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Sample records for magnetic body forces

  1. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  2. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James; Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Samuel; Mihalusova, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    We have commissioned a superconducting solenoid based apparatus designed to exert strong magnetic body forces on biological specimens and other organic materials in ambient environmental conditions for extended periods. In its room temperature bore, it can produce a maximum magnetic field-field gradient product of 16 T^2-cm-1 which is sufficient to levitate frog embryos Xenopus Laevis[1]. We will discuss how we are applying these magnetic body forces to probe the known influences of gravitational forces on frog embryos and the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. In the process, we will describe a novel method for measuring the diamagnetic susceptibilities of specimens such as paramecia.

  3. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  4. Tornado-like flows driven by magnetic body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbeth, Gunter; Grants, Ilmars; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2014-11-01

    Alternating magnetic fields produce well-defined flow-independent body forces in electrically conducting media. This property is used to construct a laboratory analogue of the Fiedler chamber with a room-temperature liquid metal as working fluid. A continuously applied rotating magnetic field (RMF) provides the source of the angular momentum. A pulse of a much stronger travelling magnetic field drives a converging flow at the metal surface, which focuses this angular momentum towards the axis of the container. The resulting vortex is studied experimentally and numerically. In a certain range of the ratio of both driving actions the axial velocity changes its direction in the vortex core, resembling the subsidence in an eye of a tropical cyclone or a large tornado. During the initial deterministic spin-up stage the vortex is well described by axisymmetric direct numerical simulation. Being strong enough the flow develops a funnel-shaped surface depression that enables visual observation of the vortex structure. As the RMF strength is increased the eyewall diameter grows until it breaks down to multiple vortices. A number of further observed similarities to tornado-like vortices will be discussed. The work is supported by the German Helmholtz Association in frame of the LIMTECH alliance.

  5. Calculation of forces on magnetized bodies using COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, John

    1987-01-01

    The methods described may be used with a high degree of confidence for calculations of magnetic traction forces normal to a surface. In this circumstance all models agree, and test cases have resulted in theoretically correct results. It is shown that the tangential forces are in practice negligible. The surface pole method is preferable to the virtual work method because of the necessity for more than one NASTRAN run in the latter case, and because distributed forces are obtained. The derivation of local forces from the Maxwell stress method involves an undesirable degree of manipulation of the problem and produces a result in contradiction of the surface pole method.

  6. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm. PMID:19529740

  7. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  8. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  9. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  10. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  11. Magnetic human body communication.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiwoong; Mercier, Patrick P

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new human body communication (HBC) technique that employs magnetic resonance for data transfer in wireless body-area networks (BANs). Unlike electric field HBC (eHBC) links, which do not necessarily travel well through many biological tissues, the proposed magnetic HBC (mHBC) link easily travels through tissue, offering significantly reduced path loss and, as a result, reduced transceiver power consumption. In this paper the proposed mHBC concept is validated via finite element method simulations and measurements. It is demonstrated that path loss across the body under various postures varies from 10-20 dB, which is significantly lower than alternative BAN techniques. PMID:26736639

  12. Modeling the Sedimentation of Red Blood Cells in Flow under Strong External Magnetic Body Force using a Lattice Boltzmann Fictitious Domain Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xing; Lin, Guang

    2014-11-01

    To model the sedimentation of the red blood cell (RBC) in a square duct and a circular pipe, the recently developed technique derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain method (LBM-DLM/FD) is extended to employ the mesoscopic network model for simulations of the sedimentation of the RBC in flow. The flow is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method with a strong magnetic body force, while the network model is used for modeling RBC deformation. The fluid-RBC interactions are enforced by the Lagrange multiplier. The sedimentation of the RBC in a square duct and a circular pipe is simulated, revealing the capacity of the current method for modeling the sedimentation of RBC in various flows. Numerical results illustrate that that the terminal setting velocity increases with the increment of the exerted body force. The deformation of the RBC has significant effect on the terminal setting velocity due to the change of the frontal area. The larger the exerted force is, the smaller the frontal area and the larger deformation of the RBC are.

  13. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gmez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis. PMID:26150330

  14. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  15. Three-body critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Mattos, T G; Harnau, L; Dietrich, S

    2015-04-01

    Within mean-field theory we calculate universal scaling functions associated with critical Casimir forces for a system consisting of three parallel cylindrical colloids immersed in a near-critical binary liquid mixture. For several geometrical arrangements and boundary conditions at the surfaces of the colloids we study the force between two colloidal particles in the direction normal to their axes, analyzing the influence of the presence of a third particle on that force. Upon changing temperature or the relative positions of the particles we observe interesting features such as a change of sign of this force caused by the presence of the third particle. We determine the three-body component of the forces acting on one of the colloids by subtracting the pairwise forces from the total force. The three-body contribution to the total critical Casimir force turns out to be more pronounced for small surface-to-surface distances between the colloids as well as for temperatures close to criticality. Moreover, we compare our results with similar ones for other physical systems such as three atoms interacting via van der Waals forces. PMID:25974488

  16. Dynamic magnetic forces in superconducting ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, F.C.; Weng, K.; Chang, P. )

    1989-12-01

    Dynamic forces between small permanent magnets and bulk high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconducting ceramic materials have been measured, including magnetic stiffness and damping effects. The vibration frequencies and the related magnetic stiffness show a large dependence on the magnet-superconductor distance. The dynamic magnetic stiffness is shown to be related to small static reversible magnetic forces, but is not correlated with the static hysteretic forces. The magnetic damping is inversely related to the magnet-superconductor distance and can critically damp the oscillations at small gaps. These data also show that the flux pinning forces depend on the prior flux history in the superconductor.

  17. Modeling forces on the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Drake, Russel; Morgan, Michael; Peters, Todd; Riddle, Chris; Rollins, Karen

    1999-11-01

    Several simulations involving the human body, using the simulation software Interactive Physics™, are used to analyze the forces during both static situations and dynamic collisions. The connection of the simulations with the biological sciences and with sports activities should make them appealing to both high school and college-level physics students.

  18. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy with Magnetic Tiped Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, John A.; Fainchtein, Raul; Smith, Doran D.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy has been performed, until recently, by attaching the sample under study to a fragile microcantilever. Increasing the resolution, force-sensitivity and practicality of the technique, demands both reducing the size of the magnetic particle and measuring magnetic resonance as an excitation of magnetic-tip cantilevers. To lift the sample-on-cantilever restriction we have succesfully attached and controllably magnetized a micron-size Alnico particle to the end of a commercial Si cantilever. We will describe the techniques and protocols used to magnetize and characterize the magnetic particles as well as the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance with these probes.

  20. Non-contact bimodal magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, J.; Marioni, M.; Romer, S.; Joshi, N. R.; Hug, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    A bimodal magnetic force microscopy technique optimized for lateral resolution and sensitivity for small magnetic stray fields is discussed. A double phase-locked loop (PLL) system is used to drive a high-quality factor cantilever under vacuum conditions on its first mode and simultaneously on its second mode. The higher-stiffness second mode is used to map the topography. The magnetic force is measured with the higher-sensitivity first oscillation mode.

  1. Verifying Magnetic Force on a Conductor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory measurement of the magnetic force acting on a straight wire of length "l" carrying a current of intensity "i" in a magnetic field "B" is usually made using current balances, which are offered by various physics apparatus suppliers' catalogues. These balances require an adequate magnet and commonly allow only the measurement of the…

  2. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  3. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. PMID:25736463

  4. Hyper-resistive forced magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekstein, G.

    2016-02-01

    We study Taylor's model of forced magnetic reconnection mediated by plasma hyper-resistivity. This includes both linear and nonlinear regimes of the process. It is shown how the onset of plasmoid instability occurs in the strongly nonlinear regime of forced reconnection.

  5. Current-modulating magnetic force microscope probe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Frank Z.; Helian, Na; Clegg, Warwick W; Windmill, James F. C.; Jenkins, David

    2001-06-01

    A new current-modulating probe for the magnetic force microscope (MFM) is proposed in this article. The magnetic field, which will be used to interact with a magnetic specimen{close_quote}s stray field, is induced on the sharp tip of the conical magnetic core surrounded by a microfabricated single turn conductive coil. The reciprocity principle is used to obtain the force acting on the probe due to the specimen{close_quote}s stray field when scanned over a magnetic specimen. The magnetic field intensity is adjustable by control of the applied current. Images of specimens have been modeled using this probe. The suitability to different specimens is seen to be the biggest advantage of this scheme over the conventional probe designs. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Forced Magnetic Reconnection In A Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of forced magnetic field reconnection induced by an externally imposed resonant magnetic perturbation usually uses a sheared slab or cylindrical magnetic field model and often focuses on the potential time-asymptotic induced magnetic island state. However, tokamak plasmas have significant magnetic geometry and dynamical plasma toroidal rotation screening effects. Also, finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) and banana width (FBW) effects can damp and thus limit the width of a nascent magnetic island. A theory that is more applicable for tokamak plasmas is being developed. This new model of the dynamics of forced magnetic reconnection considers a single helicity magnetic perturbation in the tokamak magnetic field geometry, uses a kinetically-derived collisional parallel electron flow response, and employs a comprehensive dynamical equation for the plasma toroidal rotation frequency. It is being used to explore the dynamics of bifurcation into a magnetically reconnected state in the thin singular layer around the rational surface, evolution into a generalized Rutherford regime where the island width exceeds the singular layer width, and assess the island width limiting effects of FLR and FBW polarization currents. Support by DoE grants DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-FG02-92ER54139.

  7. Magnetic force microscopy: quantitative issues in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel Wce; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  8. Modeling solar force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.; Lou, Y. Q.

    1990-03-01

    A class of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields is presented, described in terms of the solutions to a second-order, nonlinear ordinary differential equation. These magnetic fields are three-dimensional, filling the infinite half-space above a plane where the lines of force are anchored. They model the magnetic fields of the sun over active regions with a striking geometric realism. The total energy and the free energy associated with the electric current are finite and can be calculated directly from the magnetic field at the plane boundary using the virial theorem. In the study of solar magnetic fields with data from vector magnetographs, there is a long-standing interest in devising algorithms to extrapolate for the force-free magnetic field in a given domain from prescribed field values at the boundary. The closed-form magnetic fields of this paper open up an opportunity for testing the reliability and accuracy of algorithms that claim the capability of performing this extrapolation. The extrapolation procedure as an ill-posed mathematical problem is discussed.

  9. Levitation forces in bearingless permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, W.; Silber, S.; Nenninger, K.

    1999-09-01

    Bearingless motors combine brushless AC-motors with active magnetic bearings by the integration of two separate winding systems (torque and radial levitation force windings with different pole pairs) in one housing. This paper gives an insight into the influences of the motor design on the levitation force and torque generation. It is shown that especially for machines with small air gaps it can be very important to choose the right design parameters. Increasing the permanent magnet height in order to increase the motor torque can result in a remarkable reduction of radial forces. The interrelationships are discussed on the basis of Maxwell and Lorentz forces acting upon the stator surface. The investigations are presented for a bearingless low cost motor, suited for pump, fan or blower applications. The presented motor needs only four coils for operation.

  10. Magnetic force control technique in industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, S.

    2010-11-01

    Techniques of the magnetic force control have been examined for industrial application. The problems and the technique are different in dispersion medium of gas and that of liquid. In addition, the method is different depending on the magnetic characteristic of the target objects. In case of the liquid, the dispersion medium having different viscosity was examined. The separation speed is decided with the magnitude of the magnetic force because a drag force increases with the viscosity. When the water is the dispersion medium, magnetic seeding is possible and hence the nonmagnetic materials can be separated and even the dissolved material could be separated. The separation technique has been used for purifying the waste water form paper mill or wash water of drum. On the other hand when the water is not dispersion medium, mainly the ferromagnetism particle becomes the target object because the magnetic seeding becomes difficult. The iron fragments have been separated from the slurry of slicing machine of solar battery. It has been clarified high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) can be applied for the viscous fluid of which viscosity was as high as 10 Pa s. When the dispersion medium is gaseous material, the air is important. The drag force from air depends greatly on Reynolds number. When speed of the air is small, the Reynolds number is small, and the drag force is calculated by the Stokes’ law of resistance. The study with gaseous dispersion medium is not carried out much. The magnetic separation will discuss the possibility of the industrial application of this technique.

  11. Magnetic field gradient measurement on magnetic cards using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Leib, J.; Jiles, D. C.; Chedister, W. C.

    2002-05-01

    The magnetic field gradients of magnetic stripe cards, which are developed for classifying magnetic particles used in magnetic particle inspections, have been measured using a magnetic force microscope (MFM). The magnetic force exerted on a MFM probe by the stray field emanating from the card was measured to determine the field gradients. The results are in good agreement with the field gradients estimated from the magnetizing field strengths used in the encoding process.

  12. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

  13. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  14. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented

  15. Treatment of body forces in boundary element design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saigal, Sunil; Kane, James H.; Aithal, R.; Cheng, Jizu

    1989-01-01

    The inclusion of body forces has received a good deal of attention in boundary element research. The consideration of such forces is essential in the desgin of high performance components such as fan and turbine disks in a gas turbine engine. Due to their critical performance requirements, optimal shapes are often desired for these components. The boundary element method (BEM) offers the possibility of being an efficient method for such iterative analysis as shape optimization. The implicit-differentiation of the boundary integral equations is performed to obtain the sensitivity equations. The body forces are accounted for by either the particular integrals for uniform body forces or by a surface integration for non-uniform body forces. The corresponding sensitivity equations for both these cases are presented. The validity of present formulations is established through a close agreement with exact analytical results.

  16. A compact high field magnetic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibiao; Wang, Ze; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-12-01

    We present the design and performance of a simple and compact magnetic force microscope (MFM), whose tip-sample coarse approach is implemented by the piezoelectric tube scanner (PTS) itself. In brief, a square rod shaft is axially spring-clamped on the inner wall of a metal tube which is glued inside the free end of the PTS. The shaft can thus be driven by the PTS to realize image scan and inertial stepping coarse approach. To enhance the inertial force, each of the four outer electrodes of the PTS is driven by an independent port of the controller. The MFM scan head is so compact that it can easily fit into the 52mm low temperature bore of a 20T superconducting magnet. The performance of the MFM is demonstrated by imaging a manganite thin film at low temperature and in magnetic fields up to 15T. PMID:25189114

  17. Magnetic Forces and DNA Mechanics in Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Loenhout, Marijn T. J.; Burnham, Daniel R.; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful tool for the study of DNA-enzyme interactions. Both the magnet-based manipulation and the camera-based detection used in MT are well suited for multiplexed measurements. Here, we systematically address challenges related to scaling of multiplexed magnetic tweezers (MMT) towards high levels of parallelization where large numbers of molecules (say 103) are addressed in the same amount of time required by a single-molecule measurement. We apply offline analysis of recorded images and show that this approach provides a scalable solution for parallel tracking of the xyz-positions of many beads simultaneously. We employ a large field-of-view imaging system to address many DNA-bead tethers in parallel. We model the 3D magnetic field generated by the magnets and derive the magnetic force experienced by DNA-bead tethers across the large field of view from first principles. We furthermore experimentally demonstrate that a DNA-bead tether subject to a rotating magnetic field describes a bicircular, Limaçon rotation pattern and that an analysis of this pattern simultaneously yields information about the force angle and the position of attachment of the DNA on the bead. Finally, we apply MMT in the high-throughput investigation of the distribution of the induced magnetic moment, the position of attachment of DNA on the beads, and DNA flexibility. The methods described herein pave the way to kilo-molecule level magnetic tweezers experiments. PMID:22870220

  18. Modeling Forces on the Human Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Drake, Russel; Morgan, Michael; Peters, Todd; Riddle, Chris; Rollins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Presents five models of the human body as a mechanical system which can be used in introductory physics courses: human arms as levers, humans falling from small heights, a model of the human back, collisions during football, and the rotating gymnast. Gives ideas for discussions and activities, including Interactive Physics (TM) simulations. (WRM)

  19. Cooling force on ions in a magnetized electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B.; Zwicknagel, Günter

    2013-07-01

    Electron cooling is a well-established method to improve the phase space quality of ion beams in storage rings. In the common rest frame of the ion and the electron beam, the ion is subjected to a drag force and it experiences a loss or a gain of energy which eventually reduces the energy spread of the ion beam. A calculation of this process is complicated as the electron velocity distribution is anisotropic and the cooling process takes place in a magnetic field which guides the electrons. In this paper the cooling force is calculated in a model of binary collisions (BC) between ions and magnetized electrons, in which the Coulomb interaction is treated up to second order as a perturbation to the helical motion of the electrons. The calculations are done with the help of an improved BC theory which is uniformly valid for any strength of the magnetic field and where the second-order two-body forces are treated in the interaction in Fourier space without specifying the interaction potential. The cooling force is explicitly calculated for a regularized and screened potential which is both of finite range and less singular than the Coulomb interaction at the origin. Closed expressions are derived for monochromatic electron beams, which are folded with the velocity distributions of the electrons and ions. The resulting cooling force is evaluated for anisotropic Maxwell velocity distributions of the electrons and ions.

  20. MICROFLARE ACTIVITY DRIVEN BY FORCED MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Crockett, P. J.; Keenan, F. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2010-03-20

    High cadence, multiwavelength, optical observations of a solar active region, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Two magnetic bright points are seen to separate in opposite directions at a constant velocity of 2.8 km s{sup -1}. After a separation distance of {approx}4400 km is reached, multiple Ellerman bombs are observed in both H{alpha} and Ca-K images. As a result of the Ellerman bombs, periodic velocity perturbations in the vicinity of the magnetic neutral line, derived from simultaneous Michelson Doppler Imager data, are generated with amplitude {+-}6 km s{sup -1} and wavelength {approx}1000 km. The velocity oscillations are followed by an impulsive brightening visible in H{alpha} and Ca-K, with a peak intensity enhancement of 63%. We interpret these velocity perturbations as the magnetic field deformation necessary to trigger forced reconnection. A time delay of {approx}3 minutes between the H{alpha}-wing and Ca-K observations indicates that the observed magnetic reconnection occurs at a height of {approx}200 km above the solar surface. These observations are consistent with theoretical predictions and provide the first observational evidence of microflare activity driven by forced magnetic reconnection.

  1. Forces and moments on a slender, cavitating body

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, C.E.; Clark, E.L.; Buffington, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Recently a numerical code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to predict the pitching moment, normal force, and axial force of a slender, supercavitating shape. The potential flow about the body and cavity is calculated using an axial distribution of source/sink elements. The cavity surface is assumed to be a constant pressure streamline, extending beyond the base of the model. Slender body approximation is used to model the crossflow for small angles of attack. A significant extension of previous work in cavitation flow is the inclusion of laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions on the body. Predictions with this code, for axial force at zero angle of attack, show good agreement with experiments. There are virtually no published data availble with which to benchmark the pitching moment and normal force predictions. An experiment was designed to measure forces and moments on a supercavitation shape. The primary reason for the test was to obtain much needed data to benchmark the hydrodynamic force and moment predictions. Since the numerical prediction is for super cavitating shapes at very small cavitation numbers, the experiment was designed to be a ventilated cavity test. This paper describes the experimental procedure used to measure the pitching moment, axial and normal forces, and base pressure on a slender body with a ventilated cavity. Limited results are presented for pitching moment and normal force. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-01

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm. PMID:24651941

  3. Pulsed magnetic field magnetic force microscope and evaluation of magnetic properties of soft magnetic tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yangdong; Yoshimura, Satoru; Egawa, Genta; Zheng, Fu; Kinoshita, Yukinori; Saito, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    A pulsed magnetic field magnetic force microscope (PMF-MFM) is developed for evaluation of the magnetic properties of nano-scale materials and devices, as well as the characteristics of MFM tips. We present the setup of the PMF-MFM system, and focus on the evaluation of a FeCo soft magnetic tip by PMF-MFM. We find a new theoretical method to calculate tip magnetization curves (M-H curves) using MFM phase signals. We measure the MFM phase and amplitude signals for the FeCo tip during the presence of the pulsed magnetic fields oriented parallel and antiparallel to the initial tip magnetization direction, and acquire the tip coercivity H c ~ 1.1?kOe. The tip M-H curves are also calculated using the MFM phase signals data. We obtain the basic features of the tip magnetic properties from the tip M-H curves.

  4. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  5. Magnet polepiece design for uniform magnetic force on superparamagnetic beads

    PubMed Central

    Fallesen, Todd; Hill, David B.; Steen, Matthew; Macosko, Jed C.; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2010-01-01

    Here we report construction of a simple electromagnet with novel polepieces which apply a spatially uniform force to superparamagnetic beads in an optical microscope. The wedge-shaped gap was designed to keep ∂Bx∕∂y constant and B large enough to saturate the bead. We achieved fields of 300–600 mT and constant gradients of 67 T∕m over a sample space of 0.5×4 mm2 in the focal plane of the microscope and 0.05 mm along the microscope optic axis. Within this space the maximum force on a 2.8 μm diameter Dynabead was 12 pN with a spatial variation of approximately 10%. Use of the magnet in a biophysical experiment is illustrated by showing that gliding microtubules propelled by the molecular motor kinesin can be stopped by the force of an attached magnetic bead. PMID:20687745

  6. Magnetic force-induced damping effect for magnetic bearing motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Chang; Yao, Y. D.; Chang, Yu-Hsiu; Tung, Pi-Cheng; Xiao, Ren-Bin

    2005-05-01

    An innovative damping induced by magnetic force was designed successfully for a totally passive magnetic bearing motor. A magnetic ring of high permeability and an annular-shaped rubber pad were mounted on the stator 0.55 mm below the permanent magnet of the rotor. Computer simulations were compared with experimental measurements to decide on the material and configuration of the critical components. The natural frequencies for lateral and rotational modes of the rotor are around 22 Hz measured by impulse method. Both the magnetic bearing motor with and without magnetic damping are rotated at a rated speed of 3840 rpm, which is far above the first critical speed of 1305 rpm. Without magnetic damping, the natural damping ratio in the radial direction of the rotor is 0.0655. After damping, it increases to 0.1401. We have demonstrated by both experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that the antishock performance is significantly improved by the innovative damping technology in a passive magnetic bearing motor.

  7. Magnetic-enhanced normal force of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xing-Yan; Yu, Miao; Fu, Jie

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the static and dynamic normal forces of magnetorheological (MR) fluids with and without shearing were investigated by using an advanced commercial rheometer. The effects of time history, shear rate, and temperature under sweeping magnetic field on the normal force of MR fluids were systematically studied. Moreover, the influence of shear stress, gap distance, and the comparison of static and dynamic normal force in various magnetic field were also studied. The experimental results indicated that the normal force of MR fluids largely depend on magnetic field, more than 170% normal force increased when the magnetic field increases from 0 to 1 T. This behavior can be regard as the magnetic field-dependent of normal force, moreover, the mechanism of interaction between the magnetic field and normal force was investigated by microstructure analysis. The results show that the gap distance changes step-wise with increasing the magnetic field instead of continue increase. When imposing shearing, three regions can be found in the relationship between normal forces and shear rate, the normal force first decreases to a minimum value and then increases by increasing shear rates. The temperature effect of the normal forces is also measured and the normal force would increase with increasing of temperature. Comparing between with static and dynamic normal force shows that the dynamic normal force is larger than static normal force. And the average normal force is also larger than the shear stress. Finally, a normal force was calculated based on the magnetic field energy theory.

  8. Novel magnetic tips developed for the switching magnetization magnetic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Cambel, V.; Elias, P.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Martaus, J.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Kostic, I.; Materials Science Division; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Using micromagnetic calculations we search for optimal magnetic properties of novel magnetic tips to be used for a Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy (SM-MFM), a novel technique based on two-pass scanning with reversed tip magnetization. Within the technique the sum of two scans images local atomic forces and their difference maps the local magnetic forces. The tip magnetization is switched during the scanning by a small magnetic field. The technology of novel low-coercitive magnetic tips is proposed. For best performance the tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching field, and single-domain state at remanence. Such tips are equipped with Permalloy objects of a precise shape that are defined on their tilted sides. We calculate switching fields of such tips by solving the micromagnetic problem to find the optimum shape and dimensions of the Permalloy objects located on the tips. Among them, hexagon was found as the best shape for the tips.

  9. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking. PMID:19118685

  10. Discreteness noise versus force errors in N-body simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Hut, Piet; Makino, Jun

    1993-01-01

    A low accuracy in the force calculation per time step of a few percent for each particle pair is sufficient for collisionless N-body simulations. Higher accuracy is made meaningless by the dominant discreteness noise in the form of two-body relaxation, which can be reduced only by increasing the number of particles. Since an N-body simulation is a Monte Carlo procedure in which each particle-particle force is essentially random, i.e., carries an error of about 1000 percent, the only requirement is a systematic averaging-out of these intrinsic errors. We illustrate these assertions with two specific examples in which individual pairwise forces are deliberately allowed to carry significant errors: tree-codes on supercomputers and algorithms on special-purpose machines with low-precision hardware.

  11. Secondary resonance magnetic force microscopy using an external magnetic field for characterization of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongzi; Mo, Kangxin; Ding, Xidong; Zhao, Liangbing; Lin, Guocong; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Dihu

    2015-09-01

    A bimodal magnetic force microscopy (MFM) that uses an external magnetic field for the detection and imaging of magnetic thin films is developed. By applying the external modulation magnetic field, the vibration of a cantilever probe is excited by its magnetic tip at its higher eigenmode. Using magnetic nanoparticle samples, the capacity of the technique which allows single-pass imaging of topography and magnetic forces is demonstrated. For the detection of magnetic properties of thin film materials, its signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity are demonstrated to be superior to conventional MFM in lift mode. The secondary resonance MFM technique provides a promising tool for the characterization of nanoscale magnetic properties of various materials, especially of magnetic thin films with weak magnetism.

  12. Lift Force Acting on Bodies in Viscous Liquid Under Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipitsyn, Vitaliy; Ivanova, Alevtina; Vlasova, Olga; Kozlov, Victor

    2014-11-01

    The averaged lift force acting on a rigid body located near the wall of the cavity with a viscous liquid under high-frequency oscillations of various types is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are conducted with cylindrical and rectangular solids. Amplitude and frequency of vibration, viscosity and density of fluid, specific solid size, its density and shape vary. Lift force was measured by the dynamic hanging of the body in the gravity when the body oscillates without touching the cavity walls. The vibrations generate a repulsive force, holding a heavy body above the bottom of the cavity, and the light one at some distance from the ceiling. Lift force changes qualitatively in case of combined translational and rotational oscillations of the cavity containing fluid and solid; it is much greater than at the translational vibrations and appears throughout the entire volume of the liquid. The work contains a theoretical description of the mechanism of lift force generation and the comparison of the experimental and theoretical results. The agreement of the results is found in the limit of high dimensionless frequencies. The considered effects could be interesting for vibrational control of solid inclusions in viscous liquids. Work was done in the framework of the Program of strategic development of PSHPU (project 030-F) and supported by Ministry of Education of Perm Region (project C26/625) and grant 4022.2014.1 (Leading Scientific School).

  13. Body force circulation and the Antarctic Ozone minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamical mechanism, which is relevant to the ozone-depletion problem and which involves a 'body force' circulation discussed by Eliassen (1951), is considered. The body force problem and its application to 'generic' upper-tropospheric wave-driving are discussed theoretically. Following a review of the interhemispheric differences in the winter and early-spring circulation, the elliptic equation governing the residual mean meridional streamfunction is derived, and its analytic-solution properties in negligible shear are discussed. Finally, a numerical solution is derived using the observed August winds under the assumption of radiative equilibrium, and the effect of diabatic heating is discussed.

  14. Kinetic pressure force in collisioness magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aunai, Nicolas; Belmont, Gerard; Smets, Roch

    2010-05-01

    We present a numerical study of symmetric collisionless magnetic reconnection. Using a 2D hybrid simulation code we focused on the ion acceleration both from the kinetic and the fluid point of vue. We show that an off-diagonal pressure force originating from the particle dynamics contributes to the fluid bulk energy budget roughly as much as the Hall electric field. The fast electron flow created by the reconnection electric field, is responsible for a sharp electrostatic potential drop inside of the separatrix region, normal to the magnetic field. From the kinetic perspective, individual ions coming from the inflow region are demagnetized and greatly accelerated when going through this potential drop. Then they bounce in the potential well and, thanks to the small divergence of the structure, transfert some of their kinetic energy to the outflow direction. From the fluid perspective it is understood for many years now that this Hall electric field plays a crucial role in increasing the downstream bulk velocity of the ions, allowing a fast reconnection rate, as opposed to the MHD regime where such effect is prohibited. However, we show here that the kinetic dynamics of the ions inside the seperatrix region creates a quadrupolar structure of the in-plane off-diagonal pressure around the reconnection site. When taken into account into the fluid momentum equation, the resulting pressure force , located on the separatrices, is found to work against the electric field and has roughly the same amplitude. A small but finite difference between these to forces allows the fluid to be accelerated. This pressure tensor effect is rarely taken into account in fluid simulations despite its apparent importance on the energy point of view.

  15. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  16. Nonlinear gravitational self-force: Field outside a small body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2012-10-01

    A small extended body moving through an external spacetime gαβ creates a metric perturbation hαβ, which forces the body away from geodesic motion in gαβ. The foundations of this effect, called the gravitational self-force, are now well established, but concrete results have mostly been limited to linear order. Accurately modeling the dynamics of compact binaries requires proceeding to nonlinear orders. To that end, I show how to obtain the metric perturbation outside the body at all orders in a class of generalized wave gauges. In a small buffer region surrounding the body, the form of the perturbation can be found analytically as an expansion for small distances r from a representative worldline. Given only a specification of the body’s multipole moments, the field obtained in the buffer region suffices to find the metric everywhere outside the body via a numerical puncture scheme. Following this procedure at first and second order, I calculate the field in the buffer region around an arbitrarily structured compact body at sufficiently high order in r to numerically implement a second-order puncture scheme, including effects of the body’s spin. I also define nth-order (local) generalizations of the Detweiler-Whiting singular and regular fields and show that in a certain sense, the body can be viewed as a skeleton of multipole moments.

  17. Force and torque characteristics for magnetically driven blood pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pan; Haik, Yousef; Kilani, Mohammad; Chen, Ching-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Magnetically driven screw pumps were designed and fabricated for pumping biological fluids. The magnetic field simulations for three different magnetic coupling arrangements were obtained numerically. The force and torque for the three arrangements were computed. The effect of the separation gap between poles and the rotational angle on the force and torque is also presented. The pump characteristics were obtained experimentally.

  18. May the Magnetic Force Be with You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Jesse; Richey, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Although most elementary students have had experiences with magnets, they generally have misconceptions about magnetism (Driver et al. 1994; Burgoon, Heddle, and Duran 2010). For example, students may think magnets can attract all metals or that larger magnets are stronger than smaller magnets. Students often confuse magnets with magnetic

  19. Magnetic dynamos in accreting planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, Gregor; Labrosse, Stéphane; Gerya, Taras; Morishima, Ryuji; Tackley, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Laboratory measurements revealed ancient remanent magnetization in meteorites [1] indicating the activity of magnetic dynamos in the corresponding meteorite parent body. To study under which circumstances dynamo activity is possible, we use a new methodology to simulate the internal evolution of a planetary body during accretion and differentiation. Using the N-body code PKDGRAV [2] we simulate the accretion of planetary embryos from an initial annulus of several thousand planetesimals. The growth history of the largest resulting planetary embryo is used as an input for the thermomechanical 2D code I2ELVIS [3]. The thermomechanical model takes recent parametrizations of impact processes [4] and of the magnetic dynamo [5] into account. It was pointed out that impacts can not only deposit heat deep into the target body, which is later buried by ejecta of further impacts [6], but also that impacts expose in the crater region originally deep-seated layers, thus cooling the interior [7]. This combination of impact effects becomes even more important when we consider that planetesimals of all masses contribute to planetary accretion. This leads occasionally to collisions between bodies with large ratios between impactor and target mass. Thus, all these processes can be expected to have a profound effect on the thermal evolution during the epoch of planetary accretion and may have implications for the magnetic dynamo activity. Results show that late-formed planetesimals do not experience silicate melting and avoid thermal alteration, whereas in early-formed bodies accretion and iron core growth occur almost simultaneously and a highly variable magnetic dynamo can operate in the interior of these bodies. [1] Weiss, B.P. et al., Science, 322, 713-716, 2008. [2] Richardson, D. C. et al., Icarus, 143, 45-59, 2000. [3] Gerya, T.V and Yuen, D.J., Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 163, 83-105, 2007. [4] Monteux, J. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L24201, 2007. [5] Aubert, J. et al., Geophys. J. Int., 179, 1414-1428, 2009. [6] Safronov, V.S., Icarus, 33, 3-12, 1978. [7] Davies, G.F., in: Origin of the Earth, ed. H.E. Newsom, J.H. Jones, Oxford Un. Press, 175-194, 1990.

  20. Electric and Magnetic Forces between Parallel-Wire Conductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses electric and magnetic forces between parallel-wire conductors and derives, in a simple fashion, order of magnitude estimates of the ratio of the likely electrostatic and electromagnetic forces for a simple parallel-wire balance. (Author/HM)

  1. Investigation of many-body forces in krypton and xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Salacuse, J.J.; Egelstaff, P.A.

    1988-10-15

    The simplicity of the state dependence at relatively high temperatures ofthe many-body potential contribution to the pressure and energy has been pointed out previously (J. Ram and P. A. Egelstaff, J. Phys. Chem. Liq. 14, 29 (1984); A. Teitsima and P. A. Egelstaff, Phys. Rev. A 21, 367 (1980)). In this paper, we investigate how far these many-body potential terms may be represented by simple models in the case of krypton on the 423-, 273-, 190-, and 150-K isotherms, and xenon on the 170-, 210-, and 270-K isotherms. At the higher temperatures the best agreement is found for the mean-field type of theory, and some consequences are pointed out. On the lower isotherms a state point is found where the many-body energy vanishes, and large departures from mean-field behavior are observed. This is attributed to the influence of short-ranged many-body forces.

  2. Small acoustically forced symmetric bodies in viscous fluids.

    PubMed

    Nadal, François; Lauga, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The total force exerted on a small rigid body by an acoustic field in a viscous fluid is addressed analytically in the limit where the typical size of the particle is smaller than both the viscous diffusion length scale and the acoustic wavelength. In this low-frequency limit, such a force can be calculated provided the effect of the acoustic steady streaming is negligible. Using the Eulerian linear expansion of Lagrangian hydrodynamic quantities (velocity and pressure), the force on a small solid sphere free to move in an acoustic field is first calculated in the case of progressive and standing waves, and it is compared to past results. The proposed method is then extended to the case of more complex shapes with three planes of symmetry. For a symmetric body oriented with one of its axis along the wave direction, the acoustic force exerted by a progressive wave is affected by the particle shape at leading order. In contrast, for a standing wave (with the same orientation), the force experienced by the particle at leading order is the same as the one experienced by a sphere of same volume and density. PMID:27036245

  3. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  4. May the Magnetic Force Be with You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Jesse; Richey, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Although most elementary students have had experiences with magnets, they generally have misconceptions about magnetism (Driver et al. 1994; Burgoon, Heddle, and Duran 2010). For example, students may think magnets can attract all metals or that larger magnets are stronger than smaller magnets. Students often confuse magnets with magnetic…

  5. Fluctuations of the van der Waals attraction force between macroscopic bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    The tliccry of the fluctuations of the van der Waals (vdW) attractive force between macroscopic bodies is developed. A general equation for the spectral density of the fluctuating surface Maxwell stress (force per unit mea.) in va,cuurn nea,r the surface of a body is derived under the assumption that, inside the bodies, the random La.ngevin sources of the electric and magnetic fields (charges, polarizations, currents) are Gaussian. This spectral density of stress is an integral over frequencies of a sum of terms each of which is a product of Fourier amplitudes of two field components' correlation functions. For metallic bodies, the contribution of free electrons to the vdW force (at frequencies up to the frequency of electron scattering) is calculated. This contribution to the force and its noise grows with temperature. Application of noiseless voltage to two interacting metals across the vacuum gap between them generates an additional force noise. This additional noise is proportional to the volta.ge squared and to the spectral density of the random electric field at the frequency of noise measurement. The theoretical qualitative conclusions are in good agreement with experirncnts.

  6. Science in a Box. Magnets III: Force Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents ideas to help elementary school educators teach their students about magnetic force fields by observing how iron filings line up around magnets. The article lists materials needed and offers a student page with suggested student activities. (SM)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  8. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  9. Nuclear matter equation of state and three-body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, H. M. M.; Algamoudi, A. M. A.

    2012-04-01

    The energy per particle, symmetry energy, pressure, and free energy are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter using BHF approach with modern nucleon-nucleon CD-Bonn, Nijm1, Argonne v18, and Reid 93 potentials. To obtain saturation in nuclear matter we add three-body interaction terms which are equivalent to a density-dependent two-nucleon interaction a la Skyrme force. Good agreement is obtained in comparison with previous theoretical estimates and experimental data.

  10. Lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor is calculated as a function of displacement from its original position at rest using Bean's critical-state model to describe flux pinning. The force is linear for small displacements and saturates at large displacements. In the absence of edge effects the force always attracts the magnet to its original position. Thus it is a restoring force that contributes to the stability of the levitated magnet. In the case of a thick superconductor slab, the origin of the force is a magnetic dipole layer consisting of positive and negative supercurrents induced on the trailing side of the magnet. The qualitative behavior is consistent with experiments reported to date. Effects due to the finite thickness of the superconductor slab and the granular nature of high-Tc materials are also considered.

  11. Solvable Many-Body Models of Goldfish Type with One-, Two- and Three-Body Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihun, Oksana; Calogero, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The class of solvable many-body problems ''of goldfish type'' is extended by including (the additional presence of) three-body forces. The solvable N-body problems thereby identified are characterized by Newtonian equations of motion featuring 19 arbitrary ''coupling constants''. Restrictions on these constants are identified which cause these systems - or appropriate variants of them - to be isochronous or asymptotically isochronous, i.e. all their solutions to be periodic with a fixed period (independent of the initial data) or to have this property up to contributions vanishing exponentially as t→ ∞.

  12. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  13. Varying the effective buoyancy of cells using magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M.

    2004-06-01

    We introduce a magnetic force buoyancy variation (MFBV) technique that employs intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields to vary the effective buoyancy of cells and other diamagnetic systems in solution. Nonswimming Paramecia have been suspended, forced to sediment and driven to rise in solution using MFBV. Details of their response to MFBV have been used to determine the magnetic susceptibility of a single Paramecium. The use of MFBV as a means by which to suspend cell cultures indefinitely is also described.

  14. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-06-01

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a non-negligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analogue of Earnshaw's theorem, in which the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffness at the field-cooling position, independent of the angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  15. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  16. Three-Body Forces and the Limit of Oxygen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio; Holt, Jason D.; Schwenk, Achim; Akaishi, Yoshinori

    2010-07-16

    The limit of neutron-rich nuclei, the neutron drip line, evolves regularly from light to medium-mass nuclei except for a striking anomaly in the oxygen isotopes. This anomaly is not reproduced in shell-model calculations derived from microscopic two-nucleon forces. Here, we present the first microscopic explanation of the oxygen anomaly based on three-nucleon forces that have been established in few-body systems. This leads to repulsive contributions to the interactions among excess neutrons that change the location of the neutron drip line from {sup 28}O to the experimentally observed {sup 24}O. Since the mechanism is robust and general, our findings impact the prediction of the most neutron-rich nuclei and the synthesis of heavy elements in neutron-rich environments.

  17. Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based on Ultrasensitive Force Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamin, H. J.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) seeks to dramatically improve the sensitivity and resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), perhaps ultimately down to the molecular scale. It uses force detection to circumvent the sensitivity limits inherent in conventional inductively-detected MRI. By using an ultrasensitive, single crystal silicon cantilever cooled to 300 mK, we can detect forces smaller than 1 aN, allowing us to sense the magnetism from small ensembles of nuclear spins. We have used tobacco mosaic virus as a test object, detecting the hydrogen signal. Using three-dimensional scans and mathematical deconvolution algorithms, we have made 3D reconstructions of the viruses with resolution down to roughly 4 nm. This represents a 10^8x improvement in minimum detectable volume compared to the best conventional MRI. Advancing the technique further will require reducing the force noise, increasing the achieved magnetic field gradients, and making use of the inherent chemical sensitivity of magnetic resonance.

  18. Magnetic force of piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters with external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.; Leng, Y. G.; Gao, Y. J.

    2015-11-01

    In piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters with external magnetic field, one of the difficulties is the impact of the external magnetic field or magnetic force on vibration response and energy harvesting efficiency. Here we use the magnetizing current and magnetic dipoles approaches to analyze the magnetic force. The two calculation models are proposed for the energy harvesters. The calculation results of the two methods are compared with a set of experimental data. It has been proved that errors are produced with both methods while the magnet interval is sufficiently small. However, the calculation result achieved from magnetic dipoles approach is closer to experimental measurements than the one of magnetizing current approach. Consequently, the magnetic dipoles approach can be chosen preferably to calculate the magnetic force of piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters with external magnetic field.

  19. Measured force/current relations in solid magnetic thrust bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.; Wakefield, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    When magnetic bearings are employed in a pump, compressor, turbine, or other rotating machine, measurement of the current in the bearing coils provides knowledge of the forces imposed on the bearings. This can be a significant indicator of machine problems. Additionally, magnetic bearings can be utilized as a load cell for measuring impeller forces in test rigs. The forces supported by magnetic bearings are directly related to the currents, air gaps, and other parameters in the bearings. This paper discusses the current/force relation for magnetic thrust bearings. Force versus current measurements were made on a particular magnetic bearing in a test rig as the bearing coil currents were cycled at various time rates of change.d the quasi-static force versus current relations were measured for a variety of air gaps and currents. The thrust bearing exhibits a hysteresis effect, which creates a significant difference between the measured force when the current is increasing as compared to that when the current is decreasing. For design current loops, 0.95 A to 2.55 A, at the time rate of change of 0.1 A/s, the difference between increasing and decreasing current curves due to hysteresis ranged from 4 to 8%. If the bearing is operated in small trajectories about a fixed (nonzero) operation point on the F/I (force/current) curve, the scatter in the measurement error could be expected to be on the order of 4%. A quasi-static nonlinear current/force equation was developed to model the data and curve-fit parameters established for the measured data. The effects of coercive force and iron reluctance, obtained from conventional magnetic materials tests, were included to improve the model, but theoretically calculated values from simple magnetic circuit theory do not produce accurate results. Magnetic fringing, leakage, and other effects must be included.

  20. Power dissipation and magnetic forces and MAGLEV rebars

    SciTech Connect

    Zahn, M.

    1997-03-01

    Concrete guideways for proposed MAGLEV vehicles may be reinforced with electrically conducting and magnetizable steel rebars. Transient magnetic fields due to passing MAGLEV vehicles will then induce transient currents in the rebars leading to power dissipation and temperature rise as well as Lorentz and magnetization forces on the rebars. In order to evaluate if this heating and force on the rebars affects concrete life and performance, analysis is presented for an infinitely long conducting and magnetizable cylinder in imposed uniform axial or transverse magnetic fields. Exact and approximate solutions are presented for sinusoidal steady state and step transient magnetic fields inside and outside the cylinder, the induced current density, the vector potential for transverse magnetic fields, the time average dissipated power in the sinusoidal steady state, and the total energy dissipated for step transients. Forces are approximately calculated for imposed magnetic fields` with a weak spatial gradient. The analysis is applied to representative rebar materials.

  1. MAGNETIC HELICITY OF SELF-SIMILAR AXISYMMETRIC FORCE-FREE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Mei; Flyer, Natasha; Low, Boon Chye

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we continue our theoretical studies addressing the possible consequences of magnetic helicity accumulation in the solar corona. Our previous studies suggest that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are natural products of coronal evolution as a consequence of magnetic helicity accumulation and that the triggering of CMEs by surface processes such as flux emergence also have their origin in magnetic helicity accumulation. Here, we use the same mathematical approach to study the magnetic helicity of axisymmetric power-law force-free fields but focus on a family whose surface flux distributions are defined by self-similar force-free fields. The semi-analytical solutions of the axisymmetric self-similar force-free fields enable us to discuss the properties of force-free fields possessing a huge amount of accumulated magnetic helicity. Our study suggests that there may be an absolute upper bound on the total magnetic helicity of all bipolar axisymmetric force-free fields. With the increase of accumulated magnetic helicity, the force-free field approaches being fully opened up with Parker-spiral-like structures present around a current-sheet layer as evidence of magnetic helicity in the interplanetary space. It is also found that among the axisymmetric force-free fields having the same boundary flux distribution, the one that is self-similar is the one possessing the maximum amount of total magnetic helicity. This gives a possible physical reason why self-similar fields are often found in astrophysical bodies, where magnetic helicity accumulation is presumably also taking place.

  2. Classical diamagnetism, magnetic interaction energies, and repulsive forces in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, H.

    2011-05-01

    The Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem is often summarized as saying that there is no classical magnetic susceptibility, in particular no diamagnetism. This is seriously misleading. The theorem assumes position-dependent interactions but this is not required by classical physics. Since the work of Darwin in 1920 it has been known that the magnetism due to classical charged point particles can only be described by allowing velocity-dependent interactions in the Lagrangian. Legendre transformation to an approximate Hamiltonian can give an estimate of the Darwin diamagnetism for a system of charged point particles. Comparison with experiment, however, requires knowledge of the number of classically behaving electrons in the sample. A new repulsive effective many-body force, which should be relevant in plasmas, is predicted by the Hamiltonian.

