Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic bioplex assay

  1. Magnetic bead based immuno-detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables using the Bio-Plex suspension array system.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Basavanna, U

    2015-04-01

    Listeriosis, a disease contracted via the consumption of foods contaminated with pathogenic Listeria species, can produce severe symptoms and high mortality in susceptible people and animals. The development of molecular methods and immuno-based techniques for detection of pathogenic Listeria in foods has been challenging due to the presence of assay inhibiting food components. In this study, we utilize a macrophage cell culture system for the isolation and enrichment of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii from infant formula and leafy green vegetables for subsequent identification using the Luminex xMAP technique. Macrophage monolayers were exposed to infant formula, lettuce and celery contaminated with L. monocytogenes or L. ivanovii. Magnetic microspheres conjugated to Listeria specific antibody were used to capture Listeria from infected macrophages and then analyzed using the Bio-Plex 200 analyzer. As few as 10 CFU/mL or g of L. monocytogenes was detected in all foods tested. The detection limit for L. ivanovii was 10 CFU/mL in infant formula and 100 CFU/g in leafy greens. Microsphere bound Listeria obtained from infected macrophage lysates could also be isolated on selective media for subsequent confirmatory identification. This method presumptively identifies L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii from infant formula, lettuce and celery in less than 28 h with confirmatory identifications completed in less than 48 h. PMID:25475329

  2. Evaluation of the BioPlex 2200 ANA screen: analysis of 510 healthy subjects: incidence of natural/predictive autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Shovman, O; Gilburd, B; Barzilai, O; Shinar, E; Larida, B; Zandman-Goddard, G; Binder, S R; Shoenfeld, Y

    2005-06-01

    The BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen is a fully automated system that determines levels for 13 different autoimmune antibodies of established clinical significance. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of the BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen assay and to analyze the antibody profile samples collected from healthy subjects against comparative ELISA and IIF screening methods. A total of 510 specimens were randomly selected from a cohort of apparently healthy blood bank donors. Samples were distributed to five age brackets. All samples were tested using Bio-Rad's ANA Screen kit. Specificity was compared to IIF and ELISA results. Most of the samples were found negative in all ANA screening systems (84.5% by IIF, 92.5% by BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen kit, and 94.5% by ELISA). The frequency of positive results was highest (15.5%) using IIF, in comparison to almost similar results (5.5% vs. 7.5%) achieved by ANA ELISA and BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen kits. The positive rate of autoantibodies was significantly reduced when analyzed by different combinations of ANA screen assays (from 2.35% using IIF + BioPlex ANA Screen tests to 0.98% by using all three tests). Using the BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen system, we were able to identify samples with high levels of individual antibodies: anti-dsDNA at 20-63 IU/mL, antichromatin at 4-8 AI, anti-SmRNP at 2-6 AI, and anti-RNPA at 2-4.5 AI. Importantly, from 7 IIF and ELISA positive sera, 5 of these were also BioPlex 2200 positive, suggesting that the BioPlex is seeing the samples that are of the greatest interest, using the established techniques. The specificity of the BioPlex 2200 ANA Screen analysis of 13 different analytes (dsDNA, centromere B, chromatin, Jo1, ribosomal P, RNP 68, RNP A, Scl-70, Sm, SmPNP, SS-A52, SS-A60, SS-B) is comparable (P < 0.252) to the ELISA ANA screening test. Like the ELISA, the BioPlex 2200 has a lower (P < 0.001) positive rate than IIF for the autoantibody screening. PMID:16014555

  3. Modeling of Solid Waste Processing Options in BIO-Plex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Luis F.; Finn, Cory; Kang, Sukwon; Hogan, John; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    BIO-Plex is a ground-based test bed currently under development by NASA for testing technologies and practices that may be utilized in future long-term life support missions. All aspects of such an Advanced Life Support (ALS) System must be considered to confidently construct a reliable system, which will not only allow the crew to survive in harsh environments, but allow the crew time to perform meaningful research. Effective handling of solid wastes is a critical aspect of the system, especially when recovery of resources contained in the waste is required. This is particularly important for ALS Systems configurations that include a Biomass Production Chamber. In these cases, significant amounts of inedible biomass waste may be produced, which can ultimately serve as a repository of necessary resources for sustaining life, notably carbon, water, and plant nutrients. Numerous biological and physicochemical solid waste processing options have been considered. Biological options include composting, aerobic digestion, and anaerobic digestion. Physicochemical options include pyrolysis, SCWO (supercritical water oxidation), various incineration configurations, microwave incineration, magnetically assisted gasification, and low temperature plasma reaction. Modeling of these options is a necessary step to assist in the design process. A previously developed top-level model of BIO-Plex implemented in MATLAB Simulink (r) for the use of systems analysis and design has been adopted for this analysis. Presently, this model only considered incineration for solid waste processing. Present work, reported here, includes the expansion of this model to include a wider array of solid waste processing options selected from the above options, bearing in mind potential, near term solid waste treatment systems. Furthermore, a trade study has also been performed among these solid waste processing technologies in an effort to determine the ideal technology for long-term life support

  4. BIO-Plex Information System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Boulanger, Richard; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a suggested design for an integrated information system for the proposed BIO-Plex (Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex) at Johnson Space Center (JSC), including distributed control systems, central control, networks, database servers, personal computers and workstations, applications software, and external communications. The system will have an open commercial computing and networking, architecture. The network will provide automatic real-time transfer of information to database server computers which perform data collection and validation. This information system will support integrated, data sharing applications for everything, from system alarms to management summaries. Most existing complex process control systems have information gaps between the different real time subsystems, between these subsystems and central controller, between the central controller and system level planning and analysis application software, and between the system level applications and management overview reporting. An integrated information system is vitally necessary as the basis for the integration of planning, scheduling, modeling, monitoring, and control, which will allow improved monitoring and control based on timely, accurate and complete data. Data describing the system configuration and the real time processes can be collected, checked and reconciled, analyzed and stored in database servers that can be accessed by all applications. The required technology is available. The only opportunity to design a distributed, nonredundant, integrated system is before it is built. Retrofit is extremely difficult and costly.

  5. Evaluation of the BioPlex 2200 Syphilis System as a First-Line Method of Reverse-Sequence Screening for Syphilis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Paola; Foschi, Claudio; Moroni, Alessandra; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Bacchi Reggiani, Letizia; Cevenini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent technological advances, the diagnosis of syphilis remains a challenging enterprise. Actually, most high-volume laboratories have adopted the “reverse algorithm” due several factors, including the potential to automate testing. Recently, immunoassays processed on random-access systems have been proposed as screening tests. The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostic performances of BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgG and BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgM, tests based on Multiplex Flow technology, in comparison with the performance of Architect Syphilis TP, a chemiluminescent immunoassay for the detection of IgG and/or IgM anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies. A retrospective study was performed with a panel of 100 blood donor sera, a panel of 350 clinical and laboratory-characterized syphilitic sera, and 170 samples obtained from subjects with potentially interfering conditions. Moreover, 200 unselected samples submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory of St. Orsola Hospital in Bologna for routine screening for syphilis were evaluated. As confirmatory tests, T. pallidum hemagglutination and Western blot assays were used. Considering the IgG Western blot (WB) assay to be the gold standard method, BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgG specificity was far higher than Architect Syphilis TP specificity (89.7% versus 78.4%, respectively), whereas the sensitivity was 100% for both automated methods. Compared to the IgM WB assay, BioPlex 2200 Syphilis IgM performed with a specificity of 94.9%, whereas the sensitivity was 84.8%. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, the high sample throughput and its valuable analytical performances, BioPlex Syphilis 2200 IgG could represent a suitable choice for high-volume laboratories. BioPlex Syphilis 2200 IgM could be considered a good addition to IgG testing for uncovering active infections. PMID:23697575

  6. Dynamic Model of the BIO-Plex Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Cory; Meyers, Karen; Duffield, Bruce; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BIO-Plex facility will need to support a variety of life support system designs and operation strategies. These systems will be tested and evaluated in the BIO-Plex facility. An important goal of the life support program is to identify designs that best meet all size and performance constraints for a variety of possible future missions. Integrated human testing is a necessary step in reaching this goal. System modeling and analysis will also play an important role in this endeavor. Currently, simulation studies are being used to estimate air revitalization buffer and storage requirements in order to develop the infrastructure requirements of the BIO-Plex facility. Simulation studies are also being used to verify that the envisioned operation strategy will be able to meet all performance criteria. In this paper, a simulation study is presented for a nominal BIO-Plex scenario with a high-level of crop growth. A general description of the dynamic mass flow model is provided, along with some simulation results. The paper also discusses sizing and operations issues and describes plans for future simulation studies.

  7. Modeling Separate and Combined Atmospheres in BIO-Plex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Finn, Cory; Kwauk, Xianmin; Blackwell, Charles; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We modeled BIO-Plex designs with separate or combined atmospheres and then simulated controlling the atmosphere composition. The BIO-Plex is the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex, a large regenerative life support test facility under development at NASA Johnson Space Center. Although plants grow better at above-normal carbon dioxide levels, humans can tolerate even higher carbon dioxide levels. Incinerator exhaust has very high levels of carbon dioxide. An elaborate BIO-Plex design would maintain different atmospheres in the crew and plant chambers and isolate the incinerator exhaust in the airlock. This design easily controls the crew and plant carbon dioxide levels but it uses many gas processors, buffers, and controllers. If all the crew's food is grown inside BIO-Plex, all the carbon dioxide required by the plants is supplied by crew respiration and the incineration of plant and food waste. Because the oxygen mass flow must balance in a closed loop, the plants supply all the oxygen required by the crew and the incinerator. Using plants for air revitalization allows using fewer gas processors, buffers, and controllers. In the simplest design, a single combined atmosphere was used for the crew, the plant chamber, and the incinerator. All gas processors, buffers, and controllers were eliminated. The carbon dioxide levels were necessarily similar for the crew and plants. If most of the food is grown, carbon dioxide can be controlled at the desired level by scheduling incineration. An intermediate design uses one atmosphere for the crew and incinerator chambers and a second for the plant chamber. This allows different carbon dioxide levels for the crew and plants. Better control of the atmosphere is obtained by varying the incineration rate. Less gas processing storage and control is needed if more food is grown.

  8. Modeling Separate and Combined Atmospheres in BIO-Plex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Finn, Cory; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Blackwell, Charles; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We modeled BIO-Plex designs with separate or combined atmospheres and then simulated controlling the atmosphere composition. The BIO-Plex is the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex, a large regenerative life support test facility under development at NASA Johnson Space Center. Although plants grow better at above-normal carbon dioxide levels, humans can tolerate even higher carbon dioxide levels. incinerator exhaust has very high levels of carbon dioxide. An elaborate BIO-Plex design would maintain different atmospheres in the crew and plant chambers and isolate the incinerator exhaust in the airlock. This design easily controls the crew and plant carbon dioxide levels but it uses many gas processors, buffers, and controllers. If all the crew's food is grown inside BIO-Plex, all the carbon dioxide required by the plants is supplied by crew respiration and the incineration of plant and food waste. Because the oxygen mass flow must balance in a closed loop, the plants supply all the oxygen required by the crew and the incinerator. Using plants for air revitalization allows using fewer gas processors, buffers, and controllers. In the simplest design, a single combined atmosphere was used for the crew, the plant chamber, and the incinerator. All gas processors, buffers, and controllers were eliminated. The carbon dioxide levels were necessarily similar for the crew and plants. If most of the food is grown, carbon dioxide can be controlled at the desired level by scheduling incineration. An intermediate design uses one atmosphere for the crew and incinerator chambers and a second for the plant chamber. This allows different carbon dioxide levels for the crew and plants. Better control of the atmosphere is obtained by varying the incineration rate. Less gas processing, storage, and control is needed if more food is grown.

  9. Assaying Carcinoembryonic Antigens by Normalized Saturation Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Shi, Jin-Cheng; Chiang, Ming-Hsien

    2015-07-01

    Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) that provide unique advantages have been extensively used to develop immunoassay methods. However, these developed magnetic methods have been used only for specific immunoassays and not in studies of magnetic characteristics of materials. In this study, a common vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) was used for the measurement of the hysteresis loop for different carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA) concentrations ( Φ CEA) based on the synthesized BMNs with anti-CEA coating. Additionally, magnetic parameters such as magnetization ( M), remanent magnetization ( M R), saturation magnetization ( M S), and normalized parameters (Δ M R/ M R and Δ M S/ M S) were studied. Here, Δ M R and Δ M s were defined as the difference between any ΦCEA and zero Φ CEA. The parameters M, Δ M R, and Δ M S increased with Φ CEA, and Δ M S showed the largest increase. Magnetic clusters produced by the conjugation of the BMNs to CEAs showed a Δ M S greater than that of BMNs. Furthermore, the relationship between Δ M S/ M S and Φ CEA could be described by a characteristic logistic function, which was appropriate for assaying the amount of CEAs. This analytic Δ M S/ M S and the BMNs used in general magnetic immunoassays can be used for upgrading the functions of the VSM and for studying the magnetic characteristics of materials.

  10. Microfluidic Magnetic Bead Assay for Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel cell detection device based on a magnetic bead cell assay and microfluidic Coulter counting technology. The device cannot only accurately measure cells size distribution and concentration but also detect specific target cells. The device consists of two identical micro Coulter counters separated by a fluid chamber where an external magnetic field is applied. Antibody-functionalized magnetic beads were bound to specific antigens expressed on the target cells. A high-gradient magnetic field was applied to the chamber closer to the second counter via an external cylindrical magnet. Because of the magnetic interaction between the magnetic beads and the magnetic field, target cells were retarded by the magnetic field; transit time of a target cell (bound with magnetic beads) passing through the second counter was longer than that through the first counter. In comparison, transit times of a nontarget cell remained nearly the same when it passed through both counters. Thus, from the transit time delay we can identify target cells and quantify their concentration in a cell suspension. The transit time and the size of each cell were accurately measured in terms of the width and amplitude of the resistive pulses generated from the two Coulter counters. Experiments demonstrated that for mixed cells with various target cell ratios, the transit time delay increased approximately linearly with the increasing target cell ratio. The limit of detection (LOD) of the assay was estimated to be 5.6% in terms of target cell ratio. Cell viability tests further demonstrated that most cells were viable after the detection. With the simple device configuration and easy sample preparation, this rapid and reliable method is expected to accurately detect target cells and could be applied to facilitate stem cell isolation and characterization. PMID:26636715

  11. Clinical evaluation of BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab, an automated screening method providing discrete detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, HIV-1 antibody, and HIV-2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Salmona, Maud; Delarue, Severine; Delaugerre, Constance; Simon, François; Maylin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis is essential for optimal therapeutic outcomes in patients infected with HIV. Currently, none of the commercially available fourth-generation assays differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies (Ab) or the HIV-1 p24 antigen (Ag). The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel assay, the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab. This assay uses a multiplex flow immunoassay design allowing the simultaneous detection and identification of antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O), HIV-2, and the HIV-1 p24 antigen, in addition to providing a traditional composite result. A total of 1,505 routine serum samples were prospectively tested. Results were compared with those from the Architect HIV Combo assay. The sensitivity of the BioPlex 2200 was 100%. The specificity assessed on repeated false-positive samples was 99.5%. In addition, 524 frozen specimens from patients known to be infected with HIV-1 or HIV-2 were tested. Of these specimens, 420 were infected with HIV-1, including 156 of known genotypes, 86 were infected with HIV-2, 7 were infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2, and 11 were from patients with acute HIV infection. Sensitivity was 100% for the HIV genotypes tested. The differentiation capabilities of the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab assay for HIV-1, HIV-2, dual HIV-1/HIV-2, and early infections were 100%, 90.7%, 100%, and 90.9%, respectively. The BioPlex 2200 is a sensitive and specific assay that offers advantages over conventional HIV combo assays, also referred to as fourth-generation assays, to accurately differentiate and report HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. PMID:24153130

  12. Comparison of non-magnetic and magnetic beads in bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hansenová Maňásková, Silvie; van Belkum, Alex; Endtz, Hubert P; Bikker, Floris J; Veerman, Enno C I; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2016-09-01

    Multiplex bead-based flow cytometry is an attractive way for simultaneous, rapid and cost-effective analysis of multiple analytes in a single sample. Previously, we developed various bead-based assays using non-magnetic beads coated with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens for the detection of antibodies. Here, we compared the performance of the assay using non-magnetic beads with one based on the newly developed magnetic beads. We optimized the magnetic beads' coupling procedure and antibody detection assays for S. aureus and S. pneumoniae antigens and we measured IgG in human pooled serum against a series of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae-derived antigens in a singleplex and in a multiplex assay, respectively. For the multiplex assay, the comparison between magnetic and non-magnetic beads showed: i) in the majority of the cases (13 of the 17 tested S. pneumoniae antigens) significantly higher Median Fluorescence Intensity (MFI) values, ii) lower detection limits, iii) lower coefficient of variation (CV: 12% vs. 7% for non-magnetic vs. magnetic beads), so lower inter-assay variation and hence higher reproducibility. Magnetic bead coupling is cost effective, as we used 25% of the normal amount of antigen and only 50% of the beads in comparison to the non-magnetic beads. This optimized magnetic-based assay, which combines ease of use with an improved assay performance, allows detection of antibodies with a low titer that are potentially missed with the non-magnetic-based assay. PMID:27296810

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric assay of beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Kono, M; O'Hara, K; Shiomi, Y

    1980-01-01

    Beta-Lactam antibiotics and the crude enzyme were mixed in deuterium oxide and placed in a nuclear magnetic resonance tube. The change of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum during the enzymatic reaction was then analyzed to determine beta-lactamase activity. By using beta-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins, cephalosporins, and cephamycins as substrates, a comparison of the beta-lactamase activities was made between the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric assay and the iodometric assay. There was a close correlation between these two methods. PMID:6986114

  14. The BioPlex Network: A Systematic Exploration of the Human Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Huttlin, Edward L.; Ting, Lily; Bruckner, Raphael J.; Gebreab, Fana; Gygi, Melanie P.; Szpyt, John; Tam, Stanley; Zarraga, Gabriela; Colby, Greg; Baltier, Kurt; Dong, Rui; Guarani, Virginia; Vaites, Laura Pontano; Ordureau, Alban; Rad, Ramin; Erickson, Brian K.; Wühr, Martin; Chick, Joel; Zhai, Bo; Kolippakkam, Deepak; Mintseris, Julian; Obar, Robert A.; Harris, Tim; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros; Sowa, Mathew E.; DeCamilli, Pietro; Paulo, Joao A.; Harper, J. Wade; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein interactions form a network whose structure drives cellular function and whose organization informs biological inquiry. Using high-throughput affinity-purification mass spectrometry, we identify interacting partners for 2,594 human proteins in HEK293T cells. The resulting network (BioPlex) contains 23,744 interactions among 7,668 proteins with 86% previously undocumented. BioPlex accurately depicts known complexes, attaining 80-100% coverage for most CORUM complexes. The network readily subdivides into communities that correspond to complexes or clusters of functionally related proteins. More generally, network architecture reflects cellular localization, biological process, and molecular function, enabling functional characterization of thousands of proteins. Network structure also reveals associations among thousands of protein domains, suggesting a basis for examining structurally-related proteins. Finally, BioPlex, in combination with other approaches can be used to reveal interactions of biological or clinical significance. For example, mutations in the membrane protein VAPB implicated in familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis perturb a defined community of interactors. PMID:26186194

  15. Matching Crew Diet and Crop Food Production in BIO-Plex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Kwauk, Xianmin; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper matches the BIO-Plex crop food production to the crew diet requirements. The expected average calorie requirement for BIO-Plex is 2,975 Calories per crewmember per day, for a randomly selected crew with a typical level of physical activity. The range of 2,550 to 3,400 Calories will cover about two-thirds of all crews. The exact calorie requirement will depend on the gender composition, individual weights, exercise, and work effort of the selected crew. The expected average crewmember calorie requirement can be met by 430 grams of carbohydrate, 100 grams of fat, and 90 grams of protein per crewmember per day, for a total of 620 grams. Some fat can replaced by carbohydrate. Each crewmember requires only 2 grams of vitamins and minerals per day. Only unusually restricted diets may lack essential nutrients. The Advanced Life Support (ALS) consensus is that BIO-Plex should grow wheat, potato, and soybean, and maybe sweet potato or peanut, and maybe lettuce and tomato. The BIO-Plex Biomass Production System food production and the external food supply must be matched to the crew diet requirement for calories and nutritional balance. The crop production and external supply specifications can each be varied as long as their sum matches the required diet specification. We have wide flexibility in choosing the crops and resupply. We can easily grow one-half the crew calories in one BIO-Plex Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) if we grow only the most productive crops (wheat, potato, and sweet potato) and it we achieve nominal crop productivity. If we assume higher productivity we can grow a wider variety of crops. If we grow one-half of the crew calories, externally supplied foods can easily provide the other half of the calories and balance the diet. We can not grow 95 percent of the crew calories in two BPCs at nominal productivity while growing a balanced diet. We produce maximum calories by growing wheat, potato, and peanut.

  16. Magnetic Barcode Assay for Genetic Detection of Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Hoang, Anh N.; Chung, Jaehoon; Gural, Nil; Ford, Christopher B.; Min, Changwook; Shah, Rupal R.; Ahmad, Rushdy; Fernandez-Suarez, Marta; Fortune, Sarah M.; Toner, Mehmet; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    The task of rapidly identifying patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in resource-constrained environments remains a challenge. A sensitive and robust platform that does not require bacterial isolation or culture is critical in making informed diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Here we introduce a platform for the detection of nucleic acids based on a magnetic barcoding strategy. PCR-amplified mycobacterial genes are sequence-specifically captured on microspheres, labeled by magnetic nanoprobes, and detected by nuclear magnetic resonance. All components are integrated into a single, small fluidic cartridge for streamlined on-chip operation. We use this platform to detect MTB and identify drug-resistance strains from mechanically processed sputum samples within 2.5 hours. The specificity of the assay is confirmed by a panel of clinically relevant non-MTB bacteria, and the clinical utility is demonstrated by the measurements in MTB-positive patient specimens. Combined with portable systems, the magnetic barcode assay holds promise to become a sensitive, high-throughput, and low-cost platform for point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:23612293

  17. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Field Distribution of Magnetic Micro-barcodes for Suspension Assay Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Vo Thanh; Anandakumar, S.; Kim, CheolGi; Jeong, Jong-Ruyl

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we have investigated real-time decoding feasibility of magnetic micro-barcodes in a microfluidic channel by using numerical analysis of magnetic field distribution of the micro-barcodes. The vector potential model based on a molecular current has been used to obtain magnetic stray field distribution of ferromagnetic bars which consisting of the micro-barcodes. It reveals that the stray field distribution of the micro-barcodes strongly depends on the geometries of the ferromagnetic bar. Interestingly enough, we have found that one can avoide the miniaturization process of a magnetic sensor device needed to increase the sensitivity by optimizing the geometries of micro-barcodes. We also estimate a magnetic sensor response depending on flying height and lateral misalignment of the micro-barcodes over the sensor position and found that control of the flying height is crucial factor to enhance the detection sensitivity and reproducibility of a magnetic sensor signal in the suspension assay technology.

  18. Analysis of edible oil processing options for the BIO-Plex advanced life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwalt, C. J.; Hunter, J.

    2000-01-01

    Edible oil is a critical component of the proposed plant-based Advanced Life Support (ALS) diet. Soybean, peanut, and single-cell oil are the oil source options to date. In terrestrial manufacture, oil is ordinarily extracted with hexane, an organic solvent. However, exposed solvents are not permitted in the spacecraft environment or in enclosed human tests by National Aeronautics and Space Administration due to their potential danger and handling difficulty. As a result, alternative oil-processing methods will need to be utilized. Preparation and recovery options include traditional dehulling, crushing, conditioning, and flaking, extrusion, pressing, water extraction, and supercritical extraction. These processing options were evaluated on criteria appropriate to the Advanced Life Support System and BIO-Plex application including: product quality, product stability, waste production, risk, energy needs, labor requirements, utilization of nonrenewable resources, usefulness of by-products, and versatility and mass of equipment to determine the most appropriate ALS edible oil-processing operation.

  19. Rapid immunoenzyme assay of aflatoxin B1 using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Urusov, Alexandr E; Petrakova, Alina V; Vozniak, Maxim V; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2014-01-01

    The main limitations of microplate-based enzyme immunoassays are the prolonged incubations necessary to facilitate heterogeneous interactions, the complex matrix and poorly soluble antigens, and the significant sample dilutions often required because of the presence of organic extractants. This study presents the use of antibody immobilization on the surface of magnetic particles to overcome these limitations in the detection of the mycotoxin, aflatoxin B1. Features of the proposed system are a high degree of nanoparticle dispersion and methodologically simple immobilization of the antibodies by adsorption. Reactions between the immobilized antibodies with native and labeled antigens are conducted in solution, thereby reducing the interaction period to 5 min without impairing the analytical outcome. Adsorption of immunoglobulins on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles increases their stability in aqueous-organic media, thus minimizing the degree of sample dilution required. Testing barley and maize extracts demonstrated a limit of aflatoxin B1 detection equal to 20 pg/mL and total assay duration of 20 min. Using this method, only the 3-fold dilution of the initial methanol/water (60/40) extraction mixture in the microplate wells is necessary. The proposed pseudo-homogeneous approach could be applied toward immunodetection of a wide range of compounds. PMID:25412219

  20. Bioregenerative Life Support Systems Test Complex (Bio-Plex) Food Processing System: A Dual System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Vittadini, Elena; Peterson, Laurie J.; Swango, Beverly E.; Toerne, Mary E.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Bioregenerative Life Support Test Complex, BIO-Plex, is currently being constructed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, TX. This facility will attempt to answer the questions involved in developing a lunar or planetary base. The Food Processing System (FPS) of the BIO-Plex is responsible for supplying food to the crew in coordination with the chosen mission scenario. Long duration space missions require development of both a Transit Food System and of a Lunar or Planetary Food System. These two systems are intrinsically different since the first one will be utilized in the transit vehicle in microgravity conditions with mostly resupplied foods, while the second will be used in conditions of partial gravity (hypogravity) to process foods from crops grown in the facility. The Transit Food System will consist of prepackaged food of extended shelf life. It will be supplemented with salad crops that will be consumed fresh. Microgravity imposes significant limitation on the ability to handle food and allows only for minimal processing. The challenge is to develop food systems similar to the International Space Station or Shuttle Food Systems but with a shelf life of 3 - 5 years. The Lunar or Planetary Food System will allow for food processing of crops due to the presence of some gravitational force (1/6 to 1/3 that of Earth). Crops such as wheat, soybean, rice, potato, peanut, and salad crops, will be processed to final products to provide a nutritious and acceptable diet for the crew. Not only are constraints imposed on the FPS from the crops (e.g., crop variation, availability, storage and shelf-life) but also significant requirements are present for the crew meals (e.g., RDA, high quality, safety, variety). The FPS becomes a fulcrum creating the right connection from crops to crew meals while dealing with issues of integration within a closed self-regenerative system (e.g., safe processing, waste production, volumes, air contaminations, water usage, etc

  1. Dose-response curve of a microfluidic magnetic bead-based surface coverage sandwich assay.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, Matteo; Trouillon, Raphaël; Tekin, H Cumhur; Lehnert, Thomas; Gijs, Martin A M

    2015-09-25

    Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') have been used to advantage in many microfluidic devices for sensitive antigen (Ag) detection. Today, assays that use as read-out of the signal the number count of immobilized beads on a surface for quantification of a sample's analyte concentration have been among the most sensitive and have allowed protein detection lower than the fgmL(-1) concentration range. Recently, we have proposed in this category a magnetic bead surface coverage assay (Tekin et al., 2013 [1]), in which 'large' (2.8μm) antibody (Ab)-functionalized magnetic beads captured their Ag from a serum and these Ag-carrying beads were subsequently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0μm) Ab-coated magnetic beads. When the system was exposed to a magnetic induction field, the magnet dipole attractive interactions between the two bead types were used as a handle to approach both bead surfaces and assist with Ag-Ab immunocomplex formation, while unspecific binding (in absence of an Ag) of a large bead was reduced by exploiting viscous drag flow. The dose-response curve of this type of assay had two remarkable features: (i) its ability to detect an output signal (i.e. bead number count) for very low Ag concentrations, and (ii) an output signal of the assay that was non-linear with respect to Ag concentration. We explain here the observed dose-response curves and show that the type of interactions and the concept of our assay are in favour of detecting the lowest analyte concentrations (where typically either zero or one Ag is carried per large bead), while higher concentrations are less efficiently detected. We propose a random walk process for the Ag-carrying bead over the magnetic landscape of small beads and this model description explains the enhanced overall capture probability of this assay and its particular non-linear dose response curves. PMID:25817550

  2. Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex): NASA's Next Human-Rated Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tri, Terry O.

    1999-01-01

    As a key component in its ground test bed capability, NASA's Advanced Life Support Program has been developing a large-scale advanced life support test facility capable of supporting long-duration evaluations of integrated bioregenerative life support systems with human test crews. This facility-targeted for evaluation of hypogravity compatible life support systems to be developed for use on planetary surfaces such as Mars or the Moon-is called the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex) and is currently under development at the Johnson Space Center. This test bed is comprised of a set of interconnected chambers with a sealed internal environment which are outfitted with systems capable of supporting test crews of four individuals for periods exceeding one year. The advanced technology systems to be tested will consist of both biological and physicochemical components and will perform all required crew life support functions. This presentation provides a description of the proposed test "missions" to be supported by the BIO-Plex and the planned development strategy for the facility.

  3. An Immuno-Magnetic Nanobead Probe Competitive Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella choleraesuis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daofeng; Yu, Zhibiao; Huang, Yanmei; Wang, Shuying; Wang, Jingyun; Guo, Qi; Xu, Chaolian; Xia, Shiqi; Lai, Weihua

    2016-03-01

    A competitive lateral flow assay for the rapid detection of Salmonella choleraesuis was developed. Immuno-magnetic nanobeads were produced by covalently coupling anti-Salmonella choleraesuis antibody to magnetic nanobeads. These immuno-magnetic nanobeads were used as visually detected probes in the subsequent assay. Compared with the traditional sandwich assay, which is used for detecting macro-molecules, this new method was developed based on the competitive relationship between S. choleraesuis in the inspected sample and the outer membrane protein immobilized on the T line. Thus, only one antibody was necessary in the new assay, whereas a pair of rigorously selected antibodies were required in the sandwich assay. The sensitivity of the competitive assay for S. choleraesuis was 1.2 x 10(7) cfu/mL. In addition, no cross reactions were found in the 17 common non-Salmonella bacteria strains and in the 4 Salmonella strains of other serotypes. Thus, with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity, the assay can be applied for the rapid detection of pre-enriched culture that may contain S. choleraesuis. PMID:27455631

  4. Spinning magnetic trap for automated microfluidic assay systems†

    PubMed Central

    Verbarg, Jasenka; Kamgar-Parsi, Kian; Shields, Adam R.; Howell, Peter B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2012-01-01

    While sophisticated analyses have been performed using lab-on-chip devices, in most cases the sample preparation is still performed off chip. The global need for easy-to-use, disposable testing devices necessitates that sample processing is automated and that transport complexity between the processing and analytical components is minimal. We describe a complete sample manipulation unit for performing automated target capture, efficient mixing with reagents, and controlled target release in a microfluidic channel, using an array of spinning magnets. The “MagTrap” device consists of 6 pairs of magnets in a rotating wheel, situated immediately beneath the microchannel. Rotation of the wheel in the direction opposite to the continuous flow entraps and concentrates the bead-target complexes and separates them from the original sample matrix. As the wheel rotates and the active pair of magnets moves away from the microchannel, the beads are released and briefly flow downstream before being trapped and pulled upstream by the next pair of magnets. This dynamic and continuous movement of the beads ensures that the full surface area of each bead is exposed to reagents and prevents aggregation. The release of the target-bead complexes for further analysis is facilitated by reversing the rotational direction of the wheel to sweep the beads downstream. Sample processing with the MagTrap was demonstrated for the detection of E. coli in a range of concentrations (1 × 103, 1 × 104 and 1 × 106 cells ml−1). Results show that sample processing with the MagTrap outperformed the standard manual protocols, improving the detection capability while simultaneously reducing the processing time. PMID:22344487

  5. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  6. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G.; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R.

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  7. Ultrasensitive protein detection: a case for microfluidic magnetic bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Tekin, H Cumhur; Gijs, Martin A M

    2013-12-21

    We review the use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles ('magnetic beads') in microfluidic systems for ultrasensitive protein detection. During recent years magnetic beads have been used frequently in immunoassays, either as mobile substrates on which the target antigen is captured, as detection labels, or simultaneously as substrates and labels. The major part of the reviewed work has as application the detection of antibodies or disease biomarkers in serum or of biotoxins from food samples. Several of the most sensitive assays allow protein detection down to fg mL(-1) concentrations. We benchmark the performance of these microfluidic magnetic bead-based assays with the most promising earlier work and with alternative solutions. PMID:24145920

  8. Droplet-based microfluidic washing module for magnetic particle-based assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hun; Xu, Linfeng; Oh, Kwang W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform for magnetic particle-based assays by employing in-droplet washing. The droplet-based washing was implemented by traversing functionalized magnetic particles across a laterally merged droplet from one side (containing sample and reagent) to the other (containing buffer) by an external magnetic field. Consequently, the magnetic particles were extracted to a parallel-synchronized train of washing buffer droplets, and unbound reagents were left in an original train of sample droplets. To realize the droplet-based washing function, the following four procedures were sequentially carried in a droplet-based microfluidic device: parallel synchronization of two trains of droplets by using a ladder-like channel network; lateral electrocoalescence by an electric field; magnetic particle manipulation by a magnetic field; and asymmetrical splitting of merged droplets. For the stable droplet synchronization and electrocoalescence, we optimized droplet generation conditions by varying the flow rate ratio (or droplet size). Image analysis was carried out to determine the fluorescent intensity of reagents before and after the washing step. As a result, the unbound reagents in sample droplets were significantly removed by more than a factor of 25 in the single washing step, while the magnetic particles were successfully extracted into washing buffer droplets. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate a magnetic particle-based immunoassay with streptavidin-coated magnetic particles and fluorescently labelled biotin in the proposed continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform. PMID:25379098

  9. Droplet-based microfluidic washing module for magnetic particle-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun; Xu, Linfeng; Oh, Kwang W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform for magnetic particle-based assays by employing in-droplet washing. The droplet-based washing was implemented by traversing functionalized magnetic particles across a laterally merged droplet from one side (containing sample and reagent) to the other (containing buffer) by an external magnetic field. Consequently, the magnetic particles were extracted to a parallel-synchronized train of washing buffer droplets, and unbound reagents were left in an original train of sample droplets. To realize the droplet-based washing function, the following four procedures were sequentially carried in a droplet-based microfluidic device: parallel synchronization of two trains of droplets by using a ladder-like channel network; lateral electrocoalescence by an electric field; magnetic particle manipulation by a magnetic field; and asymmetrical splitting of merged droplets. For the stable droplet synchronization and electrocoalescence, we optimized droplet generation conditions by varying the flow rate ratio (or droplet size). Image analysis was carried out to determine the fluorescent intensity of reagents before and after the washing step. As a result, the unbound reagents in sample droplets were significantly removed by more than a factor of 25 in the single washing step, while the magnetic particles were successfully extracted into washing buffer droplets. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate a magnetic particle-based immunoassay with streptavidin-coated magnetic particles and fluorescently labelled biotin in the proposed continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform. PMID:25379098

  10. Magnetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA) for determination of specific IgG in paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Z P; Guesdon, J L; Drouhet, E; Improvisi, L

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA) for quantification of IgG antibodies to somatic and metabolic antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis was developed. Activation of magnetic polyacrylamide agarose beads with concanavalin A was superior to glutaraldehyde activation, and test sensitivity was higher for somatic than for metabolic antigens. Comparative MELISA, counterimmunoelectrophoresis and erythroimmunoassay tests with sera from 33 proven cases of paracoccidioidomycosis, 14 cases of histoplasmosis and 20 normal human sera showed the MELISA could distinguish antibody levels in paracoccidioidomycosis from those in normal sera; however two sera from histoplasmosis cases cross-reacted in the MELISA. MELISA is a rapid test (5-6 h) and the results suggest it has considerable potential value for assay of anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies. PMID:6438813

  11. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. PMID:25296660

  12. Magnetic bead-quantum dot assay for detection of a biomarker for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe; Searson, Peter C

    2015-11-14

    Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level. PMID:26457768

  13. Magnetic bead-quantum dot assay for detection of a biomarker for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chloe; Searson, Peter C.

    2015-10-01

    Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level.Current diagnostic methods for traumatic brain injury (TBI), which accounts for 15% of all emergency room visits, are limited to neuroimaging modalities. The challenges of accurate diagnosis and monitoring of TBI have created the need for a simple and sensitive blood test to detect brain-specific biomarkers. Here we report on an assay for detection of S100B, a putative biomarker for TBI, using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads for capture of the protein, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. From Western Blot, we show efficient antigen capture and concentration by the magnetic beads. Using magnetic bead capture and quantum dot detection in serum samples, we show a wide detection range and detection limit below the clinical cut-off level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05608j

  14. Sensitive, simultaneous quantitation of two unlabeled DNA targets using a magnetic nanoparticle-enzyme sandwich assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Pilapong, Chalermchai; Guo, Yuan; Ling, Zhenlian; Cespedes, Oscar; Quirke, Philip; Zhou, Dejian

    2013-10-01

    We report herein the development of a simple, sensitive colorimetric magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-enzyme-based DNA sandwich assay that is suitable for simultaneous, label-free quantitation of two DNA targets down to 50 fM level. It can also effectively discriminate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with human cancers (KRAS codon 12/13 SNPs). This assay uses a pair of specific DNA probes, one being covalently conjugated to an MNP for target capture and the other being linked to an enzyme for signal amplification, to sandwich a DNA target, allowing for convenient magnetic separation and subsequent efficient enzymatic signal amplification for high sensitivity. Careful optimization of the MNP surfaces and assay conditions greatly reduced the background, allowing for sensitive, specific detection of as little as 5 amol (50 fM in 100 μL) of target DNA. Moreover, this sensor is robust, it can effectively discriminate cancer-specific SNPs against the wild-type noncancer target, and it works efficiently in 10% human serum. Furthermore, this sensor can simultaneously quantitate two different DNA targets by using two pairs of unique capture- and signal-DNA probes specific for each target. This general, simple, and sensitive DNA sensor appears to be well-suited for a wide range of genetics-based biosensing and diagnostic applications. PMID:23971744

  15. Sensitive, Simultaneous Quantitation of Two Unlabeled DNA Targets Using a Magnetic Nanoparticle–Enzyme Sandwich Assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report herein the development of a simple, sensitive colorimetric magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)–enzyme-based DNA sandwich assay that is suitable for simultaneous, label-free quantitation of two DNA targets down to 50 fM level. It can also effectively discriminate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with human cancers (KRAS codon 12/13 SNPs). This assay uses a pair of specific DNA probes, one being covalently conjugated to an MNP for target capture and the other being linked to an enzyme for signal amplification, to sandwich a DNA target, allowing for convenient magnetic separation and subsequent efficient enzymatic signal amplification for high sensitivity. Careful optimization of the MNP surfaces and assay conditions greatly reduced the background, allowing for sensitive, specific detection of as little as 5 amol (50 fM in 100 μL) of target DNA. Moreover, this sensor is robust, it can effectively discriminate cancer-specific SNPs against the wild-type noncancer target, and it works efficiently in 10% human serum. Furthermore, this sensor can simultaneously quantitate two different DNA targets by using two pairs of unique capture- and signal-DNA probes specific for each target. This general, simple, and sensitive DNA sensor appears to be well-suited for a wide range of genetics-based biosensing and diagnostic applications. PMID:23971744

  16. Design criteria for developing low-resource magnetic bead assays using surface tension valves.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nicholas M; Creecy, Amy E; Majors, Catherine E; Wariso, Bathsheba A; Short, Philip A; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2013-01-01

    Many assays for biological sample processing and diagnostics are not suitable for use in settings that lack laboratory resources. We have recently described a simple, self-contained format based on magnetic beads for extracting infectious disease biomarkers from complex biological samples, which significantly reduces the time, expertise, and infrastructure required. This self-contained format has the potential to facilitate the application of other laboratory-based sample processing assays in low-resource settings. The technology is enabled by immiscible fluid barriers, or surface tension valves, which stably separate adjacent processing solutions within millimeter-diameter tubing and simultaneously permit the transit of magnetic beads across the interfaces. In this report, we identify the physical parameters of the materials that maximize fluid stability and bead transport and minimize solution carryover. We found that fluid stability is maximized with ≤0.8 mm i.d. tubing, valve fluids of similar density to the adjacent solutions, and tubing with ≤20 dyn/cm surface energy. Maximizing bead transport was achieved using ≥2.4 mm i.d. tubing, mineral oil valve fluid, and a mass of 1-3 mg beads. The amount of solution carryover across a surface tension valve was minimized using ≤0.2 mg of beads, tubing with ≤20 dyn/cm surface energy, and air separators. The most favorable parameter space for valve stability and bead transport was identified by combining our experimental results into a single plot using two dimensionless numbers. A strategy is presented for developing additional self-contained assays based on magnetic beads and surface tension valves for low-resource diagnostic applications. PMID:24403996

  17. A highly sensitive and flexible magnetic nanoprobe labeled immunochromatographic assay platform for pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Yong; Lu, Ying; Xu, Xiaowei; Yan, Jun; Pan, Yingjie

    2015-10-15

    A magnetic nanoprobe labeled immunochromatographic test strip (MNP/ICTS) was developed to detect food-borne pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Specific antibody against V. parahaemolyticus was used as test line by coating onto the nitrocellulose membrane. Magnetic nanoprobe was prepared by immobilizing the specific antibody onto the surface of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Specificity and sensitivity of the MNP/ICTS system were verified by artificially contaminated shrimp homogenate samples. Reliability and application feasibility of the MNP/ICTS system were demonstrated by using seafood samples (n=36). Comparing with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and traditional culture methods, the MNP/ICTS system is found to be not only a rapid qualitative analysis (~10 min), but also an accurately quantitative detection platform. Through its rapid magnetic separation property, the MNP/ICTS system is capable to flexibly combine with a sample enrichment and pre-incubation process. This combination makes the qualitative sensitivity for the food samples surged more than 100-fold. A naked-eye observation of 1.58×10(2) CFU/g V. parahaemolyticus was realized. This sensitivity could meet the V. parahaemolyticus test threshold value in many countries. Also, the total sample pre-treatment plus MNP/ICTS assay only needs about 4.5h. Namely, we can get test results in a day. Hence, the developed MNP/ICTS assay platform is simple, rapid and highly sensitive. It is a flexible test platform for pathogen detection. The favorable comparison with PCR and culture methods further proves that the developed MNP/ICTS is applicable into food-borne pathogen or other areas where a simple, rapid, sensitive and point-of-care analysis is desirable. PMID:26188497

  18. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors and Magnetic Labels for Chip-Scale Detection of Immunosorbent Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Lora Millen

    2005-12-17

    The combination of giant magnetoresistive sensors, magnetic labeling strategies, and biomolecule detection is just beginning to be explored. New readout methods and assay formats are necessary for biomolecules detection to flourish. The work presented in this dissertation describes steps toward the creation of a novel detection method for bioassays utilizing giant magnetoresistive sensors as the readout method. The introduction section contains a brief review of some of the current methods of bioassay readout. The theoretical underpinnings of the giant magnetoresistive effect are also discussed. Finally, the more prominent types of giant magnetoresistive sensors are described, as well as their complicated fabrication. Four data chapters follow the introduction; each chapter is presented as a separate manuscript, either already published or soon to be submitted. Chapter 1 presents research efforts toward the production of a bioassay on the surface of a gold-modified GMR sensor. The testing of this methodology involved the capture of goat a-mouse-coated magnetic nanoparticles on the mouse IgG-modified gold surface. The second, third and fourth chapters describe the utilization of a self-referenced sample stick for scanning across the GMR sensor. The sample stick consisted of alternating magnetic reference and bioactive gold addresses. Chapter 2 is concerned with the characterization of both the scanning readout method and the binding and detection of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles to a biotinylated surface. Chapter 3 advances the sample stick readout with the use of the system for detection of a sandwich immunoassay with rabbit IgG proteins. Finally, simultaneous detection of three IgG proteins is demonstrated in Chapter 4. The dissertation is concluded with a brief summary of the research presented and a discussion of the possible future applications and direction of this work.

