static weight, have been performed in order to evaluate the lifetime. The paper presents the progress in structural analyses of the W7-X magnet system under the as-built conditions, loads due to the trim coil operation, and results of the weight support fatigue analysis.

  2. Supporting your child with weight loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... health care provider can set healthy goals for weight-loss and help with monitoring and support. Getting support ... to get the whole family to join a weight-loss plan, even if weight loss is not the ...

  3. Magnetic record support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, M.; Morita, H.; Tokuoka, Y.; Izumi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Kubota, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic layer of a magnetic record support is coated with a thin film of a polymer with a siloxane bond. The magnetic layer consists of a thin film obtained by vacuum metallization, cathode sputtering or dispersion of a ferromagnetic metal powder in a binder. The polymer with a siloxane bond is produced by the polymerization of an organic silicon compound which inherently contains or is able to form this bond. Polymerization is preferably performed by plasma polymerization.

  4. Partial weight support differentially affects corticomotor excitability across muscles of the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    Runnalls, Keith D.; Anson, Greg; Wolf, Steven L.; Byblow, Winston D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Partial weight support may hold promise as a therapeutic adjuvant during rehabilitation after stroke by providing a permissive environment for reducing the expression of abnormal muscle synergies that cause upper limb impairment. We explored the neurophysiological effects of upper limb weight support in 13 healthy young adults by measuring motor‐evoked potentials (MEPs) from transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of primary motor cortex and electromyography from anterior deltoid (AD), biceps brachii (BB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), and first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Five levels of weight support, varying from none to full, were provided to the arm using a commercial device (Saebo Mobile Arm Support). For each level of support, stimulus–response (SR) curves were derived from MEPs across a range of TMS intensities. Weight support affected background EMG activity in each of the four muscles examined (P <0.0001 for each muscle). Tonic background activity was primarily reduced in the AD. Weight support had a differential effect on the size of MEPs across muscles. After curve fitting, the SR plateau for ECR increased at the lowest support level (P =0.004). For FDI, the SR plateau increased at the highest support level (P =0.0003). These results indicate that weight support of the proximal upper limb modulates corticomotor excitability across the forearm and hand. The findings support a model of integrated control of the upper limb and may inform the use of weight support in clinical settings. PMID:25501435

  5. The role of social support in weight loss maintenance: results from the MedWeight study.

    PubMed

    Karfopoulou, Eleni; Anastasiou, Costas A; Avgeraki, Evangelia; Kosmidis, Mary H; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2016-06-01

    The role of social support in weight management is not fully understood, as more support has been linked to both favorable and unfavorable outcomes. We examined social support in relation to weight loss maintenance, comparing between maintainers and regainers of weight loss. The MedWeight study is a Greek registry of people who have intentionally lost ≥10 % of their weight and are either maintaining this loss for over a year (maintainers), or have regained weight (regainers). Demographics and lifestyle habits questionnaires are completed online. Dietary assessment is carried out by two telephone 24 h recalls. Perceived social support was assessed by validated scales examining support from family and friends regarding healthy eating and exercise. 289 maintainers and 122 regainers participated. Regainers received more support compared to maintainers. However, maintainers reported receiving compliments and active participation, whereas regainers receiving verbal instructions and encouragements. Maintainers who received diet support displayed improved dietary intakes, such as lower energy intake; regainers' diet was unaffected by support. Positive, rather than instructive, support appears beneficial in weight loss maintenance. PMID:26801339

  6. Nutritional support of very low birth weight newborns.

    PubMed

    Ditzenberger, Georgia

    2009-06-01

    Nutritional support to promote optimal postnatal growth for very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns less than 1500 g at birth during the initial prolonged hospitalization is a significant issue. This article reviews the concepts involved in the nutritional support of VLBW newborns, including definitions and discussions of growth, optimal postnatal growth, body composition, initial weight loss, growth expectations, growth assessment tools used during the postnatal period, the relation between inadequate nutrition and neurodevelopment, the relation between protein intake and cognitive outcome, postnatal nutrition balance, the potential for programming of future adult-onset chronic conditions, a review of fetal nutritional intake, and current recommendations for nutritional support of VLBW newborns. PMID:19460663

  7. Weighted K-means support vector machine for cancer prediction.

    PubMed

    Kim, SungHwan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the support vector machine (SVM) has been widely applied to diverse bio-medical fields to address disease subtype identification and pathogenicity of genetic variants. In this paper, I propose the weighted K-means support vector machine (wKM-SVM) and weighted support vector machine (wSVM), for which I allow the SVM to impose weights to the loss term. Besides, I demonstrate the numerical relations between the objective function of the SVM and weights. Motivated by general ensemble techniques, which are known to improve accuracy, I directly adopt the boosting algorithm to the newly proposed weighted KM-SVM (and wSVM). For predictive performance, a range of simulation studies demonstrate that the weighted KM-SVM (and wSVM) with boosting outperforms the standard KM-SVM (and SVM) including but not limited to many popular classification rules. I applied the proposed methods to simulated data and two large-scale real applications in the TCGA pan-cancer methylation data of breast and kidney cancer. In conclusion, the weighted KM-SVM (and wSVM) increases accuracy of the classification model, and will facilitate disease diagnosis and clinical treatment decisions to benefit patients. A software package (wSVM) is publicly available at the R-project webpage (https://www.r-project.org). PMID:27512621

  8. Intelligent Quality Prediction Using Weighted Least Square Support Vector Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaojun

    A novel quality prediction method with mobile time window is proposed for small-batch producing process based on weighted least squares support vector regression (LS-SVR). The design steps and learning algorithm are also addressed. In the method, weighted LS-SVR is taken as the intelligent kernel, with which the small-batch learning is solved well and the nearer sample is set a larger weight, while the farther is set the smaller weight in the history data. A typical machining process of cutting bearing outer race is carried out and the real measured data are used to contrast experiment. The experimental results demonstrate that the prediction accuracy of the weighted LS-SVR based model is only 20%-30% that of the standard LS-SVR based one in the same condition. It provides a better candidate for quality prediction of small-batch producing process.

  9. Caregiver Preferences regarding Technology's Role in Supporting Adolescent Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi-Hayes, Josette M.; Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Cataldo, Rosa; Huang, Jiayu; Pati, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    Background. Health technology provides a wealth of strategies to address chronic health issues, such as childhood obesity. Few studies have assessed parental preferences regarding use of health technology to support weight management for adolescents. Objective. This study determined caregiver beliefs, attitudes, and practices towards using traditional methods and technology-based health applications to address weight management among overweight adolescents. Methods. Self-administered surveys were distributed to caregivers of children ages 11–18 years in Stony Brook Children's Hospital outpatient offices with a BMI ≥ 85th percentile for age, gender. The data were entered into StudyTrax research platform and analyzed using SAS. Results.  N = 114. Mean BMI z-score = 1.95 ± 0.50. Two-thirds (65.8%) of caregivers preferred a weight management program that includes both traditional and technology components. Most parents rated involvement in program development (68.1%), access to content (72.4%) as very important. Those who believed their child's weight was a problem (p = 0.01) were more likely than other parents to prefer a program that combined both traditional and technology components. Conclusions. Parents' perceptions of their child's weight drove preferences about incorporating technology elements into a weight management program. Future weight management programs should incorporate parental content preferences and be tailored to different age groups. PMID:27347500

  10. Support Needs of Overweight African American Women for Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Janet L.; Stewart, Diana W.; Lynam, Ian M.; Daley, Christine M.; Befort, Christie; Scherber, Robyn M.; Mercurio, Andrea E.; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine social support needs of obese and overweight African American women for weight loss. Methods: Focus groups were conducted with overweight and obese African American women. Data were analyzed using standard grounded theory text analysis. Results: Our middle-aged (45.7 years; SD = 12.6) women (N = 66) were interested in…

  11. Structural safety assessment under the low temperature of KSTAR superconducting magnet-supporting post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Her, N. I.; Sa, J. W.; Cho, S.; Do, C. J.; Choi, C. H.; Kim, B. C.; Im, K. H.; Kyum, M.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, G. H.; Yoo, B. J.; Oh, Y. K.; Kim, D. L.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.; Kstar Team

    2001-01-01

    A magnet-supporting post installed between the lower TF coil cooled by 4.5 K supercritical helium and the cryostat base is one of the most important components of the superconducting magnet-supporting structure for KSTAR Tokamak. This structure should be flexible to absorb thermal shrink of the magnet and should also be rigid to support the magnet weight and the plasma disruption load. The post was designed with stainless steel (SS) 316 LN and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) that has low thermal conductivity and high structural strength at low temperature. In order to verify the fabricability and the structural safety, a whole scale prototype of the KSTAR magnet-supporting post was manufactured and tested. Both static and compressive cyclic load tests under the maximum plasma vertical disruption load and the magnet dead weight were performed. The test results showed that the magnet-supporting post of KSTAR Tokamak was fabricable and structurally rigid.

  12. [Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its Application in Ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Lindner, T; Langner, S; Paul, K; Pohlmann, A; Hadlich, S; Niendorf, T; Jünemann, A; Guthoff, R F; Stachs, O

    2015-12-01

    The value of diffusion-weighted magnet resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) has been demonstrated for an ever growing range of clinical indications. DWI is sensitive to the diffusion of water molecules and probes their random displacement within tissue. DWI provides both qualitative and quantitative information on tissue characteristics, e.g. tissue cellularity. This review provides an overview of diffusion-weighted imaging and its emerging applications in ophthalmology. The basic physics and technical foundations of DWI are introduced. The emerging applications of DWI are surveyed, particularly in diseases of the eye, orbit and optical nerve. PMID:26678901

  13. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landreman, Matt; Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  14. The Ganong paradigm: Converging evidence supporting initial phoneme weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Erik C.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2003-10-01

    In the present experiment we investigate whether the initial phoneme is given more weight in word recognition [W. D. Marslen-Wilson and A. Welsh, Cognit. Psych. 10, 29-63 (1978)] or if all phonemes in a word are weighted equally [C. M. Connine, D. G. Blasko, and D. Titone, J. Mem. Lang. 32, 193-210 (1993)]. Using the Ganong paradigm [W. F. Ganong, JEP:HPP. 6, 110-125 (1980)], participants were instructed to categorize a final ambiguous fricative in the target items, which included both words and pseudowords. Pseudowords were created by changing either the initial or a medial phoneme within the words. For example, the word diminish was altered to create the pseudowords timinish and dimimish. In addition, initial and medial phonemes were altered by either one or three distinctive features. The differences in the labeling of the final ambiguous fricative in the target items led to the conclusion that the initial phoneme is weighted more heavily. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  15. Field Balancing of Magnetically Levitated Rotors without Trial Weights

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Yingguang; Han, Bangcheng; Zheng, Shiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Unbalance in magnetically levitated rotor (MLR) can cause undesirable synchronous vibrations and lead to the saturation of the magnetic actuator. Dynamic balancing is an important way to solve these problems. However, the traditional balancing methods, using rotor displacement to estimate a rotor's unbalance, requiring several trial-runs, are neither precise nor efficient. This paper presents a new balancing method for an MLR without trial weights. In this method, the rotor is forced to rotate around its geometric axis. The coil currents of magnetic bearing, rather than rotor displacement, are employed to calculate the correction masses. This method provides two benefits when the MLR's rotation axis coincides with the geometric axis: one is that unbalanced centrifugal force/torque equals the synchronous magnetic force/torque, and the other is that the magnetic force is proportional to the control current. These make calculation of the correction masses by measuring coil current with only a single start-up precise. An unbalance compensation control (UCC) method, using a general band-pass filter (GPF) to make the MLR spin around its geometric axis is also discussed. Experimental results show that the novel balancing method can remove more than 92.7% of the rotor unbalance and a balancing accuracy of 0.024 g mm kg−1 is achieved.

  16. Support for linguistic macrofamilies from weighted sequence alignment

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Computational phylogenetics is in the process of revolutionizing historical linguistics. Recent applications have shed new light on controversial issues, such as the location and time depth of language families and the dynamics of their spread. So far, these approaches have been limited to single-language families because they rely on a large body of expert cognacy judgments or grammatical classifications, which is currently unavailable for most language families. The present study pursues a different approach. Starting from raw phonetic transcription of core vocabulary items from very diverse languages, it applies weighted string alignment to track both phonetic and lexical change. Applied to a collection of ∼1,000 Eurasian languages and dialects, this method, combined with phylogenetic inference, leads to a classification in excellent agreement with established findings of historical linguistics. Furthermore, it provides strong statistical support for several putative macrofamilies contested in current historical linguistics. In particular, there is a solid signal for the Nostratic/Eurasiatic macrofamily. PMID:26403857

  17. Support for linguistic macrofamilies from weighted sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Gerhard

    2015-10-13

    Computational phylogenetics is in the process of revolutionizing historical linguistics. Recent applications have shed new light on controversial issues, such as the location and time depth of language families and the dynamics of their spread. So far, these approaches have been limited to single-language families because they rely on a large body of expert cognacy judgments or grammatical classifications, which is currently unavailable for most language families. The present study pursues a different approach. Starting from raw phonetic transcription of core vocabulary items from very diverse languages, it applies weighted string alignment to track both phonetic and lexical change. Applied to a collection of ∼1,000 Eurasian languages and dialects, this method, combined with phylogenetic inference, leads to a classification in excellent agreement with established findings of historical linguistics. Furthermore, it provides strong statistical support for several putative macrofamilies contested in current historical linguistics. In particular, there is a solid signal for the Nostratic/Eurasiatic macrofamily. PMID:26403857

  18. Weighted averages of magnetization from magnetic field measurements: A fast interpretation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, Maurizio

    2003-08-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be interpreted in terms of weighted averages of magnetization (WAM) by a simple transformation. The WAM transformation consists of dividing at each measurement point the experimental magnetic field by a normalizing field, computed from a source volume with a homogeneous unit-magnetization. The transformation yields a straightforward link among source and field position vectors. A main WAM outcome is that sources at different depths appear well discriminated. Due to the symmetry of the problem, the higher the considered field altitude, the deeper the sources outlined by the transformation. This is shown for single and multi-source synthetic cases as well as for real data. We analyze the real case of Mt. Vulture volcano (Southern Italy), where the related anomaly strongly interferes with that from deep intrusive sources. The volcanic edifice is well identified. The deep source is estimated at about 9 km depth, in agreement with other results.

  19. Smartphone applications to support weight loss: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Christine A; Pfammatter, Angela F; Conroy, David E; Spring, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Lower cost alternatives are needed for the traditional in-person behavioral weight loss programs to overcome challenges of lowering the worldwide prevalence of overweight and obesity. Smartphones have become ubiquitous and provide a unique platform to aid in the delivery of a behavioral weight loss program. The technological capabilities of a smartphone may address certain limitations of a traditional weight loss program, while also reducing the cost and burden on participants, interventionists, and health care providers. Awareness of the advantages smartphones offer for weight loss has led to the rapid development and proliferation of weight loss applications (apps). The built-in features and the mechanisms by which they work vary across apps. Although there are an extraordinary number of a weight loss apps available, most lack the same magnitude of evidence-based behavior change strategies typically used in traditional programs. As features develop and new capabilities are identified, we propose a conceptual model as a framework to guide the inclusion of features that can facilitate behavior change and lead to reductions in weight. Whereas the conventional wisdom about behavior change asserts that more is better (with respect to the number of behavior change techniques involved), this model suggests that less may be more because extra techniques may add burden and adversely impact engagement. Current evidence is promising and continues to emerge on the potential of smartphone use within weight loss programs; yet research is unable to keep up with the rapidly improving smartphone technology. Future studies are needed to refine the conceptual model’s utility in the use of technology for weight loss, determine the effectiveness of intervention components utilizing smartphone technology, and identify novel and faster ways to evaluate the ever-changing technology. PMID:26236766

  20. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging and its recent trend—a survey

    PubMed Central

    Chilla, Geetha Soujanya; Tan, Cher Heng

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1985, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging has been evolving and is becoming instrumental in diagnosis and investigation of tissue functions in various organs including brain, cartilage, and liver. Even though brain related pathology and/or investigation remains as the main application, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is becoming a standard in oncology and in several other applications. This review article provides a brief introduction of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, challenges involved and recent advancements. PMID:26029644

  1. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  2. Brief report: A randomized controlled trial examining peer support and behavioral weight loss treatment.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Noel; Ennett, Susan T; Ward, Dianne S; Bowling, J Michael; Fisher, Edwin B; Tate, Deborah F

    2015-10-01

    Peer support among adolescents has been positively associated with heath behaviors; however, enhancing peer support for weight loss has rarely been studied among adolescents. This study examined whether a peer support training component delivered to enhance a standard weight loss program led to improved outcomes. Forty-one overweight adolescent females were randomly assigned to a Standard or Enhanced Peer Support intervention. The Enhanced group received in person peer support skills training and practiced skills using social networking. At 16 weeks, participants in the Enhanced condition reported significantly increased perceptions of friend support. Both groups demonstrated significant weight loss (6.4 lbs, ± 8.3). Attendance and self-monitoring were associated with weight loss. Perceptions of peer support can be increased with a peer training component, but did not increase weight loss during the short term. PMID:26265590

  3. Occlusion and weight change in a patient after esophagectomy: success derived from restoration of occlusal support.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Reiko; Soga, Yoshihiko; Minakuchi, Mami; Nawachi, Kumiko; Maruyama, Takayuki; Kuboki, Takuo; Morita, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    Occlusal support may be an important factor affecting nutritional support after major surgery. This report presents a patient who gained body weight after receiving a new prosthesis. The patient was an 82-year-old man with thoracic esophageal carcinoma. He did not have occlusal support because of multiple caries lesions. His body weight slowly increased after surgery, but almost stopped in the period of 54 to 68 days after surgery. After treatment with dentures (day 72 postsurgery), body weight gain was observed again, although his medical treatment had not changed. An appropriate prosthesis could contribute to perioperative nutrition support and may lead to earlier recovery after surgery. PMID:24179973

  4. Birth weight, domestic violence, coping, social support, and mental health of young Iranian mothers in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Mozhdeh Nasseh Lotf; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Nygren, Lennart; Nojomi, Marzieh; Richter, Jörg

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations of birth weight with sociodemographic variables, domestic violence, ways of coping, social support, and general mental health of Iranian mothers. Six hundred mothers aged 15 to 29 years participated between June 2009 and November 2010. t-Test, analysis of variance, Spearman's correlation, and multiple regression were used. The results showed that there was no significant association between birth weight and general mental health of the mothers. Prenatal care visits, the mothers' history of having children with low birth weight (LBW), and weight gain during pregnancy were significantly associated with birth weight. The women who reported physical abuse during pregnancy had infants with lower birth weight. Satisfaction with social support and use of positive reappraisal were significantly associated with higher birth weight. In conclusion, a high quality of prenatal care and screening of pregnant women are recommended. Social environments good enough during pregnancy have protective effects against LBW. PMID:23817159

  5. Benefits of recruiting participants with friends and increasing social support for weight loss and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Wing, R R; Jeffery, R W

    1999-02-01

    To determine the benefits of social support for weight loss and maintenance, this study recruited participants (N = 166) either alone or with 3 friends or family members and then randomly assigned them to a standard behavioral treatment (SBT) or SBT with social support strategies. Participants recruited with friends had greater weight losses at the end of the 4-month treatment and at Month 10 follow-up. Both recruitment strategy and the social support manipulation affected treatment completion and weight-loss maintenance. In those recruited alone and given SBT, 76% completed treatment and 24% maintained their weight loss in full from Months 4 to 10. Among those recruited with friends and given SBT plus social support, 95% completed treatment and 66% maintained their weight loss in full. PMID:10028217

  6. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  7. Identifying the ischaemic penumbra using pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Harston, George W J; Tee, Yee Kai; Blockley, Nicholas; Okell, Thomas W; Thandeswaran, Sivarajan; Shaya, Gabriel; Sheerin, Fintan; Cellerini, Martino; Payne, Stephen; Jezzard, Peter; Chappell, Michael; Kennedy, James

    2015-01-01

    The original concept of the ischaemic penumbra suggested imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism would be required to identify tissue that may benefit from intervention. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging, a chemical exchange saturation transfer technique, has been used to derive cerebral intracellular pH in preclinical stroke models and has been proposed as a metabolic marker of ischaemic penumbra. In this proof of principle clinical study, we explored the potential of this pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique at tissue-level. Detailed voxel-wise analysis was performed on data from a prospective cohort of 12 patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Voxels within ischaemic core had a more severe intracellular acidosis than hypoperfused tissue recruited to the final infarct (P < 0.0001), which in turn was more acidotic than hypoperfused tissue that survived (P < 0.0001). In addition, when confined to the grey matter perfusion deficit, intracellular pH (P < 0.0001), but not cerebral blood flow (P = 0.31), differed between tissue that infarcted and tissue that survived. Within the presenting apparent diffusion coefficient lesion, intracellular pH differed between tissue with early apparent diffusion lesion pseudonormalization and tissue with true radiographic recovery. These findings support the need for further investigation of pH-weighted imaging in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:25564491

  8. Identifying the ischaemic penumbra using pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harston, George W. J.; Tee, Yee Kai; Blockley, Nicholas; Okell, Thomas W.; Thandeswaran, Sivarajan; Shaya, Gabriel; Sheerin, Fintan; Cellerini, Martino; Payne, Stephen; Jezzard, Peter; Chappell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The original concept of the ischaemic penumbra suggested imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism would be required to identify tissue that may benefit from intervention. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging, a chemical exchange saturation transfer technique, has been used to derive cerebral intracellular pH in preclinical stroke models and has been proposed as a metabolic marker of ischaemic penumbra. In this proof of principle clinical study, we explored the potential of this pH-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique at tissue-level. Detailed voxel-wise analysis was performed on data from a prospective cohort of 12 patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Voxels within ischaemic core had a more severe intracellular acidosis than hypoperfused tissue recruited to the final infarct (P < 0.0001), which in turn was more acidotic than hypoperfused tissue that survived (P < 0.0001). In addition, when confined to the grey matter perfusion deficit, intracellular pH (P < 0.0001), but not cerebral blood flow (P = 0.31), differed between tissue that infarcted and tissue that survived. Within the presenting apparent diffusion coefficient lesion, intracellular pH differed between tissue with early apparent diffusion lesion pseudonormalization and tissue with true radiographic recovery. These findings support the need for further investigation of pH-weighted imaging in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:25564491

  9. Strategies to Address Weight-Based Victimization: Youths' Preferred Support Interventions from Classmates, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhl, Rebecca M.; Peterson, Jamie Lee; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Weight-Based Victimization is a frequent experience for adolescents who are overweight or obese, and is associated with numerous psychosocial and physical consequences for those who are targets of victimization. Assessing targets' preferences for different types of support and intervention has been absent in the context of weight-based…

  10. Effects of Peer Support and Therapist Contact on Long-Term Weight Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Michael G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of posttreatment programs to enhance weight loss maintenance. Obese clients (N=85) participated in either behavior therapy, behavior therapy and peer-support, or behavior therapy and therapist-contact programs. At 7-month follow-up, therapist-contact program showed significantly greater weight loss maintenance than did…

  11. Combating Weight-Based Bullying in Schools: Is There Public Support for the Use of Litigation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puhl, Rebecca; Luedicke, Joerg; King, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying litigation is an emerging area of law that has increased in response to serious cases of bullying at school. Weight-based bullying is prevalent at school, but no research has examined the use of litigation to address this problem. We assessed public support for litigation approaches to address weight-based bullying at school,…

  12. Periodic weight support effects on rat soleus fibers after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschka, Edward O.; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1988-01-01

    The morphological and histochemical properties of rat soleus muscles were investigated following one week of hindlimb suspension. Short-duration daily weight support activity is shown to ameliorate, but not prevent, soleus atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension. The results indicate that fiber cross-sectional area is more responsive to periodic weight support in dark than light ATPas fibers, and that muscle fiber atrophy need not be associated with a loss in succinate dehydrogenase activity.

  13. Eating behaviors, victimization, and desire for supportive intervention among adolescents in weight-loss camps.

    PubMed

    King, Kelly M; Puhl, Rebecca M; Luedicke, Joerg; Peterson, Jamie Lee

    2013-12-01

    This study examined links between eating behaviors, weight-based victimization (WBV) and preferences for bullying intervention among adolescents. Adolescents enrolled in weight loss camps participated in an online survey (N = 361). Regression models examined relationships between key variables. Almost half of adolescents who experienced WBV engaged in unhealthy eating behaviors, which corresponded to less desire for supportive intervention. Unhealthy eating behaviors may offset adaptive coping strategies to deal with WBV, such as support from peers and family. PMID:24183141

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle-supported glutathione: a conceptually sustainable organocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptually novel nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable organocatalyst has been developed, which is readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials in a truly sustainable manner; which catalyzes Paal-Knorr reaction with high yield in pure aqueous medium that...

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging in pediatric body magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Govind B; Caro-Dominguez, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI is being increasingly used in pediatric body imaging. Its role is still emerging. It is used for detection of tumors and abscesses, differentiation of benign and malignant tumors, and detection of inflamed bowel segments in inflammatory bowel disease in children. It holds great promise in the assessment of therapy response in body tumors, with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value as a potential biomarker. Significant overlap of ADC values of benign and malignant processes and less reproducibility of ADC measurements are hampering its widespread use in clinical practice. With standardization of the technique, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is likely to be used more frequently in clinical practice. We discuss the principles and technique of DWI, selection of b value, qualitative and quantitative assessment, and current status of DWI in evaluation of disease processes in the pediatric body. PMID:27229502

  16. Body weight support by virtual model control of an impedance controlled exoskeleton (LOPES) for gait training.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Herman; Koopman, Bram; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of an alternative method to support body weight in a powered exoskeleton is demonstrated. Instead of using an overhead suspension system, body weight is supported by augmenting the joint moments through virtual model control. The advantages of this novel method is that it allows for independent support of the left and right leg, and does not interfere with the excitation of cutanous afferents and balance of the body or trunk. Results show that after a short familiarization period the activity of muscles during initial stance reduces and kinematics become close to normal. PMID:19163077

  17. Feature weighting algorithms for classification of hyperspectral images using a support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bin; Zhao, Chunhui; Yin, Guisheng

    2014-05-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) is a widely used approach for high-dimensional data classification. Traditionally, SVMs use features from the spectral bands of hyperspectral images with each feature contributing equally to the classification. In practical applications, although affected by noise, slight contributions can also be obtained from deteriorated bands. Thus, compared with feature reduction or equal assignment of weights to all the features, feature weighting is a trade-off choice. In this study, we examined two approaches to assigning weights to SVM features to increase the overall classification accuracy: (1) "CSC-SVM" refers to a support vector machine with compactness and a separation coefficient feature weighting algorithm, and (2) "SE-SVM" refers to a support vector machine with a similarity entropy feature weighting algorithm. Analyses were conducted on a public data set with nine selected land-cover classes. In comparison with traditional SVMs and other classical feature weighting algorithms, the proposed weighting algorithms increase the overall classification accuracy, and even better results could be obtained with few training samples. PMID:24921869

  18. Nonporous magnetic materials as enzyme supports: studies with immobilized chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Munro, P A; Dunnill, P; Lilly, M D

    1977-01-01

    Chymotrypsin has been immobilized to several nonporous magnetic materials. Nickel particles were considered to be most suitable as immobilized enzyme supports. Chymotrypsin immobilized to nonporous magnetic supports was not fouled significantly by either whole milk or clarified yeast homogenate. AE-cellulose-chymotrypsin was rapidly fouled by both these materials and chymotrypsin immobilized to acrylic-based ion exchangers was slowly fouled. Immobilized enzyme activity was found to be inversely proportional to particle diameter for nonporous rock magnetic particles. Immobilization by adsorption and then glutaraldehyde crosslinking was used to produce controlled amounts of chymotrypsin on the particles. Esterolytic activity increased with enzyme loading but caseinolytic activity did not increase. Chymotrypsin is inhibited by metal ions from the magnetic supports. It is partially protected by use of a preliminary protein coating and may be reactivated by incubation with EDTA or BSA. PMID:14743

  19. A smartphone-supported weight loss program: design of the ENGAGED randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity remains a major public health challenge, demanding cost-effective and scalable weight management programs. Delivering key treatment components via mobile technology offers a potential way to reduce expensive in-person contact, thereby lowering the cost and burden of intensive weight loss programs. The ENGAGED study is a theory-guided, randomized controlled trial designed to examine the feasibility and efficacy of an abbreviated smartphone-supported weight loss program. Methods/design Ninety-six obese adults (BMI 30–39.9 kg/m2) will be randomized to one of three treatment conditions: (1) standard behavioral weight loss (STND), (2) technology-supported behavioral weight loss (TECH); or (3) self-guided behavioral weight loss (SELF). All groups will aim to achieve a 7% weight loss goal by reducing calorie and fat intake and progressively increasing moderate intensity physical activity to 175 minutes/week. STND and TECH will attend 8 group sessions and receive regular coaching calls during the first 6 months of the intervention; SELF will receive the Group Lifestyle Balance Program DVD’s and will not receive coaching calls. During months 1–6, TECH will use a specially designed smartphone application to monitor dietary intake, body weight, and objectively measured physical activity (obtained from a Blue-tooth enabled accelerometer). STND and SELF will self-monitor on paper diaries. Linear mixed modeling will be used to examine group differences on weight loss at months 3, 6, and 12. Self-monitoring adherence and diet and activity goal attainment will be tested as mediators. Discussion ENGAGED is an innovative weight loss intervention that integrates theory with emerging mobile technologies. We hypothesize that TECH, as compared to STND and SELF, will result in greater weight loss by virtue of improved behavioral adherence and goal achievement. Trial registration NCT01051713 PMID:23194256