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  4. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; GALNANDER, B.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LOFNES, T.; SIDORIN, A.O.; SMIRNOV, A.V.; ZIEMANN, V.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  6. Experimental Benchmarking of the Magnetized Friction Force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Galnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  7. Drag measurements on a body of revolution in Langley's 13-inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, David A.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Langley's 13-inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) has been used to conduct low-speed wind tunnel drag force measurements on a laminar-flow body-of-revolution free of support system interference, in order to verify the drag force measurement capabilities of the MSBS. The drag force calibrations and wind-on repeatability data obtained have verified the design capabilities for this system. A drag-prediction code has been used to assess the MSBS's usefulness in body drag estimation.

  8. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  9. Sensitive magnetic force detection with a carbon nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Willick, Kyle; Haapamaki, Chris; Baugh, Jonathan

    2014-03-21

    We propose a technique for sensitive magnetic point force detection using a suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance frequency show that single Bohr magneton changes in the magnetic state of an individual magnetic molecule grafted to the CNT can translate to detectable frequency shifts, on the order of a few kHz. The dependences of the resonator response to device parameters such as length, tension, CNT diameter, and gate voltage are explored and optimal operating conditions are identified. A signal-to-noise analysis shows that, in principle, magnetic switching at the level of a single Bohr magneton can be read out in a single shot on timescales as short as 10 μs. This force sensor should enable new studies of spin dynamics in isolated single molecule magnets, free from the crystalline or ensemble settings typically studied.

  10. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  11. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms.

  12. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  13. Magnetic forces in high-Tc superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    In September 1987, researchers at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearings at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989, a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu307. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  14. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  15. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested. PMID:24697421

  16. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-01

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  17. Dual-tip magnetic force microscopy with suppressed influence on magnetically soft samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precner, Marián; Fedor, Ján; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír

    2015-02-01

    Standard magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is considered as a powerful tool used for magnetic field imaging at nanoscale. The method consists of two passes realized by the magnetic tip. Within the first one, the topography pass, the magnetic tip directly touches the magnetic sample. Such contact perturbs the magnetization of the sample explored. To avoid the sample touching the magnetic tip, we present a new approach to magnetic field scanning by segregating the topological and magnetic scans with two different tips located on a cut cantilever. The approach minimizes the disturbance of sample magnetization, which could be a major problem in conventional MFM images of soft magnetic samples. By cutting the cantilever in half using the focused ion beam technique, we create one sensor with two different tips—one tip is magnetized, and the other one is left non-magnetized. The non-magnetized tip is used for topography and the magnetized one for the magnetic field imaging. The method developed we call dual-tip magnetic force microscopy (DT-MFM). We describe in detail the dual-tip fabrication process. In the experiments, we show that the DT-MFM method reduces significantly the perturbations of the magnetic tip as compared to the standard MFM method. The present technique can be used to investigate microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic samples and is relevant in a wide range of applications, e.g., data storage and biomedicine.

  18. Magnetic forces in high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 research at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearing at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989 a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu3O7. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic drag forces of a magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the drag force reaches a constant value, independent of the speed. Dampling of lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  19. Detecting the gravitational sensitivity of Paramecium caudatum using magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2006-03-01

    Under normal conditions, Paramecium cells regulate their swimming speed in response to the pN level mechanical force of gravity. This regulation, known as gravikinesis, is more pronounced when the external force is increased by methods such as centrifugation. Here we present a novel technique that simulates gravity fields using the interactions between strong inhomogeneous magnetic fields and cells. We are able to achieve variable gravities spanning from 10xg to -8xg; where g is earth's gravity. Our experiments show that the swimming speed regulation of Paramecium caudatum to magnetically simulated gravity is a true physiological response. In addition, they reveal a maximum propulsion force for paramecia. This advance establishes a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms.

  20. Considerations of a large force balanced magnetic energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyssa, Y. M.; Boom, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a generalized toroid-dipole force balancing system needs a minimum unidirectionally stressed confining structure required by the virial theorem. Expressions are derived for the induction relations based on the virial theorem of Clausius, and for the circumferential forces in terms of the radial stresses from the dipole and the torus. Expressions are tabulated for the forces and structural parameters for toroids and dipoles of circular cross-section, and for short solenoids. It is concluded that there is no benefit in a reduced structure by changing to a complicated force balanced double magnet system of a toroid and a dipole.

  1. Magnetic field induced by the carbon nanotubes current by magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Kotaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are reported to be able to generate large magnetic field because of their nanometer-size-diameter [K. Tsubaki, H. Yamaguchi, J. Phys. C 38 (2006) 49]. The magnetic fields around CNTs current path are investigated by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Under the consideration of the magnetic properties of magnetically coated tip of MFM, tip heights, current directions, and background magnetic field, etc., the magnetic field distribution are analyzed. The distribution of the magnetic field generated by the CNTs current is found to be asymmetric, and its distribution anomaly is found to be a kind of hysteresis effect of the MFM cantilever materials.

  2. Estimate of Magnetic Forces on Beam Sweeping Kickers

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Martin

    2000-02-23

    The beam sweeping magnet kickers are two pairs of conductors placed 90 degrees apart inside a circular magnetic yoke. Each pair has the same excitation current in the opposite directions, and the two currents are a sine and a cosine in phase. To estimate the magnetic forces on the kickers due to the excitation currents, we make the following simplifications: (1) The four conductors are all parallel to one another; (2) There are no relative motions within the system; and (3) the magnetic yoke has {mu} = {infinity}, and the fields are zero near the outside inner surface of the yoke.

  3. Levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Wang, G.; Zhou, D. J.; Zhao, L. F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying high and low magnetic fields generated from a superconducting magnet were investigated. The magnetic field intensity of the superconducting magnet was measured when the exciting current was 90 A. The magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field were both calculated. The YBCO bulk was cooled by liquid nitrogen in field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) condition. The results showed that the levitation forces increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Moreover, the levitation forces were more dependent on magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field than magnetic field intensity.

  4. The relationship between CME momenta and magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Bercik, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Free magnetic energy is the energy source of solar flares and CMEs. At theinitiation of a CME, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types of energy. Observable magnetic field sudden changes havebeen found at the onset of flares. The Lorentz force around the onset of a flare have been formulated in recent studies and can be estimatedusing photospheric vector magnetic field data. It is proposed that outward Lorentz force impulses could be related to CME momenta. We analyze about 30 CMEs and their source region magnetic fields.The best vector magnetic field data are observed for active regions nearthe center of the solar disk. We first select CMEs that appear to be haloor partial halo CMEs in the LASCO images, and then we use STEREO SECCHI COR2white light images to estimate CME mass and speed. We then estimatethe Lorentz forces in the source active regions at the flare onset using SDO HMI photosheric vector magnetic field data.We report our work in progress and describe our analyses.

  5. On the Relationship between Solar Magnetic Forces and CME Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Lynch, Ben; Sun, Xudong; Welsch, Brian T.; Bercik, David J.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-04-01

    Free magnetic energy is the energy source of solar flares and CMEs. At the initiation of a CME, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types of energy. Observable magnetic field sudden changes have been found at the onset of flares. The Lorentz force around the onset of a flare have been formulated in recent studies and can be estimated using photospheric vector magnetic field data. It is proposed that outward Lorentz force impulses could be related to CME momenta. We analyze about 30 CMEs and their source region magnetic fields. The best vector magnetic field data are observed for active regions near the center of the solar disk. We first select CMEs that appear to be halo or partial halo CMEs in the LASCO images, and then we use STEREO SECCHI COR2 white light images to estimate CME mass and speed. We then estimate the Lorentz forces in the source active regions at the flare onset using SDO HMI photosheric vector magnetic field data. We report our studies and describe our analyses.This study is under the support of NSF grants.

  6. Force-Free Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, R.

    2003-05-01

    In the course of an ongoing investigation of force-free magnetic fields in the spherical geometry appropriate to the solar corona, we have found solutions that represent magnetic flux ropes. The magnetic energy stored in these ropes and the surrounding field is larger than that which can be stored in simple magnetic arcades with the same boundary conditions, and in some cases exceeds slightly the Aly-Sturrock limit on the energy of a closed force-free magnetic field with all its magnetic flux connected to the coronal base. Flux-rope solutions with the highest energies tend to arise when a strong potential field overlies a region of sheared field containing field-aligned currents. These flux-rope solutions have an unusual topology; instead of a single twisted, disconnected flux system, there are two distinct rope structures. A two-dimensional slice through each rope contains an O-type magnetic neutral point, and the overall solution therefore correspondingly contains two X-type neutral points. We speculate on the relation of this unusual topology to observations of magnetic clouds as interplanetary signatures of coronal mass ejections. This work was supported by NASA grant NAG5-9733 to Middlebury College.

  7. Design and optimization of force-reduced high field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembeczki, Szabolcs

    High field magnets have many important applications in different areas of research, in the power industry and also for military purposes. For example, high field magnets are particularly useful in: material sciences, high energy physics, plasma physics (as fusion magnets), high power applications (as energy storage devices), and space applications (in propulsion systems). One of the main issues with high-field magnets is the presence of very large electromagnetic stresses that must be counteracted and therefore require heavy support structures. In superconducting magnets, the problems caused by Lorentz forces are further complicated by the fact that superconductors for high field applications are pressure sensitive. The current carrying capacity is greatly reduced under stress and strain (especially in the case of Nb 3Sn and the new high temperature superconductors) so the reduction of the acting forces is of even greater importance. Different force-reduced magnet concepts have been studied in the past, both numerical and analytical methods have been used to solve this problem. The developed concepts are based on such complex winding geometries that the realization and manufacturing of such coils is extremely difficult and these concepts are mainly of theoretical interest. In the presented research, a novel concept for force-reduced magnets has been developed and analyzed which is easy to realize and therefore is of practical interest. The analysis has been performed with a new methodology, which does not require the time consuming finite element calculations. The developed computer models describe the 3-dimensional winding configuration by sets of filaments (filamentary approximation). This approach is much faster than finite element analysis and therefore allows rapid optimization of concepts. The method has been extensively tested on geometries of force-reduced solenoids where even analytical solutions exist. As a further cross check, the developed computer codes have been tested against qualified finite element codes and found to be in excellent agreement. The developed concept of force-reduced coils is directly applicable to pulsed magnets and a conceptual design of a 25 Tesla magnet has been developed. Although no experimental proof was possible within the scope of this research, there is strong evidence to believe that the developed concept is also applicable to superconducting magnets operating in a constant current mode.

  8. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells’ traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  9. Local nonlinear rf forces in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    The local nonlinear forces induced by radio frequency (rf) waves are derived in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, where the inhomogeneity exists in the rf fields, in the static magnetic field as well as in the equilibrium density and temperature. The local parallel force is completely resonant, but a novel component dependent on those inhomogeneities is obtained as the result of the inhomogeneous transport of parallel resonant-absorbed momentum by the nonlinear perpendicular drift flux. In the local poloidal force, the component induced by the inhomogeneity of rf power absorption is also confirmed and it can be recognized as the residual effect from the incomplete cancellation between the rate of the diamagnetic poloidal momentum gain and the Lorentz force due to the radial diffusion-like flux. The compact expression for radial force is also obtained for the first time, whose nonresonant component is expressed as the sum of the ponderomotive force on particles and the gradients of the nonresonant perpendicular pressure and of the nonresonant momentum flux due to the finite temperature effect. Numerical calculations in a 1-D slab model show that the resonant component dependent on the inhomogeneities may be significant when the ion absorption dominates the resonant wave-particle interaction. A quantitative estimation shows that the novel component in the parallel force is important to understand the experiments of the ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive.

  10. Minimization of cogging force in a linear permanent magnet motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hor, P.J.; Zhu, Z.Q.; Howe, D.; Rees-Jones, J.

    1998-09-01

    A finite element/analytically based method is used to aid the minimization of cogging force, due to slotting and the finite length of the ferromagnetic core, in a tubular brushless permanent magnet motor. The method is validated against both finite element calculations and measurements on a prototype motor.

  11. Using Magnetic Forces to Probe the Gravi-response of Swimming Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Paramecium Caudatum, a single celled ciliate, alters its swimming behavior when subjected to different gravity environments (e.g. centrifugation and micro-gravity). To dissect the mechanisms behind this gravi-response and that of other biological systems, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means of creating a rapidly tunable, simulated variable gravity environment. Since biological materials are weakly diamagnetic, we must subject them to intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields with characteristic field-field gradient products on the order of 16 T^2/cm. We will describe experiments on Paramecium Caudatum in which we adjust their net buoyancy with magnetic forces and measure the resulting changes in their swimming behavior.

  12. THE MEAN ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE RESULTING FROM MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: d.w.hughes@leeds.ac.uk

    2011-02-01

    Motivated both by considerations of the generation of large-scale astrophysical magnetic fields and by potential problems with mean magnetic field generation by turbulent convection, we investigate the mean electromotive force (emf) resulting from the magnetic buoyancy instability of a rotating layer of stratified magnetic field, considering both unidirectional and sheared fields. We discuss why the traditional decomposition into {alpha} and {beta} effects is inappropriate in this case, and that it is only consideration of the entire mean emf that is meaningful. By considering a weighted average of the unstable linear eigenmodes, and averaging over the horizontal plane, we obtain depth-dependent emfs. For the simplified case of isothermal, ideal MHD, we are able to obtain an analytic expression for the emf; more generally, the emf has to be determined numerically. We calculate how the emf depends on the various parameters of the problem, particularly the rotation rate and the latitude of the magnetic layer.

  13. Bld10/Cep135 stabilizes basal bodies to resist cilia-generated forces.

    PubMed

    Bayless, Brian A; Giddings, Thomas H; Winey, Mark; Pearson, Chad G

    2012-12-01

    Basal bodies nucleate, anchor, and organize cilia. As the anchor for motile cilia, basal bodies must be resistant to the forces directed toward the cell as a consequence of ciliary beating. The molecules and generalized mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of basal bodies remain to be discovered. Bld10/Cep135 is a basal body outer cartwheel domain protein that has established roles in the assembly of nascent basal bodies. We find that Bld10 protein first incorporates stably at basal bodies early during new assembly. Bld10 protein continues to accumulate at basal bodies after assembly, and we hypothesize that the full complement of Bld10 is required to stabilize basal bodies. We identify a novel mechanism for Bld10/Cep135 in basal body maintenance so that basal bodies can withstand the forces produced by motile cilia. Bld10 stabilizes basal bodies by promoting the stability of the A- and C-tubules of the basal body triplet microtubules and by properly positioning the triplet microtubule blades. The forces generated by ciliary beating promote basal body disassembly in bld10Δ cells. Thus Bld10/Cep135 acts to maintain the structural integrity of basal bodies against the forces of ciliary beating in addition to its separable role in basal body assembly. PMID:23115304

  14. Fluctuation-Induced Interactions in external magnetic fields: Casimir force and Radiative Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul

    Thermally induced electromagnetic fields give rise to the Casimir force and the near field heat transfer between two bodies separated by a gap. These phenomena are described by Rytova's theory of fluctuating electromagnetic fields and both the Casimir force and the near field heat transfer depend on the local dielectric function of the bodies. In this work we present a theoretical calculation on the modulation of fluctuation-induced interactions in the presence of an external magnetic field. The system consists of two parallel plates separated by a gap d. Each plate is isotropic and has a local dielectric function. Applying an external magnetic field parallel to the plates, in the so called Voigt configuration, the plates become anisotropic. In particular, we consider plates of InSb. For the Casimir force the two plates are kept at the same temperature and the external field reduces the magnitude of the force. Similarly if the two plates are kept at different temperature the near field radiative heat transfer is modulated by the magnitude of the external magnetic field. The results are extended to semiconducting quantum wells. In both cases, the excitation of magnetoplasmons provides an explanation for the observed effect.

  15. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  16. Corroboration of magnetic forces in US Maglev design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.; He, J.; Wang, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Four System Concept Definition (SCD) contractors to the National Maglev Initiative (NMI) developed conceptual designs of maglev systems in 1991--1992. The objective of the work reported here was to perform independent calculations of the magnetic forces and fields of these four systems to assess the ``reasonableness`` of the results presented to the government. Commercial computer software was used for computing forces in the system employing nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and for some calculations of induced eddy current effects in finite-sized systems. Other cases required the use of models developed at ANL and verified by experiment, or in a few cases, new computer programs that have not been validated by experiment. The magnetic forces calculated by the contractors were found to be credible in every case evaluated. The stray fields were also found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated by the contractors, but, for lack of spice, are not reported here.

  17. Corroboration of magnetic forces in US Maglev design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.; He, J.; Wang, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Four System Concept Definition (SCD) contractors to the National Maglev Initiative (NMI) developed conceptual designs of maglev systems in 1991--1992. The objective of the work reported here was to perform independent calculations of the magnetic forces and fields of these four systems to assess the reasonableness'' of the results presented to the government. Commercial computer software was used for computing forces in the system employing nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and for some calculations of induced eddy current effects in finite-sized systems. Other cases required the use of models developed at ANL and verified by experiment, or in a few cases, new computer programs that have not been validated by experiment. The magnetic forces calculated by the contractors were found to be credible in every case evaluated. The stray fields were also found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated by the contractors, but, for lack of spice, are not reported here.

  18. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    PubMed

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked. PMID:11102074

  19. The magnetic mirror force in plasma fluid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been several attempts to include the magnetic mirror force in the equation of motion for a plasma in a fluid formalism. In the process, some confusion has been evident regarding when and how this should be done. This problem has been addressed in the literature, but these treatments appear to have been forgotten or misunderstood. The mathematical arguments are summarized so that the physical consequences are readily perceived. It is shown that for an isotropic plasma fluid, in the direction parallel or anti-parallel to a magnetic field, the forces associated with a diverging magnetic field cancel out. Only for anisotropies in the fluid properties does the diverging field influence the plasma dynamics.

  20. Force prediction in permanent magnet flat linear motors (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, J. F.; Akmese, R.

    1991-11-01

    The advent of neodymium iron boron rare-earth permanent magnet material has afforded the opportunity to construct linear machines of high force to weight ratio. The paper describes the design and construction of an axial flux machine and rotating drum test rig. The machine occupies an arc of 45° on a drum 1.22 m in diameter. The excitation is provided by blocks of NdFeB material which are skewed in order to minimize the force variations due to slotting. The stator carries a three-phase short-chorded double-layer winding of four poles. The machine is supplied by a PWM inverter the fundamental component of which is phase locked to the rotor position so that a ``dc brushless'' drive system is produced. Electromagnetic forces including ripple forces are measured at supply frequencies up to 100 Hz. They are compared with finite-element analysis which calculates the force variation over the time period. The paper then considers some of the causes of ripple torque. In particular, the force production due solely to the permanent magnet excitation is considered. This has two important components each acting along the line of motion of the machine, one is due to slotting and the other is due to the finite length of the primary. In the practical machine the excitation poles are skewed to minimize the slotting force and the effectiveness of this is confirmed by both results from the experiments and the finite-element analysis. The end effect force is shown to have a space period of twice that of the excitation. The amplitude of this force and its period are again confirmed by practical results.

  1. THE NEGATIVE EFFECTIVE MAGNETIC PRESSURE IN STRATIFIED FORCED TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kemel, Koen; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2012-04-20

    To understand the basic mechanism of the formation of magnetic flux concentrations, we determine by direct numerical simulations the turbulence contributions to the mean magnetic pressure in a strongly stratified isothermal layer with large plasma beta, where a weak uniform horizontal mean magnetic field is applied. The negative contribution of turbulence to the effective mean magnetic pressure is determined for strongly stratified forced turbulence over a range of values of magnetic Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Small-scale dynamo action is shown to reduce the negative effect of turbulence on the effective mean magnetic pressure. However, the turbulence coefficients describing the negative effective magnetic pressure phenomenon are found to converge for magnetic Reynolds numbers between 60 and 600, which is the largest value considered here. In all these models, the turbulent intensity is arranged to be nearly independent of height, so the kinetic energy density decreases with height due to the decrease in density. In a second series of numerical experiments, the turbulent intensity increases with height such that the turbulent kinetic energy density is nearly independent of height. Turbulent magnetic diffusivity and turbulent pumping velocity are determined with the test-field method for both cases. The vertical profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity is found to agree with what is expected based on simple mixing length expressions. Turbulent pumping is shown to be down the gradient of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, but it is twice as large as expected. Corresponding numerical mean-field models are used to show that a large-scale instability can occur in both cases, provided the degree of scale separation is large enough and hence the turbulent magnetic diffusivity small enough.

  2. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-03-23

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed. PMID:26964007

  3. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  4. New insights into the use of magnetic force microscopy to discriminate between magnetic and nonmagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Cristina S.; Quaresma, Pedro; Baptista, Pedro V.; Carvalho, Patrícia A.; Araújo, João Pedro; Pereira, Eulália; Eaton, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is a very powerful technique, which can potentially be used to detect and localize the magnetic fields arising from nanoscopic magnetic domains, such as magnetic nanoparticles. However, in order to achieve this, we must be able to use MFM to discriminate between magnetic forces arising from the magnetic nanoparticles and nonmagnetic forces from other particles and sample features. Unfortunately, MFM can show a significant response even for nonmagnetic nanoparticles, giving rise to potentially misleading results. The literature to date lacks evidence for MFM detection of magnetic nanoparticles with nonmagnetic nanoparticles as a control. In this work, we studied magnetite particles of two sizes and with a silica shell, and compared them to nonmagnetic metallic and silica nanoparticles. We found that even on conducting, grounded substrates, significant electrostatic interaction between atomic force microscopy probes and nanoparticles can be detected, causing nonmagnetic signals that might be mistaken for a true MFM response. Nevertheless, we show that MFM can be used to discriminate between magnetic and nonmagnetic nanoparticles by using an electromagnetic shielding technique or by analysis of the phase shift data. On the basis of our experimental evidence we propose a methodology that enables MFM to be reliably used to study unknown samples containing magnetic nanoparticles, and correctly interpret the data obtained.

  5. On unsteady-motion theory of magnetic force for maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Energy Technology

    1995-12-14

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique is a useful tool for measuring motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  6. On the unsteady-motion theory of magnetic forces for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1996-02-01

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance their understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique provides a useful tool to measure motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  7. Characterization of Magnetic Particles on Cantilevers for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doran D.; Marohn, John A.; Fainchtein, Raul

    1998-03-01

    Until recently, magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) measured the gradient dipole force between spins in a sample, mounted to a microcantilever, and a millimeter size magnetic particle. In an effort to lift MRFM's sample-on-cantilever restriction, we have developed a technique for mounting micron-scale Alnico particles on commercial silicon microcantilevers and magnetizing the particles so their easy axis ends up perpendicular to the plane of the cantilever (a force/gradient geometry which results in easy to interpret images). It is observed that the spring constant k of the resulting cantilever depends strongly on magnetic field B. A simple model explains this magnetic field contribution to the cantilever's spring constant, and allows us to extract the B-H curve and magnetic moment of the cantilever's magnetic particle from the observed k(B). We will draw on this model to assess the utility of using magnetically tipped cantilevers, configured in various cantilever/particle geometries, to perform MRFM at high magnetic field. We will also describe an apparatus for characterizing cantilevers as a function of magnetic field.

  8. Magnetic force micropiston: An integrated force/microfluidic device for the application of compressive forces in a confined environment

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. K.; Kleckner, N.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular biology takes place inside confining spaces. For example, bacteria grow in crevices, red blood cells squeeze through capillaries, and chromosomes replicate inside the nucleus. Frequently, the extent of this confinement varies. Bacteria grow longer and divide, red blood cells move through smaller and smaller passages as they travel to capillary beds, and replication doubles the amount of DNA inside the nucleus. This increase in confinement, either due to a decrease in the available space or an increase in the amount of material contained in a constant volume, has the potential to squeeze and stress objects in ways that may lead to changes in morphology, dynamics, and ultimately biological function. Here, we describe a device developed to probe the interplay between confinement and the mechanical properties of cells and cellular structures, and forces that arise due to changes in a structure's state. In this system, the manipulation of a magnetic bead exerts a compressive force upon a target contained in the confining space of a microfluidic channel. This magnetic force microfluidic piston is constructed in such a way that we can measure (a) target compliance and changes in compliance as induced by changes in buffer, extract, or biochemical composition, (b) target expansion force generated by changes in the same parameters, and (c) the effects of compression stress on a target's structure and function. Beyond these issues, our system has general applicability to a variety of questions requiring the combination of mechanical forces, confinement, and optical imaging. PMID:24593368

  9. Magnetic force micropiston: An integrated force/microfluidic device for the application of compressive forces in a confined environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. K.; Kleckner, N.

    2014-02-01

    Cellular biology takes place inside confining spaces. For example, bacteria grow in crevices, red blood cells squeeze through capillaries, and chromosomes replicate inside the nucleus. Frequently, the extent of this confinement varies. Bacteria grow longer and divide, red blood cells move through smaller and smaller passages as they travel to capillary beds, and replication doubles the amount of DNA inside the nucleus. This increase in confinement, either due to a decrease in the available space or an increase in the amount of material contained in a constant volume, has the potential to squeeze and stress objects in ways that may lead to changes in morphology, dynamics, and ultimately biological function. Here, we describe a device developed to probe the interplay between confinement and the mechanical properties of cells and cellular structures, and forces that arise due to changes in a structure's state. In this system, the manipulation of a magnetic bead exerts a compressive force upon a target contained in the confining space of a microfluidic channel. This magnetic force microfluidic piston is constructed in such a way that we can measure (a) target compliance and changes in compliance as induced by changes in buffer, extract, or biochemical composition, (b) target expansion force generated by changes in the same parameters, and (c) the effects of compression stress on a target's structure and function. Beyond these issues, our system has general applicability to a variety of questions requiring the combination of mechanical forces, confinement, and optical imaging.

  10. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Almer, J.D. ); Rossing, T.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to further understand the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  11. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Almer, J.D.; Rossing, T.D.

    1992-04-01

    Experiments have been performed to further understand the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  12. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials. PMID:26758898

  13. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L.; Cohen, Avis H.; Fauci, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed. PMID:21037110

  14. Effect of guideway discontinuities on magnetic levitation and drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, T. D.; Korte, R.; Hull, J. R.

    Transients in the lift and drag forces on a NdFeB permanent magnet were observed as the magnet passed over various discontinuities in a rotating aluminum disk at velocities of 4 to 25 m/s. For full cuts in the disk, the amplitude of the lift and drag transients and the waveform of the drag transient depend on the width, and the amplitudes are much larger than for partial cuts. The use of a backing plate to join two cut segments is ineffective.

  15. Effect of guideway discontinuities on magnetic levitation and drag forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rossing, T.D.; Korte, R. Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL . Dept. of Physics); Hull, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Transients in the lift and drag forces on a NdFeB permanent magnet were observed as the magnet passed over various discontinuities in a rotating aluminum disk at velocities of 4 to 25 m/s. For full cuts in the disk, the amplitude of the lift and drag transients and the waveform of the drag transient depend on the width, and the amplitudes are much larger than for partial cuts. The use of a backing plate to join two cut segments is ineffective. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Implementation of NMR pulse sequences for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Bradley; Eichler, Alexander; Degen, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning microscopy technique that allows measuring nuclear spin densities with a resolution of a few nanometers. Ongoing efforts are aiming at improving this resolution, which might ultimately facilitate non-destructive 3D scans of complex molecules or solid state systems with atomic resolution. Here, we review our current efforts to utilize in an MRFM experiment pulsing techniques borrowed from the nuclear magnetic resonance community. The use of advanced pulsing schemes may improve signal-to-noise ratio, imaging resolution, and allow the investigation of novel phenomena.

  17. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  18. Effect of magnet/slot combination on triple-frequency magnetic force and vibration of permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Mina; Wang, Shiyu; Xiu, Jie; Cao, Shuqian

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between magnet/slot combination and magnetic forces including unbalanced magnetic force (UMF) and cogging torque (CT) of permanent magnet (PM) motors is investigated by using superposition principle and mechanical and magnetic symmetries. The results show that magnetic force can be produced by all magnets passing a single slot, by all slots passing a single magnet, or by eccentricity, which respectively correspond to three frequency components. The results further show that net force/torque can be classified into three typical cases: UMF is suppressed and CT is excited, UMF excited and CT suppressed, and UMF and CT both suppressed, and consequently possible vibrations include three unique groups: rotational modes, translational modes, and balanced modes. The conclusion that combinations with the greatest common divisor (GCD) greater than unity can avoid UMF is mathematically verified, and at the same time lower CT harmonics are preliminarily addressed by the typical excitations. The above findings can create simple guidelines for the suppression of certain UMF and/or CT by using suitable combinations, which in turn can present approach to yield a more desirable response in high performance applications. The superposition effect and predicted relationship are verified by the transient magnetic Finite Element method. Since this work is motivated by symmetries, comparisons are made in order to give further insight into the inner force and vibration behaviors of general rotary power-transmission systems.

  19. Dilation of force-free magnetic flux tubes. [solar magnetic field profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenthal, S.

    1977-01-01

    A general study is presented of the mapping functions which relate the magnetic-field profiles across a force-free rope in segments subjected to various external pressures. The results reveal that if the external pressure falls below a certain critical level (dependent on the flux-current relation which defines the tube), the magnetic profile consists of an invariant core sheathed in a layer permeated by an azimuthal magnetic field.

  20. Dynamic nanomagnetism characterization of individual magnetic nanoparticles by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Zhenghua; Pan, Deng; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, stroboscopic imaging of an alternating magnetic field (AC magnetic field) from individual superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles was achieved using the developed frequency modulated-magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM) technique, which enables the imaging of the vector signals of AC magnetic fields, such as a combination of in-phase and quadrature signals or that of amplitude and phase signals. FM-MFM uses the frequency modulation of cantilever oscillation, caused by the application of an off-resonant AC magnetic field to a mechanically oscillated cantilever, and visualises the vector signals of the AC magnetic field by adding a frequency demodulator and a lock-in amplifier to a conventional magnetic force microscope. Stroboscopic imaging of an AC magnetic field was carried out by varying the phase of the measured in-phase and quadrature signals via a signal processing technique. For the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, stroboscopic imaging of the time-variable AC magnetic field, caused by the rotation of the magnetic moments within the particles, was demonstrated. This article describes the present status of FM-MFM technology, with particular attention to the feasibility of detecting magnetic moments of individual nanoparticles, and the possible application of FM-MFM in biological imaging.

  1. Force-Free Magnetic Relaxation in Driven Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. Z.; Boozer, A. H.

    2005-06-01

    Taylor relaxation in a driven plasma with normal magnetic field intercepting the boundary is described by the Jensen-Chu theory, which predicts infinite energy and helicity barriers that constrain the accessible relaxed states to system scale. For a partially relaxed force-free (j=kB) plasma where k is a field line constant, nonlinearity regularizes the Jensen-Chu singularities and new branches of relaxed state become accessible, such as the flipped spheromak and other high k states.

  2. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  3. Force-free magnetic fields - The magneto-frictional method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, W. H.; Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    The problem under discussion is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force j x B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. We choose to represent the magnetic field in terms of Clebsch variables in the form B = grad alpha x grad beta. These variables are constant on any field line so that each field line is labeled by the corresponding values of alpha and beta. When the field is described in this way, the most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. We show that such field configurations may be calculated by a magneto-frictional method. We imagine that the field lines move through a stationary medium, and that each element of magnetic field is subject to a frictional force parallel to and opposing the velocity of the field line. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta, that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. We apply the method first to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions, and then to a problem of cylindrical symmetry that was previously discussed by Barnes and Sturrock (1972). In one important respect, our new results differ from the earlier results of Barnes and Sturrock, and we conclude that the earlier article was in error.

  4. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, William; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy; Blomberg, Erick; McCullian, Brendan; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, P. Chris

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes are commercially-available, versatile structures that have a variety of applications. Although most commonly used as the support structure for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, membranes are also ultrasensitive high-frequency mechanical oscillators. The sensitivity stems from the high quality factor Q 106 , which has led to applications in sensitive quantum optomechanical experiments. The high sensitivity also opens the door to ultrasensitive force detection applications. We report force detection of electron spin magnetic resonance at 300 K using a Si3N4 membrane with a force sensitivity of 4 fN/√{ Hz}, and a potential low temperature sensitivity of 25 aN/√{ Hz}. Given membranes' sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiN membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument that has superior spatial resolution to conventional NMR.

  5. Boundary force method for analyzing two-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, P. W.; Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Boundary Force Method (BFM) was formulated for the two-dimensional stress analysis of complex crack configurations. In this method, only the boundaries of the region of interest are modeled. The boundaries are divided into a finite number of straight-line segments, and at the center of each segment, concentrated forces and a moment are applied. This set of unknown forces and moments is calculated to satisfy the prescribed boundary conditions of the problem. The elasticity solution for the stress distribution due to concentrated forces and a moment applied at an arbitrary point in a cracked infinite plate are used as the fundamental solution. Thus, the crack need not be modeled as part of the boundary. The formulation of the BFM is described and the accuracy of the method is established by analyzing several crack configurations for which accepted stress-intensity factor solutions are known. The crack configurations investigated include mode I and mixed mode (mode I and II) problems. The results obtained are, in general, within + or - 0.5 percent of accurate numerical solutions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated through the analysis of complex crack configurations for which limited or no solutions are known.

  6. Height and Body Composition Determine Arm Propulsive Force in Youth Swimmers Independent of a Maturation Stage

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Tatiane; Costa, Manoel; Oliveira, Saulo; Júnior, Marcos Barbosa; Ritti-Dias, Raphael; Santos, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anthropometric variables, body composition and propulsive force in swimmers aged 9–17 years. Anthropometric characteristics (body height and mass, sitting height, arm span, arm muscle area and body composition) and the propulsive force of the arm (tethered swimming test) were evaluated in 56 competitive male swimmers. Tanner’s stages of genital maturation (P1–5) were used. The data analysis included correlations and multiple linear regression. The propulsive force of the arm was correlated with body height (r = 0.34; p =0.013), arm span (r = 0.29; p =0.042), sitting height (r = 0.36; p =0.009), % body fat (r = 0.33; p =0.016), lean body mass (r = 0.34; p =0.015) and arm muscle area (r = 0.31; p =0.026). Using multiple linear regression models, the percent body fat and height were identified as significant predictors of the propulsive force of the arm after controlling for the maturation stage. This model explained 22% (R2 = 0.22) of associations. In conclusion, the propulsive force of swimmers was related to body height and percent body fat. PMID:25414760

  7. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.; He, J.; Rote, D.M. ); Rossing, T.D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-11-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the magnetic levitation of vehicles over guideways consisting of periodically-spaced conducting coils. Examples of proposed guideway configurations include arrays of independent coils (''loop track''), interconnected coils (''ladder track''), two layers of coils (double-layer ''null-flux'' track), and figure-eight coils (single-layer ''null-flux'' track). Typically, widely-separated superconducting magnets are mounted in the vehicle. A system that achieves both lift and guidance from vertical figure-eight coils in the guideway sidewalls has been developed in Japan. This system, when well designed, can have a very large lift-to-drag ratio. The authors conducted an experimental and theoretical investigation of the lift, drag, and guidance forces on a permanent magnet moving close to various arrays of figure-eight coils. The measured time-histories of the forces provide a basis for the evaluation of electrodynamic models and codes developed to analyze the magnetic levitation of vehicles using the discrete suspension coils of the null-flux type. Good correlation was found between the experimental data and the predictions of the code COIL GDWY. The authors report some of the results and discuss their application to the design of maglev systems.

  8. Localized Spectroscopy using a Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Giorgio; Lin, Qiong; Mouaziz, Schahrazede; Hunkeler, Andreas; Degen, Christian; Meier, Urban; Brugger, Juerger; Meier, Beat

    2006-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) constitutes a promising next-generation magnetic resonance detection device at room temperature. A MRFM observes nuclear (or electron) spin magnetization as a force, which occurs when a paramagnetic sample is polarized in inhomogeneous static magnetic field (10E5 T/m) and a high frequency drives the cantilever on-resonance by a cyclic adiabatic modulation, which make able to measure T1 rho. In this contribution, we combine the MRFM with spin-echo spectroscopy to add spectral resolution to NMR signals of micro-scale objects at room temperature. First experimental spectra recorded with the amplitude detection technique from a sample of barium chlorate monohydrate and ammonium sulfate single crystals mounted on a non commercial cantilever show resolution of 2μm and a sensitivity of 10E13 spins. The new microscope, which uses the frequency detection down to m-Hz resolution and the annealed non-commercials cantilevers, which have Q factor up to 250000 at room temperature, improve the sensitivity to 10E9 spins. This new setup and a new measurement technique should make able to measure T1.

  9. Low magnetic Prandtl number dynamos with helical forcing.

    PubMed

    Mininni, Pablo D; Montgomery, David C

    2005-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of dynamo action in a forced Roberts flow. The behavior of the dynamo is followed as the mechanical Reynolds number is increased, starting from the laminar case until a turbulent regime is reached. The critical magnetic Reynolds for dynamo action is found, and in the turbulent flow it is observed to be nearly independent on the magnetic Prandtl number in the range from approximately 0.3 to approximately 0.1. Also the dependence of this threshold with the amount of mechanical helicity in the flow is studied. For the different regimes found, the configuration of the magnetic and velocity fields in the saturated steady state are discussed. PMID:16383758

  10. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  11. On the unsteady-motion theory of magnetic forces for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1993-11-01

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. In the past, most maglev-system designs were based on a quasisteady-motion theory of magnetic forces. This report presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique provides a useful tool to measure motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  12. A simple model simulating a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-07-01

    This software can be used in a computational fluids dynamics (CFD) code to represent a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces. The combined software can be used effectively in car design analyses that involve many underhood thermal management simulations. FANMOD uses as input the rotational speed of the fan, geometric fan data, and the lift and drag coefficients of the blades, and predicts the body forces generated by the fan inmore » the axial and circumferential directions. These forces can be used as momentum forces in a CFD code to simulate the effect of the fan in an underhood thermal management simulation.« less

  13. Interpretation of Magnetic Phase Anomalies over 2D Tabular Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, phase angle (inverse tangent of the ratio of the horizontal to vertical gradients of magnetic anomalies) profile over two-dimensional tabular bodies has been subjected to detailed analysis for determining the source parameters. Distances between certain characteristic positions on this phase curve are related to the parameters of two-dimensional tabular magnetic sources. In this paper, I have derived the mathematical expressions for these relations. It has been demonstrated here that for locating the origin of the 2D tabular source, knowledge on the type of the model (contact, sheet, dyke, and fault) is not necessary. A procedure is evolved to determine the location, depth, width and magnetization angle of the 2D sources from the mathematical expressions. The method is tested on real field data. The effect of the overlapping bodies is also discussed with two synthetic examples. The interpretation technique is developed for contact, sheet, dike and inclined fault bodies.

  14. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  15. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  16. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  17. Public Relations Body of Knowledge Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRSA Task Force

    1988-01-01

    Lists the initial readings to be codified in the public relations body of knowledge. Categories include foundations of public relations, organizational and managerial context, the communication and relationship context, public relations processes, elements and functions of professional practice, and contexts for professional practice. (MM)

  18. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: Application to noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Río, Fernando del Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J. Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation.

  19. Analytical equation of state with three-body forces: application to noble gases.

    PubMed

    del Río, Fernando; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Guzmán, Orlando; Moreno-Razo, José Antonio; Ramos, J Eloy

    2013-11-14

    We developed an explicit equation of state (EOS) for small non polar molecules by means of an effective two-body potential. The average effect of three-body forces was incorporated as a perturbation, which results in rescaled values for the parameters of the two-body potential. These values replace the original ones in the EOS corresponding to the two-body interaction. We applied this procedure to the heavier noble gases and used a modified Kihara function with an effective Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) term to represent the two- and three-body forces. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations with two- and three-body forces. There was good agreement between predicted, simulated, and experimental thermodynamic properties of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, up to twice the critical density and up to five times the critical temperature. In order to achieve 1% accuracy of the pressure at liquid densities, the EOS must incorporate the effect of ATM forces. The ATM factor in the rescaled two-body energy is most important at temperatures around and lower than the critical one. Nonetheless, the rescaling of two-body diameter cannot be neglected at liquid-like densities even at high temperature. This methodology can be extended straightforwardly to deal with other two- and three-body potentials. It could also be used for other nonpolar substances where a spherical two-body potential is still a reasonable coarse-grain approximation. PMID:24320280

  20. Three-Body Forces and Proton-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jason D; Menendez, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first study of three-nucleon (3N) forces for proton-rich nuclei along the N 8 and N 20 isotones. Our results for the ground-state energies and proton separation energies are in very good agreement with experiment where available, and with the empirical isobaric multiplet mass equation. We predict the spectra for all N 8 and N 20 isotones to the proton dripline, which agree well with experiment for 18Ne, 19Na, 20Mg and 42Ti. In all other cases, we provide first predictions based on nuclear forces. Our results are also very promising for studying isospin symmetry breaking in medium-mass nuclei based on chiral effective field theory.

  1. Influence of effective three-body force on the spectroscopy of /sup 19/O

    SciTech Connect

    Haung, W.; Song, H.; Wang, Z.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1983-04-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the influence of effective three-body force on the spectroscopy of /sup 19/O. The model space was chosen as the configuration space which consists of the j-j coupling states of three valence neutrons in the s-d shell. The effective interaction including two- and three-body forces was then derived in the framework of the folded diagram method (FDM). Besides two traditional three-body terms, there is another kind of three-body force, the folded one constructed with two two-body diagrams, in FDM. The G-matrix elements of soft core Reid force were used in the numerical calculations. In the case of lacking the G-matrix elements, we adopted the matrix elements of M-3Y force as the equivalents. The results show that the influence of the effective three-body forces on the spectrum of /sup 19/O is not of importance, but the part coming from the folded three-body term is worth noting.

  2. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  3. Statistical methods for including two-body forces in large system calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, S.M.

    1980-07-01

    Large systems of interacting particles are often treated by assuming that the effect on any one particle of the remaining N-1 may be approximated by an average potential. This approach reduces the problem to that of finding the bound-state solutions for a particle in a potential; statistical mechanics is then used to obtain the properties of the many-body system. In some physical systems this approach may not be acceptable, because the two-body force component cannot be treated in this one-body limit. A technique for incorporating two-body forces in such calculations in a more realistic fashion is described. 1 figure.

  4. Paramagnetic Beads and Magnetically Mediated Strain Enhance Cardiomyogenesis in Mouse Embryoid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Geuss, Laura R.; Wu, Douglas C.; Ramamoorthy, Divya; Alford, Corinne D.; Suggs, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in proper embryologic development, and similarly such forces can directly impact pluripotency and differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) in vitro. In addition, manipulation of the embryoid body (EB) microenvironment, such as by incorporation of microspheres or microparticles, can similarly influence fate determination. In this study, we developed a mechanical stimulation regimen using permanent neodymium magnets to magnetically attract cells within an EB. Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD)-conjugated paramagnetic beads were incorporated into the interior of the EBs during aggregation, allowing us to exert force on individual cells using short-term magnetization. EBs were stimulated for one hour at different magnetic field strengths, subsequently exerting a range of force intensity on the cells at different stages of early EB development. Our results demonstrated that following exposure to a 0.2 Tesla magnetic field, ESCs respond to magnetically mediated strain by activating Protein Kinase A (PKA) and increasing phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2) expression. The timing of stimulation can also be tailored to guide ESC differentiation: the combination of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) supplementation with one hour of magnetic attraction on Day 3 enhances cardiomyogenesis by increasing contractile activity and the percentage of sarcomeric ?-actin-expressing cells compared to control samples with BMP4 alone. Interestingly, we also observed that the beads alone had some impact on differentiation by increasingly slightly, albeit not significantly, the percentage of cardiomyocytes. Together these results suggest that magnetically mediated strain can be used to enhance the percentage of mouse ESC-derived cardiomyocytes over current differentiation protocols. PMID:25501004

  5. A Study of Laminar Compressible Viscous Pipe Flow Accelerated by an Axial Body Force, with Application to Magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1961-01-01

    A study is made of the steady laminar flow of a compressible viscous fluid in a circular pipe when the fluid is accelerated by an axial body force. The application of the theory to the magnetofluidmechanics of an electrically conducting gas accelerated by electric and magnetic fields is discussed. Constant viscosity, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity are assumed. Fully developed flow velocity and temperature profiles are shown, and detailed results of the accelerating flow development, including velocity and pressure as functions of distance, are given for the case where the axial body force is constant and for the case where it is a linear function of velocity. From these results are determined the pipe entry length and the pressure difference required.

  6. Evolving nuclear many-body forces with the similarity renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgenson, E. D.; Navratil, P.; Furnstahl, R. J.

    2011-03-15

    In recent years, the Similarity Renormalization Group has provided a powerful and versatile means to soften interactions for ab initio nuclear calculations. The substantial contribution of both induced and initial three-body forces to the nuclear interaction has required the consistent evolution of free-space Hamiltonians in the three-particle space. We present the most recent progress on this work, extending the calculational capability to the p-shell nuclei and showing that the hierarchy of induced many-body forces is consistent with previous estimates. Calculations over a range of the flow parameter for {sup 6}Li, including fully evolved NN + 3N interactions, show moderate contributions due to induced four-body forces and display the same improved convergence properties as in lighter nuclei. A systematic analysis provides further evidence that the hierarchy of many-body forces is preserved.