  19. A rapid assay for Hendra virus IgG antibody detection and its titre estimation using magnetic nanoparticles and phycoerythrin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Pallister, Jackie; Lapierre, Florian; Crameri, Gary; Wang, Lin-Fa; Zhu, Yonggang

    2015-09-15

    Detection of Hendra viral IgG antibody in animal sera is useful for surveillance following a virus outbreak. The commonly used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence-based Luminex assay typically consist of three steps and take at least several hours to complete. We have simplified the procedure to two steps in an effort to develop a rapid procedure for IgG antibody, but not IgM antibody, detection. This is achieved by conjugating the fluorescence label R-phycoerythrin directly onto the IgG binding protein Protein G. The use of magnetic nanoparticles, due to their large specific surface area, has helped reduce each of the binding steps to 20 min. As a result, the whole assay can be completed in 60 min. We also demonstrate a method to quickly estimate IgG antibody titres by assaying the sera at only two dilutions (i.e. 1:20 and 1:1000) and using the fluorescence ratio at these dilutions as an indicator of antibody titre. The results of this approach correlated well with the well-regarded serum neutralization test in virus antibody assays. This protocol reported here can be adopted in Luminex assays, fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assays and assays on microfluidics platforms for rapid antibody surveillance of Hendra and other viruses. PMID:26141730

  20. Ionic strength assay via polyacrylate-ferriferrous oxide magnetic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ran; Sun, Ye; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-05-21

    Convenient reading out and/or determination of ionic strength (IS) is of great significance for both scientific research and real life applications. We presented here a novel method for the rapid and sensitive IS assay based on the electrolyte-induced sensitive wavelength blueshifts of the reflection spectra of polyacrylate capped Fe3O4 magnetic photonic crystals (PA-Fe3O4-MPCs). For HCl, MgSO4 and the common electrolytes corresponding to the salinity of seawater (including NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, Na2SO4 and their mixtures), the PA-Fe3O4-MPCs displayed wavelength blueshifts identical to the total IS of the aqueous solutions, regardless of the kind of above-mentioned electrolytes in the solutions. Besides, the PA-Fe3O4-MPCs exhibited relatively high sensitivity (an average of 294 nm L mmol(-1) in the range of 0.05-0.30 mmol L(-1), and an even higher value of 386 nm L mmol(-1) at 0.05-0.15 mmol L(-1)) and fast response (within 8 s) to the IS of aqueous solutions. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for IS (NaCl, 0.1 mmol L(-1)) was 4.4% (n = 5). The developed method was applied to determine the salinity of seawater samples, and the determined results were validated by the traditional standard chlorinity titration and electric conductimetry method. The recoveries were in the range of 92-104%. The proposed PA-Fe3O4-MPCs based reflectometry method would have great potential for IS and salinity assays. PMID:25827462

  1. Magnetic nanoparticle based purification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody against enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Gun; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Park, Young-Il; Jung, Tae-Sung; Son, Seong-Wan; So, ByungJae; Kang, Hwan-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-enrofloxacin antibody was prepared for a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and purification system using monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupled magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The IC50 values of the developed mAb for enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin were 5.0, 8.3, 9.7, 21.7, 36.0, and 63.7 ng/mL, respectively. The lowest detectable level of ENR was 0.7 ng/mL in the prepared ELISA system. To validate the developed ELISA in the food matrix, known amounts of ENR were spiked in meat and egg samples at 10, 20 and 30 ng/mL. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 72.9 to 113.16% with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.42 to 10.11%. The applicability of the mAb-MNP system was verified by testing the recoveries for ENR residue in three different matrices. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 75.16 to 86.36%, while the CV ranged from 5.08 to 11.53%. Overall, ENR-specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and developed for use in competitive to ELISAs for the detection of ENR in animal meat samples. Furthermore, we suggest that a purification system for ENR using mAb-coupled MNPs could be useful for determination of ENR residue in food. PMID:26040610

  2. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved. PMID:27041274

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle based purification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibody against enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gun; Kim, Myeong-Ae; Park, Young-Il; Jung, Tae-Sung; Son, Seong-Wan; So, ByungJae

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-enrofloxacin antibody was prepared for a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and purification system using monoclonal antibody (mAb) coupled magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The IC50 values of the developed mAb for enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, sarafloxacin, pefloxacin, and norfloxacin were 5.0, 8.3, 9.7, 21.7, 36.0, and 63.7 ng/mL, respectively. The lowest detectable level of ENR was 0.7 ng/mL in the prepared ELISA system. To validate the developed ELISA in the food matrix, known amounts of ENR were spiked in meat and egg samples at 10, 20 and 30 ng/mL. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 72.9 to 113.16% with a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.42 to 10.11%. The applicability of the mAb-MNP system was verified by testing the recoveries for ENR residue in three different matrices. Recoveries for ENR ranged from 75.16 to 86.36%, while the CV ranged from 5.08 to 11.53%. Overall, ENR-specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and developed for use in competitive to ELISAs for the detection of ENR in animal meat samples. Furthermore, we suggest that a purification system for ENR using mAb-coupled MNPs could be useful for determination of ENR residue in food. PMID:26040610

  4. Development of a screening assay for ligands to the estrogen receptor based on magnetic microparticles and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongsoo; van Breemen, Richard B

    2008-01-01

    A high throughput screening assay for the identification of ligands to pharmacologically significant receptors was developed based on magnetic particles containing immobilized receptors followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This assay is suitable for the screening of complex mixtures such as botanical extracts. For proof-of-principle, estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) and ER-beta were immobilized on magnetic particles functionalized with aldehyde or carboxylic acid groups. Alternatively, biotinylated ER was immobilized onto streptavidin-derivatized magnetic particles. The ER that was immobilized using the streptavidin-biotin chemistry showed higher activity than that immobilized on aldehyde or carboxylic acid functionalized magnetic particles. Immobilized ER was incubated with extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) or Humulus lupulus L. (hops). As a control for non-specific binding, each botanical extract was incubated with magnetic particles containing no ER. After magnetic separation of the particles containing bound ligands from the unbound components in the extract, the particles were washed, ligands were released using methanol, and then the ligands were identified using LC-MS. The estrogens genistein and daidzein were identified in the red clover extract, and the estrogen 8-prenylnaringenin was identified in the hop extract. These screening results are consistent with those obtained using previous screening approaches. PMID:18220538

  5. AB108. The appliance of Bio-Plex immunoassay using dried blood spots for mucopolysaccharidosis IVA newborn screening in Taiwan—a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Tsai, Chia-Chen; Lin, Shuan-Pei

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IVA is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) resulting in excessive lysosomal storage of keratan sulfate. This excessive storage causes a systemic skeletal dysplasia, short stature, and joint abnormalities. Treatments for MPS IVA are available. Better outcomes are associated with early treatment, which highlights a need for newborn screening for MPS IVA. Methods We have conducted a newborn screening pilot program for MPS IVA since December 1, 2013. Screening involved measuring the quantity of GALNS in dried blood spots on filter paper (DBFP) from newborns using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. The amounts of fluorescence sorting detected by YAG laser with wavelengths of 532 (exciting) and 580 nm (emission) is proportional to the quantity of GALNS protein. Results More than 5,657 neonates have been analyzed, in those, 132 newborns had GALNS quantification less than the cut-off value (48.64 ρg/mL) at the first screening test. Most of them (n=124) were exclusive and only eight had been recalled for a second DBFP collection and GALNS quantity rechecked. The reference values were 48.64-552.4 ρg/mL. For the confirmed MPS IV patients without enzyme replacement therapy (n=11), the GALNS quantities were far less than 5% of the normal population, and ranged from 0.00 to 4.02 ρg/mL. The GALNS quantities of the carriers (n=2) were significantly reduced comparing with those of the normal values. Conclusions The Bio-Plex immunoassay has the potential to be adopted for newborn screening of MPS IVA. This method is reliable, sensitive, validated, simple, and cost-effective in measuring GALNS enzyme in DBFP.

  6. A Magnetic Nanoparticle Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Sensitive Quantification of Zearalenone in Cereal and Feed Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Wang, Xin; Sun, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Song, Houhui; Yan, Yaxian; Sun, Jianhe; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-01-01

    A novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on magnetic nanoparticles and biotin/streptavidin-HRP (MNP-bsELISA) was developed for rapid and sensitive detection of zearalenone (ZEN). The detection signal was enhanced and the sensitivity of the assay was improved by combined use of antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles and biotin-streptavidin system. Under the optimized conditions, the regression equation for quantification of ZEN was y = −0.4287x + 0.3132 (R2 = 0.9904). The working range was 0.07–2.41 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.04 ng/mL and IC50 was 0.37 ng/mL. The recovery rates of intra-assay and inter-assay ranged from 92.8%–111.9% and 91.7%–114.5%, respectively, in spiked corn samples. Coefficients of variation were less than 10% in both cases. Parallel analysis of cereal and feed samples showed good correlation between MNP-bsELISA and liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry (R2 = 0.9283). We conclude that this method is suitable for rapid detection of zearalenone in cereal and feed samples in relevant laboratories. PMID:26492271

  7. Magnetic levitation as a platform for competitive protein-ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Soh, Siowling; Mirica, Katherine A; Whitesides, George M

    2012-07-17

    This paper describes a method based on magnetic levitation (MagLev) that is capable of indirectly measuring the binding of unlabeled ligands to unlabeled protein. We demonstrate this method by measuring the affinity of unlabeled bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) for a variety of ligands (most of which are benzene sulfonamide derivatives). This method utilizes porous gel beads that are functionalized with a common aryl sulfonamide ligand. The beads are incubated with BCA and allowed to reach an equilibrium state in which the majority of the immobilized ligands are bound to BCA. Since the beads are less dense than the protein, protein binding to the bead increases the overall density of the bead. This change in density can be monitored using MagLev. Transferring the beads to a solution containing no protein creates a situation where net protein efflux from the bead is thermodynamically favorable. The rate at which protein leaves the bead for the solution can be calculated from the rate at which the levitation height of the bead changes. If another small molecule ligand of BCA is dissolved in the solution, the rate of protein efflux is accelerated significantly. This paper develops a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explain both this observation, and the physical-organic chemistry that underlies it. Using this model, we calculate the dissociation constants of several unlabeled ligands from BCA, using plots of levitation height versus time. Notably, although this method requires no electricity, and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it can measure accurately the binding of unlabeled proteins to small molecules over a wide range of dissociation constants (K(d) values within the range from ~10 nM to 100 μM are measured easily). Assays performed using this method generally can be completed within a relatively short time period (20 min-2 h). A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight greater

  8. Magnetic Levitation as a Platform for Competitive Protein-Ligand Binding Assays

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Nathan D.; Soh, Siowling; Mirica, Katherine A.; Whitesides, George M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method based on magnetic levitation (MagLev) that is capable of indirectly measuring the binding of unlabeled ligands to unlabeled protein. We demonstrate this method by measuring the affinity of unlabeled bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) for a variety of ligands (most of which are benzene sulfonamide derivatives). This method utilizes porous gel beads that are functionalized with a common aryl sulfonamide ligand. The beads are incubated with BCA and allowed to reach an equilibrium state in which the majority of the immobilized ligands are bound to BCA. Since the beads are less dense than the protein, protein binding to the bead increases the overall density of the bead. This change in density can be monitored using MagLev. Transferring the beads to a solution containing no protein creates a situation where net protein efflux from the bead is thermodynamically favorable. The rate at which protein leaves the bead for the solution can be calculated from the rate at which the levitation height of the bead changes. If another small molecule ligand of BCA is dissolved in the solution, the rate of protein efflux is accelerated significantly. This paper develops a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explain both this observation, and the physical-organic chemistry that underlies it. Using this model, we calculate the dissociation constants of several unlabeled ligands from BCA, using plots of levitation height versus time. Notably, although this method requires no electricity, and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it can measure accurately the binding of unlabeled proteins to small molecules over a wide range of dissociation constants (Kd’s within the range of ~ 10 nM to 100 µM are measured easily). Assays performed using this method generally can be completed within a relatively short time period (20 minutes – 2 hours). A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight

  9. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M; Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5'-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (-control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z' = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  10. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K.; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M.; Becker, Jeanne L.; Souza, Glauco R.

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5′-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (−control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z’ = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  11. An Electrochemical Genosensing Assay Based on Magnetic Beads and Gold Nanoparticle-Loaded Latex Microspheres for Vibrio cholerae Detection.

    PubMed

    Low, Kim-Fatt; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Singh, Kirnpal Kaur Banga; Surareungchai, Werasak; Yean, Chan Yean

    2015-04-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical genosensing assay was developed for the sequence-specific detection of Vibrio cholerae DNA using magnetic beads as the biorecognition surface and gold nanoparticle-loaded latex microspheres (latex-AuNPs) as a signal-amplified hybridization tag. This biorecognition surface was prepared by immobilizing specific biotinylated capturing probes onto the streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads. Fabricating a hybridization tag capable of amplifying the electrochemical signal involved loading multiple AuNPs onto polyelectrolyte multilayer film-coated poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) latex microspheres as carrier particles. The detection targets, single-stranded 224-bp asymmetric PCR amplicons of the V. cholerae lolB gene, were sandwich-hybridized to magnetic bead-functionalized capturing probes and fluorescein-labeled detection probes and tagged with latex-AuNPs. The subsequent electrochemical stripping analysis of chemically dissolved AuNPs loaded onto the latex microspheres allowed for the quantification of the target amplicons. The high-loading capacity of the AuNPs on the latex microspheres for sandwich-type dual-hybridization genosensing provided eminent signal amplification. The genosensing variables were optimized, and the assay specificity was demonstrated. The clinical applicability of the assay was evaluated using spiked stool specimens. The current signal responded linearly to the different V. cholerae concentrations spiked into stool specimens with a detection limit of 2 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. The proposed latex-AuNP-based magnetogenosensing platform is promising, exhibits an effective amplification performance, and offers new opportunities for the ultrasensitive detection of other microbial pathogens. PMID:26310076

  12. Magnetically optimized SERS assay for rapid detection of trace drug-related biomarkers in saliva and fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianxi; Guo, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hui; Fu, Shuyue; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-06-15

    New developments in the fields of human healthcare and social security call for the exploration of an easy and on-field method to detect drug-related biomarkers. In this paper, Au nanoparticles dotted magnetic nanocomposites (AMN) modified with inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) were used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to quickly monitor trace drug-related biomarkers in saliva and to on-site screen a trace drug biomarker in fingerprints. Due to inducing with an external magnet, such substrate presented a huge SERS activity, which has met the sensitivity requirement for assay to detect the drug biomarkers in saliva from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and also the limit of detection for drug biomarker in fingerprint reached 100 nM. In addition, this AMN-based SERS assay was successfully conducted using a portable Raman spectrometer, which could be used to on-site and accurately differentiate between the smokers and drug addicts in near future. PMID:25603400

  13. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  14. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  15. Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Ting; Ren, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Yi-Ming; Wei, Ying; Qing, Lin-Sen; Liao, Xun

    2014-05-01

    Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe3O4-SiO2) possessed three dimensional core-shell structures with an average diameter of ~20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emu·g(-1). The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The Km and the Vmax values (0.02 mM, 6.40 U·mg(-1) enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 U·mg(-1) enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 °C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. PMID:24656379

  16. Study of the temperature dependent immuno-reaction kinetics for the bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle assay of bio-markers of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Y.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, T. C.; Yang, C. C.; Ho, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    By conjugating antibodies on magnetic nanoparticles, target antigens can be quantitatively detected by measuring the magnetic signals of the magnetic nanoparticles due to their association with target antigens. This method of detection is called magnetically labeled immunoassay. The assay characteristics of magnetically labeled immunoassay have been reported widely. However, the immuno-reaction kinetics of magnetically labeled immunoassay has not been studied. In this work, the reaction rates between magnetic nanoparticles and target antigens are measured at various temperatures. It is found that the temperature dependent reaction rate obeys Arrhenius's equation, which shows the collision frequency and activation energy for the immuno-reaction between antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and target antigens. The carcinoembryonic antigen, which is a regular blood bio-marker for in-vitro diagnosis of colorectal cancer, is used as a target antigen for the example.

  17. An immune sandwich assay of carcinoembryonic antigen based on the joint use of upconversion phosphors and magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaohua; Wu, Zhengjun; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-06-21

    We herein report a sensitive and selective immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on the joint use of upconversion phosphors (UCPs) and magnetic beads (MBs). UCPs as the signal probe were designed with a core-shell structure which provided a 40-fold enhancement of the luminescence intensity. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-modified UCPs were covalently conjugated with the anti-CEA antibody (coating), and streptavidin functionalized magnetic beads were combined with another biotin-tagged anti-CEA antibody. With the assistance of a magnet, the as-formed immune sandwich in the presence of CEA can be readily separated from the assay matrix. The immunosensor showed a linear dynamic range for CEA within 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) in a buffered aqueous solution, and 0.1-20 ng mL(-1) in a human serum sample. The sensor was highly specific to CEA. Our results have suggested the potential application of the UCP-MB based immunoassay for CEA in clinical analysis. PMID:25882752

  18. On-chip, aptamer-based sandwich assay for detection of glycated hemoglobins via magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinglun; Chang, Ko-Wei; Wang, Chih-Hung; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Shiesh, Shu-Chu; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-05-15

    Diabetes can be diagnosed and monitored by measurement of the cutoff ratio between glycated hemoglobins (HbA1c) and total hemoglobin (Hb), which does not require a fasting blood sample and is less influenced by biological variations. In this study, we combined the advantages of the microfluidic system and the selected low-cost, stable and specific aptamers and developed an integrated, aptamer-based microfluidic system for automatic glycated hemoglobin measurements. The detection process of human whole blood can be totally automated in this integrated microfluidic system. According to the experimental results, when compared to conventional bench-top manual assays, reagent consumption was significantly reduced by 75%, and the analysis time was reduced from 3.5h to 30 min. Besides, the novelty in this research also lies in the simultaneously performed two parallel assays for detection of Hb and HbA1c in a single chip. Therefore, this sensitive and low-cost aptamer-based microfluidic system may become a promising tool for point-of -care diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:26797251

  19. Colorimetric Assay for the Detection of Typical Biomarkers for Periodontitis Using a Magnetic Nanoparticle Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wignarajah, Shayalini; Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Bizzarro, Sergio; Bikker, Floris J; Kaman, Wendy E; Zourob, Mohammed

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is a chronic disease which affects at least 10% of the population. If untreated, periodontitis can lead to teeth loss. Unfortunately, current diagnostic tests are limited in their sensitivity and specificity. In this study, a novel multiplex hand-held colorimetric diagnostic biosensor, using two typical inflammatory salivary biomarkers, Human Neutrophil Elastase (HNE) and Cathepsin-G, was constructed as proof of concept to potentially detect periodontitis. The biosensing method was based on the measurement of proteolytic activity using specific proteases probes. These probes consist of specific proteases substrates covalently bound to a magnetic bead from one end and to the gold sensor surface by the other end. When intact, this renders the golden sensor black. Upon proteolysis, the cleaved magnetic beads will be attracted by an external magnet revealing the golden color of the sensor surface observable by the naked eye. The biosensor was capable of specific and quantitative detection of HNE and Cathepsin-G in solution and in spiked saliva samples with a lower detection limit of 1 pg/mL and 100 fg/mL for HNE and Cathepsin-G, respectively. Examination of periodontitis patients' sample and a healthy control showed the potential of the multiplex biosensor to detect the presence of HNE and Cathepsin-G activity in situ. This approach is anticipated to be a useful biochip array amenable to low-cost point-of-care devices. PMID:26631371

  20. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  1. Development of SERS substrate using phage-based magnetic template for triplex assay in sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Shin, Yesol; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-11-15

    Development of a new substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one area of interest for the improvement of SERS performance. Herein, we introduce a new method for developing new mesoporous SERS substrates using M13 phages that display cysteine-rich peptides on the pVIII major units, which is an alternative for thiol donor using chemical modifications. Together with the SERS substrate development, and the use of the SERS technique for sepsis diagnostics is a new approach in clinical settings. The substrates were characterized and magnetized with magnetic immuno colloids made of gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles and specific antibodies. Conventionally, the SERS-tags are prepared by using gold nanoparticles and are modified with Raman dyes to immobilize specific antibodies to capture the biomarkers in the serum samples. However, in this method the SERS-tags are bound to the mesoporous substrate via antibody/antigen interactions to form clusters or layer-by-layer assemblies of SERS-tags for Raman signal enhancement. The SERS spectra showed distinct peaks for tags corresponding to three typical sepsis-specific biomarkers for diagnostics with the limit of detection values of 27 pM, 103 pM, and 78 pM for C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), respectively. With such an approach, SERS can be used for clinical purposes and can be improved by phage display modification rather than chemical alternatives. PMID:27209579

  2. Magnetic-nanobead-based competitive enzyme-linked aptamer assay for the analysis of oxytetracycline in food.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunxia; Tang, Zonggui; Liu, Changbin; Kang, Lichao; Sun, Fengxia

    2015-05-01

    This study presents a novel analytical method for the detection of oxytetracycline (OTC) in complex food matrices based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked aptamer assay and magnetic separation technology. In this protocol, free OTC competed with horseradish peroxidase labeled OTC (OTC-HRP) for binding to the OTC aptamer immobilized on magnetic beads. The parameters that can affect the response, such as avidin concentration, aptamer concentration, OTC-HRP concentration, incubation temperature, incubation time, blocking agent, and binding buffer, were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the linear range for the OTC concentration detection is 0.5-100 ng mL(-1), with a concentration of OTC needed to obtain 50 % of the maximum signal of 14.47 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection and the limit of quantitation were 0.88 and 3.40 ng mL(-1), respectively. There was no obvious cross-reactivity with most of the tetracycline pesticides. The recovery rates ranged from 71.0 to 91.2 % for the food samples, including chicken, milk, and honey, and the relative standard deviation was less than 15.0 %. The proposed method was applied to measure OTC in real samples, and was validated using high-performance liquid chromatography. This method has the advantages of magnetic separation and the concentration effect of magnetic nanoparticles, the specificity of the aptamer, and the high-throughput of microtiter plates; it offers a promising approach for the screening of OTC because it is simple, rapid, highly sensitive, and has low cost. PMID:25855149

  3. Novel readout method for molecular diagnostic assays based on optical measurements of magnetic nanobead dynamics.

    PubMed

    Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula; Bejhed, Rebecca S; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Østerberg, Frederik W; Strömberg, Mattias; Nilsson, Mats; Strømme, Maria; Svedlindh, Peter; Hansen, Mikkel F; Vavassori, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate detection of DNA coils formed from a Vibrio cholerae DNA target at picomolar concentrations using a novel optomagnetic approach exploiting the dynamic behavior and optical anisotropy of magnetic nanobead (MNB) assemblies. We establish that the complex second harmonic optical transmission spectra of MNB suspensions measured upon application of a weak uniaxial AC magnetic field correlate well with the rotation dynamics of the individual MNBs. Adding a target analyte to the solution leads to the formation of permanent MNB clusters, namely, to the suppression of the dynamic MNB behavior. We prove that the optical transmission spectra are highly sensitive to the formation of permanent MNB clusters and, thereby to the target analyte concentration. As a specific clinically relevant diagnostic case, we detect DNA coils formed via padlock probe recognition and isothermal rolling circle amplification and benchmark against a commercial equipment. The results demonstrate the fast optomagnetic readout of rolling circle products from bacterial DNA utilizing the dynamic properties of MNBs in a miniaturized and low-cost platform requiring only a transparent window in the chip. PMID:25539065

  4. Thrombin-linked aptamer assay for detection of platelet derived growth factor BB on magnetic beads in a sandwich format.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limin; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Here we describe a thrombin-linked aptamer assay (TLAA) for protein by using thrombin as an enzyme label, harnessing enzyme activity of thrombin and aptamer affinity binding. TLAA converts detection of specific target proteins to the detection of thrombin by using a DNA sequence that consists of two aptamers with the first aptamer binding to the specific target protein and the second aptamer binding to thrombin. Through the affinity binding, the thrombin enzyme is labeled on the protein target, and thrombin catalyzes the hydrolysis of small peptide substrate into product, generating signals for quantification. As a proof of principle, we show a sandwich TLAA for platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) by using anti-PDGF-BB antibody coated on magnetic beads and an oligonucleotide containing the aptamer for PDGF-BB and the aptamer for thrombin. The binding of PDGF-BB to both the antibody and the aptamer results in labeling the complex with thrombin. We achieved detection of PDGF-BB at 16 pM. This TLAA contributes a new application of thrombin and its aptamer in bioanalysis, and shows potentials in assay developments. PMID:27343590

  5. Evaluation of progesterone content in saliva using magnetic particle-based immuno supported liquid membrane assay (m-ISLMA).

    PubMed

    Tudorache, Madalina; Zdrojewska, Izabela Anna; Emnéus, Jenny

    2006-08-15

    Progesterone in saliva was monitored using a new method called magnetic particle-based immuno supported liquid membrane assay (m-ISLMA) in a sequential injection (SI) setup, allowing automatic sample cleanup, analyte enrichment, and detection in a single analysis unit. Progesterone (Ag) diffuses from a continuous flowing sample - the donor - into a supported organic liquid membrane (SLM), based on analyte partitioning (solubility) between the aqueous donor and the organic phase. The Ag is re-extracted from the SLM into a second stagnant aqueous acceptor, containing antibodies (Ab) immobilized on magnetic beads, held at the bottom of the acceptor by a magnet. Due to the formation of strong Ag-Ab-bead complexes and a large excess of Ab-beads, the Ag is accumulated and selectively enriched in the acceptor. The extracted progesterone was quantified by injecting into the acceptor a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled analyte tracer, the substrate (luminol, H(2)O(2), and p-iodophenol), and finally detection of the generated chemiluminescence by a photomultiplier tube. After optimization of experimental parameters (e.g., sample flow rate, extraction time, type of organic solvent and antibody-bead concentration in the acceptor), a detection limit of 8.50+/-0.17 fgL(-1) and a dynamic range between 35 fgL(-1) and 10 pgL(-1) was reached. The progesterone level of saliva for three subjects (women in different period of ovarian cycle) was investigated, and the corresponding progesterone concentrations detected with m-ISLMA coincided well with the expected values. PMID:16473507

  6. Development of a fluorescent enzyme-linked DNA aptamer-magnetic bead sandwich assay and portable fluorometer for sensitive and rapid leishmania detection in sandflies.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G; Richarte, Alicia M; Phillips, Taylor; Savage, Alissa A; Sivils, Jeffrey C; Greis, Alex; Mayo, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    A fluorescent peroxidase-linked DNA aptamer-magnetic bead sandwich assay is described which detects as little as 100 ng of soluble protein extracted from Leishmania major promastigotes with a high molarity chaotropic salt. Lessons learned during development of the assay are described and elucidate the pros and cons of using fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles and quantum dots versus a more consistent peroxidase-linked Amplex Ultra Red (AUR; similar to resazurin) fluorescence version of the assay. While all versions of the assays were highly sensitive, the AUR-based version exhibited lower variability between tests. We hypothesize that the AUR version of this assay is more consistent, especially at low analyte levels, because the fluorescent product of AUR is liberated into bulk solution and readily detectable while fluorophores attached to the reporter aptamer might occasionally be hidden behind magnetic beads near the detection limit. Conversely, fluorophores could be quenched by nearby beads or other proximal fluorophores on the high end of analyte concentration, if packed into a small area after magnetic collection when an enzyme-linked system is not used. A highly portable and rechargeable battery-operated fluorometer with on board computer and color touchscreen is also described which can be used for rapid (<1 h) and sensitive detection of Leishmania promastigote protein extracts (∼ 100 ng per sample) in buffer or sandfly homogenates for mapping of L. major parasite geographic distributions in wild sandfly populations. PMID:24222436

  7. Development of a fluorescent enzyme-linked DNA aptamer-magnetic bead sandwich assay and portable fluorometer for sensitive and rapid listeria detection.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G; Phillips, Taylor; Montez, Tiffany; Garcia, Adrian; Sivils, Jeffrey C; Mayo, Michael W; Greis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescent DNA aptamer-magnetic bead sandwich assay was developed to detect listeriolysin O (LLO) protein from pathogenic Listeria bacteria using a peroxidase-linked system, Amplex Ultra Red (AUR; derivatized resazurin) substrate, and a custom-designed handheld fluorometer. The assay is highly sensitive with demonstrated limits of detection (LODs) in the range of 4 to 61 L. monocytogenes cells or the equivalent LLO produced by 4 to 61 cells on average in separate titration trials. Total assay processing and analysis time was approximately 30 mins. The assay has demonstrated the ability to detect 6 species of Listeria as desired by the USDA's Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). The portable system was designed to be used primarily with surface swab samples from fomites, but it can also be used to assess enrichment cultures. The minimal time to detect a positive enrichment culture in our hands from an initial 10 cell inoculum in 200 ml of broth has been 8 h post-incubation at 37 °C in shaker flask cultures. An optional automated magnetic bead assay processing and wash device capable of simultaneously processing 6 samples with low and consistent fluorescence background for higher volume central laboratories is also described. PMID:25511112

  8. Lab-on-a-disc agglutination assay for protein detection by optomagnetic readout and optical imaging using nano- and micro-sized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco; Fock, Jeppe; Creagh, Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Boisen, Anja

    2016-11-15

    We present a biosensing platform for the detection of proteins based on agglutination of aptamer coated magnetic nano- or microbeads. The assay, from sample to answer, is integrated on an automated, low-cost microfluidic disc platform. This ensures fast and reliable results due to a minimum of manual steps involved. The detection of the target protein was achieved in two ways: (1) optomagnetic readout using magnetic nanobeads (MNBs); (2) optical imaging using magnetic microbeads (MMBs). The optomagnetic readout of agglutination is based on optical measurement of the dynamics of MNB aggregates whereas the imaging method is based on direct visualization and quantification of the average size of MMB aggregates. By enhancing magnetic particle agglutination via application of strong magnetic field pulses, we obtained identical limits of detection of 25pM with the same sample-to-answer time (15min 30s) using the two differently sized beads for the two detection methods. In both cases a sample volume of only 10µl is required. The demonstrated automation, low sample-to-answer time and portability of both detection instruments as well as integration of the assay on a low-cost disc are important steps for the implementation of these as portable tools in an out-of-lab setting. PMID:27183287

  9. Comparison of a PCR serotyping assay, Check&Trace assay for Salmonella, and Luminex Salmonella serotyping assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica identified from fresh and naturally contaminated cilantro.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Ewing, L; Jarvis, K; Dudley, K; Grim, C; Gopinath, G; Flamer, M-L; Auguste, W; Jayaram, A; Elmore, J; Lamont, M; McGrath, T; Hanes, D E

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica isolated from fresh cilantro samples collected through the USDA/AMS Microbiological Data Program (MDP) were used to compare a PCR serotyping assay against the Check&Trace assay and the Luminex (BioPlex) Salmonella serotyping assay. The study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the three methods for serotyping Salmonella from both enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures. In this investigation, Salmonella spp. serotyping was conducted using 24 h enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures from cilantro samples, with the PCR serotyping assay. Conversely, the Check&Trace and Luminex for Salmonella assays required pure cultures for Salmonella serotyping. The cilantro samples contained S. enterica serovar Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Tennessee, identified by the PCR serotyping assay and Check&Trace for Salmonella, but the Luminex assay only identified two of the four serotypes of the cilantro samples. The anticipated impact from this study is that the PCR serotyping assay provides a time- and cost-effective means for screening, identifying and serotyping Salmonella using DNA extracted from 24 h enrichment cilantro samples. PMID:24929735

  10. Gold magnetic nanoparticle conjugate-based lateral flow assay for the detection of IgM class antibodies related to TORCH infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Qinlu; Hou, Peng; Chen, Mingwei; Hui, Wenli; Vermorken, Alphons; Luo, Zhiyi; Li, Hong; Li, Qin; Cui, Yali

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) system for the detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, related to TORCH [(T)oxoplasmosis, (O)ther agents, (R)ubella (also known as German Measles), (C)ytomegalovirus, and (H)erpes simplex virus infections], based on gold magnetic nanoparticles, was established. Following modification with poly(methacrylic acid), the gold magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with an anti‑human IgM antibody (μ‑chain specific) to construct a probe. A lateral flow assay device was constructed based on these conjugates. IgM antibodies to four types of pathogens, notably toxoplasmosis, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 2, were detected using this device. Compared with commercial colloidal gold‑based LFIA strips, our method exhibited higher sensitivity. No interference with triglycerides, hemoglobin and bilirubin occurred, and no cross‑reactivity was noted among the four pathogens. The gold magnetic nanoparticle‑LFIA strips were used to assess 41 seropositive and 121 seronegative serum samples. The sensitivity was 100% (162/162) and the specificity was 100% (162/162). This method cannot only be used for the detection of TORCH IgM-specific antibodies, but it can potentially be developed for use in the diagnosis of other acute or recently identified autoimmune diseases. PMID:26329478

  11. Development of a single-antigen magnetic bead assay (SAMBA) for the sensitive detection of HPA-1a alloantibodies using tag-engineered recombinant soluble β3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis; Battermann, Anja; Hiller, Oliver; Meyer, Oliver; Figueiredo, Constanca; Salama, Abdulgabar; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-05-31

    Timely and accurate testing for human platelet antigen 1a (HPA-1a) alloantibodies is vital for clinical diagnosis of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). Current antigen-specific assays used for the detection of HPA-1 alloantibodies are technically very complex and cumbersome for most diagnostic laboratories. Hence, we designed and applied recombinant soluble (rs) β3 integrins displaying HPA-1a or HPA-1b epitopes for the development of a single-antigen magnetic bead assay (SAMBA). Soluble HPA-1a and HPA-1b were produced recombinantly in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and differentially tagged. The recombinant soluble proteins were then immobilized onto paramagnetic beads and used for analysis of HPA-1 alloantibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HPA-1a serum samples (n=7) from NAIT patients, inert sera and sera containing non-HPA-1a antibodies were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the SAMBA. Fusion of V5-His or GS-SBP-His tags to the rsβ3 integrins resulted in high-yield expression. SAMBA was able to detect all HPA-1a and -1b alloantibodies recognized by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens assay (MAIPA). No cross-reactions between the sera were observed. Two out of seven of the HPA-1a alloantibody-containing sera demonstrated weak to moderate reactivity in MAIPA but strong signals in SAMBA. SAMBA provides a very reliable method for the detection of HPA-1 antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity. This simple and rapid assay can be adapted for use in any routine laboratory and can be potentially adapted for use on automated systems. PMID:23454035

  12. Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle peroxidase mimetic-based colorimetric assay for the rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticide and nerve agent.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minmin; Fan, Kelong; Pan, Yong; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Fei; Yang, Dongling; Lu, Di; Feng, Jing; Zhao, Jianjun; Yang, Liu; Yan, Xiyun

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection methods are in urgent demand for the screening of extensively used organophosphorus pesticides and highly toxic nerve agents for their neurotoxicity. In this study, we developed a novel Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) peroxidase mimetic-based colorimetric method for the rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The detection assay is composed of MNPs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and choline oxidase (CHO). The enzymes AChE and CHO catalyze the formation of H(2)O(2) in the presence of acetylcholine, which then activates MNPs to catalyze the oxidation of colorimetric substrates to produce a color reaction. After incubation with the organophosphorus neurotoxins, the enzymatic activity of AChE was inhibited and produced less H(2)O(2), resulting in a decreased catalytic oxidation of colorimetric substrates over MNP peroxidase mimetics, accompanied by a drop in color intensity. Three organophosphorus compounds were tested on the assay: acephate and methyl-paraoxon as representative organophosphorus pesticides and the nerve agent Sarin. The novel assay displayed substantial color change after incubation in organophosphorus neurotoxins in a concentration-dependent manner. As low as 1 nM Sarin, 10 nM methyl-paraoxon, and 5 μM acephate are easily detected by the novel assay. In conclusion, by employing the peroxidase-mimicking activity of MNPs, the developed colorimetric assay has the potential of becoming a screening tool for the rapid and sensitive assessment of the neurotoxicity of an overwhelming number of organophosphate compounds. PMID:23153113

  13. Quantification and viability assays of Toxoplasma gondii in commercial "Serrano" ham samples using magnetic capture real-time qPCR and bioassay techniques.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Samblas, M; Vílchez, S; Racero, J C; Fuentes, M V; Osuna, A

    2015-04-01

    "Serrano" ham is a typical pork product from the Mediterranean area, highly valued for its flavour. To make Serrano ham, pork undergoes a salting and a subsequent fermentation process known as curing. Certain pigs used for meat production are an important source of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans. We have developed a method for quantifying and assaying the viability of the T. gondii present in commercial Serrano ham samples. A magnetic capture method for the isolation of T. gondii DNA and a qRT-PCR were used to estimate the T. gondii burden in 475 commercial samples of "Serrano" ham in two presentation formats: ham pieces and sliced ham. The infectivity capacity of T. gondii in positive samples was assayed in mice. The global prevalence of T. gondii was 8.84%, ranging from 32.35% in one of the companies to 0% prevalence in three other companies. The infectivity assays revealed that only 4.84% of the positive samples were infective. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report focussing on the prevalence of T. gondii in commercial "Serrano" ham. The method described here could be useful for producers to guarantee the safety of their products. PMID:25475273