  20. A novel device for studying weight supported, quadrupedal overground locomotion in spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Marvin; Traughber, Terrance; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; de Leon, Ray D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Providing weight support facilitates locomotion in spinal cord injured animals. To control weight support, robotic systems have been developed for treadmill stepping and more recently for overground walking. New Method We developed a novel device, the body weight supported ambulatory rodent trainer (i.e. BART). It has a small pneumatic cylinder that moves along a linear track above the rat. When air is supplied to the cylinder, the rats are lifted as they perform overground walking. We tested the BART device in rats that received a moderate spinal cord contusion injury and in normal rats. Locomotor training with the BART device was not performed. Results All of the rats learned to walk in the BART device. In the contused rats, significantly greater paw dragging and dorsal stepping occurred in the hindlimbs compared to normal. Providing weight support significantly raised hip position and significantly reduced locomotor deficits. Hindlimb stepping was tightly coupled to forelimb stepping but only when the contused rats stepped without weight support. Three weeks after the contused rats received a complete spinal cord transection, significantly fewer hindlimb steps were performed. Comparison with Existing Methods Relative to rodent robotic systems, the BART device is a simpler system for studying overground locomotion. The BART device lacks sophisticated control and sensing capability, but it can be assembled relatively easily and cheaply. Conclusions These findings suggest that the BART device is a useful tool for assessing quadrupedal, overground locomotion which is a more natural form of locomotion relative to treadmill locomotion. PMID:25794460

  1. Combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for the assessment of in vivo knee joint kinematics under full weight-bearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Al Hares, Ghaith; Eschweiler, Jörg; Radermacher, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    The development of detailed and specific knowledge on the biomechanical behavior of loaded knee structures has received increased attention in recent years. Stress magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been introduced in previous work to study knee kinematics under load conditions. Previous studies captured the knee movement either in atypical loading supine positions, or in upright positions with help of inclined supporting backrests being insufficient for movement capture under full-body weight-bearing conditions. In this work, we used a combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for measurement and assessment in knee kinematics under full-body weight-bearing in single legged stance. The proposed method is based on registration of high-resolution static magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in supine position with low-resolution data, quasi-static upright-magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in loaded positions for different degrees of knee flexion. The proposed method was applied for the measurement of tibiofemoral kinematics in 10 healthy volunteers. The combined magnetic resonance imaging approach allows the non-invasive measurement of knee kinematics in single legged stance and under physiological loading conditions. We believe that this method can provide enhanced understanding of the loaded knee kinematics. PMID:25979443

  2. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  3. Strategies to address weight-based victimization: youths' preferred support interventions from classmates, teachers, and parents.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Peterson, Jamie Lee; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-03-01

    Weight-Based Victimization is a frequent experience for adolescents who are overweight or obese, and is associated with numerous psychosocial and physical consequences for those who are targets of victimization. Assessing targets` preferences for different types of support and intervention has been absent in the context of weight-based victimization, but is needed to help inform potential interventions, motivate action, and identify strategies to help adolescents cope with experiences of weight-related teasing or bullying. Adolescents (14-18 years, N = 361, 40 % female, 71 % Caucasian) enrolled in national weight-loss camps completed an on-line survey. Participants who reported previous experiences of weight-based victimization were surveyed about their preferred interventions from peers, friends, teachers, Physical Education (PE) teachers/coaches, and parents. Participants indicated their preferences for specific strategies pertaining to target support, bullying intervention and prevention (e.g., inclusion in peer activities, confronting the bully, telling an adult, and improving anti-bullying policies). Friends (66 %) and peers (58 %) were the most highly preferred intervention agents followed by teachers (55 %), PE teachers/coaches (44 %), and parents (43 %). Participants who experienced more weight-based victimization expressed increased desire for intervention. The frequency of victimization, social support from friends and family, and perceived likelihood and helpfulness of intervention significantly influenced participant preferences for certain types of intervention, although preferences were generally consistent across participants' characteristics. The current study is the first to document youth's preferences for interventions in response to weight-based victimization. The findings have important implications for encouraging appropriate intervention and informing bystanders, which may help to reduce the prevalence, recurrence, and consequences for youth

  4. Weighted current sheets supported in normal and inverse configurations - A model for prominence observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, P.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique which incorporates both photospheric and prominence magnetic field observations is used to analyze the magnetic support of solar prominences in two dimensions. The prominence is modeled by a mass-loaded current sheet which is supported against gravity by magnetic fields from a bipolar source in the photosphere and a massless line current in the corona. It is found that prominence support can be achieved in three different kinds of configurations: an arcade topology with a normal polarity; a helical topology with a normal polarity; and a helical topology with an inverse polarity. In all cases the important parameter is the variation of the horizontal component of the prominence field with height. Adding a line current external to the prominence eliminates the nonsupport problem which plagues virtually all previous prominence models with inverse polarity.

  5. The Effects of an Educational and Supportive Relactation Program on Weight Gain of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Dehkhoda, Nahid; Valizadeh, Sousan; Jodeiry, Behzad; Hosseini, Mohammad-Bagher

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Re-establishing breastfeeding (relactation) is necessary in preterm infants who are deprived of breastfeeding due to hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Although NICU nurses train mothers about breastfeeding and relactation to some degree, there exists a lack of support or evaluation for restarting breastfeeding. The present study tried to determine the effects of an educational and supportive relactation program on weight gain of preterm infants. Methods: This clinical trial study was performed on 60 preterm infants with mean gestational age of 29 weeks hospitalized in NICU of Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran). The infants were evaluated in two groups of 30. The mothers of infants in the control group received routine training and support about relactation while the intervention group received routine training as well as the designed educational and supportive relactation program including breast pumping, increasing milk agents and kangaroo mother care. Daily follow-up was conducted by the researcher. All the infants were weighed by a co-researcher. Results: On the 14th day of the study, the mean (SD) weight of infants in the control and intervention groups was 1666.67 (136.08) and 1765.86 (156.96) g, respectively. Conclusion: Providing mothers with support from the medical team and training on relactation and kangaroo mother care can lead to better weight gain of the low birth weight premature infants. PMID:25276715

  6. A filament supported by different magnetic field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Démoulin, P.; Wiegelmann, T.; Aulanier, G.; Török, T.; Bommier, V.

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation of vector magnetogram data obtained by THEMIS/MTR on 2005 May 27 suggests the simultaneous existence of different magnetic configurations within one active region filament: one part of the filament is supported by field line dips within a flux rope, while the other part is located in dips within an arcade structure. Although the axial field chirality (dextral) and the magnetic helicity (negative) are the same along the whole filament, the chiralities of the filament barbs at different sections are opposite, i.e., right-bearing in the flux rope part and left-bearing in the arcade part. This argues against past suggestions that different barb chiralities imply different signs of helicity of the underlying magnetic field. This new finding about the chirality of filaments will be useful to associate eruptive filaments and magnetic cloud using the helicity parameter in the Space Weather Science.

  7. Light weight, high field, stable, superconducting magnets for advanced transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.; Kenney, W.J.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Although the Guideway may be the most expensive component of a MAGLEV system, the importance of a suitable magnet system should not be underestimated. The reliability of operation of MAGLEV depends on the superconducting magnets performing to their specifications in a reliable manner (i.e., without training or quenching). Besides reliability the magnets should produce high field, be sufficiently stable to withstand reasonable perturbations, be light weight, be protected in the event of a quench, and be economical (although performance should outweigh cost). We propose to develop superconducting magnets that have these features. Our magnet designs are based on internally cooled, cable-in-conduit superconductor with Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) as the structural reinforcement. Although the initial work is with metallic superconductors such as NbTi, the processes being developed will be applicable to the High Temperature Ceramic Superconductors when they become suitable for magnet applications.

  8. A Design Library of Magnet Support - a Proposal -

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Although the ideal and universal support system has not been invented yet, there are many implementations which fulfill most of alignment's requirements. However, inventing a new support system seems to represent the last design challenge, why would we otherwise witness so many new attempts. Already Plato reminded his scholars that one should learn from the past. Unfortunately, learning from previous designs and implementations doesn't seem to carry much attraction. Or it is that we, the customers, are not doing our job by letting the design engineer know what we would like to see done, what we think works, and what is already there. This contribution is an initiative to create a reference for support systems which exist in our laboratories and we know do work. Such an undertaking will require everybody's active support and feedback. I already have to thank my peers at many laboratories who helped me put together this first draft. Only if a more or less complete library of existing designs can be compiled with easy access to drawings can we then hope that the support system design competition looses its challenge. As alignment tolerances get ever tighter, the interplay of alignment with mechanical engineering becomes ever more important. In fact, accelerator alignment has advanced so far that mechanical uncertainties now exceed observational uncertainties. Of the mechanical issues bearing upon alignment, one of the most crucial is the magnet supports; these must provide both stability and a fineness of motion substantially exceeding the final alignment tolerances. Magnet supports are the interface that allows mechanical mounting of components and their subsequent alignment to a nominal position in three-dimensional space. Supports thus provide two functions: that of a spacer to bring the component close to its ideal position, and that of a fine motion system to enable the surveyor to move the component to its ideal location within the required tolerance. It is

  9. Life cycle impact assessment weights to support environmentally preferable purchasing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Thomas P; Lippiatt, Barbara C; Cooper, Jennifer

    2007-11-01

    LCA is a quantitative method for understanding the environmental impacts of a product, yet all product purchasing decisions are ultimately subjective. Weights are the nexus between the quantitative results of LCA and the values-based, subjective choices of decision makers. In May 2007, NIST introduced a new optional weight set in Version 4.0 of the BEES software. Three key points about this new optional weight set are the basis for discussion in this paper: The new weight set was created specifically in the context of BEES. It is intended to support a practical method to assist environmentally preferable purchasing in the United States based on LCIA results. This is in contrast to the weight sets currently in BEES, which are based on generalist perspectives. The new weight set was created by a multi-stakeholder panel via the AHP method, and is a synthesis of panelists' perspectives on the relative importance of each environmental impact category in BEES. The weight set draws on each panelist's personal and professional understanding of, and value attributed to, each impact category. While the synthesized weight set may not equally satisfy each panelist's view of impact importance, it does reflect contemporary values in applying LCAto real world decisions, and represents one approach others can learn from in producing weight sets. The new weight set offers BEES users an additional option for synthesizing and comparing the environmental performance of building products and making purchasing decisions. In so doing, it strengthens the decision-making process, which is important when making product comparisons in the public domain. The Weight Set: Across all panelists and with explicit consideration of all time horizons, anthropogenic contributions to global warming, weighted at 29%, was judged most important, yet not so important that decisions can be made solely on the basis of this impact. A strong tail of other concerns include fossil fuel depletion (10%), criteria

  10. Interlimb Coordination in Body-Weight Supported Locomotion: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Seiterle, Stefan; Susko, Tyler; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K.; Riener, Robert; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion involves complex neural networks responsible for automatic and volitional actions. During locomotion, motor strategies can rapidly compensate for any obstruction or perturbation that could interfere with forward progression. In this pilot study, we examined the contribution of interlimb pathways for evoking muscle activation patterns in the contralateral limb when a unilateral perturbation was applied and in the case where body weight was externally supported. In particular, the latency of neuromuscular responses was measured, while the stimulus to afferent feedback was limited. The pilot experiment was conducted with six healthy young subjects. It employed the MIT-Skywalker (beta-prototype), a novel device intended for gait therapy. Subjects were asked to walk on the split-belt treadmill, while a fast unilateral perturbation was applied mid-stance by unexpectedly lowering one side of the split-treadmill walking surfaces. Subject's weight was externally supported via the body-weight support system consisting of an underneath bicycle seat and the torso was stabilized via a loosely fitted chest harness. Both the weight support and the chest harness limited the afferent feedback. The unilateral perturbations evoked changes in the electromyographic activity of the non-perturbed contralateral leg. The latency of all muscle responses exceeded 100 ms, which precludes the conjecture that spinal cord alone is responsible for the perturbation response. It suggests the role of supraspinal or midbrain level pathways at the inter-leg coordination during gait. PMID:25990210

  11. Interlimb coordination in body-weight supported locomotion: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Seiterle, Stefan; Susko, Tyler; Artemiadis, Panagiotis K; Riener, Robert; Igo Krebs, Hermano

    2015-08-20

    Locomotion involves complex neural networks responsible for automatic and volitional actions. During locomotion, motor strategies can rapidly compensate for any obstruction or perturbation that could interfere with forward progression. In this pilot study, we examined the contribution of interlimb pathways for evoking muscle activation patterns in the contralateral limb when a unilateral perturbation was applied and in the case where body weight was externally supported. In particular, the latency of neuromuscular responses was measured, while the stimulus to afferent feedback was limited. The pilot experiment was conducted with six healthy young subjects. It employed the MIT-Skywalker (beta-prototype), a novel device intended for gait therapy. Subjects were asked to walk on the split-belt treadmill, while a fast unilateral perturbation was applied mid-stance by unexpectedly lowering one side of the split-treadmill walking surfaces. Subject's weight was externally supported via the body-weight support system consisting of an underneath bicycle seat and the torso was stabilized via a loosely fitted chest harness. Both the weight support and the chest harness limited the afferent feedback. The unilateral perturbations evoked changes in the electromyographic activity of the non-perturbed contralateral leg. The latency of all muscle responses exceeded 100ms, which precludes the conjecture that spinal cord alone is responsible for the perturbation response. It suggests the role of supraspinal or midbrain level pathways at the inter-leg coordination during gait. PMID:25990210

  12. Treadmill Training with Partial Body-Weight Support in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Akmer; Krosschell, Kristin; Spira, Deborah Gaebler

    2009-01-01

    OKAim: The aim of this systematic review was to examine the literature on the effects of partial body-weight support treadmill training (PBWSTT) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) on functional outcomes and attainment of ambulation. Method: We searched the relevant literature from 1950 to July 2007. We found eight studies on the use of PWSBTT on…

  13. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  14. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-02-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  15. Teacher and Friend Social Support: Association with Body Weight in African-American Adolescent Females.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Jevetta; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Webb, Fern J; Lee, Jenny; Doldren, Michelle; Rathore, Mobeen

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect ecological influences of teacher and friend social support on body weight and diet behaviors in African-American adolescent females. Using a quantitative, cross-sectional research design, a convenience sample of 182 urban African-American adolescent females (12-17 years old) completed a 39-item questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed perceived teacher social support, friend social support, nutrition self-efficacy, and diet behaviors (with internal reliability values of scale items: alpha = 0.74, 0.81, 0.77, and 0.69 respectively). Anthropometric assessments were conducted to measure height and weight to compute BMI. Majority of the participants were in middle or early high school (65 %) and were overweight or obese (57.7 %). Both teacher social support and friend social support demonstrated a positive, indirect influence on child weight status through nutrition self-efficacy and diet behaviors following two different and specific paths of influence. Diet behaviors, in turn, demonstrated a positive, direct effect on child weight status. In the structural model, teacher social support had the greatest effect on diet behaviors, demonstrating a direct, positive influence on diet behaviors (B = 0.421, p < 0.05), but its direct effect on nutrition self-efficacy was not significant. Friend social support demonstrated a positive, direct effect on nutrition self-efficacy (B = 0.227, p < 0.05), but its direct effect on diet behaviors was not statistically significant. The study's findings call for actively addressing the childhood obesity epidemic in the school environment by implementing health behavior change strategies at various social and ecological environmental levels. PMID:26863465

  16. Micronanostructures of the scales on a mosquito's legs and their role in weight support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. W.; Kong, X. Q.; Wu, Diane

    2007-07-01

    We show here that the mosquito cannot only give rise to a higher water-supporting force than the water strider if the ratio of the water-supporting force to the body weight of the insect itself is compared, but also can safely take off or land on the water surface, and also can attach on any solid surface like the fly. We found that the mosquito’s legs are covered by numerous scales consisting of the uniform microscale longitudinal ridges (nanoscale thickness and microscale spacing between) and nanoscale cross ribs (nanoscale thickness and spacing between). Such special delicate microstructure and/or nanostructure on the leg surface give a water contact angle of ˜153° and give a surprising high water-supporting ability. It was found that the water-supporting force of a single leg of the mosquito is about 23 times the body weight of the mosquito, compared with a water strider’s leg giving a water-supporting force of about 15 times the body weight of the insect.

  17. Influence of 7 days of hindlimb suspension and intermittent weight support on rat muscle mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierotti, David J.; Roy, Roland R.; Flores, Vinicio; Edgerton, Reggie

    1990-01-01

    The effect of intermittent periods of weight support on a decrease in mass of the soleus (Sol) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles atrophied by hindlimb suspension (HS) was investigated in rats subjected to continuous HS for seven days or an HS plus intermittent (10 min every 6 hrs of slow walking on a treadmill) weight support (HS-WS). After 7 d HS, the Sol weight relative to body weight was 21 and 9 percent lower in Hs and HS-WS, respectively, than in control rats. Maximum tetanic tension/muscle mass ratio was significantly lower in HS than in controls; the HS-WS rats had values similar to controls, whereas the maximum tetanic tension/muscle weight was significantly elevated in HS-WS compared to controls. Contraction times were 25 percent faster in the Sol and unchanged in the MG of HS rats, indicating that a low-force short-duration exercise regime results in a significant functional recovery in the 'slow' Sol, whereas the 'fast' MG is less affected.

  18. Design study for a magnetically supported reaction wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.; Dendy, J.; Sabnis, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are described of a study program in which the characteristics of a magnetically supported reaction wheel are defined. Tradeoff analyses are presented for the principal components, which are then combined in several reaction wheel design concepts. A preliminary layout of the preferred configuration is presented along with calculated design and performance parameters. Recommendations are made for a prototype development program.

  19. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  20. Improved equilibrium reconstructions by advanced statistical weighting of the internal magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Murari, A; Gelfusa, M; Peluso, E; Gaudio, P; Mazon, D; Hawkes, N; Point, G; Alper, B; Eich, T

    2014-12-01

    In a Tokamak the configuration of the magnetic fields remains the key element to improve performance and to maximise the scientific exploitation of the device. On the other hand, the quality of the reconstructed fields depends crucially on the measurements available. Traditionally in the least square minimisation phase of the algorithms, used to obtain the magnetic field topology, all the diagnostics are given the same weights, a part from a corrective factor taking into account the error bars. This assumption unduly penalises complex diagnostics, such as polarimetry, which have a limited number of highly significant measurements. A completely new method to choose the weights, to be given to the internal measurements of the magnetic fields for improved equilibrium reconstructions, is presented in this paper. The approach is based on various statistical indicators applied to the residuals, the difference between the actual measurements and their estimates from the reconstructed equilibrium. The potential of the method is exemplified using the measurements of the Faraday rotation derived from JET polarimeter. The results indicate quite clearly that the weights have to be determined carefully, since the inappropriate choice can have significant repercussions on the quality of the magnetic reconstruction both in the edge and in the core. These results confirm the limitations of the assumption that all the diagnostics have to be given the same weight, irrespective of the number of measurements they provide and the region of the plasma they probe. PMID:25554293

  1. Improved equilibrium reconstructions by advanced statistical weighting of the internal magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Gelfusa, M.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Mazon, D.; Hawkes, N.; Point, G.; Alper, B.; Eich, T.

    2014-12-01

    In a Tokamak the configuration of the magnetic fields remains the key element to improve performance and to maximise the scientific exploitation of the device. On the other hand, the quality of the reconstructed fields depends crucially on the measurements available. Traditionally in the least square minimisation phase of the algorithms, used to obtain the magnetic field topology, all the diagnostics are given the same weights, a part from a corrective factor taking into account the error bars. This assumption unduly penalises complex diagnostics, such as polarimetry, which have a limited number of highly significant measurements. A completely new method to choose the weights, to be given to the internal measurements of the magnetic fields for improved equilibrium reconstructions, is presented in this paper. The approach is based on various statistical indicators applied to the residuals, the difference between the actual measurements and their estimates from the reconstructed equilibrium. The potential of the method is exemplified using the measurements of the Faraday rotation derived from JET polarimeter. The results indicate quite clearly that the weights have to be determined carefully, since the inappropriate choice can have significant repercussions on the quality of the magnetic reconstruction both in the edge and in the core. These results confirm the limitations of the assumption that all the diagnostics have to be given the same weight, irrespective of the number of measurements they provide and the region of the plasma they probe.

  2. Vibration study of the APS storage ring 0. 8 meter quadrupole magnet/magnet support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this study are as follows: Determine the vibration characteristics (frequency, damping, and mode shapes) of the magnet on prototypic supports (the actual mounting system used to mount the magnet on the girder). Measure system response to ambient floor motion. Measure the effect of various modifications to determine if the magnet response can be modified to minimize unwanted response characteristics. Modifications investigated include support schemes, increasing system damping, and increasing mechanical rigidity. Measure system response to coolant flow. Determine vibrational characteristics of a large concrete block placed on a concrete floor, including response to ambient floor motions.

  3. Diffeomorphic susceptibility artifact correction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Ruthotto, L; Kugel, H; Olesch, J; Fischer, B; Modersitzki, J; Burger, M; Wolters, C H

    2012-09-21

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a key investigation technique in modern neuroscience. In clinical settings, diffusion-weighted imaging and its extension to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are usually performed applying the technique of echo-planar imaging (EPI). EPI is the commonly available ultrafast acquisition technique for single-shot acquisition with spatial encoding in a Cartesian system. A drawback of these sequences is their high sensitivity against small perturbations of the magnetic field, caused, e.g., by differences in magnetic susceptibility of soft tissue, bone and air. The resulting magnetic field inhomogeneities thus cause geometrical distortions and intensity modulations in diffusion-weighted images. This complicates the fusion with anatomical T1- or T2-weighted MR images obtained with conventional spin- or gradient-echo images and negligible distortion. In order to limit the degradation of diffusion-weighted MR data, we present here a variational approach based on a reference scan pair with reversed polarity of the phase- and frequency-encoding gradients and hence reversed distortion. The key novelty is a tailored nonlinear regularization functional to obtain smooth and diffeomorphic transformations. We incorporate the physical distortion model into a variational image registration framework and derive an accurate and fast correction algorithm. We evaluate the applicability of our approach to distorted DTI brain scans of six healthy volunteers. For all datasets, the automatic correction algorithm considerably reduced the image degradation. We show that, after correction, fusion with T1- or T2-weighted images can be obtained by a simple rigid registration. Furthermore, we demonstrate the improvement due to the novel regularization scheme. Most importantly, we show that it provides meaningful, i.e. diffeomorphic, geometric transformations, independent of the actual choice of the regularization parameters. PMID:22941943

  4. Differential effects of low versus high amounts of weight supported treadmill training in spinally transected rats.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Ray D; See, Pamela A; Chow, Cheryl H T

    2011-06-01

    Intensive weight-supported treadmill training (WSTT) improves locomotor function following spinal cord injury. Because of a number of factors, undergoing intensive sessions of training may not be feasible. Whether reduced amounts of training are sufficient to enhance spinal plasticity to a level that is necessary for improving function is not known. The focus of the present study was to assess differences in recovery of locomotor function and spinal plasticity as a function of the amount of steps taken during WSTT in a rodent model of spinal cord injury. Rats were spinally transected at 5 days of age. When they reached 28 days of age, a robotic system was used to implement a weight-supported treadmill training program of either 100 or 1000 steps/training session daily for 4 weeks. Antibodies for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, and the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin, were used to examine the expression of these proteins in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord. Rats that received weight-supported treadmill training performed better stepping relative to untrained rats, but only the rats that received 1000 steps/training session recovered locomotor function that resembled normal patterns. Only the rats that received 1000 steps/training session recovered normal levels of synaptophysin immunoreactivity around motor neurons. Weight-supported treadmill training consisting of either 100 or 1000 steps/training session increased BDNF immunoreactivity in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord. TrkB expression in the ventral horn was not affected by spinal cord transection or weight-supported treadmill training. Synaptophysin expression, but not BDNF or TrkB expression was correlated with the recovery of stepping function. These findings suggested that a large amount of weight-supported treadmill training was necessary for restoring synaptic connections to motor neurons within the locomotor generating circuitry. Although a large amount of training

  5. myPace: an integrative health platform for supporting weight loss and maintenance behaviors.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Julie; Harricharan, Michelle; Fletcher, Dave; Gilchrist, Becky; Coughlan, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major health concern caused by unhealthy eating behaviors. Digital weight loss interventions have adopted mobile technology primarily in order to support self-monitoring. However, many available apps are not designed as a part of dietetic practice; therefore, a distinct gap in the research exists relating to technology that supports the patient-practitioner relationship. This paper presents myPace, which is a complete weight loss and management system that is deployed via a smartphone and a PC. It connects dietitians and patients between face-to-face consultations and extends the relationship through patients' regular progress updates and dietitians' tailored and timely advice, for sustained behavior change. The prototype was developed from research into behavior change for weight loss, which furthermore was underpinned by theory and tenets of human support models, such as the supportive accountability framework. We report on an early-phase system design goals via a formative research process, which aimed to implement theoretical principles and match practical dietetic practice. To that end, only the clinical end user's perspective was sought through a coaching think-aloud protocol on the first iteration of the prototype and interviews with dietitians. Findings show that the system has many positive design features, but which require further development in order for the system to be fully acceptable within dietetic practice and motivate patient engagement. PMID:25438329

  6. Assessment Method of Harmonic Emission Level Based on the Improved Weighted Support Vector Machine Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-Zhong; Su, Ning; Ding, Li-Ping; Qiu, Si-Yu

    This paper presents a new method to estimate the system harmonic impedance and the harmonic emission level based on the improved weighted support vector machine (WSVM) regression. According to the differences of harmonic measurement data at the point of common coupling, the WSVM can be obtained by correcting the error requirement of SVM by Euclidean distance as a weighted index and determining the weighted coefficient of penalty parameter by linear interpolation, then the system harmonic impedance and the harmonic emission level can be calculated. Based on analyzing the simulation of the circuit and the practical application of field data, it proves that the proposed method can effectively restrain the influence caused by the fluctuation of background harmonic on estimation results. Compared with other methods, the estimate result of the proposed method is more reasonable.

  7. Social support for healthy behaviors: scale psychometrics and prediction of weight loss among women in a behavioral program.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, Michaela; Moore, Susan D; Schoffman, Danielle E; Lee, Katherine; King, Abby C; Taylor, C Barr; Kiernan, Nancy E; Perri, Michael G

    2012-04-01

    Social support could be a powerful weight-loss treatment moderator or mediator but is rarely assessed. We assessed the psychometric properties, initial levels, and predictive validity of a measure of perceived social support and sabotage from friends and family for healthy eating and physical activity (eight subscales). Overweight/obese women randomized to one of two 6-month, group-based behavioral weight-loss programs (N = 267; mean BMI 32.1 ± 3.5; 66.3% White) completed subscales at baseline, and weight loss was assessed at 6 months. Internal consistency, discriminant validity, and content validity were excellent for support subscales and adequate for sabotage subscales; qualitative responses revealed novel deliberate instances not reflected in current sabotage items. Most women (>75%) "never" or "rarely" experienced support from friends or family. Using nonparametric classification methods, we identified two subscales-support from friends for healthy eating and support from family for physical activity-that predicted three clinically meaningful subgroups who ranged in likelihood of losing ≥5% of initial weight at 6 months. Women who "never" experienced family support were least likely to lose weight (45.7% lost weight) whereas women who experienced both frequent friend and family support were more likely to lose weight (71.6% lost weight). Paradoxically, women who "never" experienced friend support were most likely to lose weight (80.0% lost weight), perhaps because the group-based programs provided support lacking from friendships. Psychometrics for support subscales were excellent; initial support was rare; and the differential roles of friend vs. family support could inform future targeted weight-loss interventions to subgroups at risk. PMID:21996661

  8. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  9. A voxel based comparative analysis using magnetization transfer imaging and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Mangalore; Saini, Jitender; Pasha, Shaik Afsar; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims: In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) tissue damage occurs in specific cortical and subcortical regions. Voxel based analysis using T1-weighted images depict quantitative gray matter (GM) atrophy changes. Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging depicts qualitative changes in the brain parenchyma. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether MT imaging could indicate abnormalities in PSP. Settings and Design: A total of 10 patients with PSP (9 men and 1 woman) and 8 controls (5 men and 3 women) were studied with T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3DMT imaging. Voxel based analysis of T1-weighted MRI was performed to investigate brain atrophy while MT was used to study qualitative abnormalities in the brain tissue. We used SPM8 to investigate group differences (with two sample t-test) using the GM and white matter (WM) segmented data. Results: T1-weighted imaging and MT are equally sensitive to detect changes in GM and WM in PSP. Magnetization transfer ratio images and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo revealed extensive bilateral volume and qualitative changes in the orbitofrontal, prefrontal cortex and limbic lobe and sub cortical GM. The prefrontal structures involved were the rectal gyrus, medial, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). The anterior cingulate, cingulate gyrus and lingual gyrus of limbic lobe and subcortical structures such as caudate, thalamus, insula and claustrum were also involved. Cerebellar involvement mainly of anterior lobe was also noted. Conclusions: The findings suggest that voxel based MT imaging permits a whole brain unbiased investigation of central nervous system structural integrity in PSP. PMID:25024571

  10. SUSCEPTIBILITY ARTIFACTS ON T2*-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE CANINE AND FELINE SPINE.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Laura J; Hecht, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo sequence is a sensitive means to detect blood degradation products. While not a routine sequence in magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in small animals, it can provide additional valuable information in select cases. The goal of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe findings when acquiring this sequence during magnetic resonance imaging examination of the spine in small animals. The University of Tennessee's veterinary radiology database was searched for dogs and cats that underwent magnetic resonance imaging for suspect spinal disease in which a T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo sequence was acquired and susceptibility artifact was identified. The following information was recorded: signalment, clinical signs, location and appearance of susceptibility artifact, and final diagnosis. Thirty-nine cases were included in the study. Extradural susceptibility artifacts were observed in cases of intervertebral disc herniation with or without associated hemorrhage (n = 28), extradural hemorrhage associated with spinal trauma (n = 2), hemophilia (n = 1), and in a cystic extradural mass (n = 1). Remaining lesions displaying susceptibility artifact were intramedullary and included presumptive acute noncompressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (n = 2), hematoma (n = 1), hemangiosarcoma metastasis (n = 1), intramedullary disc extrusion (n = 1), presumptive meningomyelitis (n = 1), and a mass of undetermined etiology (n = 1). Inclusion of a T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo sequence may be helpful in spinal magnetic resonance imaging when standard imaging sequences are ambiguous or intramedullary lesions are observed. PMID:25693447

  11. Arm weight support training improves functional motor outcome and movement smoothness after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Sebastiano, Fabio; Spicciato, Francesca; Tortola, Paolo; Nilsson, Jan; Pierelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness in acute stroke patients of a rehabilitation program performed with or without an arm weight support device. Twenty-eight acute, first-ever unilateral stroke patients were enrolled in a single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Clinical evaluation included Fugl-Mayer Assessment, Functional Independence Measure and kinematic analysis [maximum and mean hand velocity, maximum range of motion (Max RoM), normalized jerk (NJ)]. Patients received 12 daily 30-minute sessions (6/week) of additional upper limb therapy performed using an arm weight support device (study group) or additional traditional physiotherapy (control group). The patients were evaluated on admission and at the end of the rehabilitation intervention. The two groups were clinically comparable on admission (p>0.05). Both groups showed significant improvements in clinical scale scores and in Max RoM in flexion-extension, while only the study group showed improvements in NJ and in Max RoM in adduction-abduction. Rehabilitation training using an arm weight support device appears to be a useful method to supplement conventional therapy in acute stroke patients, increasing smoothness of movement and motor function. PMID:25014045

  12. Vibration and Control of Flexible Rotor Supported by Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou

    1988-01-01

    Active vibration control of flexible rotors supported by magnetic bearings is discussed. Using a finite-element method for a mathematical model of the flexible rotor, the eigenvalue problem is formulated taking into account the interaction between a mechanical system of the flexible rotor and an electrical system of the magnetic bearings and the controller. However, for the sake of simplicity, gyroscopic effects are disregarded. It is possible to adapt this formulation to a general flexible rotor-magnetic bearing system. Controllability with and without collocation sensors and actuators located at the same distance along the rotor axis is discussed for the higher order flexible modes of the test rig. In conclusion, it is proposed that it is necessary to add new active control loops for the higher flexible modes even in the case of collocation. Then it is possible to stabilize for the case of uncollocation by means of this method.