  7. Forced MHD Turbulence at Low Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikanov, Oleg; Thess, Andre

    1997-11-01

    A static homogeneous magnetic field is known to suppress turbulent motions of electrically conducting fluids. In laboratory or industrial flows of liquid metals, where the magnetic Reynolds number is very small, the effect of the Lorentz force reduces to the anisotropic Joule dissipation which damps velocity gradients in the direction of magnetic field. The flow becomed anisotropic and even kinematically two-dimensional. To better understand the evolution of initially isotropic turbulence under an imposed magnetic field we perform DNS of homogeneous flow contained in a box with periodic boundary conditions. It is found that the pathway traversed by the flow transformation depends drastically on the Stuart number N=σ B^2 L/ρ u. If N is small the flow remains three-dimensional and turbulent and no detectable deviation from isotropy is observed. In the case of strong magnetic field (large N) a rapid transformation to a purely two-dimensional steady state is obtained. At intermediate value of N the system exhibits intermittent behavior, characterized by organized quasi-2D evolution lasting several eddy-turnover times, which is interrupted by strong 3D turbulent bursts.

  8. Towards dynamic control of magnetic fields to focus magnetic carriers to targets deep inside the body

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic drug delivery has the potential to target therapy to specific regions in the body, improving efficacy and reducing side effects for treatment of cancer, stroke, infection, and other diseases. Using stationary external magnets, which attract the magnetic drug carriers, this treatment is limited to shallow targets (<5 cm below skin depth using the strongest possible, still safe, practical magnetic fields). We consider dynamic magnetic actuation and present initial results that show it is possible to vary magnets one against the other to focus carriers between them on average. The many remaining tasks for deep targeting in-vivo are then briefly noted. PMID:20165553

  9. Studies of coercive force of permanent magnet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Permanent magnets were prepared by sintering on-stoichiometry Sm2Co17 and Sm2Co17 doped Fe,Mn,Zr and Hf. Coercive forces subscript i H subscript C were low, less than 1 kOe. Although doping increases anisotropy field, it does not enhance subscript i H subscript C except for Mn as dopant. In this case, doping increases subscript i H subscript C about two-fold. In these systems subscript i H subscript C seems to be nucleation-controlled. It is postulated that nucleation occurs at the oxidized surface where anisotropy is weak or negative. Surfaces were investigated by Auger spectroscopy with results consistent with the postulated mechanism. To test for effects of surface roughness, powders were washed with acid. No increase in subscript i H subscript C was observed. Samples ground under pentane and liquid nitrogen showed no significant difference in subscript i H subscript C. Oxygen content was about 3000 ppm by weight in the finished magnets. Results suggest that coercive force of the so-called 2-17 magnets (which are actually 2-phase mixtures of components with 1:5 and 2:17 stoichiometry, originates with the component having 1:5 stoichiometry.

  10. Characterization of Solar Wind Interaction With Magnetized Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C.; Karimabadi, H.

    2002-12-01

    Since the dawn of the space age, the magnetosphere has been studied extensively not only to understand the geospace environment but also how solar wind, or stellar winds in general, interact with magnetized bodies. Early theoretical investigations of solar wind interaction with magnetized asteroids suggested that in addition to a magnetospheric type interaction it was possible that, instead, only a whistler wing would be generated. Recently, through 2-D global hybrid (fluid electrons, kinetic ions) simulations, we have demonstrated that depending on the magnetic dipole strength of a body its interaction with the solar wind can be even more diverse and that a variety of solutions exist. For example, in addition to a whistler wing it is possible for a magnetized asteroid to have a set of fast and slow magnetosonic wakes. In another type of solution, a fast magnetosonic wake is the dominant feature of the interaction region. Our studies have also demonstrated that depending on the magnetic field strength of a body, the size of the interaction region may be comparable or smaller than ion gyroradius and, as a result, kinetic motion of the ions has a profound influence on the global structure of the interaction region. We have found that a useful parameter in characterization of the interaction region is Dp, the distance from the body at which solar wind ram pressure is balanced by its magnetic pressure. In this presentation, we illustrate the transition of the interaction region from a single whistler wing to a full magnetospheric type interaction as Dp, normalized to ion inertial length, is increased from values less than 1 to over 100. Implication of these results for various bodies in the solar system is also discussed.

  11. The rate of separation of magnetic lines of force in a random magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mixing of magnetic lines of force, as represented by their rate of separation, as a function of distance along the magnetic field, is considered with emphasis on neighboring lines of force. This effect is particularly important in understanding the transport of charged particles perpendicular to the average magnetic field. The calculation is carried out in the approximation that the separation changes by an amount small compared with the correlation scale normal to the field, in a distance along the field of a few correlation scales. It is found that the rate of separation is very sensitive to the precise form of the power spectrum. Application to the interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields is discussed, and it is shown that in some cases field lines, much closer together than the correlation scale, separate at a rate which is effectively as rapid as if they were many correlation lengths apart.

  12. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10(-16) emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  13. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10−16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  14. REVIEW OF TERMS FOR REGULATED VERSUS FORCED, NEUROCHEMICAL-INDUCED CHANGES IN BODY TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deviations of the body temperature of homeothermic animals may be regulated or forced. A regulated change in core temperature is caused by a natural or synthetic compound that displaces the set-point temperature. A forced shift occurs when an excessive environmental or endogenous...

  15. Variable force, eddy-current or magnetic damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An object of the invention is to provide variable damping for resonant vibrations which may occur at different rotational speeds in the range of rpms in which a rotating machine is operated. A variable force damper in accordance with the invention includes a rotating mass carried on a shaft which is supported by a bearing in a resilient cage. The cage is attached to a support plate whose rim extends into an annular groove in a housing. Variable damping is effected by tabs of electrically conducting nonmagnetic material which extend radially from the cage. The tabs at an index position lie between the pole face of respective C shaped magnets. The magnets are attached by cantilever spring members to the housing.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy with a microwire rf source

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, M.; Degen, C. L.; Rettner, C. T.; Mamin, H. J.; Rugar, D.

    2007-06-25

    The authors use a 1.0 {mu}m wide patterned Cu wire with an integrated nanomagnetic tip to measure the statistical nuclear polarization of {sup 19}F in CaF{sub 2} by magnetic resonance force microscopy. With less than 350 {mu}W of dissipated power, the authors achieve rf magnetic fields over 4 mT at 115 MHz for a sample positioned within 100 nm of the 'microwire' rf source. A 200 nm diameter FeCo tip integrated onto the wire produces field gradients greater than 10{sup 5} T/m at the same position. The large rf fields from the broadband microwire enable long rotating-frame spin lifetimes of up to 15 s at 4 K.

  17. Forced Hall magnetic reconnection: Parametric variation of the ``Newton Challenge''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.

    2006-06-01

    A parametric study of forced magnetic reconnection using a 2D Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the "Newton Challenge" is presented. The "Newton Challenge" defined a magnetic reconnection problem in which reconnection was initiated by a spatially and temporally dependent inflow velocity on the upstream boundary. In this study the magnitude and time dependence of the inflow velocity are varied, as well as the length of the system and the boundary conditions. The general conclusion is that reconnection occurs sooner and faster for stronger impulsive drives (e.g., larger inflow velocities and longer time scales). The results are fairly insensitive to system length. Finally, the Hall MHD results are compared to results from a particle-in-cell simulation study.

  18. Forced Hall magnetic reconnection: Parametric variation of the 'Newton Challenge'

    SciTech Connect

    Huba, J.D.

    2006-06-15

    A parametric study of forced magnetic reconnection using a 2D Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the 'Newton Challenge' is presented. The 'Newton Challenge' defined a magnetic reconnection problem in which reconnection was initiated by a spatially and temporally dependent inflow velocity on the upstream boundary. In this study the magnitude and time dependence of the inflow velocity are varied, as well as the length of the system and the boundary conditions. The general conclusion is that reconnection occurs sooner and faster for stronger impulsive drives (e.g., larger inflow velocities and longer time scales). The results are fairly insensitive to system length. Finally, the Hall MHD results are compared to results from a particle-in-cell simulation study.

  19. a Measurement of the Three-Body Photodisintegration of HELIUM-3 and its Relation to Three-Body Forces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarty, Adam James

    The three-body photodisintegration of ^3He has been measured at energies below the pion production threshold using a continuous bremsstrahlung gamma-ray beam at the Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory. Coincident proton pairs emitted on opposite sides of the beam were detected using four sets of plastic scintillator telescopes arranged symmetrically about the beam at 81^ circ and 91^circ. Differential cross sections were extracted, as a function of the undetected neutron momentum, from kinematic regions where three-body forces effects are expected to be maximized and two-body mechanisms suppressed. These measured cross sections show an enhancement over calculations using one-body and two -body photo-absorption mechanisms only. The inclusion of the two-pion-exchange three-body absorption mechanism is needed to adequately describe the data. This constitutes direct evidence for the existence of three-body forces in ^3He, since the two-pion-exchange mechanism is directly related to three-body forces through gauge invariance. Cross sections differential only in the solid angles of the two detected protons were also measured as a function of incident gamma-ray energy. The angular and energy dependence of these cross sections were compared to those expected from 3N phase-space considerations alone. The measured angular dependence is indicative of a non-phase -space distribution, with an enhancement in the collinear geometry. The measured energy distribution followed the general trend of phase-space predictions, but show a departure from phase-space in the 150-200 MeV energy range.

  20. Eddy currents induced by RF magnetic fields in biological bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jen-Hwang; Chen, Kun-Mu

    A new theoretical method for determining the electric field or the eddy current induced by a uniform RF magnetic field or a beam of RF magnetic field in a biological body of rotational symmetry is presented. The body is subdivided into a number of circular rings with various radii and cross-sectional areas. The induced electric field or eddy current in each ring is then numerically determined on the basis of the theory of vector potential and the moment method. Numerical examples are given, and the results based on the present theory are found to deviate significantly from the often used, quasi-static solutions. An experiment was conducted to measure the electric fields induced by a UHF magnetic field in phantom biological models. The theory was verified by the experiment and the existing theoretical results.

  1. Electricity, magnetism and the body: some uses and abuses.

    PubMed

    Barker, A T

    1994-04-01

    The human body can be regarded as an extraordinarily complex electrical machine. It will respond to externally applied electromagnetic stimuli and aspects of its functionality can be interrogated electromagnetically to aid in diagnosis. The paper describes examples of interactions between electromagnetism and the body. The hazards of electric shock are considered along with the use of the defibrillator for restarting the heart. Electromagnetic therapies are discussed in the light of the disappointing lack of objective evidence to support claims for their effectiveness. Finally, two examples of new diagnostic techniques using electromagnetic energy are described. Electrical impedance tomography produces cross-sectional images of the distribution of electrical impedance in the body and magnetic nerve stimulation uses currents induced by large magnetic field pulses to stimulate nerves and the human brain without causing pain. PMID:8021899

  2. Experimental analysis of retention forces of different magnetic devices for bone-anchored auricular facial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Voigt, A; Christ, S; Klein, M

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which combination of differently designed magnetic abutments provides the best retention for an auricular prosthesis. The withdrawal forces of eight combinations of abutments were measured and results compared. There was a significantly higher withdrawal force in arrangements containing three magnets over only two. The highest withdrawal force was found in the combination of one telescopic magnet and two large spherical magnets (median: 7.69 N), whereas two telescopic magnets alone showed the lowest withdrawal force (3.41 N). The use of two conical magnets increased retention slightly, but the median retention force remained the same (3.41 N). The commonly used combination of two small spherical magnets and one telescopic magnet showed the lowest retention of combinations consisting of three magnets (4.94 N). There seems to be no difference in median withdrawal force if a conical magnet instead of a telescopic magnet is used. The withdrawal force at a 45 degrees angle was about 10% higher than the vertical force but the difference was not significant. The rupture force needed to tear the magnet completely out of the silicone was 240.6-519.7 N (mean 331.74 N) and therefore over 10 times higher than magnetic retention. PMID:18440779

  3. The Aerodynamic Forces on Slender Plane- and Cruciform-Wing and Body Combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R

    1950-01-01

    The load distribution, forces, and moments are calculated theoretically for inclined slender wing-body combinations consisting of a slender body of revolution and either a plane or cruciform arrangement of low-aspect-ratio pointed wings. The results are applicable at subsonic and transonic speeds, and at supersonic speeds, provided the entire wing-body combination lies near the center of the Mach cone.

  4. Nonlocal Properties of Dynamical Three-Body Casimir-Polder Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzuto, L.; Passante, R.; Persico, F.

    2007-06-15

    We consider the three-body Casimir-Polder interaction between three atoms during their dynamical self-dressing. We show that the time-dependent three-body Casimir-Polder interaction energy displays nonlocal features related to quantum properties of the electromagnetic field and to the nonlocality of spatial field correlations. We discuss the measurability of this intriguing phenomenon and its relation with the usual concept of stationary three-body forces.

  5. {lambda}NN Three-Body Force due to Coherent {lambda}-{sigma} Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Akaishi, Yoshinori; Myint, Khin Swe

    2008-04-29

    The overbinding problem of {sub {lambda}}{sup 5}He is solved by introducing a concept of coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling which is equivalent to a {lambda}NN three-body force. This three-body force is coherently enhanced in the 0{sup +} states of {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}H and {sub {lambda}}{sup 4}He. The 0{sup +}-1{sup +} splitting in these hypernuclei is mainly due to coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling and partly due to the {lambda}N spin-spin interaction. A {lambda}NN three-body potential is derived from the coupled-channel treatment. The origin of the repulsive and attractive nature of the three-body force is discussed. Coherent {lambda}-{sigma} coupling becomes more important in neutron-rich hypernuclei and especially in neutron-star matter at high densities. The possible existence of ''hyperheavy hydrogen'', {sub {lambda}}{sup 6}H, is suggested.

  6. Magnetic Forces Simulation of Bulk HTS over Permanent Magnetic Railway with Numerical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiyun; Zhuang, Shujun

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic levitation forces of bulk high temperature superconductor (HTS) above two types permanent magnet railway (PMR) is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The models are formulated by H-formulation and resolving codes is developed using Finite Element Program Generator (FEPG). The E- J power law is used to describe the electrical field vs. current density nonlinear characteristic of HTS. The applied magnetic fields induced by the PMR are calculated by the standard analysis method with the equivalent surface current model. By the method, the calculation formulation of magnetic fields generated by Halbach PMR and symmetrical PMR is derived respectively. The simulation results show that the finite element dynamic mesh rebuilding problem of HTS magnetic levitation transportation system comprised of bulk HTS and PMR can be easily avoided by the methods.

  7. Magnetic Domain Analysis of GMR Spin Valves with CoFe Electrodes via Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dise, Joseph; Schmidt, Robert; Wu, Jun; Stearrett, Ryan; Haughey, Kevin; Xiao, John; Nowak, Edmund; CenterSpintronics and Biodetection Team

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) has given new insight to the emergence of magnetic domains in giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin valves with CoFe electrodes. The MFM images, taken under application of different magnetic fields, reveal how the uniformity of magnetization varies in both the parallel state and antiparallel state. In the parallel state, the image shows uniform contrast indicating that the magnetization is uniform through the sample. In the antiparallel state, different colors are present indicating that the direction of magnetization varies. This difference in the direction of magnetization arises from the antiferromagnetic coupling between the free layer and pinned layers in the GMR stack. Additionally, high field saturation allows for the analysis of the magnetic reversal of the pinned layer. MFM images are taken during this magnetic switching to observe the location of the first domains in local structure. Multiple samples will be used with variations in thickness of the free layer, thickness of the nonmagnetic spacer layer between the free and pinned layer, and aspect ratio of the samples. Samples will be grown via dc magnetron sputtering and then patterned with photolithography and ion beam etching. Department of Energy Award DE-FG02-07ER46374

  8. Magnetic resonance force microscopy and a solid state quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelekhov, D. V.; Martin, I.; Suter, A.; Reagor, D. W.; Hammel, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Quantum Computer (QC) is a device that utilizes the principles of Quantum Mechanics to perform computations. Such a machine would be capable of accomplishing tasks not achievable by means of any conventional digital computer, for instance factoring large numbers. Currently it appears that the QC architecture based on an array of spin quantum bits (qubits) embedded in a solid-state matrix is one of the most promising approaches to fabrication of a scalable QC. However, the fabrication and operation of a Solid State Quantum Computer (SSQC) presents very formidable challenges; primary amongst these are: (1) the characterization and control of the fabrication process of the device during its construction and (2) the readout of the computational result. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)--a novel scanning probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance-provides an attractive means of addressing these requirements. The sensitivity of the MRFM significantly exceeds that of conventional magnetic resonance measurement methods, and it has the potential for single electron spin detection. Moreover, the MRFM is capable of true 3D subsurface imaging. These features will make MRFM an invaluable tool for the implementation of a spin-based QC. Here we present the general principles of MRFM operation, the current status of its development and indicate future directions for its improvement.

  9. Magnetic evidence for a partially differentiated carbonaceous chondrite parent body

    PubMed Central

    Carporzen, Laurent; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Shuster, David L.; Ebel, Denton; Gattacceca, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    The textures of chondritic meteorites demonstrate that they are not the products of planetary melting processes. This has long been interpreted as evidence that chondrite parent bodies never experienced large-scale melting. As a result, the paleomagnetism of the CV carbonaceous chondrite Allende, most of which was acquired after accretion of the parent body, has been a long-standing mystery. The possibility of a core dynamo like that known for achondrite parent bodies has been discounted because chondrite parent bodies are assumed to be undifferentiated. Resolution of this conundrum requires a determination of the age and timescale over which Allende acquired its magnetization. Here, we report that Allende’s magnetization was acquired over several million years (Ma) during metasomatism on the parent planetesimal in a >  ∼ 20 μT field up to approximately 9—10 Ma after solar system formation. This field was present too recently and directionally stable for too long to have been generated by the protoplanetary disk or young Sun. The field intensity is in the range expected for planetesimal core dynamos, suggesting that CV chondrites are derived from the outer, unmelted layer of a partially differentiated body with a convecting metallic core.

  10. Lower body predictors of glenohumeral compressive force in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P; Torry, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand how lower body kinematics relate to peak glenohumeral compressive force and develop a regression model accounting for variability in peak glenohumeral compressive force. Data were collected for 34 pitchers. Average peak glenohumeral compressive force was 1.72% ± 33% body weight (1334.9 N ± 257.5). Correlation coefficients revealed 5 kinematic variables correlated to peak glenohumeral compressive force (P < .01, α = .025). Regression models indicated 78.5% of the variance in peak glenohumeral compressive force (R2 = .785, P < .01) was explained by stride length, lateral pelvis flexion at maximum external rotation, and axial pelvis rotation velocity at release. These results indicate peak glenohumeral compressive force increases with a combination of decreased stride length, increased pelvic tilt at maximum external rotation toward the throwing arm side, and increased pelvis axial rotation velocity at release. Thus, it may be possible to decrease peak glenohumeral compressive force by optimizing the movements of the lower body while pitching. Focus should be on both training and conditioning the lower extremity in an effort to increase stride length, increase pelvis tilt toward the glove hand side at maximum external rotation, and decrease pelvis axial rotation at release. PMID:25734579

  11. How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

  12. Construction of a 3He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a 3He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  13. Construction of a (3)He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a (3)He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization. PMID:26931857

  14. The indirect measurement of biomechanical forces in the moving human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluss, Melanie; Laws, Kenneth; Martin, Natalie; Nowicki, T. Scott; Mira, Allan

    2006-02-01

    Inexpensive experimental techniques now exist for indirectly measuring forces within the moving human body. These techniques involve nontrivial applications of basic physical principles, have practical uses, and are appropriate for undergraduate experimentation. A two-dimensional video motion analysis is used to find the accelerations of various parts of the body, and anatomical geometry is used to determine specific biomechanical forces and torques. The simple movement of a dancer landing from a vertical jump is analyzed through the use of a theoretical model of the leg to find the forces in the tendons attached to the knee. It is shown that these forces can be sufficiently large to lead to injury if jumps are performed repetitively.

  15. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  16. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  17. Radiation-Reaction Force on a Small Charged Body to Second Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Jordan; Flanagan, Eanna

    2015-04-01

    In classical electrodynamics, an accelerating charge emits radiation and experiences a corresponding radiation reaction force, or self force. We extend to greater precision (higher order in perturbation theory) a previous rigorous derivation of the electromagnetic self force in flat spacetime by Gralla, Harte, and Wald. The method introduced by Gralla, Harte, and Wald computes the self-force from the Maxwell field equations and conservation of stress-energy, and does not require regularization of a singular point charge, as has been necessary in prior computations. For our higher order compuation, it becomes necessary to adopt an adjusted definition of the mass of the body to avoid including self-energy from the electromagnetic field sourced during the history of the body. We derive the evolution equations for the mass, spin, and center of mass position of an extended body through second order using our adjusted formalism. The final equations give an acceleration dependent evolution of the spin (self-torque), as well as a mixing between the extended body effects and the acceleration dependent effects on the overall body motion.

  18. Body-force-driven multiplicity and stability of combined free and forced convection in rotating curved ducts: Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Wang, L.

    A numerical study is made on the fully developed bifurcation structure and stability of forced convection in a rotating curved duct of square cross-section. Solution structure is determined as variation of a parameter that indicates the effect of rotation (Coriolis-force-driven multiplicity). Three solutions for the flows in a stationary curved duct obtained in the work of Yang and Wang [1] are used as initial solutions of continuation calculations to unfold the solution branches. Twenty-one solution branches are found comparing with five obtained by Selmi and Nandakumar [2]. Dynamic responses of the multiple solutions to finite random disturbances are examined by the direct transient computation. Results show that characteristics of physically realizable fully developed flows changes significantly with variation of effect of rotation. Fourteen sub-ranges are identified according to characteristics of physically realizable solutions. As rotation effect changes, possible physically realizable fully-developed flows can be stable steady 2-cell state, stable multi-cell state, temporal periodic oscillation between symmetric/asymmetric 2-cell/4-cell flows, temporal oscillation with intermittency, temporal chaotic oscillation and temporal oscillation with pseudo intermittency. Among these possible physically realizable fully developed flows, stable multi-cell state and stable steady 2-cell state exist as dual stable. And oscillation with pseudo intermittency is a new phenomenon. In addition to the temporal oscillation with intermittency, sudden shift from stationary stable solution to temporal chaotic oscillation is identified to be another way of onset of chaos.

  19. The "Newton Challenge": Properties of Forced Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2005-05-01

    Inspired by the observations of thin (ion-scale) current sheets at important magnetospheric boundaries, the study of the properties of thin current sheets has become very popular in recent years. Most of these investigations, however, have ignored the question of how the sheets are formed. Instead, usually a simple Harris-type current sheet is postulated at the outset, and the resulting behavior is then determined. Recently, a collaborative effort, dubbed the "Newton Challenge" and involving J. Birn, K. Galsgaard, M. Hesse, M. Hoshino, J. Huba, G. Lapenta, P.~L. Pritchett, K. Schindler, L. Yin, J. Büchner, T. Neukirch, and E.~R. Priest, was begun to investigate the transition from thicker to thin current sheets that can occur as a result of magnetopause deformations imposed by the solar wind. A standard 2-D model problem in which current sheet thinning was forced by imposing a finite deformation of the field above and below the current sheet was studied by a variety of physical models ranging from resistive MHD to fully kinetic particle models. The aim was to determine whether differences would arise between the fluid and kinetic treatments that might affect the onset of magnetic reconnection. The initial results indicate that full-particle, hybrid, and Hall-MHD models lead to fast reconnection and similar final states despite differences in energy transfer and dissipation. Resistive MHD simulations show reduced reconnection rates that depend on the magnitude of the resistivity. These results will be reviewed, and additional features of forced reconnection, including continuous forcing, open boundaries, the presence of a normal field component, and 3-D effects, will be discussed.

  20. Frequency tuning of piezoelectric energy harvesters by magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ashtari, Waleed; Hunstig, Matthias; Hemsel, Tobias; Sextro, Walter

    2012-03-01

    A piezoelectric energy harvester is an electromechanical device that converts ambient mechanical vibration into electric power. Most existing vibration energy harvesting devices operate effectively at a single frequency only, dictated by the design of the device. This frequency must match the frequency of the host structure vibration. However, real world structural vibrations rarely have a specific constant frequency. Therefore, piezoelectric harvesters that generate usable power across a range of exciting frequencies are required to make this technology commercially viable. Currently known harvester tuning techniques have many limitations, in particular they miss the ability to work during harvester operation and most often cannot perform a precise tuning. This paper describes the design and testing of a vibration energy harvester with tunable resonance frequency, wherein the tuning is accomplished by changing the attraction force between two permanent magnets by adjusting the distance between the magnets. This tuning technique allows the natural frequency to be manipulated before and during operation of the harvester. Furthermore the paper presents a physical description of the frequency tuning effect. The experimental results achieved with a piezoelectric bimorph fit the calculated results very well. The calculation and experimental results show that using this tuning technique the natural frequency of the harvester can be varied efficiently within a wide range: in the test setup, the natural frequency of the piezoelectric bimorph could be increased by more than 70%.

  1. Induction of electromotive force by an autonomously moving magnetic bot.

    PubMed

    Sailapu, Sunil Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2014-02-01

    We report the observation of the induction of electromotive force (emf) into a Faraday coil by an autonomously moving composite magnetic particle in aqueous medium. The particle consisted of a micron-sized polymer sphere, which was decorated with catalytic Pd nanoparticles (NPs) and attached to a micron-scale (N-42 grade) rare-earth magnet. The Pd NPs catalytically decomposed H2 O2 to generate O2 , resulting in buoyancy-driven vertical motion of the particle, while the micromagnet induced emf during the flight. Because a small volume of ethanol was layered on top of the liquid, the bubble burst when the particle ascended to the top and thus nearly continuous vertical motion was achieved. Spikes of alternating electrical signal could be observed up to 20 times per minute. The signal was sufficiently strong to illuminate light-emitting diodes following appropriate amplification. This distinctive approach is expected to pave the way to developing synthetic bots which are autonomously propelled, generating their own signal for running complex circuitry. PMID:24492970

  2. Gravity and magnetic modeling of granitic bodies in Central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machadinho, Ana; Figueiredo, Fernando; Pereira, Alcides

    2015-04-01

    A better understanding of the subsurface geometry of the granitic bodies in Central Portugal is the main goal of this work. The results are also relevant for the assessment of the geothermal potential of the same region. The study area is located in the Central Iberian Zone where the Beiras granite batholith outcrops. These variscan granitoids were emplaced into the "Complexo Xisto-Grauváquico" (CXG), a thick and monotonous megasequences of metapelites and metagreywackes. This metasedimentary sequence is affected by the Variscan deformation phases and a late Proterozoic to Cambrian age has been generally assumed for this rocks. The granitoids in the region are attributed to the magmatic activity associated to the post-collisional stages of the Variscan orogeny during the D3 stage. The granitic bodies in the study area are considered syn-D3 and late to post-D3. To achieve the goal of the research, magnetic and gravimetric surveys where performed in order to obtain the Bouguer and magnetic anomalies. All the standard corrections were applied to the gravimetric and magnetic data. Considering and integrating all the available geological data and physical proprieties (density and magnetic susceptibility) the mentioned potential fields were simultaneously modeled. In this way it was possible to characterize the subsurface geometry of the granitic bodies in the studied region. The modeling results show that the regional tectonic setting controls the geometry of the granitic bodies as well as the structure of the host CXG metasedimentary sequence. Through the modeling of the potential field the overall geometry, average and maximum depths of the granitic bodies in the study area was obtained. Some late to post-D3 plutons outcrop in spatial continuity and as they have similar ages, a common feeding zone is assumed as the most likely scenario. The sin-D3 pluton is more abrupt and vertical, suggesting the presence of a fault contact with the late-D3 pluton. According to the developed study the areas with higher geothermal potential for EGS applications are located over the sectors where the granitic bodies have the greater thickness.

  3. On the evaluation of time-dependent fluid-dynamic forces on bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio

    We present some exact expressions for the evaluation of time-dependent forces on a body in an incompressible and viscous cross-flow which only require the knowledge of the velocity field (and its derivatives) in a finite and arbitrarily chosen region enclosing the body.Given a control volume V with external surface S which encloses an arbitrary body, the fluid-dynamic force F on the body can be evaluated from one of the following three expressions (in abbreviated form):F = [...] + body motion terms,F = [...] + body motion terms,F = no volume integral terms + [...] + body motion terms, where N is the space dimension, u is the flow velocity, [...] is the vorticity, x is the position vector, and the tensors [...], [...], [...] depend only on the velocity field u and its (spatial and temporal) derivatives.The first equation is already known for either simply connected domains or inviscid flows. We re-derive it here for viscous flows in doubly connected domains (i.e. domains which include a body). We then obtain the second and third equation through a simple algebraic manipulation of the first equation.These expressions are particularly useful for experimental techniques like Digital particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) which provide time sequences of 2D velocity fields but not pressure fields.They are tested experimentally with DPIV on two-dimensional, low Reynolds number circular cylinder flows. Both steady and unsteady motions are studied.

  4. The force function of two rigid celestial bodies in Delaunay-Andoyer variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlenko, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Two new expansions of the force function of two rigid celestial bodies of finite size and arbitrary shape are obtained in Delaunay-Andoyer variables with any degree of accuracy, in the form of a partial sum of an eight dimensional Fourier series. These expansions of the force function contain products of expressions for the momenta and Stokes constants in terms of sines and cosines, whose arguments are linear combinations of the Delaunay and Andoyer angular variables. These representations of the force function are compact and convenient for applications in various problems in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics.

  5. Drawing and using free body diagrams: Why it may be better not to decompose forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviani, Ivica; Erceg, Nataša; Mešić, Vanes

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigated how two different approaches to drawing free body diagrams influence the development of students' understanding of Newton's laws, including their ability to identify real forces. For this purpose we developed a 12-item two-tier multiple choice survey and conducted a quasiexperiment. This experiment included two groups of first-year physics students from Rijeka (RG) (ne=27 ) and Split (SG) (nc=25 ) Universities. Students from both groups solved mechanics problems for a period of two class hours. The only difference was that RG students used the superposition of forces approach to solving mechanics problems and in SG the decomposition of forces approach has been used. The ANCOVA (nc=17 , ne=17 ) showed a statistically significant difference in favor of RG, whereby the effect sizes were moderate to large, and the largest differences have been observed in the ability of identifying real forces. Students from the control group (SG) more often exhibited the misconception that forces and their components act on a body independently and simultaneously. Our results support the idea that the practice of resolving forces into the components may not be the most effective way to develop understanding of Newton's laws and the concept of force.

  6. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Solar Corona. I. Force-free Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyer, N.; Fornberg, B.; Thomas, S.; Low, B. C.

    2004-05-01

    Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value problems in an unbounded domain posed by the equilibrium equations. It is well known from virial considerations that stringent global constraints apply for a force-free field to be confined in equilibrium against expansion into the unbounded space. This property as a basic mechanism for solar coronal mass ejections is explored by examining several sequences of axisymmetric force-free fields of an increasing total azimuthal flux with a power-law distribution over the poloidal field. Particular attention is paid to the formation of an azimuthal rope of twisted magnetic field embedded within the global field, and to the energy storage properties associated with such a structure. These sequences of solutions demonstrate (1) the formation of self-similar regions in the far global field where details of the inner boundary conditions are mathematically irrelevant, and (2) the possibility that there is a maximum to the amount of azimuthal magnetic flux confined by a poloidal field of a fixed flux anchored rigidly to the inner boundary. The nonlinear elliptic boundary value problems we treat are mathematically interesting and challenging, requiring a specially designed solver, which is described in the Appendix.

  7. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-12-01

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-off, a dronefly increases its stroke amplitude gradually in the first 10-14 wingbeats and becomes airborne at about the 12th wingbeat. The aerodynamic force increases monotonously from zero to a value a little larger than its weight, and the leg force decreases monotonously from a value equal to its weight to zero, showing that the droneflies do not jump and only use aerodynamic force of flapping wings to lift themselves into the air. Compared with take-offs in insects in previous studies, in which a very large force (5-10 times of the weight) generated either by jumping legs (locusts, milkweed bugs and fruit flies) or by the 'fling' mechanism of the wing pair (butterflies) is used in a short time, the take-off in the droneflies is relatively slow but smoother. PMID:24132205

  8. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-off, a dronefly increases its stroke amplitude gradually in the first 10–14 wingbeats and becomes airborne at about the 12th wingbeat. The aerodynamic force increases monotonously from zero to a value a little larger than its weight, and the leg force decreases monotonously from a value equal to its weight to zero, showing that the droneflies do not jump and only use aerodynamic force of flapping wings to lift themselves into the air. Compared with take-offs in insects in previous studies, in which a very large force (5–10 times of the weight) generated either by jumping legs (locusts, milkweed bugs and fruit flies) or by the ‘fling’ mechanism of the wing pair (butterflies) is used in a short time, the take-off in the droneflies is relatively slow but smoother. PMID:24132205

  9. Levitation force on a permanent magnet over a superconducting plane: Modified critical-state model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors consider a model system of a permanent magnet above a semi-infinite superconductor. They introduce a modified critical-state model, and carry out derivations of the levitation force acting on the magnet. A key feature of the modification allows the current density to be less than the critical value. The theoretical results show an exponential relationship between the force and the distance. Analytical expressions are developed for permanent magnets in the form of a point dipole, a tip of a magnetic force microscope, and a cylindrical magnet. In the latter case, the exponential relationship has been observed in numerous experiments but without previous interpretation.

  10. Kilohertz magnetic field focusing and force enhancement using a metallic loop array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dede, Ercan M.; Lee, Jaewook; Guo, Yuanbo; Qin Zhou, Li; Zhang, Minjuan; Banerjee, Debasish

    2012-07-01

    We present a device capable of focusing a kilohertz magnetic field and enhancing the associated magnetic force. The device comprises a two-by-two array of electrically conductive metallic loops embedded in a base substrate. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations verify that the induced electrical current in the loop structure influences the magnetic field distribution thus leading to magnetic force enhancement. Experimental measurements of the magnetic force generated by the device operating at one kilohertz are compared with measurements of a control sample without loops. Such devices have logical applications in electromechanical actuators and transducers.

  11. Plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic measurements at nonmagnetic bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    The need to explore the magnetospheres of the Earth and the giant planets is widely recognized and is an integral part of our planetary exploration program. The equal need to explore the plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic environments of the nonmagnetic bodies is not so widely appreciated. The previous, albeit incomplete, magnetic and electric field measurements at Venus, Mars, and comets have proven critical to our understanding of their atmospheres and ionospheres in areas ranging from planetary lightning to solar wind scavenging and accretion. In the cases of Venus and Mars, the ionospheres can provide communication paths over the horizon for low-altitude probes and landers, but we know little about their lower boundaries. The expected varying magnetic fields below these planetary ionospheres penetrates the planetary crusts and can be used to sound the electrical conductivity and the thermal profiles of the interiors. However, we have no knowledge of the levels of such fields, let alone their morphology. Finally, we note that the absence of an atmosphere and an ionosphere does not make an object any less interesting for the purposes of electromagnetic exploration. Even weak remanent magnetism such as that found on the Moon during the Apollo program provides insight into the present and past states of planetary interiors. We have very intriguing data from our space probes during times of both close and distant passages of asteroids that suggest they may have coherent magnetization. If true, this observation will put important constraints on how the asteroids formed and have evolved. Our planetary exploration program must exploit its full range of exploration tools if it is to characterize the bodies of the solar system thoroughly. We should especially take advantage of those techniques that are proven and require low mass, low power, and low telemetry rates to undertake.

  12. Plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic measurements at nonmagnetic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    The need to explore the magnetospheres of the Earth and the giant planets is widely recognized and is an integral part of our planetary exploration program. The equal need to explore the plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic environments of the nonmagnetic bodies is not so widely appreciated. The previous, albeit incomplete, magnetic and electric field measurements at Venus, Mars, and comets have proven critical to our understanding of their atmospheres and ionospheres in areas ranging from planetary lightning to solar wind scavenging and accretion. In the cases of Venus and Mars, the ionospheres can provide communication paths over the horizon for low-altitude probes and landers, but we know little about their lower boundaries. The expected varying magnetic fields below these planetary ionospheres penetrates the planetary crusts and can be used to sound the electrical conductivity and the thermal profiles of the interiors. However, we have no knowledge of the levels of such fields, let alone their morphology. Finally, we note that the absence of an atmosphere and an ionosphere does not make an object any less interesting for the purposes of electromagnetic exploration. Even weak remanent magnetism such as that found on the Moon during the Apollo program provides insight into the present and past states of planetary interiors. We have very intriguing data from our space probes during times of both close and distant passages of asteroids that suggest they may have coherent magnetization. If true, this observation will put important constraints on how the asteroids formed and have evolved. Our planetary exploration program must exploit its full range of exploration tools if it is to characterize the bodies of the solar system thoroughly. We should especially take advantage of those techniques that are proven and require low mass, low power, and low telemetry rates to undertake.

  13. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through superposition of force-free magnetic fields: Periodic boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2013-11-15

    In ideal magnetohydrodynamics characterized by an infinite electrical conductivity, the magnetic flux across an arbitrary fluid surface is conserved in time. The magnetofluid then can be partitioned into contiguous subvolumes of fluid, each of which entraps its own subsystem of magnetic flux. During dynamical evolution of the magnetofluid, these subvolumes press into each other; and in the process, two such subvolumes may come into direct contact while ejecting a third interstitial subvolume. Depending on the orientations of magnetic fields of the two interacting subvolumes, the magnetic field at the common surface of interaction may become discontinuous and a current sheet is formed there. This process of current sheet formation and their subsequent decay is believed to be a plausible mechanism for coronal heating and may also be responsible for various eruptive phenomena at the solar corona. In this work, we explore this theoretical concept through numerical simulations of a viscous, incompressible magnetofluid characterized by infinite electrical conductivity. In particular, we show that if the initial magnetic field is prescribed by superposition of two linear force-free fields with different torsion coefficients, then formation of current sheets are numerically realizable in the neighborhood of magnetic nulls.

  14. A microscopic approach to Casimir and Casimir–Polder forces between metallic bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Barcellona, Pablo Passante, Roberto

    2015-04-15

    We consider the Casimir–Polder interaction energy between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic plate, as well as the Casimir interaction energy between two macroscopic metal plates, in terms of the many-body dispersion interactions between their constituents. Expressions for two- and three-body dispersion interactions between the microscopic parts of a real metal are first obtained, both in the retarded and non-retarded limits. These expressions are then used to evaluate the overall two- and three-body contributions to the macroscopic Casimir–Polder and Casimir force, and to compare them with each other, for the two following geometries: metal nanoparticle/half-space and half-space/half-space, where all the materials are assumed perfect conductors. The above evaluation is obtained by summing up the contributions from the microscopic constituents of the bodies (metal nanoparticles). In the case of nanoparticle/half-space, our results fully agree with those that can be extracted from the corresponding macroscopic results, and explicitly show the non-applicability of the pairwise approximation for the geometry considered. In both cases, we find that, while the overall two-body contribution yields an attractive force, the overall three-body contribution is repulsive. Also, they turn out to be of the same order, consistently with the known non applicability of the pairwise approximation. The issue of the rapidity of convergence of the many-body expansion is also briefly discussed.

  15. Drawing and Using Free Body Diagrams: Why It May Be Better Not to Decompose Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviani, Ivica; Erceg, Nataša; Mešic, Vanes

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how two different approaches to drawing free body diagrams influence the development of students' understanding of Newton's laws, including their ability to identify real forces. For this purpose we developed a 12-item two-tier multiple choice survey and conducted a quasiexperiment. This experiment included two groups…

  16. Drawing and Using Free Body Diagrams: Why It May Be Better Not to Decompose Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviani, Ivica; Erceg, Nataa; Meic, Vanes

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how two different approaches to drawing free body diagrams influence the development of students' understanding of Newton's laws, including their ability to identify real forces. For this purpose we developed a 12-item two-tier multiple choice survey and conducted a quasiexperiment. This experiment included two groups

  17. Drag measurements on a laminar-flow body of revolution in the 13-inch magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel drag force measurements were taken on a laminar flow body of revolution free of support interference. This body was tested at zero incidence in the NASA Langley 13 in. Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS). The primary objective of these tests was to substantiate the drag force measuring capabilities of the 13 in. MSBS. The drag force calibrations and wind-on repeatability data provide a means of assessing these capabilities. Additional investigations include: (1) the effects of fixing transition; (2) the effects of fins installed in the tail; and (3) surface flow visualization using both liquid crystals and oil flow. Also two simple drag prediction codes were used to assess their usefulness in estimating overall body drag.

  18. A preliminary investigation of the dynamic force-calibration of a magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments acting upon a magnetically suspended wind tunnel model are derived from calibrations of suspension electro magnet currents against known forces. As an alternative to the conventional calibration method of applying steady forces to the model, early experiences with dynamic calibration are outlined, that is a calibration obtained by oscillating a model in suspension and deriving a force/current relationship from its inertia force and the unsteady components of currents. Advantages of dynamic calibration are speed and simplicity. The two methods of calibration applied to one force component show good agreement.

  19. Local stress and heat flux in atomistic systems involving three-body forces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youping

    2006-02-01

    Local densities of fundamental physical quantities, including stress and heat flux fields, are formulated for atomistic systems involving three-body forces. The obtained formulas are calculable within an atomistic simulation, in consistent with the conservation equations of thermodynamics of continuum, and can be applied to systems with general two- and three-body interaction forces. It is hoped that this work may correct some misuse of inappropriate formulas of stress and heat flux in the literature, may clarify the definition of site energy of many-body potentials, and may serve as an analytical link between an atomistic model and a continuum theory. Physical meanings of the obtained formulas, their relation with virial theorem and heat theorem, and the applicability are discussed. PMID:16468857

  20. Flow force and torque on submerged bodies in lattice-Boltzmann methods via momentum exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovacchini, Juan P.; Ortiz, Omar E.

    2015-12-01

    We review the momentum exchange method to compute the flow force and torque on a submerged body in lattice-Boltzmann methods by presenting an alternative derivation. Our derivation does not depend on a particular implementation of the boundary conditions at the body surface, and it relies on general principles. After the introduction of the momentum exchange method in lattice-Boltzmann methods, some formulations were introduced to compute the fluid force on static and moving bodies. These formulations were introduced in a rather intuitive, ad hoc way. In our derivation, we recover the proposals most frequently used, in some cases with minor corrections, gaining some insight into the two most used formulations. At the end, we present some numerical tests to compare different approaches on a well-known benchmark test that support the correctness of the formulas derived.

  1. Flow force and torque on submerged bodies in lattice-Boltzmann methods via momentum exchange.

    PubMed

    Giovacchini, Juan P; Ortiz, Omar E

    2015-12-01

    We review the momentum exchange method to compute the flow force and torque on a submerged body in lattice-Boltzmann methods by presenting an alternative derivation. Our derivation does not depend on a particular implementation of the boundary conditions at the body surface, and it relies on general principles. After the introduction of the momentum exchange method in lattice-Boltzmann methods, some formulations were introduced to compute the fluid force on static and moving bodies. These formulations were introduced in a rather intuitive, ad hoc way. In our derivation, we recover the proposals most frequently used, in some cases with minor corrections, gaining some insight into the two most used formulations. At the end, we present some numerical tests to compare different approaches on a well-known benchmark test that support the correctness of the formulas derived. PMID:26764848

  2. Wing/body kinematics measurement and force and moment analyses of the takeoff flight of fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mao-Wei; Sun, Mao

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, we present a detailed analysis of the takeoff mechanics of fruitflies which perform voluntary takeoff flights. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during takeoff were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, inertia force acting on the insect was computed and aerodynamic force and moment of the wings were calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. The following has been shown. In its voluntary takeoff, a fruitfly jumps during the first wingbeat and becomes airborne at the end of the first wingbeat. When it is in the air, the fly has a relatively large "initial" pitch-up rotational velocity (more than 5 000°/s) resulting from the jumping, but in about 5 wing-beats, the pitch-up rotation is stopped and the fly goes into a quasi-hovering flight. The fly mainly uses the force of jumping legs to lift itself into the air (the force from the flapping wings during the jumping is only about 5%-10% of the leg force). The main role played by the flapping wings in the takeoff is to produce a pitch-down moment to nullify the large "initial" pitch-up rotational velocity (otherwise, the fly would have kept pitching-up and quickly fallen down).

  3. Power generation from human body motion through magnet and coil arrays with magnetic spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yufeng; Kim, Eun Sok

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a hand-held electromagnetic energy harvester which can be used to harvest tens of mW power level from human body motion. A magnet array, aligned to a coil array for maximum magnetic flux change, is suspended by a magnetic spring for a resonant frequency of several Hz and is stabilized horizontally by graphite sheets for reducing the friction. An analytical model of vibration-driven energy harvester with magnetic spring through magnet and coil arrays is developed to explore the power generation from vibrations at low frequency and large amplitude. When the energy harvester (occupying 120 cc and weighing 180 g) is placed in a backpack of a human walking at various speeds, the power output increases as the walking speed increases from 0.45 m/s (slow walking) to 3.58 m/s (slow running), and reaches 32 mW at 3.58 m/s.