  14. A triple-amplification colorimetric assay for antibiotics based on magnetic aptamer-enzyme co-immobilized platinum nanoprobes and exonuclease-assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yangbao; Gan, Ning; Ren, Hong-Xia; Li, Tianhua; Cao, Yuting; Hu, Futao; Yan, Zhongdan; Chen, Yinji

    2015-11-21

    Herein, an ultrasensitive and selective colorimetric assay for antibiotics, using chloramphenicol (CAP) as the model analyte, was developed based on magnetic aptamer-HRP-platinum composite probes and exonuclease-assisted target recycling. The composite probes were prepared through immunoreactions between the double stranded DNA antibody (anti-DNA) labeled on core-shell Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles (AuMNP-anti-DNA) as the capture probe, and the double stranded aptamer (aptamer hybrid with its complementary oligonucleotides) labeled on Pt@HRP nanoparticles as the nanotracer (ds-Apt-HRP-PtNPs). When the CAP samples were incubated with the probes for 30 min at room temperature, they could be captured by the aptamer to form a nanotracer-CAP complex, which was then released into the supernatant after magnetic separation. This is because the anti-DNA on the capture probes cannot recognize the single strand aptamer-CAP complex. The exonuclease I (Exo I) added into the supernatant can further digest the aptamer-CAP from the 3'-end of the aptamer and the CAP in the aptamer-CAP complex can be released again, which can further participate in a new cycling process to react with the probes. Pt and HRP in the nanotracer could both catalyze and dual amplify the absorbance at 650 nm ascribed to the 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)-H2O2 system. Moreover, Exo I can assist the target recycling, which can further amplify the signal. Thus, the triple amplified signal can be quantified by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the CAP detection possessed a linear range of 0.001-10 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.0003 ng mL(-1) (S/N = 3). The assay was successfully employed to detect CAP in milk, which is much more facile, time saving, and sensitive than the commercial ELISA kits. PMID:26442572

  15. Competitive fluorescence assay for specific recognition of atrazine by magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer based on Fe3O4-chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangyang; Li, Tengfei; Yang, Xin; She, Yongxin; Wang, Miao; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shanshan; Jin, Fen; Jin, Maojun; Shao, Hua; Jiang, Zejun; Yu, Hailong

    2016-02-10

    A novel fluorescence sensing strategy for determination of atrazine in tap water involving direct competition between atrazine and 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (5-DTAF), and which exploits magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP), has been developed. The MMIP, based on Fe3O4-chitosan nanoparticles, was synthesized to recognize specific binding sites of atrazine. The recognition capability and selectivity of the MMIP for atrazine and other triazine herbicides was investigated. Under optimal conditions, the competitive reaction between 5-DTAF and atrazine was performed to permit quantitation. Fluorescence intensity changes at 515 nm was linearly related to the logarithm of the atrazine concentration for the range 2.32-185.4 μM. The detection limit for atrazine was 0.86μM (S/N=3) and recoveries were 77.6-115% in spiked tap water samples. PMID:26686107

  16. Clinical Comparison of QUANTA Flash dsDNA Chemiluminescent Immunoassay with Four Current Assays for the Detection of Anti-dsDNA Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Infantino, Maria; Meacci, Francesca; Bentow, Chelsea; Martis, Peter; Benucci, Maurizio; Afeltra, Antonella; Rigon, Amelia; Atzeni, Fabiola; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Manfredi, Mariangela; Mahler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The objective of the present study was to compare QUANTA Flash dsDNA, a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CIA) on the BIO-FLASH, a rapid-response chemiluminescent analyzer, to three other anti-dsDNA antibody assays and to Crithidia luciliae indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT). Methods. In the first part of the study, 161 samples, 61 from patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 100 from a disease control group, were tested by QUANTA Flash dsDNA CIA, QUANTA Lite dsDNA SC ELISA, BioPlex 2200 multiplex flow immunoassay (MFI), ImmuLisa dsDNA ELISA, and NOVA Lite CLIFT. A second cohort of 69 SLE patients was then tested by QUANTA Flash dsDNA and CLIFT to expand the study. Results. The overall qualitative agreements varied between 77.0% (NOVA Lite CLIFT versus QUANTA Lite) and 89.4% (ImmuLisa versus NOVA Lite CLIFT). The clinical sensitivities for the anti-dsDNA antibody tests varied from 8.2% (NOVA Lite CLIFT) to 54.1% (QUANTA Lite), while the clinical specificities varied from 88.0% (BioPlex 2200) to 100.0% (NOVA Lite CLIFT). Good correlation was found between QUANTA Flash dsDNA and NOVA Lite CLIFT. Conclusion. Significant variations among dsDNA methods were observed. QUANTA Flash dsDNA provides a good combination of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of SLE and good agreement to CLIFT. PMID:25759849

  17. Novel circulating peptide biomarkers for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma revealed by a magnetic bead-based MALDI-TOFMS assay.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun; Li, Wei; Wang, Feng; Qu, Haixia; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lanping; Sun, Yulin; Ma, Qingwei; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2016-04-26

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms worldwide. Patients are often diagnosed at advanced stages with poor prognosis due to the absence of obvious early symptoms. Here, we applied a high-throughput serum peptidome analysis to identify circulating peptide markers of ESCC. Weak cationic exchange magnetic beads coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for two-stage proteotypic peptide profiling in complex serum samples collected from 477 cancer patients and healthy controls. We established a genetic algorithm model containing three significantly differentially expressed peptides at 1,925.5, 2,950.6 and 5,900.0 Da with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.00% and 95.92% in the training set and 97.03% and 100.00% in the validation set, respectively. The model's diagnostic capability was significantly better than SCC-Ag and Cyfra 21-1, especially for early stage ESCC, with an achieved sensitivity of 96.94%. Subsequently, these peptides were identified as fragments of AHSG, TSP1 and FGA by linear ion trap-orbitrap hybrid tandem mass spectrometry. Notably, increased tissue and serum levels of TSP1 in ESCC were verified and correlated with disease progression. In addition, tissue TSP1 was an independent poor prognostic factor in ESCC. In conclusion, the newly established circulating peptide panel and identified proteins could serve as potential biomarkers for the early detection and diagnosis of ESCC. Nevertheless, a larger cohort will be required for further unequivocal validation of their clinical application. PMID:26993605

  18. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  19. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Demonstration of a novel radiobioassay method

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Matthew J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2011-08-01

    In the event of an accidental or intentional release of radionuclides into a populated area, three things must occur in a timely manner: food and drinking water supplies must be determined to be safe to eat / drink, civilians and/or military personnel must be surveyed to ensure that they do not have external contamination, and they must be screened to ensure that significant ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides has not occurred (this paper is concerned with the latter). In the event of such a disaster, the volume of radiobioassays to be performed would be tremendous. If the event released significant levels of β- or α-emitting radionuclides, in vivo assays would be ineffective. Therefore, highly efficient and rapid analytical methods for radionuclide detection from submitted spot urine samples (≤ 50 mL) would be required. At present, the quantitative determination of α-emitting radionuclides from urine samples is highly labor intensive, and requires significant sample preparation and analysis time. Sorbent materials that provide effective collection and enable rapid assay could significantly streamline the radioanalytical process. We have demonstrated the use of paramagnetic nanoparticles as a novel class of extracting media for four α-emitting radionuclides of concern (Po, Ra, Am, and U) from chemically unmodified and pH 2 human urine. Herein the initial experimental sorption results are presented along with a novel method that utilizes paramagnetic nanoparticles for the extraction of radionuclides from unmodified human urine followed by the magnetic field-induced collection of the particles for subsequent α-counting-source preparation. Additionally, we construct a versatile human dose model that determines the detector count times required to estimate internal human dose at specific protective action thresholds. The model provides a means to assess a method’s detection capabilities and use fundamental health physics parameters and actual experimental

  20. Helicase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Diaz, Jason; You, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Helicases are a class of enzymes which are motor proteins using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move directionally along a nucliec acid phosphodiester backbone (such as DNA, RNA and DNA-RNA hybrids) and separate two annealed nucleic acid strands. Many cellular processes, such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair involve helicase activity. Here, we provide a protocol to analyze helicase activities in vitro. In this protocol, the DNA helicase protein Merkel cell polyomavirus large T-antigen was expressed in the mammalian cell line HEK293 and immoblized on an IgG resin. The helicase assay is performing while the protein is immoblized on IgG resin.

  1. Angiogenesis Assays.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  2. Magnetic nanoemulsions as drug delivery system for Foscan ®: Skin permeation and retention in vitro assays for topical application in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo, Fernando L.; Michieleto, Leandro; Rodrigues, Marcilene A. M.; Macaroff, Patrícia P.; Morais, Paulo C.; Lacava, Zulmira G. M.; Bentley, Maria Vitória L. B.; Tedesco, Antonio C.

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we performed the synthesis and in vitro characterization of a new class of drug delivery system (DDS) denominated magnetic nanoemulsion (MNE). The association of colloidal nanoparticles with biocompatible magnetic fluids results in a new DDS for application in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and magnetic hyperthermia treatment. It works in a synergic manner with an expected enhancement in tumor damage after minimum drug doses, based on heat dissipation and/or light photosensitization. For this purpose, we investigated the permeation and retention in vitro model using Foscan ® as a photosensitizer incorporated in MNE using a Franz diffusion cell and a biological skin model in biomimetic conditions.

  3. Highly specific and rapid immuno-fluorescent visualization and detection of E. coli O104:H4 with protein-A coated magnetic beads based LST-MUG assay.

    PubMed

    Barizuddin, Syed; Balakrishnan, Baskar; Stringer, R Cody; Dweik, Majed

    2015-08-01

    A method combining immunomagnetic separation and fluorescent sensing was developed to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) O104:H4. The antibody specific to E. coli O104:H4 was immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. This protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4 complex was used to bind Fluorescein IsoThioCyanate (FITC) labeled E. coli O104:H4 antigen (whole cell) on it. The goal was to achieve a fluorescently detectable protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4-E. coli O104:H4 complex on the magnetic beads. Fluorescent microscopy was used to image the magnetic beads. The resulting fluorescence on the beads was due to the FITC labeled antigen binding on the protein-A-anti E. coli O104:H4 immobilized magnetic beads. This visually proves the antigen-antibody binding. The fluorescent imaging results were obtained in 2 h if the minimum available bacteria in the sample were at least 10(5) CFU/ml. If no fluorescence was observed on the magnetic beads during fluorescent imaging, it indicates the bacterial concentration in the sample to be too low for it to have bound to the magnetic beads and hence no detection was possible. To detect bacterial concentration less than 10(5) CFU/ml in the sample, an additional step was required for detection. The magnetic bead complex was added to the LST-MUG (lauryl sulfate tryptose-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-glucuronide), a signaling reporter. The E. coli O104:H4 grows in LST-MUG and releases β-glucuronidase enzyme. This enzyme cleaves the MUG substrate that produces 4-methylumbelliferone, a highly fluorescent species. This fluorescence was detected using a spectrofluorometer. The emission peak in the fluorescent spectrum was found to be at 450 nm. The lower and upper detection range for this LST-MUG assay was found to be 2.05×10(5)-4.09×10(8) CFU/ml. The results for the LST-MUG assay for concentrations below 10(5) CFU/ml were ascertained in 8h. The advantages of this technique include the specific detection of bacteria without an enrichment step and

  4. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  5. Early TBI-Induced Cytokine Alterations are Similarly Detected by Two Distinct Methods of Multiplex Assay

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sanjib; Katki, Khurshed; Arisi, Gabriel M.; Foresti, Maira L.; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    Annually, more than a million persons experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the US and a substantial proportion of this population develop debilitating neurological disorders, such as, paralysis, cognitive deficits, and epilepsy. Despite the long-standing knowledge of the risks associated with TBI, no effective biomarkers or interventions exist. Recent evidence suggests a role for inflammatory modulators in TBI-induced neurological impairments. Current technological advances allow for the simultaneous analysis of the precise spatial and temporal expression patterns of numerous proteins in single samples which ultimately can lead to the development of novel treatments. Thus, the present study examined 23 different cytokines, including chemokines, in the ipsi and contralateral cerebral cortex of rats at 24 h after a fluid percussion injury (FPI). Furthermore, the estimation of cytokines were performed in a newly developed multiplex assay instrument, MAGPIX (Luminex Corp), and compared with an established instrument, Bio-Plex (Bio-Rad), in order to validate the newly developed instrument. The results show numerous inflammatory changes in the ipsi and contralateral side after FPI that were consistently reported by both technologies. PMID:21954376

  6. Environmental Technology Verification Report for Abraxis 17β-Estradiol (E2) Magnetic Particle Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Test Kits

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) and its verification organization partner, Battelle, operate the Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) Center under ETV. The AMS Center recently evaluated the performance of the Abraxis 17(beta)-estradiol (E2) magnetic p...

  7. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  8. Comparison of autoantibody specificities between traditional and bead-based assays in a large, diverse collection of SLE patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Benjamin F.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Lu, Rufei; Vidal, Gabriel; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Robertson, Julie M.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Neas, Barbara R.; Reichlin, Morris; Scofield, R. Hal; Harley, John B.; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The replacement of standard immunofluorescence anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) methods with bead-based assays is a new clinical option. A large, multi-racial cohort of SLE patients, blood relatives and unaffected control individuals was evaluated for familial aggregation and subset clustering of autoantibodies by high-throughput serum screening technology and traditional methods. Methods Serum samples (1,540 SLE patients, 1,127 unaffected relatives, and 906 healthy, population-based controls) were analyzed for SLE autoantibodies using a bead-based assay, immunofluorescence, and immunodiffusion. Autoantibody prevalence, disease sensitivity, clustering, and association with standard immunodiffusion results were evaluated. Results ANA frequency in SLE patient sera were 89%, 73%, and 67% by BioPlex 2200 and 94%, 84%, and 86% by immunofluorescence in African-American, Hispanic, and European-American patients respectively. 60kD Ro, La, Sm, nRNP A, and ribosomal P prevalence were compared across assays, with sensitivities ranging from 0.92 to 0.83 and specificities ranging from 0.90 to 0.79. Cluster autoantibody analysis showed association of three subsets: 1) 60kD Ro, 52kD Ro and La, 2) spliceosomal proteins, and 3) dsDNA, chromatin, and ribosomal P. Familial aggregation of Sm/RNP, ribosomal P, and 60kD Ro in SLE patient sibling pairs was observed (p ≤ 0.004). Simplex pedigree patients had a greater prevalence for dsDNA (p=0.0003) and chromatin (p=0.005) autoantibodies than multiplex patients. Conclusion ANA frequencies detected by a bead-based assay are lower in European-American SLE patients compared to immunofluorescence. These assays have strong positive predictive values across racial groups, provide useful information for clinical care, and provide unique insights to familial aggregation and autoantibody clustering. PMID:23112091

  9. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1993-01-01

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor.

  13. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1993-09-07

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor. 34 figures.

  14. Mass Spectrometry and Multiplex Antigen Assays to Assess Microbial Quality and Toxin Production of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Clinical and Food Samples

    PubMed Central

    Attien, Paul; Sina, Haziz; Moussaoui, Wardi; Zimmermann-Meisse, Gaëlle; Dadié, Thomas; Keller, Daniel; Riegel, Philippe; Edoh, Vincent; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Djè, Marcellin; Prévost, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the microbial quality of meat products and on some clinical samples in Abidjan focused on Staphylococcus genus and the toxin production profile of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated. Bacteria were collected from 240 samples of three meat products sold in Abidjan and 180 samples issued from clinical infections. The strains were identified by both microbiological and MALDI-TOF-MS methods. The susceptibility to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The production of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, LukE/D, and epidermolysins was screened using radial gel immunodiffusion. The production of staphylococcal enterotoxins and TSST-1 was screened by a Bio-Plex Assay. We observed that 96/240 of meat samples and 32/180 of clinical samples were contaminated by Staphylococcus. Eleven species were isolated from meats and 4 from clinical samples. Forty-two S. aureus strains were isolated from ours samples. Variability of resistance was observed for most of the tested antibiotics but none of the strains displays a resistance to imipenem and quinolones. We observed that 89% of clinical S. aureus were resistant to methicillin against 58% for those issued from meat products. All S. aureus isolates issued from meat products produce epidermolysins whereas none of the clinical strains produced these toxins. The enterotoxins were variably produced by both clinical and meat product samples. PMID:24987686

  15. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  16. Immunochromatographic assay on thread.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gina; Mao, Xun; Juncker, David

    2012-09-18

    Lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays are low-cost, simple-to-use, rapid tests for point-of-care screening of infectious diseases, drugs of abuse, and pregnancy. However, lateral flow assays are generally not quantitative, give a yes/no answer, and lack multiplexing. Threads have recently been proposed as a support for transporting and mixing liquids in lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays, but their use for quantitative high-sensitivity immunoassays has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we introduce the immunochromatographic assay on thread (ICAT) in a cartridge format that is suitable for multiplexing. The ICAT is a sandwich assay performed on a cotton thread knotted to a nylon fiber bundle, both of which are precoated with recognition antibodies against one target analyte. Upon sample application, the assay results become visible to the eye within a few minutes and are quantified using a flatbed scanner. Assay conditions were optimized, the binding curves for C-reactive protein (CRP) in buffer and diluted serum were established and a limit of detection of 377 pM was obtained. The possibility of multiplexing was demonstrated using three knotted threads coated with antibodies against CRP, osteopontin, and leptin proteins. The performance of the ICAT was compared with that of the paper-based and conventional assays. The results suggest that thread is a suitable support for making low-cost, sensitive, simple-to-use, and multiplexed diagnostic tests. PMID:22889381

  17. Rapid mercury assays

    SciTech Connect

    Szurdoki, S.; Kido, H.; Hammock, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    We have developed rapid assays with the potential of detecting mercury in environmental samples. our methods combine the simple ELISA-format with the selective, high affinity complexation of mercuric ions by sulfur-containing ligands. The first assay is based on a sandwich chelate formed by a protein-bound ligand immobilized on the wells of a microliter plate, mercuric ion of the analyzed sample, and another ligand conjugated to a reporter enzyme. The second assay involves competition between mercuric ions and an organomercury-conjugate to bind to a chelating conjugate. Several sulfur containing chelators (e.g., dithiocarbamates) and organomercurials linked to macromolecular carriers have been investigated in these assay formats. The assays detect mercuric ions in ppb/high ppt concentrations with high selectivity.

  18. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  19. Lateral flow assays

    PubMed Central

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  20. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  1. SNAP Assay Technology.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    The most widely used immunoassay configuration is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) because the procedure produces highly sensitive and specific results and generally is easy to use. By definition, ELISAs are immunoassays used to detect a substance (typically an antigen or antibody) in which an enzyme is attached (conjugated) to one of the reactants and an enzymatic reaction is used to amplify the signal if the substance is present. Optimized ELISAs include several steps that are performed in sequence using a defined protocol that typically includes application of sample and an enzyme-conjugated antibody or antigen to an immobilized reagent, followed by wash and enzyme reaction steps. The SNAP assay is an in-clinic device that performs each of the ELISA steps in a timed sequential fashion with little consumer interface. The components and mechanical mechanism of the assay device are described. Detailed descriptions of features of the assay, which minimize nonspecific binding and enhance the ability to read results from weak-positive samples, are given. Basic principles used in assays with fundamentally different reaction mechanisms, namely, antigen-detection, antibody-detection, and competitive assays are given. Applications of ELISA technology, which led to the development of several multianalyte SNAP tests capable of testing for up to 6 analytes using a single-sample and a single-SNAP device are described. PMID:27154596

  2. Nanoparticles for Use in Enzyme Assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Pil; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have created new ways to enhance the performance of classical biosensors in analytical sciences. NPs with unprecedented physiochemical properties can serve both as excellent carriers of bioreceptors and as signal enhancers, leading to improved assay platforms with high sensitivity and selectivity. Because enzymes play central roles in many cellular functions, specific and precise assays of their functions are of great significance in medical science and biotechnology. Here we review recent advances in NP-based biosensors and their use in enzyme assays. With fast and specific responses to enzyme-mediated reactions, NPs transduce and amplify the initial responses into various types of signals, such as electrochemical, optical and magnetic ones. Translation of their potential should lead to functionalized NPs finding wide applications in diagnostics, drug development and biotechnology. PMID:26662229

  3. Rover waste assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  5. Lateral flow strip assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  6. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  7. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  8. Macroautophagic cargo sequestration assays.

    PubMed

    Seglen, Per O; Luhr, Morten; Mills, Ian G; Sætre, Frank; Szalai, Paula; Engedal, Nikolai

    2015-03-01

    Macroautophagy, the process responsible for bulk sequestration and lysosomal degradation of cytoplasm, is often monitored by means of the autophagy-related marker protein LC3. This protein is linked to the phagophoric membrane by lipidation during the final steps of phagophore assembly, and it remains associated with autophagic organelles until it is degraded in the lysosomes. The transfer of LC3 from cytosol to membranes and organelles can be measured by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence microscopy, but these assays provide no information about functional macroautophagic activity, i.e., whether the phagophores are actually engaged in the sequestration of cytoplasmic cargo and enclosing this cargo into sealed autophagosomes. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggest that macroautophagy can proceed independently of LC3. There is therefore a need for alternative methods, preferably effective cargo sequestration assays, which can monitor actual macroautophagic activity. Here, we provide an overview of various approaches that have been used over the last four decades to measure macroautophagic sequestration activity in mammalian cells. Particular emphasis is given to the so-called "LDH sequestration assay", which measures the transfer of the autophagic cargo marker enzyme LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) from the cytosol to autophagic vacuoles. The LDH sequestration assay was originally developed to measure macroautophagic activity in primary rat hepatocytes. Subsequently, it has found use in several other cell types, and in this article we demonstrate a further validation and simplification of the method, and show that it is applicable to several cell lines that are commonly used to study autophagy. PMID:25576638

  9. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  10. Radioreceptor assay for oxyphenonium.

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The development of a radioreceptor assay for the quaternary anticholinergic drug, oxyphenonium, in plasma is reported. It is based on competition between this drug and 3H-dexetimide for binding to muscarinic receptors. After ion pair extraction and reextraction, the drug can be determined in plasma at concentrations down to a value of 100 pg/ml. This permits pharmacokinetic studies to be made after inhalation of oxyphenonium. PMID:6428927

  11. Robust quantitative scratch assay

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Andrea; Angeli, Marc; Pastrello, Chiara; McQuaid, Rosanne; Li, Han; Jurisicova, Andrea; Jurisica, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing assay (or scratch assay) is a technique frequently used to quantify the dependence of cell motility—a central process in tissue repair and evolution of disease—subject to various treatments conditions. However processing the resulting data is a laborious task due its high throughput and variability across images. This Robust Quantitative Scratch Assay algorithm introduced statistical outputs where migration rates are estimated, cellular behaviour is distinguished and outliers are identified among groups of unique experimental conditions. Furthermore, the RQSA decreased measurement errors and increased accuracy in the wound boundary at comparable processing times compared to previously developed method (TScratch). Availability and implementation: The RQSA is freely available at: http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RQSA_Scripts.zip. The image sets used for training and validation and results are available at: (http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/trainingSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/validationSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSetResults.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975Results.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip). Supplementary Material is provided for detailed description of the development of the RQSA. Contact: juris@ai.utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26722119

  12. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  13. C. elegans chemotaxis assay.

    PubMed

    Margie, Olivia; Palmer, Chris; Chin-Sang, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms use chemotaxis to seek out food sources, avoid noxious substances, and find mates. Caenorhabditis elegans has impressive chemotaxis behavior. The premise behind testing the response of the worms to an odorant is to place them in an area and observe the movement evoked in response to an odorant. Even with the many available assays, optimizing worm starting location relative to both the control and test areas, while minimizing the interaction of worms with each other, while maintaining a significant sample size remains a work in progress (1-10). The method described here aims to address these issues by modifying the assay developed by Bargmann et al.(1). A Petri dish is divided into four quadrants, two opposite quadrants marked "Test" and two are designated "Control". Anesthetic is placed in all test and control sites. The worms are placed in the center of the plate with a circle marked around the origin to ensure that non-motile worms will be ignored. Utilizing a four-quadrant system rather than one 2 or two 1 eliminates bias in the movement of the worms, as they are equidistant from test and control samples, regardless of which side of the origin they began. This circumvents the problem of worms being forced to travel through a cluster of other worms to respond to an odorant, which can delay worms or force them to take a more circuitous route, yielding an incorrect interpretation of their intended path. This method also shows practical advantages by having a larger sample size and allowing the researcher to run the assay unattended and score the worms once the allotted time has expired. PMID:23644543

  14. Radon assay for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  15. Radon assay for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  16. Biosensors: Viruses for ultrasensitive assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional assay based on genetically engineered viral nanoparticles and nickel nanohairs can detect much lower levels of protein markers associated with heart attacks than conventional assays.

  17. Metal-amplified Density Assays, (MADAs), including a Density-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DeLISA).

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Gonidec, Mathieu; Shapiro, Nathan D; Kresse, Kayleigh M; Whitesides, George M

    2015-02-21

    This paper reports the development of Metal-amplified Density Assays, or MADAs - a method of conducting quantitative or multiplexed assays, including immunoassays, by using Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure metal-amplified changes in the density of beads labeled with biomolecules. The binding of target analytes (i.e. proteins, antibodies, antigens) to complementary ligands immobilized on the surface of the beads, followed by a chemical amplification of the binding in a form that results in a change in the density of the beads (achieved by using gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules, and electroless deposition of gold or silver), translates analyte binding events into changes in density measureable using MagLev. A minimal model based on diffusion-limited growth of hemispherical nuclei on a surface reproduces the dynamics of the assay. A MADA - when performed with antigens and antibodies - is called a Density-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, or DeLISA. Two immunoassays provided a proof of principle: a competitive quantification of the concentration of neomycin in whole milk, and a multiplexed detection of antibodies against Hepatitis C virus NS3 protein and syphilis T. pallidum p47 protein in serum. MADAs, including DeLISAs, require, besides the requisite biomolecules and amplification reagents, minimal specialized equipment (two permanent magnets, a ruler or a capillary with calibrated length markings) and no electrical power to obtain a quantitative readout of analyte concentration. With further development, the method may be useful in resource-limited or point-of-care settings. PMID:25474561

  18. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  19. HIV-1 Fusion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cavrois, Marielle; Neidleman, Jason; Greene, Warner C.

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 fusion assay measures all steps in the HIV-1 life cycle up to and including viral fusion. It relies on the incorporation of a β-lactamase Vpr (BlaM-Vpr) protein chimera into the virion and the subsequent transfer of this chimera into the target cell by fusion (Figure 1). The transfer is monitored by the enzymatic cleavage of CCF2, a fluorescent dye substrate of β-lactamase, loaded into the target cells. Cleavage of the β-lactam ring in CCF2 by β-lactamase changes the fluorescence emission spectrum of the dye from green (520 nm) to blue (447 nm). This change reflects virion fusion and can be detected by flow cytometry (Figure 2).

  20. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis. PMID:26498795

  1. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  2. An assay for adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, D. W.

    1968-01-01

    Adult mice injected with an adequate amount of a non-immunogenic antigen progress to a specific state of immunological paralysis, unless a substance with `extrinsic' adjuvanticity is injected before the induction of paralysis is completed. Consequently incipiently paralysed mice can be used to assay substances for adjuvanticity. Conventional adjuvants such as Freund's adjuvant and pertussis possess adjuvanticity; other substances with varying degrees of adjuvanticity are listed in the tables. It has been shown that the adjuvanticity effect of an injection of pertussis lasts for only a few days, although the effect of such an injection of pertussis on phagocytosis of carbon particles does not reach a maximum until 2 weeks after the injection. The dose-effectiveness of alum precipitated (highly phagocytosable) bovine γ-globulin was greatly increased by the intraperitoneal injection of pertussis. The evidence is considered to be incompatible with increased phagocytosis being either an essential factor in the role of pertussis as a conventional adjuvant, or in the adjuvanticity effect of pertussis. PMID:4179956

  3. Membrane Flotation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Dorothee A; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Many postitive-stranded RNA viruses, such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV), highjack cellular membranes, including the Golgi, ER, mitchondria, lipid droplets, and utilize them for replication of their RNA genome or assembly of new virions. By investigating how viral proteins associate with cellular membranes we will better understand the roles of cellular membranes in the viral life cycle. Our lab has focused specifically on the role of lipid droplets and lipid-rich membranes in the life cycle of HCV. To analyze the role of lipid-rich membranes in HCV RNA replication, we utilized a membrane flotation assay based on an 10–20–30% iodixanol density gradient developed by Yeaman et al. (2001). This gradient results in a linear increase in density over almost the entire length of the gradient, and membrane particles are separated in the gradient based on their buoyant characteristics. To preserve membranes in the lysate, cells are broken mechanically in a buffer lacking detergent. The cell lysate is loaded on the bottom of the gradient, overlaid with the gradient, and membranes float up as the iodixanol gradient self-generates. The lipid content of membranes and the concentration of associated proteins will determine the separation of different membranes within the gradient. After centrifugation, fractions can be sampled from the top of the gradient and analyzed using standard SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis for proteins of interest.

  4. Characterization of bacterial magnetotactic behaviors by using a magnetospectrophotometry assay.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Song, Tao; Yonnet, Jean-Paul; Wu, Long-Fei

    2009-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have the unique capacity of synthesizing intracellular single-domain magnetic particles called magnetosomes. The magnetosomes are usually organized in a chain that allows the bacteria to align and swim along geomagnetic field lines, a behavior called magnetotaxis. Two mechanisms of magnetotaxis have been described. Axial magnetotactic cells swim in both directions along magnetic field lines. In contrast, polar magnetotactic cells swim either parallel to the geomagnetic field lines toward the North Pole (north seeking) or antiparallel toward the South Pole (south seeking). In this study, we used a magnetospectrophotometry (MSP) assay to characterize both the axial magnetotaxis of "Magnetospirillum magneticum" strain AMB-1 and the polar magnetotaxis of magneto-ovoid strain MO-1. Two pairs of Helmholtz coils were mounted onto the cuvette holder of a common laboratory spectrophotometer to generate two mutually perpendicular homogeneous magnetic fields parallel or perpendicular to the light beam. The application of magnetic fields allowed measurements of the change in light scattering resulting from cell alignment in a magnetic field or in absorbance due to bacteria swimming across the light beam. Our results showed that MSP is a powerful tool for the determination of bacterial magnetism and the analysis of alignment and swimming of magnetotactic bacteria in magnetic fields. Moreover, this assay allowed us to characterize south-seeking derivatives and non-magnetosome-bearing strains obtained from north-seeking MO-1 cultures. Our results suggest that oxygen is a determinant factor that controls magnetotactic behavior. PMID:19376916

  5. Immunomagnetic reduction assay for nervous necrosis virus extracted from groupers.

    PubMed

    Lu, M W; Yang, S Y; Horng, H E; Yang, C C; Chieh, J J; Hong, Y W; Hong, C Y; Yang, H C; Wu, J L

    2012-04-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) is the cause of viral nervous disease, which is a serious constraint on production for grouper aquaculture. Real-time PCR is commonly used to detect and quantify NNV, has the disadvantages of being expensive and technically demanding. In this study, an immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay was developed as a rapid and cost-effective alternative to real-time PCR. This method used magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies specific for viral surface antigens to detect NNV in grouper tissue samples. The association of NNV with the antibody-conjugated magnetic particles resulted in a reduction in magnetic signal, which was strongly correlated with the concentration of NNV, as determined by real-time PCR. Grouper larvae were prepared for testing using a viral extraction buffer which provided a rapid, 15-min method of extracting viral antigens and had an extraction efficiency of higher than 80%. In addition, this study proposes using magnetic nanoparticles as labeling markers and as an assaying reagent for NNV. The magnetic nanoparticles are functionalized with antibodies against the viral surface of NNV and are able to associate specifically with NNV. The reduction of the magnetic signals comes from the association between magnetic particles and NNV, and relates to the concentration of NNV. The results show that the detected concentrations of NNV are highly correlated to those detected by real-time PCR. PMID:22335935

  6. Nucleotide Availability in Maize (Zea mays L.) Root Tips (Estimation of Free and Protein-Bound Nucleotides Using 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and a Novel Protein-Ligand-Binding Assay).

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, M. A.; Shearer, G. C.; Roberts, JKM.

    1994-01-01

    Sequestration of nucleotides in cells through protein binding could influence the availability of nucleotides and free energy for metabolic reactions and, therefore, affect rates of physiological processes. We have estimated the proportion of nucleotides bound to proteins in maize (Zea mays L.) root tips. Binding of nucleoside mono- and diphosphates to total root-tip protein was studied in vitro using high-performance liquid chromatography and a new ligand-binding technique. We estimate that approximately 40% of the ADP, 65% of the GDP, 50% of the AMP, and virtually all the GMP in aerobic cells are bound to proteins. In hypoxic cells, free concentrations of these nucleotides increase proportionately much more than total intracellular concentrations. Little or no binding of CDP, UDP, CMP, and UMP was observed in vitro. Binding of nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) to protein was estimated from in vivo 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements. In aerobic root tips most (approximately 70%) of the NTP is free, whereas under hypoxia NTP appears predominantly bound to protein. Our results indicate that binding of nucleotides to proteins in plant cells will significantly influence levels of free purine nucleotides available to drive and regulate respiration, protein synthesis, ion transport, and other physiological processes. PMID:12232108

  7. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  8. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  9. From Antenna to Assay

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Evan G.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single “antenna”). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ∼60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong

  10. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays. PMID:25027375

  11. The assay of diphtheria toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gerwing, Julia; Long, D. A.; Mussett, Marjorie V.

    1957-01-01

    A precise assay of diphtheria toxin is described, based on the linear relationship between the diameter of the skin reaction to, and logarithm of the dose of, toxin. It eliminates the need for preliminary titrations, is economical, provides information about the slope of the log-dose response lines and, therefore, of the validity of the assay, and yields limits of error of potency from the internal evidence of the assay. A study has been made of the effects of avidity, combining power, toxicity and buffering on the assay of diphtheria toxins against the International Standards for both Diphtheria Antitoxin and Schick-Test Toxin. All the toxins assayed against the standard toxin, whatever their other properties might be, gave log-dose response lines of similar slope provided that they were diluted in buffered physiological saline. The assays were therefore valid. These experiments were repeated concurrently in non-immune and in actively immunized guinea-pigs, and comparable figures for potency obtained in both groups. The result was not significantly affected by the avidity or combining power of the toxin. However, non-avid toxins gave low values in Schick units when assayed, by the Römer & Sames technique, in terms of the International Standard for Diphtheria Antitoxin. The problem of the ultimate standard and the implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:13511133

  12. Transwell(®) invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John

    2011-01-01

    The need to identify inhibitors of cancer invasion has driven the development of quantitative in vitro invasion assays. The most common assays used are based on the original Boyden assay system. Today commercially available plastic inserts for multi-well plates, which possess a cell-permeable membrane, as typified by Transwell(®) Permeable Supports, permit accurate repeatable invasion assays. When placed in the well of a multi-well tissue culture plate these inserts create a two-chamber system separated by the cell-permeable membrane. To create an invasion assay the pores in the membrane are blocked with a gel composed of extracellular matrix that is meant to mimic the typical matrices that tumour cells encounter during the invasion process in vivo. By placing the cells on one side of the gel and a chemoattractant on the other side of the gel, invasion is determined by counting those cells that have traversed the cell-permeable membrane having invaded towards the higher concentration of chemoattractant. In this chapter, in addition to protocols for performing Transwell invasion assays, there is consideration of the limitations of current assay designs with regard to available matrices and the absence of tumour microenvironment cells. PMID:21748672

  13. Methods to assay Drosophila behavior.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Becnel, Jaime; Pandey, Udai B

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, has been used to study molecular mechanisms of a wide range of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and various neurological diseases(1). We have optimized simple and robust behavioral assays for determining larval locomotion, adult climbing ability (RING assay), and courtship behaviors of Drosophila. These behavioral assays are widely applicable for studying the role of genetic and environmental factors on fly behavior. Larval crawling ability can be reliably used for determining early stage changes in the crawling abilities of Drosophila larvae and also for examining effect of drugs or human disease genes (in transgenic flies) on their locomotion. The larval crawling assay becomes more applicable if expression or abolition of a gene causes lethality in pupal or adult stages, as these flies do not survive to adulthood where they otherwise could be assessed. This basic assay can also be used in conjunction with bright light or stress to examine additional behavioral responses in Drosophila larvae. Courtship behavior has been widely used to investigate genetic basis of sexual behavior, and can also be used to examine activity and coordination, as well as learning and memory. Drosophila courtship behavior involves the exchange of various sensory stimuli including visual, auditory, and chemosensory signals between males and females that lead to a complex series of well characterized motor behaviors culminating in successful copulation. Traditional adult climbing assays (negative geotaxis) are tedious, labor intensive, and time consuming, with significant variation between different trials(2-4). The rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay(5) has many advantages over more widely employed protocols, providing a reproducible, sensitive, and high throughput approach to quantify adult locomotor and negative geotaxis behaviors. In the RING assay, several genotypes or drug treatments can be tested simultaneously

  14. Microbiological assay using bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V.

    1987-12-21

    This invention relates to testing processes for toxicity involving microorganisms and, more particularly, to testing processes for toxicity involving bioluminescent organisms. The present known method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity employs the mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) as the assay organism. The shrimp are difficult to raise and handle as laboratory assay organisms. This method is labor-intensive, because it requires a assay time of about 96 hours. Summary of the Invention: A microbiological assay in which the assay organism is the dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula. A sample of a substance to be assayed is added to known numbers of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate and the mixture is agitated to subject the organisms to a shear stress causing them to emit light. The amount of light emitted is measured and compared with the amount of light emitted by a known non-toxic control mixture to determine if there is diminution or non-diminution of light emitted by the sample under test which is an indication of the presence or absence of toxicity, respectively. Accordingly, an object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of testing substances for toxicity. A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity using bioluminescent dinoflagellate (Pyrocystis lunula).