  13. Digital control of magnetic bearings supporting a multimass flexible rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, F. J.; Williams, R. D.; Allaire, P. E.; Schafer, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of magnetic bearings used to support a three mass flexible rotor operated at speeds up to 14,000 RPM are discussed. The magnetic components of the bearing are of a type reported in the literature previously, but the earlier analog controls were replaced by digital ones. Analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters and digital control software were installed in an AT&T PC. This PC-based digital controller was used to operate one of the magnetic bearings on the test rig. Basic proportional-derivative control was applied to the bearings, and the bearing stiffness and damping characteristics were evaluated. Particular attention is paid to the frequency dependent behavior of the stiffness and damping properties, and comparisons are made between the actual controllers and ideal proportional-derivative control.

  14. Superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus structural support system

    DOEpatents

    Withers, Gregory J.; Meier, Stephen W.; Walter, Robert J.; Child, Michael D.; DeGraaf, Douglas W.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage apparatus comprising a cylindrical superconducting coil; a cylindrical coil containment vessel enclosing the coil and adapted to hold a liquid, such as liquefied helium; and a cylindrical vacuum vessel enclosing the coil containment vessel and located in a restraining structure having inner and outer circumferential walls and a floor; the apparatus being provided with horizontal compression members between (1) the coil and the coil containment vessel and (2) between the coil containment vessel and the vacuum vessel, compression bearing members between the vacuum vessel and the restraining structure inner and outer walls, vertical support members (1) between the coil bottom and the coil containment vessel bottom and (2) between the coil containment vessel bottom and the vacuum vessel bottom, and external supports between the vacuum vessel bottom and the restraining structure floor, whereby the loads developed by thermal and magnetic energy changes in the apparatus can be accommodated and the structural integrity of the apparatus be maintained.

  15. Prototype ventricular assist device supported on magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Maslen, E.H.; Kim, H.C.; Olsen, D.B.; Bearnson, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Mechanical artificial hearts are now expected to be used as assist or total replacements for failing human hearts, if a reliable, anatomically appropriate design is developed. Initially, ventricular assist or total replacement devices were pulsatile air driven units containing a flexing polymeric diaphragm and two valves for each ventricle. Many reliability problems were encountered. Recently, attention has been focused on axial or centrifugal continuous flow blood pumps. Magnetic bearings employed in such devices offer the advantages of no required lubrication and large operating clearances. This paper describes a prototype continuous flow pump supported in magnetic bearings. The pump performance was measured in a simulated adult human circulation system. It delivered 6 liters/min of flow at 100 mm Hg differential head operating at 2,400 rpm in water. The pump is totally magnetically supported in four magnetic bearings - two radial and two thrust. The geometry and other properties of the bearings are described. Bearing parameters such as load capacity, current gains, and open loop stiffness are discussed. Bearing coil currents were measured during operation in air and water. The rotor was operated in various orientations to determine the actuator current gains. These values were then used to estimate the radial and thrust forces acting on the rotor in both air and water.

  16. Development of high frequency low weight power magnetics for aerospace power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    A dominant design consideration in the development of space type power mangetic devices is the application of reliable thermal control methods to prevent device failure which is due to excessive temperature rises and hot temperatures in critical areas. The resultant design must also yield low weight, high efficiency, high reliability and maintainability, and long life. The weight savings and high efficiency that results by going to high frequency and unique thermal control techniques is demonstrated by the development of a 25 kVA, 20 kHz space type transformer under the power magnetics technology program. Work in the area of power rotary transformer is also discussed.

  17. Magnetic properties prediction of NdFeB magnets by using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wende

    2014-09-01

    A novel model using support vector regression (SVR) combined with particle swarm optimization (PSO) was employed to construct mathematical model for prediction of the magnetic properties of the NdFeB magnets. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) test results strongly supports that the generalization ability of SVR is high enough. Predicted results show that the mean absolute percentage error for magnetic remanence Br, coercivity Hcj and maximum magnetic energy product (BH)max are 0.53%, 3.90%, 1.73%, and the correlation coefficient (R2) is as high as 0.839, 0.967 and 0.940, respectively. This investigation suggests that the PSO-SVR is not only an effective and practical method to simulate the properties of NdFeB, but also a powerful tool to optimatize designing or controlling the experimental process.

  18. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  19. The design of anisotropic diffusion phantoms for the validation of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieremans, Els; DeDeene, Yves; Delputte, Steven; Özdemir, Mahir S.; Achten, Eric; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2008-10-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging offers a non-invasive tool to explore the three-dimensional structure of brain white matter in clinical practice. Anisotropic diffusion hardware phantoms are useful for the quantitative validation of this technique. This study provides guidelines on how to manufacture anisotropic fibre phantoms in a reproducible way and which fibre material to choose to obtain a good quality of the diffusion weighted images. Several fibre materials are compared regarding their effect on the diffusion MR measurements of the water molecules inside the phantoms. The diffusion anisotropy influencing material properties are the fibre density and diameter, while the fibre surface relaxivity and magnetic susceptibility determine the signal-to-noise ratio. The effect on the T2-relaxation time of water in the phantoms has been modelled and the diffusion behaviour inside the fibre phantoms has been quantitatively evaluated using Monte Carlo random walk simulations.

  20. sw-SVM: sensor weighting support vector machines for EEG-based brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrad, N.; Congedo, M.; Phlypo, R.; Rousseau, S.; Flamary, R.; Yger, F.; Rakotomamonjy, A.

    2011-10-01

    In many machine learning applications, like brain-computer interfaces (BCI), high-dimensional sensor array data are available. Sensor measurements are often highly correlated and signal-to-noise ratio is not homogeneously spread across sensors. Thus, collected data are highly variable and discrimination tasks are challenging. In this work, we focus on sensor weighting as an efficient tool to improve the classification procedure. We present an approach integrating sensor weighting in the classification framework. Sensor weights are considered as hyper-parameters to be learned by a support vector machine (SVM). The resulting sensor weighting SVM (sw-SVM) is designed to satisfy a margin criterion, that is, the generalization error. Experimental studies on two data sets are presented, a P300 data set and an error-related potential (ErrP) data set. For the P300 data set (BCI competition III), for which a large number of trials is available, the sw-SVM proves to perform equivalently with respect to the ensemble SVM strategy that won the competition. For the ErrP data set, for which a small number of trials are available, the sw-SVM shows superior performances as compared to three state-of-the art approaches. Results suggest that the sw-SVM promises to be useful in event-related potentials classification, even with a small number of training trials.

  1. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in tubo-ovarian abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tohru; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Doh, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    In this report, we describe the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) in a patient who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the pelvis and subsequent histologic analysis. The content of the TOA was markedly high signal intensity relative to the surrounding tissue on DWI, and it showed low signal intensity on the apparent diffusion coefficient map; these findings were consistent with those of published reports on brain and liver abscesses. PMID:20088410

  2. Hybrid Nanotrimers for Dual T1 and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoparticle-based probes for dual T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could allow us to image and diagnose the tumors or other abnormalities in an exceptionally accurate and reliable manner. In this study, by fusing distinct nanocrystals via solid-state interfaces, we built hybrid heteronanostructures to combine both T1 and T2- weighted contrast agents together for MRI with high accuracy and reliability. The resultant hybrid heterotrimers showed high stability in physiological conditions and could induce both simultaneous positive and negative contrast enhancements in MR images. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging study revealed that the hybrid heterostructures displayed favorable biodistribution and were suitable for in vivo imaging. Their potential as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted MRI was further demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. PMID:25283972

  3. Focal liver lesions hyperintense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Alessandro; Marin, Daniele; Bae, Kyongtae T; Lagalla, Roberto; Agnello, Francesco; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Brancatelli, Giuseppe

    2009-10-01

    This article reviews focal liver lesions hyperintense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images and describes the underlying etiologies associated with their T1 signal intensity. Although focal liver lesions are commonly detected because of their iso- or hypointensity on T1-weighted images, lesions (benign or malignant) may present with T1 hyperintensity when they contain T1 shortening elements--such as fat, hemorrhage, copper, melanin, and highly concentrated proteins. Our discussion includes the description of state-of-the-art T1-weighted MR sequences and the imaging features of lesions on pre- and postcontrast MR images that are characteristic for lesion composition and useful for making accurate diagnosis. PMID:19842568

  4. Predicting Weight Support Based on Wake Measurements of a Flying Bird in Still Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Eric; Lentink, David

    2014-11-01

    The wake development of a freely flying Pacific Parrotlet (Forpus coelestis) was examined in still air. The bird was trained to fly from perch to perch through the laser sheet while wearing custom-made laser safety goggles. This enabled a detailed study of the evolution of the vortices shed in its wake using high-speed particle image velocimetry at 1000 Hz in the plane transverse to the flight path. The measurement started when the bird was approximately 0.25 wingbeats in front of the laser sheet and stopped after it traveled 3.5 wingbeats beyond the laser sheet. The instantaneous lift force that supports body weight was calculated based on the velocity field, using both the Kuttta-Joukowski and the actuator disk quasi-steady model. During the first few flaps, both models predict an instantaneous lift that is reasonably close to the weight of the bird. Several flaps away from the laser sheet, however, the models predict that the lift steadily declines to about 50% of the weight of the bird. In contrast to earlier reports for bat wakes in wind tunnels, these findings for bird wakes in still air suggest that the predictive strength of quasi-steady force calculations depends on the distance between the animal and the laser sheet.

  5. Metal Matrix Superconductor Composites for Flight-Weight Microwave Lightcraft Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Dan A.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-04-28

    Flight-weight superconducting magnets are designed for a 20-m diameter MicroWave LightCraft (MWLC). The twin coil unit with storage capacity of 900 MJ, is made of structural carbon fiber filaments with a superconducting MgCNi{sub 3} high current density film surface layer, imbedded in a beryllium stabilizer matrix of high electrical and thermal conductivity. These 'bucking' magnets run circumferentially about the lightcraft rim, and provide a 2-Tesla magnetic field necessary for the craft's hypersonic MHD slipstream accelerator. Each magnet is comprised of a single 22 cm diameter, hollow cylindrical cable made from metal matrix composites for superconductors (MMC lowbar Sc) with integral coolant passageways for circulating liquid-helium coolant to prevent the magnets from warming above the superconductive transition temperature. Each is suspended inside a 30-cm diameter toroidal vacuum tube, braced by a radial mesh of high-strength insulating fibers loaded in tension. For a coil separation distance of 1.4 m, each coil has a calculated mass of 1365 kg which is within 2x of the ultimate objective.

  6. Metal Matrix Superconductor Composites for Flight-Weight Microwave Lightcraft Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Dan A.; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-04-01

    Flight-weight superconducting magnets are designed for a 20-m diameter MicroWave LightCraft (MWLC). The twin coil unit with storage capacity of 900 MJ, is made of structural carbon fiber filaments with a superconducting MgCNi3 high current density film surface layer, imbedded in a beryllium stabilizer matrix of high electrical and thermal conductivity. These "bucking" magnets run circumferentially about the lightcraft rim, and provide a 2-Tesla magnetic field necessary for the craft's hypersonic MHD slipstream accelerator. Each magnet is comprised of a single 22 cm diameter, hollow cylindrical cable made from metal matrix composites for superconductors (MMC_Sc) with integral coolant passageways for circulating liquid-helium coolant to prevent the magnets from warming above the superconductive transition temperature. Each is suspended inside a 30-cm diameter toroidal vacuum tube, braced by a radial mesh of high-strength insulating fibers loaded in tension. For a coil separation distance of 1.4 m, each coil has a calculated mass of 1365 kg which is within 2x of the ultimate objective.

  7. THERMAL EQUILIBRIA OF MAGNETICALLY SUPPORTED BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, H.; Machida, M.; Nakamura, K. E.; Matsumoto, R.

    2009-05-20

    We present new thermal equilibrium solutions for optically thin and optically thick disks incorporating magnetic fields. The purpose of this paper is to explain the bright hard state and the bright/slow transition observed in the rising phases of outbursts in black hole candidates. On the basis of the results of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we assume that magnetic fields inside the disk are turbulent and dominated by the azimuthal component and that the azimuthally averaged Maxwell stress is proportional to the total (gas, radiation, and magnetic) pressure. We prescribe the magnetic flux advection rate to determine the azimuthal magnetic flux at a given radius. Local thermal equilibrium solutions are obtained by equating the heating, radiative cooling, and heat advection terms. We find magnetically supported ({beta} = (p {sub gas} + p {sub rad})/p {sub mag} < 1), thermally stable solutions for both optically thin disks and optically thick disks, in which the heating enhanced by the strong magnetic field balances the radiative cooling. The temperature in a low-{beta} disk (T {approx} 10{sup 7}-10{sup 11}K) is lower than that in an advection-dominated accretion flow (or radiatively inefficient accretion flow) but higher than that in a standard disk. We also study the radial dependence of the thermal equilibrium solutions. The optically thin, low-{beta} branch extends to M-dot{approx}>0.1 M-dot{sub Edd}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub Edd} is the Eddington mass accretion rate, in which the temperature anticorrelates with the mass accretion rate. Thus, optically thin low-{beta} disks can explain the bright hard state. Optically thick, low-{beta} disks have the radial dependence of the effective temperature T {sub eff} {proportional_to} piv{sup -3/4}. Such disks will be observed as staying in a high/soft state. Furthermore, limit cycle oscillations between an optically thick low-{beta} disk and a slim disk will occur because

  8. In vivo measurement of aerodynamic weight support in freely flying birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-11-01

    Birds dynamically change the shape of their wing during the stroke to support their body weight aerodynamically. The wing is partially folded during the upstroke, which suggests that the upstroke of birds might not actively contribute to aerodynamic force production. This hypothesis is supported by the significant mass difference between the large pectoralis muscle that powers the down-stroke and the much smaller supracoracoideus that drives the upstroke. Previous works used indirect or incomplete techniques to measure the total force generated by bird wings ranging from muscle force, airflow, wing surface pressure, to detailed kinematics measurements coupled with bird mass-distribution models to derive net force through second derivatives. We have validated a new method that measures aerodynamic force in vivo time-resolved directly in freely flying birds which can resolve this question. The validation of the method, using independent force measurements on a quadcopter with pulsating thrust, show the aerodynamic force and impulse are measured within 2% accuracy and time-resolved. We demonstrate results for quad-copters and birds of similar weight and size. The method is scalable and can be applied to both engineered and natural flyers across taxa. The first author invented the method, the second and third authors validated the method and present results for quadcopters and birds.

  9. Imaging hypothalamic activity using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the mouse and human brain.

    PubMed

    Lizarbe, Blanca; Benítez, Ania; Sánchez-Montañés, Manuel; Lago-Fernández, Luis F; Garcia-Martin, María L; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic appetite regulation is a vital homeostatic process underlying global energy balance in animals and humans, its disturbances resulting in feeding disorders with high morbidity and mortality. The objective evaluation of appetite remains difficult, very often restricted to indirect measurements of food intake and body weight. We report here, the direct, non-invasive visualization of hypothalamic activation by fasting using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, in the mouse brain as well as in a preliminary study in the human brain. The brain of fed or fasted mice or humans were imaged at 7 or 1.5 Tesla, respectively, by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging using a complete range of b values (10weighted image data sets were registered and analyzed pixel by pixel using a biexponential model of diffusion, or a model-free Linear Discriminant Analysis approach. Biexponential fittings revealed statistically significant increases in the slow diffusion parameters of the model, consistent with a neurocellular swelling response in the fasted hypothalamus. Increased resolution approaches allowed the detection of increases in the diffusion parameters within the Arcuate Nucleus, Ventromedial Nucleus and Dorsomedial Nucleus. Independently, Linear Discriminant Analysis was able to classify successfully the diffusion data sets from mice and humans between fed and fasted states. Present results are consistent with increased glutamatergic neurotransmission during orexigenic firing, a process resulting in increased ionic accumulation and concomitant osmotic neurocellular swelling. This swelling response is spatially extendable through surrounding astrocytic networks until it becomes MRI detectable. Present findings open new avenues for the direct, non-invasive, evaluation of appetite disorders and other hypothalamic pathologies helping potentially in the development of the corresponding therapies. PMID:23000787

  10. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a patient with struma ovarii.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tohru; Ninoi, Teruhisa; Maebayashi, Tetunori; Doh, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Mniki, Yumo

    2014-06-01

    In this report, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of struma ovarii (SO) in a patient who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the pelvis and subsequent histological analysis is described. The solid portion of SO showed a high apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, indicating unrestricted diffusion, and each loculus of SO showed different ADC values due to the different viscosity of the cyst contents in each loculus. These unique and characteristic DWI findings may serve as a helpful sign in making the correct diagnosis of SO when DWI findings are interpreted in conjunction with conventional MRI findings. PMID:25272567

  11. Texture features on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: new potential biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, A.; Mazzetti, S.; Giannini, V.; Russo, F.; Bollito, E.; Porpiglia, F.; Stasi, M.; Regge, D.

    2015-04-01

    To explore contrast (C) and homogeneity (H) gray-level co-occurrence matrix texture features on T2-weighted (T2w) Magnetic Resonance (MR) images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for predicting prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness, and to compare them with traditional ADC metrics for differentiating low- from intermediate/high-grade PCas. The local Ethics Committee approved this prospective study of 93 patients (median age, 65 years), who underwent 1.5 T multiparametric endorectal MR imaging before prostatectomy. Clinically significant (volume ≥0.5 ml) peripheral tumours were outlined on histological sections, contoured on T2w and ADC images, and their pathological Gleason Score (pGS) was recorded. C, H, and traditional ADC metrics (mean, median, 10th and 25th percentile) were calculated on the largest lesion slice, and correlated with the pGS through the Spearman correlation coefficient. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) assessed how parameters differentiate pGS = 6 from pGS ≥ 7. The dataset included 49 clinically significant PCas with a balanced distribution of pGS. The Spearman ρ and AUC values on ADC were: -0.489, 0.823 (mean) -0.522, 0.821 (median) -0.569, 0.854 (10th percentile) -0.556, 0.854 (25th percentile) -0.386, 0.871 (C); 0.533, 0.923 (H); while on T2w they were: -0.654, 0.945 (C); 0.645, 0.962 (H). AUC of H on ADC and T2w, and C on T2w were significantly higher than that of the mean ADC (p = 0.05). H and C calculated on T2w images outperform ADC parameters in correlating with pGS and differentiating low- from intermediate/high-risk PCas, supporting the role of T2w MR imaging in assessing PCa biological aggressiveness.

  12. Training Veterans to Provide Peer Support in a Weight-Management Program: MOVE!

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. Methods We developed an MI peer counselor training program for volunteer veterans, the “Buddies” program, to provide one-on-one telephone support for veterans enrolled in MOVE!. Buddies were recruited at 5 VHA sites and trained to provide peer support for the 6-month MOVE! intervention. We used a DVD to teach MI skills and followed with 2 to 3 booster sessions. We observed training, conducted pre- and posttraining surveys, and debriefed focus groups to assess training feasibility. Results Fifty-six Buddies were trained. Results indicate positive receipt of the program (89% reported learning about peer counseling and 87% reported learning communication skills). Buddies showed a small improvement in MI self-efficacy on posttraining surveys. We also identified key challenges to learning MI and training implementation. Conclusions MI training is feasible to implement and acceptable to volunteer Buddies. Trainers must assess how effectively volunteers learn MI skills in order to enhance its effective use in health promotion. PMID:24199738

  13. Body Weight Support Treadmill Training for Children With Developmental Delay Who Are Ambulatory

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Leah; McMillan, Amy Gross; Yates, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) on gait and gross motor skill development in children (2–5 years old) with developmental delay who are ambulatory. Methods Twenty-four subjects (12 control, 12 BWSTT) were enrolled in this randomized control trial. All subjects continued to receive physical therapy. Subjects were tested at baseline, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and at 6 weeks following completion of BWSTT. Outcomes were assessed using the 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT) and Gross Motor Function Measure- D and E. Results Significant improvements were seen in gait velocity and gross motor skill attainment. With positive interactions in both the 10MWT and GMFM-E, the BWSTT group as compared to the control group demonstrated functional gains in gait velocity and gross motor skills, P = .033 and.017, respectively. Conclusions A 6-week high intensity BWSTT program can improve gait velocity and influence functional gains. PMID:26397083

  14. Experimental active structural acoustic control of simply supported plates using a weighted sum of spatial gradients.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Daniel R; Johnson, William R; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    A limitation currently facing active structural acoustic control (ASAC) researchers is that an ideal minimization quantity for use in the control algorithms has not been developed. A novel parameter termed the "weighted sum of spatial gradients" (WSSG) was recently developed for use in ASAC and shown to effectively attenuate acoustic radiation from a vibrating flat simply supported plate in computer simulations. This paper extends this research from computer simulations and provides experimental test results. The results presented show that WSSG is a viable control quantity and provides better results than the volume velocity approach. The paper also investigates several of the challenges presented by the use of WSSG. These include determining a method to measure WSSG experimentally, an analysis of the influence of noise on WSSG control results and complications presented when degenerate modes exist. Results are shown and discussed for several experimental configurations. PMID:25373961

  15. Incidence and Predictors of Catheterization-Related Cerebral Infarction on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Mitsumasa; Suu, Kanae; Kimura, Masahiro; Minamino-Muta, Eri; Nakane, Eisaku; Izumi, Toshiaki; Miyamoto, Shoichi; Haruna, Tetsuya; Ueyama, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and risk factors of catheterization-related CI in the contemporary era, using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive 84 patients who underwent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) after 2.81 ± 2.4 days (mean ± SD) of catheterization via aortic arch. We categorized the patients by the presence or absence of acute CI determined by diffusion-weighted MRI and analyzed the incidence and predictors. Results. Of 84 patients that underwent MRI after catheterization, acute CI was determined in 27 (32.1%) patients. In univariate analysis, dyslipidemia, age, coronary artery disease, antiplatelet agents, number of catheters used, urgent settings, and interventional procedures were significantly different. Multivariate analysis revealed dyslipidemia (odds ratio [OR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41–16.03; p = 0.01), higher age (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.007–1.19; p = 0.03), and the number of catheters used (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.21–4.36; p = 0.01) as independent predictors of the incidence of catheterization-related acute CI. Conclusions. Dyslipidemia, higher age, and number of catheters used were independent predictors for acute CI after catheterization. These findings imply that managing dyslipidemia and comprehensive planning to minimize the numbers of catheters are important. PMID:27127790

  16. Heavily T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Landmarks of the Cavernous Sinus and Paracavernous Region

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M.; Bobek-Billewicz, B.; Sloniewski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance anatomy of the cavernous sinus. Heavily T2-weighted submillimetric sequence in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes was performed in 16 healthy patients. The sequence provides high contrast between fluid and other structures of the cavernous sinus. High signal intensity of the venous spaces of the cavernous sinus provides a kind of a background for internal carotid artery, cranial nerves, and meninges, as well as bony and fibrous structures. The study was performed with the help of an anatomic atlas. Different magnetic resonance (MR) landmarks of the cavernous and parasellar region were introduced and demonstrated. MR images, superior to computer tomography, allow a detailed assessment of the cavernous sinus anatomy. Delineation by magnetic resonance of tiny anatomical structures may help the neurosurgeon trace the exact outline of a tumor and help to plan an adequate strategy if complete resection is attempted. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8 PMID:17171105

  17. Apolipoprotein E polymorphism and acute ischemic stroke: a diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawu; Laakso, Mikko P; Karonen, Jari O; Vanninen, Ritva L; Nuutinen, Juho; Soimakallio, Seppo; Aronen, Hannu J

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to study the putative effects of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) polymorphism in stroke. Thirty-one patients with acute stroke, comparative for age and gender were scanned, nine of whom were ApoE allele epsilon 4 carriers. Initially, less than 24 hours from the onset of stroke, the epsilon 4 carriers had significantly smaller volumes of hypoperfusion on relative cerebral blood volume map (P = 0.001), and smaller infarct volumes (P = 0.008) compared with the noncarriers. By day 8, this difference in the infarct volumes had disappeared, suggesting relatively enhanced infarct growth. On average, the total infarct volume increased 145% of the initial infarct volume in the epsilon 4 carriers, and 84% in the noncarriers. There were strong correlations between the imaging findings and clinical status initially and with the outcome 3 months after the stroke in the epsilon 4 noncarriers, but, with a single exception at acute phase, a lack thereof in the epsilon 4 carriers. These patterns were virtually similar in a subgroup of patients with middle cerebral artery stroke. These data support the hypothesis of increased general vulnerability of the brain in the epsilon 4 carriers. Thus, the effects of ApoE polymorphism should be accounted for when interpreting diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI studies, particularly if predicting lesion growth. PMID:12439291

  18. Use of partial body-weight support for aggressive return to running after lumbar disk herniation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moore, Melita N; Vandenakker-Albanese, Carol; Hoffman, Martin D

    2010-05-01

    This case report demonstrates the application of partial body-weight supported treadmill running in an aggressive rehabilitation program of an ultramarathon runner who had sustained a lumbar disk herniation. Body-weight supported exercise has recognized value during rehabilitation of lower-extremity injuries. In this case we found that the reductions in vertical loading forces achieved through partial body-weight support can also be valuable in the rehabilitation of an injury above the level of support. This motivated runner successfully used weight-supported treadmill training within 1 week of an acute lumbar disk herniation when he was experiencing considerable pain with unsupported walking and lower-extremity weakness. He continued its use until he adequately improved to allow return to his regular overground running program. This case demonstrates how partial body-weight support can allow aggressive running training early after a lumbar disk injury when normal impact forces cannot be tolerated and when leg weakness is a limitation. PMID:20434621

  19. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Characterization of Solitary Pulmonary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Çağlayan; Gençhellaç, Hakan; Temizöz, Osman; Polat, Ahmet; Şengül, Ersin; Duygulu, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. Aims: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted imaging on the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions. Study Design: Randomized prospective study. Methods: This prospective study included 48 solitary pulmonary nodules and masses (18 benign, 30 malignant). Single shot echo planar spin echo diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with two b factors (0 and 1000 s/mm2). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated. On diffusion weighted (DW) trace images, the signal intensities (SI) of the lesions were visually compared to the SI of the thoracic spinal cord using a 5-point scale: 1: hypointense, 2: moderately hypointense, 3: isointense, 4: moderately hyperintense, 5: significantly hyperintense. For the quantitative evaluation, the lesion to thoracic spinal signal intensity ratios and the ADCs of the lesions were compared between groups. Results: On visual evaluation, taking the density of the spinal cord as a reference, most benign lesions were found to be hypointense, while most of the malignant lesions were evaluated as hyperintense on DWI with a b factor of 1000 s/mm2. In contrast, on T2 weighted images, it was seen that the distinction of malignant lesions from benign lesions was not statistically significant. The ADCs of the malignant lesions were significantly lower than those of benign lesions (mean ADC was 2.02×10−3 mm2/s for malignant lesions, and 1.195×10−3±0.3 mm2/s for benign lesions). Setting the cut-off value at 1.5×10−3, ADC had a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 88.9% for the differentiation of benign lesions from malignant lesions. Conclusion: DWI may aid in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary lesions. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02482181) PMID:26740901

  20. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  1. Fahr disease: use of susceptibility-weighted imaging for diagnostic dilemma with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Genc, Berhan; Kulu, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Fahr disease (FD) is a well-defined rare neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by idiopathic bilateral symmetric extensive striopallidodentate calcifications. The patients may present with diverse manifestations, most commonly movement disorder, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be critical for accurate diagnosis because it is difficult to reliably identify calcifications by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a relatively new 3D gradient-echo (GE) MR sequence with special phase and magnitude processing. SWI phase images can recognize calcifications definitively with higher sensitivity compared to other MRI sequences. In this article, we present two cases of FD with different manifestations and neuroimaging in different age groups and genders, which were diagnosed by SWI and confirmed with CT, and we discuss the contribution of SWI in the diagnosis of FD. In conclusion, we suggest integrating SWI with MRI protocol to identify calcifications in suspicion of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26435928

  2. Diffusion-weighted intensity magnetic resonance in the preoperative diagnosis of cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Michele; Di Lullo, Antonella Miriam; Caruso, Antonia; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Elefante, Andrea; Brunetti, Arturo; Iengo, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the preoperative diagnosis of cholesteatoma through the use of diffusion-weighted intensity magnetic resonance (DWI-MR) in 16 consecutive patients suffering from chronic otitis media with clinical and radiological (by computed tomography) suspicion of cholesteatoma. In particular, we compared the radiological data with intraoperative ones, verifying the correspondence (in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy) between what is reported by DWI-MR and what is actually detectable at the time of surgery. Furthermore, we identified the most reliable DWI-MR sequence [single-shot (SSh) echo planar imaging (EPI) vs. multi-shot turbo spin-echo not-EPI] to detect cholesteatoma and reduce the time for examination. The obtained data on computed tomography scans revealed low diagnostic accuracy (56%); DWI-MR, instead, showed higher values, especially using not-EPI sequences (93.75 vs. 68.75% obtained by SSh-EPI sequences). PMID:25322773

  3. Abdominal applications of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Where do we stand

    PubMed Central

    Morani, Ajaykumar C; Elsayes, Khaled M; Liu, Peter S; Weadock, William J; Szklaruk, Janio; Dillman, Jonathan Russell; Khan, Asra; Chenevert, Thomas L; Hussain, Hero K

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is one of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences providing qualitative as well as quantitative information at a cellular level. It has been widely used for various applications in the central nervous system. Over the past decade, various extracranial applications of DWI have been increasingly explored, as it may detect changes even before signal alterations or morphological abnormalities become apparent on other pulse sequences. Initial results from abdominal MRI applications are promising, particularly in oncological settings and for the detection of abscesses. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinically relevant basic concepts of DWI, techniques to perform abdominal DWI, its analysis and applications in abdominal visceral MR imaging, in addition to a brief overview of whole body DWI MRI. PMID:23671743

  4. [Ovarian metastases from ventricular cancer diagnosed using diffusion-weighted 3T magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Røhl, Lisbeth; Nellemann, Hanne Marie; Ladekarl, Morten; Pedersen, Erik Morre

    2011-04-18

    A 58-year-old female with a non-resectable ventricular cancer was followed by conventional 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis and abdomen including diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). B-values were 0 and 1,000 seconds/mm2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated. At one control, ovarian metastases were detected by DWI, but did not show on conventional T2 and T1. The ovarian metastases were surgically removed and histologically verified - even though metastasectomy is controversial. In conclusion, DWI at 3.0 T is feasible and can improve the detection of metastatic disease compared with conventional MRI. PMID:21501566

  5. Design and analysis of large spaceborne light-weighted primary mirror and its support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Jin, Guang; Yang, Hong-bo

    2007-12-01

    With the development of the resolution of spaceborne remote sensor, the diameter of the primary mirror of spaceborne telescope becomes larger and larger. The distortion of primary mirror which is influenced by the mirror material, structure, self-weight, support system and temperature environment affects optical image quality finally. In this paper, an on-axis TMA high-resolution Cassegrain optical payload with a primary mirror whose diameter is φ 650mm was designed and the effects of the influence factors of the distortion acts on the on-axis TMA optical system primary mirror had been analyzed by means of Finite Element Analysis. During work, the technology of the primary mirror design had been summarized and general consideration of the primary mirror design technology also had been described at the same time. Considering the telescope manufacture and work station, a reasonable and optimal structure of the primary mirror sub-assembly is taken finally. In the end, the distortion of the primary mirror during its fabrication station and work station had been analyzed by integrated Finite Element Analysis Method. The results implicated the synthesis profile error (P-V value) for the primary mirror is less than λ/10 and all the indexes of the primary mirror satisfy the requirements of the optical system.