  4. Specialized probes with nanowhisker structures for high resolution magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, M. V.; Belousov, K. I.; Mozharov, A. M.; Mukhin, I. S.; Golubok, A. O.

    2015-11-01

    Creation and study of specialized nanowhisker probes with magnetic coating are performed for high-precision imaging of various objects by means of atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. Thin layers of Ni and Co are deposited on the surface of nanowhisker structures to perform visualization of magnetic fields on the sample surface, in particular, structure of pits on a hard disk drive (HDD). It is revealed that probes with nanowhisker structures covered with magnetic coating due to their high aspect ratio demonstrate a higher spatial resolution and contrast of magnetic fields visualization in comparison with standard magnetic probes.

  5. Avulsed Nasoenteric Bridle System Magnet as an Intranasal Foreign Body.

    PubMed

    Puricelli, Michael D; Newberry, Christopher Ian; Gov-Ari, Eliav

    2016-02-01

    Nasoenteric tubes provide short-term nutrition support to patients unable to take an adequate oral diet. Bridling systems may be used to secure tubes to guard against displacement. We present the first case of an avulsed magnet from a bridling system to raise awareness of this potential complication. The primary methods of securing a nasogastric tube are reviewed, and comparative assessment of the 3 main systems is presented. Diagnosis and management of nasal foreign bodies relevant to this case are reviewed and prevention/safety considerations discussed. PMID:26487513

  6. Revealing bending and force in a soft body through a plant root inspired approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarotti, Chiara; Totaro, Massimo; Sadeghi, Ali; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2015-03-01

    An emerging challenge in soft robotics research is to reveal mechanical solicitations in a soft body. Nature provides amazing clues to develop unconventional components that are capable of compliant interactions with the environment and living beings, avoiding mechanical and algorithmic complexity of robotic design. We inspire from plant-root mechanoperception and develop a strategy able to reveal bending and applied force in a soft body with only two sensing elements of the same kind, and a null computational effort. The stretching processes that lead to opposite tissue deformations on the two sides of the root wall are emulated with two tactile sensing elements, made of soft and stretchable materials, which conform to reversible changes in the shape of the body they are built in and follow its deformations. Comparing the two sensory responses, we can discriminate the concave and the convex side of the bent body. Hence, we propose a new strategy to reveal in a soft body the maximum bending angle (or the maximum deflection) and the externally applied force according to the body's mechanical configuration.

  7. Revealing bending and force in a soft body through a plant root inspired approach.

    PubMed

    Lucarotti, Chiara; Totaro, Massimo; Sadeghi, Ali; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    An emerging challenge in soft robotics research is to reveal mechanical solicitations in a soft body. Nature provides amazing clues to develop unconventional components that are capable of compliant interactions with the environment and living beings, avoiding mechanical and algorithmic complexity of robotic design. We inspire from plant-root mechanoperception and develop a strategy able to reveal bending and applied force in a soft body with only two sensing elements of the same kind, and a null computational effort. The stretching processes that lead to opposite tissue deformations on the two sides of the root wall are emulated with two tactile sensing elements, made of soft and stretchable materials, which conform to reversible changes in the shape of the body they are built in and follow its deformations. Comparing the two sensory responses, we can discriminate the concave and the convex side of the bent body. Hence, we propose a new strategy to reveal in a soft body the maximum bending angle (or the maximum deflection) and the externally applied force according to the body's mechanical configuration. PMID:25739743

  8. Revealing bending and force in a soft body through a plant root inspired approach

    PubMed Central

    Lucarotti, Chiara; Totaro, Massimo; Sadeghi, Ali; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    An emerging challenge in soft robotics research is to reveal mechanical solicitations in a soft body. Nature provides amazing clues to develop unconventional components that are capable of compliant interactions with the environment and living beings, avoiding mechanical and algorithmic complexity of robotic design. We inspire from plant-root mechanoperception and develop a strategy able to reveal bending and applied force in a soft body with only two sensing elements of the same kind, and a null computational effort. The stretching processes that lead to opposite tissue deformations on the two sides of the root wall are emulated with two tactile sensing elements, made of soft and stretchable materials, which conform to reversible changes in the shape of the body they are built in and follow its deformations. Comparing the two sensory responses, we can discriminate the concave and the convex side of the bent body. Hence, we propose a new strategy to reveal in a soft body the maximum bending angle (or the maximum deflection) and the externally applied force according to the body's mechanical configuration. PMID:25739743

  9. Collisions in Space: Observations of Disturbances in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Caused by Destructive Collisions of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G. L.; Jia, Y. D.

    2011-10-01

    Collisions between small interplanetary bodies can produce clouds of dust particles, which rapidly become charged in the solar wind plasma. A wide range of particle sizes will be produced and the smallest nanoscale particles can be accelerated to solar wind speed in minutes. Our multi-fluid MHD simulation with charged dust as one fluid shows a three-dimensional disturbance in the magnetic field with compression and draping in the flow direction and bending in the direction perpendicular to both the flow and unperturbed magnetic field, producing a current sheet orthogonal to the flow. The Lorentz force of this current balances the transverse momentum of the gyrating dust particles and the solar gravity force balances the magnetic pressure gradient force. Thus the magnetic gradient force is proportional to the mass of the picked up dust and allows us to weigh the dust cloud. The magnetic field behavior in the simulation results qualitatively resembles the phenomenon called an interplanetary field enhancement (IFE), which is featured by a cuspshaped magnetic field enhancement lasting from several minutes to hours, with a sharp discontinuity in at least one component of the magnetic field. The association between IFE appearance and dust production was first inferred from PVO data in the 1980s, but the IFE formation process has been unclear until now. In this paper, we will gather the statistics of IFEs and use the magnetic compression to weigh the mass of the dust cloud. We will also estimate the volume over which individual events may be sensed. Using this volume together with the IFE occurrence rate we can calculate the inferred collision rate. We find for the IFE with mass about 107 kg, this rate approximately agrees with the estimated rate of collision of interplanetary bodies which can produce dust within the same mass range.

  10. Single Electron Detection with the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidles, John A.

    1997-03-01

    The 21st century will witness the attempted development of several radically new technologies involving the measurement and manipulation of individual two-state quantum systems. Among these technologies are: imaging the 3D structure of individual molecules by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), (2) the solution of non-polynomial algorithms by quantum computing, and (3) nanoscale, ultrafast electronic devices based on the manipulation of single electron states. These technologies address urgent unmet needs of human society, and in addition raise fascinating issues in both fundamental and applied physics. The first part of the talk will consider physics issues which are common to all three technologies. Specific emphasis will be placed on the AC Stark effect, the Stern-Gerlach effect, and the Quantum Zeno effect, as manifest during the measurement and manipulation of two-state quantum systems. The second part of the talk will be specifically concerned with the design, fabrication, and operation of practical MRFM devices for achieving single-spin detection and imaging. Which approaches work? Which approaches have been shown not to work? Which approaches have not yet been tried, but are promising avenues for further research? The final portion of the talk will consider the as-yet-unsolved problem of molecular structure determination more generally. What new solutions can the physics community offer?

  11. GravitoMagnetic force in modified Newtonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2013-08-01

    We introduce the Gauge Vector-Tensor (GVT) theory by extending the AQUAL's approach to the GravitoElectroMagnetism (GEM) approximation of gravity. GVT is a generally covariant theory of gravity composed of a pseudo Riemannian metric and two U(1) gauge connections that reproduces MOND in the limit of very weak gravitational fields while remains consistent with the Einstein-Hilbert gravity in the limit of strong and Newtonian gravitational fields. GVT also provides a simple framework to study the GEM approximation to gravity. We illustrate that the gravitomagnetic force at the edge of a galaxy can be in accord with either GVT or ΛCDM but not both. We also study the physics of the GVT theory around the gravitational saddle point of the Sun and Jupiter system. We notice that the conclusive refusal of the GVT theory demands measuring either both of the gravitoelectric and gravitomagnetic fields inside the Sun-Jupiter MOND window, or the gravitoelectric field inside two different solar GVT MOND windows. The GVT theory, however, will be favored by observing an anomaly in the gravitoelectric field inside a single MOND window.

  12. Application of superconductivity for magnetic force control in medical and industrial fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, S.

    2008-09-01

    The magnetic force control technique has expanded the applied field with developing a superconductivity because a high magnetic field and a high magnetic field gradient can be produced using the superconducting magnet. The magnetic force control technique has been applied to industrial fields such as recycling of abrasives, removing ferromagnetic particles from powdered products and purifying waste water. The technique is also applied to the drug delivery system as the medical application. Open gradient of magnetic separation was used for the recycling of the abrasives in wasted slurry from solar battery factory. For the removing the ferromagnetic particles from powdered products the magnetic filters were designed not to be blocked with the aggregated powder. In the water purification system, the superconducting high gradient magnetic separation was employed. For the magnetic drug delivery system the superconducting bulk magnet was used to navigate the nanometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in the blood vessel.

  13. Role of external magnetic field and current closure in the force balance mechanism of a magnetically stabilized plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Ravi; Goyal, Vidhi

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations on the role of applied external magnetic field and return current closure in the force balance mechanism of a plasma torch are reported. The plasma torch is of low power and has wall, gas and magnetic stabilization mechanisms incorporated in it. Gas flow is divided into two parts: axial-central and peripheral-shroud, applied magnetic field is axial and return current is co-axial. Results indicate that application of large external magnetic field gives rise to not only J x B force but also, coupled with gas flow, to a new drag-cum-centrifugal force that acts on the plasma arc root and column. The magnetic field also plays a role in the return current closure dynamics and thus in the overall force balance mechanism. This in turn affects the electro-thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Detailed experimental results, analytical calculations and physical model representing the processes will be presented and discussed.

  14. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  15. Benchmarking numerical predictions with force and moment measurements on slender, supercavitating bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, C.E.; Clark, E.L.; Cole, J.K.

    1991-01-01

    High-speed water-entry is a very complex, dynamic process. As a first attempt at modeling the process, a numerical solution was developed at Sandia National Laboratories for predicting the forces and moments acting on a body with a steady supercavity, that is, a cavity which extends beyond the base of the body. The solution is limited to supercavities on slender, axisymmetric bodies at small angles of attack. Limited data were available with which to benchmark the axial force predictions at zero angle of attack. Even less data were available with which to benchmark the pitching moment and normal force predictions at nonzero angles of attack. A water tunnel test was conducted to obtain force and moment data on a slender shape. This test produced limited data because of waterproofing problems with the balance. A new balance was designed and a second water tunnel test was conducted at Tracor Hydronautics, Inc. This paper describes the numerical solution, the experimental equipment and test procedures, and the results of the second test. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Parallel RF force driven by the inhomogeneity of power absorption in magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2013-06-01

    A nonlinear parallel force can be exerted through the inhomogeneity of rf resonant absorption in a magnetized plasma. While providing no integrated force over a plasma volume, this force can redistribute momentum parallel to the magnetic field. Because flows and currents parallel to the magnetic field encounter different resistances, this redistribution can play a large role, in addition to the role played by the direct absorption of parallel momentum. For nearly perpendicular propagating waves in a tokamak plasma, this additional force is expected to affect significantly the toroidal rf-driven current and the toroidal flow drive. PMID:25167505

  17. Magnetic levitation force measurement on high [Tc] superconducting ceramic/polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Unsworth, J.; Du, Jia; Crosby, B.J. ); Macfarlane, J.C. )

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of magnetic levitation force for 0--3 and 3--3 superconducting ceramic/polymer composites is presented. A simple, inexpensive force versus distance measurement technique is described. The measurements of force against distance or magnetic field show strong hysteretic behavior, which is similar to the sintered superconductor ceramics and is consistent with the hysteresis in magnetization of superconductor. The volume fraction dependence and sample thickness dependence of the levitation forces are also studied for 0--3 composites. Results suggest that the new composite materials are most suitable for levitation applications.

  18. Flow and Force Equations for a Body Revolving in a Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1930-01-01

    Part I gives a general method for finding the steady-flow velocity relative to a body in plane curvilinear motion, whence the pressure is found by Bernoulli's energy principle. Integration of the pressure supplies basic formulas for the zonal forces and moments on the revolving body. Part II, applying this steady-flow method, finds the velocity and pressure at all points of the flow inside and outside an ellipsoid and some of its limiting forms, and graphs those quantities for the latter forms. Part III finds the pressure, and thence the zonal force and moment, on hulls in plane curvilinear flight. Part IV derives general equations for the resultant fluid forces and moments on trisymmetrical bodies moving through a perfect fluid, and in some cases compares the moment values with those found for bodies moving in air. Part V furnishes ready formulas for potential coefficients and inertia coefficients for an ellipsoid and its limiting forms. Thence are derived tables giving numerical values of those coefficients for a comprehensive range of shapes.

  19. Ground reaction forces during level ground walking with body weight unloading

    PubMed Central

    Barela, Ana M. F.; de Freitas, Paulo B.; Celestino, Melissa L.; Camargo, Marcela R.; Barela, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Partial body weight support (BWS) systems have been broadly used with treadmills as a strategy for gait training of individuals with gait impairments. Considering that we usually walk on level ground and that BWS is achieved by altering the load on the plantar surface of the foot, it would be important to investigate some ground reaction force (GRF) parameters in healthy individuals walking on level ground with BWS to better implement rehabilitation protocols for individuals with gait impairments. Objective: To describe the effects of body weight unloading on GRF parameters as healthy young adults walked with BWS on level ground. Method: Eighteen healthy young adults (27±4 years old) walked on a walkway, with two force plates embedded in the middle of it, wearing a harness connected to a BWS system, with 0%, 15%, and 30% BWS. Vertical and horizontal peaks and vertical valley of GRF, weight acceptance and push-off rates, and impulse were calculated and compared across the three experimental conditions. Results: Overall, participants walked more slowly with the BWS system on level ground compared to their normal walking speed. As body weight unloading increased, the magnitude of the GRF forces decreased. Conversely, weight acceptance rate was similar among conditions. Conclusions: Different amounts of body weight unloading promote different outputs of GRF parameters, even with the same mean walk speed. The only parameter that was similar among the three experimental conditions was the weight acceptance rate. PMID:25590450

  20. Development of a Force Measurement Device for Lower-Body Muscular Strength Measuring of Skaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Lee, Jeong Tae

    This paper presents a force measurement system that can measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The precise measurement and analysis of the left and right lower-body strength of skaters is necessary, because a left/right lower-body strength balance is helpful to improve the athletes' performance and to protect them from injury. The system is constructed with a skate sliding board, a couple of sensor-units with load cell, indicator and control box, guard, force pad, and support bracket. The developed force measurement system is calibrated by the calibration setup, and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the left is within 0.087% and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the right is within 0.109%. In order to check the feasibility of the developed measurement device, a kinematic analysis is conducted with skater. As a result, the subject shows the deviation of left and right of 12.1 N with respect to average strength and 39.1 N with respect to the maximum strength. This evaluation results are reliable enough to make it possible to measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The use of this measurement system will be expected to correct the posture of skaters and record the sports dynamics data for each athlete. It is believed that through the development of this equipment, skaters in elementary, middle, high schools, colleges, and the professional level have the systematic training to compete with world-class skaters.

  1. Axial force imparted by a current-free magnetically expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W.

    2012-08-15

    The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding, current-free, radiofrequency plasma is directly measured. For an argon gas flow rate of 25 sccm and an effective rf input power of {approx}800W, a maximum force of {approx}6mN is obtained; {approx}3mN of which is transmitted via the expanding magnetic field. The measured forces are reasonably compared with a simple fluid model associated with the measured electron pressure. The model suggests that the total force is the sum of an electron pressure inside the source and a Lorentz force due to the electron diamagnetic drift current and the applied radial magnetic field. It is shown that the Lorentz force is greatest near the magnetic nozzle surface where the radial pressure gradient is largest.

  2. On the Evolution of Pulsatile Flow Subject to a Transverse Impulse Body Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-11-01

    In the event of an unexpected abrupt traffic stop or car accident, automotive passengers will experience an abrupt body deceleration. This may lead to tearing or dissection of the aortic wall known as Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR). BTAR is the second leading cause of death in automotive accidents and, although quite frequent, the mechanisms leading to BTAR are still not clearly identified, particularly the contribution of the flow field. As such, this work is intended to provide a fundamental framework for the investigation of the flow contribution to BTAR. In this fundamental study, pulsatile flow in a three-dimensional, straight pipe of circular cross-section is subjected to a unidirectional, transverse, impulse body force applied on a strictly bounded volume of fluid. These models were simulated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. The evolution of fluid field characteristics was investigated during and after the application of the force. The application of the force significantly modified the flow field. The force induces a transverse pressure gradient causing the development of secondary flow structures that dissipate the energy added by the acceleration. Once the force ceases to act, these structures are carried downstream and gradually dissipate their excess energy.

  3. Radial forces in a centrifugal compressor; Experimental investigation by using magnetic bearings and static pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reunanen, Arttu; Larjola, Jaakko

    2005-03-01

    The volute of a centrifugal compressor causes a non-uniform pressure distribution which leads to a radial force on the impeller. This force was measured using magnetic bearings. In addition, the radial force was estimated using the static pressure distribution measured at the impeller outlet. The impeller force was found to be the highest at choke, the lowest at the design flow and moderate at stall. The radial force determined from the pressure measurements was only slightly different from the force obtained from the bearing measurements. The rotational speed was seen to affect the force to some extent.

  4. Test bodies and naked singularities: is the self-force the cosmic censor?

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Cardoso, Vitor; Khanna, Gaurav

    2010-12-31

    Jacobson and Sotiriou showed that rotating black holes could be spun up past the extremal limit by the capture of nonspinning test bodies, if one neglects radiative and self-force effects. This would represent a violation of the cosmic censorship conjecture in four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes. We show that for some of the trajectories giving rise to naked singularities, radiative effects can be neglected. However, for these orbits the conservative self-force is important, and seems to have the right sign to prevent the formation of naked singularities. PMID:21231640

  5. Visualization and quantification of magnetic nanoparticles into vesicular systems by combined atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, C.; Corsetti, S.; Passeri, D.; Rossi, M.; Carafa, M.; Marianecci, C.; Pantanella, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Ingallina, C.; Sorbo, A.

    2015-06-23

    We report a phenomenological approach for the quantification of the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) incorporated in non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). After a simple specimen preparation, i.e., by putting a drop of solution containing MNPs-loaded niosomes on flat substrates, topography and MFM phase images are collected. To attempt the quantification of the diameter of entrapped MNPs, the method is calibrated on the sole MNPs deposited on the same substrates by analyzing the MFM signal as a function of the MNP diameter (at fixed tip-sample distance) and of the tip-sample distance (for selected MNPs). After calibration, the effective diameter of the MNPs entrapped in some niosomes is quantitatively deduced from MFM images.

  6. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response. PMID:20839658

  7. Preliminary investigation of force-reduced superconducting magnet configurations for advanced technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-12-01

    The feasibility of new high-field low specific weight superconducting magnet designs using force-free fields is being explored analytically and numerically. This report attempts to assess the technical viability of force-free field concepts to produce high-field, low specific weight and large bore volume magnets, which could promote the use of high temperature superconductors. Several force-free/force-reduced magnet configurations are first reviewed, then discussed and assessed. Force-free magnetic fields, fields for which the current flows parallel to the field, have well-known mathematical solutions extending upon infinite domains. These solutions, however, are no longer force-free everywhere for finite geometries. In this preliminary study, force-free solutions such as the Lundquist solutions truncated to a size where the internal field of the coil matches an externally cylindrical magnetic field (also called a Lundquist coil) are numerically modeled and explored. Significant force-reduction for such coils was calculated, which may have some importance for the design of lighter toroidal magnets used in thermonuclear fusion power generation, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), and mobile MHD power generation and propulsion.

  8. Nuclear pairing from bare interaction: Two and three-body chiral forces

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Paolo

    2012-10-20

    In a recent paper the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei has been investigated starting from the chiral nucleon-nucleon potential at the N{sup 3}LO order in the two-body sector and the N{sup 2}LO order in the three-body sector. To include realistic nuclear forces in RHB (Relativistic Hartree Bolgoliubov) calculations we relied on a separable representation of the pairing interaction. In this paper we would like to show recent results concerning isotonic chains with N= 28,50,82.

  9. Symmetry Potential and Effective Mass with Consistent Three-Body Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zeng-Hua; Zuo, Wei

    2012-06-01

    The momentum and isospin dependence of symmetry potential and effective mass in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated in the framework of the BruecknerHartreeFock approach by adopting the realistic Bonn B two-body interaction in combination with a consistent microscopic three-body force. It is demonstrated that symmetry potentials at the normal density for different asymmetry parameters are in good agreement with the empirical value constrained by the experimental data, and the neutron and proton effective masses show strong isospin splitting with m*n > m*p on the whole range of asymmetry parameters. In the end, the density dependence of the Landau mass is displayed.

  10. Magnetization loops and pinning force of Bi-2212 single-crystal whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, S.; Gokhfeld, D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Dependence of magnetization on applied magnetic field for single-crystal Bi-2212 whiskers was measured at different temperatures. Symmetric and asymmetric magnetization loops were successfully described by the extended critical state model (the extended Valkov-Khrustalev model). Pinning force of whiskers was investigated.

  11. Force-Velocity Relationship of Upper Body Muscles: Traditional Versus Ballistic Bench Press.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Jaric, Slobodan; Padial, Paulino; Feriche, Belén

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the linearity of the force-velocity relationship, as well as the reliability of maximum force (F0), maximum velocity (V0), slope (a), and maximum power (P0); (2) compare these parameters between the traditional and ballistic bench press (BP); and (3) determine the correlation of F0 with the directly measured BP 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Thirty-two men randomly performed 2 sessions of traditional BP and 2 sessions of ballistic BP during 2 consecutive weeks. Both the maximum and mean values of force and velocity were recorded when loaded by 20-70% of 1RM. All force-velocity relationships were strongly linear (r > .99). While F0 and P0 were highly reliable (ICC: 0.91-0.96, CV: 3.8-5.1%), lower reliability was observed for V0 and a (ICC: 0.49-0.81, CV: 6.6-11.8%). Trivial differences between exercises were found for F0 (ES: < 0.2), however the a was higher for the traditional BP (ES: 0.68-0.94), and V0 (ES: 1.04-1.48) and P0 (ES: 0.65-0.72) for the ballistic BP. The F0 strongly correlated with BP 1RM (r: 0.915-0.938). The force-velocity relationship is useful to assess the upper body maximal capabilities to generate force, velocity, and power. PMID:26540734

  12. Force sensing using 3D displacement measurements in linear elastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xinzeng; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-04-01

    In cell traction microscopy, the mechanical forces exerted by a cell on its environment is usually determined from experimentally measured displacement by solving an inverse problem in elasticity. In this paper, an innovative numerical method is proposed which finds the "optimal" traction to the inverse problem. When sufficient regularization is applied, we demonstrate that the proposed method significantly improves the widely used approach using Green's functions. Motivated by real cell experiments, the equilibrium condition of a slowly migrating cell is imposed as a set of equality constraints on the unknown traction. Our validation benchmarks demonstrate that the numeric solution to the constrained inverse problem well recovers the actual traction when the optimal regularization parameter is used. The proposed method can thus be applied to study general force sensing problems, which utilize displacement measurements to sense inaccessible forces in linear elastic bodies with a priori constraints.

  13. Real-Time Control of Humanoid Robots Considering External Forces on Upper Part of the Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Kentaro; Shigemori, Yo; Uchimura, Yutaka

    Recently, the demand for the practical use of service robots has risen significantly because of acceleration of demographic aging, and a humanoid robot is one of the promising form factors of service robots. When a humanoid robot is used by a human in a real environment, the robot needs to be designed by taking into account the various external forces that act on the robot. Thus far, most of the walking humanoid robots have been mainly controlled by the conventional ZMP method to maintain a stable walking posture. However, the conventional ZMP method can not be used to handle the various external forces that act on the upper part of the humanoid robot body. To overcome these problems, in this paper, we propose a novel control method, which we called 3DZMP and pZMP, for a humanoid robot to react to the external force on the upper part of the body. The 3DZMP is defined as the point in three-dimensional space at which the moment about all axes is zero. 3DZMP can prevent the rotation of a humanoid robot. The pZMP is defined as the point corresponding to the orthographic projection of the 3DZMP on a plane. pZMP is used to evaluate the stability of 3DZMP. We implemented the proposed method on a prototype robot and verified that the robot gained the capability to react to external forces that could not be handled by the conventional ZMP method.

  14. Does Using a Visual-Representation Tool Foster Students' Ability to Identify Forces and Construct Free-Body Diagrams?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savinainen, Antti; Makynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2013-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that after physics instruction, many students have difficulties with the force concept, and with constructing free-body diagrams (FBDs). It has been suggested that treating forces as interactions could help students to identify forces as well as to construct the correct FBDs. While there is evidence that identifying…

  15. How can magnetic forces do work? Investigating the problem with students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-11-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students’ reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been tested with about 150 high school students and 50 pre-service teachers. Results indicate that students’ understanding of the direction and magnitude of the magnetic force improved markedly and that some typical difficulties were overcome. Comparison of the two types of forces and of their effects allowed focusing on their crucial difference with respect to the possibility of doing work and encouraged students to search for models that are able to link one force to another.

  16. Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement System at Any Low Temperatures From 20 K To 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, S. Baris; Coskun, Elvan

    2015-03-01

    Most of the magnetic levitation force measurements in previous studies were performed at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For the levitation force of MgB2 and iron based superconducting samples, magnetic levitation force measurement system is needed. In this study, magnetic levitation force measurement system was designed. In this system, beside vertical force versus vertical motion, lateral and vertical force versus lateral motion measurements, the vertical force versus temperature at the fixed distance between permanent magnet PM - superconducting sample SS and the vertical force versus time measurements were performed at any temperatures from 20 K to 300 K. Thanks to these measurements, the temperature dependence, time dependence, and the distance (magnetic field) and temperature dependences of SS can be investigated. On the other hand, the magnetic stiffness MS measurements can be performed in this system. Using the measurement of MS at different temperature in the range, MS dependence on temperature can be investigated. These measurements at any temperatures in the range help to the superconductivity properties to be characterized. This work was supported by TUBTAK-the Scientific and technological research council of Turkey under project of MFAG - 110T622. This system was applied to the Turkish patent institute with the Application Number of 2013/13638 on 22/11/2013.

  17. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  18. Potential of mean force between like-charged nanoparticles: Many-body effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jin-Si; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is important for the properties of polyelectrolytes such as colloids and nucleic acids. The effective pair interactions between two polyelectrolytes have been investigated extensively, but the many-body effect for multiple polyelectrolytes still remains elusive. In this work, the many-body effect in potential of mean force (PMF) between like-charged nanoparticles in various salt solutions has been comprehensively examined by Monte Carlo simulation and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Our calculations show that, at high 1:1 salt, the PMF is weakly repulsive and appears additive, while at low 1:1 salt, the additive assumption overestimates the repulsive many-body PMF. At low 2:2 salt, the pair PMF appears weakly repulsive while the many-body PMF can become attractive. In contrast, at high 2:2 salt, the pair PMF is apparently attractive while the many-body effect can cause a weaker attractive PMF than that from the additive assumption. Our microscopic analyses suggest that the elusive many-body effect is attributed to ion-binding which is sensitive to ion concentration, ion valence, number of nanoparticles and charges on nanoparticles. PMID:26997415

  19. Potential of mean force between like-charged nanoparticles: Many-body effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jin-Si; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is important for the properties of polyelectrolytes such as colloids and nucleic acids. The effective pair interactions between two polyelectrolytes have been investigated extensively, but the many-body effect for multiple polyelectrolytes still remains elusive. In this work, the many-body effect in potential of mean force (PMF) between like-charged nanoparticles in various salt solutions has been comprehensively examined by Monte Carlo simulation and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Our calculations show that, at high 1:1 salt, the PMF is weakly repulsive and appears additive, while at low 1:1 salt, the additive assumption overestimates the repulsive many-body PMF. At low 2:2 salt, the pair PMF appears weakly repulsive while the many-body PMF can become attractive. In contrast, at high 2:2 salt, the pair PMF is apparently attractive while the many-body effect can cause a weaker attractive PMF than that from the additive assumption. Our microscopic analyses suggest that the elusive many-body effect is attributed to ion-binding which is sensitive to ion concentration, ion valence, number of nanoparticles and charges on nanoparticles. PMID:26997415

  20. Potential of mean force between like-charged nanoparticles: Many-body effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jin-Si; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2016-03-01

    Ion-mediated interaction is important for the properties of polyelectrolytes such as colloids and nucleic acids. The effective pair interactions between two polyelectrolytes have been investigated extensively, but the many-body effect for multiple polyelectrolytes still remains elusive. In this work, the many-body effect in potential of mean force (PMF) between like-charged nanoparticles in various salt solutions has been comprehensively examined by Monte Carlo simulation and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Our calculations show that, at high 1:1 salt, the PMF is weakly repulsive and appears additive, while at low 1:1 salt, the additive assumption overestimates the repulsive many-body PMF. At low 2:2 salt, the pair PMF appears weakly repulsive while the many-body PMF can become attractive. In contrast, at high 2:2 salt, the pair PMF is apparently attractive while the many-body effect can cause a weaker attractive PMF than that from the additive assumption. Our microscopic analyses suggest that the elusive many-body effect is attributed to ion-binding which is sensitive to ion concentration, ion valence, number of nanoparticles and charges on nanoparticles.

  1. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  2. Magnetic microposts as an approach to apply forces to living cells

    PubMed Central

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Anguelouch, Alexandre; Yang, Michael T.; Lamb, Corinne M.; Liu, Zhijun; Kirschner, Stuart B.; Liu, Yaohua; Reich, Daniel H.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2007-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical forces whether applied externally or generated internally via the cytoskeleton. To study the cellular response to forces separately, we applied external forces to cells via microfabricated magnetic posts containing cobalt nanowires interspersed among an array of elastomeric posts, which acted as independent sensors to cellular traction forces. A magnetic field induced torque in the nanowires, which deflected the magnetic posts and imparted force to individual adhesions of cells attached to the array. Using this system, we examined the cellular reaction to applied forces and found that applying a step force led to an increase in local focal adhesion size at the site of application but not at nearby nonmagnetic posts. Focal adhesion recruitment was enhanced further when cells were subjected to multiple force actuations within the same time interval. Recording the traction forces in response to such force stimulation revealed two responses: a sudden loss in contractility that occurred within the first minute of stimulation or a gradual decay in contractility over several minutes. For both types of responses, the subcellular distribution of loss in traction forces was not confined to locations near the actuated micropost, nor uniformly across the whole cell, but instead occurred at discrete locations along the cell periphery. Together, these data reveal an important dynamic biological relationship between external and internal forces and demonstrate the utility of this microfabricated system to explore this interaction. PMID:17804810

  3. Relations Between Lower Body Isometric Muscle Force Characteristics and Start Performance in Elite Male Sprint Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Beretić, Igor; Đurović, Marko; Okičić, Tomislav; DOPSAJ, Milivoj

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was twofold. The first aim was to examine the influence of absolute and relative lower body muscle force on kinematic component which determine the start performance. The second aim was to create multiregressional model which could use as a tool for swimming coaches with the purpose to start performance control and improvement. Twenty seven high-level trained male competitive swimmers all members of the Serbian National Youth and Senior Swimming Team (Age = 21.1 ± 4.3 yrs., Height = 1. 89 ± 0.10 m, Weight = 81.6 ± 8.4 kg, 50m freestyle - long course = 24.36 ± 0.86 s) performed two trials of standing leg extensors isometric muscle force testing and three swimming start trials corresponding to 10m distance. The average start time significantly correlated with variables of leg extensors maximum voluntary force (Fmax, r = -0.559, p = 0.002), leg extensors relative muscle voluntary force (Frel, r = -0.727, p < 0.001), leg extensors specific rate of force development (RFD50%, r = -0.338, p = 0.047) and leg extensors relative value of specific rate of force development (RFD50%rel, r = -0.402, p = 0.040). Regression equation for t10m prediction was defined by following variables: maximum voluntary isometric force of leg extensors muscles at absolute and relative level (Fmax and Frel), as well as a specific rate of force development of the same muscle groups (RFD50% and RFD50%rel) at absolute and relative level too with 74.4% of explained variance. Contractile abilities indicators of the leg extensors muscles included consideration: Fmax, RFD50%, Frel and RFD50%rel showed significant correlation with swimming start times on 10m. Additionally, the results suggest that swimmers, who possess greater isometric maximum force and specific rate of force development at absolute and relative levels, tend to be able to swim faster on initial 10m swim start perforamnce. Key Points In high-level male swimmers: Leg extensors maximum voluntary force, leg exten-sors relative value of maximum muscle voluntary force, leg extensors specific rate of force develop-ment and leg extensors relative value of specific rate of force development positively associated with the start time measured on 10m-mark. Time at 10m-mark was not associated with legs ex-tensors basic level of rate of force development at absolute and relative level. Obtained multi-regressional model is defined by variables which measure the development of maxi-mum voluntary isometric leg extensor muscle force on the absolute and relative level, as well as vari-ables which measure the development of specific explosive force of the same muscle group on abso-lute and relative level, this could use as a tool for swimming coaches to control the direction and ex-tent of development of a given force characteristics for providing conditions for start improvement in highly trained elite male sprint swimmers. PMID:24421722

  4. Investigation of Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2002-01-01

    The bubble coalescence and interfacial instabilities that are important to modeling critical heat flux (CHF) in reduced-gravity systems can be sensitive to even minute body forces. Understanding these complex phenomena is vital to the design and safe implementation of two-phase thermal management loops proposed for space and planetary-based thermal systems. While reduced gravity conditions cannot be accurately simulated in 1g ground-based experiments, such experiments can help isolate the effects of the various forces (body force, surface tension force and inertia) which influence flow boiling CHF. In this project, the effects of the component of body force perpendicular to a heated wall were examined by conducting 1g flow boiling experiments at different orientations. FC-72 liquid was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface at conditions approaching CHF. High-speed video imaging was employed to capture dominant CHF mechanisms. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed great sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where very small CHF values where measured, especially with downflow and downward-facing heated wall orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. Figure I shows representative images for the different CHF regimes. The Wavy Vapor Layer regime was dominant for all high velocities and most orientations, while all other regimes were encountered at low velocities, in the downflow and/or downward-facing heated wall orientations. The Interfacial Lift-off model was modified to predict the effects of orientation on CHF for the dominant Wavy Vapor Layer regime. The photographic study captured a fairly continuous wavy vapor layer travelling along the heated wall while permitting liquid contact only in wetting fronts, located in the troughs of the interfacial waves. CHF commenced when wetting fronts near the outlet were lifted off the wall. The Interfacial Lift-off model is shown to be an effective tool for predicting the effects of body force on CHF at high velocities.

  5. Transformation of body force localized near the surface of a half-space into equivalent surface stresses.

    PubMed

    Rouge, Clémence; Lhémery, Alain; Ségur, Damien

    2013-10-01

    An electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) or a laser used to generate elastic waves in a component is often described as a source of body force confined in a layer close to the surface. On the other hand, models for elastic wave radiation more efficiently handle sources described as distributions of surface stresses. Equivalent surface stresses can be obtained by integrating the body force with respect to depth. They are assumed to generate the same field as the one that would be generated by the body force. Such an integration scheme can be applied to Lorentz force for conventional EMAT configuration. When applied to magnetostrictive force generated by an EMAT in a ferromagnetic material, the same scheme fails, predicting a null stress. Transforming body force into equivalent surface stresses therefore, requires taking into account higher order terms of the force moments, the zeroth order being the simple force integration over the depth. In this paper, such a transformation is derived up to the second order, assuming that body forces are localized at depths shorter than the ultrasonic wavelength. Two formulations are obtained, each having some advantages depending on the application sought. They apply regardless of the nature of the force considered. PMID:24116402

  6. Different types of ferrite thin films as magnetic cantilever coating for magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Kirsch, M.; Pfeifer, R.; Getlawi, S.; Rigato, F.; Fontcuberta, J.; Sulzbach, T.; Hartmann, U.

    2010-05-01

    Different types of ferrites are employed in the form of thin films as magnetic coating on cantilevers for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) use. This is especially needed for cantilevers employed in high-frequency MFM (HF-MFM), where stray fields of hard disk recording heads are investigated. Our experiments show that we can operate HF-MFM successfully at carrier frequencies up 2 GHz using such ferrite-coated cantilevers. Thin films of two ferrites, NiZnFe 2O 4 spinel ferrite and Co 2 Z-type hexaferrite (Ba 3Co 2Fe 24O 41, BCFO) were prepared by RF sputtering. As a basis for these probes, we employ commercial micromachined silicon cantilevers. Additionally, films on Si (1 0 0) and Si (1 1 1)-oriented substrates with a thickness up to 100 nm were prepared for analysis purposes, enabling the optimization of the sputter process. For a high spatial resolution of MFM, however, thinner magnetic coatings are required. Therefore, the third type, c, was prepared by laser-ablation with a thickness of 30 nm, also directly onto the Si without additional buffer layer.

  7. Magnetic levitation force of semi-infinite type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    The levitation force acting on a point magnetic dipole above a semi-infinite type-II superconductor in both the Meissner and mixed states is studied. A formalism is developed for axisymmetric problems using London theory. The magnetostatic interaction energy and corresponding force can be put into closed form for such problems for arbitrary height of the magnetic point source. The results for stray fields have ready application to magnetic-force microscopy (MFM) with point probes. The results are useful for a range of experiments including the low-temperature MFM imaging of vortices and decoration measurements. Special cases include earlier results and previous approximations are obviated.

  8. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing.

    PubMed

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Romano, Francesco; Traversaro, Silvio; Nori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications. PMID:27213394

  9. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing †

    PubMed Central

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Romano, Francesco; Traversaro, Silvio; Nori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications. PMID:27213394

  10. Force-free coronal magnetic field modeling using vector fields from Hinode and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, Julia K.; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Given the lack of routine direct measurements of the magnetic field in the solar corona, force-free reconstruction methods are a promising tool for the diagnostics of the magnetic structure there. Routine photospheric magnetic field measurements which monitor the temporal evolution of an active region and contain information on the non-potentiality of the field above are used as an input. Based on the assumption that magnetic forces dominate the solar atmosphere, these models allow estimates of the total and free magnetic energy content and the structure of the magnetic field above active regions. The outcome of force-free field modeling strongly depends on the vector magnetic field data used as boundary condition. We compare the model results based on simultaneously observed vector maps from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory and from the Solar Optical Telescope Spectropolarimeter (SP) on board Hinode. We find substantial differences in the absolute estimates of the magnetic field energy but very similar relative estimates, e.g., the fraction of energy to be set free during an eruption or the fraction of flux linking distinct areas within an active region. Our study reveals that only relative estimates of coronal physical quantities from force-free models might be save and conclusions about the magnetic field topology might be drawn with caution.

  11. Non-uniform forcing of a magnetic soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Randy; Beckham, Regan

    2012-02-01

    The effects of a non-uniform magnetic field on a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a soap film are investigated. Experiments show that a strong non-uniform field will form a two-dimensional structure of magnetic nanoparticles within the soap film. A model is developed to compare with experimental results for several different magnetic field configurations. The system is modeled with a two-dimensional thin film equation with no-flux boundary conditions. We show qualitative agreement between the model and experiments.

  12. Torsional resonance mode magnetic force microscopy: enabling higher lateral resolution magnetic imaging without topography-related effects.

    PubMed

    Kaidatzis, A; García-Martín, J M

    2013-04-26

    We present experimental work that reveals the benefits of performing magnetic force microscopy measurements employing the torsional resonance mode of cantilever oscillation. This approach provides two clear advantages: the ability of performing magnetic imaging without topography-related interference and the significant lateral resolution improvement (approximately 15%). We believe that this work demonstrates a significant improvement to a versatile magnetic imaging technique widely used in academia and in industry. PMID:23535607

  13. Thin Film Magnetics for a 3D Force Microscope for Biology Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Ben; Fisher, Jay; Cribb, Jeremy; Hao, Jing; Vicci, Leandra; Taylor, Russell; Superfine, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Forces are essential for many biological functions including motility, cell division, intracellular transport and biological hydrodynamics. Magnetic beads offer the ability to probe living systems in three dimensions and apply forces of up to several nanoNewtons. We are developing a general approach for the application of magnetic forces on beads in our 3D Force Microscope. Magnetic fields are generated by paramagnetic poles, affixed to a glass coverslip and activated by six independently-controlled coils. These magnetic fields allow for the manipulation of a paramagnetic or ferromagnetic bead in three dimensions. We track the motion of the bead in real time with either laser light forward scattering (3D) or with video tracking (2D). Using Stokes Law for drag force calibration, we have found that we are able to generate up to ten nanoNewtons of force on 4.5 micron diameter paramagnetic beads, and 800 picoNewtons on 1 micron beads. These forces are larger than those typically generated by laser trapping, and can be applied without doing any lasting damage to a living cell. Progress in force calibration on the thin film magnetics will be discussed.

  14. Task III: Development of an Effective Computational Methodology for Body Force Representation of High-speed Rotor 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon-Sooi; Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A framework for an effective computational methodology for characterizing the stability and the impact of distortion in high-speed multi-stage compressor is being developed. The methodology consists of using a few isolated-blade row Navier-Stokes solutions for each blade row to construct a body force database. The purpose of the body force database is to replace each blade row in a multi-stage compressor by a body force distribution to produce same pressure rise and flow turning. To do this, each body force database is generated in such a way that it can respond to the changes in local flow conditions. Once the database is generated, no hrther Navier-Stokes computations are necessary. The process is repeated for every blade row in the multi-stage compressor. The body forces are then embedded as source terms in an Euler solver. The method is developed to have the capability to compute the performance in a flow that has radial as well as circumferential non-uniformity with a length scale larger than a blade pitch; thus it can potentially be used to characterize the stability of a compressor under design. It is these two latter features as well as the accompanying procedure to obtain the body force representation that distinguish the present methodology from the streamline curvature method. The overall computational procedures have been developed. A dimensional analysis was carried out to determine the local flow conditions for parameterizing the magnitudes of the local body force representation of blade rows. An Euler solver was modified to embed the body forces as source terms. The results from the dimensional analysis show that the body forces can be parameterized in terms of the two relative flow angles, the relative Mach number, and the Reynolds number. For flow in a high-speed transonic blade row, they can be parameterized in terms of the local relative Mach number alone.

  15. Fluctuating wind forces measured on a bluff body extending from a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Brian W.

    1989-12-01

    The effect of wind forces measured on a bluff body extending from a cavity was investigated. This was accomplished by measuring wind induced vibratory inputs to a plexiglas bluff body model. The model extended from a ground board cavity installed in the AFIT 5-Foot Wind Tunnel. Forces and moments were measured from an 8 element load cell unit built and installed in the base of a plexiglas model. Three different size cavity openings were tested for both a no-rotation and 45 degree rotation referenced to the wind. Data was taken at individual speed points between 55 ft/s and 180 ft/s, producing Reynolds number based on model width in the range of 1.5 x 10 to the 5th power to 5.0 x 10 to the 5th power. Baseline data for a closed cavity configuration was collected and compared to previous studies conducted at the USAF Academy. Force and moment coefficient data are presented, comparing cavity opening and model rotation effects. Results of shedding frequency analysis are presented based on transient data recorded.

  16. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-01

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials. PMID:23720016

  17. A study on the changes in attractive force of magnetic attachments for overdenture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Although magnetic attachment is used frequently for overdenture, it is reported that attractive force can be decreased by abrasion and corrosion. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical basis about considerations and long term prognosis of overdenture using magnetic attachments by investigating the change in attractive force of magnetic attachment applied to the patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Among the patients treated with overdenture using magnetic attachments in Dankook University Dental Hospital, attractive force records of 61 magnetic attachments of 20 subjects who re-visited from July 2013 to June 2014 were analyzed. Dental magnet tester (Aichi Micro Intelligent Co., Aichi, Japan) was used for measurement. The magnetic attachments used in this study were Magfit IP-B Flat, Magfit DX400, Magfit DX600 and Magfit DX800 (Aichi Steel Co., Aichi, Japan) filled with Neodymium (NdFeB), a rare-earth magnet. RESULTS Reduction ratio of attractive force had no significant correlation with conditional variables to which attachments were applied, and was higher when the maintenance period was longer (P<.05, r=.361). Reduction ratio of attractive force was significantly higher in the subject group in which attachments were used over 9 years than within 9 years (P<.05). Furthermore, 16.39% of total magnetic attachments showed detachment of keeper or assembly. CONCLUSION Attractive force of magnetic attachment is maintained regardless of conditional variables and reduction ratio increased as the maintenance period became longer. Further study on adhesive material, attachment method and design improvement to prevent detachment of magnetic attachment is needed. PMID:26949482

  18. Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during gliding in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2007-08-01

    Gliding has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of gliding in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short glides in an enclosed space. Short segments of the glide were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during gliding flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower glides. Flying squirrels have a number of morphological specializations not shared by sugar gliders that may help to explain their greater lift generating performance. PMID:17644674

  19. Equal sensation curves for whole-body vibration expressed as a function of driving force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the seated human is most sensitive to whole-body vertical vibration at about 5 Hz. Similarly, the body shows an apparent mass resonance at about 5 Hz. Considering these similarities between the biomechanical and subjective responses, it was hypothesized that, at low frequencies, subjective ratings of whole-body vibration might be directly proportional to the driving force. Twelve male subjects participated in a laboratory experiment where subjects sat on a rigid seat mounted on a shaker. The magnitude of a test stimulus was adjusted such that the subjective intensity could be matched to a reference stimulus, using a modified Bruceton test protocol. The sinusoidal reference stimulus was 8-Hz vibration with a magnitude of 0.5 m/s2 rms (or 0.25 m/s2 rms for the 1-Hz test); the sinusoidal test stimuli had frequencies of 1, 2, 4, 16, and 32 Hz. Equal sensation contours in terms of seat acceleration showed data similar to those in the literature. Equal sensation contours in terms of force showed a nominally linear response at 1, 2, and 4 Hz, but an increasing sensitivity at higher frequencies. This is in agreement with a model derived from published subjective and objective fitted data. .