  15. HIV-1 Capsid Stabilization Assay.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects in HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. This assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). By using our novel assay, one can measure the ability of different drugs to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine A, Bi2, and the peptide CAI. We also found that purified CPSF6 (1-321) protein stabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). Here we describe in detail the use of this capsid stability assay. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 capsid stability in vitro. PMID:26714703

  16. Optimization of protein samples for NMR using thermal shift assays.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Sandra; Lercher, Lukas; Karanth, Megha N; Meijers, Rob; Carlomagno, Teresa; Boivin, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining a stable fold for recombinant proteins is challenging, especially when working with highly purified and concentrated samples at temperatures >20 °C. Therefore, it is worthwhile to screen for different buffer components that can stabilize protein samples. Thermal shift assays or ThermoFluor(®) provide a high-throughput screening method to assess the thermal stability of a sample under several conditions simultaneously. Here, we describe a thermal shift assay that is designed to optimize conditions for nuclear magnetic resonance studies, which typically require stable samples at high concentration and ambient (or higher) temperature. We demonstrate that for two challenging proteins, the multicomponent screen helped to identify ingredients that increased protein stability, leading to clear improvements in the quality of the spectra. Thermal shift assays provide an economic and time-efficient method to find optimal conditions for NMR structural studies. PMID:26984476

  17. Immunomagnetic nanoparticle-based assays for detection of biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoyoung; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of biomarkers as key players in the paradigm shift towards preventative medicine underscores the need for their detection and quantification. Advances made in the field of nanotechnology have played a crucial role in achieving these needs, and have contributed to recent advances in the field of medicine. Nanoparticle-based immunomagnetic assays, in particular, offer numerous advantages that utilize the unique physical properties of magnetic nanoparticles. In this review, we focus on recent developments and trends with regards to immunomagnetic assays used for detection of biomarkers. The various immunomagnetic assays are categorized into the following: particle-based multiplexing, signal control, microfluidics, microarray, and automation. Herein, we analyze each category and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:24285924

  18. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  19. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  20. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  1. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  2. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  3. Assays for B lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Bondada, Subbarao; Robertson, Darrell A

    2003-11-01

    This unit describes the antigenic stimulation of in vitro antibody production by B cells and the subsequent measurement of secreted antibodies. The first basic protocol is a generalized system for inducing in vitro antibody production and can accommodate various types of antigens under study. Secreted antibodies can then be measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or other soluble-antibody detection systems. Alternatively, the number of antibody-producing cells can be quantified by plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays presented in this unit: the Cunningham-Szenberg and the Jerne-Nordin techniques. Both methods employ specially prepared slide chambers, described here, in which the antibody-producing B cells are mixed with complement and indicator sheep red blood cells (SRBC), or with trinitrophenol-modified SRBC (TNP-SRBC), with subsequent lysis and counting of plaques. Because IgM antibodies fix complement efficiently, whereas IgG and IgA antibodies do not, unmodified PFC assays measure only IgM antibodies. The assay can be modified, however, to measure all classes of antibodies or to enumerate total immunoglobulin-secreting B cells, as described in alternate protocols. Yet another method of measuring the number of antibody-producing B cells (in a class-specific fashion) is to use the ELISPOT technique described in UNIT 7.14. The resting B cells used in these procedures are prepared as described in the final support protocols for Percoll gradient centrifugation. PMID:18432909

  4. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  5. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  6. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  7. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  8. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  9. Broad base biological assay using liquid based detection assays

    SciTech Connect

    Milanovich, F; Albala, J; Colston, B; Langlois, R; Venkateswaren, K

    2000-10-31

    The release of a biological agent by terrorists represents a serious threat to the safety of US citizens. At present there are over 50 pathogens and toxins on various agency threat lists. Most of these pathogens are rarely seen by public health personnel so the ability to rapidly identify their infection is limited. Since many pathogenic infections have symptomatic delays as long as several days, effective treatment is often compromised. This translates into two major deficiencies in our ability to counter biological terrorism (1) the lack of any credible technology to rapidly detect and identify all the pathogens or toxins on current threat lists and (2) the lack of a credible means to rapidly diagnose thousands of potential victims. In this SI we are developing a rapid, flexible, inexpensive, high throughput, and deeply multiplex-capable biological assay technology. The technology, which we call the Liquid Array (LA), utilizes optical encoding of small diameter beads which serve as the templates for biological capture assays. Once exposed to a fluid sample these beads can be identified and probed for target pathogens at rates of several thousand beads per second. Since each bead can be separately identified, one can perform parallel assays by assigning a different assay to each bead in the encoded set. The goal for this development is a detection technology capable of simultaneously identifying 100s of different bioagents and/or of rapidly diagnosing several thousand individuals. We are pursuing this research in three thrusts. In the first we are exploring the fundamental interactions of the beads with proteins and nucleic acids in complex mixtures. This will provide us with a complete understanding of the limits of the technology with respect to throughput and complex environment. A major spin-off of this activity is in the rapidly emerging field of proteomics where we may be able to rapidly assess the interactions responsible for cell metabolism, structural

  10. Microbiologic assay of space hardware.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favero, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Review of the procedures used in the microbiological examination of space hardware. The general procedure for enumerating aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms and spores is outlined. Culture media and temperature-time cycles used for incubation are reviewed, along with assay systems designed for the enumeration of aerobic and anaerobic spores. The special problems which are discussed are involved in the precise and accurate enumeration of microorganisms on surfaces and in the neutralization of viable organisms buried inside solid materials that could be released to a planet's surface if the solid should be fractured. Special attention is given to sampling procedures including also the indirect techniques of surface assays of space hardware such as those using detachable or fallout strips. Some data on comparative levels of microbial contamination on lunar and planetary spacecraft are presented.

  11. Important Norwegian crude assays updated

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A

    1990-03-12

    New assays on two important Norwegian North Sea crude oils, Statfjord and Gullfaks, are presented. Both are high-quality, low-sulfur crudes that will yield a full range of good-quality products. All assay data came from industry-standard test procedures. The Statfjord field is the largest in the North Sea. Production started in 1979. Statfjord is a typical North Sea crude, produced from three separate platforms and three separate loading buoys with interconnecting lines. Current production is about 700,000 b/d. Gullfaks is produced from a large field in Block 34/10 of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea production area. Gullfaks crude oil is more biodegraded than other crudes from the region. Biodegradation has removed most of the waxy normal paraffins, resulting in a heavier, more naphthenic and aromatic crude.

  12. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks. PMID:26608293

  13. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  14. Two offshore Australian crudes assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-05-09

    Two light, sweet crudes from offshore Australia have been assayed. Gippsland crude, also called Bass Strait, is produced off the coast of Victoria, in southeastern Australia. The 47 API, 0.09% sulfur crude was analyzed in mid-1993. Skua, a 42 API, 0.06 wt % sulfur crude, is produced in the Timor Sea. Data are given on the whole crude and fractions for both deposits. Both chemical and physical properties are listed.

  15. A rapid direct telomerase assay method using 96-well streptavidin plates.

    PubMed

    Francis, Rawle; Friedman, Simon H

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a high-throughput direct assay methodfor the assay of telomerase activity that improves on previous direct telomerase assays in two ways that allow larger numbers of samples to be conveniently processed: (i) 96-well streptavidin coated plates are used to bind and wash biotinylated primer extension products from the telomerase assay, as opposed to tubes containing streptavidin-coated magnetic beads; and (ii) storage phosphor-imagery is used instead of film autoradiography to detect telomerase products after being washed and released from the streptavidin-derivatized matrix. This method improves on previous direct assay methods using magnetic beads by allowing larger numbers of samples to be conveniently assayed. Also, the total activity of the radiolabeled nucleotides used in this procedure is significantly lower than that used in standard direct telomerase assays, lowering costs and exposure to radioactivity. We have validated the assay by repeating, in triplicate, the IC50 determination of rivanol, our previously identified telomerase inhibitor. PMID:12019789

  16. Validation of a commercial canine assay kit to measure pinniped cytokines.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; Romano, Tracy; Matassa, Keith; De Guise, Sylvain

    2014-07-15

    The present study was conducted to assess and validate the cross-reactivity of commercially available multiplex human and canine cytokine kits coupled with the Bio-Plex 200 platform to measure cytokines in three pinniped species, harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), gray seals (Halichoerus grypus), and harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus). Cytokines are important small proteins that help direct a proper immune response to pathogens. The human cytokine kit allowed the detection of cytokines in the supernatant of mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but not in the three pinniped species studied, with the exception of TNFα and GM-CSF. In contrast, the canine cytokine kit appeared to cross-react with the majority of cytokines in the three pinniped species tested, including the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, the Th1 cytokine INFγ, and the Th2 cytokine IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. In addition, the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 were also measured in all pinniped species. Overall, the Bio-Plex 200 platform and the canine multiplex cytokine kit allowed the successful measurement of potentially clinically important pinniped cytokines. This additional tool may provide veterinarians with additional information to detect sub-clinical signs of inflammation or evidence for immune response, which may not be revealed during regular medical evaluation, e.g. physical examination, hematology, and serum chemistry. PMID:24845148

  17. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Diagnostics of Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Patel, Pranav; Faye, Oumar; Thaloengsok, Sasikanya; Heidenreich, Doris; Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Manopwisedjaroen, Khajohnpong; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Sall, Amadou A.; Hufert, Frank T.; Weidmann, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 2.5 billion people are exposed to the risk of contracting dengue fever (DF). Early diagnosis of DF helps to diminish its burden on public health. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase amplification assays (RT-PCR) are the standard method for molecular detection of the dengue virus (DENV). Real-time RT-PCR analysis is not suitable for on-site screening since mobile devices are large, expensive, and complex. In this study, two RT-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assays were developed to detect DENV1-4. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two quantitative RNA molecular standards, the analytical sensitivity of a RT-RPA targeting the 3´non-translated region of DENV1-4 was found to range from 14 (DENV4) to 241 (DENV1-3) RNA molecules detected. The assay was specific and did not cross detect other Flaviviruses. The RT-RPA assay was tested in a mobile laboratory combining magnetic-bead based total nucleic acid extraction and a portable detection device in Kedougou (Senegal) and in Bangkok (Thailand). In Kedougou, the RT-RPA was operated at an ambient temperature of 38°C with auxiliary electricity tapped from a motor vehicle and yielded a clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98% (n=31) and 100% (n=23), respectively. While in the field trial in Bangkok, the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 72% (n=90) and 100%(n=41), respectively. Conclusions/Significance During the first 5 days of infection, the developed DENV1-4 RT-RPA assays constitute a suitable accurate and rapid assay for DENV diagnosis. Moreover, the use of a portable fluorescence-reading device broadens its application potential to the point-of-care for outbreak investigations. PMID:26075598

  18. Specialty magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-07-01

    A number of basic conceptual designs are explained for magnet systems that use permanent magnet materials. Included are iron free multipoles and hybrid magnets. Also appended is a discussion of the manufacturing process and magnetic properties of some permanent magnet materials. (LEW)

  19. Predictive assays in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.M.L.

    1994-12-31

    There are reports of promising correlations between patient response to radiotherapy and laboratory measurements of tumor radiosensitivity, fibroblast radiosensitivity, tumor proliferation, and tumor oxygenation status. These all need to be substantiated in large clinical studies. The development of rapid, reliable assays, in particular for determining intrinsic radiosensitivity, would greatly facilitate this work. If the results illustrated in the figures in the chapter can be combined and shown to be feasible on a routine clinical basis, then radiobiologists would be able to provide radiotherapists with a useful aid for the individualization of patient treatment. 162 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Automated cytopathic effect (CPE) assays.

    PubMed

    McAleer, W J; Miller, W J; Hurni, W M; Machlowitz, R A; Hilleman, M R

    1983-07-01

    An automated CPE procedure has been developed that increases the precision and ease of performing titrations of measles, mumps and rubella viruses in vaccine materials. By this procedure, additions of cell suspensions and reagents and the dilution of samples are performed automatically by a modified Dynatiter instrument, using 96-well microtitre plates. Cell monolayers are stained with carbolfuchsin dye to eliminate the need for microscopic examination. Finally, the trays are read in an optical scanner and the end points calculated automatically by a programmable calculator. The increased accuracy and precision attained by performing greater numbers of replicate assays at reasonable cost will be of particular value to vaccine manufacturers. PMID:6885830

  1. Methods to determine biotin-binding capacity of streptavidin-coated magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Lonnie; Magnotti, Ralph; Hou, Janming; Engle, Terri; Ruley, Kevin; Shull, Bruce

    1999-04-01

    Two assays to determine the biotin-binding capacity of streptavidin magnetic particles are described and compared. The two assays are based on the use of biotinylated alkaline phosphatase and biotinylated fluorescein, respectively. Also, an assay for bound protein is presented. When the biotin-binding methods are combined with the protein assay, the specific activity can be determined. The fluorescent version is used to compare the streptavidin magnetic particles from several manufacturers.

  2. Indirect conductimetric assay of antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Sawai, J; Doi, R; Maekawa, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Kojima, H

    2002-11-01

    The applicability of indirect conductimetric assays for evaluation of antibacterial activity was examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) obtained by the indirect method was consistent with that by the direct conductimetric assay and the turbidity method. The indirect assay allows use of growth media, which cannot be used in the direct conductimetric assay, making it possible to evaluate the antibacterial activity of insoluble or slightly soluble materials with high turbidity, such as antibacterial ceramic powders. PMID:12407467

  3. The chemistry behind antioxidant capacity assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dejian; Ou, Boxin; Prior, Ronald L

    2005-03-23

    This review summarizes the multifaceted aspects of antioxidants and the basic kinetic models of inhibited autoxidation and analyzes the chemical principles of antioxidant capacity assays. Depending upon the reactions involved, these assays can roughly be classified into two types: assays based on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions and assays based on electron transfer (ET). The majority of HAT-based assays apply a competitive reaction scheme, in which antioxidant and substrate compete for thermally generated peroxyl radicals through the decomposition of azo compounds. These assays include inhibition of induced low-density lipoprotein autoxidation, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), total radical trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), and crocin bleaching assays. ET-based assays measure the capacity of an antioxidant in the reduction of an oxidant, which changes color when reduced. The degree of color change is correlated with the sample's antioxidant concentrations. ET-based assays include the total phenols assay by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (FCR), Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), "total antioxidant potential" assay using a Cu(II) complex as an oxidant, and DPPH. In addition, other assays intended to measure a sample's scavenging capacity of biologically relevant oxidants such as singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, peroxynitrite, and hydroxyl radical are also summarized. On the basis of this analysis, it is suggested that the total phenols assay by FCR be used to quantify an antioxidant's reducing capacity and the ORAC assay to quantify peroxyl radical scavenging capacity. To comprehensively study different aspects of antioxidants, validated and specific assays are needed in addition to these two commonly accepted assays. PMID:15769103

  4. Serum indices: managing assay interference.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Carter, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently encounter samples showing significant haemolysis, icterus or lipaemia. Technical advances, utilizing spectrophotometric measurements on automated chemistry analysers, allow rapid and accurate identification of such samples. However, accurate quantification of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference is of limited value if laboratories do not set rational alert limits, based on sound interference testing experiments. Furthermore, in the context of increasing consolidation of laboratories and the formation of laboratory networks, there is an increasing requirement for harmonization of the handling of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia-affected samples across different analytical platforms. Harmonization may be best achieved by considering both the analytical aspects of index measurement and the possible variations in the effects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interferences on assays from different manufacturers. Initial verification studies, followed up with ongoing quality control testing, can help a laboratory ensure the accuracy of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia index results, as well as assist in managing any biases in index results from analysers from different manufacturers. Similarities, and variations, in the effect of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference in assays from different manufacturers can often be predicted from the mechanism of interference. Nevertheless, interference testing is required to confirm expected similarities or to quantify differences. It is important that laboratories are familiar with a number of interference testing protocols and the particular strengths and weaknesses of each. A rigorous approach to all aspects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference testing allows the analytical progress in index measurement to be translated into improved patient care. PMID:27147624

  5. The validity of androgen assays

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Malcolm; Trinick, Tom R.; Wheeler, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Problems in the measurement of androgens and in interpreting results have been reviewed and classified as follows: Preanalytical factors The exact sampling conditions in relation to circadian and seasonal variations, diet, alcohol, physical activity and posture. Physiological and medical factors Androgen levels vary according to the patient's general health, stress, sexual activity and smoking habits. Analytical variables Sample preservation and storage variables are often unknown. The different androgen assays used have widely differing accuracy and precision and are subject to large inter-laboratory variation, which especially in women and children can render the results of routinely available direct immunoassays meaningless. Interpretation of results Laboratory reference ranges vary widely, largely independent of methodology, and fail to take into account the log-normal distribution of androgen values, causing errors in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Other unknowns are antagonists such as SHBG, estrogens, catecholamines, cortisol, and anti-androgens. As well as age, androgen receptor polymorphisms play a major role in regulating androgen levels and resistance to their action. Conclusions Though laboratory assays can support a diagnosis of androgen deficiency in men, they should not be used to exclude it. It is suggested that there needs to be greater reliance on the history and clinical features, together with careful evaluation of the symptomatology, and where necessary a therapeutic trial of androgen treatment given. PMID:17701661

  6. In vitro Tumorsphere Formation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara; Chen, Hexin; Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    A tumorsphere is a solid, spherical formation developed from the proliferation of one cancer stem/progenitor cell. These tumorspheres (Figure 1a) are easily distinguishable from single or aggregated cells (Figure 1b) as the cells appear to become fused together and individual cells cannot be identified. Cells are grown in serum-free, non-adherent conditions in order to enrich the cancer stem/progenitor cell population as only cancer stem/progenitor cells can survive and proliferate in this environment. This assay can be used to estimate the percentage of cancer stem/progenitor cells present in a population of tumor cells. The size, which can vary from less than 50 micrometers to 250 micrometers, and number of tumorspheres formed can be used to characterize the cancer stem/progenitor cell population within a population of in vitro cultured cancer cells and within in vivo tumors (Lo et al., 2012; Liu et al., 2009). While several cell lines can be used for tumorsphere formation assay (e.g. primary mammary tumor cells from Her2/neu-transgenic mice, MCF7, BT474 and HCC1954), some cell lines may not form typical tumorsphere structures and may be difficult to count or classify definitively as tumorspheres.

  7. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  8. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  9. Assay of potentially contaminated propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; Williams, H.E. III; Scott, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    One of the decontamination and decommissioning projects within DOD is demilitarization of an aging stockpile of munitions. A large portion of the stockpile contains depleted uranium (DU) as an armor piercing core and so these munitions must be assayed for the presence of uranium in other components. The assay method must be fast and preferably easy to implement. Presence of DU is indicated by its alpha decay. The alpha particles in turn produce ions in the ambient air. If a significant fraction of these ions can escape the quantity of propellant, the ions can be detected instead of the alpha particles. As a test of the feasibility of detecting alpha emissions from DU somewhere within a cartridge of propellant, the transmission of ions through layers of real propellant was measured. The propellant is in the form of graphite-coated cylindrical pellets. A 105nun cartridge was modified for use as a pellet chamber. A check source served as an ion source. The ion detector consisted of a grid held at 300V coupled to an ammeter. Results confirm that this is a promising technique for testing the propellant for the presence of DU quickly yet with sensitivity.

  10. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  11. Data transformation methods for multiplexed assays

    DOEpatents

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2013-07-23

    Methods to improve the performance of an array assay are described. A correlation between fluorescence intensity-related parameters and negative control values of the assay is determined. The parameters are then adjusted as a function of the correlation. As a result, sensitivity of the assay is improved without changes in its specificity.

  12. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  13. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  14. Magnetic iron particles with high magnetization useful for immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoro, Hisato; Nakabayashi, Takashi; Fujii, Shigeo; Zhao, Hong; Häfeli, Urs O.

    2009-05-01

    TiO 2-encapsulated metallic Fe particles (Ti-O/Fe) were synthesized through a solid phase reaction. The Ti-O/Fe particles were non-toxic to tumor cells in a cell viability assay. After silica coating using a sol-gel method, streptavidin was covalently bound onto the Ti-O/Fe particles. Thus produced HMMI particles showed higher magnetization (114 Am 2/kg) and a larger specific surface area (15 m 2/g) than conventional streptavidin-immobilized magnetite particles. The high magnetization allowed for rapid magnetic separation, while the additional large specific surface area improved the detection of the adiponectin antigen both in terms of extended detection range and higher assay speed.

  15. Comparison of Established and Emerging Biodosimetry Assays

    PubMed Central

    Rothkamm, K.; Beinke, C.; Romm, H.; Badie, C.; Balagurunathan, Y.; Barnard, S.; Bernard, N.; Boulay-Greene, H.; Brengues, M.; De Amicis, A.; De Sanctis, S.; Greither, R.; Herodin, F.; Jones, A.; Kabacik, S.; Knie, T.; Kulka, U.; Lista, F.; Martigne, P.; Missel, A.; Moquet, J.; Oestreicher, U.; Peinnequin, A.; Poyot, T.; Roessler, U.; Scherthan, H.; Terbrueggen, B.; Thierens, H.; Valente, M.; Vral, A.; Zenhausern, F.; Meineke, V.; Braselmann, H.; Abend, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid biodosimetry tools are required to assist with triage in the case of a large-scale radiation incident. Here, we aimed to determine the dose-assessment accuracy of the well-established dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) in comparison to the emerging γ-H2AX foci and gene expression assays for triage mode biodosimetry and radiation injury assessment. Coded blood samples exposed to 10 X-ray doses (240 kVp, 1 Gy/min) of up to 6.4 Gy were sent to participants for dose estimation. Report times were documented for each laboratory and assay. The mean absolute difference (MAD) of estimated doses relative to the true doses was calculated. We also merged doses into binary dose categories of clinical relevance and examined accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the assays. Dose estimates were reported by the first laboratories within 0.3–0.4 days of receipt of samples for the γ-H2AX and gene expression assays compared to 2.4 and 4 days for the DCA and CBMN assays, respectively. Irrespective of the assay we found a 2.5–4-fold variation of interlaboratory accuracy per assay and lowest MAD values for the DCA assay (0.16 Gy) followed by CBMN (0.34 Gy), gene expression (0.34 Gy) and γ-H2AX (0.45 Gy) foci assay. Binary categories of dose estimates could be discriminated with equal efficiency for all assays, but at doses ≥1.5 Gy a 10% decrease in efficiency was observed for the foci assay, which was still comparable to the CBMN assay. In conclusion, the DCA has been confirmed as the gold standard biodosimetry method, but in situations where speed and throughput are more important than ultimate accuracy, the emerging rapid molecular assays have the potential to become useful triage tools. PMID:23862692

  16. TRENDS IN BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS FOR MINERAL EXPLORATION: ASSAYING AND REMOTE DETECTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    1985-01-01

    Several borehole geophysical techniques have been developed in recent years. Assaying technique development has been concentrated on nuclear methods, with some progress being made on using electrical and magnetic properties for mineral identification. Adaptation of conventional surface geophysical techniques to the borehole for locating near-misses of mineralized zones has led to the development of borehole resistivity, electromagnetic (EM), gravity and magnetic methods to the borehole environment. This paper discusses some of the applications and pitfalls of these new techniques.

  17. Northwest Australia's Saladin crude assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1993-10-18

    High-quality Saladin crude oil from offshore Western Australia has been assayed. The 48.2[degree] API, 0.02 wt % sulfur crude's characteristics--determined in 1990--are presented here for the first time. The estimated 30--40 million bbl field, south of Barrow Island, is produced from two platforms in 58 ft of water in block TP 3. Production began in late 1989 from three platforms with three wells each and from two wells drilled directionally from Thevenard Island. The paper lists data on the following properties: API gravity, density, sulfur content, pour point, flash point, viscosity, salinity, heat of combustion, ash content, asphaltene content, wax content, and metal content for the whole crude and various fractions.

  18. Steroid Assays in Paediatric Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330

  19. Evaluating 6 ricin field detection assays.

    PubMed

    Slotved, Hans-Christian; Sparding, Nadja; Tanassi, Julia Tanas; Steenhard, Nina R; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-01-01

    This study presents data showing the performance of 6 commercial detection assays against ricin around concentrations specified as detection limits by the producers. A 2-fold dilution series of 20 ng/ml ricin was prepared and used for testing the lateral-flow kits: BADD, Pro Strips™, ENVI, RAID DX, Ricin BioThreat Alert, and IMASS™ device. Three of the 6 tested field assays (IMASS™ device, ENVI assay, and the BioThreat Alert assay) were able to detect ricin, although differences in the measured detection limits compared to the official detection limits and false-negative results were observed. We were not able to get the BADD, Pro Strips™, and RAID assays to function in our laboratory. We conclude that when purchasing a field responder assay, there is large variation in the specificity of the assays, and a number of in-house tests must be performed to ensure functionality. PMID:24978020

  20. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  1. Magnetic Levitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  2. Magnetic Spinner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  3. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zoolalian, M.L.; Gibbs, A.; Kuhns, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D C; Kaslow, H R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus (1971, J. Biol. Chem. 246, 3885-3894) for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays. PMID:2817333

  5. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R. )

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with (32P)ATP and glycerokinase, residual (32P)ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free (32P)phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays.

  6. Simple and sensitive microbial pathogen detection using a label-free DNA amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhuan; Zhao, Chuanqi; Yan, Zhengqing; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-14

    By the combination of quaternized magnetic nanoparticles and a label-free exonuclease III-assisted DNA amplification assay, we report a simple and facile strategy for the convenient and highly sensitive detection of microbial pathogens, with a detection limit of down to 50 cells mL(-1). PMID:27210898

  7. Immunomagnetic Reduction Assay on Des-Gamma-Carboxy Prothrombin for Screening of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chieh, Jen-Jie; Huang, K W; Chuang, C P; Wei, W C; Dong, J J; Lee, Y Y

    2016-08-01

    The accredited biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) offers limited sensitivity and specificity in the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To improve the screening performance, des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) has been identified as another promising biomarker of HCC, combined with AFP biomarkers. The results of the commercial optical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit easily have the interference problem due to the optical methodology. The immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay based on the magnetic measurement was utilized to assay DCP biomarkers without the excellent antiinterference performances. A DCP magnetic reagent, composed of iron-oxide (Fe3O4 ) magnetic nanoparticles coated with anti-DCP antibodies solved in phosphoryl-buffer solution, was synthesized and characterized. In the test of standard DCP antigens, superior antiinterference and sensitivity than optical ELISA were proved. In the animal test, the results indicate good agreement between the IMR assay findings and the tumor sizes of HCC rats at all time points after the HCC implantation. The feasibility of the developed DCP magnetic reagent with the IMR for the detection of DCP is verified, and demonstrates the high potential for future clinical applications. PMID:26415145

  8. A fully integrated microdevice for biobarcode assay based biological agent detection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Minkyung; Chung, Soyi; Kim, Yong Tae; Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-07-01

    An integrated microdevice, consisting of a micropump, a passive mixer, a magnetic separation chamber, and a microcapillary electrophoretic channel, was constructed for biobarcode assay based multiplex biological agent detection in a sample-to-answer-out manner within 30 min with high sensitivity. PMID:26032690

  9. Assay development status report for total cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    A validated cyanide assay that is applicable to a variety of tank waste matrices is necessary to resolve certain waste tank safety issues and for purposes of overall waste characterization. The target for this effort is an assay with an applicable range of greater than 1,000 ppM (0.10 wt%) total cyanide and a confidence level greater than 80%. Figure 1 illustrates the operating regime of the proposed cyanide assay method. The Assay Development Status Report for Total Cyanide will summarize the past experience with cyanide analyses on-tank waste matrices and will rate the status of the analytical methods used to assay total cyanide (CN{sup {minus}} ion) in the tank waste matrices as acceptable or unacceptable. This paper will also briefly describe the current efforts for improving analytical resolution of the assays and the attempts at speciation.

  10. Matrix effects of TRU (transuranic) assays using the SWEPP PAN assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1990-08-01

    The Drum Assay System (DAS) at the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is a second-generation active-passive neutron assay system. It has been used to assay over 5000 208-liter drums of transuranic waste from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Data from these assays have been examined and compared with the assays performed at Rocky Flats, mainly utilize counting of {sup 239}Pu gamma rays. For the most part the passive assays are in very good agreement with the Rocky Flats assays. The active assays are strongly correlated with the results of the other two methods, but require matrix-dependent correction factors beyond those provided by the system itself. A set of matrix-dependent correction factors has been developed from the study of the assay results. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Immunoliposome-based immunomagnetic concentration and separation assay for rapid detection of Cronobacter sakazakii.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Lee, Gibaek; Song, Xinjie; Park, Sunhyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2016-03-15

    This study aimed to develop an immunoliposome-based immunomagnetic concentration and separation assay for the rapid detection of Cronobacter sakazakii (C. sakazakii), an acute opportunistic foodborne pathogenic bacterium, in both pure culture and infant formula. To develop the assay, magnetic nanoparticles (diameter 30 nm) were coated with immunoglobulin G (IgG), specifically anti-C. sakazakii IgG, and applied for the sensitive and efficient detection of C. sakazakii using immunoliposomes. The binding efficiency of anti-C. sakazakii IgG to the magnetic nanoparticles was 86.23 ± 0.59%. The assay developed in this study detected as few as 3.3 × 10(3) CFUmL(-1) of C. sakazakii in pure culture within 2h 30 min; in comparison, an indirect non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was able to detect 6.2 × 10(5) CFUmL(-1) of C. sakazakii in pure culture after 17 h. The developed assay did not show any cross-reactivity with other Cronobacter spp. or pathogens belonging to other genera. In addition, the method was able to detect 10(3) CFUmL(-1) of C. sakazakii in infant formula without any pre-incubation. These results confirm that the immunoliposome-based immunomagnetic concentration and separation assay may facilitate highly sensitive, efficient, and rapid detection of C. sakazakii. PMID:26547009

  12. 233U Assay A Neutron NDA System

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.C.; Lucero, A.J.; Pierce, L.

    1998-11-17

    The assay of highly enriched {sup 233}U material presents some unique challenges. Techniques which apply to the assay of materials of Pu or enriched {sup 235}U do not convert easily over to the assay of {sup 233}U. A specialized neutron assay device is being fabricated to exploit the singles neutron signal, the weak correlated neutron signal, and an active correlated signal. These pieces of information when combined with {gamma} ray isotopics information should give a good overall determination of {sup 233}U material now stored in bldg. 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. Magneto immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Beltramino, Luis; Garnero, Nidia; Trotta, Liliana; Wagener, Marta; Fabiano, Silvia N; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2013-10-10

    A magneto immunofluorescence assay for the detection of anti-transglutaminase antibodies (ATG2) in celiac disease was developed. The ATG2 were recognized by transglutaminase enzyme immobilized on the magnetic beads and then the immunological reaction was revealed by antibodies labeled with peroxidase. The fluorescent response of the enzymatic reaction with o-phenylenediamine and H2O2 as substrates was correlated with anti-transglutaminase titer, showing EC50 and LOD values of 1:11,600 and 1:74,500 of antibody titers, respectively. A total number of 29 sera samples from clinically confirmed cases of celiac disease and 19 negative control samples were tested by the novel magneto immunofluorescence assay. The data were submitted to the receiver-operating characteristic plot (ROC) analysis which indicated that 8.1 U was the most effective cut-off value to discriminate correctly between celiac and non-celiac patients. The immunofluorescence assay exhibited a sensitivity of 96.6%, a specificity of 89.5% and an efficiency 93.8% compared with the commercial optical ELISA kit. PMID:24070488

  14. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  15. LT-HSC Methylcellulose Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kerenyi, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic differentiation is a highly complex process originating from an extraordinary population of cells called long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs). The unique feature of all stem cells, including HSCs, is their exceptional ability to divide asymmetrically giving rise to two different kinds of offspring. One daughter cell becomes an LT-HSC itself (self-renews) to maintain the LT-HSC pool, whereas the second daughter cell pursues a differentiation fate to ultimately give rise to terminally differentiated mature blood cells (Orkin and Zon, 2008). Quantification of phenotypic LT-HSCs can be performed by multi-color flow cytometry and the gold standard for assessment of LT-HSC self-renewal and function is competitive bone marrow transplantation (Miller et al., 2008). Although these methods are irreplaceable to determine LT-HSC abundance and functionality, they have their disadvantages and limitations. For example, competitive bone marrow transplantation is typically monitored as a function of peripheral blood donor contribution over 12–16 weeks. While reduced peripheral blood donor contribution by itself signifies impairment in the stem/progenitor cells compartment, it cannot unambiguously discriminate between reduced LT-HSC self-renewal, impaired LT-HSC differentiation or compromised progenitor cell differentiation. Here we describe an LT-HSCs methylcellulose colony-forming assay, as a fast complementary in vitro method to directly assess LT-HSC differentiation capacity. As described in Kerenyi et al. (2013), this technique acts as a powerful tool to differentiate between LT-HSC or progenitor cell differentiation defects.

  16. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  17. High-resolution α-amylase assay combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for expedited identification of α-amylase inhibitors: proof of concept and α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon.

    PubMed

    Okutan, Leyla; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Jäger, Anna K; Staerk, Dan

    2014-11-26

    Type 2 diabetes affects millions of people worldwide, and new improved drugs or functional foods containing selective α-amylase inhibitors are needed for improved management of blood glucose. In this article the development of a microplate-based high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay with direct photometric measurement of α-amylase activity is described. The inhibition assay is based on porcine pancreatic α-amylase with 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotriose as substrate, which this gives a stable, sensitive, and cheap inhibition assay as requested for high-resolution purposes. In combination with HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR, this provides an analytical platform that allows simultaneous chemical and biological profiling of α-amylase inhibitors in plant extracts. Proof-of-concept with an artificial mixture of six compounds-of which three are known α-amylase inhibitors-showed that the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition profiles allowed detection of sub-microgram amounts of the α-amylase inhibitors. Furthermore, the high-resolution α-amylase inhibition assay/HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR platform allowed identification of cinnamaldehyde as the α-amylase inhibitor in cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum Presl.). PMID:25368916

  18. Improvement of Microbial Assays of Vitamins

    PubMed Central

    Heed, Edward J.

    1972-01-01

    A method for the improvement of microbial assays of vitamins, which involves the addition of a surfactant to the incubated test, was developed. This surfactant tends to eliminate bacterial clumping, giving a uniform suspension of single cells, thereby making the turbidity readings less erratic and the actual assay standard curves more closely related to the desired theoretical curve. PMID:4627232

  19. Microtissue Culture Plaque Assay for Herpesvirus saimiri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Emerson W.; Dunkel, Virginia C.

    1973-01-01

    A microtissue culture method for the plaque assay of Herpesvirus saimiri has been developed. Virus titrations carried out in Microtest II tissue culture plates (Falcon) yielded reproducible results that agreed well with those obtained by employing macrocultures. The described method is quantitative, reproducible, economical, and suitable for routine assay of large numbers of virus samples. Images PMID:4201642

  20. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  1. Development of an upconverting chelate assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xudong; Haushalter, Jeanne P.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2005-04-01

    We report progress on performing a cell-based assay for the detection of EGFR on cell surfaces by using upconverting chelates. An upconversion microscope has been developed for performing assays and testing optical response. A431 cells are labeled with europium DOTA and imaged using this upconverting microscope.

  2. Fluorescence polarization assays in signal transduction discovery.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, J Richard; Daijo, Janet; Gaudet, Elizabeth A

    2003-05-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) has become widely employed for high throughput screening used in pharmaceutical drug discovery. Assays of important signal transduction targets are now adapted to FP. In this review we examine assays for cyclic adenosine monophosphate, phosphodiesterases, and protein kinases and phosphatases using FP competitive immunoassays and a direct enzymatic method called IMAP. PMID:12678698

  3. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  9. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  10. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  11. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  12. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  13. Micronucleus assay in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic pollutants produce multiple consequences at organism, population, community and ecosystem level, affecting organ function, reproductive status, population size, species survival and thus biodiversity. Among these, carcinogenic and mutagenic compounds are the most dangerous as their effects may exert a damage beyond that of individual and may be active through several generations. The application of genotoxicity biomarkers in sentinel organisms allows for the assessment of mutagenic hazards and/or for the identification of the sources and fate of the contaminants. Micronucleus (MN) test as an index of accumulated genetic damage during the lifespan of the cells is one of the most suitable techniques to identify integrated response to the complex mixture of contaminants. MN assay is today widely applied in a large number of wild and transplanted aquatic species. The large majority of studies or programmes on the genotoxic effect of the polluted water environment have been carried out with the use of bivalves and fish. Haemocytes and gill cells are the target tissues most frequently considered for the MN determination in bivalves. The MN test was widely validated and was successfully applied in a large number of field studies using bivalves from the genera Mytilus. MN in fish can be visualised in different cell types: erythrocytes and gill, kidney, hepatic and fin cells. The use of peripheral erythrocytes is more widely used because it avoids the complex cell preparation and the killing of the animals. The MN test in fish erythrocytes was validated in laboratory with different species after exposure to a large number of genotoxic agents. The erythrocyte MN test in fish was also widely and frequently applied for genotoxicity assessment of freshwater and marine environment in situ using native or caged animals following different periods of exposure. Large interspecies differences in sensitivity for MN induction were observed. Further validation studies are

  14. Assays for Determination of Protein Concentration.

    PubMed

    Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of proteins relies on accurate quantification of protein concentration. Detailed in this appendix are some commonly used methods for protein analysis, e.g., Lowry, Bradford, bicinchoninic acid (BCA), UV spectroscopic, and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (CBQCA) assays. The primary focus of this report is assay selection, emphasizing sample and buffer compatibility. The fundamentals of generating protein assay standard curves and of data processing are considered, as are high-throughput adaptations of the more commonly used protein assays. Also included is a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable BCA assay of total protein in SDS-PAGE sample buffer that is used for equal loading of SDS-PAGE gels. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248579

  15. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  16. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity. PMID:24071983

  17. Performance Evaluation of the Serum Thyroglobulin Assays With Immunochemiluminometric Assay and Immunoradiometric Assay for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Young; Chun, Sejong; Lee, Soo-Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Measurement of postoperative serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is important for detecting persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer. We evaluated the analytic performance of the DxI 800 assay (Beckman Coulter, USA) for serum Tg and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in comparison with that of the GAMMA-10 assay (Shinjin Medics Inc., Korea) for serum Tg and RIA-MAT 280 assay (Stratec, Germany) for TgAb. Methods We prospectively collected blood samples from 99 patients thyroidectomized for thyroid cancer. The functional sensitivity was investigated in standards and human serum. Precision and linearity were evaluated according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The correlation between the two assays was assessed in samples with different Tg ranges. Results The functional sensitivity of the DxI 800 assay for serum Tg was between 0.0313 and 0.0625 ng/mL. The total CV was 3.9–5.6% for serum Tg and 5.3–6.9% for serum TgAb. The coefficient of determination (R2) was 1.0 and 0.99 for serum Tg and TgAb, respectively. The cut-offs for serum TgAb were 4.0 IU/mL (DxI 800) and 60.0 IU/mL (RIA-MAT 280), and the overall agreement was 68.7%. The correlation between the two assays was excellent; the correlation coefficient was 0.99 and 0.88 for serum Tg and TgAb, respectively. Conclusions The DxI 800 is a sensitive assay for serum Tg and TgAb, and the results correlated well with those from the immunoradiometric assays (IRMA). This assay has several advantages over the IRMA and could be considered an alternative test for Tg measurement. PMID:27374705

  18. Magnetizing of permanent magnets using HTS bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole which contains the HTS bulk magnet generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnet plate inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the "rewritten" magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated.

  19. Magnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K

    2010-06-23

    Characteristic results of magnetism in small particles, thin films and tunnel junctions are presented. As a consequence of the reduced atomic coordination in small clusters and thin films the electronic states and density of states are modified. Thus, magnetic moments and magnetization are affected. Generally, in clusters and thin films magnetic anisotropy plays a special role. In tunnel junctions the interplay of magnetism, spin currents and superconductivity are of particular interest. In ring-like mesoscopic systems Aharonov-Bohm-induced currents are studied. Results are given for single transition metal clusters, cluster ensembles, thin films, mesoscopic structures and tunnel systems. PMID:21393778

  20. Hyaluronidase treatment of synovial fluid to improve assay precision for biomarker research using multiplex immunoassay platforms.

    PubMed

    Jayadev, Chethan; Rout, Raj; Price, Andrew; Hulley, Philippa; Mahoney, David

    2012-12-14

    Synovial fluid (SF) is a difficult biological matrix to analyse due to its complex non-Newtonian nature. This can result in poor assay repeatability and potentially inefficient use of precious samples. This study assessed the impact of SF treatment by hyaluronidase and/or dilution on intra-assay precision using the Luminex and Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) multiplex platforms. SF was obtained from patients with knee osteoarthritis at the time of joint replacement surgery. Aliquots derived from the same sample were left untreated (neat), 2-fold diluted, 4-fold diluted or treated with 2mg/ml testicular hyaluronidase (with 2-fold dilution). Preparation methods were compared in a polysterene-bead Luminex 10-plex (N=16), magnetic-bead Luminex singleplex (N=7) and MSD 4-plex (N=7). Each method was assessed for coefficient of variation (CV) of replicate measurements, number of bead events (for Luminex assays) and dilution-adjusted analyte concentration. Percentage recovery was calculated for dilutions and HAse treatment. Hyaluronidase treatment significantly increased the number of wells with satisfactory bead events/region (95%) compared to neat (48%, p<0.001) in the polystyrene-bead Luminex assay, but the magnetic-bead Luminex assay achieved ≥50 bead events irrespective of treatment method. Hyaluronidase treatment resulted in lower intra-assay CVs for detectable ligands (group average CV<10%) than neat, 2-fold and 4-fold dilution (CV~25% for all, p<0.05) in both polystyrene- and magnetic-bead Luminex assays. In addition, measured sample concentrations were higher and recovery was poor (elevated) after hyaluronidase treatment. In the MSD 4-plex, within-group comparison of the intra-assay CV or concentration was not conclusively influenced by SF preparation. However, only hyaluronidase treatment resulted in CV<25% for all samples for TNF-α. There was no effect on analyte concentrations or recovery. Hyaluronidase treatment can improve intra-assay precision and assay signal

  1. A Novel Detection Platform for Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Using an ICP11-Dependent Immunomagnetic Reduction (IMR) Assay

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Chen; Ho, Chia-Shin; Yang, Che-Chuan; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Chang, Jui-Feng; Li, Chun-Yuan; Cheng, Cheng-Shun; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Yen-Fu; Hsu, Ming-Hung; Lin, Feng-Chun; Wang, Hao-Ching; Lo, Chu-Fang; Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Shrimp white spot disease (WSD), which is caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), is one of the world’s most serious shrimp diseases. Our objective in this study was to use an immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay to develop a highly sensitive, automatic WSSV detection platform targeted against ICP11 (the most highly expressed WSSV protein). After characterizing the magnetic reagents (Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles coated with anti ICP11), the detection limit for ICP11 protein using IMR was approximately 2 x 10−3 ng/ml, and the linear dynamic range of the assay was 0.1~1 x 106 ng/ml. In assays of ICP11 protein in pleopod protein lysates from healthy and WSSV-infected shrimp, IMR signals were successfully detected from shrimp with low WSSV genome copy numbers. We concluded that this IMR assay targeting ICP11 has potential for detecting the WSSV. PMID:26380977

  2. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  3. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E.; Neira, Hector D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a “lateral e-flow assay” and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings. PMID:25608872

  4. Pulling on super paramagnetic beads with micro cantilevers: single molecule mechanical assay application.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Romina; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Wilson, Christian A M; Melo, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    This paper demonstrates that it is possible to trap and release a super paramagnetic micro bead by fixing three super paramagnetic micro beads in a triangular array at the sensitive end of a micro cantilever, and by simply switching on/off an external magnetic field. To provide evidence of this principle we trap a micro bead that is attached to the free end of single DNA molecule and that has been previously fixed at the other end to a glass surface, using the standard sample preparation protocol of magnetic tweezers assays. The switching process is reversible which preserves the integrity of the tethered molecule, and a local force applied over the tethered bead excludes the neighbouring beads from the magnetic trap. We have developed a quadrature phase interferometer which is able to perform under fluid environments to accurately measure small deflections, which permits the exploration of DNA elasticity. Our results agree with measurements from magnetic tweezer assays performed under similar conditions. Furthermore, compared to the magnetic tweezer methodology, the combination of the magnetic trap with a suitable measurement system for cantilever deflection, allows for the exploration of a wide range of forces using a local method that has an improved temporal resolution. PMID:26200136

  5. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    DOEpatents

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  6. Nondestructive assay confirmatory assessment experiments: mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.