  6. The Effect of Body Weight Support on Kinetics and Kinematics of a Repetitive Plyometric Task.

    PubMed

    Elias, Audrey R; Hammill, Curt D; Mizner, Ryan L

    2016-02-01

    Though essential to athletic performance, the ability to land from a jump often remains limited following injury. While recommended, jump training is difficult to include in rehabilitation programs due to high impact forces. Body weight support (BWS) is frequently used in rehabilitation of gait following neurological and orthopedic injury, and may also allow improved rehabilitation of high-impact tasks. There is a differential effect of BWS on walking and running gaits, and the effect of BWS on movements with relatively large vertical displacement is unknown. The current study evaluates the effect of BWS on a replicable single-leg hopping task. We posited that progressive BWS would decrease limb loading while maintaining the joint kinematics of the task. Twenty-eight participants repetitively hopped on and off a box at each of four BWS levels. Peak vertical ground reaction forces decreased by 22.5% between 0% and 30% BWS (P < .001). Average hip, knee, and ankle internal moments decreased by 0.5 N·m/kg each. Slight kinematic changes across BWS levels were clinically insignificant. The high level of task specificity evidenced by consistent kinematics coupled with a similar reduction of internal moment at each joint suggests that BWS may be a useful strategy for rehabilitation of jumping tasks. PMID:26398961

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in predicting the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaolei; Tong, Yuanhe; Xiao, Youping; Liao, Jiang; Chen, Yunbing; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the application value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in predicting cervical cancer radiosensitivity. Twenty-five patients who were newly diagnosed as cervical cancer and accepted simple radiotherapy were included in this study. Before external irradiation, 20 GY and at the end of irradiation, routine 1.5 T MRI and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scanning were carried. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of primary tumor was measured. Its correlation with tumor regression rate was analyzed. ADC values of before irradiation, 20 GY and at the end of irradiation was (0.93 ± 0.14) × 10-3 mm2/s, (1.25 ± 0.17) × 10-3 mm2/s and (1.55 ± 0.13) × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There were statistical significant differences (P< 0.01). D-value of ADC values between before and 20 GY external irradiation was (0.33 ± 0.16) mm2/s. The tumor volume before and at the end of external irradiation were (37.48 ± 26.83) cm3 and (4.41 ± 3.72) cm3 respectively, with tumor regression rate of before and after external irradiation of (0.86 ± 0.11). ADC values of before irradiation, 20 GY and at the end of irradiation did not correlate with tumor regression rate. D-value of ADC values between before and 20 GY external irradiation positively correlated with tumor regression rate (r = 0.423, P = 0.035). ADC value of cervical cancer increased after radiotherapy and early changes of ADC value was positively correlated with tumor regression rate, thus, ADC value could be used as a potential prediction factor for cervical cancer radiosensitivity. PMID:26550334

  8. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation. PMID:10886073

  9. Effect of depressive symptoms and social support on weight and CD4 count increase at HIV clinic in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Hibret; Haile Mariam, Damen; Tsui, Amy; Ahmed, Saifudin; Shewamare, Aster

    2012-01-01

    Studies have reported an inverse relationship between depressive symptoms and weight and CD4 gain and a positive association between social support and weight and CD4 gain. The main objective of this study was to explore the effect of depressive symptoms and perceived social support on weight change and CD4 cell progression in an HIV clinic in Ethiopia. The study design was descriptive cross-sectional, with a sample of 1815 HIV-infected adults age 18 years or above. Depressive symptoms and perceived social support were the independent variables, while weight and CD4 cell count were the dependent variables. Regression modeling was the main statistical approach used for the analysis. A significant proportion of females reported depressive symptoms: being bothered by things that do not bother other people, they had been depressed, and their sleep had been restless for 5-7 days a week. A lesser proportion of males reported these problems. A significant proportion of study participants did not have someone to borrow a small amount of money (6 USD) from for immediate help and did not have somebody to support them if they were confined to bed for several weeks. Worse depressive symptoms had a negative effect on weight gain and CD4 cell progression, while better perceived social support had a positive effect on both weight gain and CD4 cell progression. Interventions that address both of these background factors need to be designed and implemented as part of the HAART program to improve weight gain and CD4 cell progression. PMID:22273149

  10. Coronal Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Kidney: Agreement with Axial Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Imaging in Terms of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Wang, Jia; Tang, Ye-Huan; Ye, Hui-Yi; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coronal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values have gradually become applied (following conventional axial DW-MRI) in the renal analysis. To explore whether data obtained using coronal DW-MRI are comparable with those derived using axial DW-MRI, this preliminary study sought to assess the agreement in renal ADC values between coronal DW-MRI and axial DW-MRI. Methods: Thirty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study; written consents were obtained. All subjects underwent respiratory-triggered axial and coronal DW-MRI using a 1.5-MR system with b values of 0 and 800 s/mm2. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the two DW-MRI sequences were measured and statistically compared using the paired t-test. The extent of agreement of ADC values of the upper pole, mid-pole, and lower pole of the kidney; the mean ADC values of the left kidney and right kidney; and the mean ADC values of the bilateral kidneys were evaluated via calculation of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) or Bland–Altman method between the two DW-MRI sequences. Results: The SNR of coronal DW-MR images was statistically inferior to that of axial DW-MR images (P < 0.001). The ICCs of the ADC values of each region of interest, and the mean ADC values of bilateral kidneys, between the two sequences, were greater than 0.5, and the mean ADCs of the bilateral kidneys demonstrated the highest ICC (0.869; 95% confidence interval: 0.739–0.935). In addition, 94.1% (32/34), 94.1% (32/34), and 97.1% (31/34) of the ADC bias was inside the limits of agreement in terms of the mean ADC values of the left kidneys, right kidneys, and bilateral kidneys when coronal and axial DWI-MRI were compared. Conclusions: ADC values derived using coronal DW-MRI exhibited moderate-to-good agreement to those of axial DW-MRI, rendering the former an additional useful DW-MRI method, and causing the ADC values derived using the two types of DW

  11. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the normal canine brain.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Antje; Söffler, Charlotte; Failing, Klaus; Schaubmar, Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Schmidt, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI has been primarily reported as a method for diagnosing cerebrovascular disease in veterinary patients. In humans, clinical applications for diffusion-weighted MRI have also included epilepsy, Alzheimer's, and Creutzfeld-Jakob disease. Before these applications can be developed in veterinary patients, more data on brain diffusion characteristics are needed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of diffusion in the normal canine brain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed in ten, clinically normal, purpose-bred beagle dogs. On apparent diffusion coefficient maps, regions of interest were drawn around the caudate nucleus, thalamus, piriform lobe, hippocampus, semioval center, and cerebral cortex. Statistically significant differences in mean apparent diffusion coefficient were found for the internal capsule, hippocampus, and thalamus. The highest apparent diffusion coefficient (1044.29 ± 165.21 μm(2)/s (mean ± SD (standard deviation)) was detected in the hippocampus. The lowest apparent diffusion coefficient was measured in the semioval center (721.39 ± 126.28 μm(2)/s (mean ± SD)). Significant differences in mean apparent diffusion coefficients of the caudate nucleus, thalamus, and piriform lobe were found by comparing right and left sides. Differences between brain regions may occur due to differences in myelination, neural density, or fiber orientation. The reason for the differences between right and left sides remains unclear. Data from the current study provide background for further studies of diffusion changes in dogs with brain disease. PMID:24798796

  12. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Lawrence, Edward Malnor; Mazaheri, Yousef; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer. It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DW-MRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the non-mono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer. PMID:26339460

  13. Assessment of Activity of Crohn Disease by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Hua; Sun, Can-Hui; Mao, Ren; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Song; Pui, Margaret H; Chen, Min-Hu; Li, Zi-Ping

    2015-10-01

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for evaluating inflammatory activity in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A total of 47 CD patients underwent MR enterography (MRE) and DWI using 3 b values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of inflamed and normal bowel wall were calculated. The conventional MRE findings and DWI signal intensities were qualitatively scored from 0 to 3. The correlation between Crohn disease activity index (CDAI) and both ADCs and magnetic resonance imaging scores was analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CD activity. Of the 47 patients, 25 were active CD (CDAI≥150) and 22 were inactive (CDAI<150). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MRE + DWI scores of active CD were significantly higher than that of inactive CD (both P < 0.001). Apparent diffusion coefficients in inflamed segments of active CD were lower than that of inactive CD (P < 0.001). The DWI scores (r = 0.74, P < 0.001), ADCs (r = -0.71, P < 0.001), MRE scores (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), and MRE + DWI scores (r = 0.66, P < 0.001) were all correlated with CDAI. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristics curves for ADCs, DWI scores, MRE scores, and MRE + DWI scores ranged from 0.83 to 0.98. The threshold ADC value of 1.17 × 10 mm/s allowed differentiation of active from inactive CD with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC correlated with CD activity, and had excellent diagnostic accuracy for differentiating active from inactive CD. PMID:26512584

  14. Diagnostic utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in two common renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    WEN, ZHAOXIA; SUN, ZHENCHAO; WANG, YUXING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of common renal tumors. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI were performed on 85 patients with renal lesions (54 renal carcinoma and 31 renal angiomyolipoma cases). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in each case at b=800 sec/mm2 were measured in the ADC maps using a statistical software package. The 54 cases of renal cell carcinoma showed a high signal intensity in the parenchyma, and the 31 renal angiomyolipoma cases showed a well-defined mixed signal intensity on DWI. The soft-tissue component showed a high signal intensity and the fat tissue showed a low signal intensity on DWI. When the b-value was set to 800 sec/mm2, the mean ADC was significantly lower in the renal carcinoma cases than in the renal angiomyolipoma cases. In conclusion, the measurement of ADC on DWI can reveal the structure of renal tumors, which is beneficial in diagnosing and determining the prognosis of benign and malignant renal tumors. PMID:26622890

  15. An adaptive diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scheme using the multistation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yeji

    2016-02-01

    Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a useful tool in oncology, which enables fast screening of disseminated tumors, lymph nodes or abscesses in the body. Multistation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or continuously moving table (CMT) MRI can be performed to overcome the limited field of view (FOV) of the magnet bore in whole-body DWI. Although CMT-MRI is regarded as a more advanced form of whole-body MRI, it cannot be widely used because most of the available MR systems are not equipped with the required hardware/software to perform CMT. Thus, optimizing the multistation approach for whole-body DWI, which is more widely available and easier to perform with the existing MR systems, is worthwhile. To improve the quality of DW images acquired with the multistation approach, we used different combinations of the built-in body RF coil and the phased-array surface RF coils for reception of the signals in whole-body DWI in this work. If different coils are selectively used in the extended FOV and appropriate reconstruction algorithms are exploited, the screening ability of whole-body DWI can be improved while minimizing the patient's discomfort and the artifacts due to physiological motions.

  16. Positional pelvic organ prolapse (POP) evaluation using open, weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Boris; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is completed in the supine position. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRO) uses vertical magnets, allowing imaging in a variety of upright postures. This pilot study used MRO to evaluate the change of prolapse in different positions compared to non-prolapsed images. Methods: In total, 11 women (6 POP, 5 controls) aged 24 to 65 years had 12 MRO images (midline sagittal pelvic line) consecutively when supine, sitting and standing with a full and empty bladder. Lengths between the lowest point of the bladder to the pubococcygeal (PC) and pubopromontoreal (PP) lines in each image were compared, and the ratio of bladder area under the PC and PP lines to the total bladder area. Results: Significant elongation between the PC line and lowest point of the bladder was evident in subjects with POP comparing supine and standing images (p = 0.03), but not controls (p = 0.07). Similarly, this axis was significantly longer in cystocele subjects versus controls only in the standing position. Bladder area under the PC line was significantly increased between supine and standing positions only among subjects with cystocele (p < 0.01), and significantly larger among the study group in the standing position (p < 0.005), less significant in the supine position (p = 0.015), and not significant in the sitting position (p = 0.3). Conclusions: MRO imaging allows us to investigate the effects of upright position and weight bearing on the staging of POP. Imaging patients when sitting and standing identified that significant changes occur in the maximal descent of the bladder. PMID:26225170

  17. Cyst infection in unilateral renal cystic disease and the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yasukazu; Kodama, Koichi; Motoi, Isamu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2012-11-01

    In multicystic renal diseases, cyst infection is a complex issue because of the absence of validated diagnostic methods. Unilateral renal cystic disease is a rare multicystic disease, believed to have an acquired maldevelopmental origin. Unilateral renal cystic disease is often confused with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease but has some distinguishing characteristics: unilateral localization, negative family history, and no progression to chronic renal failure. We describe a case of unilateral renal cystic disease with cyst infection that could be detected by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, but not by conventional imaging techniques. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be useful for detecting infected cysts, especially in multicystic renal diseases. PMID:22990058

  18. Limb contribution to increased self-selected walking speeds during body weight support in individuals poststroke.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Christopher P; Burgess, Jamie K; Brown, David A

    2015-03-01

    Individuals poststroke walk at faster self-selected speeds under some nominal level of body weight support (BWS) whereas nonimpaired individuals walk slower after adding BWS. The purpose of this study was to determine whether increases in self-selected overground walking speed under BWS conditions of individuals poststroke can be explained by changes in their paretic and nonparetic ground reaction forces (GRF). We hypothesize that increased self-selected walking speed, recorded at some nominal level of BWS, will relate to decreased braking GRFs by the paretic limb. We recruited 10 chronic (>12 months post-ictus, 57.5±9.6 y.o.) individuals poststroke and eleven nonimpaired participants (53.3±4.1 y.o.). Participants walked overground in a robotic device, the KineAssist Walking and Balance Training System that provided varying degrees of BWS (0-20% in 5% increments) while individuals self-selected their walking speed. Self-selected walking speed and braking and propulsive GRF impulses were quantified. Out of 10 poststroke individuals, 8 increased their walking speed 13% (p=0.004) under some level of BWS (5% n=2, 10% n=3, 20% n=3) whereas nonimpaired controls did not change speed (p=0.470). In individuals poststroke, changes to self-selected walking speed were correlated with changes in paretic propulsive impulses (r=0.68, p=0.003) and nonparetic braking impulses (r=-0.80, p=0.006), but were not correlated with decreased paretic braking impulses (r=0.50 p=0.14). This investigation demonstrates that when individuals poststroke are provided with BWS and allowed to self-select their overground walking speed, they are capable of achieving faster speeds by modulating braking impulses on the nonparetic limb and propulsive impulses of the paretic limb. PMID:25770079

  19. Effect of Body-Weight-Support Running on Lower-Limb Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Neal, Michael; Fleming, Neil; Eberman, Lindsey; Games, Kenneth; Vaughan, Jeremiah

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Body-weight-support (BWS) running is increasing in popularity, despite limited evidence of its effects on running mechanics. Objectives To determine the effect of increasing BWS on lower-limb biomechanics during lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill running. Methods Fourteen male recreational runners completed 15 randomized trials on an LBPP treadmill at 5 levels of BWS and 3 velocities (1-minute trials with 3-minute recovery). Knee and ankle kinematic data were recorded continuously via electrogoniometry. Synchronous in-shoe plantar-pressure data identified stride onset and quantified foot-segment forces. Data were recorded during the final 30 seconds of each trial and averaged over 10 consecutive stride cycles. Results Higher levels of BWS resulted in significantly (P<.001) increased stride duration, reduced stride frequency, and reduced ground contact time (GCT). In addition, normalized GCT (GCT/stride duration) was significantly reduced (P<.001), indicating increased flight time. Increasing BWS resulted in significant reductions (P<.001) in peak knee flexion and dorsiflexion and reduced overall knee and ankle range of motion during the stance phase. Conclusion Running on an LBPP treadmill alters lower-limb kinematics, resulting in reduced ankle and knee joint range of motion. In addition, increased BWS alters stride characteristics, resulting in shorter GCT and longer flight time. Clinicians must be aware of lower-limb kinematic alterations to provide safe and effective parameters for rehabilitation involving LBPP treadmills. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):784-793. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6503. PMID:27581179

  20. A finite difference method with periodic boundary conditions for simulations of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Greg; Harkins, Kevin D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Trouard, Theodore P.

    2012-02-01

    A new finite difference (FD) method for calculating the time evolution of complex transverse magnetization in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy experiments is described that incorporates periodic boundary conditions. The new FD method relaxes restrictions on the allowable time step size employed in modeling which can significantly reduce computation time for simulations of large physical extent and allow for more complex, physiologically relevant, geometries to be simulated.

  1. Application of a body-weight-supporting kite for sprint running.

    PubMed

    Kratky, Sascha; Müller, Erich

    2013-11-01

    Improvements in sprint performance at the top level require adaptations concerning force application because ground contact time diminishes with increasing velocity. Applied training methods and devices must provoke appropriate stimuli. A knowledge about positive and negative effects of these stimuli is vital for coaches. The purpose of this study was to determine the angle of attack and lifting and retarding forces of a novel sprint training device that supports the athlete's body weight (BW), thereby decreasing ground contact time during sprints. Three different kite sizes (1.10, 1.75, 2.25 m) were investigated. A bicycle was used to accelerate the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) parawings (NPW-120, NPW-150, and NPW-170) on an indoor track to acquire data at velocities between 6.5 and 10.5 m · s. During a 5-m interval of constant speed, the resultant force of the kite was recorded on a portable computer by a load cell. The angle of attack was determined by a high-speed camera, and the mean velocity in the 5-m sector was measured by a laser gauge. Lifting and retarding forces were derived from the resultant force and angle of attack. Quadratic regression equations for lifting and retarding forces, depending on the velocity, were calculated for all 3 NPWs. A clear difference (p < 0.001) depending on the kite size was revealed for lifting and retarding forces. These forces also indicated high correlation coefficients related to velocity (r > 0.98; p < 0.001), whereas the angle of attack remained almost constant across the entire velocity range in all NPWs, yielding a lift-to-drag ratio of 2.35. Because of the kite's small retarding forces, we recommend the application of the NPW during the high-speed phase of sprinting with lifting force probably counteracting adverse effects. By adding a towing system, the retarding force can be fine tuned, erased, or turned into overspeed assistance, thereby emphasizing BW support. PMID:23442285

  2. Blade loss dynamics of a magnetically supported rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggiano, F.; Schweitzer, G.

    The equations for a rigid rotor in magnetic bearings are derived and examined for their response following a sudden unbalance created by a blade loss. The investigations concentrate on the maximum transient and steady-state response after unbalance. The analytical results are compared with experiments which were performed on a magnetic bearing test stand at our laboratory. A major result is that magnetic bearings are very well suited to cope with the loss of a rotor blade.

  3. Men’s Perceptions of Pregnancy-Related Weight Gain: A Psychosocial Firestorm (Upheaval) Intertwined With Supportive Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kristen S.; Best, Melissa; Schaller, Stephanie; Kirton, Kim; Cancilla, Amanda Gordon; Carver, Priscilla; Stokes, Shannon; Horton-Hargrove, Telesha; Murry, Tina J.; Ray, Jill

    2012-01-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 men who had a significant other who had given birth within the last 5 years. Men were asked about their perceptions of pregnancy-related weight gain, and content analysis was used to identify themes from the interviews. Men described nine themes related to perinatal weight gain: (a) negative perceptions, (b) eating behaviors, (c) exercise habits, (d) health impact, (e) body changes, (f) weight-loss success, (g) “it bothered her more than me,” (h) “the weight gain wasn’t a problem,” and (i) intimacy. Together, these themes offer a glimpse into men’s experiences and highlight the discord and balance between experiencing negative feelings/perceptions and being a supportive partner. This information on how men perceive pregnancy-related weight gain can be used to develop interventions to assist men to support their significant others in meeting weight loss goals following pregnancy. PMID:23997550

  4. Assessment of Weight Bias Among Pediatric Nurses and Clinical Support Staff Toward Obese Patients and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Janelle T; Amankwah, Ernest K; Hernandez, Raquel G

    2016-01-01

    The increasing burden of obesity is prevalent in the pediatric populations. Pediatric nurses are spending increasing amounts of time and effort caring for obese patients however no prior studies have explored how nurses perceive obese patients. The purpose of this study is to identify weight bias in pediatric nurses (RNs) and clinical support staff (CSS) working in a pediatric hospital setting. A convenience sample of RNs and CSS from an urban, pediatric hospital were surveyed using the Nurses' Attitudes toward Obesity and Obese Patients Scale (NATOOPS), which consists of 6 patient-care factors with an additional factor added to assess bias towards the patient's caregiver. Mean factor scores ≥50 indicated bias. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics and means were compared using independent t tests. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association between putative risk factors and weight bias. RNs and CSS (N=308) demonstrated weight bias toward obese patient characteristics (mean=61.9) and perceived controllability of obesity (mean=65.8). CSS felt negatively about their supportive roles in caring for obese patients (mean=52.5). Respondent weight status and professional title resulted in variability of biased attitudes. Race, employment status, number of obese patients cared for daily, and department were predictive of biased attitudes. Weight biased attitudes toward obese pediatric patients and their caregivers were found among RNs and CSS. Future qualitative research will assist in the understanding the factors that cause nurse weight bias. PMID:26948091

  5. Feasibility of Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment Enhanced with Peer Support and Mobile Health Technology for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Naslund, John A; Shevenell, Megan; Mueser, Kim T; Bartels, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    Effective and scalable lifestyle interventions are needed to address high rates of obesity in people with serious mental illness (SMI). This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of a behavioral weight loss intervention enhanced with peer support and mobile health (mHealth) technology for obese individuals with SMI. The Diabetes Prevention Program Group Lifestyle Balance intervention enhanced with peer support and mHealth technology was implemented in a community mental health setting. Thirteen obese individuals with SMI participated in a pre-post pilot study of the 24-week intervention. Feasibility was assessed by program attendance, and participant satisfaction and suggestions for improving the model. Descriptive changes in weight and fitness were also explored. Overall attendance amounted to approximately half (56 %) of weekly sessions. At 6-month follow-up, 45 % of participants had lost weight, and 45 % showed improved fitness by increasing their walking distance. Participants suggested a number of modifications to increase the relevance of the intervention for people with SMI, including less didactic instruction and more active learning, a simplified dietary component, more in depth technology training, and greater attention to mental health. The principles of standard behavioral weight loss treatment provide a useful starting point for promoting weight loss in people with SMI. However, adaptions to standard weight loss curricula are needed to enhance engagement, participation, and outcomes to respond to the unique challenges of individuals with SMI. PMID:26462674

  6. Physical Activity of Underweight, Normal Weight and Overweight Polish Adolescents: The Role of Classmate and Teacher Support in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantanista, Adam; Osinski, Wieslaw; Bronikowski, Michal; Tomczak, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships of classmate and teacher support during physical education (PE) lessons on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity of 14-16 year-old students whom were underweight, normal weight and overweight. The cross-sectional sample for the study concerned data from 1702 girls and 1547 boys, recruited…

  7. Evaluation of Angiographic and Technical Aspects of Carotid Stenting with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kurre, Wiebke; Morawe, Gerald; Zanella, Friedhelm; Rochemont, Richard Du Mesnil de

    2009-07-15

    The detection of clinically silent ischemic lesions on postprocedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has become a preferred method for the description of embolic risks. The purpose of this single-center study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) could determine material related or technical risk factors of filter-protected carotid stenting. Eighty-four patients with symptomatic severe ({>=}60%) carotid artery stenoses received filter-protected carotid stenting. Standard DWI (b = 1000) was performed within 48 h before and after carotid stenting. The occurrence and load of new postinterventional DWI lesions were assessed. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with DWI lesions, with emphasis on technical factors such as use of different access devices (guiding catheter method vs. long carotid sheath method), type of stent (open-cell nitinol stent vs. closed-cell Wallstent), and protective device (filters with 80-{mu}m vs. 110-120-{mu}m pore size). Markers for generalized atherosclerosis and for degree and site of stenosis were assessed to allow comparison of adequate risk profiles. Access, protective device, and stent type were not significantly associated with new embolic DWI lesions when we compared patients with equivalent risk profiles (long carotid sheath method 48% [11 of 23] vs. guiding catheter method 44% [27 of 61], Wallstent 47% [15 of 32] vs. nitinol stent 44% [23 of 52], and small pore size filter 61% [11 of 18] vs. large pore size filter 41% [27 of 66]). Single-center DWI studies with a moderate number of cases are inadequate for proper assessment of the embolic risk of technical- or material-related risk factors in carotid stenting. Larger multicenter studies with more cases are needed.

  8. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging: sensitivity and apparent diffusion constant in stroke.