  20. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  1. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  2. Special solutions for magnetic separation problems using force and energy conditions for ferro-particles capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandulyak, Anna; Sandulyak, Alexander; Belgacem, Fethi B. M.; Kiselev, Dmitriy

    2016-03-01

    While trying to solve the equation for the ferro-particle movement in the zone of magnetic separation, it is necessary to provisionally perform a comparative evaluation of forces influencing the ferro-particle in order to define the dominating ones, and specify the task at hand. Here, we consider various solutions of the problem and definitions of magnetic separation parameters based on the traditionally used forces and/or energy conditions of ferro-particle capture.

  3. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  4. Investigation of the influence of magnetostriction and magnetic forces on transformer core noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phophongviwat, Teeraphon

    Transformer noise is of increasing environmental concern so continued efforts are being made by electrical steel and transformer producers to satisfy users by reducing the noise. Magnetostriction and magnetic forces are the main causes of transformer core noise and vibration. Understanding of the relationship from the core material to core structure and core vibration to core noise can help the design of low noise transformer cores. The most appropriate parameter for investigating the relationship between noise and vibration is sound pressure (in the unit of Pascals) in the frequency domain because it is not A-weighted. In this study, the side surfaces of transformer cores were found to emit higher noise than front and top surfaces at low magnetic induction. When the magnetic induction was increased, the effect of magnetic force increased and caused the front surfaces to emit higher noise. For three phase three limb transformer cores, the front surface of the middle limb generated higher noise than the outer limbs due to the effect of T-joint. However this does not translate higher noise level because of the phase difference of the vibration between the limbs. Due to this A-weighted sound power level of three phase, three limb transformer cores were shown to be lower than single phase transformer cores, although at the same cross sectional area and core window size the three phase cores has larger size.. A model, developed to separate the effects of magnetostriction and magnetic forces on transformer core vibration, showed that at low induction, magnetostriction is more significant than magnetic forces. The magnetic forces become more significant than magnetostriction when the induction is increased. Magnetostriction primarily depends on material and stress but magnetic forces principally depend on core building. Louder noise can be generated from a core built with low magnetostriction material than higher magnetostriction if the building tolerances are worse. The effect of magnetic forces on transformer core vibration can be reduced by using a bonding technique..

  5. The Role of Three-Nucleon Forces and Many-Body Processes in Nuclear Pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    We present microscopic valence-shell calculations of pairing gaps in the calcium isotopes, focusing on the role of three-nucleon (3N) forces and manybody processes. In most cases, we find a reduction in pairing strength when the leading chiral 3N forces are included, compared to results with lowmomentum two-nucleon (NN) interactions only. This is in agreement with a recent energy density functional study. At the NN level, calculations that include particle particle and hole hole ladder contributions lead to smaller pairing gaps compared with experiment. When particle hole contributions as well as the normal-ordered one- and two-body parts of 3N forces are consistently included to third order, we find reasonable agreement with experimental three-point mass differences. This highlights the important role of 3N forces and manybody processes for pairing in nuclei. Finally, we relate pairing gaps to the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich calcium isotopes and study the predictions for the 2+ excitation energies, in particular for 54Ca.

  6. Relaxation of N-body systems with additive r-α interparticle forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cintio, PierFrancesco; Ciotti, Luca; Nipoti, Carlo

    2013-06-01

    In Newtonian gravity the final states of cold dissipationless collapses are characterized by several structural and dynamical properties remarkably similar to those of observed elliptical galaxies. Are these properties a peculiarity of the Newtonian force or a more general feature of long-range forces? We study this problem by means of N-body simulations of dissipationless collapse of systems of particles interacting via additive r-α forces. We find that most of the results holding in Newtonian gravity are also valid for α ≠ 2. In particular, the end-products are triaxial and never flatter than an E7 system, their surface density profiles are well described by the Sérsic law, the global density slope-anisotropy inequality is obeyed, the differential energy distribution is an exponential over a large range of energies (for α ≥ 1), and the pseudo-phase-space density is a power law of radius. In addition, we show that the process of virialization takes longer (in units of the system's dynamical time) for decreasing values of α, and becomes infinite for α = -1 (the harmonic oscillator). This is in agreement with the results of deep Modified Newtonian Dynamics collapses (qualitatively corresponding to α = 1) and it is due to the fact that the force becomes more and more similar to the α = -1 case, where, as well known, no relaxation can happen and the system oscillates forever.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of neutron matter with chiral three-body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tews, I.; Gandolfi, S.; Gezerlis, A.; Schwenk, A.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral effective field theory (EFT) enables a systematic description of low-energy hadronic interactions with controlled theoretical uncertainties. For strongly interacting systems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods provide some of the most accurate solutions, but they require as input local potentials. We have recently constructed local chiral nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N2LO ). Chiral EFT naturally predicts consistent many-body forces. In this paper, we consider the leading chiral three-nucleon (3N) interactions in local form. These are included in auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) simulations. We present results for the equation of state of neutron matter and for the energies and radii of neutron drops. In particular, we study the regulator dependence at the Hartree-Fock level and in AFDMC and find that present local regulators lead to less repulsion from 3N forces compared to the usual nonlocal regulators.

  8. Constraint Force Equation Methodology for Modeling Multi-Body Stage Separation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toniolo, Matthew D.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Pamadi, Bandu N.; Hotchko, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a generalized approach to the multi-body separation problems in a launch vehicle staging environment based on constraint force methodology and its implementation into the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2), a widely used trajectory design and optimization tool. This development facilitates the inclusion of stage separation analysis into POST2 for seamless end-to-end simulations of launch vehicle trajectories, thus simplifying the overall implementation and providing a range of modeling and optimization capabilities that are standard features in POST2. Analysis and results are presented for two test cases that validate the constraint force equation methodology in a stand-alone mode and its implementation in POST2.

  9. Spin-dependent two-body interactions from gravitational self-force computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Damour, Thibault; Geralico, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We analytically compute, through the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order and the fourth-order in spin, the gravitational self-force correction to Detweiler's gauge invariant redshift function for a small mass in circular orbit around a Kerr black hole. Using the first law of mechanics for black hole binaries with spin [L. Blanchet, A. Buonanno and A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 87, 024030 (2013)] we transcribe our results into a knowledge of various spin-dependent couplings, as encoded within the spinning effective-one-body model of T. Damour and A. Nagar [Phys. Rev. D 90, 044018 (2014)]. We also compare our analytical results to the (corrected) numerical self-force results of A. G. Shah, J. L. Friedman and T. S. Keidl [Phys. Rev. D 86, 084059 (2012)], from which we show how to directly extract physically relevant spin-dependent couplings.

  10. Verification of a Constraint Force Equation Methodology for Modeling Multi-Body Stage Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Roithmayr, Carlos; Toniolo, Matthew D.; Karlgaard, Christopher; Pamadi, Bandu N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the verification of the Constraint Force Equation (CFE) methodology and its implementation in the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) for multibody separation problems using three specially designed test cases. The first test case involves two rigid bodies connected by a fixed joint; the second case involves two rigid bodies connected with a universal joint; and the third test case is that of Mach 7 separation of the Hyper-X vehicle. For the first two cases, the POST2/CFE solutions compared well with those obtained using industry standard benchmark codes, namely AUTOLEV and ADAMS. For the Hyper-X case, the POST2/CFE solutions were in reasonable agreement with the flight test data. The CFE implementation in POST2 facilitates the analysis and simulation of stage separation as an integral part of POST2 for seamless end-to-end simulations of launch vehicle trajectories.

  11. Harmonic Fluxes and Electromagnetic Forces of Concentric Winding Brushless Permanent Magnet Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Fuminori; Takemasa, Ryo; Matsushita, Makoto; Nishizawa, Takashi; Noda, Shinichi

    Brushless permanent magnet motors have been widely used in home applications and industrial fields. These days, high efficiency and low noise motors are demanded from the view point of environment. Electromagnetic noise and iron loss of the motor are produced by the harmonic fluxes and electromagnetic forces. However, order and space pattern of these have not been discussed in detail. In this paper, fluxes, electromagnetic forces and magneto-motive forces of brushless permanent magnet motors with concentric winding were analyzed analytically, experimentally and numerically. Time harmonic fluxes and time electromagnetic forces in the air gap were measured by search coils on the inner surface of the stator teeth and analyzed by FEM. Space pattern of time harmonic fluxes and time electromagnetic forces were worked out with experiments and FEM. Magneto motive forces due to concentric winding were analyzed with equations and checked by FEM.

  12. Dynamics of a Levitron under a periodic magnetic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Alberto T.; García-Sánchez, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    The Levitron is a toy that consists of a spinning top that levitates over a magnetic base for a few minutes, until air drag decreases the spin rate below a certain limit. Stable levitation, lasting hours or even days, has been achieved for Levitrons that were externally driven by either an air jet or an alternating magnetic field. We report measurements of stable levitation for the latter case. We show that the top precession couples with the frequency of the alternating field, so that the precession period equals the period of the field. In addition, the top rotates around itself with the same period. We present numerical simulations that reproduce the essential features of this dynamics. It is also shown that the magnetic torque that drives the top is due to a misalignment between the magnetic dipole moment and the mechanical axis of the top.

  13. Limitations of force-free magnetic field extrapolations: Revisiting basic assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.; Warnecke, J.; Chitta, L. P.; Cameron, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Force-free extrapolations are widely used to study the magnetic field in the solar corona based on surface measurements. Aims: The extrapolations assume that the ratio of internal energy of the plasma to magnetic energy, the plasma β, is negligible. Despite the widespread use of this assumption observations, models, and theoretical considerations show that β is of the order of a few percent to more than 10%, and thus not small. We investigate what consequences this has for the reliability of extrapolation results. Methods: We use basic concepts starting with force and energy balance to infer relations between plasma β and free magnetic energy to study the direction of currents in the corona with respect to the magnetic field, and to estimate the errors in the free magnetic energy by neglecting effects of the plasma (β ≪ 1). A comparison with a 3D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) model supports our basic considerations. Results: If plasma β is of the order of the relative free energy (the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the total magnetic energy) then the pressure gradient can balance the Lorentz force. This is the case in solar corona, and therefore the currents are not properly described. In particular, the error in terms of magnetic energy by neglecting the plasma is of the order of the free magnetic energy, so that the latter cannot be reliably determined by an extrapolation. Conclusions: While a force-free extrapolation might capture the magnetic structure and connectivity of the coronal magnetic field, the derived currents and free magnetic energy are not reliable. Thus quantitative results of extrapolations on the location and amount of heating in the corona (through current dissipation) and on the energy storage of the magnetic field (e.g. for eruptive events) are limited.

  14. Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Damour, Thibault

    2014-12-01

    Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme-mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5th post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. [arXiv:1406.4890 [Phys. Rev. D (to be published)] ], and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. We transcribe our kinematical tidal-invariant results in the more dynamically significant effective one-body description of the tidal interaction energy. By combining, in a synergetic manner, analytical and numerical results, we provide simple, accurate analytic representations of the global, strong-field behavior of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal factor. A striking finding is that the linear-in-mass-ratio piece in the latter tidal factor changes sign in the strong-field domain, to become negative (while its previously known second post-Newtonian approximant was always positive). We, however, argue that this will be more than compensated by a probable fast growth, in the strong-field domain, of the nonlinear-in-mass-ratio contributions in the tidal factor.

  15. Measured force on elongated bodies in a simulated low-Earth orbit environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, C. A.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Gimelshein, S. F.

    2014-12-09

    An overview of the development of a magnetically filtered atomic oxygen plasma source and the application of the source to study low-Earth orbit drag on elongated bodies is presented. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source produces atomic oxygen ions (O{sup +}) with streaming energies equivalent to the relative orbital environment of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Previous research has demonstrated that momentum transfer between ions and metal surfaces is equivalent to the momentum transfer expected for neutral molecules with similar energy, due to charge exchange occurring prior to momentum transfer. Total drag measurements of aluminum cuboid geometries of varying length to diameter ratios immersed in the extracted plasma plume are presented as a function of streaming ion energy.

  16. Magnetization of a warm plasma by the nonstationary ponderomotive force of an electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Nitin; Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    2009-08-15

    It is shown that magnetic fields can be generated in a warm plasma by the nonstationary ponderomotive force of a large-amplitude electromagnetic wave. In the present Brief Report, we derive simple and explicit results that can be useful for understanding the origin of the magnetic fields that are produced in intense laser-plasma interaction experiments.

  17. Finite element calculation of forces on a DC magnet moving over an iron rail

    SciTech Connect

    Rodger, D.; Allen, N.; Coles, P.C.; Street, S.; Leonard, P.J.; Eastham, J.F. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes results taken from a test rig consisting of a DC magnet over a 0.35m radius spinning iron wheel. The magnet is excited by two coils. The iron parts are unlaminated. Eddy currents are induced in the wheel by virtue of the relative motion of wheel and magnetic field. All iron parts have a nonlinear B-H characteristic. Forces on the magnet are compared with 3D finite element predictions. The results are of relevance to the design of MAGLEV vehicles which are supported by DC magnets.

  18. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Ann. N.; Anderson, Richard E.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  19. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-11-07

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

  20. Magnetic force microscopy of conducting nanodots in NiO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meang, Wan Joo; Seo, Jeongdae; Ahn, Yoonho; Son, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    We report a nanoscale magnetic conducting filament in a resistive random access memory (RRAM) device by the direct investigation of conducting nanobits in NiO thin films using magnetic force microscopy. The conducting nanobit in a NiO RRAM capacitor formed by CAFM and KFM exhibited a typical bistable resistive switching characteristic. The magnetizations of the conducting nanobit were measured as a function of the set-reset switching cycle and as the switching cycles were increased, a strong ferromagnetic signal was observed. The metallic Ni formation in the nanoscale magnetic conducting filament could be a possible reason for the origin of the magnetism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  2. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  3. A long-lived coronal X-ray arcade. [force-free magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, J. P.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Krall, K. R.; Wu, S. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Speich, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A large, long-lived, soft X-ray emitting arch system observed during a Skylab mission is analyzed. The supposition is that these arches owe their stability to the stable coronal magnetic-field configuration. A global constant alpha force-free magnetic field analysis, is used to describe the arches which stayed in the same approximate position for several solar rotations. A marked resemblance is noted between the theoretical magnetic field configuration and the observed X-ray emmitting feature.

  4. Sting-free Unsteady Flowfield, Base Pressure and Force Measurements on Axisymmetric Bluff-Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kunimasu, Tetsuya

    2006-11-01

    To avoid interference of model support, flowfields as well as aerodynamic force and base pressure on blunt short cylinders in axial flow were measured at Re=100,000 with the JAXA 60cm magnetic suspension and balance system. The fineness ratio ranged from 1.27 to 1.79. A digital telemeter system was developed for the base pressure measurement, and the velocity field was obtained using a PIV system. Vortices along separating shear layer and shear layer flappings with or without reattachment on the wall were observed. Downstream the cylinder in the azimuthal plane, PIV snapshots showed large-scale motion of longitudinal vortices. These instantaneous flowfields presented excellent axisymmetry when they were ensemble-averaged. Mean base pressure agreed with the drag variation at different fineness ratios. The present magnetic suspension and balance system allowed evaluation of low frequency unsteady aerodynamic force vector from feedback current to the coils and the detected small model movement. Base pressure fluctuations were compared with the drag fluctuations and discussed in light of overall flowfield phenomena.

  5. Turbulence Modeling of Non-equilibrium Flows Using Turbulent Body Force Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hudong; Perot, Blair

    1998-11-01

    Results of a new turbulence model for non-equilibrium flow which is based on turbulent body force potentials are presented. Initial predictions of the model for basic turbulent flows produced promising results. This work concentrates on predicting more complex and realistic turbulent flows that are similar to the problems in design and manufacturing process. Three major cases are presented and the computational results are compared with existing experimental data and DNS data whenever possible. First, backwards-facing step flows at both high and low Reynolds numbers are investigated in order to evaluate the model's ability for correctly predicting separation and reattachment. Second, two adverse pressure gradient flows are analyzed, namely, the classic Samuel & Joubert flow and more severe case documented by Schubauer & Spangenberg. Finally, the performance of the model in predicting stagnation flows is evaluated by investigating planar and axisymmetric impinging jets. Comparisons show that model predictions match well with experimental data and DNS data. It is demonstrated that by introducing turbulent body force potentials this new non-equilibrium turbulence model is able to predict complex turbulent flows as well as Reynolds stress transport models with significant less computational cost and complexity.

  6. Characterizing local anisotropy of coercive force in motor laminations with the moving magnet hysteresis comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garshelis, I. J.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2014-05-01

    Non oriented silicon steels are widely used within rotating electrical machines and are assumed to have no anisotropy. There exists a need to detect the anisotropic magnetic properties and to evaluate the local changes in magnetic material properties due to manufacturing cutting processes. In this paper, the so called moving magnet hyteresis comparator is applied to non destructively detect directional variations in coercive force in a variety of local regions of rotor and stator laminations of two materials commonly used to construct induction motors cores. Maximum to minimum coercive force ratios were assessed, varying from 1.4 to 1.7.

  7. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  8. Magnetic energy dissipation in force-free jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Konigl, Arieh

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that a magnetic pressure-dominated, supersonic jet which expands or contracts in response to variations in the confining external pressure can dissipate magnetic energy through field-line reconnection as it relaxes to a minimum-energy configuration. In order for a continuous dissipation to occur, the effective reconnection time must be a fraction of the expansion time. The dissipation rate for the axisymmetric minimum-energy field configuration is analytically derived. The results indicate that the field relaxation process could be a viable mechanism for powering the synchrotron emission in extragalactic jets if the reconnection time is substantially shorter than the nominal resistive tearing time in the jet.

  9. DNA Micromanipulation Using Novel High-Force, In-Plane Magnetic Tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAndrew, Christopher; Mehl, Patrick; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2010-03-01

    We report the development of a magnetic force transducer that can apply piconewton forces on single DNA molecules in the focus plane allowing continuous high precision tethered-bead tracking. The DNA constructs, proteins, and buffer are introduced into a 200?L closed cell created using two glass slides separated by rigid spacers interspersed within a thin viscoelastic perimeter wall. This closed cell configuration isolates our sample and produces low-noise force-extension measurements. Specially-drawn micropipettes are used for capturing the polystyrene bead, pulling on the magnetic sphere, introducing proteins of interest, and maintaining flow. Various high-precision micromanipulators allow us to move pipettes and stage as required. The polystyrene bead is first grabbed, and held using suction; then the magnetic particle at the other end of the DNA is pulled by a force created by either two small (1mm x 2mm x 4mm) bar magnets or a micro magnet-tipped pipette. Changes in the end-to-end length of the DNA are observable in real time. We will present force extension data obtained using the magnetic tweezer.

  10. Electromagnetic Forces in a Hybrid Magnetic-Bearing Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel hybrid magnetic-bearing switched-reluctance motor (MBSRM) have been performed. A MBSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The MBSRM discussed in this report has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of four stator poles, while a second set of four stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Static torque and radial force analysis were done for rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and the theoretical radial force loads predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  11. Magnus force and the inertial properties of magnetic vortices in weak ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvezdin, A. K.; Zvezdin, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Magnus force (gyroscopic force) acting on magnetic vortices (Bloch lines) within domain boundaries in weak ferromagnets is discussed. A general formula is derived for the Magnus force in weak ferromagnets. The Magnus force is found to be nonzero for most types of domain boundaries and is determined by the average sublattice magnetization and the constants for the Dzyaloshinsky interaction and the exchange interaction between sublattices. Generalized expressions are obtained for the effective Lagrange and Rayleigh functions in weak ferromagnets taking their vortex structure into account. The question of the vortex mass, which has been found to be on the order of m*˜10-14g/cm in YFeO3, is discussed. The dynamic flexure of domain boundaries when moving vortices are present is analyzed. A formula is derived for the magnetic field dependence of the velocity of a vortex in a motionless domain boundary.

  12. Invincible DNA tethers: covalent DNA anchoring for enhanced temporal and force stability in magnetic tweezers experiments

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Dulin, David; Wink, Max; van Laar, Theo; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a powerful single-molecule technique that allows real-time quantitative investigation of biomolecular processes under applied force. High pulling forces exceeding tens of picoNewtons may be required, e.g. to probe the force range of proteins that actively transcribe or package the genome. Frequently, however, the application of such forces decreases the sample lifetime, hindering data acquisition. To provide experimentally viable sample lifetimes in the face of high pulling forces, we have designed a novel anchoring strategy for DNA in magnetic tweezers. Our approach, which exploits covalent functionalization based on heterobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) crosslinkers, allows us to strongly tether DNA while simultaneously suppressing undesirable non-specific adhesion. A complete force and lifetime characterization of these covalently anchored DNA-tethers demonstrates that, compared to more commonly employed anchoring strategies, they withstand 3-fold higher pulling forces (up to 150 pN) and exhibit up to 200-fold higher lifetimes (exceeding 24 h at a constant force of 150 pN). This advance makes it possible to apply the full range of biologically relevant force scales to biomolecular processes, and its straightforward implementation should extend its reach to a multitude of applications in the field of single-molecule force spectroscopy. PMID:25140010

  13. Dual-body magnetic helical robot for drilling and cargo delivery in human blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonseo; Jeon, Seungmun; Nam, Jaekwang; Jang, Gunhee

    2015-05-01

    We propose a novel dual-body magnetic helical robot (DMHR) manipulated by a magnetic navigation system. The proposed DMHR can generate helical motions to navigate in human blood vessels and to drill blood clots by an external rotating magnetic field. It can also generate release motions which are relative rotational motions between dual-bodies to release the carrying cargos to a target region by controlling the magnitude of an external magnetic field. Constraint equations were derived to selectively manipulate helical and release motions by controlling external magnetic fields. The DMHR was prototyped and various experiments were conducted to demonstrate its motions and verify its manipulation methods.

  14. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  15. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: the NMR-CUFF.

    PubMed

    Windt, Carel W; Soltner, Helmut; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings. PMID:21036637

  16. Use of magnetic particles to apply mechanical forces for bone tissue engineering purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartmell, S. H.; Keramane, A.; Kirkham, G. R.; Verschueren, S. B.; Magnay, J. L.; El Haj, A. J.; Dobson, J.

    2005-01-01

    It is possible to influence osteoblast activity by the application of mechanical forces. There is potential in using these forces for tissue engineering applications in that cell matrix production may be upregulated, resulting in a functional tissue engineered construct created in a shorter culture time. We have been developing a novel technique for applying mechanical forces directly to the cell with the use of magnetic particles. Particles attached to the cell membrane can be manipulated using an external magnetic field thus applying forces in the piconewton range. We have previously demonstrated that primary human osteoblasts respond to this type of stimulus by upregulating bone related gene expression and producing mineralized matrix at early time points. In this paper we discuss the optimization of this technique by presenting data on the effects of this type of force on osteoblast proliferation, phagocytosis and also the potential use of this technique in developing 3D tissue engineered constructs.

  17. Isotropic contact forces in arbitrary representation: Heterogeneous few-body problems and low dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Pricoupenko, Ludovic

    2011-06-15

    The Bethe-Peierls asymptotic approach which models pairwise short-range forces by contact conditions is introduced in arbitrary representation for spatial dimensions less than or equal to 3. The formalism is applied in various situations and emphasis is put on the momentum representation. In the presence of a transverse harmonic confinement, dimensional reduction toward two-dimensional (2D) or one-dimensional (1D) physics is derived within this formalism. The energy theorem relating the mean energy of an interacting system to the asymptotic behavior of the one-particle density matrix illustrates the method in its second quantized form. Integral equations that encapsulate the Bethe-Peierls contact condition for few-body systems are derived. In three dimensions, for three-body systems supporting Efimov states, a nodal condition is introduced in order to obtain universal results from the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian equation and the Thomas collapse is avoided. Four-body bound state eigenequations are derived and the 2D {sup '}3+1{sup '} bosonic ground state is computed as a function of the mass ratio.

  18. Fluid force and static symmetry breaking modes of 3D bluff bodies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadot, Olivier; Evrard, Antoine; DFA Team

    2015-11-01

    A cavity at the base of the squareback Ahmed model at Re =6.106 is able to reduce the base suction by 18% and the drag coefficient by 9%, while the flow at the separation remains unaffected. Instantaneous pressure measurements at the body base, fluid force measurements and wake velocity measurements are investigated varying the cavity depth from 0 to 35% of the base height. Due to the reflectional symmetry of the rectangular base, there are two Reflectional Symmetry Breaking (RSB) mirror modes present in the natural wake that switch from one to the other randomly in accordance with the recent findings of Grandemange et al. (2013). It is shown that these modes exhibit an energetic 3D static vortex system close to the base of the body. A sufficiently deep cavity is able to stabilize the wake toward a symmetry preserved wake, thus suppressing the RSB modes and leading to a weaker elliptical toric recirculation. The stabilization can be modeled with a Langevin equation. The plausible mechanism for drag reduction with the base cavity is based on the interaction of the static 3D vortex system of the RSB modes with the base and their suppression by stabilization. There are some strong evidences that this mechanism may be generalized to axisymmetric bodies with base cavity.

  19. Body mass penalties in the physical fitness tests of the Army, Air Force, and Navy.

    PubMed

    Vanderburgh, Paul M; Crowder, Todd A

    2006-08-01

    Recent research has empirically documented a consistent penalty against heavier service members for events identical or similar to those in the physical fitness tests of the Army, Air Force, and Navy. These penalties, which are not related to body fatness, are based on biological scaling models and have a physiological basis. Using hypothetical cases, we quantified the penalties for men, with body mass of 60 vs. 90 kg, and women, 45 vs. 75 kg, to be 15% to 20% for the fitness tests of these three services. Such penalties alone can adversely affect awards and promotions for heavier service members. To deal equitably with these penalties in a practical manner, we offer two recommendations, i.e., (1) implementation of revised fitness tests with balanced events, in which the penalties of one event for heavier service members are balanced by an equal and opposite bias against lighter service members, or (2) development of correction factors that can be multiplied by raw scores to yield adjusted scores free of body mass bias. PMID:16933817

  20. Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) measurement of changes in body composition of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The survival of low birth weight pigs in particular may depend on energy stores in the body. QMR (quantitative magnetic resonance) is a new approach to measuring total body fat, lean and water. These measurements are based on quantifying protons associated with lipid and water molecules in the body...

  1. A magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure utilizing magnetic force interaction to optimize the sensitivity of current sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan; Lai, Chen-Hung; Wang, Chieh-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure using a novel magnetic-force-interaction approach to optimize the sensitivity of conventional piezoelectric current sensing technologies. The smart material-structure comprises a CuBe-alloy cantilever beam, a piezoelectric PZT sheet clamped to the fixed end of the beam, and an NdFeB permanent magnet mounted on the free end of the beam. When the smart material-structure is placed close to an AC conductor, the magnet on the beam of the smart structure experiences an alternating magnetic attractive and repulsive force produced by the conductor. Thus, the beam vibrates and subsequently generates a strain in the PZT sheet. The strain produces a voltage output because of the piezoelectric effect. The magnetic force interaction is specifically enhanced through the optimization approach (i.e., achieved by using SQUID and machining method to reorient the magnetization to different directions to maximize the magnetic force interaction). After optimizing, the beam's vibration amplitude is significantly enlarged and, consequently, the voltage output is substantially increased. The experimental results indicated that the smart material-structure optimized by the proposed approach produced a voltage output of 4.01 Vrms with a sensitivity of 501 m Vrms/A when it was placed close to a conductor with a current of 8 A at 60 Hz. The optimized voltage output and sensitivity of the proposed smart structure were approximately 316 % higher than those (1.27 Vrms with 159 m Vrms/A) of representative piezoelectric-based current sensing technologies presented in other studies. These improvements can significantly enable the development of more self-powered wireless current sensing applications in the future.

  2. Many-body Interactions in Magnetic Films and Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen D. Kevan

    2012-12-12

    We describe results supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER46158, which focused on magnetic interaction at surfaces, in thin films, and in metallic nanostructures. We report on three general topics: 1) The Rashba spin splitting at magnetic surfaces of rare earth metals, 2) magnetic nanowires self-assembled on stepped tungsten single crystals, and 3) magnetic interaction in graphene films doped with hydrogen atoms.

  3. Magnetic force microscopy investigation of arrays of nickel nanowires and nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tabasum, M R; Zighem, F; De La Torre Medina, J; Encinas, A; Piraux, L; Nysten, B

    2014-06-20

    The magnetic properties of arrays of nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs), 150 nm in diameter, electrodeposited inside nanoporous polycarbonate membranes are investigated. The comparison of the nanoscopic magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging and the macroscopic behavior as measured by alternating gradient force magnetometry (AGFM) is made. It is shown that MFM is a complementary technique that provides an understanding of the magnetization reversal characteristics at the microscopic scale of individual nanostructures. The local hysteresis loops have been extracted by MFM measurements. The influence of the shape of such elongated nanostructures on the dipolar coupling and consequently on the squareness of the hysteresis curves is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanowires exhibit stronger magnetic interactions than nanotubes. The non-uniformity of the magnetization states is also revealed by combining the MFM and AGFM measurements. PMID:24870297

  4. Magnetic force microscopy investigation of arrays of nickel nanowires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabasum, M. R.; Zighem, F.; De La Torre Medina, J.; Encinas, A.; Piraux, L.; Nysten, B.

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic properties of arrays of nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs), 150 nm in diameter, electrodeposited inside nanoporous polycarbonate membranes are investigated. The comparison of the nanoscopic magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging and the macroscopic behavior as measured by alternating gradient force magnetometry (AGFM) is made. It is shown that MFM is a complementary technique that provides an understanding of the magnetization reversal characteristics at the microscopic scale of individual nanostructures. The local hysteresis loops have been extracted by MFM measurements. The influence of the shape of such elongated nanostructures on the dipolar coupling and consequently on the squareness of the hysteresis curves is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanowires exhibit stronger magnetic interactions than nanotubes. The non-uniformity of the magnetization states is also revealed by combining the MFM and AGFM measurements.

  5. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  6. Principle and Basic Characteristics of Variable-Magnetic-Force Memory Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuto; Yuki, Kazuaki; Hashiba, Yutaka; Takahashi, Norio; Yasui, Kazuya; Kovudhikulrungsri, Lilit

    A reduction in the power consumed by motors is required for energy saving in the case of electrical appliances and electric vehicles (EV). The motors used for operating these apparatus operate at variable speeds. Further, the motors operate with small load in stationary mode and with large load in start-up mode. A permanent magnet motor can operate at the rated power with a high efficiency. However, the efficiency is lower at small load or high speed because the large constant magnetic force results in substantial core loss. Furthermore, the flux-weakening current that depresses voltage at high speed leads to significant copper loss. Therefore, we have developed a new technique for controlling the magnetic force of permanent magnet on the basis of the load or speed of the motor. In this paper, we propose the novel motor that can vary magnetic flux and we clarify the principle.

  7. Magnetic Force Microscopy and Energy Loss Imaging of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, Bruno; Bertoni, Giovanni; Fragouli, Despina; Falqui, Andrea; Salerno, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2011-12-01

    We present quantitative, high spatially resolved magnetic force microscopy imaging of samples based on 11 nm diameter superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in air at room temperature. By a proper combination of the cantilever resonance frequency shift, oscillation amplitude and phase lag we obtain the tip-sample interaction maps in terms of force gradient and energy dissipation. These physical quantities are evaluated in the frame of a tip-particle magnetic interaction model also including the tip oscillation amplitude. Magnetic nanoparticles are characterized both in bare form, after deposition on a flat substrate, and as magnetically assembled fillers in a polymer matrix, in the form of nanowires. The latter approach makes it possible to reveal the magnetic texture in a composite sample independently of the surface topography.

  8. Magnetic Force Microscopy and Energy Loss Imaging of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles”

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Bruno; Bertoni, Giovanni; Fragouli, Despina; Falqui, Andrea; Salerno, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2011-01-01

    We present quantitative, high spatially resolved magnetic force microscopy imaging of samples based on 11 nm diameter superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in air at room temperature. By a proper combination of the cantilever resonance frequency shift, oscillation amplitude and phase lag we obtain the tip-sample interaction maps in terms of force gradient and energy dissipation. These physical quantities are evaluated in the frame of a tip-particle magnetic interaction model also including the tip oscillation amplitude. Magnetic nanoparticles are characterized both in bare form, after deposition on a flat substrate, and as magnetically assembled fillers in a polymer matrix, in the form of nanowires. The latter approach makes it possible to reveal the magnetic texture in a composite sample independently of the surface topography. PMID:22355717

  9. Principle and Basic Characteristics of a Hybrid Variable-Magnetic-Force Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuto; Kuramochi, Satoru

    Reduction in the power consumed by motors is important for energy saving in the case of electrical appliances and electric vehicles (EVs). The motors used for operating these devices operate at variable speeds. Further, the motors operate with a small load in the stationary mode and a large load in the starting mode. A permanent magnet motor can be operated at the rated power with a high efficiency. However, the efficiency is low at a small load or at a high speed because the large constant magnetic force results in substantial core loss. Furthermore, the flux-weakening current that decreases the voltage at a high speed leads to significant copper loss and core loss. Therefore, we have developed a new technique for controlling the magnetic force of a permanent magnet on the basis of the load or speed of the motor. In this paper, we propose a novel motor that can vary the magnetic flux of a permanent magnet and clarify the principle and basic characteristics of the motor. The new motor has a permanent magnet that is magnetized by the magnetizing coil of the stator. The analysis results show that the magnetic flux linkage of the motor can be changed from 37% to 100% that a high torque can be produced.

  10. Comparison of seat belt force-limiting methods using the MADYMO multi-body/finite element program.

    PubMed

    Sieveka, E M; Kent, R W; Crandall, J R

    2001-01-01

    Belt force can be limited by a device in the belt retractor hardware or with force-limiting as an integral part of the webbing force/strain properties. In this research, MADYMO multi-body/finite element models of a 50th percentile Hybrid-3 male passenger in an airbag-equipped 4-door mid-size sedan were set up to compare occupant injury response under loading 1) from a baseline standard (non-force-limiting) belt system, 2) from a retractor-based force-limiting system, and 3) from a webbing-based force-limiting system. Chest acceleration was similar for the two force-limiting designs but the peak was approximately 10% greater for the standard belt. The magnitude of the head acceleration was similar for all three belts while the duration of these accelerations was much narrower for the force-limiting belts. Chest compression was similar for both force-limiting methods, and was about 60% less than the standard belt case. Compared to the baseline system and the retractor-based system, webbing-based force-limiting allowed greater pelvic excursion and a corresponding increase in femur force. It is concluded that webbing-based force limiting has some potential for reducing head and chest responses but these reductions must be evaluated with respect to other considerations such as submarining potential, non-frontal impact response, and future concepts like programmable force limiting. PMID:12214345

  11. Stochastic Resonance Magnetic Force Microscopy imaging of Josephson Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naibert, Tyler; Polshyn, Hryhoriy; Wolin, Brian; Durkin, Malcolm; Garrido Menacho, Rita; Mondragon Shem, Ian; Chua, Victor; Hughes, Taylor; Mason, Nadya; Budakian, Raffi

    Vortex interactions are key to explaining the behavior of many two dimensional superconducting systems. We report on the development of a technique to locally probe vortex interactions in a 2D array of Josephson junctions. Scanning a magnetic tip attached to an ultra-soft cantilever over the array produces changes in the frequency of the cantilever along certain lines, forming geometric patterns in the scans. Different tip-surface separations and external magnetic fields produce a number of different patterns. These patterns correspond to tip locations in which two configurations of vortices in the lattice have degenerate energies. By imaging the locations of these degeneracies, information on the local vortex interactions may be obtained.

  12. MEMS-based Force-clamp Analysis of the Role of Body Stiffness in C. elegans Touch Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Bryan C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Mazzochette, Eileen A.; Goodman, Miriam B.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2013-01-01

    Touch is enabled by mechanoreceptor neurons in the skin and plays an essential role in our everyday lives, but is among the least understood of our five basic senses. Force applied to the skin deforms these neurons and activates ion channels within them. Despite the importance of the mechanics of the skin in determining mechanoreceptor neuron deformation and ultimately touch sensation, the role of mechanics in touch sensitivity is poorly understood. Here, we use the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to directly test the hypothesis that body mechanics modulate touch sensitivity. We demonstrate a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based force clamp that can apply calibrated forces to freely crawling C. elegans worms and measure touch-evoked avoidance responses. This approach reveals that wild-type animals sense forces < 1 μN and indentation depths < 1 μm. We use both genetic manipulation of the skin and optogenetic modulation of body wall muscles to alter body mechanics. We find that small changes in body stiffness dramatically affect force sensitivity, while having only modest effects on indentation sensitivity. We investigate the theoretical body deformation predicted under applied force and conclude that local mechanical loads induce inward bending deformation of the skin to drive touch sensation in C. elegans. PMID:23598612

  13. MEMS-based force-clamp analysis of the role of body stiffness in C. elegans touch sensation.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Bryan C; Park, Sung-Jin; Mazzochette, Eileen A; Goodman, Miriam B; Pruitt, Beth L

    2013-06-01

    Touch is enabled by mechanoreceptor neurons in the skin and plays an essential role in our everyday lives, but is among the least understood of our five basic senses. Force applied to the skin deforms these neurons and activates ion channels within them. Despite the importance of the mechanics of the skin in determining mechanoreceptor neuron deformation and ultimately touch sensation, the role of mechanics in touch sensitivity is poorly understood. Here, we use the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to directly test the hypothesis that body mechanics modulate touch sensitivity. We demonstrate a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based force clamp that can apply calibrated forces to freely crawling C. elegans worms and measure touch-evoked avoidance responses. This approach reveals that wild-type animals sense forces <1 μN and indentation depths <1 μm. We use both genetic manipulation of the skin and optogenetic modulation of body wall muscles to alter body mechanics. We find that small changes in body stiffness dramatically affect force sensitivity, while having only modest effects on indentation sensitivity. We investigate the theoretical body deformation predicted under applied force and conclude that local mechanical loads induce inward bending deformation of the skin to drive touch sensation in C. elegans. PMID:23598612

  14. Dynamic fe Model of Sitting Man Adjustable to Body Height, Body Mass and Posture Used for Calculating Internal Forces in the Lumbar Vertebral Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankoke, S.; Buck, B.; Woelfel, H. P.

    1998-08-01

    Long-term whole-body vibrations can cause degeneration of the lumbar spine. Therefore existing degeneration has to be assessed as well as industrial working places to prevent further damage. Hence, the mechanical stress in the lumbar spineespecially in the three lower vertebraehas to be known. This stress can be expressed as internal forces. These internal forces cannot be evaluated experimentally, because force transducers cannot be implementated in the force lines because of ethical reasons. Thus it is necessary to calculate the internal forces with a dynamic mathematical model of sitting man.A two dimensional dynamic Finite Element model of sitting man is presented which allows calculation of these unknown internal forces. The model is based on an anatomic representation of the lower lumbar spine (L3-L5). This lumber spine model is incorporated into a dynamic model of the upper torso with neck, head and arms as well as a model of the body caudal to the lumbar spine with pelvis and legs. Additionally a simple dynamic representation of the viscera is used. All these parts are modelled as rigid bodies connected by linear stiffnesses. Energy dissipation is modelled by assigning modal damping ratio to the calculated undamped eigenvalues. Geometry and inertial properties of the model are determined according to human anatomy. Stiffnesses of the spine model are derived from static in-vitro experiments in references [1] and [2]. Remaining stiffness parameters and parameters for energy dissipation are determined by using parameter identification to fit measurements in reference [3]. The model, which is available in 3 different postures, allows one to adjust its parameters for body height and body mass to the values of the person for which internal forces have to be calculated.

  15. Structural responses of cells to intracellular magnetic force induced by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Han; Tong, Sheng; Bao, Gang; Wang, Biao

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of intracellular force on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We generated intracellular force on endothelial cells under different magnetic fields using the cell uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Cell responses to intracellular force were observed using fluorescent microscopy. Our results indicated that nanoparticles were taken up by the cell by endocytosis and were deposited in lysosomes. Nanoparticles and lysosomes inside the cell could be relocated by the application of a magnetic force. The intracellular magnetic force could also be used to accelerate cell migration by adjusting the magnetic fields and giving the cell free culture space. No cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was found in our experiments. By comparing intracellular relocalization with migration of the whole cell, we obtained a better understanding of the self-defence mechanisms of cells based on their mechanical properties. Based on the promising mechanical properties and low cytotoxicity of our magnetic nanoparticles, their potential applications in cytomechanics and cell patterning are discussed. PMID:24336693

  16. VARIFORC: a powerful FORC analysis tool specially suited to environmental magnetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    VARIFORC is a new tool for the analysis of first-order reversal curves (FORC), especially developed for the highly demanding applications typically occurring in environmental magnetism (e.g. quantitative magnetic component unmixing in weak samples). The currently unique capabilities of VARIFORC are illustrated with examples where the magnetic signature of authigenic minerals (e.g. magnetofossils) is isolated from other magnetic contributions associated with detrital or aeolian inputs in pelagic carbonates. Life demonstrations at the poster stand are possible. VARIFORC is freely available at http://www.conrad-observatory.at/cmsjoomla/de/download.

  17. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  18. Fluidic assisted thin-film device heterogeneous integration: Surface tension as driving force and magnetic as guiding force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Ray Chaudhuri, Ritesh; Seo, Sang-Woo

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a fluidic assisted heterogeneous integration of optical thin-film device using surface tension as driving force and magnetic field as guiding force. Thin-film devices can be auto-aligned and integrated using surface tension onto their predesigned locations on a host substrate due to minimization of interfacial energy. By inserting a layer of nickel (Ni) into device metallization step, magnetic force was employed to increase mobility and contact probability of thin-film devices to their binding sites on the host substrate. A thin-film gallium arsenide (GaAs) inverted Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photodetector (PD) has been successfully integrated onto a silicon host substrate with the proposed integration approach. The influence of the nickel layer to the PD performance was also investigated. Due to the self-assembly capability and thin-film format of the device, the proposed method has potential for wafer-scale implementation and is compatible with the matured silicon-based CMOS technology. This is a critical step towards a scalable manufacturing process to create advanced photonic/optoelectronic systems that are low-cost, compact, high performance, and complex in multi-material functionality.

  19. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces

    SciTech Connect

    Punyabrahma, P.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  20. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyabrahma, P.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  1. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. K.; Cribb, J.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Taylor, R. M.; Haase, J.; Bloom, K.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2006-01-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 μm paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 μm paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4π sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 μm xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  2. Microscopic optical potential with two and three body forces for nucleon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Y. K.; Gupta, M.; Bhagwat, A.; Haider, W.; Rafi, Sayed; Sharma, M.; Pachouri, D.