    1980-04-30

    The confirmatory assessment experiments demonstrate traceable nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of plutonium in mixed oxide powder using commercially available spontaneous-fission assay systems. The experiments illustrate two major concepts: the production of calibration materials using calorimetric assay, and the use of paired measurements for measurement assurance. Two batches of well-characterized mixed oxide powder were used to establish the random and systematic error components. The major components of an NDA measurement assurance technique to establish and maintain traceability are identified and their functions are demonstrated. 20 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Practical assay for nitrite and nitrosothiol as an alternative to the Griess assay or the 2,3-diaminonaphthalene assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanming; Zhang, Quanjuan; Qian, Xuhong; Yang, Youjun

    2015-01-20

    Nitrite is a heavily assayed substrate in the fields of food safety, water quality control, disease diagnosis, and forensic investigation and more recently in basic biological studies on nitric oxide physiology and pathology. The colorimetric Griess assay and the fluorimetric 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) assay are the current gold standards for nitrite quantification. They are not without limitations, yet have amazingly survived 156 and 44 years, respectively, due to the lack of a practical alternative. Both assays exhibit slow detection kinetics due to inactivation of nucleophiles under strongly acidic media, require an extensive incubation time for reaction to go completion, and hence offer a limited detection throughput. By converting an intermolecular reaction of the Griess assay intramolecularly, we designed a novel probe (NT555) for nitrite detection, which displays superior detection kinetics and sensitivity. NT555 was constructed following our "covalent-assembly" probe design principle. Upon detection, it affords a gigantic bathochromic shift of the absorption spectrum and a sensitive turn-on fluorescence signal from a zero background, both of which are typical of an "assembly" type probe. Overall, NT555 has addressed various difficulties associated with the Griess and the DAN assays and represents an attractive alternative for practical applications. PMID:25519711

  8. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  9. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Baldwin, M.J.

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Ultrarapid detection of pathogenic bacteria using a 3D immunomagnetic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-07-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  11. Ultrarapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria Using a 3D Immunomagnetic Flow Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  12. Acoustic trapping as a generic non-contact incubation site for multiplex bead-based assays.

    PubMed

    Tenje, Maria; Xia, Hongyan; Evander, Mikael; Hammarström, Björn; Tojo, Axel; Belák, Sándor; Laurell, Thomas; LeBlanc, Neil

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show a significantly reduced assay time and a greatly increased bead recovery for a commercial Luminex-based multiplex diagnostic immunoassay by performing all liquid handling steps of the assay protocol in a non-contact acoustic trapping platform. The Luminex assay is designed for detecting antibodies in poultry serum for infectious bursal disease virus, infectious bronchitis virus, Newcastle disease virus and avian reovirus. Here, we show proof-of-concept of a microfluidic system capable of being fully automated and handling samples in a parallel format with a miniature physical footprint where the affinity beads are retained in a non-contact levitated mode in a glass capillary throughout the assay protocol. The different steps are: incubation with the serum sample, secondary antibodies and fluorescent reporters and finally washing to remove any non-specifically bound species. A Luminex 200 instrument was used for the readout. The flow rates applied to the capillary during the initial trapping event and the wash steps were optimised for maximum bead recovery, resulting in a bead recovery of 75% for the complete assay. This can be compared to a bead recovery of approximately 30% when an automatic wash station was used when the assay was performed in the conventional manual format. The time for the incubation steps for a single assay was reduced by more than 50%, without affecting assay performance, since intermediate wash steps became redundant in the continuously perfused bead trapping capillary. We analyzed seven samples, in triplicates, and we can show that the readout of the assay performed in the acoustic trap compared 100% to the control ELISAs (positive or negative readout) and resulted in comparable S/P values as the conventional manual protocol. As the acoustic trapping does not require the particles to have magnetic properties, a greater degree of freedom in selecting microparticles can be provided. In extension, this can provide an

  13. Precision estimates for tomographic nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    One technique being applied to improve the accuracy of assays of waste in large containers is computerized tomography (CT). Research on the application of CT to improve both neutron and gamma-ray assays of waste is being carried out at LANL. For example, tomographic gamma scanning (TGS) is a single-photon emission CT technique that corrects for the attenuation of gamma rays emitted from the sample using attenuation images from transmission CT. By accounting for the distribution of emitting material and correcting for the attenuation of the emitted gamma rays, TGS is able to achieve highly accurate assays of radionuclides in medium-density wastes. It is important to develope methods to estimate the precision of such assays, and this paper explores this problem by examining the precision estimators for TGS.

  14. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S; Bustin, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein-protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  15. LIMITATIONS OF THE FLUORESCENT PROBE VIABILITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell viability commonly is determined flow cytometrically by the carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA)/propidium iodide (PI) assay. FDA is taken up by the viable cell and converted via cytoplasmic esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis to carboxyfluorescein (CF). F fluorescence intensity is...

  16. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    PubMed Central

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methanol was unsatisfactory. Phosphate buffer (0.06 M) produced higher activity than did either U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reconstituted hard water or Tris buffer sediment diluents. Intracellular formazan crystals were dissolved within minutes when in contact with immersion oil. Greater crystal production (respiration) detected by a tetrazolium salt assay occurred at increased substrate concentrations. Test diluents containing macrophyte exudates produced greater activity than did phosphate buffer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water, or ultrapure water diluents. Both assays showed decreases in sediment or bacterial activity through time. PMID:16347067

  17. Scrape Loading/Dye Transfer Assay.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Sovadinová, Iva; Upham, Brad L

    2016-01-01

    The scrape loading/dye transfer (SL/DT) technique is a simple functional assay for the simultaneous assessment of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in a large population of cells. The equipment needs are minimal and are typically met in standard cell biology labs, and SL/DT is the simplest and quickest of all the assays that measure GJIC. This assay has also been adapted for in vivo studies. The SL/DT assay is also conducive to a high-throughput setup with automated fluorescence microscopy imaging and analysis to elucidate more samples in shorter time, and hence can serve a broad range of in vitro pharmacological and toxicological needs. PMID:27207291

  18. BIOMARKER ASSAYS IN NIPPLE APIRATE FLUID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The noninvasive technique of nipple aspiration as a potential source of biomarkers of breast cancer risk was evaluated. The feasibility of performing mutagenesis assays, amplifying DNA and performing protein electrophoresis on nipple aspirate fluid was explored. ...

  19. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S.; Bustin, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein–protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  20. Developmental Toxicity Assays Using the Drosophila Model

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Matthew D.; Montgomery, Sara L.; Prince, Lisa; Vorojeikina, Daria

    2014-01-01

    The fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) has long been a premier model for developmental biologists and geneticists. The utility of Drosophila for toxicology studies has only recently gained broader recognition as a tool to elaborate molecular genetic mechanisms of toxic substances. In this article two practical applications of Drosophila for developmental toxicity assays are described. The first assay takes advantage of newly developed methods to render the fly embryo accessible to small molecules, toxicants and drugs. The second assay engages straightforward exposures to developing larvae and easy to score outcomes of adult development. With the extensive collections of flies that are publicly available and the ease with which to create transgenic flies, these two assays have a unique power for identifying and characterizing molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways specific to the mode of action of a number of toxicants and drugs. PMID:24789363

  1. CONTROL ASSAY DEVELOPMENT: METHODOLOGY AND LABORATORY VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Control Assay Development (CAD), a data acquisition program designed to evaluate the potential applicability of various treatment processes for the control of solid, liquid, and gaseous emissions from coal conversion plants. The CAD program described could be...

  2. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  3. Magnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Silke; Appel, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanocomposites are multi-component materials, typically containing nanosized magnetic materials to trigger the response to an external stimulus (i.e., an external static or alternating magnetic field). Up to now, the search for novel nanocomposites has lead to the combination of a plethora of different materials (e.g., gels, liquid crystals, renewable polymers, silica, carbon or metal organic frameworks) with various types of magnetic particles, offering exciting perspectives not only for fundamental investigations but also for application in various fields, including medical therapy and diagnosis, separations, actuation, or catalysis. In this review, we have selected a few of the most recent examples to highlight general concepts and advances in the preparation of magnetic nanocomposites and recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26938504

  4. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  5. Rapid assays for environmental and biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Szurdoki, F; Jaeger, L; Harris, A; Kido, H; Wengatz, I; Goodrow, M H; Székács, A; Wortberg, M; Zheng, J; Stoutamire, D W; Sanborn, J R; Gilman, S D; Jones, A D; Gee, S J; Choudary, P V; Hammock, B D

    1996-05-01

    Rapid, inexpensive, sensitive, and selective enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) now are utilized in environmental science. In this laboratory, many ELISAs have been developed for pesticides and other toxic substances and also for their metabolites. Compounds for which ELISAs have recently been devised include insecticides (organophosphates, carbaryl, pyrethroids, and fenoxycarb), herbicides (s-triazines, arylureas, triclopyr, and bromacil), fungicides (myclobutanil), TCDD, and metabolites of naphthalene and toluene. New rapid assays have been developed for mercury. PMID:8642182

  6. Automated optical sensing system for biochemical assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroszlan, Peter; Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new system called FOBIA that was developed and optimized with respect to automated operation of repetitive assay cycles with regenerable bioaffinity sensors. The reliability and precision of the new system is demonstrated by an application in a competitive assay for the detection of the triazine herbicide Atrazine. Using one sensor in more than 300 repetitive cycles, a signal precision better than 5% was achieved.

  7. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  8. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  9. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  10. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware. PMID:1971160

  11. Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford-Long, A. K.

    Spin-transport effects, such as giant magnetoresistance, rely on the fact that there is a difference in scattering between the spin-up and spin-down electrons in a ferromagnetic material. The degree to which each electron channel is scattered depends on the magnetisation direction within the material, and thus on the local magnetic domain structure. It is therefore of importance when analysing spin-transport devices to understand their magnetic domain structure, both as a bulk property and locally. The aim of this chapter is to review a number of the techniques currently used to image magnetic domain structure in materials. Although a considerable amount of information about the magnetic properties and behaviour of a piece of material, for example a thin ferromagnetic film, can be obtained from bulk magnetometry measurements, it is often extremely useful to image the magnetic domain structure of the film and thus gain information about its magnetic properties at a local level. The various magnetic imaging techniques yet to be described can be extended, by the application of in-situ magnetic fields which allow not only the magnetic domains but also the magnetisation reversal process to be followed in real-time.

  12. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  13. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  14. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  15. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  16. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  17. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Andrew R.; El Yamani, Naouale; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Brunborg, Gunnar; Azqueta, Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardizing the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature, and voltage gradient) are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e., cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls) or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay), or photosensitiser plus light to oxidize guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites). Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period—for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial—to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation. PMID:25368630

  18. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  19. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  20. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  1. Magnet Healing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2000-03-01

    Many people are convinced that static magnets—applied to their skin—will heal ills, and many businesses sell such magnets. The biophysics of such healing was reviewed [1] together with the general biophysics of static fields. Birds and insects do use the earth’s magnetic field for navigation. While insect and frog egg development can clearly be influenced by high fields (7 T and 17 T respectively), there is no experimental evidence that small magnetic fields (of less than 0.5 T) might heal, and much evidence that they cannot heal. A puzzle to the physics community is: How to show laypersons that simple magnets (very probably) do not heal, however attractive that idea might be. [1] L. Finegold, The Physics of "Alternative Medicine": Magnet Therapy, The Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 3:26-33 (1999).

  2. Evaluation of three gentamicin serum assay techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, G.R.; Gwizdala, C.; Wery, J.; Ferry, D.; Starnes, R.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation was designed to compare the enzyme-modified immunoassay (Syva--EMIT) with a radioimmunoassay (New England Nuclear--RIA) and the radiometric assay (Johnston--BACTEC) to determine the optimal assay for use in our aminoglycoside dosing service. The serum concentration determinations obtained via the three assay methods were analyzed by linear regression analysis. Significant positive correlations were noted between the three assay techniques (p less than 0.005) during both sample collection phases. The coefficients of determination for EMIT vs BACTEC and RIA vs BACTEC were 0.73 and 0.83 during phase 1, respectively, and 0.65 and 0.68 during phase 2, respectively. The slope of the regression lines also varied markedly during the two phases; 0.49 and 0.42 for EMIT and for RIA vs BACTEC, respectively, during phase 1 compound with 1.12 and 0.77, respectively, during phase 2. The differences noted in these relationships during phase 1 and 2 may be related to the alteration of the pH of the control sera utilized in the BACTEC assay. In contrast, RIA vs EMIT regression analysis indicated that existence of a highly significant relationship (p less than 0.0005 and r2 . 0.90). The EMIT technique was the easiest and most accurate for determination of serum gentamicin concentrations, whereas the BACTEC method was judged unacceptable for clinical use.

  3. Comet assay to sense neutron 'fingerprint'.

    PubMed

    Gajendiran, N; Tanaka, K; Kamada, N

    2000-09-18

    The suitability of comet assay to identify DNA damage induced by neutrons of varying energy was tested. For this purpose, monoenergetic neutrons from Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator (HIRRAC) were used to induce DNA damage in irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The level of damage was computed as tail moment for different doses (0.125-1 Gy) and compared with the effects resulting from irradiation with (60)Co gamma. The neutron-irradiated cells exhibited longer comet tails consisting of tiny pieces of broken DNA in contrast to the streaking tails generated by (60)Co gamma. The peak biological effectiveness occurred at 0.37 and 0.57 MeV; a further increase or decrease in neutron energy led to a reduced RBE value. The RBE values, as measured by the comet assay, were 6.3, 5.4, 4.7, 4.3, 2.6, and 1.7 for 0.37, 0.57, 0.79, 0.186, 1, and 2.3 MeV neutrons. The lower RBE value obtained by the comet assay when compared to that for other biological end points is discussed. This study reports the usefulness of the alkaline comet assay for identifying DNA damage induced by neutrons of the same radiation weighting factor. The comet assay is a potential tool for use in neutron therapy, as well as a method for the rapid screening of samples from individuals accidentally exposed to radiation. PMID:11024477

  4. An improved molecular assay for Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Grahn, R A; BonDurant, R H; van Hoosear, K A; Walker, R L; Lyons, L A

    2005-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) is the causative agent of bovine trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted disease leading to abortion (from 1 to 8 months gestation), infertility, and occasional pyometra. The annual losses to the U.S. beef industry are estimated to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Currently, the "gold standard" diagnostic test for trichomonosis in most countries is the cultivation of live organisms from reproductive secretions. The cultured organisms can then be followed by PCR assays with primers that amplify T. foetus to the exclusion of all other trichomonad species. Thus, negative results present as null data, indistinguishable from failed PCR amplification during T. foetus specific amplification. Our newly developed assay improves previously developed PCR based techniques by using diagnostic size variants from within the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region that is between the 18S rRNA and 5.8S rRNA subunits. This new PCR assay amplifies trichomonad DNA from a variety of genera and positively identifies the causative agent in the bovine trichomonad infection. This approach eliminates false negatives found in some current assays as well as identifying the causative agent of trichomonad infection. Additionally, our assay incorporates a fluorescently labeled primer enabling high sensitivity and rapid assessment of the specific trichomonad species. Moreover, electrophoretic separation of amplified samples can be outsourced, thus eliminating the need for diagnostic laboratories to purchase expensive analysis equipment. PMID:15619373

  5. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation <10 %). Cell-based assays are often considered superior related to the biological significance, however, typically they cannot still be considered as really quantitative, in particular when results are compared over longer periods of time or between laboratories. A very careful choice of assays is therefore recommended. Strategies to further optimize assays are outlined, considering the evaluation and the decrease of the relevant error sources. Analytical performance and data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development. PMID:26070362

  6. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  7. Microplate Assay for Colletotrichum Spore Production

    PubMed Central

    Slade, S. J.; Harris, R. F.; Smith, C. S.; Andrews, J. H.; Nordheim, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    A simple microplate method was devised to assay spore production by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides by growing the fungus on 1 ml of solid media in the wells of tissue culture plates. Growth and sporulation on microplates were compared at days 4 and 8 with growth and sporulation in 100-ml liquid batch cultures that involved 11 common media. Spore production per unit volume of medium was the same for solid and liquid forms of the media. Qualitative assessment of mycelial growth measured on microplates agreed with that of growth measured in liquid cultures. The microplate assay indicated that V8 juice was the best medium and that an organic content of about 6 mg/ml was optimal for high sporulation and low mycelium production. The assay provides a convenient, rapid, and inexpensive means of screening media for the production of fungal conidia in large numbers, to be used, for example, in biological control programs. PMID:16347310

  8. Microbiological assay of ketoconazole in shampoo.

    PubMed

    Staub, Inara; Schapoval, Elfrides E S; Bergold, Ana M

    2005-03-23

    Ketoconazole, an anti-fungal agent, is often incorporated in several pharmaceutical forms and in shampoo formulation it is known to be effective against fungal infection on the scalp. This paper describes a method to quantify ketoconazole in shampoo by comparing the cylinder plate assay and the HPLC method. The test organism used for the agar diffusion assay was Candida albicans ATCC 10231. Three different concentrations of ketoconazole were used for the diffusion assay. A mean zone diameter was obtained for each concentration. A standard curve was obtained by plotting the three values derived from the zone diameters. A prospective validation of the method showed that the method was linear (r = 0.9982), precise (R.S.D. = 2.57%) and accurate. The results obtained by the two methods were statistically evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the results obtained indicate that there is no significant difference between these two methods. PMID:15725566

  9. Assays of Transendothelial Migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Luscinskas, F. William

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory response is critical for our ability to heal wounds and fight off foreign microorganisms. Uncontrolled inflammation is also at the root of most pathology. Recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation plays a defining role in the inflammatory response, and migration of leukocytes across endothelium is arguably the point of no return of the inflammatory response. Assays to study the transmigration of leukocytes have and will continue to shed light on the regulation of this vital response. Assays of transendothelial migration in vitro allow the controlled observation of this phenomenon as well as experiments to study its regulation. In this chapter we describe in vitro assays of transendothelial migration that have been used successfully in the authors’ laboratories for decades and have proven to be reproducible, reliable, and predictive of the behavior of leukocytes and endothelial cells in models of inflammation in vivo. PMID:18772016

  10. Miniaturization of hydrolase assays in thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Severino A; Moraes, Caroline S; Costa, Samara G; de Souza, Wanderley; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S; Genta, Fernando A

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the protocols of reducing sugar measurements with dinitrosalicylic acid and bicinchoninic acid for thermocyclers and their use in enzymatic assays for hydrolases such as amylase and β-1,3-glucanase. The use of thermocyclers for these enzymatic assays resulted in a 10 times reduction in the amount of reagent and volume of the sample needed when compared with conventional microplate protocols. We standardized absorbance readings from the polymerase chain reaction plates, which allowed us to make direct readings of the techniques above, and a β-glycosidase assay was also established under the same conditions. Standardization of the enzymatic reaction in thermocyclers resulted in less time-consuming temperature calibrations and without loss of volume through leakage or evaporation from the microplate. Kinetic parameters were successfully obtained, and the use of the thermocycler allowed the measurement of enzymatic activities in biological samples from the field with a limited amount of protein. PMID:23123426

  11. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  13. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  14. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  15. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  16. Robot speeds assays and enhances safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.F.; Powell, W.D.; Blankenship, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, a robotics system utilizing a gantry robot and an automated inventory system operates five calorimeters and two gamma isotopic assay instruments. This system has significantly improved safeguards, because the opportunity for diversion has been greatly reduced. Not only is the accountability much more timely because throughput has doubled but the special nuclear material has been made physically more secure in several ways. First, items awaiting assay are kept in the inventory system, whose doors remain locked whenever the robot is unattended. An alarm sounds if the doors are unlocked without authorization. Second, light curtains surround the robot's work envelope and pressure-sensitive pads cover the floor to detect entry into the assay area. Third, the robot weighs each item whenever it is moved, and the result is compared with the weight that was measured when the item was first put into inventory. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Harmonization of the intracellular cytokine staining assay.

    PubMed

    Welters, Marij J P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Letsch, Anne; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-07-01

    Active immunotherapy for cancer is an accepted treatment modality aiming to reinforce the T-cell response to cancer. T-cell reactivity is measured by various assays and used to guide the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. However, data obtained across different institutions may vary substantially making comparative conclusions difficult. The Cancer Immunotherapy Immunoguiding Program organizes proficiency panels to identify key parameters influencing the outcome of commonly used T-cell assays followed by harmonization. Our successes with IFNγ-ELISPOT and peptide HLA multimer analysis have led to the current study on intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). We report the results of three successive panels evaluating this assay. At the beginning, 3 out of 9 participants (33 %) were able to detect >6 out of 8 known virus-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. This increased to 50 % of the laboratories in the second phase. The reported percentages of cytokine-producing T cells by the different laboratories were highly variable with coefficients of variation well over 60 %. Variability could partially be explained by protocol-related differences in background cytokine production leading to sub-optimal signal-to-noise ratios. The large number of protocol variables prohibited identification of prime guidelines to harmonize the assays. In addition, the gating strategy used to identify reactive T cells had a major impact on assay outcome. Subsequent harmonization of the gating strategy considerably reduced the variability within the group of participants. In conclusion, we propose that first basic guidelines should be applied for gating in ICS experiments before harmonizing assay protocol variables. PMID:22714399

  18. Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study.

    PubMed

    Surowiec, Izabella; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Wu, Junfang; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Trygg, Johan; Nording, Malin L

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract illustrating the study workflow. NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, LC-TOFMS Liquid chromatography-Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry, GC Gas

  19. Evaluation of a novel ultra-sensitive nanoparticle probe-based assay for ricin detection.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui-qiong; Jia, Min-xian; Shi, Li-jun; Liu, Jun; Wang, Rui; Lv, Mao-min; Ma, Yu-yuan; Zhao, Xiong; Zhang, Jin-gang

    2014-01-01

    A gold nanoparticle (GNP) probe-based assay (GNPA) modified from the bio-barcode assay (BCA) was developed for ultrasensitive detection of ricin, a potential biothreat agent. In the GNPA, a chain of ricin was captured by a GNP probe coated with polyclonal antibodies and single-stranded signal DNA. A magnetic microparticle (MMP) probe coated with ricin A chain monoclonal antibody was then added to form an immuno-complex. After being magnetically separated, the immuno-complex containing the single-stranded signal DNA was characterized by PCR and real-time PCR. A detection limit of 10(-2) fg/ml was determined for the ricin A chain; this is eight orders of magnitude more sensitive than that achieved with an ELISA and two orders more sensitive than that obtained with the BCA. The coefficients of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter-assay values ranged from 3.82-6.46%. The results here show that this novel assay is an ultrasensitive method for detection of ricin proteins and may be suitable for the ultrasensitive detection of other proteins. PMID:24164314

  20. Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal - Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal

    Cancer.gov

    This document provides instructions for configuring and uploading data files to the CPTAC Assay Portal. It is divided into sections, with an overview checklist provided at the end. If help is needed at any stage of the process, please use the support page: https://assays.cancer.gov/support/

  1. Method validation and clinical utility of chromogenic factor VIII assay compared to one-stage assay.

    PubMed

    Gouws, Wilmare; Botha, Elsabie; Visser, Adele

    2014-01-01

    The chromogenic FVIII assay is currently considered the gold standard for quantitation of factor VIII levels in both haemophilia A patients and as part of screening for thrombophilia. A method validation and evaluation of clinical utility within a routine diagnostic laboratory was undertaken by comparing the currently used one-stage assay to a commercially available chromogenic assay (Siemens, Johannesburg, South Africa). In total, 60 samples were included in this study to encompass the whole diagnostic range of the assay. Both low and high values showed very good correlation on linear regression analysis with correlation coeffients of 0.949 and 0.888 respectively. However, the lower detection limit of the Siemens Chromogenic assay was 1.5 IU/dL rendering it impossible to utilize in the setting of classifying a haemophilia A patient in terms of disease severity. Although the Siemens FVIII chromogenic assay shows excellent correlation to the currently used one-stage assay, the relatively high detection limit restrict implementation as a stand-alone assay in a routine diagnostic laboratory. PMID:23504571

  2. Operant assays for assessing pain in preclinical rodent models: highlights from an orofacial assay.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Niall P; Mills, Richard H; Caudle, Robert M; Neubert, John K

    2014-01-01

    Despite an immense investment of resources, pain remains at epidemic proportions. Given this, there has been an increased effort toward appraising the process by which new painkillers are developed, focusing specifically on why so few analgesics make it from the benchside to the bedside. The use of behavioral assays and animal modeling for the preclinical stages of analgesic development is being reexamined to determine whether they are truly relevant, meaningful, and predictive. Consequently, there is a strengthening consensus that the traditional reflex-based assays upon which several decades of preclinical pain research has been based are inadequate. Thus, investigators have recently turned to the development of new preclinical assays with improved face, content, and predictive validity. In this regard, operant pain assays show considerable promise, as they are more sensitive, present better validity, and, importantly, better encompass the psychological and affective dimensions of pain that trouble human pain sufferers. Here, we briefly compare and contrast reflex assays with operant assays, and we introduce a particular operant orofacial pain assay used in a variety of experiments to emphasize how operant pain assays can be applied to preclinical studies of pain. PMID:25103871

  3. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay in low volume.

    PubMed

    Bainor, Anthony; Chang, Lyra; McQuade, Thomas J; Webb, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2011-03-15

    The BCA assay is a colorimetric method for estimating protein concentration. In 96-well plates, the relationship between protein content and absorbance is nearly linear over a wide range; however, performance is reduced in lower volume. To overcome this limitation, we performed the BCA assays in opaque, white 384-well plates. These plates emit fluorescence between 450-600 nm when excited at 430 nm; thus, their fluorescence is quenched by the BCA chromophore (λ(max) 562 nm). This arrangement allowed accurate determination of protein content using only 2 μL of sample. Moreover, soluble flourescein could replace the white plates, creating a homogenous format. PMID:21078286

  4. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C; Bourne, Mark M; Crooks, William J; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R; Miko, David K; Salazar, William R; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I; Vigil, Georgiana M

    2012-07-13

    Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains {approx} 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting {approx}100g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm {sup 3}He tubes with length of 6 feet, and {sup 3}He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the

  5. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density has halved and doubled, respectively every 2 to 2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 x 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. The recent achievements in magnetic disk recording will first be surveyed briefly. Then the principal areas of current technical development will be outlined. Finally, some comments will be made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  6. Lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  7. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  8. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  9. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  10. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  11. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J

    1984-01-01

    This article offers a review of the physics of the magnetic monopole, which, although as yet unseen, offers sound theoretical reasons to believe that it must exist. Several theories are presented and equations are given. The idea that magnetic monopoles, stable particles carrying magnetic charges, ought to exist has, according to the authors, proved to be very durable. One theory presented demonstrates the consistency of magnetic monopoles with quantum electrodynamics. Another theory demonstrates the necessity of monopoles in grand unified gauge theories. The authors believe it is reasonable to expect the monopole to be an extremely heavy stable elementary particle. The stability of the classical monopole solution given is ensured by a topological principle explained.

  12. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  13. Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This science visualization shows a magnetospheric substorm, during which, magnetic reconnection causes energy to be rapidly released along the field lines in the magnetotail, that part of the magne...

  14. Nondestructive assay of boxed radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, W.P.; Roberts, R.J.; Jasen, W.G.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the problems related to the nondestructive assay (NDA) of boxed radioactive waste at the Hanford Site and how Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) is solving the problems. The waste form and radionuclide content are described. The characteristics of the combined neutron and gamma-based measurement system are described.

  15. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors. PMID:26551162

  16. A Rapid and Quantitative Recombinase Activity Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here a comparison between the recombinase systems FLP-FRT and Cre-loxP. A transient excision based dual luciferase expression assay is used for its rapid and repeatable nature. The detection system was designed within an intron to remove the remaining recombinase recognition site and no...

  17. Three-dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichert, Anke

    2001-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flue virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  18. Assay for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-hour experiment designed to introduce students to chemistry of the angiotensis-converting enzyme, illustrate design of a quenched fluorescence substrate, and examine considerations necessary in designing a clinical assay. Includes background information on the biochemistry of hypertension, reagents/materials needed, procedures…

  19. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  20. INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON OF CHOLINESTERASE ASSAY MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twelve wildlife toxicology laboratories participated in an interlaboratory survey of cholinesterase (ChE) assays to determine comparability of absolute ChE values and estimates of ChE inhibition from organophosphorus insecticide-dosed birds and to examine the type and consistency...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  16. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, L.J.; Dayton, B.D.; Moore, M.L.; Shu, A.Y.; Heys, J.R.; Meek, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources.

  17. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN 'IN VITRO' NEUROTOXICITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this research project was to investigate the possibility of developing the neurotoxic esterase (NTE) assay into a totally in vitro system to enable neurotoxicity assessment to be carried out rapidly on large numbers of compounds. The purified enzyme was to be immobiliz...

  19. Wafer-scale Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Davila, Antonio; Zand, Katayoun; Douglas, Wallace C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial metabolic and biophysical parameters are associated with degenerative diseases and the aging process. To evaluate these biochemical parameters, current technology requires several hundred milligrams of isolated mitochondria for functional assays. Here, we demonstrate manufacturable wafer-scale mitochondrial functional assay lab-on-a-chip devices, which require mitochondrial protein quantities three orders of magnitude less than current assays, integrated onto 4” standard silicon wafer with new fabrication processes and materials. Membrane potential changes of isolated mitochondria from various well-established cell lines such as human HeLa cell line (Heb7A), human osteosarcoma cell line (143b) and mouse skeletal muscle tissue were investigated and compared. This second generation integrated lab-on-a-chip system developed here shows enhanced structural durability and reproducibility while increasing the sensitivity to changes in mitochondrial membrane potential by an order of magnitude as compared to first generation technologies. We envision this system to be a great candidate to substitute current mitochondrial assay systems. PMID:22627274

  20. Analysis of Gold Ores by Fire Assay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyth, Kristy M.; Phillips, David N.; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm

    2004-01-01

    Students of an Applied Chemistry degree course carried out a fire-assay exercise. The analysis showed that the technique was a worthwhile quantitative analytical technique and covered interesting theory including acid-base and redox chemistry and other concepts such as inquarting and cupelling.

  1. Homogeneous assay technology based on upconverting phosphors.

    PubMed

    Kuningas, Katri; Rantanen, Terhi; Ukonaho, Telle; Lövgren, Timo; Soukka, Tero

    2005-11-15

    Upconversion photoluminescence can eliminate problems associated with autofluorescence and scattered excitation light in homogeneous luminescence-based assays without need for temporal resolution. We have demonstrated a luminescence resonance energy-transfer-based assay utilizing inorganic upconverting (UPC) lanthanide phosphor as a donor and fluorescent protein as an acceptor. UPC phosphors are excited at near-infrared and they have narrow-banded anti-Stokes emission at visible wavelengths enabling measurement of the proximity-dependent sensitized emission with minimal background. The acceptor alone does not generate any direct emission at shorter wavelengths under near-infrared excitation. A competitive model assay for biotin was constructed using streptavidin-conjugated Er3+,Yb3+-doped UPC phosphor as a donor and biotinylated phycobiliprotein as an acceptor. UPC phosphor was excited at near-infrared (980 nm) and sensitized acceptor emission was measured at red wavelength (600 nm) by using a microtitration plate fluorometer equipped with an infrared laser diode and suitable excitation and emission filters. Lower limit of detection was in the subnanomolar concentration range. Compared to time-resolved fluorometry, the developed assay technology enabled simplified instrumentation. Excitation at near-infrared and emission at red wavelengths render the technology also suitable to analysis of strongly colored and fluorescent samples, which are often of concern in clinical immunoassays and in high-throughput screening. PMID:16285685

  2. A dual amplification strategy for DNA detection combining bio-barcode assay and metal-enhanced fluorescence modality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Li, Tian; Huang, Hongduan; Chen, Yang; Liu, Feng; Huang, Chengzhi; Li, Na

    2014-11-11

    Silver-enhanced fluorescence was coupled with a bio-barcode assay to facilitate a dual amplification assay to demonstrate a non-enzymatic approach for simple and sensitive detection of DNA. In the assay design, magnetic nanoparticles seeded with silver nanoparticles were modified with the capture DNA, and silver nanoparticles were modified with the binding of ssDNA and the fluorescently labeled barcode dsDNA. Upon introduction of the target DNA, a sandwich structure was formed because of the hybridization reaction. By simple magnetic separation, silver-enhanced fluorescence of barcode DNAs could be readily measured without the need of a further step to liberate barcode DNAs from silver nanoparticles, endowing the method with simplicity and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 1 pM. PMID:25233044

  3. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  4. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  5. Paraprotein interference with turbidimetric gentamicin assay

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Kendra; Brown, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gentamicin due to its low level of resistance and rapid bactericidal activity is commonly used to treat gram-negative bacteria. However, due to its toxic effects it needs to be monitored. To date, no interference has been reported with gentamicin assays. Materials and methods A patient with leg cellulitis and sepsis received a single dose of gentamicin and a sample was sent for gentamicin analysis. The sample showed high blank absorbance readings on Beckman DxC800 and DC800 analysers with various dilutions. A second sample was received and analysed on a Roche Cobas system to obtain a result. A third sample was received 107 hours later with the same results and this sample was then analysed neat and post ethanol precipitation on all the turbidimetric assays available on the DxC800 analyser. Results The high blank absorbance was observed upon addition of the reactive reagents due to protein precipitation. Although not obvious from the patient protein results, it was shown the presence of high IgM paraprotein, 18.9 g/L (reference range 0.4-2.3 g/L) was the cause of precipitation, giving high blank readings. Of all the other turbidimetric assays, only vancomicin and valproate showed similar high blank absorbance readings. To be able to provide more rapid results it was shown ethanol could be used as a precipitant of proteins in both calibrators and patient samples with acceptable recovery. Conclusion IgM paraprotein was identified as the cause of interference with the gentamicin, vancomicin and valproate assays. Protein interference in these assays can be overcome by precipitation with ethanol. PMID:25672475

  6. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-01

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis. PMID:25410901

  7. Non-separation assay for glycohemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Blincko, S; Edwards, R

    1998-06-01

    The determination of glycohemoglobin [HbA1c, HbA1, or total glycohemoglobin (GHb)] has become an established procedure in the management of diabetes mellitus. Here, we describe the development of a simple, fluorescence, non-separation assay for the percentage of GHb (%GHb). The fluorescence of an eosin-boronic acid derivative when it was mixed with hemolysates of unwashed erythrocytes was quenched in proportion to the percentage of glycohemoglobin. Measurement of the fluorescence intensity gave an estimate of GHb in the sample, and measurement of light absorbance gave an estimate of total hemoglobin. A combination of the two measurements gave the assay response. Comparison with HPLC (Menarini-Arkray HA-8140 fully automated analyzer) for the percentage of HbA1 (%HbA1) gave %GHb(NETRIA) = 1.1(SD +/-0.03)%HbA1 +0.6(SD +/-0.3), S(y/x) = 0.821, r = 0.972, n = 80; comparison for HbA1c gave %GHb(NETRIA) = 1.3(SD +/-0.04)%HbA1c + 1.8(SD +/-0.3), S(y/x) = 0.813, r = 0.973, n = 80. Precision, estimated as the percentage of the CV of the %GHb assay results, was <2% (intraassay, range 5-22% GHb) and <4.2% (interassay, range 4-16% GHb). Dilution of a high-percentage GHb sample lysate showed that the assay was linear, and addition of glucose (60 mmol/L), bilirubin (250 micromol/L), and triglycerides (14 mmol/L) to low, medium, and high %GHb samples showed no clinical interference in assay results. PMID:9625057

  8. Production and assay of forskolin antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Ho, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Forskolin (Fo), a cardiovascular active diterpene of plant origin, has been widely used as a research tool in regulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase (AC). A linear relationship of Fo binding to plasma membrane with activation of AC has been reported. The present abstract describes the production and assay of Fo antibodies (AB). 7-0-Hemisuccinyl-7-deacetyl Fo, coupled to either human serum albumin or goat IgG, was injected into goats to elicit AB to Fo haptan. AB to Fo in antiserum or an isolated IgG fraction was tested by two assay methods, a radioimmunoassay using /sup 3/H-Fo as a tracer and a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horse radish peroxidase-rabbit anti goat IgG as indicator. The titers for Fo antiserum were 4000-10,000. In the defined assay condition, approximately 20-25% of the added /sup 3/H-Fo was found to bind to AB. The bound radioactivity was displaced by Fo-HSA or Fo-goat IgG or free unlabelled Fo ranging from 0.5-50 pmol/tube, or 5-500 nM. The IC/sub 50/ was approximately 8-10 pmol/tube or 80-100 nM. The binding of HRP-rabbit anti goat IgG in the ELISA was inhibited by proper Fo conjugate. The development of methods for production and assay for Fo AB may be useful in the study of mechanism of activation of AC by Fo and Fo-like compound.

  9. Assays for mammalian tyrosinase: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Jara, J.R.; Solano, F.; Lozano, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    This work describes a comparative study of the tyrosinase activity determined using three methods which are the most extensively employed; two radiometric assays using L-tyrosine as substrate (tyrosine hydroxylase and melanin formation activities) and one spectrophotometric assay using L-dopa (dopa oxidase activity). The three methods were simultaneously employed to measure the activities of the soluble, melanosomal, and microsomal tyrosinase isozymes from Harding-Passey mouse melanoma through their purification processes. The aim of this study was to find any correlation among the tyrosinase activities measured by the three different assays and to determine whether that correlation varied with the isozyme and its degree of purification. The results show that mammalian tyrosinase has a greater turnover number for L-dopa than for L-tyrosine. Thus, enzyme activity, expressed as mumol of substrate transformed per min, is higher in assays using L-dopa as substrate than those using L-tyrosine. Moreover, the percentage of hydroxylated L-tyrosine that is converted into melanin is low and is affected by several factors, apparently decreasing the tyrosinase activity measured by the melanin formation assay. Bearing these considerations in mind, average interassay factors are proposed. Their values are 10 to transform melanin formation into tyrosine hydroxylase activity, 100 to transform tyrosine hydroxylase into dopa oxidase activity, and 1,000 to transform melanin formation into dopa oxidase activity. Variations in these values due to the presence in the tyrosinase preparations of either inhibitors or regulatory factors in melanogenesis independent of tyrosinase are also discussed.

  10. Development of a Panel of Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assays for Detection of Biothreat Agents

    PubMed Central

    Euler, Milena; Wang, Yongjie; Heidenreich, Doris; Patel, Pranav; Strohmeier, Oliver; Hakenberg, Sydney; Niedrig, Matthias; Hufert, Frank T.