    PubMed

    Jones, S C; Perez-Trepichio, A D; Xue, M; Furlan, A J; Awad, I A

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI) is sensitive to the diffusibility of water and may offer characterization and anatomical localization of stroke leading to early tailored therapeutic intervention. We compared DWI, the apparent diffusion constant (ADC), and autoradiographic cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in the rat. Sprague-Dawley rats were embolized with a single silicone cylinder injected into the internal carotid artery. Both common carotids were permanently ligated. The animals were anesthetized (isoflurane in O2), and paralyzed (gallamine). MR-DWI were obtained with a GE 4.7 T magnet (TE = 3 s, TR = 80 msec, b = 2393.10(-3) mm2/s, slice thickness 3 mm). DWI and CBF autoradiograms were compared visually. ADC was assessed in various regions, including ischemic cortex and a region homologous to ischemic cortex. Imaging times from stroke onset were 50 +/- 6 min (mean +/- SEM) for DWI, 185 +/- 17 min for a second DWI. CBF was determined at 258 +/- 15 min. The specificity was 100% at both 50 min and 185 min, indicating that there were no false positives; in 3 animals ischemia was not present. However, the sensitivity analysis indicated that early DWI yields some false negatives; at 50 min the sensitivity was 60%. We attribute our result of low early sensitivity to small infarcts in relation to the slice thickness. Later, at 185 min, sensitivity was 100%. The first ADCs were higher than the second ADC values in ischemic cortex. For infarcts larger than the slice thickness, early MR-DWI is highly sensitive for imaging evolving ischemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7976548

  9. The effect of arm weight support on upper limb muscle synergies during reaching movements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compensating for the effect of gravity by providing arm-weight support (WS) is a technique often utilized in the rehabilitation of patients with neurological conditions such as stroke to facilitate the performance of arm movements during therapy. Although it has been shown that, in healthy subjects as well as in stroke survivors, the use of arm WS during the performance of reaching movements leads to a general reduction, as expected, in the level of activation of upper limb muscles, the effects of different levels of WS on the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of upper limb muscles have not been thoroughly investigated before. Methods In this study, we systematically assessed the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of 14 upper limb muscles in a group of 9 healthy subjects who performed 3-D arm reaching movements while provided with different levels of arm WS. We studied the hand trajectory and the trunk, shoulder, and elbow joint angular displacement trajectories for different levels of arm WS. Besides, we analyzed the amplitude of the surface electromyographic (EMG) data collected from upper limb muscles and investigated patterns of coordination via the analysis of muscle synergies. Results The characteristics of the kinematics of motion varied across WS conditions but did not show distinct trends with the level of arm WS. The level of activation of upper limb muscles generally decreased, as expected, with the increase in arm WS. The same eight muscle synergies were identified in all WS conditions. Their level of activation depended on the provided level of arm WS. Conclusions The analysis of muscle synergies allowed us to identify a modular organization underlying the generation of arm reaching movements that appears to be invariant to the level of arm WS. The results of this study provide a normative dataset for the assessment of the effects of the level of arm WS on muscle synergies in stroke

  10. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dongsu; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  11. An 8-Week Web-Based Weight Loss Challenge With Celebrity Endorsement and Enhanced Social Support: Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J; Callister, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Background Initial engagement and weight loss within Web-based weight loss programs may predict long-term success. The integration of persuasive Web-based features may boost engagement and therefore weight loss. Objective To determine whether an 8-week challenge within a commercial Web-based weight loss program influenced weight loss, website use, and attrition in the short term, when compared to the standard program. Methods De-identified data for participants (mean age 36.7±10.3 years; 86% female) who enrolled in the Biggest Loser Club (BLC) (n=952) and the BLC’s Shannan Ponton Fast Track Challenge (SC) for 8 weeks (n=381) were compared. The BLC program used standard evidence-based website features, with individualized calorie and exercise targets to facilitate a weight loss of 0.5-1 kg per week (–500kcal/day less than estimated energy expenditure). SC used the same website features but in addition promoted greater initial weight loss using a 1200 kcal/day energy intake target and physical activity energy expenditure of 600 kcal/day. SC used persuasive features to facilitate greater user engagement, including offering additional opportunities for social support (eg, webinar meetings with a celebrity personal trainer and social networking) endorsed by a celebrity personal trainer. Self-reported weekly weight records were used to determine weight change after 8 weeks. A primary analysis was undertaken using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) with all available weight records for all participants included. Dropout (participants who cancelled their subscription) and nonusage (participants who stopped using the Web-based features) attrition rates at 8 weeks were calculated. The number of participants who accessed each website feature and the total number of days each feature was used were calculated. The difference between attrition rates and website use for the two programs were tested using chi-square and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests, respectively. Results

  12. Family factors and social support in the developmental outcomes of very low-birth weight children.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D P; Park, J M

    2000-06-01

    This study used data that were representative of the normative population of all infants born in 1988 and were followed during the first 3 years of life. Large developmental delays and limitations in function were common among children weighing less than 1500 g at birth. Among very low-birth weight infants, minority status and living in a household headed by a single mother further worsen the disadvantages associated with a very low birth weight. Nor could the disadvantages associated with very low birth weight be accounted for by controls for other risk factors or buffering statuses and behaviors. Among all children (including those of very low birth weight) poverty, reliance on Medicaid and other government sources for health insurance, a history of risky behaviors, and inadequate prenatal care are the major risk factors for developmental delays, limitations in function, and impairment at birth. State program benefit levels have no obvious effects on child outcomes, taking into account participation in individual programs. An important finding in light of TANF is that maternal work, the use of child care, and the form and cost of child care did not influence developmental delay, limitation in function, or impairment, the outcomes that we were able to measure during the first 3 years of life. TANF eligibility requirements, however, may increase difficulty in obtaining prenatal and other medical services for mothers and children in need--factors shown here to be related strongly to increased risk of low birth weight and developmental delays, limitations, and impairments. Race and ethnicity, poverty status, and family structure are fundamental factors in early child development and function. Minority status, poverty, and single-parent households greatly increase the likelihood that a mother will engage in risky behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, illegal drug use) during pregnancy and receive inadequate prenatal care. Risky behaviors and inadequate prenatal care are

  13. Vibration study of the APS storage ring 0.8 meter quadrupole magnet/magnet support assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this study are as follows: Determine the vibration characteristics (frequency, damping, and mode shapes) of the magnet on prototypic supports (the actual mounting system used to mount the magnet on the girder). Measure system response to ambient floor motion. Measure the effect of various modifications to determine if the magnet response can be modified to minimize unwanted response characteristics. Modifications investigated include support schemes, increasing system damping, and increasing mechanical rigidity. Measure system response to coolant flow. Determine vibrational characteristics of a large concrete block placed on a concrete floor, including response to ambient floor motions.

  14. Robust optimal design of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments for skin microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Raguin, L. G.

    2010-10-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in several diseases including chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance (MR) has the potential to provide quantitative information and a better penetration depth compared with other non-invasive methods such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. The continuous progress in hardware resulting in higher sensitivity must be coupled with advances in data acquisition schemes. In this article, we first introduce a physical model for quantifying skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MR (DWMR) based on an effective dispersion model for skin leading to a q-space model of the DWMR complex signal, and then design the corresponding robust optimal experiments. The resulting robust optimal DWMR protocols improve the worst-case quality of parameter estimates using nonlinear least squares optimization by exploiting available a priori knowledge of model parameters. Hence, our approach optimizes the gradient strengths and directions used in DWMR experiments to robustly minimize the size of the parameter estimation error with respect to model parameter uncertainty. Numerical evaluations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach as compared to conventional DWMR protocols.

  15. Advanced Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques of the Human Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Jalal B.; Bammer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Unlike those of the brain, advances in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the human spinal cord have been challenged by the more complicated and inhomogeneous anatomy of the spine, the differences in magnetic susceptibility between adjacent air and fluid-filled structures and the surrounding soft tissues, and the inherent limitations of the initially used echo-planar imaging techniques used to image the spine. Interval advances in DWI techniques for imaging the human spinal cord, with the specific aims of improving the diagnostic quality of the images, and the simultaneous reduction in unwanted artifacts have resulted in higher-quality images that are now able to more accurately portray the complicated underlying anatomy and depict pathologic abnormality with improved sensitivity and specificity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has benefited from the advances in DWI techniques, as DWI images form the foundation for all tractography and DTI. This review provides a synopsis of the many recent advances in DWI of the human spinal cord, as well as some of the more common clinical uses for these techniques, including DTI and tractography. PMID:22158130

  16. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging for acute stroke: practical and popular

    PubMed Central

    Tan, P L; King, D; Durkin, C J; Meagher, T M; Briley, D

    2006-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the feasibility and impact of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) as the first line neuroimaging of stroke at a district general hospital. Methods Prospective audit of all in‐patients admitted with clinically suspected acute stroke and referred for imaging over a consecutive 17 week period. The data collected included scan type, time from cerebral event to imaging request, and time from formal radiological request to neuroimaging. Clinicians' (general physicians, neurologists, and radiologists) perceptions were assessed by a questionnaire. Results 148 patients had neuroimaging for clinically suspected stroke during this period. Eighty one per cent of patients (120 of 148) had DW MRI as first line. Ninety two per cent of these patients had DW MRI within 24 hours of the formal radiological request. Twenty eight patients did not undergo DW MRI because lack of MRI safety, clinical state, unavailability because of maintenance service or lack of trained staff. Clinicians found the introduction of the DW MRI based service a significant improvement on computed tomography, especially for equivocal cases. Conclusion DW based MRI service is both feasible and sustainable in the setting of a district general hospital and most clinicians feel that this is a significant improvement to stroke services. PMID:16597819

  17. Anomalous diffusion of brain metabolites evidenced by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marchadour, Charlotte; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Hantraye, Philippe; Lebon, Vincent; Valette, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Translational displacement of molecules within cells is a key process in cellular biology. Molecular motion potentially depends on many factors, including active transport, cytosol viscosity and molecular crowding, tortuosity resulting from cytoskeleton and organelles, and restriction barriers. However, the relative contribution of these factors to molecular motion in the cytoplasm remains poorly understood. In this work, we designed an original diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy strategy to probe molecular motion at subcellular scales in vivo. This led to the first observation of anomalous diffusion, that is, dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on the diffusion time, for endogenous intracellular metabolites in the brain. The observed increase of the ADC at short diffusion time yields evidence that metabolite motion is characteristic of hindered random diffusion rather than active transport, for time scales up to the dozen milliseconds. Armed with this knowledge, data modeling based on geometrically constrained diffusion was performed. Results suggest that metabolite diffusion occurs in a low-viscosity cytosol hindered by ∼2-μm structures, which is consistent with known intracellular organization. PMID:22929443

  18. Role of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging in Cerebral Alveolar Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Guocai; ZHANG, Qingxin; TANG, Guibo; XU, Hui; YANG, Zhen; GUO, Jianzhong; LIANG, Lin; QI, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Background: To analyze the characteristic performance of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in cerebral alveolar echinococcosis (CAE). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 clinical-identified CAE cases MR performance, and summarized the MRS and SWI performance of CAE. Results: The 10 cases of CAE all had the history of primary HAE, among who 6 cases had single lesion (60%), while the rest 4 cases had multiple lesions (40%); and 4 cases were concomitant with lung metastases. MRI performance: T2WI lesions were coal-like low-signal shadow, with multiple small vesicles inside the lesions; MRS performance: NAA, Cho and Cr significantly reduced, an abnormally high and steep crest was found at 1.4 ppm; the phase diagram and strength diagram of SWI showed isointensity. Conclusion: The MRS and SWI of CAE could provide important supplemental information for the diagnosis of CAE, especially the abnormally high and steep crest at 1.4 ppm provide the reliable image basis for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of CAE. PMID:25904955

  19. Electromagnet Weight Reduction in a Magnetic Levitation System for Contactless Delivery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Do-Kwan; Woo, Byung-Chul; Koo, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Chang

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an optimum design of a lightweight vehicle levitation electromagnet, which also provides a passive guide force in a magnetic levitation system for contactless delivery applications. The split alignment of C-shaped electromagnets about C-shaped rails has a bad effect on the lateral deviation force, therefore, no-split positioning of electromagnets is better for lateral performance. This is verified by simulations and experiments. This paper presents a statistically optimized design with a high number of the design variables to reduce the weight of the electromagnet under the constraint of normal force using response surface methodology (RSM) and the kriging interpolation method. 2D and 3D magnetostatic analysis of the electromagnet are performed using ANSYS. The most effective design variables are extracted by a Pareto chart. The most desirable set is determined and the influence of each design variable on the objective function can be obtained. The generalized reduced gradient (GRG) algorithm is adopted in the kriging model. This paper’s procedure is validated by a comparison between experimental and calculation results, which shows that the predicted performance of the electromagnet designed by RSM is in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:22163572

  20. Electromagnet weight reduction in a magnetic levitation system for contactless delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Do-Kwan; Woo, Byung-Chul; Koo, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Chang

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an optimum design of a lightweight vehicle levitation electromagnet, which also provides a passive guide force in a magnetic levitation system for contactless delivery applications. The split alignment of C-shaped electromagnets about C-shaped rails has a bad effect on the lateral deviation force, therefore, no-split positioning of electromagnets is better for lateral performance. This is verified by simulations and experiments. This paper presents a statistically optimized design with a high number of the design variables to reduce the weight of the electromagnet under the constraint of normal force using response surface methodology (RSM) and the kriging interpolation method. 2D and 3D magnetostatic analysis of the electromagnet are performed using ANSYS. The most effective design variables are extracted by a Pareto chart. The most desirable set is determined and the influence of each design variable on the objective function can be obtained. The generalized reduced gradient (GRG) algorithm is adopted in the kriging model. This paper's procedure is validated by a comparison between experimental and calculation results, which shows that the predicted performance of the electromagnet designed by RSM is in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:22163572

  1. Secondary neurolymphomatosis detected by whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yoshino, Kazuhiro; Sakaida, Emiko; Hashimoto, Shinichiro; Takeda, Yusuke; Kawajiri, Chika; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2013-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare clinical entity defined as peripheral nervous system infiltration by lymphoma. The diagnosis is difficult and often elusive. Whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) was developed to enhance the detection of vaguely delineated tumors. Here, we describe the case of a 71-year-old male with secondary NL of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that was successfully detected by whole-body DW MRI. The patient was diagnosed with DLBCL extending from the ethmoidal sinus to the nasal cavity, orbital cavity, and anterior cranial fossa. Although he was administered R-THP-COP chemotherapy and the tumor remarkably decreased in size, he developed painful paresthesia and weakness in the left upper and bilateral lower extremities during treatment. Because lymphoma cells were detected in his spinal fluid, high-dose methotrexate (MTX) and weekly intrathecal MTX and cytarabine injections were administered. Test results for lymphoma cells in the spinal fluid became negative ; however, the neurological disorders progressed. Whole-body DW MRI was performed as whole-body screening and could localize NL at the left cervical and bilateral lumbar nerve roots. Both cervical spine plain MRI and enhanced computed tomography performed around the same time could not detect the cervical lesion. Our case report suggests that whole-body DW MRI is a useful diagnostic imaging procedure, especially as whole-body screening in facilities where PET/CT is not available. PMID:24369224

  2. Meta-analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in identification of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongyuan; Ma, Xuelei; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Jingyi; Liu, Rongjun; Chen, Zihang; Chen, Jinna; Huang, Jingwen; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in identification of colorectal cancer. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed for studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of DWI in identification of colorectal cancer. Methodological quality was assessed by Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy 2 (QUADAS 2) tool. After extracting data, we estimated the pooled sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and constructed summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) curve. Results: Ten studies involving 367 malignant lesions and 178 benign lesions were considered eligible after full-text review. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90-0.97) and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.85-0.97), respectively. Positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 12.8 (95% CI: 5.99-27.4) and 0.06 (95% CI: 0.03-0.11), respectively. The area under SROC curve was 0.98. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis indicates that DWI is a highly accurate diagnostic method in identification of colorectal cancer. PMID:26770325

  3. Evaluation of Public Health Professionals' Capacity to Implement Environmental Changes Supportive of Healthy Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantner, Leigh A.; Olson, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Community-based interventions to promote healthy weights by making environmental and policy changes in communities may be an important strategy in reversing the obesity epidemic. However, challenges faced by local public health professionals in facilitating effective environmental and policy change need to be better understood and addressed. To…

  4. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  5. Clinically Confirmed Stroke With Negative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Stephen D.J.; Doubal, Fergus N.; Dennis, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We sought to establish whether the presence (versus absence) of a lesion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion weighting (DWI-MRI) at presentation with acute stroke is associated with worse clinical outcomes at 1 year. Methods— We recruited consecutive patients with a nondisabling ischemic stroke and performed DWI-MRI. Patients were followed up at 1 year to establish stroke recurrence (clinical or on MRI), cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised,<88) and modified Rankin Scale. Results— A median of 4 days post stroke, one third (76/264; 29%) of patients did not have a DWI lesion (95% confidence interval, 23%–35%). There was no statistically significant difference between those with and without a DWI lesion with respect to age or vascular risk factors. Patients without a lesion were more likely to be women or have previous stroke. At 1 year, 11 of 76 (14%) patients with a DWI-negative index stroke had a clinical diagnosis of recurrent stroke or transient ischemic attack, 33% had cognitive impairment (Addenbrooke Cognitive Assessment Revised <88), and 40% still had modified Rankin Scale >1, no different from DWI-positive patients; DWI-positive patients were more likely to have a new lesion on MRI (14%), symptomatic or asymptomatic, than DWI-negative patients (2%; P=0.02). Our data were consistent with 6 other studies (total n=976), pooled proportion of DWI-negative patients was 21% (95% confidence interval, 12%–32%). Conclusions— Nearly one third of patients with nondisabling stroke do not have a relevant lesion on acute DWI-MRI. Patients with negative DWI-MRI had no better prognosis than patients with a lesion. DWI-negative stroke patients should receive secondary prevention. PMID:26419965

  6. Acute pancreatitis with gradient echo T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng Yue; Chen, Tian Wu; Huang, Xiao Hua; Li, Xing Hui; Wang, Si Yue; Liu, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Background To study gradient recalled echo (GRE) T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI) for normal pancreas and acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods Fifty-one patients without any pancreatic disorders (control group) and 117 patients with AP were recruited. T2* values derived from T2*WI of the pancreas were measured for the two groups. The severity of AP was graded by the magnetic resonance severity index (MRSI) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the T2* values and AP severity. The usefulness of the T2* value for diagnosing AP and the relationship between the T2* values and the severity of AP were analyzed. Results On GRE-T2*WI, the normal pancreas showed a well-marinated and consistently homogeneous isointensity. Edematous AP, as well as the non-necrotic area in necrotizing AP, showed ill-defined but homogeneous signal intensity. AP with pancreatic hemorrhage showed a decreased T2* value and a signal loss on the signal decay curve. The T2* value of pancreas in the AP group was higher than that of the control group (t=−8.20, P<0.05). The T2* value tended to increase along with the increase in MRSI scores but not with the APACHE II scores (P>0.05). AP was associated with a one standard deviation increment in the T2* value (OR =1.37; 95% CI: 1.216–1.532). Conclusions T2*WI demonstrates a few characteristics of the normal pancreas and AP, which could potentially be helpful for detecting hemorrhage, and contributes to diagnosing AP and its severity. PMID:27190768

  7. Value of 3 Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessing liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Papalavrentios, Lavrentios; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Chourmouzi, Danai; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Constantinides, Manos; Drevelegas, Antonios; Talwalkar, Jayant; Akriviadis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data are available regarding the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the new generation 3 Tesla technology, and especially diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting liver fibrosis. The aim of our pilot study was to assess the clinical performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of liver parenchyma for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods 18 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD underwent DWI with 3 Tesla MRI. DWI was performed with single-shot echo-planar technique at b values of 0-500 and 0-1000 s/mm2. ADC was measured in four locations in the liver and the mean ADC value was used for analysis. Staging of fibrosis was performed according to the METAVIR system. Results The median age of patients was 52 years (range 23-73). The distribution of patients in different fibrosis stages was: 0 (n=1), 1 (n=7), 2 (n=1), 3 (n=5), 4 (n=4). Fibrosis stage was poorly associated with ADC at b value of 0-500 s/mm2 (r= -0.30, P=0.27). However it was significantly associated with ADC at b value of 0-1000 s/mm2 (r= -0.57, P=0.01). For this b value (0-1000 s/mm2) the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.93 for fibrosis stage ≥3 and the optimal ADC cut-off value was 1.16 ×10-3 mm2/s. Conclusion 3 Tesla DWI can possibly predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. PMID:25608776

  8. The role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the classification of hepatic hydatid cysts.

    PubMed

    Ceçe, Hasan; Gündoğan, Mehmet; Karakaş, Omer; Karakaş, Ekrem; Boyacı, Fatıma Nurefşan; Yıldız, Sema; Ozgönül, Abdullah; Karakaş, Emel Yiğit; Cullu, Neşat; Seker, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to classify different types of hepatic hydatid cysts (HHCs) by measuring the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). This prospective study comprised 44 patients. The 44 HHCs were classified using Gharbi ultrasonographic classification (GUC) and then T2WIs and DWIs were obtained. The ADC values were measured of the hydatid cyst (HC) subtypes. The distribution of the ADC values in the cyst groups was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test for multi groups and the Mann-Whitney U test for paired groups. To evaluate the efficacy of ADC values in cyst diagnosis, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. According to the GUC, there were 15 type 1, 11 type 2, 7 type 3, 5 type 4 and 6 type 5 HHCs. According to the ADC values in the paired comparisons, while types 1, 2 and 5 HCs were statistically differentiated from all other groups except the type 3 group, the type 4 group was differentiated from all other groups and the type 3 group was only differentiated from the type 4 group. When two groups were formed from the HHC subtypes with types 1, 2, and 3 in one group and types 4 and 5 in the other, a statistically significant difference was determined in the mean ADC values of these new groups. In conclusion the measurement of ADC values can be considered a promising parameter as an alternative to ultrasonography in the determination of subtypes of HHCs. PMID:23177089

  9. Effects of a Body-Weight Supporting Kite on Sprint Running Kinematics in Well-Trained Sprinters.

    PubMed

    Kratky, Sascha; Buchecker, Michael; Pfusterschmied, Jürgen; Szekely, Csaba; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Data of elite sprinters indicate that faster athletes realize shorter ground contact times compared with slower individuals. Furthermore, the importance of the so-called "front side mechanics" for elite sprint performance is frequently emphasized by researchers and coaches. Recently, it was demonstrated that using a body-weight supporting kite during full-effort sprints in highly trained sprinters leads to a reduction in ground contact time. The aim of this study was to investigate possible negative effects of this body-weight supporting device on sprint running kinematics, which was not clarified in previous studies. Eleven well-trained Austrian sprinters performed flying 20-m sprints under 2 conditions: (a) free sprint (FS); and (b) body-weight supported sprint (BWS). Sprint cycle characteristics were recorded during the high-speed phase by a 16 camera 3D-system (Vicon), an optical acquisition system (Optojump-next), and a high-speed camera. Paired sample t-tests and Cohen's d effect size were used to determine differences between sprinting conditions. Compared with FS, BWS caused a decrease in ground contact time by 5.6% and an increase in air time by 5.5% (both p < 0.001), whereas stride length and rate remained unchanged. Furthermore, a reduced hip joint extension at and after take-off, an increased maximal hip joint flexion (i.e., high knee position), and a smaller horizontal distance of the touchdown to the center of gravity could be observed (all p < 0.01). These results indicate no negative effects on front side mechanics during BWS and that sprinting with a body-weight supporting kite seems to be a highly specific method to reduce ground contact time in well-trained sprinters. PMID:26270692

  10. Development of a miniaturized, light-weight magnetic sector for a field-portable mass spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Tomassian, A. D.

    1991-01-01

    A miniaturized, lightweight magnetic sector for a focal plane mass spectrograph (Mattauch-Herzog design) has been designed and fabricated by using a new high-energy-product magnet material (Nd-B-Fe alloy) and a high permeability magnet yoke material (V-Co-Fe alloy). The magnetic sector weighs less than 10 kg, has a focal plane of 5.1 cm in length, and covers a nominal mass range of 40-240 amu. Such a magnetic sector, in conjunction with an array detector and a short microbore capillary column, is well suited for the development of a field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer instrument of high performance.

  11. Social support, perceptions of attractiveness, weight, and the CPI in socially anxious males and females.

    PubMed

    Haemmerlie, F M; Montgomery, R L; Melchers, J

    1988-05-01

    To see how socially anxious people function in a number of domains, Watson and Friend's (1969) Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (SAD) was administered to 101 undergraduates along with the California Personality Inventory (CPI) and the Psychosocial Support Inventory (PSI), a measure of social support. Additionally, a perceived attractiveness measure and various measures related to being overweight were taken. SAD scores correlated significantly in a negative direction with 13 of the 18 CPI scales, and those with high SAD scores had poorer social support networks. High SAD scores also were related to the perception of being overweight, but not to perceived physical attractiveness or to actually being overweight. Gender differences showed that females had more intimate social interactions and that socially anxious females relied more on their family for social support than did other people. Overall, the results suggested that the socially anxious person may have deficits in a variety of personal and interpersonal domains. PMID:3384973

  12. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pursey, Kirrilly M.; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J.; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E.; Burrows, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies. PMID:25988110

  13. Vibration study of the APS magnet support assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Chen, S.S.

    1990-11-01

    Stability of the positron closed orbit is a requirement for successful operation of the Advanced Photon Source. The fact that vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets can lead to distortion of the positron closed orbit and to potentially unacceptable beam emittance growth provides the motivation for the subject studies. Low frequency vibrations can be controlled with steering magnets using feedback systems, provided the vibration amplitudes are within the dynamic range of the controllers. High frequency vibration amplitudes, on the other hand, are out of the range of the controller and, therefore must be limited to ensure the emittance growth will not exceed a prescribed value. Vibration criteria were developed based on the requirement that emittance growth be limited to 10 percent. Recognizing that the quadrupole magnets have the most significant effect, three different scenarios were considered: vibration of a single quadrupole within the storage ring, random vibration of all the quadrupoles in the ring, and the hypothetical case of a plane wave sweeping across the site and the quadrupoles following the motion of the plane wave. The maximum allowable peak vibration amplitudes corresponding to these three vibration scenarios are given. The criteria associated with the passage of a plane wave is dependent on wavelength, or, alternatively, on frequency given the wave speed. The wave speed used is that measured as a part of the geotechnical investigation at the APS site.

  14. Magnetic Carbon Supported Palladium Nanoparticles: An Efficient and Sustainable Catalyst for Hydrogenation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; the catalyst can be used for the hydrogenation of alkenes and reduction of aryl nitro compounds.

  15. Sprint running with a body-weight supporting kite reduces ground contact time in well-trained sprinters.

    PubMed

    Kratky, Sascha; Müller, Erich

    2013-05-01

    It is well founded that ground contact time is the crucial part of sprinting because the available time window to apply force to the ground diminishes with growing running velocity. In view of this knowledge, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of body-weight support during full-effort sprints on ground contact time and selected stride parameters in 19 Austrian male elite sprinters. A kite with a lifting effect combined with a towing system to erase drag was used. The subjects performed flying 20-m sprints under 3 conditions: (a) free sprint; (b) body-weight supported sprint-normal speed (BWS-NS); and (c) body-weight supported sprint-overspeed (BWS-OS). Sprint cycle characteristics were recorded during the high-speed phase by an optical acquisition system. Additionally, running velocity was derived from the 20-m sprint time. Compared with the fastest free sprint, running velocity, step length, and step frequency remained unchanged during BWS-NS, whereas ground contact time decreased (-5.80%), and air time increased (+5.79%) (both p < 0.001). Throughout, BWS-OS ground contact time (-7.66%) was reduced, whereas running velocity (+2.72%), air time (+4.92%), step length (+1.98%) (all p < 0.001), and step frequency (+1.05%; p < 0.01) increased. Compared with BWS-NS, BWS-OS caused an increase in running velocity (+3.33%), step length (+1.92%) (both p < 0.001), and step frequency (+1.37%; p < 0.01), whereas ground contact time was diminished (-1.97%; p < 0.001). In summary, sprinting with a body-weight supporting kite appeared to be a highly specific method to simulate an advanced performance level, indicated by higher running velocities requiring reduced ground contact times. The additional application of an overspeed condition led to a further reduction of ground contact time. Therefore, we recommend body-weight supported sprinting as an additional tool in sprint training. PMID:22744303

  16. Magnetic Silica Supported Copper: A Modular Approach to Aqueous Ullmann-type Amination of Aryl Halides

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of magnetic silica supported copper catalyst has been described via in situ generated magnetic silica (Fe3O4@SiO2); the catalyst can be used for the efficacious amination of aryl halides in aqueous medium under microwave irradiation.