    2014-03-01

    The proton - nucleus optical potentials generated by folding the calculated complex, density and energy dependent g- matrices (with and without three-body forces (TBF): Urbana IX (UVIX) and TNI) over the target nucleon density distributions obtained from the relativistic mean field theory, are used for the calculation of the differential cross section dσ / dθ , polarization Ay , spin rotation function (Q). for 65 and 200 MeV polarized proton incident on 40Ca and 208Pb . The agreement with the experiment is rather impressive. It is found that the inclusion of TBF (Urbana IX )UVIX) and TNI) reduces the strength of the central part of the optical potential in the nuclear interior and affects the calculated spin-orbit potential only marginally and leads to an improvement in the agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  3. Numerical analyses of magnetic field and force in toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage using unit coils (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    1997-04-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than other systems of electric energy storage because of its larger amounts of stored energy and its higher efficiency. There are two types of SMES. One is the solenoid type and the other is the toroidal type. Some models of solenoid-type SMES are designed in the U.S. and in Japan. But the large scale SMES causes a high magnetic field in the living environment, and causes the erroneous operation of electronic equipment. The authors studied some suitable designs of magnetic shielding for the solenoidal-type SMES to reduce the magnetic field in the living environment. The toiroidal type SMES is studied in this article. The magnetic leakage flux of the toiroidal-type SMES is generally lower than that of the solenoid-type SMES. The toroidal-type SMES is constructed of unit coils, which are convenient for construction. The magnetic leakage flux occurs between unit coils. The electromagnetic force of the coils is very strong. Therefore analyses of the leakage flux and electromagnetic force are important to the design of SMES. The authors studied the number, radius, and length of unit coils. The storage energy is 5 G Wh. The numerical analyses of magnetic fields in the toroidal type SMES are obtained by analytical solutions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Suspension force control of bearingless permanent magnet slice motor based on flux linkage identification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suming; Zhu, Huangqiu

    2015-07-01

    The control accuracy and dynamic performance of suspension force are confined in the traditional bearingless permanent magnet slice motor (BPMSM) control strategies because the suspension force control is indirectly achieved by adopting a closed loop of displacement only. Besides, the phase information in suspension force control relies on accurate measurement of rotor position, making the control system more complex. In this paper, a new suspension force control strategy with displacement and radial suspension force double closed loops is proposed, the flux linkage of motor windings is identified based on voltage-current model and the flexibility of motor control can be improved greatly. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed suspension force control strategy is effective to realize the stable operation of the BPMSM. PMID:25840676

  5. Morphology and Dynamics of Lithospheric Body Force Instabilities: Sheets, Drips and In-Between

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, A.; Moresi, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Foundering of the Earth's lithosphere, and consequent energy and mass flux across the upper boundary layer and mantle interface, is driven locally by gravitational body forces. The related instabilities are usually classified as having sheet-like or drip-like morphologies. The former is associated with whole lithosphere (subduction) or delamination type foundering such as suggested for beneath the southern Sierra-Nevada and the Colorado Plateau, the latter to classic Rayleigh-Taylor instability below an upper layer, suggested to have occurred beneath the Tibetan Plateau and North Island, New Zealand. This dichotomy is non-trivial; classification of phenomena into one or the other is often debated and is difficult to infer from observables. The two morphologies are most likely end-members. Here I refine the dynamics driving morphology selection as a function of rheological lamination and boundary layer Rayleigh number in 2D and 3D, using the finite-element particle-in-cell code Underworld. I explore the influence of morphology on mass flux, topography and crustal deformation as well as deviation from classic 2D scalings. Additionally, tectonic displacement interference with instability development is discussed using basic 3D shear-box style models. By quantifying and describing the theoretical instability dynamics which could result in a plausible range of morphological expressions, I aim to build a general framework which can be paired to the discussion involving firstly, the recognition of varied styles of body force instabilities in the modern Earth and rock record and secondly, to what degree pattern selection impacts boundary layer mass and energy flux.

  6. Structure formation by a fifth force: N-body versus linear simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Zhao Hongsheng

    2009-08-15

    We lay out the frameworks to numerically study the structure formation in both linear and nonlinear regimes in general dark-matter-coupled scalar field models, and give an explicit example where the scalar field serves as a dynamical dark energy. Adopting parameters of the scalar field which yield a realistic cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum, we generate the initial conditions for our N-body simulations, which follow the spatial distributions of the dark matter and the scalar field by solving their equations of motion using the multilevel adaptive grid technique. We show that the spatial configuration of the scalar field tracks well the voids and clusters of dark matter. Indeed, the propagation of scalar degree of freedom effectively acts as a fifth force on dark matter particles, whose range and magnitude are determined by the two model parameters ({mu},{gamma}), local dark matter density as well as the background value for the scalar field. The model behaves like the {lambda}CDM paradigm on scales relevant to the CMB spectrum, which are well beyond the probe of the local fifth force and thus not significantly affected by the matter-scalar coupling. On scales comparable or shorter than the range of the local fifth force, the fifth force is perfectly parallel to gravity and their strengths have a fixed ratio 2{gamma}{sup 2} determined by the matter-scalar coupling, provided that the chameleon effect is weak; if on the other hand there is a strong chameleon effect (i.e., the scalar field almost resides at its effective potential minimum everywhere in the space), the fifth force indeed has suppressed effects in high density regions and shows no obvious correlation with gravity, which means that the dark-matter-scalar-field coupling is not simply equivalent to a rescaling of the gravitational constant or the mass of the dark matter particles. We show these spatial distributions and (lack of) correlations at typical redshifts (z=0,1,5.5) in our multigrid million-particle simulations. The viable parameters for the scalar field can be inferred on intermediate or small scales at late times from, e.g., weak lensing and phase space properties, while the predicted Hubble expansion and linearly simulated CMB spectrum are virtually indistinguishable from the standard {lambda}CDM predictions.

  7. Improvement of the propulsion force for HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetically levitated carrying system by using the pinned flux of HTSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, T.; Ohashi, S.

    Magnetically levitated carrying system has been developed. In this system, pinning force of high temperature bulk superconductor (HTSC) is used for the levitation and guidance. The magnetic rail is set on the ground, and flux from the magnetic rail is pinned by HTSCs. To increase levitation force, repulsive force of the permanent magnet is used. For the propulsion system, electromagnets are installed on the surface of the magnetic rail. Improvement of the propulsion force is studied. In the previous system, only flux of the permanent magnet of the carrier is used for propulsion. To increase propulsion force, that of the HTSC of the carrier is also used. Using this excitation method, the propulsion force is improved even though total number of the excited coil is the same.

  8. Magnetic field sensor based on the Ampere's force using dual-polarization DBR fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuang; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Baiou

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic field sensor using distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser by Ampere's force effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key sensing element, that is the dual-polarization DBR fiber laser, is fixed on the middle part of two copper plates which carry the current. Ampere's force is applied onto the coppers due to an external magnetic field generated by a DC solenoid. Thus, the lateral force from the coppers is converted to a corresponding beat frequency signal shift produced by the DBR laser. The electric current sensing is also realized by the same configuration and same principle simultaneously in an intuitive manner. Good agreement between the theory calculation and the experimental results is obtained, which shows a good linearity. This sensor's sensitivity to the magnetic field and to the electric current finally reaches ~258.92 kHz/mT and ~1.08727 MHz/A, respectively.

  9. A body-force based method to generate supersonic equilibrium turbulent boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindim, M.; Gaitonde, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We further develop a simple counterflow body force-based approach to generate an equilibrium spatially developing turbulent boundary layer suitable for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of viscous-inviscid interactions. The force essentially induces a small separated region in an incoming specified laminar boundary layer. The resulting unstable shear layer then transitions and breaks down to yield the desired unsteady profile. The effects of wall thermal conditions are explored to demonstrate the capability of the method for both fixed wall and adiabatic wall conditions. We then describe an efficient method to select parameters that ensure transition by examining precursor signatures using generalized stability variables. These precursors are shown to be evident in a computational domain spanning only a small region around the trip and can also be detected using 2D simulations. Finally, the method is tested for different Mach numbers ranging from 1.7 to 2.9, with emphasis on flow field surveys, Reynolds stresses, and energy spectra. These results provide guidance on boundary conditions for desired boundary layer thickness at each Mach number. The consequences of using a much lower Reynolds number in computation relative to experiment are evident at the higher Mach number, where a self sustaining turbulent boundary layer is more difficult to obtain.

  10. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  11. Approximating edges of source bodies from magnetic or gravity anomalies.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Simpson, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Cordell and Grauch (1982, 1985) discussed a technique to estimate the location of abrupt lateral changes in magnetization or mass density of upper crustal rocks. The final step of their procedure is to identify maxima on a contoured map of horizontal gradient magnitudes. Attempts to automate their final step. The method begins with gridded magnetic or gravity anomaly data and produces a plan view of inferred boundaries of magnetic or gravity sources. The method applies to both local surveys and to continent-wide compilations of magnetic and gravity data.-from Authors

  12. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10-20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  13. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10(-20) A m(2), respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  14. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  15. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  16. Magnetic tracking of acoustic radiation force-induced micro-order displacement.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Theo Z; Almeida, Thiago W J; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O

    2011-05-01

    The dynamic behavior of a rigid magnetic sphere induced by an acoustic radiation force was investigated. The sphere was suspended in water in a simple pendulum configuration. The drag force acting on the pendulum during its motion was considered to follow a modified Stokes law for a low Reynolds number, accounting for phenomena related to its oscillatory movement. Steady forces of long (a few seconds) and short (a few milliseconds) durations were used. The movement of the magnetic sphere was tracked using a magnetoresistive sensor. From the new equilibrium position of the sphere in response to the long-duration static radiation force, the amplitude of this force was estimated. To assess the water viscosity, the relaxation movement after the acoustic force had stopped was fitted to a harmonic-motion model. Based on the results for the acoustic force and water viscosity, a theoretical profile of the sphere's micro-order displacement as a function of time caused by short-duration acoustic radiation force agreed well with experimental results. PMID:21622046

  17. Line-Tied Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Laboratory: Equilibrium Force Balance and Eruptive Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, M.; Belova, E. V.

    2013-07-01

    Flux-rope-based models of solar eruptions rely on the formation of a line-tied flux rope equilibrium that persists until an ideal instability or a breakdown in force balance triggers an eruption. In this paper, we present a quantitative study of equilibrium force balance in solar-relevant flux ropes, focusing primarily on the role of the potential magnetic field in controlling the flux rope behavior. This study was conducted using a newly constructed laboratory experiment in conjunction with supporting three-dimensional MHD simulations that directly model the experimental geometry. The flux ropes studied here, which are produced in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX), evolve quasi-statically over many Alfvén times and have footpoints that are line-tied to two fixed electrodes [E. Oz, C. E. Myers, M. Yamada, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 102107 (2011)]. They are formed within a solar-relevant potential magnetic field configuration that can be systematically modified between discharges. Detailed in situ magnetic measurements from the experiments are compared directly to results from the simulations in order to quantitatively evaluate the various contributions to the equilibrium force balance. We find that forces derived from the applied toroidal guide field contribute significantly to the equilibrium—so much so that the flux ropes are often well confined even in the absence of a "strapping" arcade. These observed guide field forces arise from changes in the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension that result from a combination of effects within the expanding flux rope. With regard to eruptions, the aforementioned guide field forces supplement the well-known strapping field forces to largely prevent the flux ropes from erupting. In particular, many regimes were explored where the strapping field configuration is predicted to be "torus unstable" and yet the flux ropes do not erupt. Eruptions are observed in some regimes, however, and we will discuss the physical mechanisms that may explain this behavior.

  18. Forced Magnetic Reconnection and Field Penetration of an Externally Applied Rotating Helical Magnetic Field in the TEXTOR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Y.; Finken, K. H.; Jakubowski, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Reiser, D.; Wolf, R. C.; Zimmermann, O.; Bock, M. F. M. de; Jaspers, R.; Matsunaga, G.

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization.

  19. A procedure to estimate the electric field induced in human body exposed to unknown magnetic sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wencui; Bottauscio, Oriano; Chiampi, Mario; Giordano, Domenico; Zilberti, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The paper proposes and discusses a boundary element procedure able to predict the distribution of the electric field induced in a human body exposed to a low-frequency magnetic field produced by unknown sources. As a first step, the magnetic field on the body surface is reconstructed starting from the magnetic field values detected on a closed surface enclosing the sources. Then, the solution of a boundary value problem provides the electric field distribution inside the human model. The procedure is tested and validated by considering different non-uniform magnetic field distributions generated by a Helmholtz coil system as well as different locations of the human model. PMID:22899216

  20. A discrete-forcing immersed boundary method for the fluid-structure interaction of an elastic slender body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Injae; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-01-01

    We present an immersed boundary (IB) method for the simulation of flow around an elastic slender body. The present method is based on the discrete-forcing IB method for a stationary, rigid body proposed by Kim, Kim and Choi (2001) [25]. The discrete-forcing approach is used to relieve the limitation on the computational time step size. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are implicitly coupled with the dynamic equation for an elastic slender body motion. The first is solved in the Eulerian coordinate and the latter is described in the Lagrangian coordinate. The elastic slender body is modeled as a thin and flexible solid and is segmented by finite number of thin blocks. Each block is moved by external and internal forces such as the hydrodynamic, elastic and buoyancy forces, where the hydrodynamic force is obtained directly from the discrete forcing used in the IB method. All the spatial derivative terms are discretized with the second-order central difference scheme. The present method is applied to three different fluid-structure interaction problems: flows around a flexible filament, a flapping flag in a free stream, and a flexible flapping wing in normal hovering, respectively. Computations are performed at maximum CFL numbers of 0.75-1. The results obtained agree very well with those from previous studies.

  1. Force measurements of a magnetic micro actuator proposed for a microvalve array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pauline J.; Chang, Frank W.; Yuen, Michelle C.; Otillar, Robert; Horsley, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Low-cost, easily-fabricated and power-efficient microvalves are necessary for many microfluidic lab-on-a-chip applications. In this study, we present a simple, low-power, scalable, CMOS-compatible magnetic actuator for microvalve applications composed of a paramagnetic bead as the ball valve over a picoliter reaction well etched into a silicon substrate. The paramagnetic bead, composed of either pure FeSi or magnetite in a SiO2 matrix, is actuated by the local magnetic field gradient generated by a microcoil in an aqueous environment, and the reaction well is situated at the microcoil center. A permanent magnet beneath the microvalve device provides an external magnetic biasing field that magnetizes the bead, enabling bidirectional actuation and reducing the current required to actuate the bead to a level below 10 mA. The vertical and radial magnetic forces exerted on the bead by the microcoil were measured for both pure FeSi and composite beads and agree well with the predictions of 2D axisymmetric finite element method models. Vertical forces were within a range of 13-80 nN, and radial forces were 11-60 nN depending on the bead type. The threshold current required to initiate bead actuation was measured as a function of bead diameter and is found to scale inversely with volume for small beads, as expected based on the magnetic force model. To provide an estimate of the stiction force acting between the bead and the passivation layer on the substrate, repeated actuation trials were used to study the bead throw distance for substrates coated with silicon dioxide, Parylene-C, and photoresist. The stiction observed was lowest for a photoresist-coated substrate, while silicon dioxide and Parylene-C coated substrates exhibited similar levels of stiction.

  2. Characteristics and computer model simulation of magnetic damping forces in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the magnetic damping force in electrodynamic suspension (EDS) maglev systems. The computer model simulations, which combine electrical system equations with mechanical motion equations on the basis of dynamic circuit theory, were conducted for a loop-shaped coil guideway. The intrinsic damping characteristics of the EDS-type guideway are investigated, and the negative damping phenomenon is confirmed by the computer simulations. The report also presents a simple circuit model to aid in understanding damping-force characteristics.

  3. Effect of size on levitation force in a magnet/superconductor system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.; Hull, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    We consider a model system consisting of an infinitely long magnetic dipole line placed symmetrically above an infinitely long superconducting strip. Using the Meissner effect of superconductors, we derive analytical expressions of the levitation forces acting on the dipole line. At lowest-order approximation, we discuss the possible application of our model system to estimate the upper limit of the levitation forces in some magnetic bearing systems. In one example, the model correctly calculated the vertical vibration frequency of an experimental superconducting bearing.

  4. Application of atomic force microscopy for investigation of magnetic structure of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, I. S.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Prioli, R.; Zanette, S. I.; Caride, A. O.; Acselrad, O.; Silva, E. M.; Simao, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used for investigation of magnetic structure in steels Fe - 28 Mn - 8.5 Al - 1C - 1.4Si under the different regimes of isotermic aging. A theoretical model for the MFM image of such a structure is developed. Also the calculation method of the van der Waals forces is considered which may be used for the interpretation of the topography measurements. The utility of MFM data is demonstrated for testing of micromagnetic structure of steels and conditions are formulated which should be fulfilled to look into its details.

  5. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines. PMID:26632021

  6. Practical limits to the performance of magnetic bearings: Peak force, slew rate, and displacement sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslen, E.; Hermann, P.; Scott, M.; Humphris, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are subject to performance limits which are quite different from those of conventional bearings. These are due in part to the inherent nonlinearity of the device and in part to its electrical nature. Three important nonideal behaviors are presented: peak force capacity, force slew rate limitation, and sensitivity to rotor motion at large displacements. The problem of identifying the dynamic requirements of a magnetic bearing when used to support a known structure subject to known loads is discussed in the context of these limitations. Several simple design tools result from this investigation.

  7. Magnetic buoyancy force acting on bubbles in nonconducting and diamagnetic fluids under microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Wakayama, N.I.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic buoyancy force acting on a bubble in a one-dimensional magnetic field can be represented as F=({chi}{sub G}{minus}{chi}{sub L}){integral}H(dH/dx)dVol{sub B}, where {chi}{sub G} and {chi}{sub L} are the volume magnetic susceptibilities of the gas and liquid, respectively, and {ital H} is the magnetic field strength. Since {vert_bar}{chi}{sub L}{vert_bar}{gt}{vert_bar}{chi}{sub G}{vert_bar} and most liquids are diamagnetic, this expression indicates that the magnetic buoyancy forces act in the direction of increasing magnetic field strength. Because the magnetic buoyancy force in a diamagnetic fluid is small, the motion of bubbles under normal gravity is difficult to study, but microgravity offers the possibility of detailed observations. Using a compact permanent magnet under microgravity conditions, N{sub 2} bubbles in pure water (0.01 dyne s/cm{sup 2}) and in a 69:31 glycerol/water mixture (0.21 dyne s/cm{sup 2}) were found to move in the direction of increasing {ital H}, and to be held stationary at the point of maximum {ital H}. The motion of the bubbles was also simulated with a theoretical model and was found to agree with measurements made under microgravity conditions. These results indicate that magnetic buoyancy can be used to control bubble motion. Since most fluids are diamagnetic, magnetic buoyancy can be used to control bubbles in many fluidic devices used in space applications.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Electric contributions to magnetic force microscopy response from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lu Hua Chen, Ying

    2014-12-07

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) signals have recently been detected from whole pieces of mechanically exfoliated graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets, and magnetism of the two nanomaterials was claimed based on these observations. However, non-magnetic interactions or artefacts are commonly associated with MFM signals, which make the interpretation of MFM signals not straightforward. A systematic investigation has been done to examine possible sources of the MFM signals from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets and whether the MFM signals can be correlated with magnetism. It is found that the MFM signals have significant non-magnetic contributions due to capacitive and electrostatic interactions between the nanosheets and conductive cantilever tip, as demonstrated by electric force microscopy and scanning Kevin probe microscopy analyses. In addition, the MFM signals of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets are not responsive to reversed magnetic field of the magnetic cantilever tip. Therefore, the observed MFM response is mainly from electric artefacts and not compelling enough to correlate with magnetism of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets.

  9. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions.

    PubMed

    Myers, Clayton E; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E

    2015-12-24

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events. PMID:26701052

  10. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Force and Magnetic Laval Nozzle Acceleration in an Applied-Field MPD Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobari, Hiroyuki; Sato, Ryuichi; Harata, Kenji; Hattori, Kunihiko; Ando, Akira; Inutake, Masaaki

    2003-10-01

    A magneto-plasma-dynamic thruster (MPDT) is expected as one of the promising electric propulsion systems owing to features of a relatively large thrust, high specific impulse that is unattainable by conventional chemical or nuclear propulsion required for space missions such as a manned Mars mission. To clarify the electromagnetic acceleration mechanism of a plasma flow in an applied-field MPDT, detailed flow field and electromagnetic force field are evaluated experimentally with spectroscopic technique and magnetic probe array. It is found that an axial drag force generated by an interaction between azimuthal plasma current and radial magnetic field cancels an acceleration force in a uniform magnetic field. A thermal energy component is much larger than a flow energy component in Bernoulli's equation and ion acoustic Mach number is limited less than unity in the muzzle region of MPD arcjet. In order to convert the thermal energy to the flow energy, magnetic Laval nozzle acceleration with a local magnetic coil is attempted. The ion Mach number after passing through the nozzle throat exceeds unity and a production of supersonic plasma flow is achieved. An optimum magnetic nozzle configuration is discussed with the experimental results.

  11. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; Deluca, Edward E.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun’s corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such ‘failed torus’ events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  12. Novel electro-magnetic test facility for the calibration of a propulsor fluctuating force module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, N.; Lonsdale, A.; Hodges, A. Y.

    2004-05-01

    The testing of scale model propulsors is an essential part of any marine propulsion design process. The fluctuating force module (FFM) is a self-contained, instrumented propulsor drive system designed to be an integral part of a scaled propulsor test facility. This paper describes a novel electro-magnetic test facility which provides a static axial thrust of 0-1kN and triaxial dynamic forces of 0.3-3Nrms, at frequencies of 80-800Hz, to an equivalent propulsor mass rotating at speeds of 0-900rpm, in order to calibrate the FFM force measurement systems.

  13. Design considerations of electromagnetic force in a direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. S.; Tsai, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of electromagnetic force associated with the width of stator teeth, width of rotor back iron, and slot opening for a ten-pole nine-slot direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor is presented. The study calculates the amplitude of the electromagnetic force on the rotating rotor by using the finite-element method. The results show that the amplitude of electromagnetic force, which may cause the noise and vibration of motors, changes with the variation of these above mentioned three factors. The relationship between the considerations of output torque and the minimization of noise and vibration is also established in this paper.

  14. A microfabricated magnetic force transducer-microaspiration system for studying membrane mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stark, D J; Killian, T C; Raphael, R M

    2011-10-01

    The application of forces to cell membranes is a powerful method for studying membrane mechanics. To apply controlled dynamic forces on the piconewton scale, we designed and characterized a microfabricated magnetic force transducer (MMFT) consisting of current-carrying gold wires patterned on a sapphire substrate. The experimentally measured forces applied to paramagnetic and ferromagnetic beads as a function of applied current agree well with theoretical models. We used this device to pull tethers from microaspirated giant unilamellar vesicles and measure the threshold force for tether formation. In addition, the interlayer drag coefficient of the membrane was determined from the tether-return velocity under magnetic force-free conditions. At high levels of current, vesicles expanded as a result of local temperature changes. A finite element thermal model of the MMFT provided absolute temperature calibration, allowing determination of the thermal expansivity coefficient of stearoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidycholine vesicles (1.7 ± 0.4 × 10(-3) K(-1)) and characterization of the Joule heating associated with current passing through the device. This effect can be used as a sensitive probe of temperature changes on the microscale. These studies establish the MMFT as an effective tool for applying precise forces to membranes at controlled rates and quantitatively studying membrane mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties. PMID:21896973

  15. Magnetic Suspension Force in an Induction Bearingless Motor with a Squirrel Cage Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katou, Tatsuya; Chiba, Akira; Fukao, Tadashi

    Theoretical equations of magnetic force in an induction bearingless motor have been reported. In the bearingless motor, both 4-pole and 2-pole windings are stored in stator slots for torque and suspension force generation. In the analysis, squirrel cage rotor currents are considered. These currents are induced by both torque and suspension winding currents. Inductance matrix is represented by four sets of three-phase windings, thus 1212 matrix is constructed. A simplification and reasonable assumptions are introduced to obtain understandable expressions for suspension force and torque representation. The rotor flux linkages in an induction bearingless motor are derived, and then, simulation model of suspension force is constructed. It is shown that the response and the phase of suspension force are delayed in a case of cage rotors.

  16. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  17. Self-magnetized effects in relativistic cold plasmas due to ponderomotive forces: application to relativistic magnetic guiding of light.

    PubMed

    Lehner, T; di Menza, L

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear equations are derived relevant to describe the propagation of powerful electromagnetic fields launched within a plasma. The nonlinear generation of self-induced collective electromagnetic perturbations are obtained with matter lying in the relativistic regime. Our main result is the self-consistent treatment of the coupled equations between the pump and its self-induced fields. In particular, a mechanism is pointed out for self-generation of quasistatic magnetic field that is due to the relativistic ponderomotive force. This process is found to be more efficient to produce quasistatic magnetic fields, as confirmed by recent experiments, as compared to known effects such as the inverse Faraday effect. As an application, we investigate conditions for relativistic magnetic guiding of light to occur under the combined action of the self-induced density and magnetic field. PMID:11800797

  18. Magnetic force microscopy of epitaxial magnetite films through the Verwey transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. K. H.; Jayathilaka, P. B.; Bauer, C. A.; Monti, M. C.; Markert, J. T.; de Lozanne, A.; Miller, Casey W.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetic force microscopy was performed on 300 nm thick magnetite films grown epitaxially on MgO (001) at temperatures ranging from well below to well above the Verwey transition temperature, TV. Frequency shift images were acquired at different locations on the sample as temperature was increased through the Verwey transition. The magnetic domain features are persistent at all temperatures, which indicates that the domains are pinned across the phase transition, probably due to antiphase boundaries. An enhancement of magnetic contrast below TV indicates the moments tilt out of the plane below TV, which is corroborated by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry.

  19. Long-lived magnetism from solidification-driven convection on the pallasite parent body.

    PubMed

    Bryson, James F J; Nichols, Claire I O; Herrero-Albillos, Julia; Kronast, Florian; Kasama, Takeshi; Alimadadi, Hossein; van der Laan, Gerrit; Nimmo, Francis; Harrison, Richard J

    2015-01-22

    Palaeomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that, shortly after the birth of the Solar System, the molten metallic cores of many small planetary bodies convected vigorously and were capable of generating magnetic fields. Convection on these bodies is currently thought to have been thermally driven, implying that magnetic activity would have been short-lived. Here we report a time-series palaeomagnetic record derived from nanomagnetic imaging of the Imilac and Esquel pallasite meteorites, a group of meteorites consisting of centimetre-sized metallic and silicate phases. We find a history of long-lived magnetic activity on the pallasite parent body, capturing the decay and eventual shutdown of the magnetic field as core solidification completed. We demonstrate that magnetic activity driven by progressive solidification of an inner core is consistent with our measured magnetic field characteristics and cooling rates. Solidification-driven convection was probably common among small body cores, and, in contrast to thermally driven convection, will have led to a relatively late (hundreds of millions of years after accretion), long-lasting, intense and widespread epoch of magnetic activity among these bodies in the early Solar System. PMID:25612050

  20. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  1. Magnetic levitation force and penetration depth in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.H.; Miller, J.H. Jr.; Ting, C.S. )

    1995-01-01

    The superconducting levitation force [ital F] acting on a magnet placed above a type-II superconductor in both Meissner and mixed states is calculated as a function of temperature, based upon the London model. A simple relationship between the levitation force and the London penetration depth [lambda] is found. In particular, in the limit of [ital a]/[lambda][much gt]1, where [ital a] is the separation between the magnet and the superconductor, [ital F] varies linearly with [lambda], regardless of the shape of the magnet. The temperature dependences of [lambda] and [ital F] are examined for various superconducting pairing states, including [ital s]-wave, [ital d]-wave, and [ital s]+[ital id] states. It is found that, at low temperatures, both [lambda] and [ital F] show an exponential temperature dependence for [ital s]-wave, linear-[ital T] for [ital d]-wave, and [ital T][sup 2] dependence in a wide low-temperature range for the [ital s]+[ital id] state with a dominant [ital d]-wave component. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is proposed to accurately measure the temperature-dependent levitation force. It is shown that the microscopic size of the MFM tip enables one to obtain the intrinsic temperature-dependent penetration depth of a single grain, in spite of the overall quality of the superconducting sample.

  2. Temperature properties of the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force in Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Rintaro; Natsumeda, Mitsutoshi; Hoshijima, Jun; Kuniyoshi, Futoshi

    2016-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the coercive force decrease ratio for aligned magnets was investigated from room temperature (296 K) to 473 K. The temperature properties of the angular dependence of the coercive force were also measured from room temperature to 413 K, for comparison against the coercive force decrease ratio. From the temperature dependence of the coercive force decrease ratio of magnets with different alignment, it was found that the coercive force decrease ratio decreased as temperature increased until becoming close to the calculation results that were obtained from the Gaussian distribution for Nd2Fe14B grain alignment and from the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law. When we compared the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results and the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experimental data of the coercive force decrease ratio, it was found that this latter expanded to 30° for Nd13.48B5.76Co0.55Febal. having 0.95 alignment, at room temperature, from 14° that was the calculated angle obtained from the Gaussian distribution and the Kondorskii law. The angular dependence of coercive force of this magnet at room temperature agrees well with the calculation, when σ=31°, which is 30° for the reversed magnetization area, is applied as the standard deviation of Nd2Fe14B grain alignment distribution. For Nd12.75Dy0.84B5.81Co0.55Febal. with 0.96 for alignment, the reverse magnetization area also expanded to 36° and agreed well with the calculation result applied σ=44°, which has 36° for the reverse magnetization area. It was also found that, as temperature increased, the angle of the reverse magnetization area obtained from the experimental data shrunk towards the calculated angle. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of the angular dependence of the coercive force, it seems that the calculated angular dependence of the coercive force can qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties. These results strongly suggest that the magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains. It also suggests that, when such magnetic domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, they leap through several grains with weak pinning force, which determines the coercive force.

  3. Self-Assembled DNA Structures for Molecular Force Measurement: A Magnetically Actuated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, M.; Lauback, S.; Miller, C.; Peace, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding molecular forces is important to comprehend many of the underlying properties of molecular machines and biological processes. The relevant forces in these cases often lie in the picoNewton range, and thus experiments on individual biomolecules must integrate techniques capable of measuring such forces. A mechanical system to measure molecular forces associated with interacting DNA strands is being developed by using self-assembled DNA nanostructures and super-paramagnetic beads. The DNA nanostructure consists of single-stranded DNA molecules which can be folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides, i.e., staples, via programmed molecular self-assembly. These nanostructures can be polymerized into micron-scale filaments. By functionalizing the filament ends with bispecific conjugate staples, the structure can be attached to a surface as well as labeled with magnetic beads in order to apply a force on the system. External magnetic fields provide the means to maneuver and manipulate the magnetically labeled DNA structures. Preliminary findings associated with the DNA constructs and their manipulation lay the groundwork to establish real-time control of DNA nanodevices with micromanipulation.

  4. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure body composition in infants and children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (QMR) is being used in human adults to obtain measures of total body fat (FM) with high precision. The current study assessed a device specially designed to accommodate infants and children between 3 and 50 kg (EchoMRI-AH™). Body composition of 113 infants and...

  5. In vivo measurement of body composition of chickens using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QMR is a nuclear magnetic resonance based method for measuring the fat, lean and water content of the total body of the live animal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of QMR for measuring the body composition of chickens while comparing QMR results to those obtained by dual X-ray ab...

  6. Nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field modelling and preprocessing of vector magnetograms in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Inhester, B.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Knowledge about the coronal magnetic field is important to the understanding of many phenomena, such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Routine measurements of the solar magnetic field vector are traditionally carried out in the photosphere. We compute the field in the higher layers of the solar atmosphere from the measured photospheric field under the assumption that the corona is force-free. However, those measured data are inconsistent with the above force-free assumption. Therefore, one has to apply some transformations to these data before nonlinear force-free extrapolation codes can be applied. Aims: Extrapolation codes of cartesian geometry for medelling the magnetic field in the corona do not take the curvature of the Sun's surface into account. Here we develop a method for nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field medelling and preprocessing of photospheric vector magnetograms in spherical geometry using the optimization procedure. Methods: We describe a newly developed code for the extrapolation of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic fields in spherical coordinates over a restricted area of the Sun. The program uses measured vector magnetograms on the solar photosphere as input and solves the force-free equations in the solar corona. We develop a preprocessing procedure in spherical geometry to drive the observed non-force-free data towards suitable boundary conditions for a force-free extrapolation. Results: We test the code with the help of a semi-analytic solution and assess the quality of our reconstruction qualitatively by magnetic field line plots and quantitatively with a number of comparison metrics for different boundary conditions. The reconstructed fields from the lower boundary data with the weighting function are in good agreement with the original reference fields. We added artificial noise to the boundary conditions and tested the code with and without preprocessing. The preprocessing recovered all main structures of the magnetogram and removed small-scale noise. The main test was to extrapolate from the noisy photospheric vector magnetogram with and without preprocessing. The preprocessing was found to significantly improve the agreement between the extrapolated and the exact field.

  7. Repulsive force generation due to topological effect of circulating magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaka, Hideo; Minami, Yoshinari

    1999-01-01

    The basic conception and technology for gravity control of spaceship are proposed. Gravitational repulsive force is generated due to the de Rham cohomology effect of four-dimensional angular momentum by means of the clockwise circulation flow of magnetic fluid where occurs the vast positive energy of magnons consisting of spin waves. Repulsive force generator is constructed by two toroidal tubes where ferromagnetic fluids applied by external magnetic fields and laser beams are circulated in the reverse directions of each other. Since the generator yields the topologically excited space around the spaceship, the generator is a very promising engine for space drive propulsion systems. The article describes the basic theory, the spaceship's engine system, and the estimation of gravitational repulsive force.

  8. Calculation of cogging force in a novel slotted linear tubular brushless permanent magnet motor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.Q.; Hor, P.J.; Howe, D.; Rees-Jones, J.

    1997-09-01

    There is an increasing requirement for controlled linear motion over short and long strokes, in the factory automation and packaging industries, for example. Linear brushless PM motors could offer significant advantages over conventional actuation technologies, such as motor driven cams and linkages and pneumatic rams--in terms of efficiency, operating bandwidth, speed and thrust control, stroke and positional accuracy, and indeed over other linear motor technologies, such as induction motors. Here, a finite element/analytical based technique for the prediction of cogging force in a novel topology of slotted linear brushless permanent magnet motor has been developed and validated. The various force components, which influence cogging are pre-calculated by the finite element analysis of some basic magnetic structures, facilitate the analytical synthesis of the resultant cogging force. The technique can be used to aid design for the minimization of cogging.

  9. Numerical modeling of MHD hypersonic flow over a large body in planetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, E. V.; Likhachev, A. P.; Medin, S. A.

    The interaction of magnetic field and plasma structures is of an essential interest in astrophysics and geophysics In particular the attention is paid to the MHD phenomena occurring when a meteoroid body of a space origin i e asteroid or comet fragment enters an atmosphere of a planet possessing own magnetic field This work is devoted to numerical study of the MHD phenomena arising in a hypersonic flow over a body in a magnetic field under conditions taking place at the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with the Jupiter Numerical modeling has been carried out in 2D and 3D formulations In 2D formulations the intensity of MHD interaction determined by the magnetic pressure number R H varies when the Jupiter atmosphere altitude at which the MHD process is considered is chosen as H 100 280 360 km The analysis of influence of orientation of magnetic field with respect to the axis of the body and direction of its movement on the MHD effects is made It has been shown that at parallel orientation of an external magnetic field and an axis of a body amplification of a magnetic field mainly occurs in a skin-layer before a shock wave and is approximately equal to the ratio of velocities at the shock wave The maximum factor of amplification of a magnetic field with respect to a field of the planet amounts to sim 10 At the perpendicular orientation of the magnetic field relative to the axis of the body and the direction of movement the high amplification of a field occurs in compressed layer in front of the body and in large area behind a

  10. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Jun; Valentine, Megan T.

    2012-05-15

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to {approx}4.5 {mu}m paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as {approx}1 kPa.

  11. Critical speeds and forced response solutions for active magnetic bearing turbomachinery, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, J.; Rawal, D.; Kirk, R. Gordon

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of critical speeds and forced response of active magnetic bearing turbomachinery is of great interest due to the increased use of this new and promising technology. Calculating the system undamped critical speeds and forced response is important to all those who are involved in the design of the active magnetic bearing system. An extended Jeffcott model which was used as an approximate solution to a more accurate transfer matrix procedure is presented. Theory behind a two-degree-of freedom extended Jeffcoat model is presented. Results of the natural frequency calculation are shown followed by the results of the forced response calculation. The system response was predicted for two types of forcing. A constant magnitude excitation with a wide frequency variation was applied at the bearings as one forcing function. The normal unbalance force at the midspan was the second source of excitation. The results of this extended Jeffcott solution gives useful design guidance for the influence of the first and third modes of a symmetric rotor system.

  12. Quantitatively Resolving Ligand–Receptor Bonds on Cell Surfaces Using Force-Induced Remnant Magnetization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecule-specific noncovalent bonding on cell surfaces is the foundation for cellular recognition and functioning. A major challenge in probing these bonds is to resolve the specific bonds quantitatively and efficiently from the nonspecific interactions in a complex environment. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we were able to resolve quantitatively three different interactions for magnetic beads bearing anti-CD4 antibodies with CD4+ T cell surfaces based upon their binding forces. The binding force of the CD4 antibody–antigen bonds was determined to be 75 ± 3 pN. For comparison, the same bonds were also studied on a functionalized substrate surface, and the binding force was determined to be 90 ± 6 pN. The 15 pN difference revealed by high-resolution FIRMS illustrates the significant impact of the bonding environment. Because the force difference was unaffected by the cell number or the receptor density on the substrate, we attributed it to the possible conformational or local environmental differences of the CD4 antigens between the cell surface and substrate surface. Our results show that the high force resolution and detection efficiency afforded by FIRMS are valuable for studying protein–protein interactions on cell surfaces. PMID:27163031

  13. Drag measurements on a laminar flow body of revolution in Langley's 13 inch magnetic suspension and balance system. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Low-speed wind tunnel drag force measurements were taken on a laminar flow body of revolution free of support interference. This body was tested at zero incidence in the NASA Langley 13 inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS). The primary objective of these tests was to substantiate the drag force measuring capabilities of the 13 inch MSBS. A secondary objective was to obtain support interference free drag measurements on an axisymmetric body of interest. Both objectives were met. The drag force calibrations and wind-on repeatability data provide a means of assessing the drag force measuring capabilities of the 13 inch MSBS. The measured drag coefficients for this body are of interest to researchers actively involved in designing minimum drag fuselage shapes. Additional investigations included: the effects of fixing transition; the effects of fins installed in the tail; surface flow visualizations using both liquid crystals and oil flow; and base pressure measurements using a one-channel telemetry system. Two drag prediction codes were used to assess their usefulness in estimating overall body drag. These theoretical results did not compare well with the measured values because of the following: incorrect or non-existent modeling of a laminar separation bubble on the body and incorrect of non-existent estimates of base pressure drag.

  14. Experimental study of the two-body spin-orbit force in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Burgunder, G; Sorlin, O; Nowacki, F; Giron, S; Hammache, F; Moukaddam, M; de Séréville, N; Beaumel, D; Càceres, L; Clément, E; Duchêne, G; Ebran, J P; Fernandez-Dominguez, B; Flavigny, F; Franchoo, S; Gibelin, J; Gillibert, A; Grévy, S; Guillot, J; Lepailleur, A; Matea, I; Matta, A; Nalpas, L; Obertelli, A; Otsuka, T; Pancin, J; Poves, A; Raabe, R; Scarpaci, J A; Stefan, I; Stodel, C; Suzuki, T; Thomas, J C

    2014-01-31

    Energies and spectroscopic factors of the first 7/2-, 3/2-, 1/2-, and 5/2- states in the (35)Si21 nucleus were determined by means of the (d, p) transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at GANIL using the MUST2 and EXOGAM detectors. By comparing the spectroscopic information on the Si35 and S37 isotones, a reduction of the p3/2-p1/2 spin-orbit splitting by about 25% is proposed, while the f7/2-f5/2 spin-orbit splitting seems to remain constant. These features, derived after having unfolded nuclear correlations using shell model calculations, have been attributed to the properties of the two-body spin-orbit interaction, the amplitude of which is derived for the first time in an atomic nucleus. The present results, remarkably well reproduced by using several realistic nucleon-nucleon forces, provide a unique touchstone for the modeling of the spin-orbit interaction in atomic nuclei. PMID:24580444

  15. Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L.

    2010-03-15

    The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

  16. Computational analysis of wake structure and body forces on marine animal research tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanio, Matthew; Morrida, Jacob; Green, Melissa

    2013-11-01

    The Acousounde 3B marine animal research tag is used to study the relationship between the sounds made by whales and their behaviors, and ultimately to improve whale conservation efforts. In practical implementation, some researchers have attached external GPS Fastloc devices to the top surface of the tag, in order to accurately record the position of the whales throughout the deployment. There is a need to characterize the flow over the tag in order to better understand the body forces being exerted on it and how wake turbulence could affect noise measurements. The addition of the GPS Fastloc exacerbates both of these concerns, as it complicates the hydrodynamics of the device. Using CFD techniques, we were able to simulate the flow over the tag with a GPS attachment at multiple yaw angles. We used Pointwise to construct the mesh and Fluent to simulate the flow. We have also used flow visualization to experimentally validate our computational results. It was found that the GPS has a minimal effect on the wake of the tag at a 0 degree offset from the freestream flow. However, at increasing offset angles, the presence of the GPS greatly increased the amount of wake turbulence observed. Performed work while undergrad at Syracuse.

  17. Navier-Stokes Computations of Longitudinal Forces and Moments for a Blended Wing Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Biedron, Robert T.; Park, Michael A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2005-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of applying CFD methods to aerodynamic analyses for aircraft stability and control. The integrated aerodynamic parameters used in stability and control, however, are not necessarily those extensively validated in the state of the art CFD technology. Hence, an exploratory study of such applications and the comparison of the solutions to available experimental data will help to assess the validity of the current computation methods. In addition, this study will also examine issues related to wind tunnel measurements such as measurement uncertainty and support interference effects. Several sets of experimental data from the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and the National Transonic Facility are presented. Two Navier-Stokes flow solvers, one using structured meshes and the other unstructured meshes, were used to compute longitudinal static stability derivatives for an advanced Blended Wing Body configuration over a wide range of angles of attack. The computations were performed for two different Reynolds numbers and the resulting forces and moments are compared with the above mentioned wind tunnel data.

  18. Navier-Stokes Computations of Longitudinal Forces and Moments for a Blended Wing Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Biedron, Robert T.; Park, Michael A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of applying CFD methods to aerodynamic analyses for aircraft stability and control. The integrated aerodynamic parameters used in stability and control, however, are not necessarily those extensively validated in the state of the art CFD technology. Hence, an exploratory study of such applications and the comparison of the solutions to available experimental data will help to assess the validity of the current computation methods. In addition, this study will also examine issues related to wind tunnel measurements such as measurement uncertainty and support interference effects. Several sets of experimental data from the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and the National Transonic Facility are presented. Two Navier-Stokes flow solvers, one using structured meshes and the other unstructured meshes, were used to compute longitudinal static stability derivatives for an advanced Blended Wing Body configuration over a wide range of angles of attack. The computations were performed for two different Reynolds numbers and the resulting forces and moments are compared with the above mentioned wind tunnel data.

  19. Do body weight and gender shape the work force? The case of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Asgeirsdottir, Tinna Laufey

    2011-03-01

    Most studies of the relationship between body weight - as well as its corollary, beauty - and labor-market outcomes have indicated that it is a function of a gender bias, the negative relationship between excess weight or obesity and labor-market outcomes being greater for women than for men. Iceland offers an exceptional opportunity to examine this hypothesis, given that it scores relatively well on an index of gender equality comprising economic, political, educational, labor-market, and health-based criteria. Equipped with an advanced level of educational attainment, on average, women are well represented in Iceland's labor force. When it comes to women's presence in the political sphere, Iceland is out of the ordinary as well; that Icelanders were the first in the world to elect a woman to be president may suggest a relatively gender-blind assessment in the labor market. In the current study, survey data collected by Gallup Iceland in 2002 are used to examine the relationship between weight and employment within this political and social setting. Point estimates indicate that, despite apparently lesser gender discrimination in Iceland than elsewhere, the bias against excess weight and obesity remains gender-based, showing a slightly negative relationship between weight and the employment rate of women, whereas a slightly positive relationship was found for men. PMID:21196135

  20. Experimental Study of the Two-Body Spin-Orbit Force in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgunder, G.; Sorlin, O.; Nowacki, F.; Giron, S.; Hammache, F.; Moukaddam, M.; de Séréville, N.; Beaumel, D.; Càceres, L.; Clément, E.; Duchêne, G.; Ebran, J. P.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Flavigny, F.; Franchoo, S.; Gibelin, J.; Gillibert, A.; Grévy, S.; Guillot, J.; Lepailleur, A.; Matea, I.; Matta, A.; Nalpas, L.; Obertelli, A.; Otsuka, T.; Pancin, J.; Poves, A.; Raabe, R.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Thomas, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Energies and spectroscopic factors of the first 7/2-, 3/2-, 1/2-, and 5/2- states in the Si2135 nucleus were determined by means of the (d, p) transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at GANIL using the MUST2 and EXOGAM detectors. By comparing the spectroscopic information on the Si35 and S37 isotones, a reduction of the p3/2-p1/2 spin-orbit splitting by about 25% is proposed, while the f7/2-f5/2 spin-orbit splitting seems to remain constant. These features, derived after having unfolded nuclear correlations using shell model calculations, have been attributed to the properties of the two-body spin-orbit interaction, the amplitude of which is derived for the first time in an atomic nucleus. The present results, remarkably well reproduced by using several realistic nucleon-nucleon forces, provide a unique touchstone for the modeling of the spin-orbit interaction in atomic nuclei.

  1. Note on a Lagally formulation for the steady body force attendant to surface-singularity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockett, Terry E.

    2010-08-01

    In 1922, Lagally presented expressions for the overall loads in response to a steady flow of an inviscid incompressible fluid stream impinging on a shape created by isolated singularities embedded within the extended flow field interior to the body surface. The simple load expressions are a summation of terms containing the product of the local regular fluid speed (defined as the speed excluding contribution from the local singularity) and the singularity strength. In 1981, Guevel and Grekas extended the analysis to a similar case with singularities distributed on a closed surface. In 2006, Ledoux et al gave a straightforward derivation for a source surface distribution and argued that such an approach is 'less prone to numerical inaccuracies'. Herein the straightforward nonlinear formulation appropriate for surface singularities is expanded to include a surface distribution of vortices and/or doublets. Numerical results derived from both the Lagally integral for distributed singularities and the integration of the product of the inviscid pressure and unit normal are shown to have similar convergence tendencies toward exact inviscid results for the computed forces on a class of two-dimensional lifting foils.