    2013-01-01

    Syndromic panels for infectious disease have been suggested to be of value in point-of-care diagnostics for developing countries and for biodefense. To test the performance of isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assays, we developed a panel of 10 RPAs for biothreat agents. The panel included RPAs for Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis, variola virus, and reverse transcriptase RPA (RT-RPA) assays for Rift Valley fever virus, Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Marburg virus. Their analytical sensitivities ranged from 16 to 21 molecules detected (probit analysis) for the majority of RPA and RT-RPA assays. A magnetic bead-based total nucleic acid extraction method was combined with the RPAs and tested using inactivated whole organisms spiked into plasma. The RPA showed comparable sensitivities to real-time RCR assays in these extracts. The run times of the assays at 42°C ranged from 6 to 10 min, and they showed no cross-detection of any of the target genomes of the panel nor of the human genome. The RPAs therefore seem suitable for the implementation of syndromic panels onto microfluidic platforms. PMID:23345286

  11. Improved flow cytometry based cytotoxicity and binding assay for clinical antibody HLA crossmatching.

    PubMed

    Alheim, Mats; Paul, Prashanta Kumer; Hauzenberger, Dan-Mikael; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    The presence of preformed donor-specific HLA antibodies leads to early antibody mediated kidney allograft rejection. Therefore, detection and avoidance of donor reactive HLA antibodies prior to transplantation is of outmost importance in order to minimize the risk of rejection. Detection of pre-formed HLA antibodies is currently performed using complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay alone or together with a flow cytometry based crossmatch (FCXM). This study was initiated to further evaluate our recently developed flow cytometry based procedure for determination of both cytotoxicity of and IgG binding to donor-derived lymphocytes by HLA antibodies. Highly enriched immuno-magnetic bead purified T and B lymphocytes were used as target cells for patient sera using 96-well plates. Importantly, the assay shows high sensitivity and specificity as determined by HLA typed donor cells and serum with defined HLA antibody IgG and C1q. Based on this and additional data generated in this paper, such as evaluation of appropriate serum and complements incubation times and assay reproducibility and stability, will enable us to more rapidly implement this assay in our clinical laboratory routines. In addition, we demonstrate that FCtox crossmatching of deceased donor cells has superior specificity compared to conventional CDC assay especially regarding high frequencies of false-positive reactions. PMID:26429307

  12. Development of a panel of recombinase polymerase amplification assays for detection of biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Euler, Milena; Wang, Yongjie; Heidenreich, Doris; Patel, Pranav; Strohmeier, Oliver; Hakenberg, Sydney; Niedrig, Matthias; Hufert, Frank T; Weidmann, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    Syndromic panels for infectious disease have been suggested to be of value in point-of-care diagnostics for developing countries and for biodefense. To test the performance of isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assays, we developed a panel of 10 RPAs for biothreat agents. The panel included RPAs for Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis, variola virus, and reverse transcriptase RPA (RT-RPA) assays for Rift Valley fever virus, Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Marburg virus. Their analytical sensitivities ranged from 16 to 21 molecules detected (probit analysis) for the majority of RPA and RT-RPA assays. A magnetic bead-based total nucleic acid extraction method was combined with the RPAs and tested using inactivated whole organisms spiked into plasma. The RPA showed comparable sensitivities to real-time RCR assays in these extracts. The run times of the assays at 42°C ranged from 6 to 10 min, and they showed no cross-detection of any of the target genomes of the panel nor of the human genome. The RPAs therefore seem suitable for the implementation of syndromic panels onto microfluidic platforms. PMID:23345286

  13. A rapid and selective assay for measuring cell surface hydrophobicity of brewer's yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Straver, M H; Kijne, J W

    1996-03-15

    A rapid and selective assay was developed to measure cell surface hydrophobicity of brewer's yeast cells. During this so-called magnobead assay, bottom-fermenting yeast cells adhere to paramagnetic, polystyrene-coated latex beads which can easily be removed from the cell suspension by using a (samarium-cobalt) magnet. At pH 4 center dot 5, electrostatic repulsion between yeast cells and latex beads was found to be minimal and yeast cell adhesion was predominantly based on hydrophobic interactions. The percentage of cells adhering to the beads could be calculated and provided a measure for cell surface hydrophobicity. Cell surface hydrophobicity measured by the magnobead assay was found to yield similar results, as did determination of contact angles of water droplets on a layer of yeast cells, a standard method for measuring surface hydrophobicity. However, the magnobead assay has the following advantages: (i) it is a quick and simple method, and, more significantly, (ii) hydrophobicity can be measured under physiological conditions. Use of the magnobead assay confirmed that a higher level of cell surface hydrophobicity is correlated with stronger flocculence of brewer's lager yeast cells. PMID:8904332

  14. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  19. Variola Virus-Specific Diagnostic Assays: Characterization, Sensitivity, and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kondas, Ashley V.; Olson, Victoria A.; Li, Yu; Abel, Jason; Laker, Miriam; Rose, Laura; Wilkins, Kimberly; Turner, Jonathan; Kline, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A public health response relies upon rapid and reliable confirmation of disease by diagnostic assays. Here, we detail the design and validation of two variola virus-specific real-time PCR assays, since previous assays cross-reacted with newly identified cowpox viruses. The assay specificity must continually be reassessed as other closely related viruses are identified. PMID:25673790

  20. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy based nanoparticle assays for rapid, point-of-care diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Ashley J.

    Nucleotide and immunoassays are important tools for disease diagnostics. Many of the current laboratory-based analytical diagnostic techniques require multiple assay steps and long incubation times before results are acquired. In the development of bioassays designed for detecting the emergence and spread of diseases in point-of-care (POC) and remote settings, more rapid and portable analytical methods are necessary. Nanoparticles provide simple and reproducible synthetic methods for the preparation of substrates that can be applied in colloidal assays, providing gains in kinetics due to miniaturization and plasmonic substrates for surface enhanced spectroscopies. Specifically, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is finding broad application as a signal transduction method in immunological and nucleotide assays due to the production of narrow spectral peaks from the scattering molecules and the potential for simultaneous multiple analyte detection. The application of SERS to a no-wash, magnetic capture assay for the detection of West Nile Virus Envelope and Rift Valley Fever Virus N antigens is described. The platform utilizes colloid based capture of the target antigen in solution, magnetic collection of the immunocomplexes and acquisition of SERS spectra by a handheld Raman spectrometer. The reagents for a core-shell nanoparticle, SERS based assay designed for the capture of target microRNA implicated in acute myocardial infarction are also characterized. Several new, small molecule Raman scatterers are introduced and used to analyze the enhancing properties of the synthesized gold coated-magnetic nanoparticles. Nucleotide and immunoassay platforms have shown improvements in speed and analyte capture through the miniaturization of the capture surface and particle-based capture systems can provide a route to further surface miniaturization. A reaction-diffusion model of the colloidal assay platform is presented to understand the interplay of system

  1. Synthesis and characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Dipti; Peeples, Brianna N.; Spence, Destiny D.; Peeples, Caryn; Bell, Crystal N.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in a wide array of industrial and biomedical applications due to their unique properties at the nanoscale level. They are extensively used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic hyperthermia treatment, drug delivery, and in assays for biological separations. Furthermore, superparamagnetic nanoparticles are of large interest for in vivo applications. However, these unmodified nanoparticles aggregate and consequently lose their superparamagnetic behaviors, due to high surface to volume ratio and strong dipole to dipole interaction. For these reasons, surface coating is necessary for the enhancement and effectiveness of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in various applications. In addition to providing increased stability to the nanoparticles in different solvents or media, stabilizers such as surfactants, organic/inorganic molecules, polymer and co-polymers are employed as surface coatings, which yield magnetically responsive systems. In this work we present the synthesis and magnetic characterization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APS) and citric acid. The particles magnetic hysteresis was measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with an in-plane magnetic field. The uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  2. Magnetic direction.

    PubMed

    Duchene, Pam; Muhm, John B

    2005-01-01

    In April 2005, the American Nurses Association (ANA) awarded St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, its highest honor for excellence in nursing: "Magnet Recognition." The Magnet Recognition Program was developed by the ANA's American Nurses Credentialing Center in the early 1980s to recognize health care organizations that provide the best in nursing care and uphold the tradition of excellence in professional nursing practice. St. Joseph began pursuing Magnet status more than three years ago, starting with a number of enhancements to nursing practices. The hospital worked hard to improve nurse-to-patient staffing and included many of its nurses on the nursing quality council, division advisory, and cultural diversity committees. Magnet program appraisers visited the hospital this January to conduct an intensive, on-site three-day examination. They interviewed patients, staff nurses, physicians, hospital employees, administrators, board members, and nursing leadership to evaluate St. Joseph's nursing care, services, and delivery of care to patients and their families. Soon after, Magnet status was bestowed. PMID:16350902

  3. Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a Duplex Droplet Digital PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, KaShonda; Cosman, Angela; Belgrader, Phillip; Chapman, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Health care-associated infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contribute to significant hospitalization costs. We report here a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay, which is a next-generation emulsion-based endpoint PCR assay for high-precision MRSA analysis. Reference cultures of MRSA, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and confounders were included as controls. Copan swabs were used to sample cultures and collect specimens for analysis from patients at a large teaching hospital. Swab extraction and cell lysis were accomplished using magnetic-driven agitation of silica beads. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) (Roche Light Cycler 480) and ddPCR (Bio-Rad QX100 droplet digital PCR system) assays were used to detect genes for the staphylococcal protein SA0140 (SA) and the methicillin resistance (mecA) gene employing standard TaqMan chemistries. Both qPCR and ddPCR assays correctly identified culture controls for MRSA (76), MSSA (12), and confounder organisms (36) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Analysis of the clinical samples (211 negative and 186 positive) collected during a study of MRSA nasal carriage allowed direct comparison of the qPCR and ddPCR assays to the Cepheid MRSA GeneXpert assay. A total of 397 clinical samples were examined in this study. Cepheid MRSA GeneXpert values were used to define negative and positive samples. Both the qPCR and ddPCR assays were in good agreement with the reference assay. The sensitivities for the qPCR and ddPCR assays were 96.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.1 to 98.5%) and 96.8% (95% CI, 93.1 to 98.5%), respectively. Both the qPCR and ddPCR assays had specificities of 91.9% (95% CI, 87.5 to 94.9%) for qPCR and 91.0% (95% CI, 86.4 to 94.2%) for ddPCR technology. PMID:23596244

  4. A versatile electrowetting-based digital microfluidic platform for quantitative homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergauwe, Nicolas; Witters, Daan; Ceyssens, Frederik; Vermeir, Steven; Verbruggen, Bert; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) lab-on-a-chip systems have already proven their potential within a broad range of bio-assays. Nevertheless, research on the analytical performance of those systems is limited, yet crucial for a further breakthrough in the diagnostic field. Therefore, this paper presents the intrinsic possibilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip as a versatile platform for homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays with high analytical performance. Both droplet dispensing and splitting cause variations in droplet size, thereby directly influencing the assay's performance. The extent to which they influence the performance is assessed by a theoretical sensitivity analysis, which allows the definition of a basic framework for the reduction of droplet size variability. Taking advantage of the optimized droplet manipulations, both homogeneous and heterogeneous bio-assays are implemented in the EWOD lab-on-a-chip to demonstrate the analytical capabilities and versatility of the device. A fully on-chip enzymatic assay is realized with high analytical performance. It demonstrates the promising capabilities of an EWOD lab-on-a-chip in food-related and medical applications, such as nutritional and blood analyses. Further, a magnetic bio-assay for IgE detection using superparamagnetic nanoparticles is presented whereby the nanoparticles are used as solid carriers during the bio-assay. Crucial elements are the precise manipulation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with respect to dispensing and separation. Although the principle of using nano-carriers is demonstrated for protein detection, it can be easily extended to a broader range of bio-related applications like DNA sensing. In heterogeneous bio-assays the chip surface is actively involved during the execution of the bio-assay. Through immobilization of specific biological compounds like DNA, proteins and cells a reactive chip surface is realized, which enhances the bio-assay performance. To demonstrate

  5. Detailed assays conducted on Vietnamese crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Du, P.Q. )

    1990-07-16

    More oil property data, in the form of recent crude oil assays, have been made available for two Vietnamese crude oils, Bach Ho (White Tiger) and Dai Hung (Big Bear). Crude oil data presented earlier gave limited properties of the crudes,which are from the Miocene formations. Further analyses have been conducted on Bach Ho crude from the Oligocene formations. Production from Oligocene is far more representative of the oils produced from the Bach Ho field and marketed worldwide. Currently, Bach Ho is the only producing field. Dai Hung is expected to be in production during the next few years. Bach Ho is currently producing at the rate of 20,000 b/d. That figure is projected to grow to 100,000 b/d by 1992 and to 120,000 b/d by 1995. Detailed assays of both crude oils are presented.

  6. Nondestructive assay methods for solids containing plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Macmurdo, K.W.; Gray, L.W.; Gibbs, A.

    1984-06-01

    Specific nondestructive assay (NDA) methods, e.g. calorimetry, coincidence neutron counting, singles neutron counting, and gamma ray spectrometry, were studied to provide the Savannah River Plant with an NDA method to measure the plutonium content of solid scrap (slag and crucible) generated in the JB-Line plutonium metal production process. Results indicate that calorimetry can be used to measure the plutonium content to within about 3% in 4 to 6 hours by using computerized equilibrium sample power predictive models. Calorimetry results confirm that a bias exists in the present indirect measurement method used to estimate the plutonium content of slag and crucible. Singles neutron counting of slag and crucible can measure plutonium to only +-30%, but coincidence neutron counting methods improve measurement precision to better than +-10% in less than ten minutes. Only four portions of a single slag and crucible sample were assayed, and further study is recommended.

  7. DNA Origami Seesaws as Comparative Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Philipp C; Høiberg, Hans C; Simmel, Stephanie S; Holzmeister, Phil; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2016-06-16

    The application of commonly used force spectroscopy in biological systems is often limited by the need for an invasive tether connecting the molecules of interest to a bead or cantilever tip. Here we present a DNA origami-based prototype in a comparative binding assay. It has the advantage of in situ readout without any physical connection to the macroscopic world. The seesaw-like structure has a lever that is able to move freely relative to its base. Binding partners on each side force the structure into discrete and distinguishable conformations. Model experiments with competing DNA hybridisation reactions yielded a drastic shift towards the conformation with the stronger binding interaction. With reference DNA duplexes of tuneable length on one side, this device can be used to measure ligand interactions in comparative assays. PMID:27038073

  8. A specific endpoint assay for ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, I A; Warms, J V

    1987-01-01

    Simple endpoint assays for free ubiquitin (Ub) and for the Ub-activating enzyme are described. The method for measuring Ub makes use of the reaction of iodoacetamide-treated Ub-activating enzyme (E): [3H]ATP + Ub + E----E X [3H]AMP-Ub + PPi and PPi----2Pi (in the presence of pyrophosphatase). The Ub is then measured by determining the acid-insoluble radioactivity. The reaction is accompanied by a slow enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of the complex to AMP plus Ub. The presence of ubiquitin-activating enzyme in excess of Ub by approximately equal to 0.1 microM assures that the steady state will be close to the endpoint for total Ub. A preparation of the activating enzyme from human erythrocytes that does not depend on affinity chromatography is described. Several applications of the assay are presented. PMID:3031643

  9. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-07-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  10. Bio-assays for microchemical environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Richard E.

    1967-01-01

    A solution of the problem of environmental contamination must be based on accurate measurement of the extent of the contamination and of the resulting hazards. This paper reviews the methods for the estimation of microchemical contaminants in water with the aid of living organisms. The methods are grouped according to the nature of the response of the organism to the contaminant—namely, acute response (usually death), behavioural change, physiological change, biochemical and histochemical change, ecological change, embryological and regenerational change, growth change, histological change and perception by man or aquatic organisms. Finally, the following problems are discussed: selection of appropriate tests and standardization, the dangers of sequential concentration and the need for multi-parametric assays (assays involving several responses of a single organism, or responses of several organisms) for complete characterization of the effects of a contaminant on the environment. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:5299747

  11. Expert system technology for nondestructive waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.K.; Determan, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Nondestructive assay waste characterization data generated for use in the National TRU Program must be of known and demonstrable quality. Each measurement is required to receive an independent technical review by a qualified expert. An expert system prototype has been developed to automate waste NDA data review of a passive/active neutron drum counter system. The expert system is designed to yield a confidence rating regarding measurement validity. Expert system rules are derived from data in a process involving data clustering, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms. Expert system performance is assessed against confidence assignments elicited from waste NDA domain experts. Performance levels varied for the active, passive shielded, and passive system assay modes of the drum counter system, ranging from 78% to 94% correct classifications.

  12. System and method for assaying a radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Cadieux, James R; King, III, George S; Fugate, Glenn A

    2014-12-23

    A system for assaying a radionuclide includes a liquid scintillation detector, an analyzer connected to the liquid scintillation detector, and a delay circuit connected to the analyzer. A gamma detector and a multi-channel analyzer are connected to the delay circuit and the gamma detector. The multi-channel analyzer produces a signal reflective of the radionuclide in the sample. A method for assaying a radionuclide includes selecting a sample, detecting alpha or beta emissions from the sample with a liquid scintillation detector, producing a first signal reflective of the alpha or beta emissions, and delaying the first signal a predetermined time. The method further includes detecting gamma emissions from the sample, producing a second signal reflective of the gamma emissions, and combining the delayed first signal with the second signal to produce a third signal reflective of the radionuclide.

  13. System and method for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    DiPrete, David P; Whiteside, Tad; Pak, Donald J; DiPrete, Cecilia C

    2013-11-12

    A system for assaying radiation includes a sample holder configured to hold a liquid scintillation solution. A photomultiplier receives light from the liquid scintillation solution and generates a signal reflective of the light. A control circuit biases the photomultiplier and receives the signal from the photomultiplier reflective of the light. A light impermeable casing surrounds the sample holder, photomultiplier, and control circuit. A method for assaying radiation includes placing a sample in a liquid scintillation solution, placing the liquid scintillation solution in a sample holder, and placing the sample holder inside a light impermeable casing. The method further includes positioning a photomultiplier inside the light impermeable casing and supplying power to a control circuit inside the light impermeable casing.

  14. Delayed gamma technique for fissile material assay

    SciTech Connect

    Mozin, Vladimir; Tobin, Stephen; Vujie, Jasmina; Hunt, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Research sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative are investigating several non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of fissile plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. AppHcation of the delayed gamma signatures is investigated in this context. The objective of the research is to assess whether the delayed gamma assay instrument can provide sufficient sensitivity, isotope specificity and accuracy as required in nuclear material safeguards. This effort includes theoretical and experimental components for the optimal combination of interrogation parameters. A new modeling algorithm offering a high level of detail was developed specifically for this purpose and was validated in series of benchmark experiments. Preliminary modeling of the delayed gamma response from spent fuel assemblies was accomplished offering a future direction for the design process.

  15. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  16. Developments in plutonium waste assay at AWE.

    PubMed

    Miller, T J

    2009-06-01

    In 2002 a paper was presented at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) on the assay of low level plutonium (Pu) in soft drummed waste (Miller 2002 INMM Ann. Meeting (Orlando, FL, 23-27 July 2002)). The technique described enabled the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), at Aldermaston in the UK, to meet the stringent Low Level Waste Repository at Drigg (LLWRD) conditions for acceptance for the first time. However, it was initially applied to only low density waste streams because it relied on measuring the relatively low energy (60 keV) photon yield from Am-241 during growth. This paper reviews the results achieved when using the technique to assay over 10,000 waste packages and presents the case for extending the range of application to denser waste streams. PMID:19454791

  17. Quantitative comparisons of in vitro assays for estrogenic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, H; Tong, W; Perkins, R; Soto, A M; Prechtl, N V; Sheehan, D M

    2000-01-01

    Substances that may act as estrogens show a broad chemical structural diversity. To thoroughly address the question of possible adverse estrogenic effects, reliable methods are needed to detect and identify the chemicals of these diverse structural classes. We compared three assays--in vitro estrogen receptor competitive binding assays (ER binding assays), yeast-based reporter gene assays (yeast assays), and the MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN assay)--to determine their quantitative agreement in identifying structurally diverse estrogens. We examined assay performance for relative sensitivity, detection of active/inactive chemicals, and estrogen/antiestrogen activities. In this examination, we combined individual data sets in a specific, quantitative data mining exercise. Data sets for at least 29 chemicals from five laboratories were analyzed pair-wise by X-Y plots. The ER binding assay was a good predictor for the other two assay results when the antiestrogens were excluded (r(2) is 0.78 for the yeast assays and 0.85 for the E-SCREEN assays). Additionally, the examination strongly suggests that biologic information that is not apparent from any of the individual assays can be discovered by quantitative pair-wise comparisons among assays. Antiestrogens are identified as outliers in the ER binding/yeast assay, while complete antagonists are identified in the ER binding and E-SCREEN assays. Furthermore, the presence of outliers may be explained by different mechanisms that induce an endocrine response, different impurities in different batches of chemicals, different species sensitivity, or limitations of the assay techniques. Although these assays involve different levels of biologic complexity, the major conclusion is that they generally provided consistent information in quantitatively determining estrogenic activity for the five data sets examined. The results should provide guidance for expanded data mining examinations and the selection of appropriate

  18. Small Sample Assay Station users guide

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E.L.; Bourret, S.; Meier, M.M.

    1981-03-01

    A system for acquisition of delayed neutron data, based on an LSI-11 with 28 K words of memory, is described. Hardware features are a six-channel scaler and level sensor to determine the state of the experiment; and normal peripherals include dual floppy-disk drive, line printer, and CRT terminal. The software for experiment control and for the analysis of data is presented. The protocol for assays that optimally utilize the system is suggested.

  19. Yemen's light, sweet Alif crude assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-05-23

    Crude oil from Yemen's Alif field has been assayed. The light sweet crude, also known as Marib, is part of the Marib al-Jawf concession in northern Yemen. Alif field was discovered in 1984 by Hunt Oil Co. The field was declared commercial in November 1985. Alif production averaged 118,500 b/d in 1992. Physical and chemical properties are listed for the whole crude and its fractions.

  20. Polymeric assay film for direct colorimetric detection

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Nagy, Jon; Spevak, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    A lipid bilayer with affinity to an analyte, which directly signals binding by a changes in the light absorption spectra. This novel assay means and method has special applications in the drug development and medical testing fields. Using a spectrometer, the system is easily automated, and a multiple well embodiment allows inexpensive screening and sequential testing. This invention also has applications in industry for feedstock and effluent monitoring.

  1. Polymeric assay film for direct colorimetric detection

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Nagy, Jon; Spevak, Wayne

    2002-01-01

    A lipid bilayer with affinity to an analyte, which directly signals binding by a changes in the light absorption spectra. This novel assay means and method has special applications in the drug development and medical testing fields. Using a spectrometer, the system is easily automated, and a multiple well embodiment allows inexpensive screening and sequential testing. This invention also has applications in industry for feedstock and effluent monitoring.

  2. Assaying the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Crabb, D.W.; Minth, C.D.; Dixon, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    These experiments document the presence of enzymatic activities in extracts of commonly used cell lines which interfere with the determination of CAT activity. We suspect that the deacetylase activity is the most important, as the extract of the H4IIE C3 cells was capable of completely deacetylating the mono- and diacetylchloramphenicol formed during a 2-hr incubation of CAT with chloramphenicol and acetyl-CoA. The results of the inhibitor experiments are consistent with the presence of proteases which degrade CAT, or a serine carboxylesterase. The interference was also reduced by about half by EDTA; a metalloenzyme (either a protease or esterase) may therefore be involved. This interference appears to be a common phenomenon. We have surveyed 23 different cell types for the presence of the interfering activity and found it in 15. The interference was particularly prominent in several neuroendocrine and hepatoma cells. We took advantage of the effect of EDTA and the heat stability of CAT to eliminate the interference. Addition of 5 mM EDTA and a 10-min incubation of the sonicated cell suspension at 60 degrees prior to centrifugation abolished the interference in all cell lines tested. It is important to note that in order to reveal any CAT activity in some of the extracts (e.g., PC-12 or Hep3B), it was necessary to run the CAT assay for 2 hr. The control assays were therefore run almost to completion, and were well beyond the linear range of the assay. Therefore, the small differences which we observed between the heat-treated and control samples in some instances (e.g., rice, corn, or HeLa cells) will be dramatically amplified when the CAT assay is performed under conditions in which only a small percentage of the substrate is converted to product.

  3. Methods and devices for protein assays

    DOEpatents

    Chhabra, Swapnil; Cintron, Jose M.; Shediac, Renee

    2009-11-03

    Methods and devices for protein assays based on Edman degradation in microfluidic channels are disclosed herein. As disclosed, the cleaved amino acid residues may be immobilized in an array format and identified by detectable labels, such as antibodies, which specifically bind given amino acid residues. Alternatively, the antibodies are immobilized in an array format and the cleaved amino acids are labeled identified by being bound by the antibodies in the array.

  4. Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay Test Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As easy to read as a home pregnancy test, three Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay (QLFA) strips used to test water for E. coli show different results. The brightly glowing control line on the far right of each strip indicates that all three tests ran successfully. But the glowing test line on the middle left and bottom strips reveal their samples were contaminated with E. coli bacteria at two different concentrations. The color intensity correlates with concentration of contamination.

  5. The Engineered SVA Trans-mobilization Assay.

    PubMed

    Bock, Anja; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor autonomous retrotransposons coding for the proteins required for their own mobilization, and nonautonomous retrotransposons, such as the human SVA element, which are transcribed but do not have any coding capacity. Mobilization of nonautonomous retrotransposons depends on the recruitment of the protein machinery encoded by autonomous retrotransposons. Here, we summarize the experimental details of SVA trans-mobilization assays which address multiple questions regarding the biology of both nonautonomous SVA elements and autonomous LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. The assay evaluates if and to what extent a noncoding SVA element is mobilized in trans by the L1-encoded protein machinery, the structural organization of the resulting marked de novo insertions, if they mimic endogenous SVA insertions and what the roles of individual domains of the nonautonomous retrotransposon for SVA mobilization are. Furthermore, the highly sensitive trans-mobilization assay can be used to verify the presence of otherwise barely detectable endogenously expressed functional L1 proteins via their marked SVA trans-mobilizing activity. PMID:26895056

  6. Lymphocyte chromosomal aberration assay in radiation biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Agrawala, Paban K.; Adhikari, J. S.; Chaudhury, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiations, whether medical, occupational or accidental, leads to deleterious biological consequences like mortality or carcinogenesis. It is considered that no dose of ionizing radiation exposure is safe. However, once the accurate absorbed dose is estimated, one can be given appropriate medical care and the severe consequences can be minimized. Though several accurate physical dose estimation modalities exist, it is essential to estimate the absorbed dose in biological system taking into account the individual variation in radiation response, so as to plan suitable medical care. Over the last several decades, lots of efforts have been taken to design a rapid and easy biological dosimeter requiring minimum invasive procedures. The metaphase chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, though is labor intensive and requires skilled individuals, still remains the gold standard for radiation biodosimetry. The current review aims at discussing the human lymphocyte metaphase chromosomal aberration assay and recent developments involving the application of molecular cytogenetic approaches and other technological advancements to make the assay more authentic and simple to use even in the events of mass radiation casualties. PMID:21829315

  7. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  8. Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jerald D.; Aryaeinejad, Rahmat; Greenwood, Reginald C.

    1995-01-01

    The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field.

  9. High-content screening for biofilm assays.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fubing; Hoek, Eric M V; Damoiseaux, Robert

    2010-08-01

    The authors describe a novel high-throughput screening platform that provides rapid, reliable, quantitative assessment of biofilm formation and removal on engineered surfaces. Unlike traditional biofilm assays based on plate readers, this assay platform is based on high-content screening, which allows for multiplexing to simultaneously quantify the number of bacterial adhesions per unit area and the viability of adhered cells using fluorescent dye combinations. This platform is fully automated and has a throughput of more than 10,000 wells per day. The authors used this platform to examine the influence of different assay buffer systems on bacterial adhesion, viability, and removal on cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol coating films synthesized directly onto the bottoms of 384-well plates. The results indicated that water chemistry, bacteria cell type, and film chemistry combine to govern biofilm formation. In general, both reversible and irreversible bacterial adhesion increased with the extent of cross-linking in coating films, which correlates strongly with coating film cross-linking degree and hydrophobicity, which is closely related. The high-throughput platform offers a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of fouling-resistant coating films in addition to elucidation of fundamental mechanisms governing bacterial adhesion. PMID:20639506

  10. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  11. Transformation Assay for Identification of Psychrotrophic Achromobacters

    PubMed Central

    Juni, Elliot; Heym, Gloria A.

    1980-01-01

    The finding that many psychrotrophic, gram-negative, nonmotile, oxidase-positive coccobacilli (achromobacters) are competent for genetic transformation made possible the development of a transformation assay that permits recognition of genetically related strains. It has been demonstrated that 109 independently isolated achromobacters are genetically related since deoxyribonucleic acid samples from all of these organisms were able to transform a single competent auxotrophic strain to prototrophy. Genetically interacting bacteria included strains that lacked one or more of the characteristics typical for most achromobacters. An oxidase-negative mutant of one of these strains reacted positively in the transformation assay, unlike other oxidase-negative bacteria. Achromobacters were derived from fish, poultry, irradiated foods, seawater, and other sources. One strain previously classified as Micrococcus cryophilus has been shown to be related to the achromobacters. Two achromobacters had an optimum growth temperature of 35°C and behaved as typical mesophiles. The moraxellae and Acinetobacter were shown to be unrelated to the achromobacters by using the transformation assay. The ready demonstration of genetic relatedness provides a new basis for taxonomic grouping of the psychrotrophic achromobacters. Images PMID:16345673

  12. Tumor promotion: models and assay systems.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, D J; Yamasaki, H

    1990-01-01

    Tumor promotion is defined operationally from two-stage models of experimental carcinogenesis. It is, therefore, in a strict sense, possible to identify tumor promoters only from such models. The development and use of in vitro two-stage cell transformation assays was a logical extension toward in vitro short-term testing for tumor promoters. Another approach is to apply mechanistic knowledge of the tumor promotion process in developing end points for such assays. In this context, we have been examining the role of blocked gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in tumor promotion, using in vitro and in vivo systems. Many promoters have been shown to block GJIC in vitro; our studies support the idea that inhibition of GJIC does play an important role in the promotion stage of BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation. In animal studies, we have shown that the rat liver tumor promoter phenobarbital can decrease the level of expression of the 32 Kd gap junction protein gene specifically in liver upon systemic exposure in rats. Further examination of the role of GJIC in tumor promotion is indeed warranted. Also, deployment of in vitro GJIC and transformation assay systems should provide useful short-term tests for detecting tumor promoting activity of environmental chemicals. PMID:1973858

  13. [Interference of ethylene glycol on lactate assays].

    PubMed

    Graïne, H; Toumi, K; Roullier, V; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2007-01-01

    Ethylene glycol is broken down to three main organic acids: glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid and oxalic acid which cause severe metabolic acidosis. Effect of these three acids on lactate assays was evaluated in five blood gas analysers and two clinical chemistry analysers. For all systems, no influence of oxalic acid on lactate results could be demonstrated. No interference of glycolic acid could be observed on lactate assay performed with Rapid Lab 1265 (R: 104,9 +/- 12,1%), Vitros 950 (R: 105,7 +/- 5,3 %) and Architect ci8200 (R: 104,9 +/- 4,7%), but on the contrary, CCX 4, OMNI S, ABL 725 and 825 demonstrated a concentration-dependent interference. No interference of glyoxylic acid could be observed with Vitros 950, but a positive interference could be observed with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX4 and Architect ci8200 A linear relationship between apparent lactate concentration found with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX 4, and glyoxylic acid could be observed (0,94 < r < 0,99), a weaker interference being observed with Rapid Lab 1265 and Architect ci 8200. Our results demonstrated that in case of ethylene glycol poisoning, cautious interpretation of lactate assay should be done, since wrong results of lactacidemia could lead to misdiagnostic and delay patient treatment. PMID:17627925

  14. Quality control of antibodies for assay development.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Seitz, Harald

    2016-09-25

    Antibodies are used as powerful tools in basic research, for example, in biomarker identification, and in various forms for diagnostics, for example, identification of allergies or autoimmune diseases. Due to their robustness and ease of handling, immunoassays are favourite methods for investigation of various biological or medical questions. Nevertheless in many cases, additional analyses such as mass spectrometry are used to validate or confirm the results of immunoassays. To minimize the workload and to increase confidence in immunoassays, there are urgent needs for antibodies which are both highly specific and well validated. Unfortunately many commercially available antibodies are neither well characterized nor fully tested for cross-reactivities. Adequate quality control and validation of an antibody is time-consuming and can be frustrating. Such validation needs to be performed for every assay/application. However, where an antibody validation is successful, a highly specific and stable reagent will be on hand. This article describes the validation processes of antibodies, including some often neglected factors, as well as unspecific binding to other sample compounds in a multiparameter diagnostic assay. The validation consists of different immunological methods, with important assay controls, and is performed in relation to the development of a diagnostic test. PMID:26873787

  15. Gamma neutron assay method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cole, J.D.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Greenwood, R.C.

    1995-01-03

    The gamma neutron assay technique is an alternative method to standard safeguards techniques for the identification and assaying of special nuclear materials in a field or laboratory environment, as a tool for dismantlement and destruction of nuclear weapons, and to determine the isotopic ratios for a blend-down program on uranium. It is capable of determining the isotopic ratios of fissionable material from the spontaneous or induced fission of a sample to within approximately 0.5%. This is based upon the prompt coincidence relationships that occur in the fission process and the proton conservation and quasi-conservation of nuclear mass (A) that exists between the two fission fragments. The system is used in both passive (without an external neutron source) and active (with an external neutron source) mode. The apparatus consists of an array of neutron and gamma-ray detectors electronically connected to determine coincident events. The method can also be used to assay radioactive waste which contains fissile material, even in the presence of a high background radiation field. 7 figures.

  16. In vitro Cell Migration and Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V.

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup. PMID:24962652

  17. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  18. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  19. Accelerated immunoassays based on magnetic particle dynamics in a rotating capillary tube with stationary magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Tae; Sudheendra, L.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid and simple magnetic particle-based immunoassay has been demonstrated in a capillary mixing system. Antibody-coated micrometer size super-paramagnetic polystyrene (SPP) particles were used in an assay for rabbit IgG in a sandwich (non-competitive) format. The kinetics of the assay was compared between a plate – based system and a single capillary tube. The interaction between the antigen (R-IgG) and the antibody (anti-R-IgG) that was carried by the SPP particles in a rotating capillary was tested under a stationary magnetic field. Competing magnetic and viscous drag forces helped to enhance the interaction between the analyte and the capture antibodies on the particles. The dimensionless Mason number (Mn) was employed to characterize the magnetic particle dynamics – a previously determined critical Mason number (Mnc) was employed as a guide to the appropriate experimental conditions of magnetic field strength and rotational speed of the capillary. The advantage of the rotating capillary system included a short assay time and a reduced reactive volume (20μl). The results show that the immunoassay kinetics were improved by the formation of chains of the SPP particles for the conditions that corresponded to the critical Mason number. PMID:22931580

  20. Magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Harriss

    1992-01-01

    The move to visualization and image processing in data systems is increasing the demand for larger and faster mass storage systems. The technology of choice is magnetic tape. This paper briefly reviews the technology past, present, and projected. A case is made for standards and the value of the standards to users.

  1. "Swinging" Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Languis, Marlin

    1975-01-01

    Presents detailed teaching plans for activities with "rubberized" magnets as well as background information and alternative teaching-learning approaches. This activity may be used to develop student skills in inferring and in observing evidence of interaction. Includes instructions for equipment construction. (BR)

  2. Magnetic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ferrofluidics Corporation's recent innovation is a spindle for rotating computer discs that supports the disc's rotating shaft on a film of magnetic fluid instead of conventional ball bearings. According to its developers, the spindle offers greatly increased rotational stability, meaning substantially reduced vibration and mechanical noise, and non- repeatable runout. This allows disc drives to store two to 10 times more information.

  3. Optical protein detection based on magnetic clusters rotation.

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, Donatien; Brient-Litzler, Elodie; Daynes, Aurélien; Compain, Eric; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2015-09-25

    In this paper we present a simple method to quantify aggregates of 200nm magnetic particles. This method relies on the optical and magnetic anisotropy of particle aggregates, whereas dispersed particles are optically isotropic. We orientate aggregates by applying short pulses of a magnetic field, and we measure optical density variation directly linked to this reorientation. By computing the scattering efficiency of doublets and singlets, we demonstrate the absolute quantification of a few % of doublets in a well dispersed suspension. More generally, these optical variations are related to the aggregation state of the sample. This method can be easily applied to an agglutination assay, where target proteins induce aggregation of colloidal particles. By observing only aligned clusters, we increase sensitivity and we reduce the background noise as compared to a classical agglutination assay: we obtain a detection limit on the C-reactive protein of less than 3pM for a total assay time of 10min. PMID:25849116

  4. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  5. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  6. Permanent magnet array for the magnetic refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. J.; Kenkel, J. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2002-05-01

    Recent research into the development of magnetic refrigeration (MR) operating at room temperature has shown that it can provide a reliable, energy-efficient cooling system. To enhance the cooling power of the magnetic refrigerator, it is required to use a magnetic refrigerant material with large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) at the appropriate temperature. Most advanced magnetic refrigerant materials show largest MCE at high applied magnetic fields generated by a superconducting magnet. For application of MCE to air conditioners or household refrigerators, it is essential to develop a permanent magnet array to form a compact, strong, and energy-efficient magnetic field generator. Generating a magnetic field well above the remanence of a permanent magnet material is hard to achieve through conventional designs. A permanent magnet array based on a hollow cylindrical flux source is found to provide an appropriate geometry and magnetic field strength for MR applications.

  7. Binding of biological effectors on magnetic nanoparticles measured by a magnetically induced transient birefringence experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, C.; Gazeau, F.; Roger, J.; Pons, J. N.; Salis, M. F.; Perzynski, R.; Bacri, J. C.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the relaxation of the magnetically induced birefringence in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in order to detect the binding reaction of polyclonal antibodies on the particle surface. The birefringence relaxation is driven by the rotational diffusion of the complex formed by the magnetic nanoparticles bound to the antibody and thus is directly related to the hydrodynamic size of this complex. Birefringence relaxations are well described by stretched exponential laws revealing a polydisperse distribution of hydrodynamic diameters. Comparing the size distribution of samples with different initial ratios of immunoglobuline added per magnetic nanoparticles, we evidence the graft of an antibody on particle and eventually the onset of particles agregation. Measurements on samples separated in size by gel filtration demonstrate the robustness of our experiment for the determination of size distribution and its modification due to the adsorption of a macromolecule. The immunoglobuline binding assay is performed comparatively for ionic magnetic nanoparticles with different coatings.

  8. Integrated air stream micromixer for performing bioanalytical assays on a plastic chip.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Matthias; Li, Kebin; Zhang, Xuefeng; Clime, Liviu; Robideau, Gregg P; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Veres, Teodor

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design, functioning and use of an integrated mixer that relies on air flux to agitate microliter entities of fluid in an embedded microfluidic cavity. The system was fabricated from multiple layers of a thermoplastic elastomer and features circuits for both liquid and air supply along with pneumatic valves for process control. Internally-dyed polymer particles have been used to visualize flow within the fluid phase during agitation. Numerical modelling of the micromixer revealed an overall efficacy of 10(-1) to 10(-2) for momentum transfer at the air-water interface. Simulation of air vortex dynamics showed dependency of the flow pattern on the velocity of the flux entering the cavity. Three bioanalytical assays have been performed as proof-of-concept demonstrations. In a first assay, cells of Listeria monocytogenes were combined with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in high-density coverage of the bacteria's surface with NPs after 1 min of agitation. This finding is contrasted by a control experiment without agitation for which interaction between bacteria and NPs remains low. In a second one, capture and release of genomic DNA from fungi through adsorption onto magnetic beads was tested and shown to be improved by agitation compared to non-agitated controls. A third assay finally involved fluorescently-labelled target oligonucleotide strands and polystyrene particles modified with DNA capture probes to perform detection of nucleic acids on beads. Excellent selectivity was obtained in a competitive hybridization process using a multiplexed micromixer chip design. PMID:25091476

  9. Technique to optimize magnetic response of gelatin coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nidhi; Parekh, Kinnari

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the results of optimization of magnetic response for highly stable bio-functionalize magnetic nanoparticles dispersion. Concentration of gelatin during in situ co-precipitation synthesis was varied from 8, 23 and 48 mg/mL to optimize magnetic properties. This variation results in a change in crystallite size from 10.3 to 7.8 ± 0.1 nm. TEM measurement of G3 sample shows highly crystalline spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 7.2 ± 0.2 nm and diameter distribution (σ) of 0.27. FTIR spectra shows a shift of 22 cm(-1) at C=O stretching with absence of N-H stretching confirming the chemical binding of gelatin on magnetic nanoparticles. The concept of lone pair electron of the amide group explains the mechanism of binding. TGA shows 32.8-25.2% weight loss at 350 °C temperature substantiating decomposition of chemically bind gelatin. The magnetic response shows that for 8 mg/mL concentration of gelatin, the initial susceptibility and saturation magnetization is the maximum. The cytotoxicity of G3 sample was assessed in Normal Rat Kidney Epithelial Cells (NRK Line) by MTT assay. Results show an increase in viability for all concentrations, the indicative probability of a stimulating action of these particles in the nontoxic range. This shows the potential of this technique for biological applications as the coated particles are (i) superparamagnetic (ii) highly stable in physiological media (iii) possibility of attaching other drug with free functional group of gelatin and (iv) non-toxic. PMID:26152511

  10. Comparison of Three Automated Immunoassay Methods for the Determination of Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific Immunoglobulin M ▿

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Mario; Bosmans, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    In this study we compared the performances of three commercially available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immunoglobulin M (IgM) assays on highly automated immunoassay platforms: BioPlex 2200 (Bio-Rad Laboratories), Immulite 2000 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics), and Liaison (DiaSorin). As a confirmatory method, immunoblotting was performed. The specificity of the three EBV IgM assays was evaluated by testing 293 selected sera from patients with various infectious and noninfectious diseases. After the exclusion of 30 samples, the specificities were 96.2% for Liaison, 98.1% for Immulite, and 97.0% for BioPlex. For evaluation of the sensitivity, samples from 70 consecutive patients with a positive heterophile antibody test were examined, irrespective of clinical or biological findings. After the exclusion of six samples, the sensitivities were 89.1% for Liaison, 84.4% for Immulite, and 89.1% for BioPlex. Finally, in a prospective study performed with 500 samples obtained from consecutive patients and sent in by general practitioners, we also determined Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen IgG and viral capsid antigen IgG in a two-phase approach. Concordance of the EBV serologic status was 96.2% between Liaison and Immulite, 96.4% between Immulite and BioPlex, and 97.8% between BioPlex and Liaison. The three EBV IgM immunoassays that we evaluated have acceptable and comparable performances. PMID:20147496

  11. Evaluation of Chikungunya Diagnostic Assays: Differences in Sensitivity of Serology Assays in Two Independent Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Grace; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Lai, Yee-Ling; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige-Chanditha; Chow, Angela; Leo, Yee-Sin; Tan, Li-Kiang; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Background The sensitivity and specificity of two in-house MAC-ELISA assays were tested and compared with the performance of commercially-available CTK lateral flow rapid test and EUROIMMUN IFA assays for the detection of anti-Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) IgM. Each MAC-ELISA assay used a whole virus-based antigen derived from genetically distinct CHIKV strains involved in two chikungunya disease outbreaks in Singapore (2008); a January outbreak strain with alanine at amino acid residue 226 of the E1 glycoprotein (CHIKV-A226) and a May-to-September outbreak strain that possessed valine at the same residue (CHIKV-226V). We report differences in IgM detection efficacy of different assays between the two outbreaks. The sensitivities of two PCR protocols were also tested. Methods and Findings For sera from January outbreak, the average detection threshold of CTK lateral flow test, MAC-ELISAs and EUROIMMUN IFA assays was 3.75, 4.38 and 4.88 days post fever onset respectively. In contrast, IgM detection using CTK lateral flow test was delayed to more than 7 days after fever onset in the second outbreak sera. However, MAC-ELISA using CHIKV-226V detected IgM in the second outbreak sera 3.96 days after fever onset, which was approximately one day earlier compared to the same assay using CHIKV-A226 (4.86 days). Specificity was 100% for both commercial assays, and 95.6% for the in-house MAC-ELISAs. For sensitivity determination of the PCR protocols, the probe-based real time RT-PCR method was found to be 10 times more sensitive than one based on SYBR Green. Conclusion Our findings suggested that the two strains of CHIKV using variants A226 and 226V resulted in variation in sensitivities of the assays evaluated. We postulated that the observed difference in antigen efficacy could be due to the amino acid substitution differences in viral E1 and E2 envelope proteins, especially the E1-A226V substitution. This evaluation demonstrates the importance of appraisal of different

  12. Nondestructive boxed transuranic (TRU) waste assay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, John T.; Jones, Stephanie A.; Lucero, Randy F.