  17. Human milk feeding supports adequate growth in infants ≤ 1250 grams birth weight

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite current nutritional strategies, premature infants remain at high risk for extrauterine growth restriction. The use of an exclusive human milk-based diet is associated with decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but concerns exist about infants achieving adequate growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate growth velocities and incidence of extrauterine growth restriction in infants ≤ 1250 grams (g) birth weight (BW) receiving an exclusive human milk-based diet with early and rapid advancement of fortification using a donor human milk derived fortifier. Methods In a single center, prospective observational cohort study, preterm infants weighing ≤ 1250 g BW were fed an exclusive human milk-based diet until 34 weeks postmenstrual age. Human milk fortification with donor human milk derived fortifier was started at 60 mL/kg/d and advanced to provide 6 to 8 additional kilocalories per ounce (or 0.21 to 0.28 kilocalories per gram). Data for growth were compared to historical growth standards and previous human milk-fed cohorts. Results We consecutively evaluated 104 infants with mean gestational age of 27.6 ± 2.0 weeks and BW of 913 ± 181 g (mean ± standard deviation). Weight gain was 24.8 ± 5.4 g/kg/day with length 0.99 ± 0.23 cm/week and head circumference 0.72 ± 0.14 cm/week. There were 3 medical NEC cases and 1 surgical NEC case. 22 infants (21%) were small for gestational age at birth. Overall, 45 infants (43%) had extrauterine growth restriction. Weight velocity was affected by day of fortification (p = 0.005) and day of full feeds (p = 0.02). Our cohort had significantly greater growth in weight and length compared to previous entirely human milk-fed cohorts. Conclusions A feeding protocol for infants ≤ 1250 g BW providing an exclusive human milk-based diet with early and rapid advancement of fortification leads to growth meeting targeted standards with a low rate of extrauterine growth restriction. Consistent

  18. Evaluation of Public Health Professionals’ Capacity to Implement Environmental Changes Supportive of Healthy Weight

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Community-based interventions to promote healthy weights by making environmental and policy changes in communities may be an important strategy in reversing the obesity epidemic. However, challenges faced by local public health professionals in facilitating effective environmental and policy change need to be better understood and addressed. To better understand capacity-building needs, this study evaluated the efforts of the Healthy Start Partnership, a university-community project to promote healthy weights in young families in a rural eight-county area of upstate New York. Qualitative interviews (n = 30) and pre/post surveys (n = 31) were conducted over three years of the intervention. Challenges faced by partners significantly slowed progress of environmental interventions in some communities. First, many partners did not feel their “regular” jobs afforded them sufficient time to do community work. Second, many partners did not feel they had the personal political power to work on broader environmental, policy, or system change issues. Third, facilitating and policy change and reaching out to non-traditional partners, like businesses, required developing a new set of public health skills. Fourth, the long-time frame of environmental and policy work meant that many efforts would exceed the grant period. Building local public health leaders for environmental and policy change necessitates that these challenges are acknowledged and addressed. PMID:22326561

  19. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Blood Flow in the Microvasculature of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truica, Loredana Sorina

    In this thesis, water diffusion in human liver and placenta is studied using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging. For short, randomly oriented vascular segments, intravascular water motion is diffusion-like. For tissues with large vascular compartments the diffusion decay is bi-exponential with one component corresponding to diffusing water and the other to water in the microvasculature. This model, known as the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model, is seldom used with abdominal organs because of motion artifacts. This limitation was overcome for the experiments reported here by introducing: 1) parallel imaging, 2) navigator echo respiratory triggering (NRT), 3) a double echo diffusion sequence that inherently compensates for eddy current effects, 4) SPAIR fat suppression and 5) a superior approach to image analysis. In particular, the use of NRT allowed us to use a free breathing protocol instead of the previously required breath hold protocol. The resulting DWI images were of high quality and motion artifact free. Diffusion decays were measured over a larger portion of the decay than had previously been reported and the results are considerably better than those previously reported. For both studies, reliable measurements of the diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D) and perfusion fraction (f), were obtained using a region of interest analysis as well as a pixel-by-pixel approach. To within experimental error, all patients had the same values of D (1.10 mum 2/ms +/- 0.16 mum2/ms), D* (46 mum2/ms +/- 17 mum2/ms) and f (44.0% +/- 6.9%) in liver and D (1.8 mum 2/ms +/- 0.2 mum2/ms), D* (30 mum 2/ms +/- 12 mmu2/ms), and f (40% +/- 6%) in the placenta. No dependence on gestational age was found for the placental study. Parametric maps of f and D* were consistent with blood flow patterns in both systems. The model worked well for both investigated organs even though their anatomical structures are quite different. A method for

  20. Role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in differentiating malignancies from benign ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xinhua; Zhang, Hongbin; Meng, Shuang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Chuge

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the diagnostic values of computed tomography (CT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in differentiating malignancies from benign ovarian tumors and a meta-analysis to further confirm our results on DW-MRI. Methods: Totally 64 patients pathologically confirmed as ovarian cancer were included in this study. CT scan and DWI-MRI were performed and analyzed to get compared with pathological results, thereby assessing their accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Meta-analysis was conducted by database searching and strict eligibility criteria, using STATA 12.0 (Stata Corp, College Station, TX, USA) software. Results: The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for diagnosis of ovarian cancer in CT were 81.82%, 84.48%, 76.67%, 87.50% and 71.88%, respectively; those in DW-MRI were 89.77%, 93.10%, 83.33%, 91.53% and 86.21%, respectively. The Kappa coefficient of DW-MRI (K = 0.771) compared with pathological results was higher than CT (K = 0.602). The average apparent diffusion coefficient values of DW-MRI in diagnosis of benign and malignant ovarian tumors suggested statistically significant difference (1.325 ± 0.269×10-3 mm2/s vs. 0.878 ± 0.246×10-3 mm2/s, P < 0.001). Meta-analysis results showed that the combined sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio of DW-MRI in discriminating benign versus malignant ovarian tumors were 0.93, 0.88, 7.70, 0.08 and 101.24, respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.95. Conclusions: Both CT and DW-MRI were of great diagnostic value in differentiating malignancies from benign ovarian tumors, while DW-MRI was superior to CT with higher accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26884905

  1. Hemorrhage detection during focused-ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening by using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Chen, Jin-Chung; Hsu, Po-Hong; Wu, Xin-Yu; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2008-04-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound has been discovered to be able to locally and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which can be detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, side effects such as microhemorrhage, erythrocyte extravasations or even extensive hemorrhage may also occur. Although current contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI can be used to detect the changes in BBB permeability, its efficacy in detecting tissue hemorrhage after focused-ultrasound sonication remains limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging (MR-SWI) for identifying possible tissue hemorrhage associated with disruption of the BBB induced by focused ultrasound in a rat model. The brains of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 107 sonications, either unilaterally or bilaterally. Localized BBB opening was achieved by delivering burst-mode focused ultrasound energy into brain tissue in the presence of microbubbles. Rats were studied by T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI techniques, as well as by SWI. Tissue changes were analyzed histologically and the extent of apoptosis was investigated with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling method. The results demonstrated that SWI is more sensitive than standard T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI techniques in detecting hemorrhages after brain sonication. Longitudinal study showed that SWI is sensitive to the recovery process of the damage and, therefore, could provide important and complementary information to the conventional MR images. Potential applications such as drug delivery in the brain might be benefited. PMID:18313204

  2. Design and Analyisi of a Self-centered Cold Mass Support for the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Li, S. Y.; Guo, Xing Long; Zheng, Shi Xian; Green, Michael A.

    2011-05-04

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils in seven modules, which are magnetically hooked together since there is no iron to shield the coils and the return flux. The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module consists of a superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional conducting 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities. The coupling coil will produce up to a 2.2 T magnetic field on the centerline to keep the beam within the RF cavities. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in MICE is up to 500 kN in longitudinal direction, which will be transferred to the base of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module through a cold mass support system. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediate thermal interruption is applied to the coupling magnet, and the design is introduced in detail in this paper. The thermal and structural analysis on the cold mass support assembly has been carried out using ANSYS. The present design of the cold mass support can satisfy with the stringent requirements for the magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4.2 K and fully charged.

  3. Does Brief Telephone Support Improve Engagement With a Web-Based Weight Management Intervention? Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Leanne; Lloyd, Scott; Phillips, Dawn; Stuart, Beth; Williams, Sarah; Bradbury, Katherine; Roderick, Paul; Murray, Elizabeth; Michie, Susan; Little, Paul; Yardley, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent reviews suggest Web-based interventions are promising approaches for weight management but they identify difficulties with suboptimal usage. The literature suggests that offering some degree of human support to website users may boost usage and outcomes. Objective We disseminated the POWeR (“Positive Online Weight Reduction”) Web-based weight management intervention in a community setting. POWeR consisted of weekly online sessions that emphasized self-monitoring, goal-setting, and cognitive/behavioral strategies. Our primary outcome was intervention usage and we investigated whether this was enhanced by the addition of brief telephone coaching. We also explored group differences in short-term self-reported weight loss. Methods Participants were recruited using a range of methods including targeted mailouts, advertisements in the local press, notices on organizational websites, and social media. A total of 786 adults were randomized at an individual level through an online procedure to (1) POWeR only (n=264), (2) POWeR plus coaching (n=247), or (3) a waiting list control group (n=275). Those in the POWeR plus coaching arm were contacted at approximately 7 and 28 days after randomization for short coaching telephone calls aimed at promoting continued usage of the website. Website usage was tracked automatically. Weight was assessed by online self-report. Results Of the 511 participants allocated to the two intervention groups, the median number of POWeR sessions completed was just one (IQR 0-2 for POWeR only, IQR 0-3 for POWeR plus coach). Nonetheless, a substantial minority completed at least the core three sessions of POWeR: 47 participants (17.8%, 47/264) in the POWeR-only arm and 64 participants (25.9%, 64/247) in the POWeR plus coaching arm. Participants in the POWeR plus coaching group persisted with the intervention for longer and were 1.61 times more likely to complete the core three sessions than the POWeR-only group (χ2 1=4.93; OR 1

  4. The effectiveness of including support people in a cognitive behavioural weight loss maintenance programme for obese adults: study rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Rieger, E; Treasure, J; Swinbourne, J; Adam, B; Manns, C; Caterson, I

    2014-04-01

    The well-documented finding that obese adults have a high likelihood of weight regain following participation in behavioural weight loss programmes highlights the importance of developing more effective approaches for weight loss maintenance. One promising approach is to improve the quality of social support for effective weight control available to an obese individual by including support people in behavioural weight loss programmes. This paper describes the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial that evaluates the effectiveness of training support people to assist obese adults in their weight management. The study entails a two-arm randomized controlled trial in which obese participants take part in a 1-year (26-session) cognitive behaviour therapy group weight management programme, including motivational interviewing strategies (CBT-MI). In one arm, participants receive CBT-MI alone, while in the second arm (CBT-MI-SP), participants also have a support person who attends 10 group sessions designed to teach effective skills for supporting an individual in healthy weight control. More specifically, support people will be trained in skills that aim to promote self-motivation for weight management. Assessments of anthropometric, medical, behavioural, motivational, psychological and social functioning take place at pre-treatment, post-treatment and a 1-year follow-up. By helping obese participants to increase and sustain their motivation and skills for weight control both during treatment and in the crucial period after treatment cessation through the ongoing input of support people, the CBT-MI-SP approach of the current study has the potential to effectively help patients to achieve sustained weight loss while minimizing the patient's need for ongoing, intensive weight control treatment with its attendant costs. PMID:25826731

  5. Diagnostic Performance of Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Bone Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Peng; Cui, Long-Biao; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Cao, Jing; Chang, Ning; Tang, Xing; Qi, Shun; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Yin, Hong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current state-of-the-art nuclear medicine imaging methods (such as PET/CT or bone scintigraphy) may have insufficient sensitivity for predicting bone tumor, and substantial exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with the risk of secondary cancer development. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is radiation free and requires no intravenous contrast media, and hence is more suitable for population groups that are vulnerable to ionizing radiation and/or impaired renal functions. This meta-analysis was conducted to investigate whether whole-body DW-MRI is a viable means in differentiating bone malignancy. Medline and Embase databases were searched from their inception to May 2015 without language restriction for studies evaluating DW-MRI for detection of bone lesions. Methodological quality was assessed by the quality assessment of diagnostic studies (QUADAS-2) instrument. Sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and areas under the curve (AUC) were used as measures of the diagnostic accuracy. We combined the effects by using the random-effects mode. Potential threshold effects and publication bias were investigated. We included data from 32 studies with 1507 patients. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90–0.97), 0.92 (95% CI, 0.88–0.95), and 0.98 on a per-patient basis, and they were 0.91 (95% CI, 0.87–0.94), 0.94 (95% CI, 0.90–0.96), and 0.97 on a per-lesion basis. In subgroup analysis, there is no statistical significance found in the sensitivity and specificity of using DWI only and DWI combined with other morphological or functional imaging sequence in both basis (P > 0.05). A b value of 750 to 1000 s/mm2 enables higher AUC and DOR for whole-body imaging purpose when compared with other values in both basis either (P < 0.01). The ROC space did not show a curvilinear trend of points and a threshold effect was not observed. According to the Deek's plots, there was no publication bias on

  6. Extremely long-lived magnetic excitations in supported Fe chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, J. P.; Lorente, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical study of the lifetime of the first excited state of spin chains made of an odd number of Fe atoms on C u2N /Cu (100 ) . Yan, Choi, Burgess, Rolf-Pissarczyk, and Loth [Nat. Nanotech. 10, 40 (2015), 10.1038/nnano.2014.281] recently observed very long lifetimes in the case of F e3 chains. We consider the decay of the first excited state induced by electron-hole pair creation in the substrate. For a finite magnetic field, the two lowest-lying states in the chain have a quasi-Néel state structure. Decay from one state to the other strongly depends on the degree of entanglement of the local spins in the chain. The weak entanglement in the chain accounts for the long lifetimes that increase exponentially with chain length. Despite their apparently very different properties, the behavior of odd and even chains is governed by the same kind of phenomena, in particular entanglement effects. The present results account quite well for the lifetimes recently measured by Yan et al. on F e3 .

  7. Design of set-point weighting PIλ + Dμ controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, H; Fatehi, A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI(λ) + D(μ) controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI(λ) + D(μ) controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller. PMID:25554294

  8. Influence of magnetic non-uniformity existing in a rigid rotor supported by a superconducting magnetic bearing on its whirling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Soichiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Toshihiko

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting magnetic bearings (SMBs) have a significant feature over conventional bearings in terms of supporting a shaft without physical contact while attaining its stability without control. In their large-scale rotary applications, magnetization distribution of a rotor in the circumferential direction can be non-uniform and it would be better to know influence of such circumferential magnetic non-uniformity existing in a rotor on its dynamics, especially on its behaviors in the vicinity of the critical speed. In this study, further developing our previous research, we improved our analytical model so that we can adjust several different degrees of magnetic non-uniformity by arranging multiple magnetization vectors and investigated its influence. First, we simulated dynamical behavior of the system by numerical calculations and their results show that, with increasing the degree of magnetic non-uniformity, the whirling amplitude of the system, together with the difference of the amplitudes in the orthogonal directions in the whirling plane, get larger. Further, the rotational frequency at which the whirling amplitude takes its peak gets lower, which is caused by nonlinearity of the electromagnetic force. We carried out experiments and verified our numerical predicions.

  9. The relationship between body mass index and unhealthy weight control behaviors among adolescents: the role of family and peer social support.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S

    2012-12-01

    Adolescents classified as overweight or obese are more likely to use unhealthy weight control behaviors such as skipping meals or fasting than their healthy weight peers. Adolescents with low perceived social support may be at particular risk. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between adolescent overweight and obesity, indices of perceived peer and family social support, and their interaction in the use of unhealthy weight control behaviors among adolescents. The present study used data from the 2001-2002 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children collaborative survey. Participants included 4598 adolescent girls and boys in the ninth and tenth grades. Results of binary logistic regression analyses showed that obese boys and girls were more likely to use unhealthy weight control behaviors than their healthy weight peers. Boys and girls who endorsed difficult communication with their parents, low levels of parent school support, or frequent bullying were more likely to engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors than relevant comparison groups. Among girls, poor classmate relationships were associated with increased use of unhealthy weight control behaviors whereas fewer friendships were associated with decreased use. Results suggest that adolescents are at high risk for use of unhealthy weight control behaviors and would benefit from interventions to increase knowledge and social support for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight. PMID:22609397

  10. Magnetic properties of nickel and cobalt catalysts supported on nanoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Polo, C; Gil, A; Korili, S A; Pérez-Landazabal, J I; Recarte, V; Trujillano, R; Vicente, M A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work is to use magnetic measurements as a research tool in the study of possible metal-support interactions in nickel and cobalt nanoporous catalysts. Several physicochemical techniques, namely nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction and chemical analysis, were used to analyze the role of the preparation method and the nature of the support on the existence of such metal-support interactions and to relate them with the magnetic response of these nanoporous systems. The catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and precipitation-deposition with two commercial oxides, gamma-Al2O3 and SiO2, as supports. The magnetic behavior of the catalysts is drastically affected by the existence of interactions between the metal and the support during the preparation procedure. The samples with weak metal-support interactions have characteristic magnetic behavior of antiferromagnetic metal oxide nanoparticles, while the ones having strong interactions display spin-glass like behavior. PMID:18681026

  11. The utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of endometriomas from hemorrhagic ovarian cysts.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Mehtap; Idilman, Ilkay S; Toprak, Huseyin; Unal, Ozlem; Ipek, Ali; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in differentiation of endometrioma and hemorrhagic ovarian cyst. A total of 24 female patients who underwent pelvic MRI with an initial diagnosis of ovarian cyst were included in the study. The final diagnosis was endometrioma in 12 patients and hemorrhagic ovarian cyst in 12 patients. We observed significantly lower ADC values in endometriomas compared with hemorrhagic ovarian cysts in all b values. DW MRI with quantitative ADC measurements can be used for differentiation of endometrioma from hemorrhagic ovarian cysts. PMID:25986161

  12. A comparative quantitative analysis of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in echo planar and PROPELLER diffusion-weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Joon; Lee, Gui-Won; Park, Yong-Soon; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can remove magnetic susceptibility artifacts and compared apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for PROPELLER DWI and the common echo planar (EP) DWI. Twenty patients that underwent brain MRI with a metal dental implant were selected. A 3.0T MR scanner was then used to obtain EP DWI, PROPELLER DWI, and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for a b-value of 0 and 1,000 s/mm2. The frequencies of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in four parts of the brain (bilateral temporal lobes, pons, and orbit) were selected. In the ADC maps, we measured the ADC values of both sides of the temporal lobe and the pons. According to the study results, the frequency of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in PROPELLER DW images was lower than it was in EP DW images. In ADC maps, the ADC values of the bilateral temporal lobes and the pons were all higher in PROPELLER ADC maps than in EP ADC maps. Our findings show that when a high-field MRI machine is used, magnetic susceptibility artifacts can distort anatomical structures and produce high-intensity signals. Furthermore, our findings suggest that in many cases, PROPELLER DWI would be helpful in terms of achieving a correct diagnosis.

  13. Decoherence-governed magnetic-moment dynamics of supported atomic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás

    2015-11-01

    Due to the quantum evolution of molecular magnetic moments, the magnetic state of nanomagnets can suffer spontaneous changes. This process can be completely quenched by environment-induced decoherence. However, we show that for typical small supported atomic objects, the substrate-induced decoherence does change the magnetic-moment evolution but does not quell it. To be specific and to compare with experiment, we analyze the spontaneous switching between two equivalent magnetization states of atomic structures formed by Fe on Cu2N/Cu (1 0 0), measured by Loth et al (2012 Science 335 196-9). Due to the substrate-induced decoherence, the Rabi oscillations proper to quantum tunneling between magnetic states are replaced by an irreversible decay of long characteristic times leading to the observed stochastic magnetization switching. We show that the corresponding switching rates are small, rapidly decreasing with system’s size, with a 1/T thermal behavior and in good agreement with experiments. Quantum tunneling is recovered as the switching mechanism at extremely low temperatures below the μK range for a six-Fe-atom system and exponentially lower for larger atomic systems. The unexpected conclusion of this work is that experiments could detect the switching of these supported atomic systems because their magnetization evolution is somewhere between complete decoherence-induced stability and unobservably fast quantum-tunneling switching.

  14. Decoherence-governed magnetic-moment dynamics of supported atomic objects.

    PubMed

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás

    2015-11-18

    Due to the quantum evolution of molecular magnetic moments, the magnetic state of nanomagnets can suffer spontaneous changes. This process can be completely quenched by environment-induced decoherence. However, we show that for typical small supported atomic objects, the substrate-induced decoherence does change the magnetic-moment evolution but does not quell it. To be specific and to compare with experiment, we analyze the spontaneous switching between two equivalent magnetization states of atomic structures formed by Fe on Cu2N/Cu (1 0 0), measured by Loth et al (2012 Science 335 196-9). Due to the substrate-induced decoherence, the Rabi oscillations proper to quantum tunneling between magnetic states are replaced by an irreversible decay of long characteristic times leading to the observed stochastic magnetization switching. We show that the corresponding switching rates are small, rapidly decreasing with system's size, with a 1/T thermal behavior and in good agreement with experiments. Quantum tunneling is recovered as the switching mechanism at extremely low temperatures below the μK range for a six-Fe-atom system and exponentially lower for larger atomic systems. The unexpected conclusion of this work is that experiments could detect the switching of these supported atomic systems because their magnetization evolution is somewhere between complete decoherence-induced stability and unobservably fast quantum-tunneling switching. PMID:26471260

  15. In Vivo Magnetization Transfer and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detects Thrombus Composition in a Mouse Model of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Prakash; Modarai, Bijan; Smith, Alberto; Botnar, René M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis remains a major health problem necessitating accurate diagnosis. Thrombolysis is associated with significant morbidity and is effective only for the treatment of unorganized thrombus. We tested the feasibility of in vivo magnetization transfer (MT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to detect thrombus organization in a murine model of deep vein thrombosis. Methods and Results Deep vein thrombosis was induced in the inferior vena cava of male BALB/C mice. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction using MT, diffusion-weighted, inversion-recovery, and T1-mapping protocols. Delayed enhancement and T1 mapping were repeated 2 hours after injection of a fibrin contrast agent. Finally, excised thrombi were used for histology. We found that MT and diffusion-weighted imaging can detect histological changes associated with thrombus aging. MT rate (MTR) maps and percentage of MT rate (%MTR) allowed visualization and quantification of the thrombus protein content, respectively. The %MTR increased with thrombus organization and was significantly higher at days 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction (days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28: %MTR=2483±451, 2079±1210, 7029±2490, 10 295±4356, 32 994±25 449; Panova<0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the %MTR and the histological protein content of the thrombus (r=0.70; P<0.05). The apparent diffusion coefficient was lower in erythrocyte-rich and collagen-rich thrombus (0.72±0.10 and 0.69±0.05 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Thrombus at days 7 and 14 had the highest apparent diffusion coefficient values (0.95±0.09 and 1.10±0.18 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Conclusions MT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences are promising for the staging of thrombus composition and could be useful in guiding medical intervention. PMID:23564561

  16. Tensor Based Representation and Analysis of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barmpoutis, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    Cartesian tensor bases have been widely used to model spherical functions. In medical imaging, tensors of various orders can approximate the diffusivity function at each voxel of a diffusion-weighted MRI data set. This approximation produces tensor-valued datasets that contain information about the underlying local structure of the scanned tissue.…

  17. Geometric and magnetic properties of Pt clusters supported on graphene: Relativistic density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The geometric and magnetic structures of small Ptn clusters (n = 1 - 5) supported on a graphene layer have been investigated using ab initio density functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling. Pt-Pt interactions were found to be much stronger than the Pt-C interactions promoting the binding to the support. As a consequence, the equilibrium structure of the gas-phase clusters is preserved if they are deposited on graphene. However, the clusters bind to graphene only via at most two Pt-C bonds: A Pt2 dumbbell prefers an upright position, the larger clusters are bound to graphene only via one edge of the planar cluster (Pt3 and Pt5) or via two terminal Pt atoms of a bent Pt4 rhombus. Evidently, the strong buckling of the graphene layer induced by the Pt-C bonds prevents the formation of a larger number of cluster-support bonds. As the local spin and orbital magnetic moments are quenched on the Pt atoms forming Pt-C bonds, the magnetic structure of the supported clusters is much more inhomogeneous as in the gas-phase. This leads to noncollinear magnetic structures and a strongly reduced magnetic anisotropy energy.

  18. Instabilities of bellows: Dependence on internal pressure, end supports, and interactions in accelerator magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shutt, R.P.; Rehak, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    For superconducting magnets, one needs many bellows for connection of various helium cooling transfer lines in addition to beam tube bellows. There could be approximately 10,000 magnet interconnection bellows in the SSC exposed to an internal pressure. When axially compressed or internally pressurized, bellows can become unstable, leading to gross distortion or complete failure. If several bellows are contained in an assembly, failure modes might interact. If designed properly, large bellows can be a very feasible possibility for connecting the large tubular shells that support the magnet iron yokes and superconducting coils and contain supercritical helium for magnet cooling. We present here (1) a spring-supported bellows model, in order to develop necessary design features for bellows and end supports so that instabilities will not occur in the bellows pressure operating region, including some margin, (2) a model of three superconducting accelerator magnets connected by two large bellows, in order to ascertain that support requirements are satisfied and in order to study interaction effects between the two bellows. Reliability of bellows for our application will be stressed. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable palladium (Pd) catalyst: a selective and sustainable oxidation protocol with high turnover number

    EPA Science Inventory

    A magnetic nanoparticle-supported ruthenium hydroxide catalyst was readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials and shown to catalyze hydration of nitriles with excellent yield in benign aqueous medium. Catalyst recovery using an external magnetic field, superior activity...

  20. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  1. Fabrication of an Implant-Supported Orbital Prosthesis with Bar-Magnetic Attachment: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Shima; Abolhassani, Abolhassan; Nematollahi, Fatemeh; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Mangoli, Amir Ali

    2015-12-01

    Implant-supported craniofacial prostheses are made to restore defective areas in the face and cranium. This clinical report describes a technique for fabrication of an orbital prosthesis with three adjacent implants in the left lateral orbital rim of a 60-year-old woman. Selection of appropriate attachment system (individual magnetic abutments versus bar-clip attachment) for implant-supported orbital prostheses depends upon the position of implants. Bar-magnetic attachment has been selected as the retention mechanism in the present case. PMID:27559354

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is caused by insufficiency of arylsulfatase A resulting in impaired myelination. Diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease have been rarely reported. We report diffusion MR imaging of MLD in a 12-month-old male who presented with regression of milestones and progressive spasticity. PMID:27606023

  3. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in a case of metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is caused by insufficiency of arylsulfatase A resulting in impaired myelination. Diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease have been rarely reported. We report diffusion MR imaging of MLD in a 12-month-old male who presented with regression of milestones and progressive spasticity.

  4. 'Are you still on that stupid diet?': women's experiences of societal pressure and support regarding weight loss, and attitudes towards health policy intervention.

    PubMed

    Whale, Katie; Gillison, Fiona B; Smith, Paula C

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated how people's attitudes and motivations towards losing weight are influenced by societal pressures surrounding weight loss, their interaction with the obesogenic environment and individuals' attitudes and motivations towards weight. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 women currently attending commercial weight-loss programmes. Participants experienced conflicting messages regarding weight norms, with the media portraying powerful social norms relating to thinness and beauty, and changes to the food environment and interactions with family and friends commonly undermining weight-loss activities and promoting increased consumption. Providing social and environmental support for the behaviours needed to produce weight loss may need to be a primary focus for obesity policy. PMID:23928985

  5. Cuckoo Search with Lévy Flights for Weighted Bayesian Energy Functional Optimization in Global-Support Curve Data Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Akemi; Iglesias, Andrés; Cabellos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The problem of data fitting is very important in many theoretical and applied fields. In this paper, we consider the problem of optimizing a weighted Bayesian energy functional for data fitting by using global-support approximating curves. By global-support curves we mean curves expressed as a linear combination of basis functions whose support is the whole domain of the problem, as opposed to other common approaches in CAD/CAM and computer graphics driven by piecewise functions (such as B-splines and NURBS) that provide local control of the shape of the curve. Our method applies a powerful nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithm called cuckoo search, introduced recently to solve optimization problems. A major advantage of this method is its simplicity: cuckoo search requires only two parameters, many fewer than other metaheuristic approaches, so the parameter tuning becomes a very simple task. The paper shows that this new approach can be successfully used to solve our optimization problem. To check the performance of our approach, it has been applied to five illustrative examples of different types, including open and closed 2D and 3D curves that exhibit challenging features, such as cusps and self-intersections. Our results show that the method performs pretty well, being able to solve our minimization problem in an astonishingly straightforward way. PMID:24977175

  6. Effects of molecular weight and tacticity on the Tg of poly(methyl methacrylate) films supported by silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Kun; Chen, Fei; Tsui, Ophelia

    The glass transition temperature (Tg) of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films supported by silica is studied as a function of film thickness at different molecular weights (Mw) for different polymer tacticities. The Tg confinement effect is found to depend on the Mw and tacticity. For the films with a low Mw of 2.5 kg/mol,Tg is depressed for the atactic films, consistent with previous results. In contrast, the films with a higher syndiotactic content exhibit Tg enlargement as thickness decreases. We tentatively suggest this to be caused the influence of chain stiffness on the Tg that dominates at low Mw and varies with tacticity. For sufficiently high Mw, the effect of chain stiffness is expected to be small. At Mw = 50 kg/mol, the Tg confinement effect of the atatic and more syndiotactic films reverses from that observed of the low-Mw counterpart films. We suggest the chain stiffness effect to be negligible at this Mw, and attribute the opposite Tg confinement effect to be caused by a competition between the surface Tg and the substrate Tg in these films. The Tg found of bilayers made of the atatic and more syndiotatic PMMAs with this Mw supports our attribute. We are grateful to the support of NSF through the project DMR-1310536.

  7. Youth dietary intake and weight status: healthful neighborhood food environments enhance the protective role of supportive family home environments.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Forsyth, Ann; Bauer, Katherine W; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate individual and joint associations of the home environment and the neighborhood built environment with adolescent dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=2682; 53.2% girls; mean age14.4 years) participating in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study completed height and weight measurements and surveys in Minnesota middle and high schools. Neighborhood variables were measured using Geographic Information Systems data. Multiple regressions of BMI z-score, fruit and vegetable intake, and fast food consumption were fit including home and neighborhood environmental variables as predictors and also including their interactions to test for effect modification. Supportive family environments (i.e., higher family functioning, frequent family meals, and parent modeling of healthful eating) were associated with higher adolescent fruit and vegetable intake, lower fast food consumption, and lower BMI z-score. Associations between the built environment and adolescent outcomes were fewer. Interaction results, although not all consistent, indicated that the relationship between a supportive family environment and adolescent fruit and vegetable intake and BMI was enhanced when the neighborhood was supportive of healthful behavior. Public health interventions that simultaneously improve both the home environment and the neighborhood environment of adolescents may have a greater impact on adolescent obesity prevention than interventions that address one of these environments alone. PMID:24378461

  8. Cuckoo search with Lévy flights for weighted Bayesian energy functional optimization in global-support curve data fitting.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Akemi; Iglesias, Andrés; Cabellos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The problem of data fitting is very important in many theoretical and applied fields. In this paper, we consider the problem of optimizing a weighted Bayesian energy functional for data fitting by using global-support approximating curves. By global-support curves we mean curves expressed as a linear combination of basis functions whose support is the whole domain of the problem, as opposed to other common approaches in CAD/CAM and computer graphics driven by piecewise functions (such as B-splines and NURBS) that provide local control of the shape of the curve. Our method applies a powerful nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithm called cuckoo search, introduced recently to solve optimization problems. A major advantage of this method is its simplicity: cuckoo search requires only two parameters, many fewer than other metaheuristic approaches, so the parameter tuning becomes a very simple task. The paper shows that this new approach can be successfully used to solve our optimization problem. To check the performance of our approach, it has been applied to five illustrative examples of different types, including open and closed 2D and 3D curves that exhibit challenging features, such as cusps and self-intersections. Our results show that the method performs pretty well, being able to solve our minimization problem in an astonishingly straightforward way. PMID:24977175

  9. Design, fabrication, and testing of the magnet liner supports for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.