  2. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  3. Magnetic field generation in the cores of terrestrial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runcorn, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Efforts to find some scaling law for the dipole moments of planets seem illusory for, although dynamo theory is still in a rudimentary state, once the critical magnetic Reynolds Number is exceeded it appears that the field strength is determined by the energy source, it it is permissible to treat the core as a heat engine. For this reason the lunar magnetic field is of special significance as the paleomagnetic evidence strongly suggests that the surface field was about 1 G 3.9 by diminishing exponentially to about .02 G 3.2 by ago and completely disappearing some time later.

  4. ON THE FORCE-FREE NATURE OF PHOTOSPHERIC SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS AS OBSERVED FROM HINODE (SOT/SP)

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic field is force-free if there is no interaction between it and the plasma in the surrounding atmosphere, i.e., electric currents are aligned with the magnetic field, giving rise to zero Lorentz force. The computation of various magnetic parameters, such as magnetic energy (using the virial theorem), gradient of twist of sunspot magnetic fields (computed from the force-free parameter {alpha}), and any kind of extrapolation, heavily hinges on the force-free approximation of the photospheric sunspot magnetic fields. Thus, it is of vital importance to inspect the force-free behavior of sunspot magnetic fields. The force-free nature of sunspot magnetic fields has been examined earlier by some researchers, ending with incoherent results. Accurate photospheric vector field measurements with high spatial resolution are required to inspect the force-free nature of sunspots. For this purpose, we use several vector magnetograms of high spatial resolution obtained from the Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode. Both the necessary and sufficient conditions for force-free nature are examined by checking the global and local nature of equilibrium magnetic forces over sunspots. We find that sunspot magnetic fields are not very far from the force-free configuration, although they are not completely force-free on the photosphere. The umbral and inner penumbral fields are more force-free than the middle and outer penumbral fields. During their evolution, sunspot magnetic fields are found to maintain their proximity to force-free field behavior. Although a dependence of net Lorentz force components is seen on the evolutionary stages of the sunspots, we do not find a systematic relationship between the nature of sunspot magnetic fields and the associated flare activity. Further, we examine whether the fields at the photosphere follow linear or nonlinear force-free conditions. After examining this in various complex and simple sunspots, we conclude that, in either case, photospheric sunspot magnetic fields are closer to satisfying the nonlinear force-free field approximation.

  5. Integrated Simulation between Flexible Body of Catenary and Active Control Pantograph for Contact Force Variation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Michitsuji, Yohei; Nagai, Masao; Miyajima, Naoki

    Railway transport has been developed for a variety of requirements with a diversity of studies and technologies in recent years. In particular, the intercity railway transport that can be operated at speed of more than 350 km/h is the goal for the railway industry. Due to vibration and drag forces at high speed, contact force variation occurs between pantograph and catenary. This variation also causes instability in the pantograph and catenary interaction. In this study, multibody dynamics analysis is used to model the catenary. The integration of the catenary model and the pantograph model in the simulation flow produces contact force variations. A sinusoidal feed forward force and a simple feedback control force are applied to control the wave-like contact force fluctuations by means of active dampers. Evaluation of the combination of active control forces will produce optimized forces that may be able to maintain, thus improve the contact force variations.

  6. Embedding Circular Force-Free Flux Ropes in Potential Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. S.; Torok, T.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a method for constructing approximate force-free equilibria in active regions that locally have a potential bipolar-type magnetic field with a thin force-free flux rope embedded inside it. The flux rope has a circular-arc axis and circular cross-section in which the interior magnetic field is predominantly toroidal (axial). Its magnetic pressure is balanced outside by that of the poloidal (azimuthal) field created at the boundary by the electric current sheathing the flux rope. To facilitate the implementation of the method in our numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, the entire solution is described in terms of the vector potential of the magnetic field. The parameters of the flux rope can be chosen so that a subsequent MHD relaxation of the constructed configuration under line-tied conditions at the boundary provides a numerically exact equilibrium. Such equilibria are an approximation for the magnetic configuration preceding solar eruptions, which can be triggered in our model by imposing suitable photospheric flows beneath the flux rope. The proposed method is a useful tool for constructing pre-eruption magnetic fields in data-driven simulations of solar active events. Research supported by NASA's Heliophysics Theory and LWS Programs, and NSF/SHINE and NSF/FESD.

  7. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELD FITTING TO CORONAL LOOPS WITH AND WITHOUT STEREOSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2013-02-15

    We developed a new nonlinear force-free magnetic field (NLFFF) forward-fitting algorithm based on an analytical approximation of force-free and divergence-free NLFFF solutions, which requires as input a line-of-sight magnetogram and traced two-dimensional (2D) loop coordinates of coronal loops only, in contrast to stereoscopically triangulated three-dimensional loop coordinates used in previous studies. Test results of simulated magnetic configurations and from four active regions observed with STEREO demonstrate that NLFFF solutions can be fitted with equal accuracy with or without stereoscopy, which relinquishes the necessity of STEREO data for magnetic modeling of active regions (on the solar disk). The 2D loop tracing method achieves a 2D misalignment of {mu}{sub 2} = 2. Degree-Sign 7 {+-} 1. Degree-Sign 3 between the model field lines and observed loops, and an accuracy of Almost-Equal-To 1.0% for the magnetic energy or free magnetic energy ratio. The three times higher spatial resolution of TRACE or SDO/AIA (compared with STEREO) also yields a proportionally smaller misalignment angle between model fit and observations. Visual/manual loop tracings are found to produce more accurate magnetic model fits than automated tracing algorithms. The computation time of the new forward-fitting code amounts to a few minutes per active region.

  8. Measurement method for determining the magnetic hysteresis effects of reluctance actuators by evaluation of the force and flux variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijsen, N. H.; Jansen, J. W.; Compter, J. C.; Lomonova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    A measurement method is presented which identifies the magnetic hysteresis effects present in the force of linear reluctance actuators. The measurement method is applied to determine the magnetic hysteresis in the force of an E-core reluctance actuator, with and without pre-biasing permanent magnet. The force measurements are conducted with a piezoelectric load cell (Kistler type 9272). This high-bandwidth force measurement instrument is identified in the frequency domain using a voice-coil actuator that has negligible magnetic hysteresis and eddy currents. Specifically, the phase delay between the current and force of the voice-coil actuator is used for the calibration of the measurement instrument. This phase delay is also obtained by evaluation of the measured force and flux variation in the E-core actuator, both with and without permanent magnet on the middle tooth. The measured magnetic flux variation is used to distinguish the phase delay due to magnetic hysteresis from the measured phase delay between the current and the force of the E-core actuator. Finally, an open loop steady-state ac model is presented that predicts the magnetic hysteresis effects in the force of the E-core actuator.

  9. Measurement method for determining the magnetic hysteresis effects of reluctance actuators by evaluation of the force and flux variation.

    PubMed

    Vrijsen, N H; Jansen, J W; Compter, J C; Lomonova, E A

    2013-07-01

    A measurement method is presented which identifies the magnetic hysteresis effects present in the force of linear reluctance actuators. The measurement method is applied to determine the magnetic hysteresis in the force of an E-core reluctance actuator, with and without pre-biasing permanent magnet. The force measurements are conducted with a piezoelectric load cell (Kistler type 9272). This high-bandwidth force measurement instrument is identified in the frequency domain using a voice-coil actuator that has negligible magnetic hysteresis and eddy currents. Specifically, the phase delay between the current and force of the voice-coil actuator is used for the calibration of the measurement instrument. This phase delay is also obtained by evaluation of the measured force and flux variation in the E-core actuator, both with and without permanent magnet on the middle tooth. The measured magnetic flux variation is used to distinguish the phase delay due to magnetic hysteresis from the measured phase delay between the current and the force of the E-core actuator. Finally, an open loop steady-state ac model is presented that predicts the magnetic hysteresis effects in the force of the E-core actuator. PMID:23902095

  10. Determination of radiation exposure history of common materials and computer hardware by using atomic (and magnetic force) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Teter, J. P.; Abbundi, R. J.; Guardala, N. A.

    2003-04-01

    Defects produced by ionizing radiation are smaller than a micrometer and are unobservable in an optical microscope. An atomic force microscope was utilized to reveal their counts and structure in common materials like mica, silicon, organic solids, polymers, sugar, quartz, and calcite. A magnetic force microscope has shown the damage of radiation on computer hard disks. The present work shows that exposure to radioactive material leaves a permanent record, which can be read for dosimetric or forensic purposes by using atomic force microcopy on common objects or a magnetic force microscope on magnetic media.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility variations in Loess sequences and their relationship to astronomical forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verosub, Kenneth L.; Singer, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The long, well-exposed and often continuous sequences of loess found throughout the world are generally thought to provide an excellent opportunity for studying long-term, large-scale environmental change during the last few million years. In recent years, the most fruitful loess studies have been those involving the deposits of the loess in China. One of the most intriguing results of that work has been the discovery of an apparent correlation between variations in the magnetic susceptibility of the loess sequence and the oxygen isotope record of the deep sea. This correlation implies that magnetic susceptibility variations are being driven by astronomical parameters. However, the basic data have been interpreted in various ways by different authors, most of whom assumed that the magnetic minerals in the loess have not been affected by post-depositional processes. Using a chemical extraction procedure that allows us to separate the contribution of secondary pedogenic magnetic minerals from primary inherited magnetic minerals, we have found that the magnetic susceptibility of the Chinese paleosols is largely due to a pedogenic component which is present to a lesser degree in the loess. We have also found that the smaller inherited component of the magnetic susceptibility is about the same in the paleosols and the loess. These results demonstrate the need for additional study of the processes that create magnetic susceptibility variations in order to interpret properly the role of astronomical forcing in producing these variations.

  12. Expanded Equations for Torque and Force on a Cylindrical Permanent Magnet Core in a Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1997-01-01

    The expanded equations for torque and force on a cylindrical permanent magnet core in a large-gap magnetic suspension system are presented. The core is assumed to be uniformly magnetized, and equations are developed for two orientations of the magnetization vector. One orientation is parallel to the axis of symmetry, and the other is perpendicular to this axis. Fields and gradients produced by suspension system electromagnets are assumed to be calculated at a point in inertial space which coincides with the origin of the core axis system in its initial alignment. Fields at a given point in the core are defined by expanding the fields produced at the origin as a Taylor series. The assumption is made that the fields can be adequately defined by expansion up to second-order terms. Examination of the expanded equations for the case where the magnetization vector is perpendicular to the axis of symmetry reveals that some of the second-order gradient terms provide a method of generating torque about the axis of magnetization and therefore provide the ability to produce six-degree-of-freedom control.

  13. Si nanowire probe with Nd-Fe-B magnet for attonewton-scale force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yong-Jun; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we have developed a 210 nm-wide and 32 µm-long silicon nanowire probe with a silicon mirror using a silicon-on-insulator wafer in order to improve sensitivity of force detection for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). Additionally, a Nd-Fe-B magnet has been integrated at the end of the nanowire. The fabricated nanowire probe shows a resonance frequency of 11.256 kHz and a factor of 12 800 after annealing at 800 °C for 2 h in forming gas. The probe exhibits attonewton sensitivity, and the measurement of force mapping based on electron spin resonance is demonstrated for 3D imaging of radicals. The detected force and magnetic field gradient are approximately 82 aN and ~70.1 G μm-1 at room temperature. The radical density is calculated as 4.6  ×  1018 spins cm-3.

  14. Study of magnetism in Ni-Cr hardface alloy deposit on 316LN stainless steel using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, G. V. K.; Kumar, Anish; Chakraborty, Gopa; Albert, S. K.; Rao, B. Purna Chandra; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-07-01

    Nickel base Ni-Cr alloy variants are extensively used for hardfacing of austenitic stainless steel components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) to avoid self-welding and galling. Considerable difference in the compositions and melting points of the substrate and the Ni-Cr alloy results in significant dilution of the hardface deposit from the substrate. Even though, both the deposit and the substrate are non-magnetic, the diluted region exhibits ferromagnetic behavior. The present paper reports a systematic study carried out on the variations in microstructures and magnetic behavior of American Welding Society (AWS) Ni Cr-C deposited layers on 316 LN austenitic stainless steels, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The phase variations of the oscillations of a Co-Cr alloy coated magnetic field sensitive cantilever is used to quantitatively study the magnetic strength of the evolved microstructure in the diluted region as a function of the distance from the deposit/substrate interface, with the spatial resolution of about 100 nm. The acquired AFM/MFM images and the magnetic property profiles have been correlated with the variations in the chemical compositions in the diluted layers obtained by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The study indicates that both the volume fraction of the ferromagnetic phase and its ferromagnetic strength decrease with increasing distance from the deposit/substrate interface. A distinct difference is observed in the ferromagnetic strength in the first few layers and the ferromagnetism is observed only near to the precipitates in the fifth layer. The study provides a better insight of the evolution of ferromagnetism in the diluted layers of Ni-Cr alloy deposits on stainless steel.

  15. Integro-differential equation approach. III. Triton and. alpha. -particle bound states. Realistic forces and two-body correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Oehm, W.; Fiedeldey, H.; Sofianos, S.A. Physics Department, University of South Africa, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria, 0001, ); Fabre de la Ripelle, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Four-nucleon binding energies and Faddeev amplitudes are calculated in the integro-differential equation approach, which neglects all {ital N}-body correlations with {ital N}{ge}3, for realistic forces in the three-channel approximation. Good agreement is obtained with corresponding results recently obtained by means of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations. Thereby, the dominance of two-body correlations, even for realistic forces, is established. The effect of the inclusion of the hypercentral potential in the definition of the (modified) Faddeev amplitudes for realistic forces is investigated and found to be of less importance for realistic forces than for central spin-dependent forces. The three- and four-nucleon modified Faddeev amplitudes are also compared. We found that the {ital D}-state Faddeev amplitudes are less sensitive to the number of nucleons, to the inclusion of the hypercentral potential, and to the nucleon-nucleon force than the mixed symmetry {ital S}{prime}-state amplitudes.

  16. Identification of superconducting phases in ceramic particles by magnetic field induced forces using a magnetized wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Daniel; Hulliger, Jürg

    2010-06-01

    A new equipment for minority phase analysis of superconducting (SC) phases within chemically inhomogeneous ceramic grains using a high gradient magnetic field or field induced effect of torque is presented. Single grains down to 20 μm are either captured by a magnetized iron wire or identified because of their torque movement in a pulsed magnetic field. An assembly of many hundreds of grains can be investigated for minor quantities of SC phases from 80 K up to room temperature. A maximum field of up to 100-140 mT allows us to reliably identify SC grains and evaluate their SC critical temperatures Tc. Localization of SC grains allows us to extract them for further analysis. Experiments with YBa2Cu3O2-δ grains demonstrated that Tc values evaluated in such a way are rather close to those, which are determined by magnetization measurements.

  17. Single-shot nuclear magnetization recovery curves with force-gradient detection

    PubMed Central

    Alexson, Dimitri A.; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.; Smith, Doran D.

    2012-01-01

    We measure the spin-lattice relaxation time as a function of sample temperature in GaAs in a real-time single-shot inversion recovery experiment using spin force gradients acting on a magnetic tipped cantilever. After inverting 69Ga spins localized near the magnet with a single 20 ms adiabatic rapid passage sweep, the spins’ magnetization recovery was passively tracked by recording the cantilever’s frequency change, which is proportional to the longitudinal component of the spins’ magnetization. The cantilever’s frequency was recorded for a time 3*T1 for sample temperatures ranging from 4.8 to 25 K. The temperature dependence was observed for the 69Ga quadrupolar relaxation interaction. PMID:26130824

  18. Effect of repulsive and attractive three-body forces on nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Furumoto, T.; Sakuragi, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2009-10-15

    The effect of the three-body force (TBF) is studied in nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering on the basis of Brueckner theory for nucleon-nucleon (NN) effective interaction (complex G matrix) in the nuclear matter. A new G matrix called CEG07 proposed recently by the present authors includes the TBF effect and reproduces a realistic saturation curve in the nuclear matter, and it is shown to well reproduce proton-nucleus elastic scattering. The microscopic optical potential for the nucleus-nucleus system is obtained by folding the G matrix with nucleon density distributions in colliding nuclei. We first analyze in detail the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O elastic scattering at E/A=70 MeV. The observed cross sections are nicely reproduced up to the most backward scattering angles only when the TBF effect is included. The use of the frozen-density approximation (FDA) is essentially important to properly estimate the effect of the TBF in nucleus-nucleus scattering. Other prescriptions for defining the local density have also been tested, but only the FDA prescription gives a proper description of the experimental cross sections as well as the effect of the TBF. The effects of the three-body attraction and the {omega}-rearrangement term are also analyzed. The CEG07 interaction is compared with CDM3Y6, which is a reliable and successful effective density-dependent NN interaction used in the double-folding model. The CEG07 G matrix is also tested in the elastic scattering of {sup 16}O by the {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, and {sup 40}Ca targets at E/A=93.9 MeV, and in the elastic scattering of {sup 12}C by the {sup 12}C target at E/A=135 MeV with great success. The decisive effect of the TBF is clearly seen also in those systems. Finally, we have tested CEG07a, CEG07b, and CEG07c for the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O system at various energies.

  19. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Hunter B.; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J.; David, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  20. Spot Surface Labeling of Magnetic Microbeads and Application in Biological Force Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, Ashley; O'Brien, E. Tim; Hill, David; Superfine, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Biological force measurements on single molecules and macromolecular structures often use microbeads for the application of force. These techniques are often complicated by multiple attachments and nonspecific binding. In one set of experiments, we are applying a magnetic force microscope that allows us to pull on magnetic beads attached to ciliated human bronchial epithelial cells. These experiments provide a means to measure the stall force of cilia and understand how cilia propel fluids. However, because we are using beads with diameters of one and 2.8 microns, and the diameter of human airway cilia is approximately 200 nm, we cannot be assured that the bead is bound to a single cilium. To address this, we have developed a sputter coating technique to block the biotin binding capability of the streptavidin labeled bead over its entire surface except for a small spot. These beads may also have applications in other biological experiments such as DNA force experiments in which binding of a single target to an individual bead is critical.

  1. Report of the Task Force on SSC Magnet System Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    1984-10-01

    The Task Force on SSC Magnet Systems test Site was appointed by Maury Tigner, Director of the SSC, Phase 1 in August 1984. In brief, the charge asked the Task Force to make a critical evaluation of potential test sites for a major SSC magnet System Test Facility (STF) with regard to: (1) availability of the needed space, utilities, staff and other requirements on the desired time scale; and (2) the cost of preparing the sites for the tests and for operating the facilities during the test period. The charge further suggests that, by virtue of existing facilities and availability of experienced staff, BNL and FNAL are the two best candidate sites and that is therefore appears appropriate to restrict the considerations of the Task Force to these sites. During the subsequent deliberations of the Task Force, no new facts were revealed that altered the assumptions of the charge in this regard. The charge does not ask for a specific site recommendation for the STF. Indeed, an agreement on such a recommendation would be difficult to achieve considering the composition of the Task Force, wherein a large fraction of the membership is drawn from the two contending laboratories. Instead, we have attempted to describe the purpose of the facility, outline a productive test program, list the major facilities required, carefully review the laboratories` responses to the facility requirements, and make objective comparisons of the specific features and capabilities offered.

  2. Computational analysis of magnetic field induced deposition of magnetic particles in lung alveolus in comparison to deposition produced with viscous drag and gravitational force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafcik, Andrej; Babinec, Peter; Frollo, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic targeting of drugs attached to magnetic nanoparticles with diameter ≈ 100 nm after their intravenous administration is an interesting method of drug delivery widely investigated both theoretically as well as experimentally. Our aim in this study is theoretical analysis of a magnetic aerosol targeting to the lung. Due to lung anatomy magnetic particles up to 5 μm can be safely used, therefore the magnetic force would be stronger, moreover drag force exerted on the particle is according to Stokes law linearly dependent on the viscosity, would be weaker, because the viscosity of the air in the lung is approximately 200 fold smaller than viscosity of the blood. Lung therefore represents unique opportunity for magnetic drug targeting, as we have shown in this study by the analysis of magnetic particle dynamics in a rhythmically expanding and contracting distal and proximal alveolus subjected to high-gradient magnetic field generated by quadrupolar permanent Halbach magnet array.

  3. Asymptotic analysis of force-free magnetic fields of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Roumeliotis, G.

    1995-01-01

    It is known from computer calculations that if a force-free magnetic-field configuration is stressed progressively by footpoint displacements, the configuration expands and approaches the open configuration with the same surface flux distribution, and, in the process, the energy of the field increases progressively. Analysis of a simple model of force-free fields of cylindrical symmetry leads to simple asymptotic expressions for the extent and energy of such a configuration. The analysis is carried through for both spherical and planar source surfaces. According to this model, the field evolves in a well-behaved manner with no indication of instability or loss of equilibrium.

  4. On transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Q.; Wang, X.

    2014-07-15

    We revisit the transition from Alfvén resonance to forced magnetic reconnection with a focus on the property of their singularities. As the driven frequency tends to zero, the logarithmic singularity of Alfvén resonance shifts to the power-law singularity of forced reconnection, due to merging of the two resonance layers. The transition criterion depends on either kinetic effects or dissipations that resolve the singularity. As an example, a small but finite resistivity η is introduced to investigate the transition process. The transition threshold is then obtained as the driven frequency reaches a level of ∼O((η/k){sup 1/3})

  5. Manual of clinical magnetic resonance imaging: A practical guide to conducting magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the head and body

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, J.P.; Glazer, H.S.; Lee, J.K.T.; Murphy, W.A.; Gado, M.

    1985-01-01

    A brief introductory section familiarizes the reader with the physical principles and techniques of magnetic resonance imaging and describes the most commonly encountered artifacts. Guidelines are then offered for selecting appropriate imaging protocols and conducting examinations of the head, spine, neck, chest, cardiovascular system, abdomen, pelvis, musculoskeletal system, and breast. The imaging sequences presented for examination of each region of body.

  6. Force-Free Magnetic Fields Calculated from Automated Tracing of Coronal Loops with AIA/SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most realistic magnetic field models of the solar corona is a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) solution. There exist about a dozen numeric codes that compute NLFFF solutions based on extrapolations of photospheric vector magnetograph data. However, since the photosphere and lower chromosphere is not force-free, a suitable correction has to be applied to the lower boundary condition. Despite of such "pre-processing" corrections, the resulting theoretical magnetic field lines deviate substantially from observed coronal loop geometries. - Here we developed an alternative method that fits an analytical NLFFF approximation to the observed geometry of coronal loops. The 2D coordinates of the geometry of coronal loop structures observed with AIA/SDO are traced with the "Oriented Coronal CUrved Loop Tracing" (OCCULT-2) code, an automated pattern recognition algorithm that has demonstrated the fidelity in loop tracing matching visual perception. A potential magnetic field solution is then derived from a line-of-sight magnetogram observed with HMI/SDO, and an analytical NLFFF approximation is then forward-fitted to the twisted geometry of coronal loops. We demonstrate the performance of this magnetic field modeling method for a number of solar active regions, before and after major flares observed with SDO. The difference of the NLFFF and the potential field energies allows us then to compute the free magnetic energy, which is an upper limit of the energy that is released during a solar flare.

  7. The Influence of the Lorentz Force on Line Profiles in Early-Type Magnetic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallverdú, R. E.; Cidale, L. S.; Rohrmann, R. D.

    2007-03-01

    We have computed theoretical He I line profiles by means of LTE models for the photosphere of B stars. In these models we have taken into account the effect of the Lorentz force in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium following the procedure of tet*{Valya}. We analyze the influence of a magnetic field on the line profiles. This mechanism can explain the variations in line profile and the stability of the continuum flux of some He-variable stars. We discuss the determination of abundances in magnetic stars.

  8. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  9. Casimir interaction between two magnetic metals in comparison with nonmagnetic test bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, A. A.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2013-10-01

    We present the complete results for the dynamic experiment on measuring the gradient of the Casimir force between magnetic (Ni-coated) surfaces of a plate and a sphere. Special attention is paid to the description of some details of the setup, its calibration, error analysis, and background effects. Computations are performed in the framework of the Lifshitz theory at nonzero temperature with an account of analytic corrections to the proximity force approximation and of surface roughness using both the Drude and the plasma model approaches. The theory of magnetic interaction between a sphere and a plate due to domain structure of their surfaces is developed for both out-of-plane and in-plane magnetizations in the absence and in the presence of spontaneous magnetization. It is shown that in all cases the magnetic contribution to the measured force gradients is much smaller than the total experimental error. The comparison between experiment and theory is done using the rigorous statistical method. It is shown that the theoretical approach taking into account dissipation of free electrons is excluded by the data at a 95% confidence level. The approach neglecting dissipation is confirmed by the data at more than 90% confidence level. We prove that the results of experiments with Ni-Ni, Ni-Au, and Au-Au surfaces taken together cannot be reconciled with the approach including free electrons dissipation by the introduction of any unaccounted background force, either attractive or repulsive.

  10. The Use of Magnets for Introducing Primary School Students to Some Properties of Forces through Small-Group Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Rebecca; de Berg, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Seventeen Grade Six students were divided into small groups to study the concept of forces in the context of magnets and their properties. The researcher, a pre-service primary school teacher, encouraged the students into conversation about magnets and it was found that, without hesitation, they talked about their prior experience of magnets. The…

  11. The Use of Magnets for Introducing Primary School Students to Some Properties of Forces through Small-Group Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Rebecca; de Berg, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Seventeen Grade Six students were divided into small groups to study the concept of forces in the context of magnets and their properties. The researcher, a pre-service primary school teacher, encouraged the students into conversation about magnets and it was found that, without hesitation, they talked about their prior experience of magnets. The

  12. Electromagnetic forces in the air gap of a permanent magnet linear generator at no load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, K.; Danielsson, O.; Leijon, M.

    2006-02-01

    The basis for the work is the slow speed energy conversion of ocean wave energy into electricity using a direct-drive three-phase permanent magnetized linear generator. One of several important issues is the normal forces in the air gap, which is critical when designing the support structure of the generator. The electromagnetic forces in the air gap have been analyzed using Maxwell stress tensor method implemented in a two- dimensional finite element code. Simplified analytic calculations are made in order to validate the results from the extensive computer calculations. The normal electromagnetic forces in the air gap, Fδ, are analyzed for a two-sided linear generator at no load. An unstable condition of the global force on the piston occurs due to the fast increasing normal force as the air gap width decreases. A horizontal displacement of the piston from a neutral position with 3 mm air gap on both sides produces a resulting horizontal force on the piston, increasing with the displacement. A displacement of 1 mm gives a resulting horizontal force on the piston of 5.5 kN per pole and meter of core length, which is increased to 9 kN per pole and meter of core length for a displacement of 1.5 mm. Furthermore, the normal force varies due to cogging as the piston moves vertically. At a constant air gap width of 3 mm the normal forces per pole are varying between 9.9 and 11.3 kN/m of core length as the piston is moving from one pole to the next.

  13. Force and heat current formulas for many-body potentials in molecular dynamics simulations with applications to thermal conductivity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheyong; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Donadio, Davide; Harju, Ari

    2015-09-01

    We derive expressions of interatomic force and heat current for many-body potentials such as the Tersoff, the Brenner, and the Stillinger-Weber potential used extensively in molecular dynamics simulations of covalently bonded materials. Although these potentials have a many-body nature, a pairwise force expression that follows Newton's third law can be found without referring to any partition of the potential. Based on this force formula, a stress applicable for periodic systems can be unambiguously defined. The force formula can then be used to derive the heat current formulas using a natural potential partitioning. Our heat current formulation is found to be equivalent to most of the seemingly different heat current formulas used in the literature, but to deviate from the stress-based formula derived from two-body potential. We validate our formulation numerically on various systems described by the Tersoff potential, namely three-dimensional silicon and diamond, two-dimensional graphene, and quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanotube. The effects of cell size and production time used in the simulation are examined.

  14. Magnetic dipole super-resonances and their impact on mechanical forces at optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Iigo; Ederra, Iigo; Gonzalo, Ramn; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2014-04-01

    Artificial magnetism enables various transformative optical phenomena, including negative refraction, Fano resonances, and unconventional nanoantennas, beamshapers, polarization transformers and perfect absorbers, and enriches the collection of electromagnetic field control mechanisms at optical frequencies. We demonstrate that it is possible to excite a magnetic dipole super-resonance at optical frequencies by coating a silicon nanoparticle with a shell impregnated with active material. The resulting response is several orders of magnitude stronger than that generated by bare silicon nanoparticles and is comparable to electric dipole super-resonances excited in spaser-based nanolasers. Furthermore, this configuration enables an exceptional control over the optical forces exerted on the nanoparticle. It expedites huge pushing or pulling actions, as well as a total suppression of the force in both far-field and near-field scenarios. These effects empower advanced paradigms in electromagnetic manipulation and microscopy. PMID:24718235

  15. Circular whirling and stability due to unbalanced magnetic pull and eccentric force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Baisheng; Sun, Weipeng; Li, Zhengguang; Li, Zhihe

    2011-10-01

    This rapid communication is concerned with the circular whirling and stability of a model rotor in a synchronous generator under no load, subjected to unbalanced magnetic pull and mass eccentric force. The analysis is focused on the synchronous whirling of the rotor. Based on the existing analytical expression for unbalanced magnetic pull with any pole-pair number, the nonautonomous system of differential equations of motion with parametrically exciting force is transformed to an autonomous one by introducing a rotating coordinate frame. The circular whirlings of the model rotor are thus converted into equilibrium solutions to the autonomous system, which can be obtained by solving a system of polynomial equations with two unknowns only. Furthermore, stability of these equilibrium solutions is determined by applying the linearized stability criterion. An example is used to illustrate the proposed analytical method.

  16. Large-scale magnetic field generation by randomly forced shearing waves.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, T; McWilliams, J C; Schekochihin, A A

    2011-12-16

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of low magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) and weak shear. The dynamo is kinematic and due to fluctuations in the net (volume-averaged) electromotive force. This is a minimal proof-of-concept quasilinear calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently found in numerical experiments, on a firm theoretical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wave number and growth rate of the fastest-growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo action may be a generic property of sheared magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. PMID:22243085

  17. Magnetism of Minor Bodies in the Solar System: From 433 Eros, passing Braille, Steins, and Lutetia towards Churyumov-Gerasimenko and 1999 JU3.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercik, David; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Heinisch, Philip; Richter, Ingo; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Minor bodies in the solar system, such as asteroids and comets, are important sources of information for our knowledge of the solar system formation. Besides other aspects, estimation of a magnetization state of such bodies might prove important in understanding the early aggregation phases of the protoplanetary disk, showing the level of importance of the magnetic forces in the processes involved. Meteorites' magnetization measurements suggest that primitive bodies consist of magnetized material. However, space observations from various flybys give to date diverse results for a global magnetization estimation. The flybys at Braille and Gaspra indicate possible higher magnetization (~ 10-3 Am2/kg), while flybys at Steins and Lutetia show no significant values in the global field change illustrating low global magnetization. Furthermore, the interpretation of remote (during flybys) measurements is very difficult. For correct estimates on the local magnetization one needs (in the best case) multi-point surface measurements. Single point observation has been done by NEAR-Shoemaker on 433 Eros asteroid, revealing no signature in magnetic field that could have origin in asteroid magnetization. Similar results, no magnetization observed, have been provided by evaluation of recent data from ROMAP (Philae lander) and RPC-MAG (Rosetta orbiter) instruments from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The ROMAP instrument provided measurements from multiple points of the cometary surface as well as data along ballistic path between multiple touchdowns, which support the conclusion of no global magnetization. However, even in case of the in-situ on surface observations the magnetization estimate has a limiting spatial resolution that is dependent on the distance from the surface (~ 50 cm in case of ROMAP). To get information about possible smaller magnetized grains distribution and magnetization strength, the sensor shall be placed as close as possible to the surface. For such observations the next ideal candidate mission is Hayabusa-II with its Mascot lander equipped with fluxgate magnetometer. The small-sized lander shall deliver the magnetometer within centimeters from the surface, providing measurements on multiple points thanks to a hopping ability. The mission has been recently launched (December 2014) and is aiming to a C-type asteroid 1999 JU3 to reach it in 2018. The results will hopefully add some piece of information to the still unclear question of minor solar system bodies magnetization.

  18. Force, torque, and absorbed energy for a body of arbitrary shape and constitution in an electromagnetic radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsund, Ø.; Felderhof, B. U.

    1996-02-01

    The force and torque exerted on a body of arbitrary shape and constitution by a stationary radiation field are in principle given by integrals of Minkowski's stress tensor over a surface surrounding the body. Similarly the absorbed energy is given by an integral of the Poynting vector. These integrals are notoriously difficult to evaluate, and so far only spherical bodies have been considered. It is shown here that the integrals may be cast into a simpler form by use of Debye potentials. General expressions for the integrals are derived as sums of bilinear expressions in the coefficients of the expansion of the incident and scattered waves in terms of vector spherical waves. The expressions are simplified for small particles, such as atoms, for which the electric dipole approximation may be used. It is shown that the calculation is also relevant for bodies with nonlinear electromagnetic response.

  19. Calculation of the induced currents and forces for a hybrid magnetic levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Albertz, D.; Dappen, S.; Henneberger, G.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the calculation of the induced currents and forces for a 3D non-linear eddy current field problem with ferromagnetic moving conductors. The {rvec A}, V-{rvec A} formulation is used in combination with four different gauging methods to stabilize the solution process. To consider non-rectangular shapes of geometries tetrahedral elements were employed. The computation procedure is applied to a hybrid magnetic levitation system of a contactless and frictionless conveyance system.

  20. Perspective Primary Teachers Explores Magnetic Interactions As A Base To Understand Lorentz Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Marisa; Viola, Rossana

    2008-05-01

    Lorentz's Force represents a conceptual gap as for the analysis of the simple effects related to the properties characterizing the electric and magnetic nature of phenomena. Searching for the definition of a teaching/learning path according to MRE model [5] a research dedicated to primary school prospective teachers has been carried out. This learning path is structured and based on experimental practice [4] according to PCK guide lines and main results are here presented on the side of teachers training.

  1. Electric/magnetic dipolein an electromagnetic field: force, torque and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander; Missevitch, Oleg; Yarman, T.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we collect the relativistic expressions for the force, torque and energy of a small electric/magnetic dipole in an electromagnetic field, which we recently obtained (A.L. Kholmetskii et al., Eur. J. Phys. 33, L7 (2011), Prog. Electromagn. Res. B 45, 83 (2012), Can. J. Phys. 9, 576 (2013)) and consider a number of subtle effects, characterized the behavior of the dipole in an external field, which seem interesting from the practical viewpoint.

  2. Imaging Carbon Nanotubes in High Performance Polymer Composites via Magnetic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol; Rouse, Jason H.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Application of carbon nanotubes as reinforcement in structural composites is dependent on the efficient dispersion of the nanotubes in a high performance polymer matrix. The characterization of such dispersion is limited by the lack of available tools to visualize the quality of the matrix/carbon nanotube interaction. The work reported herein demonstrates the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a promising technique for characterizing the dispersion of nanotubes in a high performance polymer matrix.

  3. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  4. Flow in complex domains simulated by Dissipative Particle Dynamics driven by geometry-specific body-forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Deng, Mingge; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the quality of simulations by Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) of flows in complex geometries is greatly enhanced when driven by body forces suitably tailored to the geometry. In practice, the body force fields are most conveniently chosen to be the pressure gradient of the corresponding Navier-Stokes (N-S) flow. In the first of three examples, the driving-force required to yield a stagnation-point flow is derived from the pressure field of the potential flow for a lattice of counter-rotating line vortices. Such a lattice contains periodic squares bounded by streamlines with four vortices within them. Hence, the DPD simulation can be performed with periodic boundary conditions to demonstrate the value of a non-uniform driving-force without the need to model real boundaries. The second example is an irregular geometry consisting of a 2D rectangular cavity on one side of an otherwise uniform channel. The Navier-Stokes pressure field for the same geometry is obtained numerically, and its interpolated gradient is then employed as the driving-force for the DPD simulation. Finally, we present a third example, where the proposed method is applied to a complex 3D geometry of an asymmetric constriction. It is shown that in each case the DPD simulations closely reproduce the Navier-Stokes solutions. Convergence rates are found to be much superior to alternative methods; in addition, the range of convergence with respect to Reynolds number and Mach number is greatly extended.

  5. Robust tracking control of a magnetically suspended rigid body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Cox, David E.

    1994-01-01

    This study is an application of H-infinity and micro-synthesis for designing robust tracking controllers for the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Facility. The modeling, design, analysis, simulation, and testing of a control law that guarantees tracking performance under external disturbances and model uncertainties is investigated. The type of uncertainties considered and the tracking performance metric used is discussed. This study demonstrates the tradeoff between tracking performance at low frequencies and robustness at high frequencies. Two sets of controllers were designed and tested. The first set emphasized performance over robustness, while the second set traded off performance for robustness. Comparisons of simulation and test results are also included. Current simulation and experimental results indicate that reasonably good robust tracking performance can be attained for this system using multivariable robust control approach.

  6. Design framework of a teleoperating system for a magnetically levitated robot with force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Naoaki; Kato, Norihiko; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2002-02-01

    Precise works and manipulating micro objects are tough jobs for operators both mentally and physically. To execute these jobs smoothly without feeling wrongness, use of master-slave system is preferable because position and force are able to be scaled up and down as well under the system. In this study we develop a master-slave system where the size of a slave robot is very small and the slave robot is levitated by magnetic forces. In distinction from ordinary master- slave systems, the levitated robot does not get any other contact forces from outside. Thus we introduce a method using an impedance model for constructing the master-slave system. We confirmed the effectiveness of the positioning control algorithm through experiments.

  7. Novel concepts in near-field optics: from magnetic near-field to optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honghua

    Driven by the progress in nanotechnology, imaging and spectroscopy tools with nanometer spatial resolution are needed for in situ material characterizations. Near-field optics provides a unique way to selectively excite and detect elementary electronic and vibrational interactions at the nanometer scale, through interactions of light with matter in the near-field region. This dissertation discusses the development and applications of near-field optical imaging techniques, including plasmonic material characterization, optical spectral nano-imaging and magnetic field detection using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), and exploring new modalities of optical spectroscopy based on optical gradient force detection. Firstly, the optical dielectric functions of one of the most common plasmonic materials---silver is measured with ellipsometry, and analyzed with the Drude model over a broad spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. This work was motivated by the conflicting results of previous measurements, and the need for accurate values for a wide range of applications of silver in plasmonics, optical antennas, and metamaterials. This measurement provides a reference for dielectric functions of silver used in metamaterials, plasmonics, and nanophotonics. Secondly, I implemented an infrared s-SNOM instrument for spectroscopic nano-imaging at both room temperature and low temperature. As one of the first cryogenic s-SNOM instruments, the novel design concept and key specifications are discussed. Initial low-temperature and high-temperature performances of the instrument are examined by imaging of optical conductivity of vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O 3) across their phase transitions. The spectroscopic imaging capability is demonstrated on chemical vibrational resonances of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and other samples. The third part of this dissertation explores imaging of optical magnetic fields. As a proof-of-principle, the magnetic near-field response of a linear rod antenna is studied with Babinet's principle. Babinet's principle connects the magnetic field of a structure to the electric field of its complement structure. Using combined far- and near-field spectroscopy, imaging, and theory, I identify magnetic dipole and higher order bright and dark magnetic resonances at mid-infrared frequencies. From resonant length scaling and spatial field distributions, I confirm that the theoretical requirement of Babinet's principle for a structure to be infinitely thin and perfectly conducting is still fulfilled to a good approximation in the mid-infrared. Thus Babinet's principle provides access to spatial and spectral magnetic field properties, leading to targeted design and control of magnetic optical antennas. Lastly, a novel form of nanoscale optical spectroscopy based on mechanical detection of optical gradient force is explored. It is to measure the optical gradient force between induced dipole moments of a sample and an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. My study provides the theoretical basis in terms of spectral behavior, resonant enhancement, and distance dependence of the optical gradient force from numerical simulations for a coupled nanoparticle model geometry. I show that the optical gradient force is dispersive for local electronic and vibrational resonances, yet can be absorptive for collective polaronic excitations. This spectral behavior together with the distance dependence scaling provides the key characteristics for its measurement and distinction from competing processes such as thermal expansion. Furthermore, I provide a perspective for resonant enhancement and control of optical forces in general.

  8. An adaptive diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scheme using the multistation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yeji

    2016-02-01

    Whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a useful tool in oncology, which enables fast screening of disseminated tumors, lymph nodes or abscesses in the body. Multistation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or continuously moving table (CMT) MRI can be performed to overcome the limited field of view (FOV) of the magnet bore in whole-body DWI. Although CMT-MRI is regarded as a more advanced form of whole-body MRI, it cannot be widely used because most of the available MR systems are not equipped with the required hardware/software to perform CMT. Thus, optimizing the multistation approach for whole-body DWI, which is more widely available and easier to perform with the existing MR systems, is worthwhile. To improve the quality of DW images acquired with the multistation approach, we used different combinations of the built-in body RF coil and the phased-array surface RF coils for reception of the signals in whole-body DWI in this work. If different coils are selectively used in the extended FOV and appropriate reconstruction algorithms are exploited, the screening ability of whole-body DWI can be improved while minimizing the patient's discomfort and the artifacts due to physiological motions.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of Lorentz force microscopy in magnetic nano-disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, R. A.; Mello, E. P.; Coura, P. Z.; Leonel, S. A.; Maciel, I. O.; Toscano, D.; Rocha, J. C. S.; Costa, B. V.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a molecular dynamics simulation to model the Lorentz force microscopy experiment. Experimentally, this technique consists in the scattering of electrons by magnetic structures in surfaces and gases. Here, we will explore the behavior of electrons colliding with nano-magnetic disks. The computational molecular dynamics experiment allows us to follow the trajectory of individual electrons all along the experiment. In order to compare our results with the experimental one reported in literature, we model the experimental electron detectors in a simplified way: a photo-sensitive screen is simulated in such way that it counts the number of electrons that collide at a certain position. The information is organized to give in grey scale the image information about the magnetic properties of the structure in the target. Computationally, the sensor is modeled as a square matrix in which we count how many electrons collide at each specific point after being scattered by the magnetic structure. We have used several configurations of the magnetic nano-disks to understand the behavior of the scattered electrons, changing the orientation direction of the magnetic moments in the nano-disk in several ways. Our results match very well with the experiments, showing that this simulation can become a powerful technique to help to interpret experimental results.

  10. Magnetic irreversibility and pinning force density in the Mo100-xRex alloy superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Shyam; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Roy, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    We have measured the isothermal field dependence of magnetization of the Mo100-xRex (15 ? x ? 48) alloys, and have estimated the critical current and pinning force density from these measurements. We have performed structural characterization of the above alloys using standard techniques, and analyzed the field dependence of critical current and pinning force density using existing theories. Our results indicate that dislocation networks and point defects like voids and interstitial imperfections are the main flux line pinning centers in the Mo100-xRex alloys in the intermediate fields, i.e., in the "small bundle" flux line pinning regime. In this regime, the critical current density is also quite robust against increasing magnetic field. In still higher fields, the critical current density is affected by flux creep. In the low field regime, on the other hand, the pinning of the flux lines seems to be influenced by the presence of two superconducting energy gaps in the Mo100-xRex alloys. This modifies the field dependence of critical current density, and also seems to contribute to the asymmetry in the magnetic irreversibility exhibited by the isothermal field dependence of magnetization.

  11. Active-Region Twist Derived from Magnetic Tongues and Linear Force-Free Extrapolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Démoulin, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to compare the amount of twist present in emerging active regions (ARs) from photospheric and coronal data. We use linear force-free field models of the observed coronal structure of ARs to determine the global twist. The coronal twist is derived, on one hand, from the force-free parameter [α] of the model and, on the other, from the computed coronal magnetic helicity normalized by the magnetic flux squared. We compare our results, for the same set of ARs, with those of Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015), in which the twist was estimated using the so-called magnetic tongues observed in line-of-sight magnetograms during AR emergence. We corroborate the agreement between the photospheric and coronal twist-sign and the presence of magnetic tongues as an early proxy of the AR non-potentiality. We find a globally linear relationship between the coronal twist and the one previously deduced for the emerging AR flux rope at the photospheric level. The coronal-twist value is typically lower by a factor of six than the one deduced for the emerging flux rope. We interpret this result as due to the partial emergence of the flux rope that forms the region.

  12. Structure of Non-force-free Magnetic Flux Ropes in an Ambient Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2012-12-01

    The structure of non-force-free equilibrium magnetic flux ropes in an ambient medium of specified pressure pa is studied. A flux rope is a self-organized magnetized plasma structure consisting of a localized channel of electric current and the magnetic field arising from this current. An analytic method is developed to obtain one-dimensional equilibrium solutions satisfying c -1 J × B - ∇p = 0 subject to the requirements that (1) all physical quantities be nonsingular and continuous, (2) pressure p(r) be physically admissible—real and non-negative, and (3) the magnetic field profile have "minimum complexity." The solutions are shown to be characterized by two parameters, B^*_t \\equiv \\bar{B}_t/(8\\pi p_a)^{1/2} and B* p ≡ Bpa /(8πpa )1/2, where \\bar{B}_t is the toroidal (axial) field averaged over the cross-sectional radius a and Bpa is the poloidal (azimuthal) field at the edge of the current channel (r = a). The physical constraint on pressure defines equilibrium boundaries in the B* t -B* p space beyond which no physical solutions exist. The method is illustrated with a number of families of solutions governed by distinct physical constraints. The force-free limit with pa ≠ 0 is investigated and is found to be characterized by plasma β = ∞. The local Alfvén speed VA and plasma β are computed. The results are scale-invariant.