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of boxed waste assay systems (primarily those developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) is presented. The characteristics and design process involved with current generation systems--as practiced by BII--are also discussed in some detail. Finally, a specific boxed waste assay system and acceptance test results are presented. This system was developed by BII and installed at the Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility in Hanford, Washington in early 1997. The WRAP system combines imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) techniques with gamma- ray energy analysis (GEA) to assay crates up to 2.5 m X 2.5 m X 6.5 m in size. (Systems that incorporate both these methodologies are usually denoted IPAN/GEA types.) Two separate gamma-ray measurements are accomplished utilizing 16 arrayed NaI detectors and a moveable HPGe detector, while 3He detectors acquire both active and passive neutron data. These neutron measurements use BII's proprietary imaging methodology. Acceptance testing of the system was conducted at Hanford in January 1998. The system's operating performance was evaluated based on accuracy and sensitivity requirements for three different matrix types. Test results indicate an average 13% active mode accuracy for 10 nCi/g loadings of Pu waste and 5% passive mode accuracy for 10 g loadings of Pu waste. Sensitivity testing demonstrated an active mode lower limit of detection of less than 5 nCi/g of 239Pu for the medium matrix and less than 20 pCi/g of fission and activation products at 3(sigma) above background.

  13. Automated Protein Assay Using Flow Injection Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Carrie A. C.; Oates, Matthew R.; Hage, David S.

    1998-08-01

    The technique of flow injection analysis (FIA) is a common instrumental method used in detecting a variety of chemical and biological agents. This paper describes an undergraduate laboratory that uses FIA to perform a bicinchoninic acid (BCA) colorimetric assay for quantitating protein samples. The method requires less than 2 min per sample injection and gives a response over a broad range of protein concentrations. This method can be used in instrumental analysis labs to illustrate the principles and use of FIA, or as a means for introducing students to common methods employed in the analysis of biological agents.

  14. Assay of the Martian Regolith with Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Darrell M.; Reedy, R.; Jakowsky, B.; Clark, B.; Squyres, S.

    1998-01-01

    Different aspects of assaying Martian regolith using neutrons have been investigated. The epithermal portion of moderated neutrons spectra is dramatically effected by the presence of hydrogen (usually in the form of water). A simple analytic formula has been derived to describe the amplitude of this portion of the neutron spectrum as a function of water concentration. Several demonstration experiments have been performed and modeled with a Monte Carlo code. Results of these experiments generally agreed with the calculations to within 20%. In addition to He-3 detectors, lithium-glass scintillators and U-238 fission ion chambers were investigated to determine their applicability to space experiments.

  15. Nondestructive assay measurements of GNEP related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter A; Crooks, William J.; Geist, William H.; Gonzales, Robert; Helland, Carolyn A.; Jackson, Jay M.; Frame, Katherine C.; Martinez, Michael M.; Scherer, Caroylnn P.; Vo, Duc T.

    2008-06-12

    Because the reprocessing technologies that are currently being considered for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will keep various actinides commingled with plutonium at all times throughout the process, the resulting nuclear fuel that is intended for the Advanced Burner Reactor will present unique measurement challenges for the various Nondestructive Assay (NDA) techniques. In order to begin clarifying which types of materials and measurement scenarios that may exist within GNEP require the development of new measurement technologies, an initial series of measurements have been performed on materials with radiation properties that are similar to those being considered within GNEP.

  16. Assays of thyroid-stimulating antibody

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.M.; Zakarija, M.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the two major assay methods of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) of Graves' disease. The basic procedures involve: (1) some index of thyroid stimulation, usually in vitro, using TSAb to indicate its activity; and (2) indirect recognition by assessment of the inhibition of binding of radioiodinated thyrotropin (TSH) to a preparation of its receptor, i.e., TSH-binding inhibition or TBI. There is potential for misinterpretation of data acquired by testing patients' sera by one or the other basic procedure.

  17. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, J.

    1994-12-07

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system`s embedded operating and data reduction software.

  18. Nanoparticle-Based Histidine-Rich Protein-2 Assay for the Detection of the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E; Kim, Chloe; Gilman, Robert H; Sullivan, David J; Searson, Peter C

    2016-08-01

    A nanoparticle-based assay for detection and quantification of Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) in urine and serum is reported. The assay uses magnetic beads conjugated with anti-HRP2 antibody for protein capture and concentration, and antibody-conjugated quantum dots for optical detection. Western blot analysis demonstrated that magnetic beads allow the concentration of HRP2 protein in urine by 20-fold. The concentration effect was achieved because large volume of urine can be incubated with beads, and magnetic separation can be easily performed in minutes to isolate beads containing HRP2 protein. Magnetic beads and quantum dots conjugated to anti-HRP2 antibodies allows the detection of low concentrations of HRP2 protein (0.5 ng/mL), and quantification in the range of 33-2,000 ng/mL corresponding to the range associated with non-severe to severe malaria. This assay can be easily adapted to a noninvasive point-of-care test for classification of severe malaria. PMID:27185769

  19. A Spectrophotometric Assay Optimizing Conditions for Pepsin Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Ethelynda E.; Kimsey, R. Scott

    1998-01-01

    Describes a laboratory protocol optimizing the conditions for the assay of pepsin activity using the Coomasie Blue dye binding assay of protein concentration. The dye bonds through strong, noncovalent interactions to basic and aromatic amino acid residues. (DDR)

  20. Clinical Assay Development Support - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and the Cancer Diagnosis Program announce a request for applications for the Clinical Assay Development Program (CADP) for investigators seeking clinical assay development and validation resources.

  1. Electrochemical chip-based genomagnetic assay for detection of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Bartosik, Martin; Durikova, Helena; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Anton, Milan; Jandakova, Eva; Hrstka, Roman

    2016-09-15

    Cervical cancer, being the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide, predominantly originates from a persistent infection with a high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Detection of DNA sequences from these high-risk strains, mostly HPV-16 and HPV-18, represents promising strategy for early screening, which would help to identify women with higher risk of cervical cancer. In developing countries, inadequate screening options lead to disproportionately high mortality rates, making a fast and inexpensive detection schemes highly important. Electrochemical sensors and assays offer an alternative to current methods of detection. We developed an electrochemical-chip based assay, in which target HPV DNA is captured via magnetic bead-modified DNA probes, followed by an antidigoxigenin-peroxidase detection system at screen-printed carbon electrode chips, enabling parallel measurements of eight samples simultaneously. We show sensitive detection in attomoles of HPV DNA, selective discrimination between HPV-16 and HPV-18 and good reproducibility. Most importantly, we show application of the assay into both cancer cell lines and cervical smears from patients. The electrochemical results correlated well with standard methods, making this assay potentially applicable in clinical practice. PMID:27132004

  2. Magnetic bearing. [for supplying magnetic fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A magnetic bearing is described which includes a pair of coaxial, toroidal, and permanent magnets having axially directed poles. Like poles of the permanent magnets are adjacent to each other, whereby the permanent magnets have a tendency to be urged apart along the common axis. An electromagnet is wound coaxially with the permanent magnets in such a manner that the poles are axially directed. Between the poles of each permanent magnet there is a low magnetic reluctance circuit including two series air gaps. Between the poles of the electromagnet a low reluctance path including only one air gap of each of the low magnetic reluctance circuits is provided. The low reluctance path for the electromagnet includes a ring axially translatable relative to the permanent magnets. The ring forms opposite faces of the air gaps in the magnetic circuits for each permanent magnet.

  3. Digital biomagnetism: Electrodeposited multilayer magnetic barcodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palfreyman, Justin J.; Cooper, Joshaniel F. K.; van Belle, Frieda; Hong, Bingyan; Hayward, Tom J.; Lopalco, Maria; Bradley, Mark; Mitrelias, Thanos; Bland, J. Anthony C.

    2009-05-01

    A novel magnetic encoding technique for performing high-throughput biological assays is presented. Electrodeposited Ni/Cu and Co/Cu multilayer pillar structures with a diameter of 15 μm and a thickness up to 10 μm are presented as "magnetic barcodes", where the number of unique codes possible increases exponentially with a linear increase in length. A gold cap facilitates the growth of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), while microdrop printing allows efficient generation of large libraries of tagged probes. Coercivity-tuning techniques are used to exploit a non-proximity encoding methodology compatible with microfluidic flow.

  4. A Liquid-Based Colorimetric Assay of Lysine Decarboxylase and Its Application to Enzymatic Assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Kim, Hyun Joong; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Yun-Gon; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-12-28

    A liquid-based colorimetric assay using a pH indicator was introduced for high-throughput monitoring of lysine decarboxylase activity. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol purple, measured at 595 nm in liquid reaction mixture, due to an increase of pH by the production of cadaverine. Bromocresol purple was selected as the indicator because it has higher sensitivity than bromothymol blue and pheonol red within a broad range and shows good linearity within the applied pH. We applied this for simple determination of lysine decarboxylase reusability using 96-well plates, and optimization of conditions for enzyme overexpression with different concentrations of IPTG on lysine decarboxylase. This assay is expected to be applied for monitoring and quantifying the liquid-based enzyme reaction in biotransformation of decarboxylase in a high-throughput way. PMID:26282689

  5. Performance Characteristics of Xpert Flu/RSV XC Assay.

    PubMed

    Popowitch, Elena B; Miller, Melissa B

    2015-08-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay was compared to laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) (n = 207) and the Xpert Flu assay (n = 147) using archived nasopharyngeal swabs. The percentages of positive agreements with LDTs were 97.8% for influenza A, 97.2% for influenza B, and 89.3% for RSV. The sensitivity of influenza detection was improved with the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay compared to the Xpert Flu assay. PMID:26019209

  6. Developing predictive assays: the phenotypic screening "rule of 3".

    PubMed

    Vincent, Fabien; Loria, Paula; Pregel, Marko; Stanton, Robert; Kitching, Linda; Nocka, Karl; Doyonnas, Regis; Steppan, Claire; Gilbert, Adam; Schroeter, Thomas; Peakman, Marie-Claire

    2015-06-24

    Phenotypic drug discovery approaches can positively affect the translation of preclinical findings to patients. However, not all phenotypic assays are created equal. A critical question then follows: What are the characteristics of the optimal assays? We analyze this question and propose three specific criteria related to the disease relevance of the assay-system, stimulus, and end point-to help design the most predictive phenotypic assays. PMID:26109101

  7. Performance Characteristics of Xpert Flu/RSV XC Assay

    PubMed Central

    Popowitch, Elena B.

    2015-01-01

    The Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay was compared to laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) (n = 207) and the Xpert Flu assay (n = 147) using archived nasopharyngeal swabs. The percentages of positive agreements with LDTs were 97.8% for influenza A, 97.2% for influenza B, and 89.3% for RSV. The sensitivity of influenza detection was improved with the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay compared to the Xpert Flu assay. PMID:26019209

  8. Development of an immunofluorescence focus assay for Ebola virus.

    PubMed Central

    Truant, A L; Regnery, R L; Kiley, M P

    1983-01-01

    A 48-h indirect immunofluorescence focus assay for the quantitation of Ebola virus was developed, utilizing HeLa-229 cell monolayers. The dose dependency and the sensitivity of this assay as compared with conventional assays are reported. This indirect immunofluorescence focus assay can be used as a rapid, quantitative test for the detection of Ebola virus, an agent from Africa known to cause hemorrhagic fever. Images PMID:6352735

  9. Reporting biological assay screening results for maximum impact.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Evan

    2015-07-01

    A very large corpus of biological assay screening results exist in the public domain. The ability to compare and analyze this data is hampered due to missing details and lack of a commonly used terminology to describe assay protocols and assay endpoints. Minimum reporting guidelines exist that, if followed, would greatly enhance the utility of biological assay screening data so it may be independently reproduced, readily integrated, effectively compared, and rapidly analyzed. PMID:26194585

  10. Hormone assays: some aspects that endocrinologists should know.

    PubMed

    Alfayate, Rocío; Mauri, Montserrat

    2008-02-01

    Since the pioneering works of Yalow and Berson that introduced radioimmunoassays (RIA), hormone assays have been developed gradually, with improvements in all aspects of their design, from immunoradiometric assays to automatization. Examples of this evolution are the thyrotropin (TSH) and parathyroid (PTH) assays. Despite the strong accuracy and reliability of currently used hormone assays, some limitations should be reviewed, such as interference by autoantibodies, heterophile antibodies or macroprolactin and the hook effect. PMID:22964101

  11. Comparison of Luminescence ADP Production Assay and Radiometric Scintillation Proximity Assay for Cdc7 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Toshimitsu; Shum, David; Parisi, Monika; Santos, Ruth E.; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul; Rizvi, Zahra; Frattini, Mark G.; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Several assay technologies have been successfully adapted and used in HTS to screen for protein kinase inhibitors; however, emerging comparative analysis studies report very low hit overlap between the different technologies, which challenges the working assumption that hit identification is not dependent on the assay method of choice. To help address this issue, we performed two screens on the cancer target, Cdc7-Dbf4 heterodimeric protein kinase, using a direct assay detection method measuring [33P]-phosphate incorporation into the substrate and an indirect method measuring residual ADP production using luminescence. We conducted the two screens under similar conditions, where in one, we measured [33P]-phosphate incorporation using scintillation proximity assay (SPA), and in the other, we detected luminescence signal of the ATP-dependent luciferase after regenerating ATP from residual ADP (LUM). Surprisingly, little or no correlation were observed between the positives identified by the two methods; at a threshold of 30% inhibition, 25 positives were identified in the LUM screen whereas the SPA screen only identified two positives, Tannic acid and Gentian violet, with Tannic acid being common to both. We tested 20 out of the 25 positive compounds in secondary confirmatory study and confirmed 12 compounds including Tannic acid as Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase inhibitors. Gentian violet, which was only positive in the SPA screen, inhibited luminescence detection and categorized as a false positive. This report demonstrates the strong impact in detection format on the success of a screening campaign and the importance of carefully designed confirmatory assays to eliminate those compounds that target the detection part of the assay. PMID:21564015

  12. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Kamide, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the first conference devoted entirely to magnetic storms. Topics cover the relevant phenomena at the Sun/corona, propogation of these structures through interplanetary space, the response of the magnetosphere to interaction with these interplanetary structures, the formation of the storm time ring current (in particular the oxygen content of the ring-current), and storm ionospheric effects and ground based effects.

  13. Magnetic cumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskij, A. I.

    1990-08-01

    The second half of 40-th -finish of 60-th of the XX-th Century were prolific y ears of scientific activity of A.D. Sakharov (1921-1990), when his unique creati ve aptitudes and inventivity has found a wide manifestation. Besides of his decis ive contribution to creation of Soviet thermonuclear weapons, in the area of his interests entered various problems of tehrmonuclaer energetics. In 1950 I.E. Tam m and A.D. Sakharov formulated the principles of magnetic thermoisolation of High temperature Plasmas, which put a beginning to controlled thermonuclear synthesis in the U.S.S.R. In 1951 A.D. Sakharov developed the theory of magnetic stationa ry thermonuclear reactor, which are closed to modern Tokamaks. Approximately in 1960-1961 He examined the possibility of thermonuclear synthesis on the basis of L aser compression of a spherical target. The idea of magnetic cumulation was forwrded by A.D. Sakharov as one of the ways of the obtaining of a controlled impulse thermonuclear reaction.

  14. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  15. Digital microfluidic assay for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Mok, Janine; Mindrinos, Michael N; Davis, Ronald W; Javanmard, Mehdi

    2014-02-11

    Global studies of the human proteome have revealed a plethora of putative protein biomarkers. However, their application for early disease detection remains at a standstill without suitable methods to realize their utility in the clinical setting. There thus continues to be tremendous interest in developing new technology for sensitive protein detection that is both low in cost and carries a small footprint to be able to be used at the point of care. The current gold standard method for protein biomarker detection is the ELISA, which measures protein abundance using bulky fluorescent scanners that lack portability. Here, we present a digital microfluidic platform for protein biomarker detection that is low in cost compared with standard optical detection methods, without any compromise in sensitivity. This platform furthermore makes use of simple electronics, enabling its translation into a portable handheld device, and has been developed in a manner that can easily be adapted to assay different types of proteomic biomarkers. We demonstrate its utility in quantifying not only protein abundance, but also activity. Interleukin-6 abundance could be assayed from concentrations as low as 50 pM (an order of magnitude lower than that detectable by a comparable laboratory designed ELISA) using less than 5 μL of sample, and Abelson tyrosine kinase activity was detectable in samples containing 100 pM of kinase. PMID:24449893

  16. Standardisation of the factor H autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rachael; Lindner, Susanne; Bordereau, Pauline; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Tak, Federico; Ngo, Stéphanie; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The screening of all atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) patients for factor H autoantibodies is best practice. However, there is no consensus assay for the reporting of factor H autoantibody titres. In this study, three European complement laboratories with expertise in the field of autoantibody testing address this by systematically evaluating several ELISA methods used for the detection of factor H autoantibodies. All methods tested adequately detect high titre samples. However, this study recommends the Paris method for the detection and reporting of factor H autoantibodies to be used when setting up a factor H autoantibody screen. The importance of individual sample background subtraction in these ELISA tests was established. The use of a relative or arbitrary unit index with a common positive and negative serum allowed for consistent comparison of findings from different test centres. Therefore, it is recommended that a standard arbitrary unit scale based on a titration curve from a common positive anti-serum be adopted to allow future establishment of the relative importance of particular titres of factor H autoantibodies in aHUS. Systematic assay for the presence of factor H autoantibodies in patients using the Paris method will provide the longitudinal analysis needed to fully establish the importance of factor H autoantibodies in disease. This will feed into additional research to clarify whether additional factors have a bearing on the phenotype/outcome of autoimmune aHUS. PMID:23891327

  17. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 μg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 μg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  18. Cellulase assays: Methods from empirical mathematical models

    SciTech Connect

    Adney, W.S.; Baker, J.O.; Himmel, M.E.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the assay of cellulose preparations by Sattler et al. [Biotech. Bioeng. 33, 1221-1234 (1989)] describe a relationship between extent of hydrolysis, reaction time, and enzyme concentration. This procedure permits the ranking of the effectiveness of different enyzmes and of different pretreatment methods. For this method, cellulose hydrolysis data collected from hyperbolic functions of substrate concentration versus cellulose enzyme concentration at various timed incubations are collected. A double reciprocal plot based on the relationship (Y/C{sub 6}){sup {minus}1}=(KC/{sub 0}/Y{sub max})[E]{sup {minus}1} + (Y{sub max}/C{sub 0}){sup {minus}1} where Y/C{sub 0} is the fraction of substrate hydrolyzed; [E] is given in FPU/g substrate initially added; and Y{sub max}/C{sub 0} is the where Y/C{sub 0} is the fraction of substrate hydrolyzed an an infinite enzyme concentration. The y-axis intercept in the double reciprocal plot, (Y{sub max}/C{sub 0}){sup {minus}1}, may be used to quantify the {open_quotes}quality{close_quotes} of the enzyme preparation. ideally, an enzyme should have a high Y{sub max} and a low value for KC{sub 0}/Y{sub max}. The application of these assay methods to the hydrolysis of both clean, microcrystallite cellulose (Sigmacell 50) and pretreated aspen wood metal will be presented.

  19. Assaying Environmental Nickel Toxicity Using Model Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D.; Huffnagle, Ian M.; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species. PMID:24116204

  20. A quantitative assay for intercellular aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neelamegham, S.; Zygourakis, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    In an earlier communication (Munn et al., J Immunol. Methods 166: 11-25, 1993), we presented the initial development of a quantitative assay for monitoring the rates of cellular aggregation based on digital image processing and video microscopy. This study describes some important enhancements and modifications to the procedure. A new index is introduced to characterize the three-dimensional morphology of the aggregates. This index is based on temporal changes in the projected area of the cells and cell aggregates during the course of the experiment. By drawing an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, we have also introduced a procedure to normalize for variations in cell seeding density among different experiments. In addition, the image analysis technique has been improved by introducing a background subtraction algorithm to remove illumination defects and an adaptive segmentation procedure. These improvements allowed us to completely automate the image analysis procedure, thus minimizing user intervention and improving the reproducibility of the measurements. The enhanced visual assay is evaluated using some recent results from our studies on homotypic lymphocyte aggregation.

  1. Rapid Multiple Immunoenzyme Assay of Mycotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Urusov, Alexandr E.; Zherdev, Anatoly V.; Petrakova, Alina V.; Sadykhov, Elchin G.; Koroleva, Olga V.; Dzantiev, Boris B.

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are low molecular weight fungal metabolites that pose a threat as toxic contaminants of food products, thereby necessitating their effective monitoring and control. Microplate ELISA can be used for this purpose, but this method is characteristically time consuming, with a duration extending to several hours. This report proposes a variant of the ELISA method for the detection and quantification of three mycotoxins, ochratoxin A, aflatoxin B1 and zearalenone, in the kinetic regime. The main requirement for the proposed kinetic protocol was to provide a rapid method that combined sensitivity and accuracy. The use of biotin with an extended spacer together with a streptavidin–polyperoxidase conjugate provided high signal levels, despite these interactions occurring under non-equilibrium conditions. Duration of the individual mycotoxin assays was 20 min, whereas the analysis of all three mycotoxins in parallel reached a maximum duration of 25 min. Recovery of at least 95% mycotoxins in water-organic extracts was shown. The developed assays were successfully validated using poultry processing products and corn samples spiked with known quantities of mycotoxins. The detection limits for aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A and zearalenone in these substances were 0.24, 1.2 and 3 ng/g, respectively. PMID:25633750

  2. Application of nondestructive assay techniques in Kazakstan

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Butler, G.; Collins, M.

    1997-11-01

    As Kazakstan has transitioned from being part of the Soviet Union to a nonweapons state (Treaty of Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons [NPT] signatory) under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspections, significant changes have been required. Some of these changes have occurred in nuclear material protection, control, and accounting at the four nuclear facility sites in the Republic of Kazakstan. Specifically, the Republic of Kazakstan has changed from relying primarily on a subset of physical protection methods to a graded safeguards approach using a balance of material control, material accounting, and physical protection. Once more intensive material control and accounting procedures and systems are in place, a necessary step is to supply the accounting systems with measured values of high quality. This need can be met with destructive and nondestructive methods. Material control systems can also use qualitative nondestructive assay information as input. This paper will discuss the nondestructive assay techniques and systems the US Department of Energy (DOE) is providing to Kazakstan under both DOE programs and the Cooperative Threat Reduction Act as part of the nuclear material control and accounting upgrades at four facilities in Kazakstan. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. C.

    1984-05-01

    A method of measuring binding assays is carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating.

  4. Microfluidic integration for automated targeted proteomic assays.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alex J; Lin, Robert K C; Peehl, Donna M; Herr, Amy E

    2012-04-17

    A dearth of protein isoform-based clinical diagnostics currently hinders advances in personalized medicine. A well-organized protein biomarker validation process that includes facile measurement of protein isoforms would accelerate development of effective protein-based diagnostics. Toward scalable protein isoform analysis, we introduce a microfluidic "single-channel, multistage" immunoblotting strategy. The multistep assay performs all immunoblotting steps: separation, immobilization of resolved proteins, antibody probing of immobilized proteins, and all interim wash steps. Programmable, low-dispersion electrophoretic transport obviates the need for pumps and valves. A three-dimensional bulk photoreactive hydrogel eliminates manual blotting. In addition to simplified operation and interfacing, directed electrophoretic transport through our 3D nanoporous reactive hydrogel yields superior performance over the state-of-the-art in enhanced capture efficiency (on par with membrane electroblotting) and sparing consumption of reagents (ca. 1 ng antibody), as supported by empirical and by scaling analyses. We apply our fully integrated microfluidic assay to protein measurements of endogenous prostate specific antigen isoforms in (i) minimally processed human prostate cancer cell lysate (1.1 pg limit of detection) and (ii) crude sera from metastatic prostate cancer patients. The single-instrument functionality establishes a scalable microfluidic framework for high-throughput targeted proteomics, as is relevant to personalized medicine through robust protein biomarker verification, systematic characterization of new antibody probes for functional proteomics, and, more broadly, to characterization of human biospecimen repositories. PMID:22474344

  5. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (/sup 47/Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO/sub 3/. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the /sup 47/Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison.

  6. Survey of assay methods of antivenins

    PubMed Central

    Grasset, E.

    1957-01-01

    In view of the multiplicity of methods used at present for the preparation and assay of antivenins and as a first step towards the international standardization of antivenins, it seemed advisable to make a comparative study of the methods used in the institutes specializing in the production of these sera. With this end in view, the author circulated to the serologists of institutes concerned a detailed questionnaire on the assay methods used for the determination of the neutralization potency of the various types of antivenins prepared under their direction. The information supplied by these institutes is reproduced, in condensed form, in this report and is analysed by the author. The author emphasizes that the great variety in the constitution of venoms necessitates: (1) the use of monovalent standard sera against homologous “test” venoms of high activity and stability; and (2) the establishment, on a regional basis, of standard antivenins corresponding to groups of snakes characterized by venoms of common or closely related antigenic constitution. PMID:13413648

  7. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  8. Two light, sweet Indonesian crudes assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-10-31

    Two crudes from Southeast Asia have been assayed. Belida, from the South Natuna Sea, is a light, sweet crude, with an API gravity of 45.1 [degree] and almost no sulfur (0.02 wt %). Hydra, from the Zone of Cooperation between Indonesia and Australia in the Timor Sea, has a gravity of 37.5 API and a sulfur content of 0.08 wt%. Belida operator Conoco Indonesia Ltd. began phase-two oil flow from a directional development well last October. Production from the field was 84,665 b/d on Oct. 21, 1993, and was expected to reach 90,000 b/d by the end of that month. The operator expected a peak of 100,00 b/d some time this year. The second crude, Hydra, is from the first well drilled in the Zone of Cooperation between Indonesia and Australia. Marathon Oil Co. spudded the first Hydra well in block ZOCA 9-11 in late 1992. As of early last year, five operating groups were expected to drill seven wells in second-half 1993. And a total of 26 wells has been committed for the Zone of Cooperation between 1995 and 1997, making the area a hotbed of exploration. Although the Journal has acquired no additional information on the Hydra program since that time, the assay may provided an idea of the quality of the crudes from that area.

  9. High Throughput Danio Rerio Energy Expenditure Assay.

    PubMed

    Williams, Savannah Y; Renquist, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are an important model organism with inherent advantages that have the potential to make zebrafish a widely applied model for the study of energy homeostasis and obesity. The small size of zebrafish allows for assays on embryos to be conducted in a 96- or 384-well plate format, Morpholino and CRISPR based technologies promote ease of genetic manipulation, and drug treatment by bath application is viable. Moreover, zebrafish are ideal for forward genetic screens allowing for novel gene discovery. Given the relative novelty of zebrafish as a model for obesity, it is necessary to develop tools that fully exploit these benefits. Herein, we describe a method to measure energy expenditure in thousands of embryonic zebrafish simultaneously. We have developed a whole animal microplate platform in which we use 96-well plates to isolate individual fish and we assess cumulative NADH2 production using the commercially available cell culture viability reagent alamarBlue. In poikilotherms the relationship between NADH2 production and energy expenditure is tightly linked. This energy expenditure assay creates the potential to rapidly screen pharmacological or genetic manipulations that directly alter energy expenditure or alter the response to an applied drug (e.g. insulin sensitizers). PMID:26863590

  10. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile. PMID:20023265

  11. Fabrication of comb interdigitated electrodes array (IDA) for a microbead-based electrochemical assay system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyung; Hesketh, Peter J; Li, Changming; Thomas, Jennifer H; Halsall, H Brian; Heineman, William R

    2004-11-01

    This research is directed towards developing a more sensitive and rapid electrochemical sensor for enzyme labeled immunoassays by coupling redox cycling at interdigitated electrode arrays (IDA) with the enzyme label beta-galactosidase. Coplanar and comb IDA electrodes with a 2.4 microm gap were fabricated and their redox cycling currents were measured. ANSYS was used to model steady state currents for electrodes with different geometries. Comb IDA electrodes enhanced the signal about three times more than the coplanar IDAs, which agreed with the results of the simulation. Magnetic microbead-based enzyme assay, as a typical example of biochemical detection, was done using the comb and coplanar IDAs. The enzymes could be placed close to the sensing electrodes (approximately 10 microm for the comb IDAs) and detection took less than 1 min with a limit of detection of 70 amol of beta-galactosidase. We conclude that faster and more sensitive assays can be achieved with the comb IDA. PMID:15522606

  12. Systems, devices, and methods for agglutination assays using sedimentation

    DOEpatents

    Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.

    2016-01-26

    Embodiments of the present invention include methods for conducting agglutination assays using sedimentation. Aggregates may be exposed to sedimentation forces and travel through a density medium to a detection area. Microfluidic devices, such as microfluidic disks, are described for conducting the agglutination assays, as are systems for conducting the assays.

  13. A Different Approach to Validating Screening Assays for Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: There continues to be many efforts around the world to develop assays that are shorter than the traditional embryofetal developmental toxicity assay, or use fewer or no mammals, or use less compound, or have all three attributes. Each assay developer needs to test th...

  14. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  15. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    DOEpatents

    Skopek, Thomas R.; Liber, Howard L.; Penman, Bruce W.; Thilly, William G.; Hoppe, IV, Henry

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  16. Loess magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Friedrich; Evans, Michael E.

    Loess is a wind-blown Quaternary silt deposit that blankets vast tracts of land and in places reaches thicknesses in excess of 300 m. Over the last decade it has emerged that certain loess sections have recorded the polarity history of the geomagnetic field and now provide essentially continuous magnetostratigraphic archives covering the last 2-3 m.y. Indeed, it is the chronology provided by the magnetic polarity signature itself that was largely responsible for establishing the timing of the initiation of loess accumulation, particularly in the celebrated Chinese loess plateau, where a starting date close to the Gauss-Matuyama chron boundary (2.6 Ma) is now firmly established. This coincides with a widely documented global climatic shift and accelerated uplift of the Tibetan planteau. Many loess sections contain fossil soils (paleosols) that bear witness to warmer and wetter climatic conditions corresponding to interglacial periods in contrast to the cold, arid environments in which pristine loess accumulated and which correspond to glacial intervals. The resulting sequences of alternating loess and paleosols also manifest themselves magnetically, in this case in terms of susceptibility changes, entirely distinct from the remanence characteristics, which encode the geomagnetic polarity. The susceptibility time series obtained from localities in Alaska and China correlate remarkably well with the oceanic oxygen isotope signal and yield spectral power estimates in agreement with those predicted by the astronomical (Milankovitch) theory of ice ages. Comparisons of susceptibility patterns with corresponding profiles of 10Be concentration in loess allows major changes in rainfall to be estimated. In China, for example data spanning the last 130 kyr (corresponding to oxygen isotope stages 1-5) indicate that paleoprecipitation was almost halved (from ≃540 to ≃310 mm yr-1) as the warm interglacial during which paleosol S1 formed gave way to the following glacial

  17. Sensitive gluten determination in gluten-free foods by an electrochemical aptamer-based assay.

    PubMed

    Amaya-González, Sonia; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Lobo-Castañón, María Jesús

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme immunoassays are currently the methods of choice for gluten control in foods labelled as gluten free, providing a mechanism for assessing food safety for consumption by coeliac and other allergic patients. However, their limitations, many of them associated to the reactivity of the different antibodies used and their degree of specificity, have prevented the establishment of a standardised method of analysis. We explore new methods for quantitatively determining gluten content in foods based on the use of two recently described aptamers, raised against a 33-mer peptide recognised as the immunodominant fragment from α2-gliadin. The assays use the target peptide immobilised onto streptavidin-coated magnetic beads in combination with a limited amount of biotin-aptamer in a competitive format, followed by streptavidin-peroxidase labelling of the aptamer that remains bound to the magnetic beads. The enzyme activity onto the beads, measured by chronoamperometry in disposable screen-printed electrodes, is inversely related to the target concentration in the test solution. We find that while the assay using the aptamer with the highest affinity towards the target (Gli 4) achieves low detection limits (~0.5 ppm) and excellent analytical performance, when challenged in samples containing the intact protein, gliadin, it fails in detecting the peptide in solution. This problem is circumvented by employing another aptamer (Gli 1), the most abundant one in the SELEX pool, as a receptor. The proposed assays allow the convenient detection of the allergen in different kinds of food samples, including heat-treated and hydrolysed ones. The obtained results correlate with those of commercially available antibody-based assays, providing an alternative for ensuring the safety and quality of nominally gluten-free foods. Graphical Abstract Electrochemical magnetoassay for gluten determination using biotin-aptamers as receptors. PMID:26048055

  18. Human tear analysis with miniaturized multiplex cytokine assay on “wall-less” 96-well plate

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Joanne; Tong, Louis; Kim, Namyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tears are a particularly limited body fluid and commonly used in the diagnosis of patients who have ocular diseases. A popular method for analysis of ocular inflammation in tears uses Luminex® bead multiplex technology to generate valuable multiple cytokine profile outputs with 25–50 µl tear sample volume. We propose a method for measuring tear cytokines with 5 μl tear sample volume and 80% reduced Luminex reagents compared to previous protocols. Methods Using human tears pooled from 1,000 participants, the DA-Bead-based method running at 5–20 µl volume, using manual pipetting, in conjunction with a magnetic Luminex cytokine (four-plex) panel assay in a 96-well format was performed and validated for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Results Upon use of the DA-Bead method at the 5 μl volume with cytokine standards, the concentrations of each of the four cytokines were found to be linear over a range of 3.5–4 log pg/ml with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ≤5%, inter-assay %CV ≤10%, and accuracy within the 70–130% range. Upon use of a 5 µl healthy pooled tear sample, cytokine concentrations were detected with a precision intra-assay %CV ˂ 20% for IL-6, IFN-γ, or TNF-α or 30.37% with IL-1β. The inter-assay %CV with tears was ≤20.84% for all cytokines. Tear volumes run at 5 μl on DA-Bead produced a similar cytokine expression profile at a 1-month interval and were highly correlated with the larger 10 μl–based tear sample volume cytokine profile with R2 = 0.98. Conclusions DA-Bead assay is highly sensitive and reproducible and has a performance profile that is potentially suitable for use in standard clinical scenarios. Considering the use of as little as 5 µl of assay beads and 5 µl sample, this is also likely to reduce the assay cost significantly and ease diagnosis of patients with ocular diseases. PMID:26539027

  19. Some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslin, N.; Langner, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.; Miller, M.C.; Russo, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting of plutonium metal, oxide, mixed oxide, and scrap and waste. The target values are based in part on past user experience and in part on the estimated results from new coincidence counting techniques that are under development. The paper summarizes assay error sources and the new coincidence techniques, and recommends the technique that is likely to yield the lowest assay uncertainty for a given material type. These target assay uncertainties are intended to be useful for NDA instrument selection and assay variance propagation studies for both new and existing facilities. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles as nanosurgeons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Baiju G.; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have shown promise in the fields of targeted drug delivery, hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cancer therapy. The ability of magnetic nanoparticles to undergo surface modification and the effect of external magnetic field in the dynamics of their movement make them an excellent nanoplatform for cancer destruction. Surgical removal of cancerous or unwanted cells selectively from the interior of an organ or tissue without any collateral damage is a serious problem due to the highly infiltrative nature of cancer. To address this problem in surgery, we have developed a nanosurgeon for the selective removal of target cells using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles controlled by an externally applied three-dimensional rotational magnetic field. With the help of the nanosurgeon, we were able to perform surgical actions on target cells in in vitro studies. LDH and intracellular calcium release assay confirmed the death of cancer cells due to the action of the nanosurgeon which in turn nullifies the possibility of proliferation by the removed cells. The nanosurgeon will be a useful tool in the medical field for selective surgery and cell manipulation studies. Additionally, this system could be upgraded for the selective removal of complex cancers from diverse tissues by incorporating various target specific ligands on magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Jansson, Peter

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  2. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  3. Assay of Endocannabinoid Oxidation by Cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Kudalkar, Shalley N; Kingsley, Philip J; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonylethanolamide (AEA), are endogenous ligands for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and are implicated in a wide array of physiological processes. These neutral arachidonic acid (AA) derivatives have been identified as efficient substrates for the second isoform of the cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2). A diverse family of prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) and prostaglandin ethanolamides (PG-EAs) is generated by the action of COX-2 (and downstream prostaglandin synthases) on 2-AG and AEA. As the biological importance of the endocannabinoid system becomes more apparent, there is a tremendous need for robust, sensitive, and efficient analytical methodology for the endocannabinoids and their metabolites. In this chapter, we describe methodology suitable for carrying out oxygenation of endocannabinoids by COX-2, and analysis of products of endocannabinoid oxygenation by COX-2 and of endocannabinoids themselves from in vitro and cell assays. PMID:27245906

  4. Low Background Assay Results for LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey; Thomas, Keenan; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration; Berkeley Low Background Facility Team

    2016-03-01

    The next generation dark matter experiment LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) requires careful control of intrinsic radioactivity in all critical detector components in order to reach its unprecedented target sensitivity to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs): 2 ×10-48 cm2 at 50 GeV/c2. Appropriate material selection is essential to meeting this goal, and an extensive campaign of low background screening is currently being carried out using assay devices at the Sanford Underground Research Facility and the Boulby Underground Laboratory. We will present results from this work, including measurements for the Ti cryostat, PMT bases, PMT raw materials, PTFE, and other components. This work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award Number DE-AC02-05CH11231, and is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 1106400.

  5. A miniaturized fibrinolytic assay for plasminogen activators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Damron, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a micro-clot lysis assay (MCLA) for evaluating fibrinolytic activity of plasminogen activators (PA). Fibrin clots were formed in wells of microtiter plates. Lysis of the clots by PA, indicated by change in turbidity (optical density, OD), was monitored with a microplate reader at five minutes intervals. Log-log plots of PA dilution versus endpoint, the time at which the OD value was halfway between the maximum and minimum value for each well, were linear over a broad range of PA concentrations (2-200 International units/ml). The MCLA is a modification and miniaturization of well established fibrinolytic methods. The significant practical advantages of the MCLA are that it is a simple, relatively sensitive, non-radioactive, quantitative, kinetic, fibrinolytic micro-technique which can be automated.