    1981-10-09

    Heat is radiated from both the vacuum vessel that houses the magnet and the heated plasma that exists at the central region of the magnets. Approximately 30 kW of heat will be transmitted to the 311 m/sup 2/ of magnet surface area from these two heat sources. We can reduce this heat load substantially by installing liquid nitrogen (LN)-filled panels around the magnets to counteract the 300/sup 0/K vessel wall temperature. When flowing the LN inside the panels, the temperature drops to 85/sup 0/K. These LN panels also serve as thermal protection for the helium pipings in the MFTF magnet system. However, near the plasma where a higher heat load is generated, we must add water panels to protect the LN panels. All the LN panels, water panels, and their manifoldings are called the magnet liners. Of the total of 344 pieces, 240 are used directly on the magnets. The support system that mounts these LN liner panels on the magnets is the topic of this paper.

  10. Automatic Mapping Extraction from Multiecho T2-Star Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images for Improving Morphological Evaluations in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaode; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    Mapping extraction is useful in medical image analysis. Similarity coefficient mapping (SCM) replaced signal response to time course in tissue similarity mapping with signal response to TE changes in multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agent. Since different tissues are with different sensitivities to reference signals, a new algorithm is proposed by adding a sensitivity index to SCM. It generates two mappings. One measures relative signal strength (SSM) and the other depicts fluctuation magnitude (FMM). Meanwhile, the new method is adaptive to generate a proper reference signal by maximizing the sum of contrast index (CI) from SSM and FMM without manual delineation. Based on four groups of images from multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the capacity of SSM and FMM in enhancing image contrast and morphological evaluation is validated. Average contrast improvement index (CII) of SSM is 1.57, 1.38, 1.34, and 1.41. Average CII of FMM is 2.42, 2.30, 2.24, and 2.35. Visual analysis of regions of interest demonstrates that SSM and FMM show better morphological structures than original images, T2-star mapping and SCM. These extracted mappings can be further applied in information fusion, signal investigation, and tissue segmentation. PMID:24379892

  11. Predictive classification of pediatric bipolar disorder using atlas-based diffusion weighted imaging and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Benson; Wu, Mon-Ju; Bauer, Isabelle E; Modi, Haina; Zeni, Cristian P; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B; Hasan, Khader M; Soares, Jair C

    2015-11-30

    Previous studies have reported abnormalities of white-matter diffusivity in pediatric bipolar disorder. However, it has not been established whether these abnormalities are able to distinguish individual subjects with pediatric bipolar disorder from healthy controls with a high specificity and sensitivity. Diffusion-weighted imaging scans were acquired from 16 youths diagnosed with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 16 demographically matched healthy controls. Regional white matter tissue microstructural measurements such as fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity were computed using an atlas-based approach. These measurements were used to 'train' a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to predict new or 'unseen' subjects' diagnostic labels. The SVM algorithm predicted individual subjects with specificity=87.5%, sensitivity=68.75%, accuracy=78.12%, positive predictive value=84.62%, negative predictive value=73.68%, area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC)=0.7812 and chi-square p-value=0.0012. A pattern of reduced regional white matter fractional anisotropy was observed in pediatric bipolar disorder patients. These results suggest that atlas-based diffusion weighted imaging measurements can distinguish individual pediatric bipolar disorder patients from healthy controls. Notably, from a clinical perspective these findings will contribute to the pathophysiological understanding of pediatric bipolar disorder. PMID:26459075

  12. Locomotor step training with body weight support improves respiratory motor function in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    de Paleville, Daniela Terson; McKay, William; Aslan, Sevda; Folz, Rodney; Sayenko, Dimitry; Ovechkin, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective case-controlled clinical study was undertaken to investigate to what extent the manually assisted treadmill stepping Locomotor Training with body weight support (LT) can change respiratory function in individuals with chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). Pulmonary function outcomes (Forced Vital Capacity /FVC/, Forced Expiratory Volume one second /FEV1/, Maximum Inspiratory Pressure /PImax/, Maximum Expiratory Pressure /PEmax/) and surface electromyographic (sEMG) measures of respiratory muscles activity during respiratory taskswere obtained from eight individuals with chronic C3-T12 SCI before and after 62±10 (Mean ± SD) sessions of the LT. FVC, FEV1, PImax, PEmax, amount of overall sEMG activity and rate of motor unit recruitment were significantly increased after LT (p<0.05) These results suggest that these improvements induced by the LT are likely the result of neuroplastic changes in spinal neural circuitry responsible for the activation of respiratory muscles preserved after injury. PMID:23999001

  13. Superconductive material and magnetic field for damping and levitation support and damping of cryogenic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A superconductive load bearing support without a mechanical contact and vibration damping for cryogenic instruments in space is presented. The levitation support and vibration damping is accomplished by the use of superconducting magnets and the 'Meissner' effect. The assembly allows for transfer of vibration energy away from the cryogenic instrument which then can be damped by the use of either an electronic circuit or conventional vibration damping mean.

  14. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  15. When is it ok to tell patients they are overweight? General public's views of the role of doctors in supporting patients' dieting and weight management.

    PubMed

    Hart, Jo; Yelland, Sophie; Mallinson, Alice; Hussain, Zarah; Peters, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    The objective was to explore the general public's views on the role of health professionals in the management of weight with diet and the implementation of behaviour change. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. An inductive grounded theory approach utilised a coding framework; recurring concepts/themes explored in future interviews and thematic saturation achieved. Two themes summarised views on the role of health professionals in supporting dieting and weight management: responsibility to initiate talk and what patients expect. Individuals perceive health professionals as having a role in their weight management. Individuals have disparate views about responsibility for initiation of weight management talk. PMID:25759374

  16. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Do Not Help Support DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Category

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Boada, Leticia; Fraguas, David; Janssen, Joost; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review aims to determine whether or not structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data support the DSM-5 proposal of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic category, and whether or not classical DSM-IV autistic disorder (AD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) categories should be subsumed into it. The most replicated sMRI findings…

  17. Interdistrict Magnet High School Students' Perceived Social Support: An Exploratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocco, Diana J.; Fitzgerald, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Magnet high school attendance seems to lead to improved academic performance (Cobb, Bifulco, & Bell, 2009; U.S. Department of Education, 2008; Yu & Taylor, 1997). Likewise, perceived social support has been linked with positive outcomes for adolescents, including improved academic performance (Rosenfeld, Richman, & Bowen, 2000; Demaray & Malecki,…

  18. Magnetic silica supported palladium catalyst: synthesis of allyl aryl ethers in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and benign procedure for the synthesis of aryl allyl ethers has been developed using phenols, allyl acetates and magnetically recyclable silica supported palladium catalyst in water; performance of reaction in air and easy separation of the catalyst using an external mag...

  19. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  20. Evolution of the Design of Cold Mass Support for the ITER Magnet Feeder System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kun; Song, Yuntao; Niu, Erwu; Zhou, Tinzhi; Wang, Zhongwei; Chen, Yonghua; Zhu, Yinfeng

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the evolution of the design of cold mass support for the ITER magnet feeder system. The glass fibers in the cylinder and the flanges of the normal G10 support are discontinuous in the preliminary design. The heat load of this support from the analysis is only 4.86 W. However, the mechanical test of the prototype showed that it can only endure 9 kN lateral force, which is significantly less than the required 20 kN. So, the configuration of the glass fibers in the cylinders and flanges of this G10 support are modified by changing it to a continuous and knitted type to reinforce the support, and then a new improved prototype is manufactured and tested. It could endure 15 kN lateral forces this time, but still not meet the required 20 kN. Finally, the SS316LN material is chosen for the cold mass supports. The analysis results show that it is safe under 20 kN lateral forces with the heat load increased to 14.8 W. Considering the practical application, the requirements of strength is of primary importance. So, this SS316LN cold mass support is acceptable for the ITER magnet feeder system. On the other hand, the design idea of using continuous and knitted glass fibers to reinforce the strength of a G10 support is a good reference for the case with a lower heat load and not too high Lorentz force.

  1. Treadmill Training in Multiple Sclerosis: Can Body Weight Support or Robot Assistance Provide Added Value? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Eva; Beckwée, David; Pinte, Droesja; Meeusen, Romain; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This systematic review critically analyzes the literature on the effectiveness of treadmill training (TT), body-weight-supported TT (BWSTT), and robot-assisted TT (RATT) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), with focus on gait-related outcome measurements. Method. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Pedro, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library) and reference lists of articles and narrative reviews were searched. Pre-, quasi- and true-experimental studies were included if adult persons with MS were involved in TT, BWSTT, or RATT intervention studies published before 2012. Descriptive analysis was performed and two researchers scored the methodological quality of the studies. Results. 5 true- and 3 preexperimental studies (mean quality score: 66%) have been included. In total 161 persons with MS were involved (TT, BWSTT, or RATT, 6–42 sessions; 2–5x/week; 3–21 weeks). Significant improvements in walking speed and endurance were reported. Furthermore, improvements of step length, double-support time, and Expanded Disability Status Scale were found. Conclusions. There is a limited number of published papers related to TT in persons with MS, concluding that TT, BWSTT, and RATT improve the walking speed and endurance. However, it is not clear what type of TT is most effective. RCTs with larger but more homogeneous populations are needed. PMID:22701177

  2. A fully automated trabecular bone structural analysis tool based on T2* -weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kraiger, Markus; Martirosian, Petros; Opriessnig, Peter; Eibofner, Frank; Rempp, Hansjoerg; Hofer, Michael; Schick, Fritz; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    One major source affecting the precision of bone structure analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is inter- and intraoperator variability, inherent in delineating and tracing regions of interest along longitudinal studies. In this paper an automated analysis tool, featuring bone marrow segmentation, region of interest generation, and characterization of cancellous bone of articular joints is presented. In evaluation studies conducted at the knee joint the novel analysis tool significantly decreased the standard error of measurement and improved the sensitivity in detecting minor structural changes. It further eliminated the need of time-consuming user interaction, and thereby increasing reproducibility. PMID:21862288

  3. Dopamine-secreting giant adrenal ganglioneuroma: clinical and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Polat, A V; Polat, A Kamali; Aslan, K; Atmaca, H; Karagoz, F

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a dopamine-secreting giant primary adrenal ganglioneuroma (GN) in a 29-year-old male patient. Although the patient was clinically silent, the 24-hour urine levels of dopamine, normetanephrine, homovanillic acid and vanillyl mandelic acid were elevated. Abdominal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large solid tumor with calcifications and a slightly lobular edge on the left adrenal gland. A tumor, 13 x 23 x 25 cm in size, was completely resected without morbidity. A 2-year follow-up with computed tomography showed that the postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. PMID:25073244

  4. High resolution T2(*)-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Martin; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-05-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T2(*)-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 × 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T2(*)-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps. PMID:24439698

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Evaluate Major Salivary Gland Function Before and After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Stroobants, Sigrid; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI as a noninvasive tool to investigate major salivary gland function before and after radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: DW-MRI was performed in 8 HNC patients before and after parotid-sparing RT (mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland <26 Gy). A DW sequence was performed once at rest and then repeated continuously during salivary stimulation. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for both parotid and submandibular glands were calculated. Findings were compared with salivary gland scintigraphy. Results: Before RT, the mean ADC value at rest was significantly lower in the parotid than in the submandibular glands. During the first 5 min of stimulation, the ADC value of the salivary glands showed a decrease, followed by a steady increase until a peak ADC, significantly higher than the baseline value, was reached after a median of 17 min. The baseline ADC value at rest was significantly higher after RT than before RT in the nonspared salivary glands but not in the spared parotid glands. In the contralateral parotid glands, the same response was seen as before RT. This pattern was completely lost in the nonspared glands. These results corresponded with remaining or loss of salivary function, respectively, as confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Conclusions: Diffusion-weighted-MRI allows noninvasive evaluation of functional changes in the major salivary glands after RT and is a promising tool for investigating radiation-induced xerostomia.

  6. SU-E-J-157: Improving the Quality of T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Clinical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, D; Mutic, S; Hu, Y; Caruthers, S; Glide-Hurst, C; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an imaging technique that enables us to acquire T2- weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4DMRI) with sufficient spatial coverage, temporal resolution and spatial resolution for clinical evaluation. Methods: T2-weighed 4DMRI images were acquired from a healthy volunteer using a respiratory amplitude triggered T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sequence. 10 respiratory states were used to equally sample the respiratory range based on amplitude (0%, 20%i, 40%i, 60%i, 80%i, 100%, 80%e, 60%e, 40%e and 20%e). To avoid frequent scanning halts, a methodology was devised that split 10 respiratory states into two packages in an interleaved manner and packages were acquired separately. Sixty 3mm sagittal slices at 1.5mm in-plane spatial resolution were acquired to offer good spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. The in-plane field of view was 375mm × 260mm with nominal scan time of 3 minutes 42 seconds. Acquired 2D images at the same respiratory state were combined to form the 3D image set corresponding to that respiratory state and reconstructed in the coronal view to evaluate whether all slices were at the same respiratory state. 3D image sets of 10 respiratory states represented a complete 4D MRI image set. Results: T2-weighted 4DMRI image were acquired in 10 minutes which was within clinical acceptable range. Qualitatively, the acquired MRI images had good image quality for delineation purposes. There were no abrupt position changes in reconstructed coronal images which confirmed that all sagittal slices were in the same respiratory state. Conclusion: We demonstrated it was feasible to acquire T2-weighted 4DMRI image set within a practical amount of time (10 minutes) that had good temporal resolution (10 respiratory states), spatial resolution (1.5mm × 1.5mm × 3.0mm) and spatial coverage (60 slices) for future clinical evaluation.

  7. Effects of Progressive Body Weight Support Treadmill Forward and Backward Walking Training on Stroke Patients’ Affected Side Lower Extremity’s Walking Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Lee, Kyoungbo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of progressive body weight supported treadmill forward and backward walking training (PBWSTFBWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill forward walking training (PBWSTFWT), progressive body weight supported treadmill backward walking training (PBWSTBWT), on stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 36 chronic stroke patients were divided into three groups with 12 subjects in each group. Each of the groups performed one of the progressive body weight supported treadmill training methods for 30 minute, six times per week for three weeks, and then received general physical therapy without any other intervention until the follow-up tests. For the assessment of the affected side lower extremity’s walking ability, step length of the affected side, stance phase of the affected side, swing phase of the affected side, single support of the affected side, and step time of the affected side were measured using optogait and the symmetry index. [Results] In the within group comparisons, all the three groups showed significant differences between before and after the intervention and in the comparison of the three groups, the PBWSTFBWT group showed more significant differences in all of the assessed items than the other two groups. [Conclusion] In the present study progressive body weight supported treadmill training was performed in an environment in which the subjects were actually walked, and PBWSTFBWT was more effective at efficiently training stroke patients’ affected side lower extremity’s walking ability. PMID:25540499

  8. Spontaneous development of full weight-supported stepping after complete spinal cord transection in the neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Benjamin J; Callaway, Jennifer K; Ek, C Joakim; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Saunders, Norman R

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord trauma in the adult nervous system usually results in permanent loss of function below the injury level. The immature spinal cord has greater capacity for repair and can develop considerable functionality by adulthood. This study used the marsupial laboratory opossum Monodelphis domestica, which is born at a very early stage of neural development. Complete spinal cord transection was made in the lower-thoracic region of pups at postnatal-day 7 (P7) or P28, and the animals grew to adulthood. Injury at P7 resulted in a dense neuronal tissue bridge that connected the two ends of the cord; retrograde neuronal labelling indicated that supraspinal and propriospinal innervation spanned the injury site. This repair was associated with pronounced behavioural recovery, coordinated gait and an ability to use hindlimbs when swimming. Injury at P28 resulted in a cyst-like cavity encased in scar tissue forming at the injury site. Using retrograde labelling, no labelled brainstem or propriospinal neurons were found above the lesion, indicating that detectable neuronal connectivity had not spanned the injury site. However, these animals could use their hindlimbs to take weight-supporting steps but could not use their hindlimbs when swimming. White matter, demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining, was present in the injury site of P7- but not P28-injured animals. Overall, these studies demonstrated that provided spinal injury occurs early in development, regrowth of supraspinal innervation is possible. This repair appears to lead to improved functional outcomes. At older ages, even without detectable axonal growth spanning the injury site, substantial development of locomotion was still possible. This outcome is discussed in conjunction with preliminary findings of differences in the local propriospinal circuits following spinal cord injury (demonstrated with fluororuby labelling), which may underlie the weight bearing locomotion observed in the apparent absence of

  9. Flood susceptibility mapping using a novel ensemble weights-of-evidence and support vector machine models in GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrany, Mahyat Shafapour; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Jebur, Mustafa Neamah

    2014-05-01

    Flood is one of the most devastating natural disasters that occur frequently in Terengganu, Malaysia. Recently, ensemble based techniques are getting extremely popular in flood modeling. In this paper, weights-of-evidence (WoE) model was utilized first, to assess the impact of classes of each conditioning factor on flooding through bivariate statistical analysis (BSA). Then, these factors were reclassified using the acquired weights and entered into the support vector machine (SVM) model to evaluate the correlation between flood occurrence and each conditioning factor. Through this integration, the weak point of WoE can be solved and the performance of the SVM will be enhanced. The spatial database included flood inventory, slope, stream power index (SPI), topographic wetness index (TWI), altitude, curvature, distance from the river, geology, rainfall, land use/cover (LULC), and soil type. Four kernel types of SVM (linear kernel (LN), polynomial kernel (PL), radial basis function kernel (RBF), and sigmoid kernel (SIG)) were used to investigate the performance of each kernel type. The efficiency of the new ensemble WoE and SVM method was tested using area under curve (AUC) which measured the prediction and success rates. The validation results proved the strength and efficiency of the ensemble method over the individual methods. The best results were obtained from RBF kernel when compared with the other kernel types. Success rate and prediction rate for ensemble WoE and RBF-SVM method were 96.48% and 95.67% respectively. The proposed ensemble flood susceptibility mapping method could assist researchers and local governments in flood mitigation strategies.

  10. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for highly efficient T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kang, Byunghoon; Choi, Yuna; Jang, Eunji; Han, Seungmin; Lee, Kwangyeol; Suh, Jin-Suck; Haam, Seungjoo; Huh, Yong-Min

    2014-06-01

    We developed Pyrene-Gadolinium (Py-Gd) nanoparticles as pH-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents capable of showing a high-Mr signal in cancer-specific environments, such as acidic conditions. Py-Gd nanoparticles were prepared by coating Py-Gd, which is a complex of gadolinium with pyrenyl molecules, with pyrenyl polyethyleneglycol PEG using a nano-emulsion method. These particles show better longitudinal relaxation time (T1) MR signals in acidic conditions than they do in neutral conditions. Furthermore, the particles exhibit biocompatibility and MR contrast effects in both in vitro and in vivo studies. From these results, we confirm that Py-Gd nanoparticles have the potential to be applied for accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Structural Design and Analysis for a Double-Band Cold Mass Support of the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Li, S. Y.; Guo, XingLong; Pan, Heng; Xu, FengYu

    2009-07-01

    The cooling channel of Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils, which are magnetically hooked together. A pair ofcoupling magnets operating at 4 K is applied to produce up to .6 T magnetic field on the magnet centerline to keep muon beam within the RF cavity windows. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in the MICE channel is up to 500 kN inlongitudinal direction, and the requirements for magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4 K are stringent. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediatethermal interruption is applied for the coupling magnet. The physical center of the magnet does not change as it is cooled down from 300 K to 4.2 K with this support system. In this paper the design parameters of the support system are discussed. The integral analysis of the support system using FEA method was carried out to etermine the tension forces in bands when various loads are applied. The magnet centre displacement and concentricity deviation form the axis of the warm bore are obtained, and the peak tension in support bands is also determined according to the simulation results.

  12. 3D segmentation of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Eltes, Peter E.; Del Rio, Luis; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-12-01

    Computational medicine aims at employing personalised computational models in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of such models to help physicians in finding the best treatment for low back pain (LBP) is becoming popular. One of the challenges of creating such models is to derive patient-specific anatomical and tissue models of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs), as a prior step. This article presents a segmentation scheme that obtains accurate results irrespective of the degree of IVD degeneration, including pathological discs with protrusion or herniation. The segmentation algorithm, employing a novel feature selector, iteratively deforms an initial shape, which is projected into a statistical shape model space at first and then, into a B-Spline space to improve accuracy. The method was tested on a MR dataset of 59 patients suffering from LBP. The images follow a standard T2-weighted protocol in coronal and sagittal acquisitions. These two image volumes were fused in order to overcome large inter-slice spacing. The agreement between expert-delineated structures, used here as gold-standard, and our automatic segmentation was evaluated using Dice Similarity Index and surface-to-surface distances, obtaining a mean error of 0.68 mm in the annulus segmentation and 1.88 mm in the nucleus, which are the best results with respect to the image resolution in the current literature.

  13. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors. PMID:25709439

  14. Predicting Mortality in Patients With “Malignant” Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction Using Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shu-Ping; Chen, Chia-Yuen; Tsai, Fong Y.; Chan, Wing P.; Chen, Chin-I

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction (defined as space-occupying edema in more than 50% to 75% of the MCA territory) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence and assess the usefulness of SWI findings, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) as predictors of clinical outcome. Data from 16 patients with large MCA infarction previously admitted to our institution between December 2009 and October 2012 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Within 7 days after stroke onset, 1 neurologist and 1 neuroradiologist estimated the area of infarction on DWI/ADC and extent of prominent vessel sign (PVS) on SWI images using the Stroke Program Early MR Score (SPEMRS). The PVS on SWI was defined as a local prominence of hypointense vessels with either increased vessel number or diameter in the target area, when compared with the number or diameter of the contralateral MCA territory vessels. Six patients died and 10 survived. Although the DWI/ADC-SPEMRS and clinical profiles were similar between the nonsurvivor and survivor groups, SWI-SPEMRS was significantly lower in the nonsurvivor group (P < 0.001). The area of deoxygenation on SWI in patients with malignant MCA infarction can predict mortality. Lower SWI-SPEMRS is a potentially better predictor of poor outcome than lower DWI-SPEMRS. A larger prospective study is needed to clarify the role of SWI as a therapeutic guide in malignant MCA. PMID:26937906

  15. Distinction Between Recurrent Glioma and Radiation Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Combination With Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Q.-S. . E-mail: nanwushan@yahoo.com; Li, C.-F.; Liu Hong; Zhen, J.-H.; Feng, D.-C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with diffusion-weighted imaging on the evaluation of the recurrent contrast-enhancing areas at the site of treated gliomas. Methods and Materials: In 55 patients who had new contrast-enhancing lesions in the vicinity of the previously resected and irradiated high-grade gliomas, two-dimensional MR spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed. Spectral data for N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), lipid (Lip), and lactate (Lac) were analyzed in conjunction with the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in all patients. Diagnosis of these lesions was assigned by means of follow-up or histopathology. Results: The Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly higher in recurrent tumor than in regions of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The ADC value and ADC ratios (ADC of contrast-enhancing lesion to matching structure in the contralateral hemisphere) were significantly higher in radiation injury regions than in recurrent tumor (p < 0.01). With MR spectroscopic data, two variables (Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios) were shown to differentiate recurrent glioma from radiation injury, and 85.5% of total subjects were correctly classified into groups. However, with discriminant analysis of MR spectroscopy imaging plus diffusion-weighted imaging, three variables (Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and ADC ratio) were identified and 96.4% of total subjects were correctly classified. There was a significant difference between the diagnostic accuracy of the two discriminant analyses (Chi-square = 3.96, p = 0.046). Conclusion: Using discriminant analysis, this study found that MR spectroscopy in combination with ADC ratio, rather than ADC value, can improve the ability to differentiate recurrent glioma and radiation injury.

  16. Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-01-01

    Adequately selecting a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer depends on accurate grading and staging. Substantial inaccuracy of clinical staging with bimanual examination, cystoscopy, and transurethral resection of bladder tumor has facilitated the increasing utility of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate bladder cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. The high tissue contrast between cancers and surrounding tissues on DWI is derived from the difference of water molecules motion. DWI is potentially a useful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of bladder cancers; it can also monitor posttreatment response and provide information on predicting tumor biophysical behaviors. Despite advancements in DWI techniques and the use of quantitative analysis to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient values, there are some inherent limitations in DWI interpretation related to relatively poor spatial resolution, lack of cancer specificity, and lack of standardized image acquisition protocols and data analysis procedures that restrict the application of DWI and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient values. In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care. PMID:26055180

  17. The Obesity Learning Centre (OLC) – a website supporting those working towards a healthy weight and reducing obesity levels

    PubMed Central

    Korjonen, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Develop a website, the OLC, which supports those people who work on promoting a healthy weight and tackling obesity. Research shows that original networks where sharing of information and peer interaction take place create solutions to current public health challenges. Methods: Considerations that are relevant when building a new information service as well as the technical set up and information needs of users were taken into account prior to building the OLC and during continuous development and maintenance. Results: The OLC provides global news, resources and tools and link out to other networks, websites and organisations providing similar useful information. The OLC also uses social networking tools to highlight new and important information. Discussion: Networks contribute to a stronger community that can respond to emerging challenges in public health. The OLC improves connections of people and services from different backgrounds and organisations. Some challenges exist in the technical set up and also because of other aspects, e.g. public health information and differing information needs. Conclusion: Public health work programmes should include networking opportunities where public policy can be disseminated. The provision of necessary tools and resources can lead to better decision-making, save time and money and lead to improved public health outcomes. PMID:23569599

  18. One-way helical electromagnetic wave propagation supported by magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Biao; Lawrence, Mark; Gao, Wenlong; Guo, Qinghua; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we reveal the presence of photonic one-way helical surface states in a simple natural system- magnetized plasma. The application of an external magnetic field to a bulk plasma body not only breaks time-reversal-symmetry but also leads to separation of Equi-Frequency Contour surfaces (EFCs) to form topologically nontrivial gaps in k space. Interestingly, these EFCs support topologically protected surface states. We numerically investigate an interface between magnetized plasma, using a realistic model for parameter dispersion, and vacuum, to confirm the existence of one-way scatter-immune helical surface states. Unlike previous proposals for achieving photonic one-way propagation, our scheme does not require the use of artificial structures and should therefore be simple to implement experimentally.

  19. One-way helical electromagnetic wave propagation supported by magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; Lawrence, Mark; Gao, Wenlong; Guo, Qinghua; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we reveal the presence of photonic one-way helical surface states in a simple natural system- magnetized plasma. The application of an external magnetic field to a bulk plasma body not only breaks time-reversal-symmetry but also leads to separation of Equi-Frequency Contour surfaces (EFCs) to form topologically nontrivial gaps in k space. Interestingly, these EFCs support topologically protected surface states. We numerically investigate an interface between magnetized plasma, using a realistic model for parameter dispersion, and vacuum, to confirm the existence of one-way scatter-immune helical surface states. Unlike previous proposals for achieving photonic one-way propagation, our scheme does not require the use of artificial structures and should therefore be simple to implement experimentally. PMID:26883883

  20. Fundamental investigations of supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xi.

    1990-09-21

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen, has been applied to investigate silica-supported Group VIII monometallic and Group VIII-Group IB bimetallic catalysts and alumina- and silica-supported platinum-rhenium bimetallic catalysts. Two adsorbed states of hydrogen, i.e., irreversible and reversible hydrogen, on the surfaces of monometallic Ru, Pt, and Cu particles and bimetallic Ru-Group Ib, Pt-Group Ib, and Pt-Re particles were observed directly via proton NMR. The same amounts of the irreversible hydrogen adsorbed on pure Ru catalysts were measured by both proton NMR and the volumetric technique. The electronic environments on surfaces of monometallic catalysts are sensitive to changes in metal dispersion, state of adsorbed hydrogen, and residual chlorine. Surface compositions for the Ru--Cu and Pt--Cu bimetallic catalysts were determined by NMR of adsorbed hydrogen. 297 refs., 96 figs., 19 tabs.

  1. Isolation of genomic DNA using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid-phase support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiyed, Z. M.; Ramchand, C. N.; Telang, S. D.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years, techniques employing magnetizable solid-phase supports (MSPS) have found application in numerous biological fields. This magnetic separation procedure offers several advantages in terms of subjecting the analyte to very little mechanical stress compared to other methods. Secondly, these methods are non-laborious, cheap, and often highly scalable. The current paper details a genomic DNA isolation method optimized in our laboratory using magnetic nanoparticles as a solid-phase support. The quality and yields of the isolated DNA from all the samples using magnetic nanoparticles were higher or equivalent to the traditional DNA extraction procedures. Additionally, the magnetic method takes less than 15 min to extract polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ready genomic DNA as against several hours taken by traditional phenol-chloroform extraction protocols. Moreover, the isolated DNA was found to be compatible in PCR amplification and restriction endonuclease digestion. The developed procedure is quick, inexpensive, robust, and it does not require the use of organic solvents or sophisticated instruments, which makes it more amenable to automation and miniaturization.