  13. A method for embedding circular force-free flux ropes in potential magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V. S.; Török, T.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for constructing approximate force-free equilibria in pre-eruptive configurations in which a thin force-free flux rope is embedded into a locally bipolar-type potential magnetic field. The flux rope is assumed to have a circular-arc axis, a circular cross-section, and electric current that is either concentrated in a thin layer at the boundary of the rope or smoothly distributed across it with a maximum of the current density at the center. The entire solution is described in terms of the magnetic vector potential in order to facilitate the implementation of the method in numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes that evolve the vector potential rather than the magnetic field itself. The parameters of the flux rope can be chosen so that its subsequent MHD relaxation under photospheric line-tied boundary conditions leads to nearly exact numerical equilibria. To show the capabilities of our method, we apply it to several cases with different ambient magnetic fields and internal flux-rope structures. These examples demonstrate that the proposed method is a useful tool for initializing data-driven simulations of solar eruptions.

  14. ON THE STABILITY OF NON-FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC EQUILIBRIA IN STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Duez, V.; Braithwaite, J.; Mathis, S.

    2010-11-20

    The existence of stable magnetic configurations in white dwarfs, neutron stars, and various non-convective stellar regions is now well recognized. It has recently been shown numerically that various families of equilibria, including axisymmetric mixed poloidal-toroidal configurations, are stable. Here we test the stability of an analytically derived non-force-free magnetic equilibrium resulting from an initial relaxation (self-organization) process, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations: the obtained mixed configuration is compared with the dynamical evolution of its purely poloidal and purely toroidal components, both known to be unstable. The mixed equilibrium shows no sign of instability under white noise perturbations. This configuration therefore provides a good description of magnetic equilibrium topology inside non-convective stellar objects and will be useful to initialize magneto-rotational transport in stellar evolution codes and in multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  15. Effect of size and geometry on levitation force measurements between permanent magnets and high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rossing, T.D. )

    1991-11-15

    A series of experiments measuring the levitation force between a permanent magnet (PM) and a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and between pairs of PMs, coupled with finite-element calculations of the forces and fields, has identified factors that influence the levitation force. The self-demagnetizing factor within the HTS and, to some extent, within the PM has a profound effect on magnetic pressure. For large HTSs with strong flux-pinning, the demagnetizing effect of the diamagnetic image of the PM is substantial. For short distances between the HTS and PM, compression of magnetic flux produces a dependence on PM diameter.

  16. Influence of spin rate on side force of an axisymmetric body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study in which a 10-deg half-angle pointed cone model 57.9 cm long and made of magnesium (for lightness and minimization of inertial effects) is spun at several rates about its axis of symmetry. The model is spun in both directions, but most of the data presented are for the counterclockwise rotation. The resulting side force is recorded on an oscillograph. It is shown that the side force observed occurs under conditions of spin about the longitudinal axis, and that the general shape of the side-force curve with roll position does not depend strongly on spin rate. However, the peak-to-peak value of side force decreases substantially with spin rate, suggesting that the vortices producing the side force require a significant amount of time to change position and/or strength.

  17. Current evaluation of hydraulics to replace the cable force transmission system for body-powered upper-limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, M

    1990-01-01

    Present body-powered upper-limb prostheses use a cable control system employing World War II aircraft technology to transmit force from the body to the prosthesis for operation. The cable and associated hardware are located outside the prosthesis. Because individuals with arm amputations want prostheses that are natural looking with a smooth, soft outer surface, a design and development project was undertaken to replace the cable system with hydraulics located inside the prosthesis. Three different hydraulic transmission systems were built for evaluation, and other possibilities were explored. Results indicate that a hydraulic force transmission system remains an unmet challenge as a practical replacement for the cable system. The author was unable to develop a hydraulic system that meets the necessary dynamic requirements and is acceptable in size and appearance. PMID:10149042

  18. Connecting neutron star observations to three-body forces in neutron matter and to the nuclear symmetry energy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, A W; Gandolfi, S

    2012-02-24

    Using a phenomenological form of the equation of state of neutron matter near the saturation density which has been previously demonstrated to be a good characterization of quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that currently available neutron star mass and radius measurements provide a significant constraint on the equation of state of neutron matter. At higher densities we model the equation of state by using polytropes and a quark matter model. We show that observations offer an important constraint on the strength of the three-body force in neutron matter, and thus some theoretical models of the three-body force may be ruled out by currently available astrophysical data. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter and its slope that can be directly compared to the experiment and other theoretical calculations. PMID:22463511

  19. Optical atomic magnetometer at body temperature for magnetic particle imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nissa C; Yu, Dindi; Yao, Li; Xu, Shoujun

    2010-03-01

    Optical atomic magnetometers are often bulky and operate at elevated temperatures that impose restrictions on studying biological samples. Here we report a miniaturized Cs-based magnetometer, in contrast to conventionally used K- and Rb-based ones, with high sensitivity. The magnetic shield employed is more compact, and the optimal operation temperature of 37 degrees C is lower than previous magnetometers and is suitable for biological research. Applications include scanning magnetic imaging of functionalized magnetic particles and nuclear magnetic resonance of water. We reveal that the stability and sensitivity of the apparatus are not significantly affected by the absence of a laser stabilization device. PMID:20195311

  20. Magnetism and mineralogy of Almahata Sitta polymict ureilite (= asteroid 2008 TC3): Implications for the ureilite parent body magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Viktor H.; Hochleitner, Rupert; Torii, Masayuki; Funaki, Minoru; Mikouchi, Takashi; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Jenniskens, Peter; Shaddad, Muawia H.

    2011-10-01

    The Almahata Sitta meteorite is the first case of recovered extraterrestrial material originating from an asteroid that was detected in near Earth space shortly before entering and exploding in the high atmosphere. The aims of our project within the 2008 TC3 consortium were investigating Almahata Sitta's (AS) magnetic signature, phase composition and mineralogy, focussing on the opaque minerals, and gaining new insights into the magnetism of the ureilite parent body (UPB). We report on the general magnetic properties and behavior of Almahata Sitta and try to place the results in context with the existing data set on ureilites and ureilite parent body models. The magnetic signature of AS is dominated by a set of low-Ni kamacites with large grain sizes. Additional contributions come from micron-sized kamacites, suessite, (Cr) troilite, and daubreelite, mainly found in the olivine grains adjacent to carbon-rich veins. Our results show that the paleomagnetic signal is of extraterrestrial origin as can be seen by comparing with laboratory produced magnetic records (IRM). Four types of kamacite (I-IV) have been recognized in the sample. The elemental composition of the ureilite vein metal Kamacite I (particularly Co) clearly differs from the other kamacites (II-IV), which are considered to be indigenous. Element ratios of kamacite I indicate that it was introduced into the UPB by an impactor, supporting the conclusions of Gabriel and Pack (2009).

  1. Quantitative magnetic resonance analysis and a morphometric predictive model reveal lean body mass changes in migrating Nearctic-Neotropical passerines.

    PubMed

    Seewagen, Chad L; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2011-04-01

    Most studies of lean mass dynamics in free-living passerine birds have focused on Old World species at geographical barriers where they are challenged to make the longest non-stop flight of their migration. We examined lean mass variation in New World passerines in an area where the distribution of stopover habitat does not require flights to exceed more than a few hours and most migrants stop flying well before fat stores near exhaustion. We used either quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) analysis or a morphometric model to measure or estimate, respectively, the fat and lean body mass of migrants during stopovers in New York, USA. With these data, we examined (1) variance in total body mass explained by lean body mass, (2) hourly rates of fat and lean body mass change in single-capture birds, and (3) net changes in fat and lean mass in recaptured birds. Lean mass contributed to 50% of the variation in total body mass among white-throated sparrows Zonotrichia albicollis and hermit thrushes Catharus guttatus. Lean mass of refueling gray catbirds Dumetella carolinensis and white-throated sparrows, respectively, increased 1.123 and 0.320 g h(-1). Lean mass of ovenbirds Seiurus aurocapillus accounted for an estimated 33-40% of hourly gains in total body mass. On average 35% of the total mass gained among recaptured birds was lean mass. Substantial changes in passerine lean mass are not limited to times when birds are forced to make long, non-stop flights across barriers. Protein usage during migration is common across broad taxonomic groups, migration systems, and migration strategies. PMID:21079970

  2. Magnetic Boundary Conditions at Non-Conducting Planetary Bodies: Applications to Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, J.; Duling, S.; Seufert, M.; Wicht, J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of planetary bodies with their surrounding magnetized plasma can often be described with the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equations, which are commonly solved by numerical models. For these models it is necessary to define physically correct boundary conditions. Many planetary bodies have electrically non-conductive surfaces, which do not allow electric current to penetrate their surfaces. Magnetic boundary conditions, which correctly consider that the associated radial electric current at the planetary surface is zero, are however difficult to implement because they include the curl of the magnetic field. Here we derive new boundary conditions for the magnetic field at non-conducting surfaces by a decomposition of the magnetic field in poloidal and toroidal components and their spherical harmonics expansions. We find that the toroidal part of the magnetic field needs to vanish at the surface of the isolator. For the spectral spherical harmonics coefficients of the poloidal part we derive a Cauchy boundary condition, which includes the Gauss coefficients of a possible intrinsic field. Our non-conducting boundary condition can thus additionally include intrinsic dynamo fields as well as induction fields within electrically conductive subsurface layers such as subsurface oceans. We implement the new boundary condition in the MHD simulation code ZEUS-MP using spherical geometry. We apply these new magnetic boundary conditions to a model for Ganymede's plasma environment. With this model we can describe the in-situ observations by the Galileo spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope observations of Ganmyede's aurora very well.

  3. N-body model of magnetic flux tubes reconnecting in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, L.; Berrilli, F.; Del Moro, D.; Scardigli, S.; Consolini, G.; Stangalini, M.; Giannattasio, F.; Caroli, A.; Pucci, F.; Penza, V.

    2016-02-01

    The investigation of dynamics of the small scale magnetic field on the Sun photosphere is necessary to understand the physical processes occurring in the higher layers of solar atmosphere due to the magnetic coupling between the photosphere and the corona. We present a simulation able to address these phenomena investigating the statistics of magnetic loops reconnections. The simulation is based on N-body model approach and is divided in two computational layers. We simplify the convection problem, interpreting the larger convective scale, mesogranulation, as the result of the collective interaction of convective downflow of granular scale. The N-body advection model is the base to generate a synthetic time series of nanoflares produced by interacting magnetic loops. The reconnection of magnetic field lines is the result of the advection of the magnetic footpoints following the velocity field generated by the interacting downflows. The model gives a quantitative idea of how much energy is expected to be released by the reconfiguration of magnetic loops in the quiet Sun.

  4. Scaling the energy conversion rate from magnetic field reconnection to different bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Mozer, F. S.; Hull, A.

    2010-10-15

    Magnetic field reconnection is often invoked to explain electromagnetic energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres, stellar coronae, and other astrophysical objects. Because of the huge dynamic range of magnetic fields in these bodies, it is important to understand energy conversion as a function of magnetic field strength and related parameters. It is conjectured theoretically and shown experimentally that the energy conversion rate per unit area in reconnection scales as the cube of an appropriately weighted magnetic field strength divided by the square root of an appropriately weighted density. With this functional dependence, the energy release in flares on the Sun, the large and rapid variation of the magnetic flux in the tail of Mercury, and the apparent absence of reconnection on Jupiter and Saturn, may be understood. Electric fields at the perihelion of the Solar Probe Plus mission may be tens of V/m.

  5. Intraoral conversion of occlusal force to electricity and magnetism by biting of piezoelectric elements.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Takashi; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Sano, Natsuki; Ogura, Hideo; Terada, Kazuto

    2012-01-01

    Very weak electrical, magnetic and ultrasound signal stimulations are known to promote the formation, metabolism, restoration and stability of bone and surrounding tissues after treatment and operations. We have therefore investigated the possibility of intraoral generation of electricity and magnetism by occlusal force in an in vitro study. Biting bimorph piezoelectric elements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) using dental models generated appropriate magnetism for bone formation, i. e. 0.5-0.6 gauss, and lower electric currents and higher voltages, i. e. 2.0-6.0 μA at 10-22 V (appropriate levels are 30 μA and 1.25 V), as observed by a universal testing machine. The electric currents and voltages could be changed using amplifier circuits. These results show that intraoral generation of electricity and magnetism is possible and could provide post-operative stabilization and activation of treated areas of bone and the surrounding tissues directly and/or indirectly by electrical, magnetic and ultrasound stimulation, which could accelerate healing. PMID:23207207

  6. Current sheet formation in a sheared force-free-magnetic field. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study showing how continuous shearing motion of magnetic footpoints in a tenuous, infinitely conducting plasma can lead to the development of current sheets, despite the absence of such sheets or even of neutral points in the initial state. The calculations discussed here verify the earlier suggestion by Low and Wolfson (1988) that extended current sheets should form due to the shearing of a force-free quadrupolar magnetic field. More generally, this work augments earlier studies suggesting that the appearance of discontinuities - current sheets - may be a necessary consequence of the topological invariance imposed on the magnetic field geometry of an ideal MHD system by virtue of its infinite conductivity. In the context of solar physics, the work shows how the gradual and continuous motion of magnetic footpoints at the solar photosphere may lead to the buildup of magnetic energy that can then be released explosively when finite conductivity effects become important and lead to the rapid dissipation of current sheets. Such energy release may be important in solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and other eruptive events.

  7. A Sound Mind in a Sound Body: That's the Philosophy behind This Classical Greek Magnet School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    Central City High School, Kansas City, Missouri, has found its identity in the past. As part of comprehensive desegregation program, this magnet school offers its students classical Greek program that, like ancient Greek civilization, calls for as much attention to body as to mind. The costly Olympic athletic program and classical Greek curriculum…

  8. Gender differences in vestibular modulation of body mass in altered force environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Charles; Fuller, Patrick; Hoban-Higgins, Tana; Fuller, Charles

    Body mass regulation is affected by the gravitational environment. Gravitational and linear acceleration information is transduced by the vestibular macular receptors. In addition, there are gender differences in the regulation of body mass and composition. This study therefore investigated the role of the vestibular system in the regulation of body mass in age-matched male and female rats. Four groups of male and female rats were established. A 1G and a 2G labyrinthectomized experimental group (Labx) and a 1G and 2G control group (Con). Labyrinthectomies were accomplished by trans-tympanic injection of sodium arsanilate to remove vestibular input. Control groups experienced the same surgical procedures, but with a saline control injection. Body mass and food and water consumption data were collected twice weekly. Baseline data were collected prior to surgery. There was a decrease in body mass following chemical labyrinthectomy in both male and female rats. A recovery period followed surgery to allow for the re-establishment of stable growth curves. Body mass of female experimental rats returned to the same levels as the female controls while male labyrinthectomized rats continued to regulate body mass at a lower level. All 2G groups were exposed to 8 weeks of 2G produced via centrifugation while all control groups remained at 1G. All 2G groups decreased body mass at the onset of centrifugation, with experimental groups having a smaller response than the controls. Males continued to maintain body mass at a lower level under 2G, while, again body mass of the females returned to levels similar to controls. At the conclusion of the eight week centrifugation period, all four female groups had a similar body mass while differences were evident between male groups. Overall, 1G males had a higher body mass than did males exposed to 2G. Within G levels, 1G controls were heavier than 1G Labx and, in contrast, at 2G Labx had a larger body mass than controls. (Supported by NASA Grant NNA07CN33G.)

  9. Energy expectation value of the two-pion-exchange three-body force in the triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bömelburg, A.

    1983-07-01

    The energetic shift caused by the two-pion-exchange three-nucleon force in the triton is estimated in first order perturbation theory. The triton wave function ψ is gained through a Faddeev calculation using the Reid potential. Within the restricted presentation of ψ strong cancellations between terms of the order of 1 MeV lead to an unimportant small effect. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Energy expectation value of the two-pion-exchange three-nuclear force, Faddeev calculation.

  10. Magnetic fabrics analysis of the Outokumpu serpentinite body in the upper crust of Eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, F.; Kontny, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    The terrane boundary between the Archaic and Proterozoic shield in Eastern Finland is characterized by high magnetic anomalies. The anomalies which occur in the Outokumpu (OKU) area (boundary region) are probably related to heterogenic rock bodies which contain beside black schist, skarn and quartz rocks also serpentinized mantle material. This assemblage is called the OKU formation and is also the host rock of the famous Outokumpu-type massive Cu-Zn-Co-Ni-(Au-Ag) sulfide deposits. In the aeromagnetic total field anomaly map of this region banded magnetic anomalies are recognized which are related to differently magnetized, gently towards SE dipping rocks of the OKU assemblage. From reflection seismic data, these SE dipping sequences are assumed to bend more horizontal at depth and cause a prominent seismic reflector and magnetic anomaly between 1314 and 1515 m depth, enclosed by paramagnetic mica schist rocks. This rock body was drilled trough by the continuously cored 2516 m deep OKU Deep Drill Hole. The partially extremely high magnetic anomalies are related to serpentine units in the OKU assemblage. The main magnetic minerals are magnetite and pyrrhotite. Three areas with high magnetic anomalies are located along the drilled profile of the OKU assemblage body, with values of magnetic susceptibility (k) up to 193*10-3 SI, at the top (1328 - 1364 m) and bottom (1466 - 1473 m), as well in the centre (1408 - 1432 m), separated by paramagnetic rock units. Analyses of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) were done to determine the magnetic fabric and to examine deformation mechanism of the OKU body during the collisional deformation event 1.9 Ga ago. AMS data reveal magnetic fabrics at the top and the bottom of the OKU formation with well defined magnetic axes (kmax, kmin) and a nearly horizontal magnetic foliation, which is subparallel to the macroscopic foliation (mostly defined by talc minerals). Low- and high-field AMS measurements showed that ferri- and paramagnetic subfabrics are coaxial. The anisotropy values (P’) in these areas are partially high and range between 1.3 and 2.4 at the top and between 1.4 - 3.6 at the bottom anomaly, while the shape factor (T) trends to more oblate shapes (T > 0). The central anomaly shows the highest magnetic susceptibility, which is related to a high content of magnetite and pyrrhotite, mostly concentrated in huge aggregates and veins. Some of the samples show extremely high P’ values up to 5.6. The AMS ellipsoids vary strongly between prolate and oblate shapes in this area, but trend to oblate shapes towards higher k values. The magnetic susceptibility axes are not as well defined as those from the top and bottom units. The paramagnetic units of altered metaperidotites (talc-carbonate rocks) in the OKU assemblage show also mostly triaxial magnetic fabrics, and low P’ values (<1.4) with a high variation of T from prolate to oblate shapes. These results probably indicate high strain zones at the boundaries of the OKU body during the emplacement in the upper crust and therefore an alignment of magnetic minerals parallel to the structural foliation. In the center of the OKU assemblage no completely alignment of magnetite minerals took place because of less strong sheer stresses.

  11. Fully Suspended, Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig With Forced Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Jansen, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig, a significant advancement in the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under rotating and nonrotating conditions in a vacuum. The rig has as its critical components three magnetic bearings: two heteropolar radial active magnetic bearings and a magnetic thrust bearing. The bearing configuration allows full vertical rotor magnetic suspension along with a feed-forward control feature, which will enable the excitation of various natural blade modes in bladed disk test articles. The theoretical, mechanical, electrical, and electronic aspects of the rig are discussed. Also presented are the forced-excitation results of a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, unbladed rotor and a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, bladed rotor in which a pair of blades was arranged 180 degrees apart from each other. These tests include the bounce mode excitation of the rotor in which the rotor was excited at the blade natural frequency of 144 Hz. The rotor natural mode frequency of 355 Hz was discerned from the plot of acceleration versus frequency. For nonrotating blades, a blade-tip excitation amplitude of approximately 100 g/A was achieved at the first-bending critical (approximately 144 Hz) and at the first-torsional and second-bending blade modes. A blade-tip displacement of 70 mils was achieved at the first-bending critical by exciting the blades at a forced-excitation phase angle of 908 relative to the vertical plane containing the blades while simultaneously rotating the shaft at 3000 rpm.

  12. Bipolar solar magnetic fields. Behaviors resulting from a nonlinear force-free equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.; Lerche, I.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Understanding magnetic fields in the solar corona is closely related to the complex nature of the often nonlinear differential equations describing such structures. Based on the ansatz of force-free fields, a class of solutions is derived and discussed that allows for axisymmetric bipolar magnetic fields. Methods: Allowed dipolar solutions for self-similar axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields use the formalism of a Grad-Shafranov equation involving the vector potential. For separable solutions involving poloidal fields decaying radially as r-n, there are no dipolar field structures for the decay index n ≥ 1 . Results: In the domain n < 1 dipolar field structures are possible in restricted ranges of the angular coordinate θ depending on the value for n. Outside of the restricted domains there are no dipolar solutions, but there can be multipole solutions. The limiting case of the parameter n → 0 has been discussed previously, so that now the full regime 0 ≤ n < ∞ is covered.

  13. Levitation force and stability of superconducting linear bearings using NdFeB and ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, R. M.; de Andrade, R.; dos Santos, G. C.; Neves, M. A.; Nicolsky, R.

    2003-04-01

    In the frame of a project on the development of a reduced-scale-levitating rail-vehicle prototype, the performance of two different permanent magnets have been tested in linear bearings using YBa 2Cu 3O 7- y bulk superconductors. The levitation forces, the stiffness and the vibration damping have been measured using two different rail assemblies: one mounted with NdFeB magnets and another with ferrite ones. The levitation force of the NdFeB rail is more than one order of magnitude larger than that of the ferrite one. The stiffness of those linear bearing and the vibration damping were measured for several cooling heights from the rail. The stiffness increases with the decrease of the cooling height and is larger in the NdFeB rail. The vibration damping is rather low in both systems. Finally, we conclude that the NdFeB magnets are the most suitable for applications on linear levitating bearings.

  14. Mapping magnetized geologic structures from space: The effect of orbital and body parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.; Taylor, P. T.; Langel, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    When comparing previous satellite magnetometer missions (such as MAGSAT) with proposed new programs (for example, Geopotential Research Mission, GRM) it is important to quantify the difference in scientific information obtained. The ability to resolve separate magnetic blocks (simulating geological units) is used as a parameter for evaluating the expected geologic information from each mission. The effect of satellite orbital altitude on the ability to resolve two magnetic blocks with varying separations is evaluated and quantified. A systematic, nonlinear, relationship exists between resolution and distance between magnetic blocks as a function of orbital altitude. The proposed GRM would provide an order-of-magnitude greater anomaly resolution than the earlier MAGSAT mission for widely separated bodies. The resolution achieved at any particular altitude varies depending on the location of the bodies and orientation.

  15. Estimating Three-Dimensional Orientation of Human Body Parts by Inertial/Magnetic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D) space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation. PMID:22319365

  16. Towards an on-chip platform for the controlled application of forces via magnetic particles: A novel device for mechanobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticelli, M.; Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.; Conca, D. V.; Falcone, M.; Sharma, P. P.; Bertacco, R.

    2015-05-01

    In-vitro tests and analyses are of fundamental importance for investigating biological mechanisms in cells and bio-molecules. The controlled application of forces to activate specific bio-pathways and investigate their effects, mimicking the role of the cellular environment, is becoming a prominent approach in this field. In this work, we present a non-invasive magnetic on-chip platform which allows for the manipulation of magnetic particles, through micrometric magnetic conduits of Permalloy patterned on-chip. We show, from simulations and experiments, that this technology permits to exert a finely controlled force on magnetic beads along the chip surface. This force can be tuned from few to hundreds pN by applying a variable external magnetic field.

  17. Hypervelocity impacts and magnetization of small bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Guangqing; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Hide, Raymond

    1995-01-01

    The observed magnetism of asteroids such as Gaspra and Ida (and other small bodies in the solar system including the Moon and meteorites) may have resulted from an impact-induced shock wave producing a thermodynamic state in which iron-nickel alloy, dispersed in a silicate matrix, is driven from the usual low-temperature, low-pressure, alpha, kaemacite, phase to the paramagnetic, epsilon (hcp), phase. The magnetization was acquired upon rarefaction and reentry into the ferromagnetic, alpha, structure. The degree of remagnetization depends on the strength of the ambient field, which may have been associated with a Solar-System-wide magnetic field. A transient field induced by the impact event itself may have resulted in a significant, or possibly, even a dominant contribution, as well. The scaling law of Housen et al. (Housen, K. R., R. M. Schmidt, and K. A. Holsapple 1991) for catastrophic asteroid impact disaggregation imposes a constraint on the degree to which small planetary bodies may be magnetized and yet survive fragmentation by the same event. Our modeling results show it is possible that Ida was magnetized when a large impact fractured a 125 +/- 22-km-radius protoasteroid to form the Koronis family. Similarly, we calculate that Gaspra could be a magnetized fragment of a 45 +/- 15 km-radius protoasteroid.

  18. Multiple degree-of-freedom force and moment measurement for static propulsion testing using magnetic suspension technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Keith; Bartosh, Blake

    1993-01-01

    Innovative Information Systems (IIS), Inc. is in the process of designing and fabricating a high bandwidth force and moment measuring device (i.e. the Magnetic Thruster Test Stand). This device will use active magnetic suspension to allow direct measurements of the forces and torques generated by the rocket engines of the missile under test. The principle of operation of the Magnetic Thruster Test Stand (MTTS) is based on the ability to perform very precise, high bandwidth force and position measurements on an object suspended in a magnetic field. This ability exists due to the fact that the digital servo control mechanism that performs the magnetic suspension uses high bandwidth (10 kHz) position data (via an eddy-current proximity sensor) to determine the amount of force required to maintain stable suspension at a particular point. This force is converted into required electromagnet coil current, which is then output to a current amplifier driving the coils. A discussion of how the coil current and magnetic gap distance (the distance between the electromagnet and the object being suspended) is used to determine the forces being applied from the suspended assembly is presented.

  19. Reassessment of the body forces in a He atmospheric-pressure plasma jet: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. I.; Bradley, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    Using a fully self-consistent fluid model, the impact of the plasma on the background gas flow in an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet (He-APPJ) impinging ambient air is investigated through determination of the electrohydrodynamic forces (EHD forces) and gas heating effects. Three gas flow compositions have been considered: a pure helium flow, a helium flow with 2% O2 admixture, and a helium flow with 2% N2 admixture. In all cases, results show that the plasma mainly affects background flow through localized heating, which creates a pressure gradient force acting to increase the flow velocity at the exit of the capillary by approximately 1 to 3 ms-1. The EHD forces on the other hand disturb the flow only slightly. Discharges with O2 and N2 admixtures exhibit increased gas heating and EHD forces. This is attributed to the extra rotational and vibrational excitation states available, coupling electron energy to the background gas. The findings here indicate that a significant increase in the Reynold number as a result of the presence of the plasma is an unlikely explanation for plasma-induced turbulence, observed in atmospheric plasma jet discharges.

  20. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ~12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  1. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ˜12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  2. The Influence of Lorentz Force on Vacuum Arc Behaviors with AN Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S. H.; Lee, H. G.; Choi, M. J.; Kwon, J. R.; Kim, Y. J.

    The necessity of the vacuum interrupters (VIs) has been widely recognized on switching and controlling the fault currents in medium voltage level. An axial magnetic field (AMF) electrode has more advantages of the switching capability than other contact designs such as securing higher current value for transferring from the constriction arc to the diffuse. The heat flux and the local temperature on the electrode are increased by arc constriction, which is influenced by Lorentz force. It has undesirable influence on the characteristics of vacuum arc. In this study, we simulated the influence of Lorentz force on vacuum arc behaviors with an AMF electrode by using a commercial FEM package, ANSYS. The vacuum arc has been modeled with the sequential coupling method of two different fields, which are on the electromagnetic and thermal-flow. Arc constriction with various applied currents could be predicted with the results of temperature distribution.

  3. MeV scale leptonic force for cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Fumihiro; Ota, Toshihiko; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Characteristic patterns of cosmic neutrino spectrum reported by the IceCube Collaboration and long-standing inconsistency between theory and experiment in muon anomalous magnetic moment are simultaneously explained by an extra leptonic force mediated by a gauge field with a mass of the MeV scale. With different assumptions for redshift distribution of cosmic neutrino sources, diffuse neutrino flux is calculated with the scattering between cosmic neutrino and cosmic neutrino background through the new leptonic force. Our analysis sheds light on a relation among lepton physics at the three different scales, PeV, MeV, and eV, and provides possible clues to the distribution of sources of cosmic neutrino and also to neutrino mass spectrum.

  4. Asymptotic forms for the energy of force-free magnetic field ion figurations of translational symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Klinchuk, J. A.; Roumeliotis, G.

    1994-01-01

    It is known from computer calculations that if a force-free magnetic field configuration is stressed progressively by footpoint displacements, the configuration expands and approaches the open configuration with the same surface flux distribution and the energy of the field increases progressively. For configurations of translationalsymmetry, it has been found empirically that the energy tends asymptotically to a certain functional form. It is here shown that analysis of a simple model of the asymptotic form of force-free fields of translational symmetry leads to and therefore justifies this functional form. According to this model, the field evolves in a well-behaved manner with no indication of instability or loss of equilibrium.

  5. Lorentz Force on Sodium and Chlorine Ions in a Salt Water Solution Flow under a Transverse Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that, by applying elementary concepts in electromagnetism and electrochemistry to a system consisting of salt water flowing in a thin rectangular pipe at an average velocity v[subscript A] under the influence of a transverse magnetic field B[subscript 0], an electromotive force generator can be conceived. In fact, the Lorentz force

  6. A continuum body force sensor designed for flexible surgical robotics devices.

    PubMed

    Noh, Yohan; Secco, Emanuele Lindo; Sareh, Sina; Wurdemann, Helge; Faragasso, Angela; Back, Junghwan; Liu, Hongbin; Sklar, Elizabeth; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel three-axis force sensor based on optical photo interrupters and integrated with the robot arm STIFF-FLOP (STIFFness controllable Flexible and Learnable Manipulator for Surgical Operations) to measure external interacting forces and torques. The ring-shape bio-compatible sensor presented here embeds the distributed actuation and sensing system of the STIFF-FLOP manipulator and is applicable to the geometry of its structure as well to the structure of any other similar soft robotic manipulator. Design and calibration procedures of the device are introduced: experimental results allow defining a stiffness sensor matrix for real-time estimation of force and torque components and confirm the usefulness of the proposed optical sensing approach. PMID:25570797

  7. Novel system for bite-force sensing and monitoring based on magnetic near field communication.

    PubMed

    Lantada, Andres Diaz; Bris, Carlos González; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Maudes, Jesús Sanz

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral devices for bite-force sensing have several applications in odontology and maxillofacial surgery, as bite-force measurements provide additional information to help understand the characteristics of bruxism disorders and can also be of help for the evaluation of post-surgical evolution and for comparison of alternative treatments. A new system for measuring human bite forces is proposed in this work. This system has future applications for the monitoring of bruxism events and as a complement for its conventional diagnosis. Bruxism is a pathology consisting of grinding or tight clenching of the upper and lower teeth, which leads to several problems such as lesions to the teeth, headaches, orofacial pain and important disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The prototype uses a magnetic field communication scheme similar to low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) technology (NFC). The reader generates a low-frequency magnetic field that is used as the information carrier and powers the sensor. The system is notable because it uses an intra-mouth passive sensor and an external interrogator, which remotely records and processes information regarding a patient's dental activity. This permits a quantitative assessment of bite-force, without requiring intra-mouth batteries, and can provide supplementary information to polysomnographic recordings, current most adequate early diagnostic method, so as to initiate corrective actions before irreversible dental wear appears. In addition to describing the system's operational principles and the manufacture of personalized prototypes, this report will also demonstrate the feasibility of the system and results from the first in vitro and in vivo trials. PMID:23112669

  8. Novel System for Bite-Force Sensing and Monitoring Based on Magnetic Near Field Communication

    PubMed Central

    Lantada, Andres Diaz; Bris, Carlos González; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Maudes, Jesús Sanz

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral devices for bite-force sensing have several applications in odontology and maxillofacial surgery, as bite-force measurements provide additional information to help understand the characteristics of bruxism disorders and can also be of help for the evaluation of post-surgical evolution and for comparison of alternative treatments. A new system for measuring human bite forces is proposed in this work. This system has future applications for the monitoring of bruxism events and as a complement for its conventional diagnosis. Bruxism is a pathology consisting of grinding or tight clenching of the upper and lower teeth, which leads to several problems such as lesions to the teeth, headaches, orofacial pain and important disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The prototype uses a magnetic field communication scheme similar to low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) technology (NFC). The reader generates a low-frequency magnetic field that is used as the information carrier and powers the sensor. The system is notable because it uses an intra-mouth passive sensor and an external interrogator, which remotely records and processes information regarding a patient's dental activity. This permits a quantitative assessment of bite-force, without requiring intra-mouth batteries, and can provide supplementary information to polysomnographic recordings, current most adequate early diagnostic method, so as to initiate corrective actions before irreversible dental wear appears. In addition to describing the system's operational principles and the manufacture of personalized prototypes, this report will also demonstrate the feasibility of the system and results from the first in vitro and in vivo trials. PMID:23112669

  9. Measurement and calculation of levitation forces between magnets and granular superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, T. H.; Bratsberg, H.; Baziljevich, M.; Hetland, P. O.; Riise, A. B.

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments indicate that exploitation of the phenomenon of magnetic levitation may become one of the most important near-term applications of high-T(sub c) superconductivity. Because of this, the interaction between a strong permanent magnet(PM) and bulk high-T(sub c) superconductor (HTSC) is currently a subject of much interest. We have studied central features of the mechanics of PM-HTSC systems of simple geometries. Here we report experimental results for the components of the levitation force, their associated stiffness and mechanical ac-loss. To analyze the observed behavior a theoretical framework based on critical-state considerations is developed. It will be shown that all the mechanical properties can be explained consistently at a quantitative level wing a minimum of model parameters.

  10. Measurement and calculation of levitation forces between magnets and granular superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, T.H.; Bratsberg, H.; Baziljevich, M.; Hetland, P.O.; Riise, A.B.

    1995-04-01

    Recent developments indicate that exploitation of the phenomenon of magnetic levitation may become one of the most important near-term applications of high-T{sub c} superconductivity. Because of this, the interaction between a strong permanent magnet (PM) and bulk high-T{sub c} superconductor (HTSC) is currently a subject of much interest. The authors have studied central features of the mechanics of PM-HTSC systems of simple geometries. Here they report experimental results for the components of the levitation force, their associated stiffness and mechanical ac-loss. To analyze the observed behavior a theoretical framework based on critical-state considerations is developed. It will be shown that all the mechanical properties can be explained consistently at a quantitative level using a minimum of model parameters.

  11. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Magnetite Thin Films with Transition Metal Buffer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alfred Kh.; Monti, Mark C.; Markert, John T.; de Lozanne, Alex; Jayathilaka, Priyanga B.; Bauer, Chris A.; Miller, Casey W.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O4) has been the subject of interest as a material for use in spin devices. Its ideal properties for this application break down in thin film morphologies due to the occurrence of antiphase boundaries (APBs). The density of APBs can be adjusted to some degree via film strain. This is accomplished in this work by including a variety of transition metal buffer layers between Fe 3 O4 and its MgO substrate. We investigate the microscale magnetic domain structure via magnetic force microscopy of Fe 3 O4 films on MgO with no, a Mo, or an Fe buffer layer across a temperature range surrounding the Verwey temperature (TV ~ 120 K) and compare to bulk measurements from a SQUID magnetometer. Supported by NSF-ECCS (USF), NSF-DMR (UT), NSF-IGERT (UT), and the Welch Foundation (UT).

  12. Outflow and plasma acceleration in Titan's induced magnetotail: Evidence of magnetic tension forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, N.; Modolo, R.; Dubinin, E.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Bertucci, C.; Wahlund, J. E.; Leblanc, F.; Canu, P.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Waite, H.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D.; Coates, A.; Dougherty, M.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini plasma wave and particle observations are combined with magnetometer measurements to study Titan's induced magnetic tail. In this study, we report and analyze the plasma acceleration in Titan's induced magnetotail observed in flybys T17, T19, and T40. Radio and Plasma Wave Science observations show regions of cold plasma with electron densities between 0.1 and a few tens of electrons per cubic centimeter. The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS)-ion mass spectrometer (IMS) measurements suggest that ionospheric plasma in this region is composed of ions with masses ranging from 15 to 17 amu and from 28 to 31 amu. From these measurements, we determine the bulk velocity of the plasma and the Alfvén velocity in Titan's tail region. Finally, a Walén test of such measurements suggest that the progressive acceleration of the ionospheric plasma shown by CAPS can be interpreted in terms of magnetic tension forces.

  13. Microscopic ESR study of N@C60 using a Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Fong, K. C.; Lee, I. H.; Hammel, P. C.; Harneit, W.

    2007-03-01

    We report electron spin resonance studies of the endohedral fullerene N@C60 using the novel technique of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). These studies are performed at temperatures down to 1 K on both thin films of N@C60 and in samples where the endohedral fullerene is incorporated into a bulk crystalline matrix. Utilizing the large magnetic field gradients (˜ 10^5 Tesla/meter) in the vicinity of our micromagnetic probe tip, we are able to selectively probe the electron spins in sub--micron volumes. Further, our schemes for spin manipulation allow us to measure the spin--lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) with a spatial resolution in one dimension of approximately 20 nanometers. We will also discuss our efforts to improve the sensitivity of our microscope for detecting individual electronic spins. B. Naydenov, C. Spudat, W. Harneit, H. I. Suss, J. Hullinger, J. Nuss, M. Jansen, Chem. Phys. Lett., 424, 327 (2006).

  14. The simulation of a propulsive jet and force measurement using a magnetically suspended wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, K. S.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Models featuring the simulation of exhaust jets were developed for magnetic levitation in a wind tunnel. The exhaust gas was stored internally producing a discharge of sufficient duration to allow nominal steady state to be reached. The gas was stored in the form of compressed gas or a solid rocket propellant. Testing was performed with the levitated models although deficiencies prevented the detection of jet-induced aerodynamic effects. Difficulties with data reduction led to the development of a new force calibration technique, used in conjunction with an exhaust simulator and also in separate high incidence aerodynamic tests.

  15. Magnetic force microscopy of single-domain cobalt dots patterned using interference lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Bedrossian, P.J.; Baker, S.L.; Vernon, S.P.; Kania, D.R.

    1996-03-20

    We have fabricated arrays of Co dots of diameters 100 and 70 nm using interference lithography. Density of these arrays is 7.2x10{sup 9}/in{sup 2}. Magnetic force microscopy indicate that the Co dots are single domain with moments that can be controlled to point either in-plane or out-of-plane. Interference lithography is a process that is easily scaled to large areas and is potentially capable of high throughput. Large, uniform arrays of single-domain structures are potentially useful for high-density, low-noise data storage.

  16. Body equilibrium at the end of gait initiation: importance of ankle muscular force as evidenced in clubfoot children.

    PubMed

    Wicart, P; Maton, B

    2003-11-13

    This study investigates the importance of ankle muscular force and foot shape on body equilibrium at the end of a first step by means of a comparison between healthy children and children with unilateral clubfoot who showed Triceps surae atrophy. Subjects were asked to initiate gait at different velocities and to perform a few forward-oriented steps. In healthy children, there was a significant increase in the number of positive values of the centre of gravity vertical acceleration at foot contact (Z"HC) as velocity increased without any difference between the preferred and non-preferred stepping foot. These results indicated that ankle muscular forces from the leg of support intervene in braking the downfall of the body, as velocity and step length increase, and that this function does not depend on the subject's lateralization. In comparison with healthy children, clubfoot subjects showed a greater occurrence of low or negative Z"HC values when gait was initiated at a velocity greater than 0.8 m/s. However, except for two of them, there was no difference in Z"HC control between the steps initiated with the sound leg and those initiated with the affected leg. These results indicate that in unilateral clubfoot children, residual musculoskeletal impairment of one leg induces a deficit in equilibrium control as soon as step length needs a significant braking of the body's vertical fall. It is also shown that equilibrium is not limited to the gait period where the affected leg is the body's supporting leg but also when it is the stepping one. This could reflect a global alteration of the body scheme preserving symmetry in the control of both legs. PMID:14583383

  17. Optical Characterization of Lorentz Force Based CMOS-MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, John Ojur; Ahmad, Farooq; Khir, M. Haris Bin Md; Hamid, Nor Hisham Bin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field sensors are becoming an essential part of everyday life due to the improvements in their sensitivities and resolutions, while at the same time they have become compact, smaller in size and economical. In the work presented herein a Lorentz force based CMOS-MEMS magnetic field sensor is designed, fabricated and optically characterized. The sensor is fabricated by using CMOS thin layers and dry post micromachining is used to release the device structure and finally the sensor chip is packaged in DIP. The sensor consists of a shuttle which is designed to resonate in the lateral direction (first mode of resonance). In the presence of an external magnetic field, the Lorentz force actuates the shuttle in the lateral direction and the amplitude of resonance is measured using an optical method. The differential change in the amplitude of the resonating shuttle shows the strength of the external magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the shuttle is determined to be 8164 Hz experimentally and from the resonance curve, the quality factor and damping ratio are obtained. In an open environment, the quality factor and damping ratio are found to be 51.34 and 0.00973 respectively. The sensitivity of the sensor is determined in static mode to be 0.034 µm/mT when a current of 10 mA passes through the shuttle, while it is found to be higher at resonance with a value of 1.35 µm/mT at 8 mA current. Finally, the resolution of the sensor is found to be 370.37 µT. PMID:26225972

  18. Optical Characterization of Lorentz Force Based CMOS-MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor.

    PubMed

    Dennis, John Ojur; Ahmad, Farooq; Khir, M Haris Bin Md; Bin Hamid, Nor Hisham

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field sensors are becoming an essential part of everyday life due to the improvements in their sensitivities and resolutions, while at the same time they have become compact, smaller in size and economical. In the work presented herein a Lorentz force based CMOS-MEMS magnetic field sensor is designed, fabricated and optically characterized. The sensor is fabricated by using CMOS thin layers and dry post micromachining is used to release the device structure and finally the sensor chip is packaged in DIP. The sensor consists of a shuttle which is designed to resonate in the lateral direction (first mode of resonance). In the presence of an external magnetic field, the Lorentz force actuates the shuttle in the lateral direction and the amplitude of resonance is measured using an optical method. The differential change in the amplitude of the resonating shuttle shows the strength of the external magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the shuttle is determined to be 8164 Hz experimentally and from the resonance curve, the quality factor and damping ratio are obtained. In an open environment, the quality factor and damping ratio are found to be 51.34 and 0.00973 respectively. The sensitivity of the sensor is determined in static mode to be 0.034 µm/mT when a current of 10 mA passes through the shuttle, while it is found to be higher at resonance with a value of 1.35 µm/mT at 8 mA current. Finally, the resolution of the sensor is found to be 370.37 µT. PMID:26225972

  19. Geometry of halo and Lissajous orbits in the circular restricted three-body problem with drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Ashok Kumar; Kushvah, Badam Singh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we determine the effect of radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag on the Sun-(Earth-Moon) restricted three-body problem. Here, we take the larger body of the Sun as a larger primary, and the Earth+Moon as a smaller primary. With the help of the perturbation technique, we find the Lagrangian points, and see that the collinear points deviate from the axis joining the primaries, whereas the triangular points remain unchanged in their configuration. We also find that Lagrangian points move towards the Sun when radiation pressure increases. We have also analysed the stability of the triangular equilibrium points and have found that they are unstable because of the drag forces. Moreover, we have computed the halo orbits in the third-order approximation using the Lindstedt-Poincaré method and have found the effect of the drag forces. According to this prevalence, the Sun-(Earth-Moon) model is used to design the trajectory for spacecraft travelling under drag forces.

  20. A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope for Micron-scale Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo, Felipe; Paster, Jeremy W.; Tennant, Daniel M.; Markert, John T.

    2015-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) probe for the analysis of liquid and soft matter samples. This NRMFM probe uses a magnet-on-cantilever geometry and is equipped with dual x- y- z piezoelectric motion stages, for micron-step coarse positioning and sub-nanometer fine positioning of both the laser interferometer and the sample with respect to the cantilever, permitting three-dimensional scanning-mode detection of nuclear magnetism. The probe keeps the cantilever detector in high vacuum, maintaining a high Q, while the local NMR properties of nearby aqueous samples in glass microtubes are measured. The entire probe head fits in either a 3.5-cm bore magnet or in an electromagnet with a similarly small gap. We plan to demonstrate the ability to scan and distinguish microscale NMR properties using a copper sulfate solution with concentrations in the 2-20 millimolar range, thus providing dynamical imaging of regions with differing longitudinal relaxation times, T1. This concentration range will permit us to compare the conventional saturation-recovery pulse sequence with a more efficient single-pulse detection, possible when T1 is comparable to or less than the duration of the modified cyclic-adiabatic-inversion pulse.