  6. Analyte detection using an active assay

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor; Bailey, Charles L.; Evanskey, Melissa R.

    2010-11-02

    Analytes using an active assay may be detected by introducing an analyte solution containing a plurality of analytes to a lacquered membrane. The lacquered membrane may be a membrane having at least one surface treated with a layer of polymers. The lacquered membrane may be semi-permeable to nonanalytes. The layer of polymers may include cross-linked polymers. A plurality of probe molecules may be arrayed and immobilized on the lacquered membrane. An external force may be applied to the analyte solution to move the analytes towards the lacquered membrane. Movement may cause some or all of the analytes to bind to the lacquered membrane. In cases where probe molecules are presented, some or all of the analytes may bind to probe molecules. The direction of the external force may be reversed to remove unbound or weakly bound analytes. Bound analytes may be detected using known detection types.

  7. Rapid Automated Sample Preparation for Biological Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Shusteff, M

    2011-03-04

    Our technology utilizes acoustic, thermal, and electric fields to separate out contaminants such as debris or pollen from environmental samples, lyse open cells, and extract the DNA from the lysate. The objective of the project is to optimize the system described for a forensic sample, and demonstrate its performance for integration with downstream assay platforms (e.g. MIT-LL's ANDE). We intend to increase the quantity of DNA recovered from the sample beyond the current {approx}80% achieved using solid phase extraction methods. Task 1: Develop and test an acoustic filter for cell extraction. Task 2: Develop and test lysis chip. Task 3: Develop and test DNA extraction chip. All chips have been fabricated based on the designs laid out in last month's report.

  8. Assay of DAGLα/β Activity.

    PubMed

    Bisogno, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) exerts its physiological action by binding to and functionally activating type-1 (CB1) and type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors. It is thought to be produced through the action of sn-1 selective diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) that catalyzes 2-AG biosynthesis from sn-2-arachidonate-containing diacylglycerols. Since 2-AG biosynthetic enzymes have been identified only recently, little information on methodological approaches for measuring DAGL activity is as yet available. Here, a highly sensitive radiometric assay to measure DAGL activity by using 1-oleoyl[1-(14)C]-2-arachidonoylglycerol as the substrate is reported. All the steps needed to perform lipid extraction, fractionation by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and quantification of radiolabeled [(14)C]-oleic acid via scintillation counting are described in detail. PMID:27245901

  9. Indicator displacement assays inside live cells.

    PubMed

    Norouzy, Amir; Azizi, Zahra; Nau, Werner M

    2015-01-12

    The macrocycle p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene (CX4) and the fluorescent dye lucigenin (LCG) form a stable host-guest complex, in which the dye fluorescence is quenched. Incubation of live V79 and CHO cells with the CX4/LCG chemosensing ensemble resulted in its spontaneous uptake. Subsequent addition of choline, acetylcholine, or protamine, which have a high affinity for CX4 and are capable of entering cells, resulted in a fluorescence switch-on response. This can be traced to the displacement of LCG from CX4 by the analytes. The results establish the principal functionality of indicator displacement assays with synthetic receptors for the detection of the uptake of bioorganic analytes by live cells. PMID:25430503

  10. Mutagenesis assays of human amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, R.B.; Milne, K.L.; Warbuton, D.; McClamrock, H.D.; Buchanan, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts of amniocentesis samples from 144 women were tested for the presence of mutagenic substances using tester strain TA1538 in the Ames Salmonella/mammalian-microsome mutagenicity test. Because the volume of amniotic fluid in these samples was limited (generally less than 10 ml), the authors investigated modifications of this mutagenesis assay that could increase its ability to detect effects from small quantities of test material. Using mutagenicity in samples of urine from smokers as a model, it appeared that improved ability to detect small amounts of mutagen could be obtained by reducing volumes of media and reagents while keeping the amount of test sample constant. Tests of amniotic fluid extracts by this modified procedure showed small increases in revertants, about 50% above dimethylsulfoxide solvent control values. The increases suggest the presence of small amounts of mutagenic material in many of the amniotic fluid samples. At the doses employed, mutagenic activity in these samples was not associated with maternal smoking.

  11. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  12. Universal fieldable assay with unassisted visual detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelyapov, Nicolas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A universal detection system based on allosteric aptamers, signal amplification cascade, and eye-detectable phrase transition. A broadly applicable homogeneous detection system is provided. It utilizes components of the blood coagulation cascade in the presence of polystyrene microspheres (MS) as a signal amplifier. Russell's viper venom factor X activator (RVV-X) triggers the cascade, which results in an eye-visible phase transition--precipitation of MS bound to clotted fibrin. An allosteric RNA aptamer, RNA132, with affinity for RVV-X and human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.sub.165) was created. RNA132 inhibits enzymatic activity of RVV-X. The effector molecule, VEGF.sub.165, reverses the inhibitory activity of RNA132 on RVV-X and restores its enzymatic activity, thus triggering the cascade and enabling the phase transition. Similar results were obtained for another allosteric aptamer modulated by a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The assay is instrumentation-free for both processing and readout.

  13. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  14. Ferroelectricity in spiral magnets.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Maxim

    2006-02-17

    It was recently observed that the ferroelectrics showing the strongest sensitivity to an applied magnetic field are spiral magnets. We present a phenomenological theory of inhomogeneous ferroelectric magnets, which describes their thermodynamics and magnetic field behavior, e.g., dielectric susceptibility anomalies at magnetic transitions and sudden flops of electric polarization in an applied magnetic field. We show that electric polarization can also be induced at domain walls and that magnetic vortices carry electric charge. PMID:16606047

  15. Quality Assurance Specifications for Planetary Protection Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Amy

    As the European Space Agency planetary protection (PP) activities move forward to support the ExoMars and other planetary missions, it will become necessary to increase staffing of labo-ratories that provide analyses for these programs. Standardization of procedures, a comprehen-sive quality assurance program, and unilateral training of personnel will be necessary to ensure that the planetary protection goals and schedules are met. The PP Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QAQC) program is designed to regulate and monitor procedures performed by labora-tory personnel to ensure that all work meets data quality objectives through the assembly and launch process. Because personnel time is at a premium and sampling schedules are often de-pendent on engineering schedules, it is necessary to have flexible staffing to support all sampling requirements. The most productive approach to having a competent and flexible work force is to establish well defined laboratory procedures and training programs that clearly address the needs of the program and the work force. The quality assurance specification for planetary protection assays has to ensure that labora-tories and associated personnel can demonstrate the competence to perform assays according to the applicable standard AD4. Detailed subjects included in the presentation are as follows: • field and laboratory control criteria • data reporting • personnel training requirements and certification • laboratory audit criteria. Based upon RD2 for primary and secondary validation and RD3 for data quality objectives, the QAQC will provide traceable quality assurance safeguards by providing structured laboratory requirements for guidelines and oversight including training and technical updates, standardized documentation, standardized QA/QC checks, data review and data archiving.

  16. Validation of a von Willebrand factor antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and newly developed collagen-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Hilary; Wood, Darren

    2008-01-01

    No single test is comprehensive enough to detect all of the variants of von Willebrand Disease (VWD), making determination of both concentration and function of von Willebrand Factor (VWF) important for an accurate diagnosis. The objective of the study was to validate a newly developed VWF collagen binding assay (VWF:CB) and VWF antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed at the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC VWF:Ag). Linearity, sensitivity, and coefficients of variation were determined. The Asserachrom VWF:Ag ELISA was used as the reference assay for this study. Concordance correlation and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate agreement between both VWF:Ag assays. The VWF:CB accuracy was assessed by degree of association with the VWF:Ag assays, and the VWF:Ag to VWF:CB ratio. All assays were assessed for their ability to distinguish between VWD negative and VWD positive patients. Linearity, intra-assay coefficients of variation, and inter-assay coefficients of variation were acceptable for both the newly developed VWF:CB (R2 = 0.97, average CV = 4.4, and 15, respectively) and OVC VWF:Ag assays (R2 = 0.96, average CV = 7.9, and 5.9, respectively). Agreement between the OVC VWF:Ag assay and reference assay was excellent (ρc = 0.89), and although differences between assay results precluded interchangeable use of the assays, both successfully distinguished VWD positive and VWD negative dogs (P < 0.0001). The VWF:CB showed a strong association with both VWF:Ag assays (R2 = 0.86, 0.82) and VWF:Ag to VWF:CB ratios (≤ 1) were as expected. The excellent performance of both assays in this validation study confirm their reliability and potential for clinical application. PMID:19086374

  17. A continuous spectrophotometric assay and nonlinear kinetic analysis of methionine γ-lyase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Foo, Timothy C; Terentis, Andrew C; Venkatachalam, Kallidaikurichi V

    2016-08-15

    In this article, we present a new, easy-to-implement assay for methionine γ-lyase (MGL)-catalyzed γ-elimination reactions of l-methionine and its analogues that produce α-ketobutyrate (α-KB) as product. The assay employs ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry to continuously monitor the rate of formation of α-KB by its absorbance at 315 nm. We also employ a nonlinear data analysis method that obviates the need for an "initial slope" determination, which can introduce errors when the progress curves are nonlinear. The spectrophotometric assay is validated through product analysis by (1)H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), which showed that under the conditions of study l-methionine (l-met) and l-methionine sulfone (l-met sulfone) substrates were converted to α-KB product with greater than 99% yield. Using this assay method, we determined for the first time the Michaelis-Menten parameters for a recombinant form of MGL from Porphyromonas gingivalis, obtaining respective kcat and Km values of 328 ± 8 min(-1) and 1.2 ± 0.1 mM for l-met γ-elimination and 2048 ± 59 min(-1) and 38 ± 2 mM for l-met sulfone γ-elimination reactions. We envisage that this assay method will be useful for determining the activity of MGL γ-elimination reactions that produce α-KB as the end product. PMID:27235171

  18. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  19. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  20. Evaluation of lot-to-lot repeatability and effect of assay media choice in the recombinant Factor C assay.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jennifer Helen; Alwis, K Udeni; Sordillo, Joanne E; Kalluri, Kesava Srinivas; Milton, Donald Kirby

    2011-06-01

    Measurement of environmental endotoxin exposures is complicated by variability encountered using current biological assay methods arising in part from lot-to-lot variability of the Limulus-amebocyte lysate (LAL) reagents. Therefore, we investigated the lot-to-lot repeatability of commercially available recombinant Factor C (rFC) kits as an alternative to LAL. Specifically, we compared endotoxin estimates obtained from rFC assay of twenty indoor dust samples, using four different extraction and assay media, to endotoxin estimates previously obtained by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay and amounts of 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OHFA) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using gas-chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). We found that lot-to-lot variability of the rFC assay kits does not significantly alter endotoxin estimates in house dust samples when performed using three of the four assay media tested and that choice of assay media significantly altered endotoxin estimates obtained by rFC assay of house dust samples. Our findings demonstrate lot-to-lot reproducibility of rFC assay of environmental samples and suggest that use of rFC assay performed with Tris buffer or water as the extraction and assay medium for measurement of endotoxin in dust samples may be a suitable choice for developing a standardized methodology. PMID:21552635

  1. The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay as an indicator of cytotoxicity for the in vitro comet assay.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Vesely, Alexandra; Schütz, Petra; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Bausinger, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The low molecular weight DNA diffusion assay (LMW assay) has been recommended as a measure for cytotoxicity for the in vivo comet assay. To better understand the relationship between effects in the LMW assay, DNA migration in the comet assay and effects in established cytotoxicity tests, we performed in vitro experiments with cultured human cell lines (TK6, A549) and comparatively investigated five test substances (methyl methanesulfonate, (±)-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, sodium dodecyl sulphate, menthol and sodium arsenite). We measured DNA migration (tail intensity) in the comet assay and the frequency of 'hedgehogs' (cells with almost all DNA in the tail), DNA diffusion in the LMW assay, cell viability (trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide staining) and inhibition of proliferation (relative cell counts). Our in vitro experiments indicate that effects in the LMW assay occur independently from DNA effects in the comet assay and are not related to the occurrence of hedgehogs. Results from the LMW assay are in good agreement with results from viability assays and seem to allow discriminating genotoxic from non-genotoxic substances when appropriate preparation times are considered. Measurements of cytotoxicity by these methods only at an early preparation time after exposure to genotoxic substances may lead to erroneous results. PMID:24803666

  2. Thin Magnetically Soft Wires for Magnetic Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Valentina; Ipatov, Mihail; Zhukov, Arcady

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in technology involving magnetic materials require development of novel advanced magnetic materials with improved magnetic and magneto-transport properties and with reduced dimensionality. Therefore magnetic materials with outstanding magnetic characteristics and reduced dimensionality have recently gained much attention. Among these magnetic materials a family of thin wires with reduced geometrical dimensions (of order of 1–30 μm in diameter) have gained importance within the last few years. These thin wires combine excellent soft magnetic properties (with coercivities up to 4 A/m) with attractive magneto-transport properties (Giant Magneto-impedance effect, GMI, Giant Magneto-resistance effect, GMR) and an unusual re-magnetization process in positive magnetostriction compositions exhibiting quite fast domain wall propagation. In this paper we overview the magnetic and magneto-transport properties of these microwires that make them suitable for microsensor applications. PMID:22291562

  3. Dynamic manipulation of magnetic contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Congxian; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Seo, Chi Hyung; Hu, Xiaoge; Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used extensively ex vivo for cellular and molecular separations. We recently showed that a coupled nanoparticle combining a superparamagnetic core with a thin, isolated gold shell providing strong absorption in the near infrared can be used for magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging (mmPA), a new technique in which magnetic manipulation of the particle during PA imaging greatly enhances molecular contrast specificity. This particle can also be biologically targeted for in vivo applications, where mmPA imaging provides a spatially localized readout of magnetic manipulations. As an initial test of potential in vivo molecular assays and integrated molecular therapeutics using magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles, we present experiments demonstrating PA readout of trapped magnetic particles in a flow field. An aqueous solution containing a concentration of 0.05-mg/ml 10-μM superparamagnetic iron oxide particles flowed in a 1.65-mm diameter Zeus PTFE (Teflon) sublite wall tubing at three velocities of 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0-mm/s. Opposed permanent magnets separated by 40-mm were positioned on both sides of the tube. As expected, the targeted objects can be magnetically captured and accumulated locally. By translating the magnets, a dynamic magnetic field (0.1-0.3-T) was alternately generated on the side of the tube closest to one of the magnets and created a synchronous PA motion from accumulated targeted objects. This synchronized motion can be used to differentiate the stationary background or other PA sources moving asynchronously with magnetic manipulations (e.g., moving blood) from targeted cells moving synchronously with the magnetic field. This technology can potentially provide sensitive molecular assays of cellular targets travelling in the vasculature (e.g., metastatic tumor cells).

  4. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  5. Magnet innovations for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs.

  6. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  7. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  8. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  9. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other. PMID:24849678

  10. Simple Bulk Readout of Digital Nucleic Acid Quantification Assays.

    PubMed

    Morinishi, Leanna S; Blainey, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Digital assays are powerful methods that enable detection of rare cells and counting of individual nucleic acid molecules. However, digital assays are still not routinely applied, due to the cost and specific equipment associated with commercially available methods. Here we present a simplified method for readout of digital droplet assays using a conventional real-time PCR instrument to measure bulk fluorescence of droplet-based digital assays. We characterize the performance of the bulk readout assay using synthetic droplet mixtures and a droplet digital multiple displacement amplification (MDA) assay. Quantitative MDA particularly benefits from a digital reaction format, but our new method applies to any digital assay. For established digital assay protocols such as digital PCR, this method serves to speed up and simplify assay readout. Our bulk readout methodology brings the advantages of partitioned assays without the need for specialized readout instrumentation. The principal limitations of the bulk readout methodology are reduced dynamic range compared with droplet-counting platforms and the need for a standard sample, although the requirements for this standard are less demanding than for a conventional real-time experiment. Quantitative whole genome amplification (WGA) is used to test for contaminants in WGA reactions and is the most sensitive way to detect the presence of DNA fragments with unknown sequences, giving the method great promise in diverse application areas including pharmaceutical quality control and astrobiology. PMID:26436576

  11. A two-magnet strategy for improved mixing and capture from biofluids.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Thomas F; Ryskoski, Hayley B; Doyle, Andrew B; Haselton, Frederick R

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic beads are a popular method for concentrating biomolecules from solution and have been more recently used in multistep pre-arrayed microfluidic cartridges. Typical processing strategies rely on a single magnet, resulting in a tight cluster of beads and requiring long incubation times to achieve high capture efficiencies, especially in highly viscous patient samples. This report describes a two-magnet strategy to improve the interaction of the bead surface with the surrounding fluid inside of a pre-arrayed, self-contained assay-in-a-tube. In the two-magnet system, target biomarker capture occurs at a rate three times faster than the single-magnet system. In clinically relevant biomatrices, we find a 2.5-fold improvement in biomarker capture at lower sample viscosities with the two-magnet system. In addition, we observe a 20% increase in the amount of protein captured at high viscosity for the two-magnet configuration relative to the single magnet approach. The two-magnet approach offers a means to achieve higher biomolecule extraction yields and shorter assay times in magnetic capture assays and in self-contained processor designs. PMID:27158286

  12. Comparison of Five Assays for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Kimberle C.; Dickenson, Roberta A.; Wu, Fongman; Andrea, Sarah B.

    2011-01-01

    Performance characteristics of five assays for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin were compared using fresh stool samples from patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Assays were performed simultaneously and according to the manufacturers' instructions. Patients were included in the study if they exhibited clinical symptoms consistent with CDI. Nonmolecular assays included glutamate dehydrogenase antigen tests, with positive findings followed by the Premier Toxin A and B Enzyme Immunoassay (GDH/EIA), and the C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test. Molecular assays (PCR) included the BD GeneOhm Cdiff Assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, and the ProGastro Cd assay. Specimens were considered true positive if results were positive in two or more assays. For each method, the Youden index was calculated and cost-effectiveness was analyzed. Of 81 patients evaluated, 26 (32.1%) were positive for CDI. Sensitivity of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay, the Xpert C. difficile test, the ProGastro Cd assay, C. Diff Quik Chek Complete test, and two-step GDH/EIA was 96.2%, 96.2%, 88.5%, 61.5%, and 42.3%, respectively. Specificity of the Xpert C. difficile test was 96.4%, and for the other four assays was 100%. Compared with nonmolecular methods, molecular methods detected 34.7% more positive specimens. Assessment of performance characteristics and cost-effectiveness demonstrated that the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay yielded the best results. While costly, the Xpert C. difficile test required limited processing and yielded rapid results. Because of discordant results, specimen processing, and extraction equipment requirements, the ProGastro Cd assay was the least favored molecular assay. The GDH/EIA method lacked sufficient sensitivity to be recommended. PMID:21704273

  13. Magnetic liposomes for colorectal cancer cells therapy by high-frequency magnetic field treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiansyah, Andri; Huang, Li-Ying; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Tsai, Sung-Chen; Yang, Chih-Yung; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Zou, Hui-Ming; Lian, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed the cancer treatment through the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic liposomes. The citric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CAMNP, ca. 10 nm) and doxorubicin were encapsulated into the liposome (HSPC/DSPE/cholesterol = 12.5:1:8.25) by rotary evaporation and ultrasonication process. The resultant magnetic liposomes ( ca. 90 to 130 nm) were subject to characterization including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence microscope. In vitro cytotoxicity of the drug carrier platform was investigated through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using L-929 cells, as the mammalian cell model. In vitro cytotoxicity and hyperthermia (inductive heating) studies were evaluated against colorectal cancer (CT-26 cells) with high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) exposure. MTT assay revealed that these drug carriers exhibited no cytotoxicity against L-929 cells, suggesting excellent biocompatibility. When the magnetic liposomes with 1 μM doxorubicin was used to treat CT-26 cells in combination with HFMF exposure, approximately 56% cells were killed and found to be more effective than either hyperthermia or chemotherapy treatment individually. Therefore, these results show that the synergistic effects between chemotherapy (drug-controlled release) and hyperthermia increase the capability to kill cancer cells.

  14. Magnetic liposomes for colorectal cancer cells therapy by high-frequency magnetic field treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed the cancer treatment through the combination of chemotherapy and thermotherapy using doxorubicin-loaded magnetic liposomes. The citric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CAMNP, ca. 10 nm) and doxorubicin were encapsulated into the liposome (HSPC/DSPE/cholesterol = 12.5:1:8.25) by rotary evaporation and ultrasonication process. The resultant magnetic liposomes (ca. 90 to 130 nm) were subject to characterization including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence microscope. In vitro cytotoxicity of the drug carrier platform was investigated through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay using L-929 cells, as the mammalian cell model. In vitro cytotoxicity and hyperthermia (inductive heating) studies were evaluated against colorectal cancer (CT-26 cells) with high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF) exposure. MTT assay revealed that these drug carriers exhibited no cytotoxicity against L-929 cells, suggesting excellent biocompatibility. When the magnetic liposomes with 1 μM doxorubicin was used to treat CT-26 cells in combination with HFMF exposure, approximately 56% cells were killed and found to be more effective than either hyperthermia or chemotherapy treatment individually. Therefore, these results show that the synergistic effects between chemotherapy (drug-controlled release) and hyperthermia increase the capability to kill cancer cells. PMID:25246875

  15. A novel microculture kinetic assay (MiCK assay) for malignant cell growth and chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, V D

    1994-01-01

    The THERMOmax microplate reader was adapted for monitoring the growth kinetics of human leukaemic OCI/AML-2 and mouse tumour J-774.1 cell lines in continuous culture. Fluid evaporation from wells, CO2 escape and contamination were prevented by hermetic sealing of the microcultures in wells of a 96-well microplate, thus enabling the cells to grow exponentially for 72 h under the conditions of the incubated microplate reader. For both OCI/AML-2 cells, which grow in suspension, and adherent J-774.1 cells, a linear correlation was demonstrated between the number of unstained cells seeded in a given microplate well and the optical density (OD) of that well. Therefore, the OD/time curve of the culture could be deemed to be its growth curve. By the use of the linear fit equation, the actual number of the cells in the wells was computable at any time point of the assay. In the chemosensitivity test, an inhibitory effect of ARA-C on the growth of the cells could be estimated by viewing of the growth curves plotted on the screen. The maximum kinetic rates (Vmax) of the curves in the control and the ARA-C-treated wells were compared, yielding a growth inhibition index (GII). Comparison of results of the kinetic chemosensitivity assay with those of a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay revealed that the novel assay is suitable for precise quantitation of the cell chemosensitivity, is more informative and has the added technical advantage of performance without recourse to radioactive or chemically hazardous substances. PMID:7833120

  16. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  17. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  18. Electrochemical and Magnetic Technologies for Bio Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    The electrochemical and magnetic biosensors have an advantage because of the easy miniaturization of electric device components as compared with photometric instruments. These technologies have been applied to develop portable, compact and inexpensive biochip devices. A commercially successful example is the glucose sensor using enzyme transducers, which was originally reported by Clark and Lyons [1] to measure glucose by detecting the decrease in oxygen by pO2 electrode when glucose is converted to gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Electrochemical biosensors can be separated into three typical assay systems using amperometric, potentiometric or conductometric transducers. Furthermore, various magnetosensors using magnetic particles have been developed over a decade in place of photometric biosensors. In this chapter, recent advances in electrochemical and magnetic biosensors toward development of portable, compact and inexpensive biochip devices have been focused.

  19. Monoclonal-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunochromatographic assay for enrofloxacin in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroo; Satake, Atsuko; Kido, Yasumasa; Tsuji, Akio

    2002-01-01

    Enrofloxacin has been increasingly used in veterinary medicine to treat microbial infections. A simple and reliable analytical method for this drug is required. The current determination by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is sensitive but labor-intensive. This paper reports an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) and the development of a rapid test kit based on immunochromatography. The detection limits using the ELISA were 10 ppb for chicken liver and muscle, and 1 ppb for cattle milk, respectively. The mean recovery values were 77.3-96.0% for chicken liver, 72.4-92.0% for chicken muscle and 84.0-99.0% for cattle milk. The detection limits using the kit were ca. 100 ppb for chicken muscle and ca. 10 ppb for cattle milk, respectively. All ELISA results for assay of chicken liver, chicken muscle and cattle milk were confirmed using HPLC which is used as the routine assay. The HPLC (x) and ELISA (y) results showed close correlation for chicken liver (y = 8.7 + 0.85x, r2 = 0.99, n = 25), chicken muscle (y = -3.9 + 0.94x, r2 = 0.98, n = 25) and cattle milk (y = 18.4 + 0.92x, r2 = 0.99, n = 25). PMID:11827405

  20. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  1. Magnetism of Carbonados

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Taylor, P. T.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Origin of Carbonado is not clear. Magnetism of Carbonado comes from the surface, indicating contemporary formation of both the surface and magnetic carriers. The interior of carbonado is relatively free of magnetic phases.

  2. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  3. Comparison between S+L- assay and LacZ marker rescue assay for detecting replication-competent gammaretroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, A; Yoshikawa, R; Miyazawa, T

    2015-09-01

    To avoid contamination of adventitious gammaretroviruses in biological products such as vaccines, it is necessary to check the master seed cells for manufacturing. There are several assays to detect infectious gammaretroviruses. Among these, sarcoma-positive, leukemia-negative (S+L-) assay is a classical infectivity assay, which is often recommended in governmental guidelines. The S+L- cells used in S+L- assay generate unique focus upon the infection of replication-competent gammaretroviruses. Although S+L- assay is well recognized for the detection, their applicability is questionable in some cases. On the other hand, LacZ marker rescue (LMR) assay detects infectious gammaretroviruses by transducing LacZ marker gene to the target cells, which shows lacZ-positive foci if the infectious virus is present. In this study, we compared LMR and S+L- assays for detection of a variety of endogenous and exogenous gammaretroviruses. As results, LMR assay could detect all gammaretroviruses examined. On the other hand, S+L- assay using feline S+L- cells, termed QN10S, could not detect porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) subgroups A/B. Further, S+L- mink cells could not detect feline leukemia virus subgroups B in addition to PERV-A/B. These data indicate that LMR assay is better suited to detect wider range of gammaretroviruses. PMID:26164289

  4. Evaluation of Consistency in Spheroid Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids embedded in a matrix represent invaluable tools to analyze cell invasion. Spheroid sizes and invasiveness are the main observables easily measurable to evaluate effects of biological or pharmaceutical manipulations on invasion. They largely account for these 3-D platforms variability, leading to flaws in data interpretation. No method has been established yet that characterizes this variability and guarantees a reliable use of 3-D platforms. Spheroid initial/end sizes and invasiveness were systematically analyzed and compared in spheroids of U87MG cells generated by three different methods and embedded at different times in a collagen matrix. A normality test was used to characterize size distribution. We introduced the linearity-over-yield analysis as a novel mathematical tool to assess end sizes and invasion reproducibility. We further provide a proof of concept by applying these tools to the analysis of a treatment known to be effective beforehand. We demonstrate that implementation of these statistical and mathematical tools warranted a confident quantification and interpretation of in 3-D conducted assays. We propose these tools could be incorporated in a guideline for generation and use of 3-D platforms. PMID:27334575

  5. Fluorometric enzymatic assay of l-arginine.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Stepien, Agnieszka; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2017-01-01

    The enzymes of l-arginine (further - Arg) metabolism are promising tools for elaboration of selective methods for quantitative Arg analysis. In our study we propose an enzymatic method for Arg assay based on fluorometric monitoring of ammonia, a final product of Arg splitting by human liver arginase I (further - arginase), isolated from the recombinant yeast strain, and commercial urease. The selective analysis of ammonia (at 415nm under excitation at 360nm) is based on reaction with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of sulfite in alkali medium: these conditions permit to avoid the reaction of OPA with any amino acid. A linearity range of the fluorometric arginase-urease-OPA method is from 100nM to 6μМ with a limit of detection of 34nM Arg. The method was used for the quantitative determination of Arg in the pooled sample of blood serum. The obtained results proved to be in a good correlation with the reference enzymatic method and literature data. The proposed arginase-urease-OPA method being sensitive, economical, selective and suitable for both routine and micro-volume formats, can be used in clinical diagnostics for the simultaneous determination of Arg as well as urea and ammonia in serum samples. PMID:27450117

  6. Virus Characterization by FFF-MALS Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razinkov, Vladimer

    2009-03-01

    Adequate biophysical characterization of influenza virions is important for vaccine development. The influenza virus vaccines are produced from the allantoic fluid of developing chicken embryos. The process of viral replication produces a heterogeneous mixture of infectious and non-infectious viral particles with varying states of aggregation. The study of the relative distribution and behavior of different subpopulations and their inter-correlation can assist in the development of a robust process for a live virus vaccine. This report describes a field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FFF-MALS) method optimized for the analysis of size distribution and total particle counts. A method using a combination of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) and multiangle light scattering (MALS) techniques has been shown to improve the estimation of virus particle counts and the amount of aggregated virus in laboratory samples. The FFF-MALS method was compared with several other methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), size exclusion chromatography followed by MALS (SEC-MALS), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT Q-PCR), median tissue culture dose (TCID(50)), and the fluorescent focus assay (FFA). The correlation between the various methods for determining total particle counts, infectivity and size distribution is reported. The pros and cons of each of the analytical methods are discussed.

  7. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  8. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. They are using a Schlumberger neutron generator for the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel, in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics for the detection of very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. They have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The results to data are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference.

  9. PARALLEL ASSAY OF OXYGEN EQUILIBRIA OF HEMOGLOBIN

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Laura E.; Blinebry, Sara K.; Viscardi, Chelsea M.; Perez, Luis; Bonaventura, Joe; McMahon, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    Methods to systematically analyze in parallel the function of multiple protein or cell samples in vivo or ex vivo (i.e. functional proteomics) in a controlled gaseous environment have thus far been limited. Here we describe an apparatus and procedure that enables, for the first time, parallel assay of oxygen equilibria in multiple samples. Using this apparatus, numerous simultaneous oxygen equilibrium curves (OECs) can be obtained under truly identical conditions from blood cell samples or purified hemoglobins (Hbs). We suggest that the ability to obtain these parallel datasets under identical conditions can be of immense value, both to biomedical researchers and clinicians who wish to monitor blood health, and to physiologists studying non-human organisms and the effects of climate change on these organisms. Parallel monitoring techniques are essential in order to better understand the functions of critical cellular proteins. The procedure can be applied to human studies, wherein an OEC can be analyzed in light of an individual’s entire genome. Here, we analyzed intraerythrocytic Hb, a protein that operates at the organism’s environmental interface and then comes into close contact with virtually all of the organism’s cells. The apparatus is theoretically scalable, and establishes a functional proteomic screen that can be correlated with genomic information on the same individuals. This new method is expected to accelerate our general understanding of protein function, an increasingly challenging objective as advances in proteomic and genomic throughput outpace the ability to study proteins’ functional properties. PMID:23827235

  10. Granuloma pouch assay for mutagenicity testing.

    PubMed

    Maier, P

    1980-11-01

    The Granuloma Pouch Assay (GPA) is an animal model in which mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of a testcompound can be detected in rapidly dividing fibroblasts of a granulation tissue in adult male rats. Growth of this tissue was initiated with a small amount of croton oil at the inside wall of a subcutaneous air pouch on the back of the animals. The test compound can be injected either into the pouch (local) or administered by systemic routes. Alkali labile DNA-lesions, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, point mutations and tumor development in situ were determined. The comparison of mutation frequencies after local and systemic administration of testcompounds, provide an estimation of the pharmacokinetic characteristics and the mutagenic potency of the chemical. The local application route allows the detection of locally active mutagens and of compounds which require activation by P-448 dependent mono-oxygenases. Liver mediated proximate metabolites are detectable when they are transformed into ultimate carcinogens in extrahepatic cells whereas chemicals with a strong organ specific activity are not. PMID:7235991

  11. Strategies for Assaying Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Hafner Česen, Maruša; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Late endosomal organelles have an acidic pH and contain hydrolytic enzymes to degrade cargo delivered either from the extracellular environment by endocytosis or from within the cell itself by autophagy. In the event of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), the contents of late endosomes and lysosomes can be released into the cytosol and then initiate apoptosis. Compounds that can trigger LMP are therefore candidates for the induction of apoptosis, in particular in anticancer therapy. Alternatively, drug-delivery systems, such as nanoparticles, can have side effects that can include LMP, which has toxic consequences for the cells. To determine when, to what extent, and with what consequences LMP occurs is therefore of paramount importance for the evaluation of new potentially LMP-inducing compounds. In this introduction, we provide an overview of some basic assays for assessing LMP, such as staining with lysosomotropic dyes and measurement of cysteine cathepsin activity, and discuss additional strategies for the detection of the release of endogenous lysosomal molecules or preloaded exogenous tracers into the cytosol. PMID:27250949

  12. Clickable enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Canalle, Luiz A; Vong, TuHa; Adams, P Hans H M; van Delft, Floris L; Raats, Jos M H; Chirivi, Renato G S; van Hest, Jan C M

    2011-10-10

    Click chemistry is explored as a potential cost-effective and selective immobilization method for the production of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Coatings were formulated containing either a terminal alkyne or a bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) chemical handle, and a diagnostic peptide was subsequently immobilized onto these coatings by the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC) or copper-free strain-promoted azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (SPAAC), respectively. The terminal alkyne-containing coating showed high background levels in subsequent ELISA's due to the copper catalyst used in the immobilization step. The BCN-containing coating, however, was successfully employed and presents a cost-effective alternative to existing (strept)avidin-biotin immobilization methods. This technology was illustrated with an ELISA used for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but could be easily applied to a wide range of diagnostic tests. PMID:21866934

  13. Interpreting clinical assays for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Martinet, Nadine; Bertrand, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    As opposed to genetics, dealing with gene expressions by direct DNA sequence modifications, the term epigenetics applies to all the external influences that target the chromatin structure of cells with impact on gene expression unrelated to the sequence coding of DNA itself. In normal cells, epigenetics modulates gene expression through all development steps. When “imprinted” early by the environment, epigenetic changes influence the organism at an early stage and can be transmitted to the progeny. Together with DNA sequence alterations, DNA aberrant cytosine methylation and microRNA deregulation, epigenetic modifications participate in the malignant transformation of cells. Their reversible nature has led to the emergence of the promising field of epigenetic therapy. The efforts made to inhibit in particular the epigenetic enzyme family called histone deacetylases (HDACs) are described. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been proposed as a viable clinical therapeutic approach for the treatment of leukemia and solid tumors, but also to a lesser degree for noncancerous diseases. Three epigenetic drugs are already arriving at the patient’s bedside, and more than 100 clinical assays for HDACi are registered on the National Cancer Institute website. They explore the eventual additive benefits of combined therapies. In the context of the pleiotropic effects of HDAC isoforms, more specific HDACi and more informative screening tests are being developed for the benefit of the patients. PMID:21625397

  14. Liquid chromatographic assay for dicloxacillin in plasma.

    PubMed

    Alderete, Oscar; González-Esquivel, Dinora F; Del Rivero, L Misael; Castro Torres, Nelly

    2004-06-15

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of dicloxacillin in plasma has been developed. The method only requires 0.5 ml of plasma, phosphate buffer solution (pH = 4.7), acidification with 0.5N hydrochloride acid and liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Posterior evaporation of organic under nitrogen steam and redissolution in mobile phase is carried out. The analysis was performed on a Spherisorb C18 (5 microm) column, using methanol -0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH = 4.7 (75:25; v/v) as mobile phase, with ultraviolet detection at 220 nm. Results showed that the assay is sensitive: 0.5 microg/ml. The response is linear in the range of 0.5 - 10 microg/ml. Maximum inter-day coefficient of variation was 12.4%. Mean extraction recovery obtained was 96.95%. Stability studies showed that the loss was not higher than 10%, samples are stable at room temperature for 6 h, at -20 Celsius for 2 months, processed samples were stable at least for 24 h and also after two freeze-thaw cycles. The method has been used to perform pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in humans. PMID:15135112

  15. Assay of carbon nanoparticles in liquids.

    PubMed

    Nawi, Yehuda; Sasson, Yoel; Dolgin, Bella

    2016-04-01

    The critical assay of carbon black concentration suffers from the lack of available methods, especially in-situ methods suitable for nanoparticles. We propose a useful tool for monitoring carbon nanoparticles concentration in liquids by means of RGB imaging, fluorescence and conductivity measurements. In this study carbon black particles of 25-75nm size were dispersed within two types of "green" liquids (1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium based ionic liquids and glycerol) and the effect of carbon nanoparticles concentration on the liquids properties was measured. The conductivity of all the liquids increased with carbon concentration, while the slope of the curve was liquid dependent. The fluorescence intensity of ionic liquids decreased dramatically even when a small amount of carbon was added, while water-containing ionic liquids had a more moderate behavior. Glycerol has no native fluorescence, therefore, a known tracer present in soot (dibenzothiophene), having a characteristic fluorescence monitored by synchronous scan mode, was used. The carbon black effect on RGB imaging shows a linear dependence, while the red counts decreases with contamination. The proposed methods are simple and low-cost but nonetheless sensitive. PMID:26780588

  16. Fluorescence Polarization Assays in Small Molecule Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a homogeneous method that allows rapid and quantitative analysis of diverse molecular interactions and enzyme activities. This technique has been widely utilized in clinical and biomedical settings, including the diagnosis of certain diseases and monitoring therapeutic drug levels in body fluids. Recent developments in the field has been symbolized by the facile adoption of FP in high-throughput screening (HTS) and small molecule drug discovery of an increasing range of target classes. Areas covered in this review The article provides a brief overview on the theoretical foundation of FP, followed by updates on recent advancements in its application for various drug target classes, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), enzymes and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The strengths and weaknesses of this method, practical considerations in assay design, novel applications, and future directions are also discussed. What the reader will gain The reader will be informed of the most recent advancements and future directions of FP application to small molecule screening. Take home message In addition to its continued utilization in high-throughput screening, FP has expanded into new disease and target areas and has been marked by increased use of labeled small molecule ligands for receptor binding studies. PMID:22328899

  17. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production. PMID:26982471

  18. The platelet serotonin-release assay.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Arnold, Donald M; Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G

    2015-06-01

    Few laboratory tests are as clinically useful as The platelet serotonin-release assay (SRA): a positive SRA in the appropriate clinical context is virtually diagnostic of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a life- and limb-threatening prothrombotic disorder caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies that activate platelets, thereby triggering serotonin-release. The SRA's performance characteristics include high sensitivity and specificity, although caveats include indeterminate reaction profiles (observed in ∼4% of test sera) and potential for false-positive reactions. As only a subset of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies detectable by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) are additionally platelet-activating, the SRA has far greater diagnostic specificity than the EIA. However, requiring a positive EIA, either as an initial screening test or as an SRA adjunct, will reduce risk of a false-positive SRA (since a negative EIA in a patient with a "positive" SRA should prompt critical evaluation of the SRA reaction profile). The SRA also provides useful information on whether a HIT serum produces strong platelet activation even in the absence of heparin: such heparin-"independent" platelet activation is a marker of unusually severe HIT, including delayed-onset HIT and severe HIT complicated by consumptive coagulopathy with risk for microvascular thrombosis. PMID:25775976

  19. Internal Wave Apparatus for Copepod Behavior Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Haas, K. A.; Webster, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    Internal waves are ubiquitous features in coastal marine environments and have been observed to mediate vertical distributions of zooplankton in situ. Internal waves are generated through oscillations of the pycnocline in stratified waters and thereby create fine-scale hydrodynamic cues that copepods and other zooplankton are known to sense, such as fluid density gradients and velocity gradients (quantified as shear deformation rate). The role of copepod behavior in response to cues associated with internal waves is largely unknown. Thus, a coupled quantification of copepod behavior and hydrodynamic cues will provide insight to the bio-physical interaction and the role of biological versus physical forcing in mediating organism distributions. We constructed a laboratory-scale internal wave apparatus to facilitate fine-scale observations of copepod behavior in flows that replicate in situ conditions of internal waves in a two-layer stratification. Three cases are chosen with density jump ranging between 0.75 - 1.5 kg/m3. Analytical analysis of the two-layer system provides guidance of the target forcing frequency to generate a standing internal wave with a single dominate frequency of oscillation. Flow visualization and signal processing of the interface location are used to quantify the wave characteristics. A copepod behavior assay is conducted, and sample trajectories are analyzed to identify copepod response to internal wave structure.

  20. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays: An Unexpected Challenge for the Choice of an Assay in Primary Cervical Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ejegod, Ditte Møller; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥30 years (30%, vs. 49% at <30 years), in primary screening samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30–65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women. PMID:24466262