  2. Combining Persuasive Technology With Behavioral Theory to Support Weight Maintenance Through a Mobile Phone App: Protocol for the MotiMate App

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Gilly A; Freyne, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of health-focused mobile phone apps available for download increases daily, with weight management apps being among the most proliferative. However, most lack theoretic grounding or evidence of efficacy. There is a significant body of literature which provides evidence for behaviors which are associated with successful weight loss maintenance. Behavioral theory also provides further insight regarding successful behavior change and maintenance. Objective We aimed to apply this knowledge to the development of the functionality of an app targeting weight loss maintenance. Methods We have subsequently undertaken the development of a persuasive and behavior targeting mobile app (MotiMate) to assist in maintenance of weight loss. MotiMate combines persuasive and behavior change theories in a practical targeted tool through its motivational messages, personalized feedback, and intelligent supportive tools to manage weight, food, exercise, mood and stress. Results The development and trial of MotiMate received funding support in May 2014. All 88 volunteers started the trial by December 2014 and were in the process of completing their final visits when this paper was submitted (May 2015). Data analysis is currently underway. Conclusions The paper has presented a scientifically informed mobile phone app to support weight loss maintenance. Further evaluation of its efficacy is in progress. Trial Registration ANZCTR 12614000474651; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366120 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eJeQiKxi). PMID:26747725

  3. Design summary of the magnet support structures for the proton storage ring injection line upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Ledford, J.E.; Smith, B.G.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the technical engineering and design issues associated with the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) Injection Line upgrade of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The main focus is on the engineering design calculations of several magnet support structures. The general procedure based upon a set number of design criteria is outlined, followed by a case-by-case summary of the engineering design analyses, reutilization or fabrication callouts and design safety factors.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-28

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires. PMID:26219748

  5. Impact of food support on food security and body weight among HIV antiretroviral therapy recipients in Honduras: a pilot intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Palar, Kartika; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Smith, Alexandria; Farías, Hugo; Wagner, Glenn; Martinez, Homero

    2015-01-01

    Optimal strategies to improve food security and nutrition for people living with HIV (PLHIV) may differ in settings where overweight and obesity are prevalent and cardiovascular disease risk is a concern. However, no studies among PLHIV have investigated the impact of food support on nutritional outcomes in these settings. We therefore assessed the effect of food support on food insecurity and body weight in a population of PLHIV with high prevalence of overweight and obesity. We implemented a pilot intervention trial in four government-run HIV clinics in Honduras. The trial tested the effect of a monthly household food ration plus nutrition education (n = 203), compared to nutrition education alone (n = 197), over 12 months. Participants were clinic patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Assessments were obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes for this analysis were food security, using the validated Latin American and Caribbean Food Security Scale and body weight (kg). Thirty-one percent of participants were overweight (22%) or obese (8%) at baseline. At 6 months, the probability of severe food insecurity decreased by 48.3% (p < 0.01) in the food support group, compared to 11.6% in the education-only group (p < 0.01). Among overweight or obese participants, food support led to average weight gain of 1.13 kg (p < 0.01), while nutrition education alone was associated with average weight loss of 0.72 kg (p < 0.10). Nutrition education alone was associated with weight gain among underweight and normal weight participants. Household food support may improve food security but not necessarily nutritional status of ART recipients above and beyond nutrition education. Improving nutritional tailoring of food support and testing the impact of nutrition education should be prioritized for PLHIV in Latin America and similar settings. PMID:25429691

  6. Phosphotungstic acid supported on magnetic nanoparticles as an efficient reusable catalyst for epoxidation of alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kooti, M.; Afshari, M.

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Phosphotungstic acid supported on functionalized cobalt ferrite was prepared. ► Silica coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used as support. ► This composite was successfully used as catalyst for epoxidation of alkenes. ► Oxidation reactions were carried out in the presence of t-BuOOH as oxidant. ► The catalyst can be readily separated from solution by magnetic field. -- Abstract: A new magnetically separable catalyst consisting of phosphotungstic acid supported on imidazole functionalized silica coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was prepared. The synthesized catalyst was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This immobilized phosphotungstic acid was shown to be an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the epoxidation of various alkenes using tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) as oxidant. The catalyst is readily recovered by simple magnetic decantation and can be recycled several times with no significant loss of catalytic activity.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Changes in Abdominal Compartments in Obese Diabetics during a Low-Calorie Weight-Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Lena J.; Steveling, Antje; Meffert, Peter J.; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Kessler, Rebecca; Hosten, Norbert; Krüger, Janine; Gärtner, Simone; Aghdassi, Ali A.; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate changes in the fat content of abdominal compartments and muscle area during weight loss using confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in overweight diabetics. Methods Twenty-nine obese diabetics (10/19 men/women, median age: 59.0 years, median body mass index (BMI): 34.0 kg/m2) prospectively joined a standardized 15-week weight-loss program (six weeks of formula diet exclusively, followed by reintroduction of regular food with gradually increasing energy content over nine weeks) over 15 weeks. All subjects underwent a standardized MRI protocol including a confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded MR sequence with water/fat separation before the program as well at the end of the six weeks of formula diet and at the end of the program at 15 weeks. Fat fractions of abdominal organs and vertebral bone marrow as well as volumes of visceral and subcutaneous fat were determined. Furthermore, muscle area was evaluated using the L4/L5 method. Data were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for paired samples. Results Median BMI decreased significantly from 34.0 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2 (p < 0.001) at 15 weeks. Liver fat content was normalized (14.2% to 4.1%, p < 0.001) and vertebral bone marrow fat (57.5% to 53.6%, p = 0.018) decreased significantly throughout the program, while fat content of pancreas (9.0%), spleen (0.0%), and psoas muscle (0.0%) did not (p > 0.15). Visceral fat volume (3.2 L to 1.6 L, p < 0.001) and subcutaneous fat diameter (3.0 cm to 2.2 cm, p < 0.001) also decreased significantly. Muscle area declined by 6.8% from 243.9 cm2 to 226.8 cm2. Conclusion MRI allows noninvasive monitoring of changes in abdominal compartments during weight loss. In overweight diabetics, weight loss leads to fat reduction in abdominal compartments, such as visceral fat, as well as liver fat and vertebral bone marrow fat while pancreas fat remains unchanged. PMID:27110719

  8. High frequencies of elevated alkaline phosphatase activity and rickets exist in extremely low birth weight infants despite current nutritional support

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopenia and rickets are common among extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW, <1000 g birth weight) despite current practices of vitamin and mineral supplementation. Few data are available evaluating the usual course of markers of mineral status in this population. Our objectives in this study w...

  9. Perianal Fistula With and Without Abscess: Assessment of Fistula Activity Using Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Selim; Olgun, Deniz Cebi; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Tutar, Onur; Samanci, Cesur; Dikici, Suleyman; Simsek, Osman; Rafiee, Babak; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Mihmanli, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly accurate for the depiction of both the primary tract of fistula and abscesses, in patients with perianal disease. In addition, MRI can be used to evaluate the activity of fistulas, which is a significant factor for determining the therapeutic strategy. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the usefulness of diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI for assessing activity and visibility of perianal fistula. Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients with 56 perianal fistulas were included in the current retrospective study. The T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWMRI were performed and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of fistulas were measured. Fistulas were classified into two groups: only perianal fistulas and fistulas accompanied by abscess. Fistulas were also classified into two groups, based on clinical findings: positive inflammatory activity (PIA) and negative inflammatory activity (NIA). Results: Mean ADC value (mm2/s) of PIA group was significantly lower than that of NIA group, regarding lesions in patients with abscess-associated fistulas (1.371 × 10-3 ± 0.168 × 10-3 vs. 1.586 × 10-3 ± 0.136 × 10-3; P = 0.036). No statistically significant difference was found in mean ADC values between PIA and NIA groups, in patients with only perianal fistulas (P = 0.507). Perianal fistula visibility was greater with combined evaluation of T2WI and DWMRI than with T2WI, for two reviewers (P = 0.046 and P = 0.014). Conclusion: The DWMRI is a useful technique for evaluating activity of fistulas with abscess. Perianal fistula visibility is greater with combined T2WI and DWMRI than T2WI alone. PMID:26715982

  10. Monitoring and normalising a lack of appetite and weight loss. A discursive analysis of an online support group for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, Jo; Seymour-Smith, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    A significant adjustment in eating practices is required before and after bariatric surgery, yet we know relatively little about how patients manage these changes. In this paper, we explored how members of an online bariatric support group constructed their appetite and weight loss. Two hundred and eighty four online posts were collected, covering a period of just over a year, and analysed using discursive psychology. We found that a lack of appetite post-surgery was oriented to as something that was positively evaluated yet a cause for concern. Indeed, members monitored their food intake and marked out food consumption as a necessary activity in line with notions of healthy eating. Through monitoring members also normalised periods of weight stabilisation and were inducted into a group philosophy which encouraged a more holistic approach to post-surgery 'success'. Our analysis also highlights how monitoring and policing work as social support mechanisms which help to maintain weight management. Thus we argue, in line with others, that weight management, typically depicted as an individual responsibility, is bound up with the social practices of the online support group. We suggest that clinical advice about a loss of appetite and periods of weight stabilisation post-surgery perhaps need further explanation to patients. PMID:22342357

  11. Cardiac and Hepatic T2*-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Transfusion Dependent Hemoglobinopathy in North West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, N; Alinejad, V; Hejazi, S; Noroozi, M; Hashemi, A; Rahimi, B; Nateghi, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron overload is the main transfusion related side effects in patients with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies. Severe iron deposition in tissues leads to organ dysfunction. Many organs can be affected such as heart, liver, and endocrine organs. Cardiac failure and liver fibrosis are the consequent of Iron overload in transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a safe, noninvasive, and accurate method for the assessment of iron deposition in different tissues. This study assessed iron levels in liver and heart of the patients with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies. Materials and Methods The studied population consisted of 12 patients (7 male and 5 female) with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies, aged between 10-18 years old. Then, Cardiac and liver T2*- weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained. Results In current study, 1patient (8.33%) had severe, 2 patients (16.66%) had moderate and 2(16.66%) had mild cardiac iron deposition. Out of 12 patients, 1 had severe iron deposition in liver (8.33%), 5(41.66%) and 4(33.33%) had moderate and mild hepatic iron deposition, respectively. Differences between Hepatic and cardiac iron levels were not significant between males and females (p>0.05). Conclusion Since cardiac and liver iron levels were higher than normal in most of the study group, checking ferritin level and liver function test and also echocardiography in shorter intervals (each 3 months) in involved group is suggested instead of checking routinely in 6 month intervals in patients with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26985353

  12. On the stabilization of gold nanoparticles over silica-based magnetic supports modified with organosilanes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rafael L; Zanchet, Daniela; Kiyohara, Pedro K; Rossi, Liane M

    2011-04-11

    The immobilization of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) on silica is made possible by the functionalization of the silica surfaces with organosilanes. Au NPs could only be stabilized and firmly attached to silica-support surfaces that were previously modified with amino groups. Au NPs could not be stabilized on bare silica surfaces and most of the NPs were then found in the solution. The metal-support interactions before and after the Au NP formation, observed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS), indicate a stronger interaction of gold(III) ions with amino-modified silica surfaces than with the silanol groups in bare silica. An amino-modified, silica-based, magnetic support was used to prepare an active Au NP catalyst for the chemoselective oxidation of alcohols, a reaction of great interest for the fine chemical industry. PMID:21360597

  13. THERMAL EQUILIBRIA OF OPTICALLY THIN, MAGNETICALLY SUPPORTED, TWO-TEMPERATURE, BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, H.; Machida, M.; Nakamura, K. E.; Matsumoto, R.

    2010-03-20

    We obtained thermal equilibrium solutions for optically thin, two-temperature black hole accretion disks incorporating magnetic fields. The main objective of this study is to explain the bright/hard state observed during the bright/slow transition of galactic black hole candidates. We assume that the energy transfer from ions to electrons occurs via Coulomb collisions. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, and inverse Compton scattering are considered as the radiative cooling processes. In order to complete the set of basic equations, we specify the magnetic flux advection rate instead of beta = p{sub gas}/p{sub mag}. We find magnetically supported (low-beta), thermally stable solutions. In these solutions, the total amount of the heating via the dissipation of turbulent magnetic fields goes into electrons and balances the radiative cooling. The low-beta solutions extend to high mass accretion rates ({approx}>alpha{sup 2}M-dot{sub Edd}) and the electron temperature is moderately cool (T{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9.5} K). High luminosities ({approx}>0.1L{sub Edd}) and moderately high energy cutoffs in the X-ray spectrum ({approx}50-200 keV) observed in the bright/hard state can be explained by the low-beta solutions.

  14. Reduced Integration and Differentiation of the Imitation Network in Autism: A Combined Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Inna; Datko, Michael; Cabrera, Yuliana; Carper, Ruth A.; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Converging evidence indicates that brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involve atypical network connectivity, but few studies have integrated functional with structural connectivity measures. This multimodal investigation examined functional and structural connectivity of the imitation network in children and adolescents with ASD, and its links with clinical symptoms. Methods Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed in 35 participants with ASD and 35 typically developing controls, aged 8 to 17 years, matched for age, gender, intelligence quotient, and head motion. Results Within-network analyses revealed overall reduced functional connectivity (FC) between distributed imitation regions in the ASD group. Whole brain analyses showed that underconnectivity in ASD occurred exclusively in regions belonging to the imitation network, whereas overconnectivity was observed between imitation nodes and extraneous regions. Structurally, reduced fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity were found in white matter tracts directly connecting key imitation regions with atypical FC in ASD. These differences in microstructural organization of white matter correlated with weaker FC and greater ASD symptomatology. Interpretation Findings demonstrate atypical connectivity of the brain network supporting imitation in ASD, characterized by a highly specific pattern. This pattern of underconnectivity within, but overconnectivity outside the functional network is in contrast with typical development and suggests reduced network integration and differentiation in ASD. Our findings also indicate that atypical connectivity of the imitation network may contribute to ASD clinical symptoms, highlighting the role of this fundamental social cognition ability in the pathophysiology of ASD. PMID:26418284

  15. The Clinical Value of High-Intensity Signals on the Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques: Noncontrast T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Shimada, Kenei

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, significant progress has been made in the pathohistological assessment of vulnerable plaques and in invasive intravascular imaging techniques. However, the assessment of plaque morphology by invasive modalities is of limited value for the detection of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and the subsequent prediction or prevention of acute cardiovascular events. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology has reached a sufficient level of spatial resolution, which allowed the plaque visualization of large and static arteries such as the carotids and aorta. However, coronary wall imaging by MR is still challenging due to the small size of coronary arteries, cardiac and respiratory motion, and the low contrast-to-noise ratio between the coronary artery wall and the surrounding structures. Following the introduction of carotid plaque imaging with noncontrast T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), some investigators have reported that coronary artery high-intensity signals on T1WI are associated with vulnerable plaque morphology and an increased risk of future cardiac events. Although there are several limitations and issues that need to be resolved, this novel MR technique for coronary plaque imaging could influence treatment strategies for atherothrombotic disease and may be useful for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of atherothrombotic plaque formation. PMID:27455243

  16. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Kidneys with Obstructive Uropathy: Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Apaydin, Melda; Sönmezgöz, Fitnet; Çalık, Sinan; Bedel Koruyucu, Melike

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the capability of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in differentiation between benign and malignant etiology of obstructive uropathy. Materials and Methods. DWI was performed in 41 patients with hydronephrotic kidneys and 26 healthy volunteers. MR imaging was performed using a 1.5 T whole-body superconducting MR scanner. The signal intensities of the renal parenchyma on DWI and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were noted. DWI was performed with the following diffusion gradient b values: 100, 600, and 1000 s/mm2. A large circular region of interest was placed in the corticomedullary junction of the kidneys. For statistical analysis, the independent-samples t test was used. Results. The mean renal ADC values for b100, b600, and b1000 in hydronephrosis patients with benign and malignant etiology and the healthy volunteers of the control group were analysed. ADC measurements of renal parenchyma in all hydronephrotic kidneys with benign and malignant etiology were found to be statistically low compared to those of normal kidneys (P < 0.05). Conclusions. There were significant differences in the ADC values of obstructed kidneys compared to those of normal kidneys. Obstructed kidneys with malignant etiology had lower ADC values for b1000 compared to obstructed kidneys with benign etiology, but these alterations were statistically insignificant. PMID:24764775

  17. Phantom for assessment of fat suppression in large field-of-view diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, J. M.; Douglas, N. H. M.; deSouza, N. M.; Collins, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    We present the development and application of a phantom for assessment and optimization of fat suppression over a large field-of-view in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T and 3 T. A Perspex cylinder (inner diameter 185 mm, height 300 mm) which contains a second cylinder (inner diameter 140 mm) was constructed. The inner cylinder was filled with water doped with copper sulphate and sodium chloride and the annulus was filled with corn oil, which closely matches the spectrum and longitudinal relaxation times of subcutaneous abdominal fat. Placement of the phantom on the couch at 45° to the z-axis presented an elliptical cross-section, which was of a similar size and shape to axial abdominal images. The use of a phantom for optimization of fat suppression allowed quantitative comparison between studies without the differences introduced by variability between human subjects. We have demonstrated that the phantom is suitable for selection of inversion delay times, spectral adiabatic inversion recovery delays and assessment of combinatorial methods of fat suppression. The phantom is valuable in protocol development and the assessment of new techniques, particularly in multi-centre trials.

  18. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Differentiation Between Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Lymphoma at the Primary Site

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Ping; Hou, Jing; Li, Fei-Ping; Wang, Hui; Hu, Ping-Sheng; Bi, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) for differentiating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from lymphoma. Methods Intravoxel incoherent motion–based parameters including the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), pure diffusion coefficient (D), pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*), perfusion fraction (f), and fD* (the product of D* and f) were retrospectively compared between 102 patients (82 with NPC, 20 with lymphoma) who received pretreatment IVIM DWI. Results Compared with lymphoma, NPC exhibited higher ADC, D, D*, fD* values (P < 0.001) and f value (P = 0.047). The optimal cutoff values (area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively) for distinguishing the 2 tumors were as follows: ADC value of 0.761 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.781, 93.90%, 55.00%); D, 0.66 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.802, 54.88%, 100.00%); D*, 7.89 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.898, 82.93%, 85.00%); f, 0.29 (0.644, 41.46%, 95.00%); and fD*, 1.99 × 10−3 mm2/s (0.960, 85.37%, 100.00%). Conclusions Nasopharyngeal carcinoma exhibits different IVIM-based imaging features from lymphoma. Intravoxel incoherent motion DWI is useful for differentiating lymphoma from NPC. PMID:26953769

  19. Stabilizing Gyroscopic Modes in Magnetic-Bearing-Supported Flywheels by Using Cross-Axis Proportional Gains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, Timothy P.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2006-01-01

    For magnetic-bearing-supported high-speed rotating machines with significant gyroscopic effects, it is necessary to stabilize forward and backward tilt whirling modes. Instability or low damping of these modes can prevent the attainment of desired shaft speed. We show analytically that both modes can be stabilized by using cross-axis proportional gains and high- and low-pass filters in the magnetic bearing controller. Furthermore, at high shaft speeds, where system phase lags degrade the stability of the forward-whirl mode, a phasor advance of the control signal can partially counteract the phase lag. In some range of high shaft speed, the derivative gain for the tilt modes (essential for stability for slowly rotating shafts) can be removed entirely. We show analytically how the tilt eigenvalues depend on shaft speed and on various controller feedback parameters.

  20. A tosyl-activated magnetic bead cellulose as solid support for sensitive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junhong; Horák, Daniel; Lenfeld, Jiří; Hammond, Maria; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood

    2013-09-10

    Magnetic bead cellulose (MBC) was prepared using sol-gel transition of viscose in the presence of maghemite (γ-Fe₂O₃) nanoparticles. The MBC particles were then activated with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride to yield tosyl-activated magnetic bead cellulose (MBC-Ts). The microspheres were characterized by light and electron microscopy, elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine morphology, size, polydispersity and content of iron and tosyl groups. The functionality of the MBC-Ts microspheres was demonstrated using proximity ligation assay (PLA) to detect vascular endothelial growth factor in femtomolar concentration range. The MBC-Ts microspheres performed equally well as commercially available microparticles that are routinely used as solid support in solid phase PLA. PMID:23811391

  1. Design of a superconducting 28 GHz ion source magnet for FRIB using a shell-based support structure

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Rochepault, E.; Hafalia, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Prestemon, S. O.; Machicoane, G.; Pozdeyev, E.; Bultman, N.; Rao, X.

    2014-12-05

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is completing the design of a 28 GHz NbTi ion source magnet for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The design parameters are based on the parameters of the ECR ion source VENUS in operation at LBNL since 2002 featuring a sextupole-in-solenoids configuration. Whereas most of the magnet components (such as conductor, magnetic design, protection scheme) remain very similar to the VENUS magnet components, the support structure of the FRIB ion source uses a different concept. A shell-based support structure using bladders and keys is implemented in the design allowing fine tuning of the sextupole preload and reversibility of the magnet assembly process. As part of the design work, conductor insulation scheme, coil fabrication processes and assembly procedures are also explored to optimize performance. We present the main features of the design emphasizing the integrated design approach used at LBNL to achieve this result.

  2. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires.The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to

  3. Stability Limits of a PD Controller for a Flywheel Supported on Rigid Rotor and Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, TImothy P.

    2006-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings are used to provide a long-life, low-loss suspension of a high-speed flywheel rotor. This paper describes a modeling effort used to understand the stability boundaries of the PD controller used to control the active magnetic bearings on a high speed test rig. Limits of stability are described in terms of allowable stiffness and damping values which result in stable levitation of the nonrotating rig. Small signal stability limits for the system is defined as a nongrowth in vibration amplitude of a small disturbance. A simple mass-force model was analyzed. The force resulting from the magnetic bearing was linearized to include negative displacement stiffness and a current stiffness. The current stiffness was then used in a PD controller. The phase lag of the control loop was modeled by a simple time delay. The stability limits and the associated vibration frequencies were measured and compared to the theoretical values. The results show a region on stiffness versus damping plot that have the same qualitative tendencies as experimental measurements. The resulting stability model was then extended to a flywheel system. The rotor dynamics of the flywheel was modeled using a rigid rotor supported on magnetic bearings. The equations of motion were written for the center of mass and a small angle linearization of the rotations about the center of mass. The stability limits and the associated vibration frequencies were found as a function of nondimensional magnetic bearing stiffness and damping and nondimensional parameters of flywheel speed and time delay.

  4. Detection of prostate cancer by integration of line-scan diffusion, T2-mapping and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; a multichannel statistical classifier.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ian; Wells, William; Mulkern, Robert V; Haker, Steven; Zhang, Jianqing; Zou, Kelly H; Maier, Stephan E; Tempany, Clare M C

    2003-09-01

    A multichannel statistical classifier for detecting prostate cancer was developed and validated by combining information from three different magnetic resonance (MR) methodologies: T2-weighted, T2-mapping, and line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI). From these MR sequences, four different sets of image intensities were obtained: T2-weighted (T2W) from T2-weighted imaging, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) from LSDI, and proton density (PD) and T2 (T2 Map) from T2-mapping imaging. Manually segmented tumor labels from a radiologist, which were validated by biopsy results, served as tumor "ground truth." Textural features were extracted from the images using co-occurrence matrix (CM) and discrete cosine transform (DCT). Anatomical location of voxels was described by a cylindrical coordinate system. A statistical jack-knife approach was used to evaluate our classifiers. Single-channel maximum likelihood (ML) classifiers were based on 1 of the 4 basic image intensities. Our multichannel classifiers: support vector machine (SVM) and Fisher linear discriminant (FLD), utilized five different sets of derived features. Each classifier generated a summary statistical map that indicated tumor likelihood in the peripheral zone (PZ) of the prostate gland. To assess classifier accuracy, the average areas under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves over all subjects were compared. Our best FLD classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.839(+/-0.064), and our best SVM classifier achieved an average ROC area of 0.761(+/-0.043). The T2W ML classifier, our best single-channel classifier, only achieved an average ROC area of 0.599(+/-0.146). Compared to the best single-channel ML classifier, our best multichannel FLD and SVM classifiers have statistically superior ROC performance (P=0.0003 and 0.0017, respectively) from pairwise two-sided t-test. By integrating the information from multiple images and capturing the textural and anatomical features in tumor areas, summary

  5. Muscle Activation and Estimated Relative Joint Force During Running with Weight Support on a Lower-Body Positive-Pressure Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bente R; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine L

    2016-08-01

    Running on a lower-body positive-pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg muscle activation and to estimate relative knee and ankle joint forces. Runners performed 6-min running sessions at 2.22 m/s and 3.33 m/s, at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% body weight (BW). Surface electromyography, ground reaction force, and running characteristics were measured. Relative knee and ankle joint forces were estimated. Leg muscles responded differently to unweighting during running, reflecting different relative contribution to propulsion and antigravity forces. At 20% BW, knee extensor EMGpeak decreased to 22% at 2.22 m/s and 28% at 3.33 m/s of 100% BW values. Plantar flexors decreased to 52% and 58% at 20% BW, while activity of biceps femoris muscle remained unchanged. Unweighting with LBPP reduced estimated joint force significantly although less than proportional to the degree of weight support (ankle). It was concluded that leg muscle activation adapted to the new biomechanical environment, and the effect of unweighting on estimated knee force was more pronounced than on ankle force. PMID:26957520

  6. Active magnetic bearing-supported rotor with misaligned cageless backup bearings: A dropdown event simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halminen, Oskari; Kärkkäinen, Antti; Sopanen, Jussi; Mikkola, Aki

    2015-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMB) offer considerable benefits compared to regular mechanical bearings. On the other hand, they require backup bearings to avoid damage resulting from a failure in the component itself, or in the power or control system. During a rotor-bearing contact event - when the magnetic field has disappeared and the rotor drops on the backup bearings - the structure of the backup bearings has an impact on the dynamic actions of the rotor. In this paper, the dynamics of an active magnetic bearing-supported rotor during contact with backup bearings is studied with a simulation model. Modeling of the backup bearings is done using a comprehensive cageless ball bearing model. The elasticity of the rotor is described using the finite element method (FEM) and the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the system are reduced using component mode synthesis. Verification of the misaligned cageless backup bearings model is done by comparing the simulation results against the measurement results. The verified model with misaligned cageless backup bearings is found to correspond to the features of a real system.

  7. A miniaturized two-DOF rotational gyro with a ball-joint supported permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Weiping; Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a miniaturized two-degrees of freedom (DOF) rotational gyro with a ball-joint supported permanent magnet rotor. The structural design and the dynamic model of the gyro are presented and analyzed in detail in this paper and testified by preliminary experiments. When the rotor tilts away from its null position, it will be constrained by a contactless magnetic equivalent elastic torque derived from the driving structure. As a rotational gyro, this structure is very simple and small, with a core size less than 6 cm3, and it needs only 0.75 W to keep the rotor spinning at a speed of 15 000 revolutions per minute (rpm) in a standard air pressure condition. Preliminary measurements show that, at 7000 rpm within a full scale of ±100 °/s, the gyro has a scale factor of 18.69 mV/(°/s), and a nonlinearity of 0.33% is also achieved through calculation. The results show that the gyro can be used to measure two DOFs' angular rates of carriers without close-loop control due to the existence of magnetic equivalent elasticity.

  8. Impact of time-of-day on brain morphometric measures derived from T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Trefler, Aaron; Sadeghi, Neda; Thomas, Adam G; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Baker, Chris I; Thomas, Cibu

    2016-06-01

    Measures of brain morphometry derived from T1-weighted (T1W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used to elucidate the relation between brain structure and function. However, the computation of T1W morphometric measures can be confounded by subject-related factors such as head motion and level of hydration. A recent study reported subtle yet significant changes in brain volume from morning to evening in a large group of patient populations as well as in healthy elderly individuals. In addition, there is a growing recognition that factors such as circadian rhythm can impact MRI measures of brain function and structure. Here, we provide a comprehensive assessment of the impact of time-of-day (TOD) on widely used measures of brain morphometry in a group of 19 healthy young adults. Our results show that (a) even in a small group of healthy adult volunteers, a highly significant reduction in apparent brain volume, from morning to evening, could be detected; (b) the apparent volume of all three major tissue compartments - gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid - were influenced by TOD, and the magnitude of the TOD effect varied across the tissue compartments; (c) measures of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and gray matter density computed with widely used neuroimaging software suites (i.e., FreeSurfer, FSL-VBM) were all affected by TOD, while other measures, such as curvature indices and sulcal depth, were not; and (d) the effect of TOD appeared to have a greater impact on morphometric measures of the frontal and temporal lobe than on other major lobes of the brain. Our results suggest that the TOD effect is a physiological phenomenon and that controlling for the effect of TOD is crucial for proper interpretation of apparent structural differences measured with T1W morphometry. PMID:26921714

  9. Differences between Young and Older Adults in the Control of Weight Shifting within the Surface of Support

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Elisabeth A.; Caljouw, Simone R.; Coppens, Milou J. M.; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2014-01-01

    An important reason for falling in elderly is incorrect weight-shifting. In many daily life activities quick and accurate weight-shifting is needed to maintain balance and to prevent from falling. The present study aims to gain more insight in age-related differences in the control of weight-shifting. Nine healthy older adults (70.3±6.9 years) and twelve young adults (20.9±0.5 years) participated in the study. They performed a weight shifting task by moving the body's center of pressure, represented by a red dot on a screen, in different directions, towards targets of different sizes and at different distances projected on a screen. Movement time, fluency and accuracy of the movement were determined. Accuracy was quantified by the number of times the cursor hit the goal target before a target switch was realized (counts on goal) and by the time required to realize a target switch after the goal target was hit by the cursor for the first time (dwelling time). Fluency was expressed by the maximal deviation of the performed path with respect to the ideal path and the number of peaks, or inflections in the performed path. Significant main effects of target size, target distance and age on all outcome measures were found. With decreasing target size, increasing target distance and increasing age, movement time significantly increased and fluency and accuracy significantly decreased (i.e. increased number of peaks, maximal deviation, number of times on the goal target and longer dwelling time around the goal target). In addition, significant interaction effects of size*age and distance*age were found. Older adults needed more time to perform the weight-shifting task and their movements were less fluent and accurate compared to younger adults, especially with increasing task difficulty. This indicates that elderly might have difficulties with executing an adequate adaptation to a perturbation in daily life. PMID:24892646

  10. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.